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Sample records for weight bearing gait

  1. The effect of weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise on gait in rats with sciatic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Hwangbo, Gak; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to access the effect of weight bearing exercise (treadmill exercise) and non-weight-bearing exercise (swimming exercise) on gait in the recovery process after a sciatic nerve crush injury. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were randomly divided into a swimming group (n=3) with non-weight-bearing exercise after a sciatic nerve crush and a treadmill group (n=3) with weight bearing exercise after a sciatic nerve crush. Dartfish is a program that can analyze and interpret motion through video images. The knee lateral epicondyle, lateral malleolus, and metatarsophalangeal joint of the fifth toe were marked by black dots before recording. [Results] There were significant differences in TOK (knee angle toe off) and ICK (knee angle at initial contact) in the swimming group and in TOK, ICA (ankle angle at initial contact), and ICK in the treadmill group. In comparison between groups, there were significant differences in TOA (ankle angle in toe off) and ICA at the 7th day. [Conclusion] There was no difference between weight bearing and non-weight-bearing exercise in sciatic nerve damage, and both exercises accelerated the recovery process in this study. PMID:25995583

  2. Dependence of Gait Deviation on Weight-Bearing Asymmetry and Postural Instability in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej; Czamara, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Postural control deficits have been suggested to be a major component of gait disorders in children with cerebral palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between postural stability and treadmill walking, in children with unilateral cerebral palsy, by defining dependence between the posturographic weight-bearing distribution and center of pressure (CoP) sway during quiet standing with Gillette Gait Index and the 16 distinct gait parameters that composed the Gillette Gait Index. Forty-five children with unilateral cerebral palsy from 7–12 years of age were included in this study. A posturographic procedure and 3-dimensional instrumented gait analysis was developed. In general, across the entire tested group, the significant correlations concerned only the asymmetry of the weight bearing and a few of the distinct gait parameters that compose the Gillette Gait Index; moreover, correlation coefficients were low. The division of subjects into two clinical subgroups: children that exhibited a tendency to overload (1) and to underload (2) the affected body side, modified the results of the explored relationships. Our findings revealed that the difficulties experienced by children with hemiplegia while controlled in a standing position result from tendency to excessively or insufficiently load the affected lower limbs, and thus establishes a direct relationship with inadequate affected peak ankle DF in both stance and swing gait phases. Given the presented relationship between postural instability and deviation of the particular gait parameters in children with unilateral cerebral palsy, a follow-up study will be needed to determine the therapeutic approaches that will be most effective in promoting increased improvement in gait pattern, as well as the static and dynamic balance in standing. PMID:27788247

  3. A do-it-yourself membrane-activated auditory feedback device for weight bearing and gait training: a case report.

    PubMed

    Batavia, M; Gianutsos, J G; Vaccaro, A; Gold, J T

    2001-04-01

    An augmented auditory feedback device comprised of a thin membrane switch mini-buzzer, and battery is described as a modification of a previously described feedback device. The membrane switch can be customized for the patient and is designed to fit inside a patient's shoe without altering the heel height. Its appeal lies in its simplicity of construction, low cost, and ease of implementation during a patient's training for weight bearing and gait. An ever-present source of information, it provides performance-relevant cues to both patient and clinician about the occurrence, duration, and location of a force component of motor performance. The report includes suggested applications of the device, instructions to construct it, and a case report in which the device was used to improve weight bearing and gait in a cognitively healthy person with spina bifida.

  4. Postoperative insole-paedobarographic gait analysis for patients with flap coverages of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing areas of the foot.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Marcotty, M V; Sutmoeller, K; Kopp, J; Vogt, P M

    2012-04-01

    Functional results regarding shoe modifications, gait analysis and long-term durability of the reconstructed foot have not been reported using insole paedobarography. This article presents insole-paedobarographic gait analysis and discusses the various pressure distribution patterns following the reconstruction of the foot. This retrospective study reports on the clinical and functional results in 23 out of 39 patients who received flap coverage of their feet in our department in the period from 2001 to 2010. Mean follow-up time amounted to 46.6 months. Patients were separated into two groups, those with flap coverage to the sole of the foot (group 1) and those with flap coverage to non-weight-bearing areas of the foot (group 2). Gait analysis was accomplished by using insole paedobarography. The results of the gait analysis have shown that in both patient groups, when comparing affected feet with sound feet, the affected feet were exposed to significantly less support time (group 1; affected vs. sound feet: 0.44 ± 0.07 s vs. 0.55 ± 0.11 s, p = 0.047), (group 2; affected vs. sound feet: 0.47 ± 0.07 s vs. 0.54 ± 0.07 s, p = 0.029). In addition, in both patient groups, the analysis of peak-pressure distributions revealed greater pressures on the affected feet compared to the sound feet (group 1; affected vs. sound feet: 47.9 ± 10.13 N cm(-2) vs. 36.3 ± 7.5 N cm(-2), p = 0.008), (group 2; affected vs. sound feet: 38.08 ± 13.98 N cm(-2) vs. 32.92 ± 14.77 N cm(-2), p = 0.061). The insole paedobarography can contribute to a more precise gait analysis following a soft-tissue reconstruction not only of the sole but also of other foot regions as well. It can help to identify and correct movement sequences and peak-pressure distributions which are damaging to the flaps. The resulting potential minimisation of the ulceration rate can lead to a further optimisation in the rate of completely rehabilitated patients and a reduction in the revision rate.

  5. Biofeedback versus physiotherapy in patients with partial weight-bearing.

    PubMed

    Hershko, Erel; Tauber, Chanan; Carmeli, Eli

    2008-05-01

    Medical instructions for partial weight-bearing after lower limb surgery and fractures are commonly given. The techniques for instruction are mainly verbal cues. Our aim was to evaluate the efficiency of a new biofeedback device compared with traditional intervention for gait rehabilitation. After orthopedic surgery, 33 patients, randomly divided into a study group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 18), completed 10 days of a rehabilitation protocol. A significant difference (P<.05) was found between the groups. Study subjects were able to follow weight-bearing instructions better. We suggest that gait rehabilitation is more efficient when biofeedback is used to instruct patients regarding partial weight-bearing.

  6. Using gait analysis to assess weight bearing in rats with Freund׳s complete adjuvant-induced monoarthritis to improve predictivity: Interfering with the cyclooxygenase and nerve growth factor pathways.

    PubMed

    Ängeby Möller, Kristina; Berge, Odd-Geir; Finn, Anja; Stenfors, Carina; Svensson, Camilla I

    2015-06-05

    Lack of predictive power for drug effects has been a major criticism against animal pain models. It is therefore important to define the utility and limitations of different models. The aim of this study was to extend previous work on gait analysis as a tool to investigate pharmacological effects in monoarthritic rats, specifically to test the hypothesis that monoarthritis induced by Freund׳s complete adjuvant (FCA) provides a better estimate of overall analgesic efficacy of established, and novel, clinically effective and ineffective therapeutic approaches. Male rats injected intra-articularly into one ankle joint with FCA (1.0mg/ml) were treated with the monoclonal antibody to nerve growth factor (NGF), MEDI-578, the inhibitors of tropomyosin receptor kinases A, B and C (pan-Trk) AZ6623 or AZ7092, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) inhibitor AZD1386, or the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors naproxen, ibuprofen, valdecoxib or rofecoxib. Effects on weight bearing during locomotion were tested using video capture of print images. The apparent efficacy in this model was Trk inhibitors≥anti-NGF antibody>COX inhibitors. The TRPV1 inhibitor was ineffective. Together with previous data, the results support using gait-related parameters in the monoarthritis model. FCA as induction agent seems to provide a good overall prediction of analgesic efficacy in disorders with inflammatory joint pain.

  7. Calf stretching in non-weight bearing versus weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Dinh, N V; Freeman, H; Granger, J; Wong, S; Johanson, M

    2011-03-01

    Limited ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) has been associated with lower extremity overuse injuries. Therefore, clinicians often prescribe stretching exercises to increase ankle DF PROM. However, there is limited evidence to indicate if any particular gastrocnemius stretching exercise results in greater improvement in DF PROM. The aim of this study was to determine if gastrocnemius stretching in non-weight bearing (NWB) or weight bearing (WB) results in a greater increase of ankle DF PROM. 28 healthy volunteers, aged 18-55 years, who exhibited less than 10 degrees of ankle DF PROM completed the study. Participants were randomized into 2 stretching groups: NWB and WB. Both groups completed a 3-week home gastrocnemius stretching program, consisting of 5 repetitions held for 30 s each, 2 times daily. Participants' ankle DF PROM was measured with a blinded standard goniometer in NWB and WB positions before and after participation in a 3-week home gastrocnemius stretching program. Two 3-way mixed model ANOVAs demonstrated no significant difference in ankle DF PROM between the NWB and WB groups for either the NWB measurement condition (p=0.49) or WB measurement condition (p=0.86). Gastrocnemius stretching exercises performed in NWB or WB were equally effective in increasing ankle DF PROM.

  8. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke. PMID:26157272

  9. Agreement between weight bearing and non-weight bearing joint position replication tasks at the knee and hip.

    PubMed

    Foch, Eric; Milner, Clare E

    2013-01-01

    Peak joint angles assumed during the stance phase of running may indicate a runner's ability to sense limb position in space. Joint position sense can be assessed through weight bearing and non-weight bearing tasks. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if weight bearing and non-weight bearing knee and hip joint replication tasks elicited similar joint position sense test results. Absolute replication error was measured during sagittal plane knee and frontal plane hip conditions on 23 healthy runners. Three-dimensional kinematics was recorded during running. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) determined agreement between the two measures of joint position sense. Pearson's correlation coefficients measured the relationship between hip and knee absolute error and peak joint angles during running. Despite similar mean absolute error, ICCs indicated low agreement between weight bearing and non-weight bearing conditions at each joint. The results indicate the tests are not interchangeable. Absolute error for non-weight bearing hip replication was correlated with peak stance hip adduction during running. Weight bearing and non-weight bearing joint position sense tasks within the knee and hip joints measure joint position sense differently. Therefore, a task that is relevant to the activity of interest should be selected to measure joint position sense.

  10. Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) locomotion: gaits and ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Shine, Catherine L; Penberthy, Skylar; Robbins, Charles T; Nelson, O Lynne; McGowan, Craig P

    2015-10-01

    Locomotion of plantigrade generalists has been relatively little studied compared with more specialised postures even though plantigrady is ancestral among quadrupeds. Bears (Ursidae) are a representative family for plantigrade carnivorans, they have the majority of the morphological characteristics identified for plantigrade species, and they have the full range of generalist behaviours. This study compared the locomotion of adult grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis Linnaeus 1758), including stride parameters, gaits and analysis of three-dimensional ground reaction forces, with that of previously studied quadrupeds. At slow to moderate speeds, grizzly bears use walks, running walks and canters. Vertical ground reaction forces demonstrated the typical M-shaped curve for walks; however, this was significantly more pronounced in the hindlimb. The rate of force development was also significantly higher for the hindlimbs than for the forelimbs at all speeds. Mediolateral forces were significantly higher than would be expected for a large erect mammal, almost to the extent of a sprawling crocodilian. There may be morphological or energetic explanations for the use of the running walk rather than the trot. The high medial forces (produced from a lateral push by the animal) could be caused by frontal plane movement of the carpus and elbow by bears. Overall, while grizzly bears share some similarities with large cursorial species, their locomotor kinetics have unique characteristics. Additional studies are needed to determine whether these characters are a feature of all bears or plantigrade species.

  11. Foot Loading Characteristics of Different Graduations of Partial Weight Bearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusinde, Johannes; Pauser, Johannes; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Carl, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Limited weight bearing of the lower extremity is a commonly applied procedure in orthopaedic rehabilitation after reconstructive forefoot surgery, trauma surgery and joint replacement. The most frequent limitations are given as percentage of body weight (BW) and represent 10 or 50% BW. The extent of foot loading under these graduations of partial…

  12. Gait Changes with Balance-Based Torso-Weighting in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorgas, Anna-Maria; Widener, Gail L.; Gibson-Horn, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose People with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) commonly have mobility impairments that may lead to falls and limitations in activities. Physiotherapy interventions that might improve mobility typically take several weeks. Balance-based torso-weighting (BBTW), a system of strategically placing light weights to improve response to balance perturbations, has resulted in immediate small improvements in clinical measures in PwMS, but changes in spatio-temporal gait parameters are unknown. The purpose was to investigate the effects of BBTW on gait parameters in PwMS and healthy controls. Methods Design: non-randomized controlled experiment Participants 20 PwMS and 20 matched healthy controls Procedures PwMS walked on an instrumented mat at their fastest speed for three trials each in two conditions: without BBTW then with BBTW. Healthy controls walked in both conditions at two speeds: their fastest speed, and at velocities equivalent to their matched PwMS. Results Averaged gait trials showed that, with BBTW, PwMS had significantly increased velocity (p=.002), cadence (p=.007), and time spent in single-limb support (p=.014), with decreased time in double-limb support (p=.004). Healthy controls increased velocity (p=.012) and cadence (p=.015) and decreased support base (p=.014) in fast trials with BBTW; at matched velocities, step length (p=.028) and support base (p=.006) were significantly different from PwMS. All gait variables in healthy controls at fast speeds were significantly different from PwMS walking at their fastest speeds. Discussion All participants showed increases in gait velocity and cadence during fast walk with BBTW. Improvements in time spent in single- and double-limb support by PwMS with BBTW may reflect greater stability in gait. Future research might ascertain if these immediate improvements could enhance effectiveness of longer-term physiotherapy on functional mobility in PwMS. PMID:24930996

  13. Reconstructing weight-bearing surfaces: digital pad transposition.

    PubMed

    Neat, Benjamin C; Smeak, Daniel D

    2007-01-01

    The paw pads of dogs and cats are specialized skin structures that provide cushioned, durable, weight-bearing surfaces. Otherwise normal limbs may be rendered useless when pad tissue is lost because of trauma or tumor resection. This article reviews previously described reconstructive techniques involving the movement of pad tissue into weight-bearing defects. In addition, a case series of single-stage digital pad transfer to replace all or part of metacarpal or metatarsal defects is reported. This technique was predictably successful with minimal complications in conjunction with complete tumor resection, although results in two cases of severe paw trauma were less favorable.

  14. Patellar position in weight-bearing radiographs compared with non-weight-bearing: significance for the detection of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Skou, Nikolaj; Egund, Niels

    2017-03-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of patellofemoral disorders including osteoarthritis are currently often based on imaging and clinical assessment with patients in the supine position. Purpose To evaluate differences in patellar position in the trochlear groove and to assess the detection of medial and lateral patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA) on axial radiographs in supine and standing positions, respectively. Material and Methods Thirty-five women and 23 men (mean age, 56 years; age range, 18-87 years) referred for routine radiographic examinations of the knees were included. Axial radiographs of the PF joint in both supine non-weight-bearing and standing weight-bearing position in 30° knee flexion were obtained of 111 knees. Measurements performed on the radiographs: patellar tilt, patellar displacement, joint space width, and grade of OA according to Ahlbäck. Results From supine to standing position the patella moved medially and medial joint space width and lateral patellar tilt angle decreased ( P < 0.0001 for the three measured parameters). In the standing position, medial PF OA was observed in 19 knees compared to three knees in the supine position. Fourteen knees had lateral PF OA with almost unchanged grade of OA irrespective of position. Conclusion In weight-bearing positions, the patella is positioned medially in the trochlear groove compared to supine non-weight-bearing positions. Therefore, this study suggests that the common occurrence of medial PF OA can generally not be detected on axial radiographs in supine non-weight-bearing positions and confirms the importance of imaging the PF joint in standing weight-bearing positions.

  15. Weights and hematology of wild black bears during hibernation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, Glenn D.; Rogers, Lynn L.; Allen, Arthur W.; Seal, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    We compared weights and hematological profiles of adult (greater than 3-yr-old) female black bears (Ursus americanus) during hibernation (after 8 January). We handled 28 bears one to four times (total of 47) over 4 yr of varying mast and berry production. Mean weight of lactating bears was greater (P less than 0.0001) than that of non-lactating females. White blood cells (P less than 0.05) and mean corpuscular volume (P = 0.005) also differed between lactating and non-lactating bears. Hemoglobin (P = 0.006) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.02) varied among years; values were lowest during 1975, following decreased precipitation and the occurrence of a second year of mast and berry crop shortages in a three-year period. Significant (P less than 0.05) interaction between reproductive status (lactating versus non-lactating) and study year for hemoglobin, red blood cells, and packed cell volume, and increased mean corpuscular volume, suggested a greater nutritional challenge for lactating females compared to non-lactating females during the 1975 denning season. Our data suggest that hematological characteristics of denning bears may be more sensitive than weights as indicators of annual changes in nutritional status; however, other influential factors, in addition to mast and berry crop production, remain to be examined.

  16. Effects of Changing Body Weight Distribution on Mediolateral Stability Control during Gait Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Caderby, Teddy; Yiou, Eric; Peyrot, Nicolas; de Viviés, Xavier; Bonazzi, Bruno; Dalleau, Georges

    2017-01-01

    During gait initiation, anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) precede the execution of the first step. It is generally acknowledged that these APA contribute to forward progression but also serve to stabilize the whole body in the mediolateral direction during step execution. Although previous studies have shown that changes in the distribution of body weight between both legs influence motor performance during gait initiation, it is not known whether and how such changes affect a person’s postural stability during this task. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of changing initial body weight distribution between legs on mediolateral postural stability during gait initiation. Changes in body weight distribution were induced under experimental conditions by modifying the frontal plane distribution of an external load located at the participants’ waists. Fifteen healthy adults performed a gait initiation series at a similar speed under three conditions: with the overload evenly distributed over both legs; with the overload strictly distributed over the swing-limb side; and with the overload strictly distributed over the stance-leg side. Our results showed that the mediolateral location of center-of-mass (CoM) during the initial upright posture differed between the experimental conditions, indicating modifications in the initial distribution of body weight between the legs according to the load distribution. While the parameters related to the forward progression remained unchanged, the alterations in body weight distribution elicited adaptive changes in the amplitude of APA in the mediolateral direction (i.e., maximal mediolateral shift of the center of pressure (CoP)), without variation in their duration. Specifically, it was observed that the amplitude of APA was modulated in such a way that mediolateral dynamic stability at swing foot-contact, quantified by the margin of stability (i.e., the distance between the base of support boundary and

  17. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients.

  18. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26600952

  19. Smooth changes in the EMG patterns during gait transitions under body weight unloading.

    PubMed

    Labini, Francesca Sylos; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Cappellini, Germana; Gravano, Silvio; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-09-01

    During gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed, and it has been suggested that different gaits may be associated with different functioning of neuronal networks. In this study we recorded the EMG activity of leg muscles at slow increments and decrements in treadmill belt speed and at different levels of body weight unloading. In contrast to normal walking at 1 g, at lower levels of simulated gravity (<0.4 g) the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without systematic abrupt changes in either intensity or timing of EMG patterns. This phenomenon depended to a limited extent on the gravity simulation technique, although the exact level of the appearance of smooth transitions (0.4-0.6 g) tended to be lower for the vertical than for the tilted body weight support system. Furthermore, simulations performed with a half-center oscillator neuromechanical model showed that the abruptness of motor patterns at gait transitions at 1 g could be predicted from the distinct parameters anchored already in the normal range of walking and running speeds, whereas at low gravity levels the parameters of the model were similar for the two human gaits. A lack of discontinuous changes in the pattern of speed-dependent locomotor characteristics in a hypogravity environment is consistent with the idea of a continuous shift in the state of a given set of central pattern generators, rather than the activation of a separate set of central pattern generators for each distinct gait.

  20. Determinants of bone density among athletes engaged in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Jon E.; Friedlander, Anne L.; Brooks, George A.; Steiger, Peter; Stubbs, Harrison A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of weight bearing activity on the bone density was investigated in athletes by comparing the measures of bone density of athletes engaged in weight-training programs with those of polo players and nonexercising subjects. All subjects had measurements of spinal trabecular and integral bone density by quantitative tomography, as well as determinations of hip bone density by dual photon absorptiometry. Results confirmed previous findings by Block et al. (1987) of significantly greater bone density among highly trained athletes compared with nonexercising subjects of similar age. Results also indicated that athletes engaged in non-weight-bearing forms of rigorous exercise had greater levels of bone density. However, as the participants in this study were exceptional athletes, engaged in a strenuous sport with both aerobic and heavy resistance components, a confirmation of these data is needed, using larger samples of individuals.

  1. The role of vision in obese and normal-weight children's gait control.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Eva; Segers, Veerle; Deforche, Benedicte; Shultz, Sarah P; Tanghe, Ann; Gentier, Ilse; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; De Clercq, Dirk; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2011-02-01

    Previous research has suggested that perceptual-motor difficulties may account for obese children's lower motor competence; however, specific evidence is currently lacking. Therefore, this study examined the effect of altered visual conditions on spatiotemporal and kinematic gait parameters in obese versus normal-weight children. Thirty-two obese and normal-weight children (11.2±1.5 years) walked barefoot on an instrumented walkway at constant self-selected speed during LIGHT and DARK conditions. Three-dimensional motion analysis was performed to calculate spatiotemporal parameters, as well as sagittal trunk segment and lower extremity joint angles at heel-strike and toe-off. Self-selected speed did not significantly differ between groups. In the DARK condition, all participants walked at a significantly slower speed, decreased stride length, and increased stride width. Without normal vision, obese children had a more pronounced increase in relative double support time compared to the normal-weight group, resulting in a significantly greater percentage of the gait cycle spent in stance. Walking in the DARK, both groups showed greater forward tilt of the trunk and restricted hip movement. All participants had increased knee flexion at heel-strike, as well as decreased knee extension and ankle plantarflexion at toe-off in the DARK condition. The removal of normal vision affected obese children's temporal gait pattern to a larger extent than that of normal-weight peers. Results suggest an increased dependency on vision in obese children to control locomotion. Next to the mechanical problem of moving excess mass, a different coupling between perception and action appears to be governing obese children's motor coordination and control.

  2. Improvement of gait ability with a short-term intensive gait rehabilitation program using body weight support treadmill training in community dwelling chronic poststroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Naoki; Iizuka, Noboru; Saitou, Hideyuki; Tamaoka, Akira; Yanagi, Hisako

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Most previous studies have shown that body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT) can improve gait speed poststroke patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of a short-term intensive program using BWSTT among community dwelling poststroke survivors. [Subjects] Eighteen subjects participated in this study. The treatment group was composed of 10 subjects (2 women; 8 men; mean age, 59.1 ± 12.5 years; time since stroke onset, 35.3 ± 33.2 months), whereas the control group was made up of 8 subjects (3 women; 5 men; mean age, 59.8 ± 6.3 years; time since stroke onset, 39.3 ± 27.3 months). [Methods] The treatment group received BWSTT 3 times a week for 4 weeks (a total of 12 times), with each session lasting 20 minutes. The main outcome measures were maximum gait speed on a flat floor, cadence, and step length. [Results] No differences were observed in the baseline clinical data between the 2 groups. The gait speed in the treatment group was significantly improved compared with that in the control by 2-way ANOVA, while the other parameters showed no significant interaction. [Conclusion] These results suggested that short-term intensive gait rehabilitation using BWSTT was useful for improving gait ability among community dwelling poststroke subjects. PMID:25642063

  3. Overground body-weight-supported gait training for children and youth with neuromuscular impairments.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Stuberg, Wayne; Dejong, Stacey; Arpin, David J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine if body-weight-supported (BWS) overground gait training has the potential to improve the walking abilities of children and youth with childhood onset motor impairments and intellectual disabilities. Eight participants (mean age of 16.3 years) completed 12 weeks of BWS overground gait training that was performed two times a week. BWS was provided during the training sessions by an overhead harness system that rolls overground. There was a significant improvement in the preferred walking speed after the training (p < .01; pre = 0.51 ± 0.2 m/s; post = 0.67 ± 0.3 m/s; Cohen's d = 0.80) and cadence (p = .04; pre = 37 ± 7 steps/min; post = 43 ± 8 steps/min; Cohen's d = 0.94). Our results indicate that overground BWS gait training may be an effective treatment strategy for improving the preferred walking speed of children and youth with motor impairments.

  4. Orthostatic Tremor and Orthostatic Myoclonus: Weight-bearing Hyperkinetic Disorders: A Systematic Review, New Insights, and Unresolved Questions

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Anhar; van Gerpen, Jay A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Orthostatic tremor (OT) and orthostatic myoclonus (OM) are weight-bearing hyperkinetic movement disorders most commonly affecting older people that induce “shaky legs” upon standing. OT is divided into “classical” and “slow” forms based on tremor frequency. In this paper, the first joint review of OT and OM, we review the literature and compare and contrast their demographic, clinical, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, pathophysiological, and treatment characteristics. Methods A PubMed search up to July 2016 using the phrases “orthostatic tremor,” “orthostatic myoclonus,” “shaky legs,” and “shaky legs syndrome” was performed. Results OT and OM should be suspected in older patients reporting unsteadiness with prolonged standing and/or who exhibit cautious, wide-based gaits. Surface electromyography (SEMG) is necessary to verify the diagnoses. Functional neuroimaging and electrophysiology suggest the generator of classical OT lies within the cerebellothalamocortical network. For OM, and possibly slow OT, the frontal, subcortical cerebrum is the most likely origin. Clonazepam is the most useful medication for classical OT, and levetiracetam for OM, although results are often disappointing. Deep brain stimulation appears promising for classical OT. Rolling walkers reliably improve gait affected by these disorders, as both OT and OM attenuate when weight is transferred from the legs to the arms. Discussion Orthostatic hyperkinesias are likely underdiagnosed, as SEMG is often unavailable in clinical practice, and thus may be more frequent than currently recognized. The shared weight-bearing induction of OT and OM may indicate a common pathophysiology. Further research, including use of animal models, is necessary to better define the prevalence and pathophysiology of OT and OM, in order to improve their treatment, and provide additional insights into basic balance and gait mechanisms. PMID:28105385

  5. Image based weighted center of proximity versus directly measured knee contact location during simulated gait

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongsheng; Chen, Tony; Koff, Matthew F.; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Gilbert, Susannah; Choi, Dan; Warren, Russell F.; Rodeo, Scott A.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanical consequences of knee injury requires a detailed analysis of the effect of that injury on joint contact mechanics during activities of daily living. Three-dimensional (3D) knee joint geometric models have been combined with knee joint kinematics to dynamically estimate the location of joint contact during physiological activities – using a weighted center of proximity (WCoP) method. However, the relationship between the estimated WCoP and the actual location of contact has not been defined. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between knee joint contact location as estimated using the image-based WCoP method, and a directly measured weighted center of contact (WCoC) method during simulated walking. To achieve this goal, we created knee specific models of six human cadaveric knees from magnetic resonance imaging. All knees were then subjected to physiological loads on a knee simulator intended to mimic gait. Knee joint motion was captured using a motion capture system. Knee joint contact stresses were synchronously recorded using a thin electronic sensor throughout gait, and used to compute WCoC for the medial and lateral plateaus of each knee. WCoP was calculated by combining knee kinematics with the MRI-based knee specific model. Both metrics were compared throughout gait using linear regression. The anteroposterior (AP) location of WCoP was significantly correlated with that of WCoC on both tibial plateaus in all specimens (P < 0.01, 95% confidence interval of Person’s coefficient r > 0), but the correlation was not significant in the mediolateral (ML) direction for 4/6 knees (P > 0.05). Our study demonstrates that while the location of joint contact obtained from 3D knee joint contact model, using the WCoP method, is significantly correlated with the location of actual contact stresses in the AP direction, that relationship is less certain in the ML direction. PMID:24837219

  6. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  7. Extraction of natural weight shift and foot rolling in gait based on hetero-core optical fiber load sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Yudai; Koyama, Yuya; Nishiyama, Michiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Gait in daily activity affects human health because it may cause physical problems such as asymmetric pelvis, flat foot and bowlegs. Monitoring natural weight shift and foot rolling on plantar has been employed in order for researchers to analyze gait characteristics. Conventional gait monitoring systems have been developed using camera, acceleration sensor, gyro sensor and electrical load sensors. They have some problems such as limited measurement place, temperature dependence and electric leakage. On the other hand, a hetero-core optical fiber sensor has many advantages such as high sensitivity for macro-bending, light weight sensor element, independency on temperature fluctuations, and no electric contact. This paper describes extraction of natural weight shift and foot rolling for gait evaluation by using a sensitive shoe, in the insole of which hetero-core optical load sensors are embedded for detecting plantar pressure. Plantar pressure of three subjects who wear the sensitive shoe and walk on the treadmill was monitored. As a result, weight shift and foot rolling for three subjects were extracted using the proposed sensitive shoe in terms of centroid movement and positions. Additionally, these extracted data are compared to that of electric load sensor to ensure consistency. For these results, it was successfully demonstrated that hetero-core optical fiber load sensor performed in unconstraint gait monitoring as well as electric load sensor.

  8. Weight, Rather Than Obesity Distribution, Explains Peak External Knee Adduction Moment During Level Gait

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil A.; Yack, H. John; Khole, Priyanka

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a lower-body obesity pattern increases estimated forces on the medial compartment of the knee joint. Design Cross-sectional clinical biomechanical study. Results Nineteen normal weight (body mass index, 22.8 ± 1.8 kg/m2), 20 centrally obese (body mass index, 35.0 ± 4.0 kg/m2 and waist-hip ratio ≥0.85 for women; ≥0.95 for men), and 20 lower-body obese (body mass index, 36.4 ± 5.4 kg/m2) adults aged 37–55 yrs and without knee pain were recruited. There were no intergroup differences for age. Weight did not differ between obese groups, but thigh girth differed between groups (P < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, both obesity group and thigh girth were significantly related to peak external knee adduction moment in mid-stance phase. However, in multivariate analysis after adjusting for weight, no statistically significant differences persisted using either obesity distribution or thigh girth as predictors. Weight was a significant predictor of external knee adduction moment, explaining 33% (P < 0.0001) of variance in external knee adduction moment for level gait. Conclusions These data do not support a significant difference in knee medial compartment loading based on obesity distribution, but do support greater torque with higher weight. This suggests that the mechanism of obesity increasing risk for knee osteoarthritis may not be related to obesity distribution. PMID:19847127

  9. Effects of a Twelve-Week Weight Reduction Exercise Programme on Selected Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters of Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Babatunde O. A.; Olagbegi, Oladapo M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of twelve-week weight reduction exercises on selected spatiotemporal gait parameters of obese individuals and compare with their normal weight counterparts. Methods. Sixty participants (30 obese and 30 of normal weight) started but only 58 participants (obese = 30, normal weight = 28) completed the quasi-experimental study. Only obese group had 12 weeks of weight reduction exercise training but both groups had their walking speed (WS), cadence (CD), step length (SL), step width (SW), and stride length (SDL) measured at baseline and at the end of weeks 4, 8, and 12 of the study. Data were analysed using appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. There was significantly lower WS, SL, and SDL but higher CD and SW in obese group than the normal weight group at baseline and week 12. However, the obese group had significantly higher percentage changes in all selected spatiotemporal parameters than the normal weight group. Conclusion. The 12-week weight reduction exercise programme produced significantly higher percentage changes in all selected spatiotemporal gait parameters in the obese than normal weight individuals and is recommended for improvement of these parameters among the obese individuals with gait related problems. PMID:28168051

  10. Nerve growth factor inhibition with tanezumab influences weight-bearing and subsequent cartilage damage in the rat medial meniscal tear model

    PubMed Central

    LaBranche, Timothy P; Bendele, Alison M; Omura, Brian C; Gropp, Kathryn E; Hurst, Susan I; Bagi, Cedo M; Cummings, Thomas R; Grantham, Lonnie E; Shelton, David L; Zorbas, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibition with tanezumab on rats with medial meniscal tear (MMT) effectively model rapidly progressive osteoarthritis (RPOA) observed in clinical trials. Methods Male Lewis rats underwent MMT surgery and were treated weekly with tanezumab (0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg), isotype control or vehicle for 7, 14 or 28 days. Gait deficiency was measured to assess weight-bearing on the operated limb. Joint damage was assessed via histopathology. A second arm, delayed onset of treatment (starting 3–8 weeks after MMT surgery) was used to control for analgesia early in the disease process. A third arm, mid-tibial amputation, evaluated the dependency of the model on weight-bearing. Results Gait deficiency in untreated rats was present 3–7 days after MMT surgery, with a return to normal weight-bearing by days 14–28. Prophylactic treatment with tanezumab prevented gait deficiency and resulted in more severe cartilage damage. When onset of treatment with tanezumab was delayed to 3–8 weeks after MMT surgery, there was no increase in cartilage damage. Mid-tibial amputation completely prevented cartilage damage in untreated MMT rats. Conclusions These data suggest that analgesia due to NGF inhibition during the acute injury phase is responsible for increased voluntary weight-bearing and subsequent cartilage damage in the rat MMT model. This model failed to replicate the hypotrophic bone response observed in tanezumab-treated patients with RPOA. PMID:27381034

  11. Changes in skeletal muscle gene expression consequent to altered weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic organ that adapts to alterations in weight bearing. This brief review examines changes in muscle gene expression resulting from the removal of weight bearing by hindlimb suspension and from increased weight bearing due to eccentric exercise. Acute (less than or equal to 2 days) non-weight bearing of adult rat soleus muscle alters only the translational control of muscle gene expression, while chronic (greater than or equal to 7 days) removal of weight bearing appears to influence pretranslational, translational, and posttranslational mechanisms of control. Acute and chronic eccentric exercise are associated with alterations of translational and posttranslational control, while chronic eccentric training also alters the pretranslational control of muscle gene expression. Thus alterations in weight bearing influence multiple sites of gene regulation.

  12. Weight-Bearing Exercise and Foot Health in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Cuaderes, Elena; DeShea, Lise; Lamb, W Lyndon

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes contributes to sensory peripheral neuropathy, which has been linked to lower limb abnormalities that raise the risk for foot ulcers and amputations. Because amputations are a reason for pain and hospitalization in those with diabetes, it is of critical importance to gain insight about prevention of ulcer development in this population. Although the American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends that individuals with neuropathy can engage in moderate-intensity weight-bearing activity (WBA), they must wear appropriate footwear and inspect their feet daily. The physical forces and inflammatory processes from WBA may contribute to plantar characteristics that lead to ulcers. The purpose of this study was to compare neuropathic status and foot characteristics in Native Americans according to WBA classification. The t tests for unequal sample sizes found that exercisers had more difficulty sensing baseline temperature than nonexercisers, except at the right foot (all p values < .05). By dividing groups into no/low risk and high risk for ulcer, a majority showed no/low risk according to touch and vibration sense. Exercisers demonstrated higher surface skin temperature gradients at the first metatarsal head, a plantar site where wounds tend to form. The more consistently exercisers performed, the higher the plan-tar pressures were at the right second (r = .24, p = .02) and third metatarsal heads (r = .26, p = .01). Findings from this investigation do not refute current ADA recommendations and further intervention studies are needed that are longitudinal and measures WBA more accurately.

  13. Temporal-spatial gait parameters and neurodevelopment in very-low-birth-weight preterm toddlers at 18-22 months.

    PubMed

    Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Rose, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    Children born preterm with very-low birth-weight (VLBW) have increased risk of motor impairment. Early identification of impairment guides treatment to improve long-term function. Temporal-spatial gait parameters are an easily-recorded assessment of gross motor function. The objective of this study was to characterize preterm toddlers' gait and its relationship with neurodevelopment. Velocity, cycle time, step width, step length and time asymmetry, %stance, %single-limb support, and %double-limb support were calculated for 81 VLBW preterm and 43 typically-developing (TD) toddlers. Neurodevelopment was assessed with Bayley Scales of Infant Development-3rd Edition (BSID-III) motor composite and gross motor scores. Mean step width (p=.009) was wider in preterm compared to TD toddlers. Preterm toddlers with <85 BSID-III motor composite scores, indicating mild-to-moderate delay, had significantly increased step width, step length asymmetry, and step time compared to TD toddlers. Step time was also significantly longer for lower-scoring compared to higher-scoring (≥85 BSID-III motor composite scores) preterm toddlers, suggesting that step time may be particularly sensitive to gradations of motor performance. Velocity, cycle time, step length asymmetry, %stance, step length, and step time significantly correlated with BSID-III gross motor scores, suggesting that these parameters may be revealing of gross motor function. The differences in gait between lower-scoring preterm toddlers and TD toddlers, together with the correlations between gait and BSID-III motor scores, suggest that temporal-spatial gait parameters may be useful in building a clinically-relevant, easily-conducted assessment of toddler gross motor development.

  14. Effect of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on proprioception of the knee in weight and non-weight bearing tasks.

    PubMed

    Vila-Chã, Carolina; Riis, Simone; Lund, Ditte; Møller, Anders; Farina, Dario; Falla, Deborah

    2011-02-01

    The study investigates the effects of eccentric exercise of the quadriceps on proprioception of the knee in weight and non-weight bearing tasks. Proprioception of the exercised leg was assessed at 120° and 150° of knee extension in 15 healthy adults (age 25.0 ± 3.6 yrs) before, immediately after, and 24h following eccentric exercise of the quadriceps. Three tests of proprioception were performed: 1. matching the position of the exercised leg (right leg) to the reference leg (left leg) in sitting (non-weight bearing matching task); 2. repositioning the exercised leg after active movement in sitting (non-weight bearing repositioning task); 3. repositioning the exercised leg after active movement in standing (weight bearing task). Maximum knee extension force was reduced by 77.0 ± 12.3 % immediately after the exercise, and by 82.7 ± 16.2% 24h post exercise, with respect to baseline (P<0.001). The absolute error in the non-weight bearing matching task at 120° of knee extension was greater immediately following eccentric exercise (12.3 ± 5.6, P<0.001) and 24h after exercise (8.1 ± 4.5, P<0.05) compared to baseline (5.8 ± 2.7). Similarly, the absolute error in the non-weight bearing repositioning task at 120° was greater both immediately (5.9 ± 3.1°, P<0.01) and 24h post exercise (5.2 ± 3.0°, P<0.05) compared to baseline (4.5 ± 2.6°). Therefore, in both non-weight bearing tasks, the subjects matched the position of their leg after eccentric exercise by adopting a more extended knee position of the exercised limb. Furthermore, the subjects showed higher variability in their performance immediately post exercise (P<0.05, compared to baseline) but not 24h after. In contrast, eccentric exercise did not affect the repositioning errors in the weight bearing task. In conclusion, eccentric exercise of the quadriceps impairs proprioception of the knee both immediately after and 24h post exercise, but only in non-weight bearing tasks.

  15. Development of body weight support gait training system using pneumatic Mckibben actuators -control of lower extremity orthosis.

    PubMed

    Mat Dzahir, M A; Nobutomo, T; Yamamoto, S I

    2013-01-01

    Recently, robot assisted therapy devices are increasingly used for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in assisting handicapped patients to regain their impaired movements. Assistive robotic systems may not be able to cure or fully compensate impairments, but it should be able to assist certain impaired functions and ease movements. In this study, the control system of lower extremity orthosis for the body weight support gait training system which implements pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) is proposed. The hip and knee joint angles of the gait orthosis system are controlled based on the PAM coordinates information from the simulation. This information provides the contraction data for the mono- and bi-articular PAMs that are arranged as posterior and anterior actuators to simulate the human walking motion. The proposed control system estimates the actuators' contraction as a function of hip and knee joint angles. Based on the contraction model obtained, input pressures for each actuators are measured. The control system are performed at different gait cycles and two PMA settings for the mono- and bi-articular actuators are evaluated in this research. The results showed that the system was able to achieve the maximum muscle moment at the joints, and able to perform the heel contact movement. This explained that the antagonistic mono- and bi-articular actuators worked effectively.

  16. Effects of Weight-Bearing Biofeedback Training on Functional Movement Patterns Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L.; Bade, Michael J.; Davidson, Bradley S.; Dayton, Michael R.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVES Examine the effects of weight-bearing (WB) biofeedback training on WB symmetry and functional joint moments following unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BACKGROUND Individuals post unilateral TKA place more weight on the non-surgical limb compared to the surgical limb during function. It is unknown if targeted intervention can improve surgical limb use and resolve altered movement patterns. METHODS Twenty-six patients were randomized to 2 groups: RELOAD or CONTROL. The RELOAD group had standard of care rehabilitation augmented with WB biofeedback training and the CONTROL group had dose-matched standard of care. Lower limb weight-bearing ratios (WBRs) were measured preoperatively and 6 and 26 weeks after TKA during a Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST) and walking. Secondary outcomes were FTSST time, walking speed, and lower limb joint moments during the FTSST and walking. RESULTS No between-group differences were found in WBR. FTSST time improved in the RELOAD group compared to the CONTROL group at 6 (P=.021) and 26 weeks (P=.021) and there was a tendency for improved walking speed in the RELOAD group at 26 weeks (P=.068). There were no between-group differences in knee extension moment during the FTSST. Surgical-limb knee extension moments during walking increased from baseline to 26 weeks in the RELOAD group and decreased in the CONTROL group (P=.008). CONCLUSION WB biofeedback training had no effect on functional WB symmetry or knee extension moments during the FTSST. However, the biofeedback training resulted in increases of knee extension moments during gait and improved FTSST times. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 2b. PMID:26207975

  17. Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Experience Difficulties Adjusting Their Gait Pattern to Weight Added to the Waist, While Typically Developing Children Do Not

    PubMed Central

    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Bar-On, Lynn; Goudriaan, Marije; Wambacq, Hans; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; De Cock, Paul; Ortibus, Els; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity is increasing in the last decades, also in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Even though it has been established that an increase in weight can have important negative effects on gait in healthy adults and children, it has not been investigated what the effect is of an increase in body weight on the characteristics of gait in children with CP. In CP, pre and post three-dimensional gait analyses are performed to assess the effectiveness of an intervention. As a considerable amount of time can elapse between these measurements, and the effect of an alteration in the body weight is not taken into consideration, this effect of increased body weight is of specific importance. Thirty children with the predominantly spastic type of CP and 15 typically developing (TD) children were enrolled (age 3–15 years). All children underwent three-dimensional gait analysis with weight-free (baseline) and weighted (10% of the body weight added around their waist) trials. Numerous gait parameters showed a different response to the added weight for TD and CP children. TD children increased walking velocity, step- and stride length, and decreased double support duration with a slightly earlier timing of foot-off, while the opposite was found in CP. Similarly, increased ranges of motion at the pelvis (coronal plane) and hip (all planes), higher joint angular velocities at the hip and ankle, as well as increased moments and powers at the hip, knee and ankle were observed for TD children, while CP children did not change or even showed decreases in the respective measures in response to walking with added weight. Further, while TD children increased their gastrocnemius EMG amplitude during weighted walking, CP children slightly decreased their gastrocnemius EMG amplitude. As such, an increase in weight has a significant effect on the gait pattern in CP children. Clinical gait analysts should therefore take into account the negative

  18. Kinematic analysis of healthy hips during weight-bearing activities by 3D-to-2D model-to-image registration technique.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Hamai, Satoshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Ikebe, Satoru; Shimoto, Takeshi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic hip kinematics during weight-bearing activities were analyzed for six healthy subjects. Continuous X-ray images of gait, chair-rising, squatting, and twisting were taken using a flat panel X-ray detector. Digitally reconstructed radiographic images were used for 3D-to-2D model-to-image registration technique. The root-mean-square errors associated with tracking the pelvis and femur were less than 0.3 mm and 0.3° for translations and rotations. For gait, chair-rising, and squatting, the maximum hip flexion angles averaged 29.6°, 81.3°, and 102.4°, respectively. The pelvis was tilted anteriorly around 4.4° on average during full gait cycle. For chair-rising and squatting, the maximum absolute value of anterior/posterior pelvic tilt averaged 12.4°/11.7° and 10.7°/10.8°, respectively. Hip flexion peaked on the way of movement due to further anterior pelvic tilt during both chair-rising and squatting. For twisting, the maximum absolute value of hip internal/external rotation averaged 29.2°/30.7°. This study revealed activity dependent kinematics of healthy hip joints with coordinated pelvic and femoral dynamic movements. Kinematics' data during activities of daily living may provide important insight as to the evaluating kinematics of pathological and reconstructed hips.

  19. Haptic biofeedback for improving compliance with lower-extremity partial weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael C; DeLuke, Levi; Buerba, Rafael A; Fan, Richard E; Zheng, Ying Jean; Leslie, Michael P; Baumgaertner, Michael R; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-01

    After lower-extremity orthopedic trauma and surgery, patients are often advised to restrict weight bearing on the affected limb. Conventional training methods are not effective at enabling patients to comply with recommendations for partial weight bearing. The current study assessed a novel method of using real-time haptic (vibratory/vibrotactile) biofeedback to improve compliance with instructions for partial weight bearing. Thirty healthy, asymptomatic participants were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: verbal instruction, bathroom scale training, and haptic biofeedback. Participants were instructed to restrict lower-extremity weight bearing in a walking boot with crutches to 25 lb, with an acceptable range of 15 to 35 lb. A custom weight bearing sensor and biofeedback system was attached to all participants, but only those in the haptic biofeedback group were given a vibrotactile signal if they exceeded the acceptable range. Weight bearing in all groups was measured with a separate validated commercial system. The verbal instruction group bore an average of 60.3±30.5 lb (mean±standard deviation). The bathroom scale group averaged 43.8±17.2 lb, whereas the haptic biofeedback group averaged 22.4±9.1 lb (P<.05). As a percentage of body weight, the verbal instruction group averaged 40.2±19.3%, the bathroom scale group averaged 32.5±16.9%, and the haptic biofeedback group averaged 14.5±6.3% (P<.05). In this initial evaluation of the use of haptic biofeedback to improve compliance with lower-extremity partial weight bearing, haptic biofeedback was superior to conventional physical therapy methods. Further studies in patients with clinical orthopedic trauma are warranted.

  20. Seismic velocities for hydrate-bearing sediments using weighted equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Collett, T.S.; Dillon, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A weighted equation based on the three-phase time-average and Wood equations is applied to derive a relationship between the compressional wave (P wave) velocity and the amount of hydrates filling the pore space. The proposed theory predicts accurate P wave velocities of marine sediments in the porosity range of 40-80% and provides a practical means of estimating the amount of in situ hydrate using seismic velocity. The shear (S) wave velocity is derived under the assumption that the P to S wave velocity ratio of the hydrated sediments is proportional to the weighted average of the P to S wave velocity ratios of the constituent components of the sediment. In the case that all constituent components are known, a weighted equation using multiphase time-average and Wood equations is possible. However, this study showed that a three-phase equation with modified matrix velocity, compensated for the clay content, is sufficient to accurately predict the compressional wave velocities for the marine sediments. This theory was applied to the laboratory measurements of the P and S wave velocities in permafrost samples to infer the amount of ice in the unconsolidated sediment. The results are comparable to the results obtained by repeatedly applying the two-phase wave scattering theory. The theory predicts that the Poisson's ratio of the hydrated sediments decreases as the hydrate concentration increases and the porosity decreases. In consequence, the amplitude versus offset (AVO) data for the bottom-simulating reflections may reveal positive, negative, or no AVO anomalies depending on the concentration of hydrates in the sediments.

  1. Lower-extremity weight-bearing compliance is maintained over time after biofeedback training.

    PubMed

    Hustedt, Joshua W; Blizzard, Daniel J; Baumgaertner, Michael R; Leslie, Michael P; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have shown immediate compliance with weight-bearing instructions to be better after biofeedback training than after verbal or scale training. This study assessed retention of biofeedback training to determine potential clinical applicability. Twelve participants were enrolled in a prospective clinical study at an academic orthopedic center. Participants were trained with a biofeedback device to comply with touch-down weight-bearing instructions (25 lb). Immediately following the training session, weight bearing was assessed for each participant. The retention of this training was then reassessed at 2 to 4, 6 to 8, and 22 to 24 hours. Two control participants were given no biofeedback training (verbal instructions only) and were followed similarly. Following initial biofeedback training at 25 lb, participants bore an average of 20.4±2.12 lb. Retention tests during the 24-hour period showed no significant difference from the original testing, with 2- to 4-hour retention of 19.98±4.75 lb, 6- to 8-hour retention of 25.07±6.60 lb, and 22- to 24-hour retention of 21.75±4.58 lb. Participants who only received verbal instructions consistently bore several-fold greater weight than instructed. Biofeedback training has previously been shown to have a strong immediate effect on partial weight-bearing compliance. This study demonstrated that this effect lasts up to 24 hours. This maintained weight-bearing compliance after biofeedback training suggests that this method may be an effective way to train patients to comply with given instructions for limited weight bearing.

  2. Versatility of the Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap in the Reconstruction of Large Defects of the Weight-Bearing Foot: A Single-Center Experience with 20 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Marco; Jeng, Seng-Feng; Sadigh, Parviz L; Shih, Hsiang-Shun

    2016-09-01

    Background Reconstruction of the weight-bearing surface of the foot represents a challenging task. With very little scope to borrow glabrous tissue from adjacent areas means that achieving a "like for like" reconstruction is rarely possible. In this setting, alternative approaches need to be considered. In this article we present our experience with various differing designs of the anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) in the reconstruction of 20 large defects of the weight-bearing sole. Methods Twenty patients with complex soft tissue defects of the weight-bearing sole underwent reconstruction over a 5-year period. Five cases were complicated by osteomyelitis resulting in significant calcaneal defects. The follow-up period ranged from 8 to 48 months and outcomes were assessed by two-point discrimination and protective sensation, observation of gait, and the ability of the patient to return to wearing normal footwear. Results All flaps survived with the exception of two partial skin necrosis. Sensory nerve coaptation was performed in 12/20 cases. One patient underwent second-stage total calcaneal reconstruction with a fibula osteocutaneous flap. Five large defects were reconstructed with the split skin paddle technique to allow for direct donor-site closure. No evidence of postoperative ulceration was noted in any of the patients over the follow-up period and all were satisfied regarding the functional and aesthetic results achieved. Conclusion Complex defects of the weight-bearing sole can be successfully reconstructed using the free ALT flap resulting in very favorable functional outcomes. Even when calcaneal osteomyelitis has set in, excellent outcomes can be achieved.

  3. Automated assessment of pain in rats using a voluntarily accessed static weight-bearing test

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hung Tae; Uchimoto, Kazuhiro; Duellman, Tyler; Yang, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The weight-bearing test is one method to assess pain in rodent animal models; however, the acceptance of this convenient method is limited by the low throughput data acquisition and necessity of confining the rodents to a small chamber. New methods We developed novel data acquisition hardware and software, data analysis software, and a conditioning protocol for an automated high throughput static weight-bearing assessment of pain. With this device, the rats voluntarily enter the weighing chamber, precluding the necessity to restrain the animals and thereby removing the potential stress-induced confounds as well as operator selection bias during data collection. We name this device the Voluntarily Accessed Static Incapacitance Chamber (VASIC). Results Control rats subjected to the VASIC device provided hundreds of weight-bearing data points in a single behavioral assay. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) surgery and paw pad injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or carrageenan in rats generated hundreds of weight-bearing data during a 30 minute recording session. Rats subjected to CCI, CFA, or carrageenan demonstrated the expected bias in weight distribution favoring the un-operated leg, and the analgesic effect of i.p. morphine was demonstrated. In comparison with existing methods, brief water restriction encouraged the rats to enter the weighing chamber to access water, and an infrared detector confirmed the rat position with feet properly positioned on the footplates, triggering data collection. This allowed hands-off measurement of weight distribution data reducing operator selection bias. Conclusion The VASIC device should enhance the hands-free parallel collection of unbiased weight-bearing data in a high throughput manner, allowing further testing of this behavioral measure as an effective assessment of pain in rodents. PMID:26143745

  4. Effects of body weight and season on serum lipid concentrations in sloth bears (Melursus ursinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Arun Attur; Kumar, Jadav Kajal; Selvaraj, Illayaraja; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2011-09-01

    Serum lipid levels were measured in 66 healthy sloth bears (Melursus ursinus ursinus) living under semicaptive conditions with access to natural food resources in the Bannerghatta Biological Park (Karnataka, India), a portion of their native habitat range in the Indian peninsula. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were analyzed. The effects of age, body weight, and season on these lipid parameters were statistically evaluated. There were no correlations between age and any of the serum lipid parameters analyzed. Positive correlations of body weight to both triglyceride and HDL cholesterol levels in these bears were identified. In addition, seasonal trends in physiological serum lipid values, potentially due to variations in the sloth bear diet, were identified. Serum triglyceride levels were higher during postmonsoon season and cholesterol levels were higher during winter compared to other seasons. Serum lipid values obtained from sloth bears in this study were also compared to previously published data on other members of the family Ursidae. This is the first report of serum lipid values as a reference for sloth bears. These values can be used as sensitive predictors of overall health and nutritional status to aid in the captive management and feeding of these bears.

  5. Weighted Kernel Entropy Component Analysis for Fault Diagnosis of Rolling Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongdi; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Xuan, Jianping; Duan, Jie; Su, Lei; He, Zhenzhi; Lai, Wuxing

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a supervised feature extraction method called weighted kernel entropy component analysis (WKECA) for fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. The method is developed based on kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) which attempts to preserve the Renyi entropy of the data set after dimension reduction. It makes full use of the labeled information and introduces a weight strategy in the feature extraction. The class-related weights are introduced to denote differences among the samples from different patterns, and genetic algorithm (GA) is implemented to seek out appropriate weights for optimizing the classification results. The features based on wavelet packet decomposition are derived from the original signals. Then the intrinsic geometric features extracted by WKECA are fed into the support vector machine (SVM) classifier to recognize different operating conditions of bearings, and we obtain the overall accuracy (97%) for the experimental samples. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28335480

  6. Weighted Kernel Entropy Component Analysis for Fault Diagnosis of Rolling Bearings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongdi; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Xuan, Jianping; Duan, Jie; Su, Lei; He, Zhenzhi; Lai, Wuxing

    2017-03-18

    This paper presents a supervised feature extraction method called weighted kernel entropy component analysis (WKECA) for fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. The method is developed based on kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) which attempts to preserve the Renyi entropy of the data set after dimension reduction. It makes full use of the labeled information and introduces a weight strategy in the feature extraction. The class-related weights are introduced to denote differences among the samples from different patterns, and genetic algorithm (GA) is implemented to seek out appropriate weights for optimizing the classification results. The features based on wavelet packet decomposition are derived from the original signals. Then the intrinsic geometric features extracted by WKECA are fed into the support vector machine (SVM) classifier to recognize different operating conditions of bearings, and we obtain the overall accuracy (97%) for the experimental samples. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Active Flexion in Weight Bearing Better Correlates with Functional Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty than Passive Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Dong; Jain, Nimash; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Yune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Correlations between maximum flexion and functional outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients are reportedly weak. We investigated whether there are differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and other types of maximum flexion and whether the type of maximum flexion correlates with functional outcomes. Materials and Methods A total of 210 patients (359 knees) underwent preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up evaluations (6, 12, and 24 months) for the assessment of clinical outcomes including maximum knee flexion. Maximum flexion was measured under five conditions: passive nonweight bearing, passive weight bearing, active nonweight bearing, and active weight bearing with or without arm support. Data were analyzed for relationships between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing by Pearson correlation analyses, and a variance comparison between measurement techniques via paired t test. Results We observed substantial differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and the other four maximum flexion types. At all time points, passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing correlated poorly with active maximum flexion in weight bearing with or without arm support. Active maximum flexion in weight bearing better correlated with functional outcomes than the other maximum flexion types. Conclusions Our study suggests active maximum flexion in weight bearing should be reported together with passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing in research on the knee motion arc after TKA. PMID:27274468

  8. Modulation of Ankle Muscle Postural Reflexes in Stroke: Influence of Weight-bearing Load

    PubMed Central

    Marigold, Daniel S.; Eng, Janice J.; Inglis, J. Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Objective Given the known sensorimotor deficits and asymmetric weight-bearing posture in stroke, the aim of this study was to determine whether stroke affects the modulation of standing postural reflexes with varying weight-bearing load. Methods Ten individuals with chronic stroke and 10 healthy older adult controls were exposed to unexpected forward and backward platform translations while standing. Three different stance conditions were imposed: increased weight-bearing load, decreased weight-bearing load, and self-selected stance. Surface EMG from bilateral ankle dorsiflexors (tibialis anterior) and extensors (gastrocnemius) were recorded and the magnitude of background muscle activity (prior to the platform translation) and postural reflex onset latency and magnitude (75 ms following reflex onset) were determined. Results Load modulation of ankle extensors was found in controls and individuals with stroke. Although controls demonstrated modulation of ankle dorsiflexors to different loads, individuals with stroke did not show this modulation. Further, load did not change the onset latency of postural reflexes of the individuals with stroke. Conclusion The delayed paretic muscle onset latencies in conjunction with impaired modulation of ankle dorsiflexor postural reflexes may contribute to the instability and frequent falls observed among individuals with stroke. Significance The results provide some insight into standing postural reflexes following stroke. PMID:15546787

  9. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None…

  10. Weight-bearing locomotion in the developing opossum, Monodelphis domestica following spinal transection: remodeling of neuronal circuits caudal to lesion.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Benjamin J; Noor, Natassya M; Whish, Sophie C; Truettner, Jessie S; Dietrich, W Dalton; Zhang, Moses; Crack, Peter J; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Saunders, Norman R

    2013-01-01

    Complete spinal transection in the mature nervous system is typically followed by minimal axonal repair, extensive motor paralysis and loss of sensory functions caudal to the injury. In contrast, the immature nervous system has greater capacity for repair, a phenomenon sometimes called the infant lesion effect. This study investigates spinal injuries early in development using the marsupial opossum Monodelphis domestica whose young are born very immature, allowing access to developmental stages only accessible in utero in eutherian mammals. Spinal cords of Monodelphis pups were completely transected in the lower thoracic region, T10, on postnatal-day (P)7 or P28 and the animals grew to adulthood. In P7-injured animals regrown supraspinal and propriospinal axons through the injury site were demonstrated using retrograde axonal labelling. These animals recovered near-normal coordinated overground locomotion, but with altered gait characteristics including foot placement phase lags. In P28-injured animals no axonal regrowth through the injury site could be demonstrated yet they were able to perform weight-supporting hindlimb stepping overground and on the treadmill. When placed in an environment of reduced sensory feedback (swimming) P7-injured animals swam using their hindlimbs, suggesting that the axons that grew across the lesion made functional connections; P28-injured animals swam using their forelimbs only, suggesting that their overground hindlimb movements were reflex-dependent and thus likely to be generated locally in the lumbar spinal cord. Modifications to propriospinal circuitry in P7- and P28-injured opossums were demonstrated by changes in the number of fluorescently labelled neurons detected in the lumbar cord following tracer studies and changes in the balance of excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory neurotransmitter receptors' gene expression shown by qRT-PCR. These results are discussed in the context of studies indicating that although

  11. Weight-Bearing Locomotion in the Developing Opossum, Monodelphis domestica following Spinal Transection: Remodeling of Neuronal Circuits Caudal to Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Noor, Natassya M.; Whish, Sophie C.; Truettner, Jessie S.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Zhang, Moses; Crack, Peter J.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Complete spinal transection in the mature nervous system is typically followed by minimal axonal repair, extensive motor paralysis and loss of sensory functions caudal to the injury. In contrast, the immature nervous system has greater capacity for repair, a phenomenon sometimes called the infant lesion effect. This study investigates spinal injuries early in development using the marsupial opossum Monodelphis domestica whose young are born very immature, allowing access to developmental stages only accessible in utero in eutherian mammals. Spinal cords of Monodelphis pups were completely transected in the lower thoracic region, T10, on postnatal-day (P)7 or P28 and the animals grew to adulthood. In P7-injured animals regrown supraspinal and propriospinal axons through the injury site were demonstrated using retrograde axonal labelling. These animals recovered near-normal coordinated overground locomotion, but with altered gait characteristics including foot placement phase lags. In P28-injured animals no axonal regrowth through the injury site could be demonstrated yet they were able to perform weight-supporting hindlimb stepping overground and on the treadmill. When placed in an environment of reduced sensory feedback (swimming) P7-injured animals swam using their hindlimbs, suggesting that the axons that grew across the lesion made functional connections; P28-injured animals swam using their forelimbs only, suggesting that their overground hindlimb movements were reflex-dependent and thus likely to be generated locally in the lumbar spinal cord. Modifications to propriospinal circuitry in P7- and P28-injured opossums were demonstrated by changes in the number of fluorescently labelled neurons detected in the lumbar cord following tracer studies and changes in the balance of excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory neurotransmitter receptors’ gene expression shown by qRT-PCR. These results are discussed in the context of studies indicating that although

  12. Surface texture and micromechanics of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) orthopaedic implant bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Monica A.

    2001-07-01

    Tibial bearings of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were characterized to identify differences in morphology, surface texture (roughness and skewness), and micro-scale mechanical behavior. These orthopaedic implant components were fabricated by direct molding or by machining after isostatic compression molding. Sterilization was by gamma irradiation (3.3 Mrad) in air, followed by shelf aging for 2 years. Comparisons were made between unsterile and sterile bearings to identify differences in structure and properties related to wear debris. Characterization methods included confocal optical microscopy, nanoindentation, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and polarized light microscopy. Morphology was compared between bulk and surface (top and bottom) specimens of the bearings. Cryo-microtomy was used to prepare thin specimens transverse to the top surface for polarized microscopy. Nanoindentation was performed on the top bearing surfaces, near areas examined by confocal microscopy. Processing methods affected both small- and large-scale morphology of UHMWPE. Direct molding produced thinner lamellae, thicker long periods, and slightly lower crystallinity than isostatic compression molding. Both bearing types contained a thick interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases. Interfacial free energy varied with interface thickness. Resin particles were consolidated better in direct molded bearings than in machined bearings. Segregated amorphous regions were observed in the machined bearings. Sterilization and shelf aging affected nanometer-scale morphology. Chain scission significantly decreased the interface thickness, causing an increase in lamellar thickness and a small increase in crystallinity. Only a small decrease in the amorphous thickness resulted. Heterogeneous oxidation increased these changes in interface

  13. Quantifying weight bearing while in passive standers and a comparison of standers.

    PubMed

    Kecskemethy, Heidi H; Herman, Daniel; May, Ryan; Paul, Kathleen; Bachrach, Steven J; Henderson, Richard C

    2008-07-01

    Mechanical loading plays an important role in skeletal health, and this is a major reason standing devices are widely used with non-ambulatory persons. However, little is known about the true axial loading that occurs while in a stander, or the factors which may impact loading. The purpose of this study was to quantify weight borne while in a stander, and to directly compare different standers. Load measuring footplate adaptors were designed and fabricated specifically for this study. Weight bearing loads in 20 non-ambulatory persons with quadriplegic cerebral palsy aged 6 to 21 years (median 14 y) were continuously monitored during routine 30-minute standing sessions. Fourteen participants were female, six were male; one was Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) Level IV, and 19 were GMFCS Level V. Each participant was monitored on four to six occasions over an 8-week period, two to three times in each of two different standers (total 108 standing sessions). Weight bearing loads ranged widely from 37 to 101% of body weight. The difference between standers was as much as 29% body weight. There is wide variance in the actual weight borne while in passive standers. The type of stander utilized is one factor which can significantly affect the amount of weight borne.

  14. Inadequate thickness of the weight-bearing surface of claws in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, A S

    2009-12-01

    The term 'thin soles' refers to the suboptimal thickness of the weight-bearing surface of claws in ruminants. These palmar/plantar surfaces of the claws support the weight of the animal and consist of the distal wall horn, the sole proper, the heel and the minute white line area. The sole should normally only bear weight on uneven or undulating surfaces. A decrease in the thickness of the weight-bearing claw surface will decrease the protective function of this structure and may alter the proportion of weight-bearing by each section with possible detrimental effects on hoof function. Horn tissue readily absorbs water and becomes softer which can lead to increased wear rates. Growth rates normally match wear rates but, unlike the latter, time is needed for the growth rate response to adapt to changes in wear rate. Concrete surfaces can be abrasive and dairy cows that spend their lactation cycle on these floors should be let out to pasture in the dry period so that their claws can recoup lost horn. Frictional coefficient is a measure of the'slipperiness' of hooves on various surfaces. Newly laid or fresh concrete is not only abrasive but the thin surface suspension of calcium hydroxide that forms has a very alkaline pH which causes keratin degradation and is mostly responsible for the excessive claw wear that occurs. Four case studies are used to illustrate the importance of the distal wall horn, the dangers of over-trimming and the effects of disease and concrete on horn growth and wear rates.

  15. The energy expenditure of non-weight bearing crutch walking on the level and ascending stairs.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jonathan; Murphy, Alexandra; Murphy, David; Austin, Andy; Moran, Danielle; Cronin, Caitriona; Guinan, Emer; Hussey, Juliette

    2015-06-01

    Crutches are commonly prescribed to patients with lower limb dysfunction during rehabilitation to assist with mobility. The aim of this study was to determine the energy expenditure for non-weight bearing crutch walking on level ground and ascending stairs at a self selected speed in a healthy adult population. Thirty-one healthy male and female adults (mean±SD: age 21.6±1.2 years; height 170.8±10.8 cm; weight 70.8±11.4 kg) mobilised non-weight bearing with elbow crutches along a 30 m corridor and (with one crutch) up a flight of 13 stairs. Energy expenditure for each activity was measured by indirect calorimetry using the COSMED K4b(2) portable ergospirometry system. The established VO2 values were 16.4ml/kg/min for crutch walking on level ground and 17.85 ml/kg/min for stair climbing. Non-weight bearing crutch walking at a self selected speed on the level ground and up a flight of stairs resulted in a MET value of 4.57 and 5.06 respectively. The mean heart rate (HR) for crutch walking along the flat was 117.06±20.54 beats per minute (bpm), while the mean HR for ambulating upstairs with crutches was 113.91±19.32 bpm. The increased energy demands of non-weight bearing crutch walking should be considered by physical therapists when instructing patients on crutch use. Further investigation to determine the implications of these results in populations with chronic disease is warranted.

  16. The Effect of Body Weight Support Treadmill Training on Gait Recovery, Proximal Lower Limb Motor Pattern, and Balance in Patients with Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yu-Rong; Lo, Wai Leung; Lin, Qiang; Li, Le; Xiao, Xiang; Raghavan, Preeti; Huang, Dong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Gait performance is an indicator of mobility impairment after stroke. This study evaluated changes in balance, lower extremity motor function, and spatiotemporal gait parameters after receiving body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and conventional overground walking training (CT) in patients with subacute stroke using 3D motion analysis. Setting. Inpatient department of rehabilitation medicine at a university-affiliated hospital. Participants. 24 subjects with unilateral hemiplegia in the subacute stage were randomized to the BWSTT (n = 12) and CT (n = 12) groups. Parameters were compared between the two groups. Data from twelve age matched healthy subjects were recorded as reference. Interventions. Patients received gait training with BWSTT or CT for an average of 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks. Main Outcome Measures. Balance was measured by the Brunel balance assessment. Lower extremity motor function was evaluated by the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale. Kinematic data were collected and analyzed using a gait capture system before and after the interventions. Results. Both groups improved on balance and lower extremity motor function measures (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between the two groups after intervention. However, kinematic data were significantly improved (P < 0.05) after BWSTT but not after CT. Maximum hip extension and flexion angles were significantly improved (P < 0.05) for the BWSTT group during the stance and swing phases compared to baseline. Conclusion. In subacute patients with stroke, BWSTT can lead to improved gait quality when compared with conventional gait training. Both methods can improve balance and motor function. PMID:26649295

  17. Recovery of lower limb function following 6 weeks of non-weight bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, Donna L.; Eng, Janice J.; Allen, Trevor J.

    2005-05-01

    Skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy occur following an extended period of decreased use, including space flight and limb unloading. It is also likely that affected muscles will be susceptible to a re-loading injury when they begin return to earth or weight bearing. However, there is a paucity of literature evaluating the response of human unloaded muscle to exercise and return to activity. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the soreness, function and strength response of muscle to re-loading in seven patients who were non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, compared to five healthy subjects. Function improved significantly over time for the patients but was still less than the healthy subjects over 12 weeks of physiotherapy. Concentric quadriceps muscle strength increased significantly over time for the patients. There was considerable variability in the patients' reports of muscle soreness but there were no significant changes over time or between groups.

  18. Late complications of the weight-bearing upper extremity in the paraplegic patient.

    PubMed

    Gellman, H; Sie, I; Waters, R L

    1988-08-01

    Paraplegic patients rely almost exclusively on their upper extremities for weight-bearing activities such as transfers and wheelchair propulsion. Eighty-four paraplegic patients whose injury level was T2 or below and who were at least one year from spinal cord injury were screened for upper extremity complaints. Fifty-seven (67.8%) had complaints of pain in one or more areas of their upper extremities. The most common complaints were shoulder pain and/or pain relating to carpal tunnel syndrome. Twenty-five (30%) complained of shoulder pain during transfer activities. Symptoms were found to increase with time from injury. As the long-term survival of spinal cord injured patients continues to improve, an increased awareness of the complications of the weight-bearing upper extremity is necessary to keep these patients functioning in society.

  19. Altered Cellular Kinetics in Growth Plate according to Alterations in Weight Bearing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoon; Kong, Sun Young; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of change in weight bearing on the growth plate metabolism, a simulated animal model of weightlessness was introduced and the chondrocytes' cellular kinetics was evaluated. Materials and Methods Unloading condition on the hind-limb of Sprague-Dawley rats was created by fixing a tail and lifting the hind-limb. Six rats aged 6 weeks old were assigned to each group of unloading, reloading, and control groups of unloading or reloading. Unloading was maintained for three weeks, and then reloading was applied for another one week thereafter. Histomorphometry for the assessment of vertical length of the growth plate, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridin immunohistochemistry for cellular kinetics, and biotin nick end labeling transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for chondrocytes apoptosis in the growth plate were performed. Results The vertical length of the growth plate and the proliferative potential of chondrocytes were decreased in the unloading group compared to those of control groups. Inter-group differences were more significant in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones. Reloading increased the length of growth plate and proliferative potential of chondrocytes. However, apoptotic changes in the growth plate were not affected by the alterations of weight bearing. Conclusion Alterations in the weight bearing induced changes in the chondrocytic proliferative potential of the growth plate, however, had no effects on the apoptosis. This may explain why non-weight bearing in various clinical situations hampers normal longitudinal bone growth. Further studies on the factors for reversibility of chondrocytic proliferation upon variable mechanical stresses are needed. PMID:22477008

  20. The impact of adding weight-bearing exercise versus nonweight bearing programs to the medical treatment of elderly patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Shanb, Alsayed A.; Youssef, Enas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem affecting the elderly population, particularly women. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of adding weight-bearing exercise as opposed to nonweight-bearing programs to the medical treatment of bone mineral density (BMD) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of elderly patients with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: Participating in the study were 40 elderly osteoporotic patients (27 females and 13 males), with ages ranging from 60 to 67 years, who were receiving medical treatment for osteoporosis. They were assigned randomly into two groups: Group-I: Twenty patients practiced weight-bearing exercises. Group-II: Twenty patients did nonweight-bearing exercises. All patients trained for 45-60 min/session, two sessions/week for 6 months. BMD of the lumbar spine, right neck of femur, and right distal radial head of all patients were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after both treatment programs. In addition, the QoL was measured by means of the HRQoL “ECOS-16” questionnaire. Results: T-tests proved that mean values of BMD of the lumbar spine, right neck of femur and right distal radial head were significantly increased in both groups with greater improvement in the weight-bearing group. The QoL was significantly improved in both groups, but the difference between them was not significant. Conclusion: Addition of weight-bearing exercise program to medical treatment increases BMD more than nonweight-bearing exercise in elderly subjects with osteoporosis. Furthermore, both weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing exercise programs significantly improved the QoL of patients with osteoporosis. PMID:25374469

  1. Relationship between Pelvic Alignment and Weight-bearing Asymmetry in Community-dwelling Chronic Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Karthikbabu, Suruliraj; Chakrapani, Mahabala; Ganesan, Sailakshmi; Ellajosyula, Ratnavalli

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Altered pelvic alignment and asymmetrical weight bearing on lower extremities are the most common findings observed in standing and walking after stroke. The purpose of this study was to find the relationship between pelvic alignment and weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA) in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in tertiary care rehabilitation centers. In standing, the lateral and anterior pelvic tilt angle of chronic stroke survivors was assessed using palpation (PALM™) meter device. The percentage of WBA was measured with two standard weighing scales. Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to study the correlation between pelvic tilt and WBA. Results: Of 112 study participants, the mean (standard deviation) age was 54.7 (11.7) years and the poststroke duration was 14 (11) months. The lateral pelvic tilt on the most affected side and bilateral anterior pelvic tilt were 2.47 (1.8) and 4.4 (1.8) degree, respectively. The percentage of WBA was 23.2 (18.94). There was a high correlation of lateral pelvic tilt with WBA (r = 0.631; P < 0.001) than anterior pelvic tilt (r = 0.44; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Excessive lateral pelvic tilt toward the most affected side in standing may influence the weight-bearing ability of the ipsilateral lower extremity in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors. PMID:28163501

  2. Knee angle-specific MVIC for triceps surae EMG signal normalization in weight and non weight-bearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2013-08-01

    Varying the degree of weight-bearing (WB) and/or knee flexion (KF) angle during a plantar-flexion maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) has been proposed to alter soleus and/or gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis activation. This study compared the surface EMG signals from the triceps surae of 27 men and 27 women during WB and non weight bearing (NWB) plantar-flexion MVICs performed at 0° and 45° of KF. The aim was to determine which condition was most effective at eliciting the greatest EMG signals from soleus, gastrocnemius medialis, and gastrocnemius lateralis, respectively, for subsequent use for the normalization of EMG signals. WB was more effective than NWB at eliciting the greatest signals from soleus (p=0.0021), but there was no difference with respect to gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis (p⩾0.2482). Although the greatest EMG signals during MVICs were more frequently elicited at 0° of KF from gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis, and at 45° from soleus (p<0.001); neither angle consistently captured peak gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis or soleus activity. The present findings encourage more consistent use of WB plantar flexion MVICs for soleus normalization; confirm that both WB and NWB procedures can elicit peak gastrocnemius activity; and emphasize the fact that no single KF angle consistently evokes selective maximal activity of any individual triceps surae muscle.

  3. Electromyography activity of the deltoid muscle of the weight-bearing side during shoulder flexion in various weight-bearing positions

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the deltoid muscle activation during shoulder flexion exercise in various weight-bearing positions. [Subjects] A total of 15 males participated. [Methods] The participants completed three repetitions of shoulder flexion exercises in three positions (prone-on-elbow, quadruped, and standing) with electromyography activity being collected from the exercised. The muscle activations in each position by each exercise were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The electromyography activities of the middle and posterior deltoids differed significantly among positions. The prone-on-elbow and quadruped position showed a significantly higher activity than the standing position. There were no significant differences between the prone-on-elbow and quadruped positions. [Conclusion] The deltoid muscles were further strengthened in the low posture positions (prone-on-elbows and quadruped) than in standing. PMID:26644694

  4. Gait Training in Chronic Stroke Using Walk-Even Feedback Device: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    DeMars, K.

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetrical gait and a reduction in weight bearing on the affected side are a common finding in chronic stroke survivors. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of a shoe insole device that we developed, called Walk-Even, in correcting asymmetric gait in chronic stroke survivors. Six individuals with chronic (>6 months) stroke underwent 8 weeks of intervention with 2 sessions/week, each consisting of 20 minutes of gait training and 20 minutes of lower-extremity strength training. The 2 control participants underwent conventional gait training, while 4 participants underwent gait training using the Walk-Even. Following intervention, all the participants improved on most of the gait measures: peak pressure of the foot, time of transfer of weight from heel-to-forefoot, center of pressure (COP) trajectory, COP velocity, asymmetry ratio of stance, mean-force-heel, mean-force-metatarsals, Timed “Up and Go,” and Activities-specific Balance Scale. The improvement was more pronounced in the 4 participants that underwent training with Walk-Even compared to the control participants. This pilot study suggests that a combination of strength and gait training with real-time feedback may reduce temporal asymmetry and enhance weight-bearing on the affected side in chronic stroke survivors. A large randomized controlled study is needed to confirm its efficacy. PMID:28003995

  5. Gait Training in Chronic Stroke Using Walk-Even Feedback Device: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V; Khoo, I; Marayong, P; DeMars, K; Cormack, J

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetrical gait and a reduction in weight bearing on the affected side are a common finding in chronic stroke survivors. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of a shoe insole device that we developed, called Walk-Even, in correcting asymmetric gait in chronic stroke survivors. Six individuals with chronic (>6 months) stroke underwent 8 weeks of intervention with 2 sessions/week, each consisting of 20 minutes of gait training and 20 minutes of lower-extremity strength training. The 2 control participants underwent conventional gait training, while 4 participants underwent gait training using the Walk-Even. Following intervention, all the participants improved on most of the gait measures: peak pressure of the foot, time of transfer of weight from heel-to-forefoot, center of pressure (COP) trajectory, COP velocity, asymmetry ratio of stance, mean-force-heel, mean-force-metatarsals, Timed "Up and Go," and Activities-specific Balance Scale. The improvement was more pronounced in the 4 participants that underwent training with Walk-Even compared to the control participants. This pilot study suggests that a combination of strength and gait training with real-time feedback may reduce temporal asymmetry and enhance weight-bearing on the affected side in chronic stroke survivors. A large randomized controlled study is needed to confirm its efficacy.

  6. Improvements in gait speed and weight shift of persons with traumatic brain injury and vestibular dysfunction using a virtual reality computer-assisted rehabilitation environment.

    PubMed

    Sessoms, Pinata H; Gottshall, Kim R; Collins, John-David; Markham, Amanda E; Service, Kathrine A; Reini, Seth A

    2015-03-01

    Many people sustaining a traumatic brain injury experience vestibular pathology requiring physical therapy for treatment. This study measured improvements in gait speed and weight shift for subjects receiving vestibular physical therapy using a Computer-Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). A 6-session CAREN, 6-session traditional vestibular therapy group was compared with a 12-session CAREN only (0 traditional sessions) therapy group. These two groups were compared to each other and with data from healthy controls performing similar tasks on the CAREN. Those participating in 12 CAREN sessions had greater improvements in gait speed (p=0.014) and weight shift scores (p<0.001) and demonstrated similar values achieved by a healthy control population.

  7. A prospective study comparing attempted weight bearing in fiberglass below-knee casts and prefabricated pneumatic braces.

    PubMed

    Mason, Lyndon W; Dodds, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Partial weight bearing is commonly advised after fracture of the lower extremity. Research has determined this to be inaccurate both in its instruction and its reproducibility. Many trauma departments are commonly using alternatives to plaster in the splintage of fractures, such as fiberglass and the prefabricated pneumatic braces. This study's null hypothesis is that there is no difference between partial weight bearing through a fiberglass cast as compared with a pneumatic walker. A prospective study was conducted in our department including all patients who had metatarsal or ankle fractures and could partially weight bear. Patients were excluded if they were not allowed to bear weight, had received operative fixation of their fracture, or were younger than age 16 years. The patients' total weight was measured first, and then they were trained to place 50% of their weight through the splinted limb. Three measurements were taken of their attempted weight bearing at 50%, and they were blinded to the results. Over a 16-month period, 117 patients were enrolled for this study: 72 in the pneumatic walker group and 45 in the fiberglass group. There was no significant difference in sex, age, or fracture type. There was a significant difference in percentage of weight placed through the splinted limb, with the pneumatic brace group placing much greater force than the fiberglass group. This may have been caused by altered proprioception from the walker. It is important to realize this when prescribing partial weight bearing in a particular splint as this may result in avoidable complications.

  8. Sclerostin antibody inhibits skeletal deterioration in mice exposed to partial weight-bearing.

    PubMed

    Spatz, J M; Ellman, R; Cloutier, A M; Louis, L; van Vliet, M; Dwyer, D; Stolina, M; Ke, H Z; Bouxsein, M L

    2017-02-01

    Whereas much is known regarding the musculoskeletal responses to full unloading, little is known about the physiological effects and response to pharmacological agents in partial unloading (e.g. Moon and Mars) environments. To address this, we used a previously developed ground-based model of partial weight-bearing (PWB) that allows chronic exposure to reduced weight-bearing in mice to determine the effects of murine sclerostin antibody (SclAbII) on bone microstructure and strength across different levels of mechanical unloading. We hypothesize that treatment with SclAbII would improve bone mass, microarchitecture and strength in all loading conditions, but that there would be a greater skeletal response in the normally loaded mice than in partially unloaded mice suggesting the importance of combined countermeasures for exploration-class long duration spaceflight missions. Eleven-week-old female mice were assigned to one of four loading groups: normal weight-bearing controls (CON) or weight-bearing at 20% (PWB20), 40% (PWB40) or 70% (PWB70) of normal. Mice in each group received either SclAbII (25mg/kg) or vehicle (VEH) via twice weekly subcutaneous injection for 3 weeks. In partially-unloaded VEH-treated groups, leg BMD decreased -5 to -10% in a load-dependent manner. SclAbII treatment completely inhibited bone deterioration due to PWB, with bone properties in SclAbII-treated groups being equal to or greater than those of CON, VEH-treated mice. SclAbII treatment increased leg BMD from +14 to +18% in the PWB groups and 30 ± 3% in CON (p< 0.0001 for all). Trabecular bone volume, assessed by μCT at the distal femur, was lower in all partially unloaded VEH-treated groups vs. CON-VEH (p< 0.05), and was 2-3 fold higher in SclAbII-treated groups (p< 0.001). Midshaft femoral strength was also significantly higher in SclAbII vs. VEH-groups in all-loading conditions. These results suggest that greater weight bearing leads to greater benefits of SclAbII on bone

  9. Sclerostin antibody inhibits skeletal deterioration in mice exposed to partial weight-bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatz, J. M.; Ellman, R.; Cloutier, A. M.; Louis, L.; van Vliet, M.; Dwyer, D.; Stolina, M.; Ke, H. Z.; Bouxsein, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    Whereas much is known regarding the musculoskeletal responses to full unloading, little is known about the physiological effects and response to pharmacological agents in partial unloading (e.g. Moon and Mars) environments. To address this, we used a previously developed ground-based model of partial weight-bearing (PWB) that allows chronic exposure to reduced weight-bearing in mice to determine the effects of murine sclerostin antibody (SclAbII) on bone microstructure and strength across different levels of mechanical unloading. We hypothesize that treatment with SclAbII would improve bone mass, microarchitecture and strength in all loading conditions, but that there would be a greater skeletal response in the normally loaded mice than in partially unloaded mice suggesting the importance of combined countermeasures for exploration-class long duration spaceflight missions. Eleven-week-old female mice were assigned to one of four loading groups: normal weight-bearing controls (CON) or weight-bearing at 20% (PWB20), 40% (PWB40) or 70% (PWB70) of normal. Mice in each group received either SclAbII (25 mg/kg) or vehicle (VEH) via twice weekly subcutaneous injection for 3 weeks. In partially-unloaded VEH-treated groups, leg BMD decreased -5 to -10% in a load-dependent manner. SclAbII treatment completely inhibited bone deterioration due to PWB, with bone properties in SclAbII-treated groups being equal to or greater than those of CON, VEH-treated mice. SclAbII treatment increased leg BMD from +14 to +18% in the PWB groups and 30 ± 3% in CON (p < 0.0001 for all). Trabecular bone volume, assessed by μCT at the distal femur, was lower in all partially unloaded VEH-treated groups vs. CON-VEH (p < 0.05), and was 2-3 fold higher in SclAbII-treated groups (p < 0.001). Midshaft femoral strength was also significantly higher in SclAbII vs. VEH-groups in all-loading conditions. These results suggest that greater weight bearing leads to greater benefits of SclAbII on bone mass

  10. Weight-Bearing Versus Nonweight-Bearing Exercise for Persons With Diabetes and Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Michael J.; Tuttle, Lori J.; LeMaster, Joseph W.; Strube, Michael J; McGill, Janet B.; Hastings, Mary K.; Sinacore, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of weight-bearing (WB) versus nonweight-bearing (NWB) exercise for persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral neuropathy (PN). Design Randomized controlled trial with evaluations at baseline and after intervention. Setting University-based physical therapy research clinic. Participants Participants with DM and PN (N=29) (mean age ± SD, 64.5±12.5y; mean body mass index [kg/m2] ± SD, 35.5±7.3) were randomly assigned to WB (n=15) and NWB (n=14) exercise groups. All participants (100%) completed the intervention and follow-up evaluations. Interventions Group-specific progressive balance, flexibility, strengthening, and aerobic exercise conducted sitting or lying (NWB) or standing and walking (WB) occurred 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Main Outcome Measures Measures included the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and daily step counts. Secondary outcome measures represented domains across the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Results The WB group showed greater gains than the NWB group over time on the 6MWD and average daily step count (P<.05). The mean and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between-group difference over time was 29m (95% CI, 6–51) for the 6MWD and 1178 (95% CI, 150–2205) steps for the average daily step count. The NWB group showed greater improvements than the WB group over time in hemoglobin A1c values (P<.05). Conclusions The results of this study indicate the ability of this population with chronic disease to increase 6MWD and daily step count with a WB exercise program compared with an NWB exercise program. PMID:23276801

  11. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    PubMed

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training.

  12. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  13. Is Weight-Bearing Asymmetry Associated with Postural Instability after Stroke? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Jip F.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Improvement of postural stability is an important goal during poststroke rehabilitation. Since weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA) towards the nonparetic leg is common, training of weight-bearing symmetry has been a major focus in post-stroke balance rehabilitation. It is assumed that restoration of a more symmetrical weight distribution is associated with improved postural stability. Objective. To determine to what extent WBA is associated with postural instability in people after stroke. Methods. Electronic databases were searched (Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL) until March 2012. Main Eligibility Criteria. (1) Participants were people after stroke. (2) The association between WBA and postural stability was reported. Quality of reporting was assessed with the STROBE checklist and a related tool for reporting of confounding. Results. Nine observational studies met all criteria. Greater spontaneous WBA was associated with higher center of pressure (COP) velocity and with poorer synchronization of COP trajectories between the legs (two and one studies, resp.). Evidence for associations between WBA and performance on clinical balance tests or falls was weak. Conclusion. Greater WBA after stroke was associated with increased postural sway, but the current literature does not provide evidence for a causal relationship. Further studies should investigate whether reducing WBA would improve postural stability. PMID:23738232

  14. Weight-Bearing Hip Rotation Range of Motion in Female Golfers

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Background Many sports involve movements during which the lower extremity functions as a closed kinetic chain, requiring weight-bearing (WB) range of motion (ROM). Assessment of the capacity for internal and external rotation motion at the hip is typically performed with the individual in a prone, supine, or seated position. Such measurements represent ROM in a non-weight bearing (NWB) position, and, as a result, may not appropriately assess the capacity of the joint to meet the demands of the athlete's sport. To date, no research exists which documents WB hip ROM in golfers relative to the ROM demands of the golf swing or the symmetry of weight-bearing hip rotation ROM in female golfers. Objectives Weight-bearing hip rotation ROM was measured in female golfers and compared to the actual hip rotation ROM that occurred during a full golf swing. Methods Fifteen right-handed, female collegiate golfers participated in the study. The WB hip rotation ROM was measured during three different stance conditions and during full golf swings using a custom-built testing device. These actions were captured using a 3-D motion analysis system. Results The golfers WB ROM was symmetrical for external rotation and internal rotation, p = 0.648 and p = 0.078, respectively. During the backswing, the golfers used approximately 20-25% of their available WB right internal rotation, and 50-75% of their available WB left external rotation. For the downswing, the golfers used approximately 34-37% of their available WB right external rotation and 84-131% of their available WB left internal rotation. The golfers used significantly more external and internal hip rotation ROM on the left (lead) hip during both phases of the full golf swing (p < 0.001), demonstrating an asymmetrical movement pattern. Discussion In general, golfers did not exceed the measured WB ROM limits during the golf swing but did demonstrate decreased WB internal rotation on the lead hip. Conclusion Clinicians need to pay

  15. Orthotic devices and gait in polio patients.

    PubMed

    Genêt, F; Schnitzler, A; Mathieu, S; Autret, K; Théfenne, L; Dizien, O; Maldjian, A

    2010-02-01

    Polio survivors are aging and facing multiple pathologies. With age, walking becomes more difficult, partly due to locomotor deficits but also as a result of weight gain, osteoarticular degeneration, pain, cardiorespiratory problems or even post polio syndrome (PPS). These additional complications increase the risk of falls in this population where the risk of fractures is already quite high. The key joint is the knee. The muscles stabilizing this joint are often weak and patients develop compensatory gait strategies, which could be harmful to the locomotor system at medium or long term. Classically, knee recurvatum is used to lock the knee during weight bearing; however, if it exceeds 10 degrees , the knee becomes unstable and walking is unsafe. Thus, regular medical monitoring is necessary. Orthoses play an important role in the therapeutic care of polio survivors. The aim is usually to secure the knee, preventing excessive recurvatum while respecting the patient's own gait. Orthoses must be light and pressure-free if they are to be tolerated and therefore effective. Other joints present fewer problems and orthoses are rarely indicated just for them. The main issue lies in the prior evaluation of treatments' impact. Some deformities may be helpful for the patients' gait and, therefore, corrections may worsen their gait, especially if a realignment of segments is attempted. It is therefore essential to carefully pre-assess any change brought to the orthoses as well as proper indications for corrective surgery. In addition, it is essential for the patient to be monitored by a specialized team.

  16. Kurtosis based weighted sparse model with convex optimization technique for bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Xuefeng; Du, Zhaohui; Yan, Ruqiang

    2016-12-01

    The bearing failure, generating harmful vibrations, is one of the most frequent reasons for machine breakdowns. Thus, performing bearing fault diagnosis is an essential procedure to improve the reliability of the mechanical system and reduce its operating expenses. Most of the previous studies focused on rolling bearing fault diagnosis could be categorized into two main families, kurtosis-based filter method and wavelet-based shrinkage method. Although tremendous progresses have been made, their effectiveness suffers from three potential drawbacks: firstly, fault information is often decomposed into proximal frequency bands and results in impulsive feature frequency band splitting (IFFBS) phenomenon, which significantly degrades the performance of capturing the optimal information band; secondly, noise energy spreads throughout all frequency bins and contaminates fault information in the information band, especially under the heavy noisy circumstance; thirdly, wavelet coefficients are shrunk equally to satisfy the sparsity constraints and most of the feature information energy are thus eliminated unreasonably. Therefore, exploiting two pieces of prior information (i.e., one is that the coefficient sequences of fault information in the wavelet basis is sparse, and the other is that the kurtosis of the envelope spectrum could evaluate accurately the information capacity of rolling bearing faults), a novel weighted sparse model and its corresponding framework for bearing fault diagnosis is proposed in this paper, coined KurWSD. KurWSD formulates the prior information into weighted sparse regularization terms and then obtains a nonsmooth convex optimization problem. The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) is sequentially employed to solve this problem and the fault information is extracted through the estimated wavelet coefficients. Compared with state-of-the-art methods, KurWSD overcomes the three drawbacks and utilizes the advantages of both family

  17. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  18. Effects of immobilization on rat hind limb muscles under non-weight-bearing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Fagan, Julie M.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Cook, Paul H.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of stretched and unstretched immobilization of a hind limb on the concentration and the metabolism of proteins in the hind-limb muscles of rats was investigated. The animals were divided into three groups: (1) weight-bearing controls, (2) tail-cast-suspended, and (3) suspended, with one hind limb immobilized with the ankle in dorsiflexion (30-40 deg angle) and the other freely moving. It was found that unloading the hind limbs for 6 days by tail cast suspension caused soleus to atrophy and reduced growth of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles; unloading resulted in a higher degradation rate and lower synthesis rate in both in vitro and in vivo. Chronic stretch of the unloaded soleus not only prevented its atrophy but led to significant hypertrophy, relative to weight-bearing controls, with increases in both the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein fractions. Immobilizing one ankle in dorsiflexion prevented the inhibition of growth in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles due to unloading.

  19. The relationship of asymmetric weight-bearing with postural sway and visual reliance in stroke.

    PubMed

    Marigold, Daniel S; Eng, Janice J

    2006-02-01

    Due to motor and sensory deficits in individuals with stroke, we proposed that they must compensate for these impairments during standing with greater dependence on vision. In addition, we hypothesized that asymmetric weight-bearing, which occurs following stroke, is related to increased postural sway and those with greater asymmetry will have greater reliance on vision. Twenty-eight individuals with stroke and 28 healthy older adult controls stood quietly with eyes open (EO) or closed on a force platform while postural sway was quantified by centre of pressure measures and weight-bearing asymmetry was calculated from vertical ground reaction forces. To determine the influence of vision on postural sway, a visual ratio (eyes open/eyes closed (EC)) was calculated for the sway measures. The results demonstrated that individuals with stroke had greater visual dependence for the control of postural sway velocity in the medial-lateral (ML), but not anterior-posterior (AP) direction, compared to controls. Further, we found that greater asymmetry was moderately related to increased medial-lateral sway for the individuals with stroke. Contrary to predictions, those individuals with stroke with mild asymmetry had greater visual dependence than those with more severe asymmetry.

  20. The Relationship of Asymmetric Weight-bearing with Postural Sway and Visual Reliance in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marigold, Daniel S.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to motor and sensory deficits in individuals with stroke, we proposed that they must compensate for these impairments during standing with greater dependence on vision. In addition, we hypothesized that asymmetric weight-bearing, which occurs following stroke, is related to increased postural sway and those with greater asymmetry will have greater reliance on vision. Twenty-eight individuals with stroke and 28 healthy older adult controls stood quietly with eyes open or closed on a force platform while postural sway was quantified by centre of pressure measures and weight-bearing asymmetry was calculated from vertical ground reaction forces. To determine the influence of vision on postural sway, a visual ratio (eyes open/eyes closed) was calculated for the sway measures. The results demonstrated that individuals with stroke had greater visual dependence for the control of postural sway velocity in the medial-lateral, but not anterior-posterior direction, compared to controls. Further, we found that greater asymmetry was moderately related to increased medial-lateral sway for the individuals with stroke. Contrary to predictions, those individuals with stroke with mild asymmetry had greater visual dependence than those with more severe asymmetry. PMID:16399522

  1. Non-weight-bearing neural control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses have traditionally been mechanically passive devices without electronic control systems. Microprocessor-controlled passive and powered devices have recently received much interest from the clinical and research communities. The control systems for these devices typically use finite-state controllers to interpret data measured from mechanical sensors embedded within the prosthesis. In this paper we investigated a control system that relied on information extracted from myoelectric signals to control a lower limb prosthesis while amputee patients were seated. Sagittal plane motions of the knee and ankle can be accurately (>90%) recognized and controlled in both a virtual environment and on an actuated transfemoral prosthesis using only myoelectric signals measured from nine residual thigh muscles. Patients also demonstrated accurate (~90%) control of both the femoral and tibial rotation degrees of freedom within the virtual environment. A channel subset investigation was completed and the results showed that only five residual thigh muscles are required to achieve accurate control. This research is the first step in our long-term goal of implementing myoelectric control of lower limb prostheses during both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities for individuals with transfemoral amputation. PMID:23782953

  2. Alterations of collagen matrix in weight-bearing bones during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Tanzawa, H.; Uzawa, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of bone mineral density in weight-bearing bones. The objectives of this study were to characterize the post-translational modifications of collagen of weight-bearing bones subjected to hindlimb unloading for 8 weeks. In unloaded bones, tibiae and femurs, while the overall amino acid composition was essentially identical in the unloaded and control tibiae and femurs, the collagen cross-link profile showed significant differences. Two major reducible cross-links (analyzed as dihydroxylysinonorleucine and hydroxylysinonorleucine) were increased in the unloaded bones. In addition, the ratios of the former to the latter as well as pyridinoline to deoxypyridinoline were significantly decreased in the unloaded bones indicating a difference in the extent of lysine hydroxylation at the cross-linking sites between these two groups. These results indicate that upon skeletal unloading the relative pool of newly synthesized collagen is increased and it is post-translationally altered. The alteration could be associated with impaired osteoblastic differentiation induced by skeletal unloading that results in a mineralization defect.

  3. Soleus Fiber Force and Maximal Shortening Velocity After Non-Weight Bearing with Intermittent Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Bangart, Jill J.; Karhanek, Miloslav; Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of intermittent weight bearing (IWB) as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing (NWB)-induced alterations in soleus type 1 fiber force (in mN), tension (P(sub o); force per fiber cross-sectional area in kN/sq m), and maximal unloaded shortening velocity (V(sub o), in fiber lengths/s). Adult rats were assigned to one of the following groups: normal weight bearing (WB), 14 days of hindlimb NWB (NWB group), and 14 days of hindlimb NWB with IWB treatments (IWB group). The IWB treatment consisted of four 10-min periods of standing WB each day. Single, chemically permeabilized soleus fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor and were studied at maximal Ca(2+) activation, after which type 1 fiber myosin heavy-chain composition was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. NWB resulted in a loss in relative soleus mass (-45%), with type 1 fibers displaying reductions in diameter (-28%) and peak isometric force (-55%) and an increase in V(sub o) (+33%). In addition, NWB induced a 16% reduction in type 1 fiber P., a 41% reduction in type 1 fiber peak elastic modulus [E(sub o), defined as ((delta)force/(delta)length x (fiber length/fiber cross-sectional area] and a significant increase in the P(sub o)/E(sub o) ratio. In contrast to NWB, IWB reduced the loss of relative soleus mass (by 22%) and attenuated alterations in type 1 fiber diameter (by 36%), peak force (by 29%), and V(sub o)(by 48%) but had no significant effect on P(sub o), E(sub o) or P(sub o)/E(sub o). These results indicate that a modest restoration of WB activity during 14 days of NWB is sufficient to attenuate type 1 fiber atrophy and to partially restore type 1 peak isometric force and V(sub o) to WB levels. However, the NWB-induced reductions in P(sub o) and E(sub o) which we hypothesize to be due to a decline in the number and stiffness of cross bridges, respectively, are considerably less responsive to this

  4. Citrus unshiu peel extract alleviates cancer-induced weight loss in mice bearing CT-26 adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Aeyung; Im, Minju; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a critical feature of cancer-induced cachexia, caused by pro-cachectic factors secreted by host cells and tumor cells. Therefore, blockade of these factors has considered a reasonable target for pharmacological and nutritional interventions to prevent skeletal muscle loss under cancer-induced cachexia. Citrus unshiu peel (CUP) has been used for treating the common cold, dyspepsia, and bronchial discomfort and reported to have pharmacological activities against inflammation, allergy, diabetes, and viral infection. In the present study, we observed that daily oral administration of water extract of CUP (WCUP) to male BALB/c mice bearing CT-26 adenocarcinoma remarkably reduced the losses in final body weight, carcass weight, gastrocnemius muscle, epididymal adipose tissue, and hemoglobin (Hb), compared with saline treatment. The levels of serum IL-6 and muscle-specific E3 ligases elevated by tumor burden were also considerably reduced by WCUP administration. In an in vitro experiment, WCUP efficiently suppressed the production of pro-cachectic cytokines in immune cells as well as cancer cells. In addition, WCUP treatment attenuated C2C12 skeletal muscle cell atrophy caused by cancer cells. These findings collectively suggest that WCUP is beneficial as a nutritional supplement for the management of cancer patients with severe weight loss. PMID:27064118

  5. Citrus unshiu peel extract alleviates cancer-induced weight loss in mice bearing CT-26 adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeyung; Im, Minju; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-04-11

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a critical feature of cancer-induced cachexia, caused by pro-cachectic factors secreted by host cells and tumor cells. Therefore, blockade of these factors has considered a reasonable target for pharmacological and nutritional interventions to prevent skeletal muscle loss under cancer-induced cachexia. Citrus unshiu peel (CUP) has been used for treating the common cold, dyspepsia, and bronchial discomfort and reported to have pharmacological activities against inflammation, allergy, diabetes, and viral infection. In the present study, we observed that daily oral administration of water extract of CUP (WCUP) to male BALB/c mice bearing CT-26 adenocarcinoma remarkably reduced the losses in final body weight, carcass weight, gastrocnemius muscle, epididymal adipose tissue, and hemoglobin (Hb), compared with saline treatment. The levels of serum IL-6 and muscle-specific E3 ligases elevated by tumor burden were also considerably reduced by WCUP administration. In an in vitro experiment, WCUP efficiently suppressed the production of pro-cachectic cytokines in immune cells as well as cancer cells. In addition, WCUP treatment attenuated C2C12 skeletal muscle cell atrophy caused by cancer cells. These findings collectively suggest that WCUP is beneficial as a nutritional supplement for the management of cancer patients with severe weight loss.

  6. Influence of biofeedback weight bearing training in sit to stand to sit and the limits of stability on stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to observe the influence of biofeedback weight bearing training in sit to stand to sit and limits of stability on stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] For subjects of this study, 30 stroke patients were randomly divided into two groups of 15, a biofeedback weight bearing training group and a functional weight bearing training group. Biofeedback weight bearing training was conducted for 30 minutes, five times a week for eight weeks, using Biorescue. Analysis of sit to stand to sit was done with LUKOtronic while the analysis of limits of stability was done with Biorescue. [Results] In a comparison of sit to stand to sit and limits of stability between the two groups before and after intervention, Group I showed significant difference in sit to stand to sit and limits of stability when compared to Group II. [Conclusion] This study concludes that biofeedback weight bearing training is more effective in improving sit to stand to sit and limits of stability in stroke patients. PMID:27942111

  7. A Frequency-Weighted Energy Operator and complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition for bearing fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaouchen, Yacine; Kedadouche, Mourad; Alkama, Rezak; Thomas, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Signal processing techniques for non-stationary and noisy signals have recently attracted considerable attentions. Among them, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) which is an adaptive and efficient method for decomposing signals from high to low frequencies into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Ensemble EMD (EEMD) is proposed to overcome the mode mixing problem of the EMD. In the present paper, the Complementary EEMD (CEEMD) is used for bearing fault detection. As a noise-improved method, the CEEMD not only overcomes the mode mixing, but also eliminates the residual of added white noise persisting into the IMFs and enhance the calculation efficiency of the EEMD method. Afterward, a selection method is developed to choose relevant IMFs containing information about defects. Subsequently, a signal is reconstructed from the sum of relevant IMFs and a Frequency-Weighted Energy Operator is tailored to extract both the amplitude and frequency modulations from the selected IMFs. This operator outperforms the conventional energy operator and the enveloping methods, especially in the presence of strong noise and multiple vibration interferences. Furthermore, simulation and experimental results showed that the proposed method improves performances for detecting the bearing faults. The method has also high computational efficiency and is able to detect the fault at an early stage of degradation.

  8. Torsion of Undescended Testis in a 14-Month-Old Child Refusing to Bear Weight

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Ryan M; Cuenca, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we discuss a case of a 14-month-old male presenting in the emergency department with refusal to bear weight on his left leg. Plain radiographic studies revealed no evidence of effusion, fracture, or dislocation. Laboratory studies were significant for an elevated white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. Further studies included unremarkable ultrasound of the left hip and normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both hips. An incidental finding on MRI was a left inguinal mass concerning an incarcerated hernia. Ultrasound of this mass demonstrated a left undescended testis within the inguinal canal and possible incarcerated paratesticular inguinal hernia. The final pathologic diagnosis of a torsed gangrenous left testicle within the inguinal canal was confirmed during surgery. PMID:22224149

  9. Quantitative Alterations in the Function of Bone Forming Cells Due to Reduced Weight Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    Rats subjected to spaceflight or suspended in a non-weight bearing position for 2 to 3 weeks, show a significant reduction in new bone formation. This reduction is associated with a decrease in akaline phosphatase activity in the differentiated osteoblast population. Those cells in the siaphyseal region of bone are more affected than the same cell type in metaphyseal bone. Measurements of alkaline phosphate activity in specific regions of bone, and the autoradiographic localization of H(3) proline in bone forming areas are described. Concomitant with decreased bone matrix synthesis, the osteoblast population also demonstrate changes in the Golgi/lysosomal complex as a result of whole animal suspension. Morphometric techniques are being applied for quantitation of the lysosomal population and the percentage of lysosomal or Golgi bodies containing acid phosphatase activity.

  10. Reliability and minimal detectable change of the weight-bearing lunge test: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Powden, Cameron J; Hoch, Johanna M; Hoch, Matthew C

    2015-08-01

    Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (DROM) is often a point of emphasis during the rehabilitation of lower extremity pathologies. With the growing popularity of weight-bearing DROM assessments, several versions of the weight-bearing lunge (WBLT) test have been developed and numerous reliability studies have been conducted. The purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise and synthesize the studies which examined the reliability and responsiveness of the WBLT to assess DROM. A systematic search of PubMed and EBSCO Host databases from inception to September 2014 was conducted to identify studies whose primary aim was assessing the reliability of the WBLT. The Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies assessment tool was utilized to determine the quality of included studies. Relative reliability was examined through intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and responsiveness was evaluated through minimal detectable change (MDC). A total of 12 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included. Nine included studies assessed inter-clinician reliability and 12 included studies assessed intra-clinician reliability. There was strong evidence that inter-clinician reliability (ICC = 0.80-0.99) as well as intra-clinician reliability (ICC = 0.65-0.99) of the WBLT is good. Additionally, average MDC scores of 4.6° or 1.6 cm for inter-clinician and 4.7° or 1.9 cm for intra-clinician were found, indicating the minimal change in DROM needed to be outside the error of the WBLT. This systematic review determined that the WBLT, regardless of method, can be used clinically to assess DROM as it provides consistent results between one or more clinicians and demonstrates reasonable responsiveness.

  11. Enhancement of brain plasticity and recovery of locomotive function after lumbar spinal cord stimulation in combination with gait training with partial weight support in rats with cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2017-02-22

    Lumbar spinal cord stimulation (LSCS) is reportedly effective for the recovery of locomotive intraspinal neural network, motor cortex and basal ganglia in animals with complete spinal cord injury and parkinsonism. We evaluated the effect of LSCS in combination with gait training on the recovery of locomotive function and brain plasticity using a rat model of brain ischemia. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats with ischemia were randomly assigned into one of four groups: sham treatment (group 1), LSCS only (group 2), LSCS with gait training and 50% (group 3) and 80% (group 4) of body weight support. Evaluations before randomization and 4 weeks after intervention included motor scoring index, real-time PCR and Western blot. Motor scoring index was significantly improved after the intervention in groups 2 and 3. The ratio of phospho-Protein Kinase C (PKC) to PKC measured in the infarcted area tended to be higher in groups 3 and 4. Protein expression of mGluR2 and mRNA expression of mGluR1 measured in the contralateral cortex were lower in groups 3 and 4. The ratio of phospho-Akt to Akt and mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor measured in the ischemic border zone were higher in group 2. The mRNA expression of MAP1b measured in the infarcted area was significantly higher in group 2. The findings suggest that LSCS and gait training with an adequate amount of body weight support may promote brain plasticity and facilitate the functional recovery.

  12. Slow Recovery of Weight Bearing After Stabilization of Long-Bone Fractures Using Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nails in Children.

    PubMed

    Lardelli, Patrizia; Frech-Dörfler, Martina; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Mayr, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Stabilization of diaphyseal long-bone fractures using elastic stable intramedullary nails (ESIN) in children promises early mobilization and rapid resumption of full weight bearing. We evaluated the duration of postoperative functional rehabilitation after ESIN, measured by the time from stabilization until first partial weight bearing, full weight bearing, and resumption of school sports. Fifty children with unstable, displaced fractures of the femur or lower leg treated with ESIN between 2002 and 2012 were included in this retrospective analysis. We classified fractures according to the pediatric comprehensive classification of fractures (PCCF). Thirty-five children sustained a femur fracture, and 15 children had a fracture of the lower leg or tibia. The surgeons in charge applied an additional plaster cast in 7 of 15 children who suffered a lower leg fracture. The postoperative time interval until full weight bearing in the group of children who had suffered transverse or short oblique femur fractures was significantly shorter (median: 4.4 weeks; range: 0.1-9.1 weeks) than that in the group who had sustained more complex fracture patterns (median: 6.8 weeks; range: 2.9-13.9 weeks; P = 0.04). Similarly, transverse and short oblique lower leg and tibia fractures required less time until full weight bearing (median: 4.1 weeks; range 2.7-6.0 weeks) than complex lower leg fractures (median: 6.1 weeks; range: 1.3-12.9 weeks; P = 0.04). ESIN proved fairly effective in restoring full weight bearing in transverse or short oblique fractures of the lower extremities but was less effective in complex fractures.

  13. Slow Recovery of Weight Bearing After Stabilization of Long-Bone Fractures Using Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nails in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lardelli, Patrizia; Frech-Dörfler, Martina; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Mayr, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stabilization of diaphyseal long-bone fractures using elastic stable intramedullary nails (ESIN) in children promises early mobilization and rapid resumption of full weight bearing. We evaluated the duration of postoperative functional rehabilitation after ESIN, measured by the time from stabilization until first partial weight bearing, full weight bearing, and resumption of school sports. Fifty children with unstable, displaced fractures of the femur or lower leg treated with ESIN between 2002 and 2012 were included in this retrospective analysis. We classified fractures according to the pediatric comprehensive classification of fractures (PCCF). Thirty-five children sustained a femur fracture, and 15 children had a fracture of the lower leg or tibia. The surgeons in charge applied an additional plaster cast in 7 of 15 children who suffered a lower leg fracture. The postoperative time interval until full weight bearing in the group of children who had suffered transverse or short oblique femur fractures was significantly shorter (median: 4.4 weeks; range: 0.1–9.1 weeks) than that in the group who had sustained more complex fracture patterns (median: 6.8 weeks; range: 2.9–13.9 weeks; P = 0.04). Similarly, transverse and short oblique lower leg and tibia fractures required less time until full weight bearing (median: 4.1 weeks; range 2.7–6.0 weeks) than complex lower leg fractures (median: 6.1 weeks; range: 1.3–12.9 weeks; P = 0.04). ESIN proved fairly effective in restoring full weight bearing in transverse or short oblique fractures of the lower extremities but was less effective in complex fractures. PMID:26986106

  14. Loading modalities and bone structures at nonweight-bearing upper extremity and weight-bearing lower extremity: a pQCT study of adult female athletes.

    PubMed

    Nikander, Riku; Sievänen, Harri; Uusi-Rasi, Kirsti; Heinonen, Ari; Kannus, Pekka

    2006-10-01

    This cross-sectional study of adult female athletes assessed whether the apparent loading-related differences in bone structure are primarily associated with the loading type or the muscle performance-related joint moments. Several structural variables at shaft sites of the tibia, radius and humerus, and distal sites of the tibia and radius were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) among 113 female national level athletes (representing hurdling, volleyball, soccer, racket-sports and swimming) and their 30 nonathletic referents. For the weight-bearing lower extremities, the loading modalities of the above sports were classified into high-impact (hurdling, volleyball), odd-impact (soccer, racket-sports) and repetitive, nonimpact (swimming) loadings; and for the nonweight-bearing upper extremities into high magnitude (functional weightlifting in hurdling and soccer), impact (volleyball, racket-sports) and repetitive, nonimpact (swimming) loadings. As expected, athletes' bone mass was substantially higher at loaded bone sites compared with the nonathletic referents, but more pertinently to the locomotive perspective, the loading-induced additional bone mass seemed to be used to build mechanically strong and appropriate bone structures. Compared with controls, the weight-bearing bone structures of female athletes (swimmers excluded) were characterized by larger diaphysis, thicker cortices and somewhat denser trabecular bone. The athletes' bones at the nonweight-bearing upper extremity were generally larger in cross-sectional area. The estimated indices of joint moment (muscle force x estimated lever arm) were explained from 29% to 50%, and the loading modalities from 8% to 25%, of the variance in most bone variables (P < 0.05) of the tibia (shaft and distal site). In contrast to the weight-bearing tibia, only the estimated joint moment was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the structural characteristics of the radius and humerus

  15. Effects of Patellofemoral Taping on Patellofemoral Joint Alignment and Contact Area During Weight Bearing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Epstein, Ryan; Garcia, Ron; Riley, Nicole; Lee, Szu-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Although it has been theorized that patellofemoral joint (PFJ) taping can correct patellar malalignment, the effects of PFJ taping techniques on patellar alignment and contact area have not yet been studied during weight bearing. Objective To examine the effects of 2 taping approaches (Kinesio and McConnell) on PFJ alignment and contact area. Methods Fourteen female subjects with patellofemoral pain and PFJ malalignment participated. Each subject underwent a pretaping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan session and 2 MRI scan sessions after the application of the 2 taping techniques, which aimed to correct lateral patellar displacement. Subjects were asked to report their pain level prior to each scan session. During MRI assessment, subjects were loaded with 25% of body weight on their involved/more symptomatic leg at 0°, 20°, and 40° of knee flexion. The outcome measures included patellar lateral displacement (bisect-offset [BSO] index), mediolateral patellar tilt angle, patellar height (Insall-Salvati ratio), contact area, and pain. Patellofemoral joint alignment and contact area were compared among the 3 conditions (no tape, Kinesio, and McConnell) at 3 knee angles using a 2-factor, repeated-measures analysis of variance. Pain was compared among the 3 conditions using the Friedman test and post hoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results Our data did not reveal any significant effects of either McConnell or Kinesio taping on the BSO index, patellar tilt angle, Insall-Salvati ratio, or contact area across the 3 knee angles, whereas knee angle had a significant effect on the BSO index and contact area. A reduction in pain was observed after the application of the Kinesio taping technique. Conclusion In a weight-bearing condition, this preliminary study did not support the use of PFJ taping as a medial correction technique to alter the PFJ contact area or alignment of the patella. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017

  16. Mesh skin graft and digital pad transfer to reconstruct the weight-bearing surface in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Sheila C.; Mortari, Ana C.; Morishin Filho, Milton M.

    2007-01-01

    A 2-month-old dog was presented with injuries involving both hind paws. Only the 5th digit and its digital pad were present on the right paw. Following a full-thickness skin graft, the 5th digital pad was transferred distal to the metatarsal bones. The transferred pad permitted weight-bearing on the limb. PMID:18189047

  17. Weight-Bearing Dorsiflexion Range of Motion and Landing Biomechanics in Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Matthew C.; Farwell, Kelley E.; Gaven, Stacey L.; Weinhandl, Joshua T.

    2015-01-01

    Context People with chronic ankle instability (CAI) exhibit less weight-bearing dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and less knee flexion during landing than people with stable ankles. Examining the relationship between dorsiflexion ROM and landing biomechanics may identify a modifiable factor associated with altered kinematics and kinetics during landing tasks. Objective To examine the relationship between weight-bearing dorsiflexion ROM and single-legged landing biomechanics in persons with CAI. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Fifteen physically active persons with CAI (5 men, 10 women; age = 21.9 ± 2.1 years, height = 168.7 ± 9.0 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 13.3 kg) participated. Intervention(s) Participants performed dorsiflexion ROM and single-legged landings from a 40-cm height. Sagittal-plane kinematics of the lower extremity and ground reaction forces (GRFs) were captured during landing. Main Outcome Measure(s) Static dorsiflexion was measured using the weight-bearing–lunge test. Kinematics of the ankle, knee, and hip were observed at initial contact, maximum angle, and sagittal displacement. Sagittal displacements of the ankle, knee, and hip were summed to examine overall sagittal displacement. Kinetic variables were maximum posterior and vertical GRFs normalized to body weight. We used Pearson product moment correlations to evaluate the relationships between dorsiflexion ROM and landing biomechanics. Correlations (r) were interpreted as weak (0.00–0.40), moderate (0.41–0.69), or strong (0.70–1.00). The coefficient of determination (r2) was used to determine the amount of explained variance among variables. Results Static dorsiflexion ROM was moderately correlated with maximum dorsiflexion (r = 0.49, r2 = 0.24), ankle displacement (r = 0.47, r2 = 0.22), and total displacement (r = 0.67, r2 = 0.45) during landing. Dorsiflexion ROM measured statically and during landing demonstrated moderate to strong

  18. Knee kinematics in medial osteoarthritis during in vivo weight-bearing activities.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-Aki; Miura, Hiromasa; Shimoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Fregly, Benjamin J; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2009-12-01

    Dynamic knee kinematics were analyzed for medial osteoarthritic (OA) knees in three activities, including two types of maximum knee flexion. Continuous x-ray images of kneeling, squatting, and stair climbing motions were taken using a large flat panel detector. CT-derived bone models were used for the model registration-based 3D kinematic measurements. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and contact locations were determined using two methods: bone-fixed coordinate systems and by interrogation of CT-based bone model surfaces. The femur exhibited gradual external rotation with knee flexion for kneeling and squatting activities, and gradual internal rotation with knee extension for stair climbing. From 100 degrees to 120 degrees flexion, contact locations showed a medial pivot pattern similar to normal knees. However, knees with medial OA displayed a femoral internal rotation bias and less posterior translation when compared with normal knees. A classic screw-home movement was not observed in OA knees near extension. Decreased variability with both activities and methods of calculation were demonstrated for all three activities. In conclusion, the weight-bearing kinematics of patients with medial OA differs from normal knees. Pathological changes of the articulating surfaces and the ligaments correspond to observed abnormalities in knee kinematics.

  19. Weight-Bearing Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion—Can Side-to-Side Symmetry Be Assumed?

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Alon; Kozol, Zvi; Spitzer, Elad; Finestone, Aharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: In clinical practice, the range of motion (ROM) of the noninvolved side often serves as the reference for comparison with the injured side. Previous investigations of non–weight-bearing (NWB) ankle dorsiflexion (DF) ROM measurements have indicated bilateral symmetry for the most part. Less is known about ankle DF measured under weight-bearing (WB) conditions. Because WB and NWB ankle DF are not strongly correlated, there is a need to determine whether WB ankle DF is also symmetrical in a healthy population. Objective: To determine whether WB ankle DF is bilaterally symmetrical. A secondary goal was to further explore the correlation between WB and NWB ankle DF ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Training facility of the Israeli Defense Forces. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 64 healthy males (age = 19.6 ± 1.0 years, height = 175.0 ± 6.4 cm, and body mass = 71.4 ± 7.7 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Dorsiflexion ROM in WB was measured with an inclinometer and DF ROM in NWB was measured with a universal goniometer. All measurements were taken bilaterally by a single examiner. Results: Weight-bearing ankle DF was greater on the nondominant side compared with the dominant side (P < .001). Non–weight-bearing ankle DF was not different between sides (P = .64). The correlation between WB and NWB DF was moderate, with the NWB DF measurement accounting for 30% to 37% of the variance of the WB measurement. Conclusions: Weight-bearing ankle DF ROM should not be assumed to be bilaterally symmetrical. These findings suggest that side-to-side differences in WB DF may need to be interpreted while considering which side is dominant. The difference in bilateral symmetry between the WB and NWB measurements, as well as the only moderate level of correlation between them, suggests that both measurements should be performed routinely. PMID:25329350

  20. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women.

  1. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women. PMID:25931687

  2. Weight-bearing alters the expression of collagen types I and II, BMP 2/4 and osteocalcin in the early stages of distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Radomisli, T E; Moore, D C; Barrach, H J; Keeping, H S; Ehrlich, M G

    2001-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of loading on the biology of newly forming bone during limb lengthening. Unilateral 2.0 mm femoral lengthenings were performed in 20 male Sprague Dawley rats. Half (n = 10) of the animals were allowed to bear weight freely, while the other half were prevented from weight-bearing via an ipsilateral through-knee amputation. The animals in each group were sacrificed after one (n = 5) or four (n = 5) days of consolidation (post-operative days seven and 10, respectively). In situ hybridization for osteocalcin and collagen I, and antibody staining for collagen II and BMP 2/4 were used to evaluate the molecular influence of loading. There was more new bone in the distraction gap of the weight-bearing animals than there was in the non-weight-bearing animals. BMP 2/4 expression, and the messages for collagen I and osteocalcin, were more abundant in tissue from the weight-bearing animals; collagen II was higher in the non-weight-bearing animals. This suggests that early regenerate tissue is capable of responding to loading, and that weight-bearing appears to stimulate intramembranous ossification. These findings support the concept of early weight-bearing after limb lengthening.

  3. Reliability and Validity of a Partial Weight Bearing Measure of Lower Extremity Performance

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Michelle; O'Rand, Denise; Levy, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background Methods of measuring lower extremity function is limited for those with partial weight bearing (PWB) status in early phases of a lower extremity rehabilitation program. Objectives The purpose of this study was to measure intra-rater reliability of two lower extremity PWB performance measures using an incline exercise apparatus and to evaluate the concurrent validity and responsiveness to change of these two measures. Methods Thirty-seven adult patients with lower extremity injuries were measured on two PWB measures (PWB20 and PWB30) of lower extremity performance as well as several common measures of LE function. After initial testing, subjects were asked to return for retesting, following four to six weeks of rehabilitation intervention. Reliability of the data from the measures was tested using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC); validity was based on bivariate correlations of the measures. The minimal detectable change (MDC) value and limb symmetry index (LSI) were used to study the responsiveness of the PWB measures. Results The ICC for the PWB20 and PWB30 were 0.95 and 0.98, respectively. The bivariate correlations of the PWB20 with stair climbing and walking speed were greater than those of the PWB30. Correlations ranged from r = 0.49 to 0.72 between the PWB measures and the functional measures. For most patients, their change in score between initial testing and follow-up exceeded the MDC; the LSI improved for all patients. Conclusion Using the incline apparatus yielded reliable PWB data. In addition, performance on the PWB measures correlated fairly well with common measures of function. PMID:21509110

  4. Coordination strategies for limb forces during weight-bearing locomotion in normal rats, and in rats spinalized as neonates

    PubMed Central

    Giszter, Simon F; Davies, Michelle R; Graziani, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Some rats spinally transected as neonates (ST rats) achieve weight-supporting independent locomotion. The mechanisms of coordinated hindlimb weight support in such rats are not well understood. To examine these in such ST rats and normal rats, rats with better than 60% of weight supported steps on a treadmill as adults were trained to cross an instrumented runway. Ground reaction forces, coordination of hindlimb and forelimb forces and the motions of the center of pressure were assessed. Normal rats crossed the runway with a diagonal trot. On average hindlimbs bore about 80% of the vertical load carried by forelimbs, although this varied. Forelimbs and hindlimb acted synergistically to generate decelerative and propulsive rostrocaudal forces, which averaged 15% of body weight with maximums of 50% . Lateral forces were very small (<8% of body weight). Center of pressure progressed in jumps along a straight line with mean lateral deviations <1 cm. ST rats hindlimbs bore about 60% of the vertical load of forelimbs, significantly less compared to intact (p<0.05). ST rats showed similar mean rostrocaudal forces, but with significantly larger maximum fluctuations of up to 80% of body weight (p<0.05). Joint force-plate recordings showed forelimbs and hindlimb rostrocaudal forces in ST rats were opposing and significantly different from intact rats (p<0.05). Lateral forces were ~20% of body weight and significantly larger than in normal rats (p<0.05). Center of pressure zig-zagged, with mean lateral deviations of ~ 2cm and a significantly larger range (p<0.05). The haunches were also observed to roll more than normal rats. The locomotor strategy of injured rats using limbs in opposition was presumably less efficient but their complex gait was statically stable. Because forelimbs and hindlimbs acted in opposition, the trunk was held compressed. Force coordination was likely managed largely by the voluntary control in forelimbs and trunk. PMID:18612631

  5. Spaceflight-Relevant Challenges of Radiation and/or Reduced Weight Bearing Cause Arthritic Responses in Knee Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Willey, J S; Kwok, A T; Moore, J E; Payne, V; Lindburg, C A; Balk, S A; Olson, J; Black, P J; Walb, M C; Yammani, R R; Munley, M T

    2016-10-01

    There is little known about the effect of both reduced weight bearing and exposure to radiation during spaceflight on the mechanically-sensitive cartilage lining the knee joint. In this study, we characterized cartilage damage in rat knees after periods of reduced weight bearing with/without exposure to solar-flare-relevant radiation, then cartilage recovery after return to weight bearing. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 120) were either hindlimb unloaded (HLU) via tail suspension or remained weight bearing in cages (GROUND). On day 5, half of the HLU and GROUND rats were 1 Gy total-body X-ray irradiated during HLU, and half were sham irradiated (SHAM), yielding 4 groups: GROUND-SHAM; GROUND-IR; HLU-SHAM; and HLU-IR. Hindlimbs were collected from half of each group of rats on day 13. The remaining rats were then removed from HLU or remained weight bearing, and hindlimbs from these rats were collected on day 62. On day 13, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in cartilage lining the tibial plateau and femoral condyles of HLU rats was lower than that of the GROUND animals. Likewise, on day 13, immunoreactivity of the collagen type II-degrading matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and of a resultant metalloproteinase-generated neoepitope VDIPEN was increased in all groups versus GROUND-SHAM. Clustering of chondrocytes indicating cartilage damage was present in all HLU and IR groups versus GROUND-SHAM on day 13. On day 62, after 49 days of reloading, the loss of GAG content was attenuated in the HLU-SHAM and HLU-IR groups, and the increased VDIPEN staining in all treatment groups was attenuated. However, the increased chondrocyte clustering remained in all treatment groups on day 62. MMP-13 activity also remained elevated in the GROUND-IR and HLU-IR groups. Increased T2 relaxation times, measured on day 62 using 7T MRI, were greater in GROUND-IR and HLU-IR knees, indicating persistent cartilage damage in the irradiated groups. Both HLU and total-body irradiation resulted in

  6. The weight-bearing exercise for better balance program improves strength and balance in osteopenia: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    El Mohsen, Azza M. Abd; El Ghaffar, Hossam Eddien F. Abd; Nassif, Nagui S.; Elhafez, Ghada M.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the Weight-bearing Exercise for Better Balance program on the strength of hip flexors, extensors, abductors, adductors, and knee flexors and extensors and balance in osteopenia. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four postmenopausal females with osteopenia volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned into two equal groups of 12: the experimental and control groups. The Weight-bearing Exercise for Better Balance program was applied to the experimental group, while the control group did not receive any treatment. Isokinetic peak torque per body weight values of the hip flexors, extensors, abductors, adductors, and knee flexors and extensors were measured by Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer for both groups before and after six weeks of the program. Balance was assessed in both groups using the Berg Balance Scale. [Results] There was a statistically significant increase in post-intervention mean values of all measured variables compared with pre-intervention values in the experimental group. Also, there was a statistically significant increase in post-intervention mean values of all measured variables except for those of the hip extensors in the experimental group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] The weight-bearing exercise for better balance program has significant effects on lower extremity muscle strength and body balance in postmenopausal females with osteopenia. PMID:27799698

  7. Effect of daily short-duration weight-bearing on disuse-induced deterioration of musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Leung, K-S.; Li, Y-H.; Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Tam, K-F.; Chow, D.H.K.; Wan, Y.; Ling, S.; Dai, Z.; Qin, L.; Cheung, W-H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate deterioration of musculoskeletal system due to prolonged disuse and the potential of daily short-duration weight-bearing as countermeasures. Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into Control Group (CG, no intervention), Tail-suspension Group (TG, tail-suspension without treatment), and Weight-Bearing Group (WBG, tail-suspension with 20 min/day, 5 days/week body weight loading). After four weeks of treatment, femur and tibia, soleus and extensor digitorum longus were evaluated for bone and muscle quality respectively. Tensile properties of bone-tendon insertion (BTI) were evaluated using patella-patellar tendon complex. Results: Disuse induced deterioration on bone, muscle, and BTI after four weeks. Compared with CG, TG and WBG showed significant decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) of trabecular bone in distal femur (4.3-15.2%), muscle mass (31.3-52.3%), muscle cross-sectional area (29.1-35%), and failure strength of BTI (23.9-29.4%). Tensile test showed that the failure mode was avulsion of bone at the BTI. No significant difference was detected between TG and WBG for all assessments on bone, muscle, and BTI. Conclusions: Disuse caused deterioration of bone, muscle, and BTI while daily short-duration of weight-bearing did not prevent this deterioration. Mechanical stimulation with higher intensity and longer duration may be necessary to prevent musculoskeletal deterioration resulted from prolonged disuse. PMID:26032214

  8. A novel tool for continuous fracture aftercare - Clinical feasibility and first results of a new telemetric gait analysis insole.

    PubMed

    Braun, Benedikt J; Bushuven, Eva; Hell, Rebecca; Veith, Nils T; Buschbaum, Jan; Holstein, Joerg H; Pohlemann, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Weight bearing after lower extremity fractures still remains a highly controversial issue. Even in ankle fractures, the most common lower extremity injury no standard aftercare protocol has been established. Average non weight bearing times range from 0 to 7 weeks, with standardised, radiological healing controls at fixed time intervals. Recent literature calls for patient-adapted aftercare protocols based on individual fracture and load scenarios. We show the clinical feasibility and first results of a new, insole embedded gait analysis tool for continuous monitoring of gait, load and activity. Ten patients were monitored with a new, independent gait analysis insole for up to 3 months postoperatively. Strict 20 kg partial weight bearing was ordered for 6 weeks. Overall activity, load spectrum, ground reaction forces, clinical scoring and general health data were recorded and correlated. Statistical analysis with power analysis, t-test and Spearman correlation was performed. Only one patient completely adhered to the set weight bearing limit. Average time in minutes over the limit was 374 min. Based on the parameters load, activity, gait time over 20 kg weight bearing and maximum ground reaction force high and low performers were defined after 3 weeks. Significant difference in time to painless full weight bearing between high and low performers was shown. Correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between weight bearing and clinical scoring as well as pain (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Score rs=0.74; Olerud-Molander Score rs=0.93; VAS pain rs=-0.95). Early, continuous gait analysis is able to define aftercare performers with significant differences in time to full painless weight bearing where clinical or radiographic controls could not. Patient compliance to standardised weight bearing limits and protocols is low. Highly individual rehabilitation patterns were seen in all patients. Aftercare protocols should be adjusted to real

  9. Motor Learning Abilities Are Similar in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Compared to Controls as Assessed by Adaptation to Unilateral Leg-Weighting during Gait: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Diane L.; Stanley, Christopher J.; Bulea, Thomas C.; Park, Hyung Soon

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) demonstrate high response variability to motor training insufficiently accounted for by age or severity. We propose here that differences in the inherent ability to learn new motor tasks may explain some of this variability. Damage to motor pathways involving the cerebellum, which may be a direct or indirect effect of the brain injury for many with CP, has been shown to adversely affect the ability to learn new motor tasks and may be a potential explanation. Classic adaptation paradigms that evaluate cerebellar integrity have been utilized to assess adaptation to gait perturbations in adults with stroke, traumatic brain injury and other neurological injuries but not in children with CP. Materials and Methods: A case-control study of 10 participants with and 10 without hemiplegic CP within the age range of 5–20 years was conducted. Mean age of participants in the CP group was slightly but not significantly higher than controls. Step length and swing time adaptation, defined as gradual accommodation to a perturbation, and aftereffects, or maintenance of the accommodation upon removal of the perturbation, to unilateral leg weighing during treadmill gait were quantified to assess group differences in learning. Results: Adaptation and aftereffects were demonstrated in step length across groups with no main effect for group. In CP, the dominant leg had a greater response when either leg was weighted. Swing time accommodated immediately (no adaptation) in the weighted leg only, with the non-dominant leg instead showing a more pronounced response in CP. Discussion: This group of participants with unilateral CP did not demonstrate poorer learning or retention similar to reported results in adult stroke. Deficits, while not found here, may become evident in those with other etiologies or greater severity of CP. Our data further corroborate an observation from the stroke literature that repeated practice of exaggerating the

  10. Reductions in knee joint forces with weight loss are attenuated by gait adaptations in class III obesity.

    PubMed

    DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-03-01

    A consensus exists that high knee joint forces are a precursor to knee osteoarthritis and weight loss reduces these forces. Because large weight loss also leads to increased step length and walking velocity, knee contact forces may be reduced less than predicted by the magnitude of weight loss. The purpose was to determine the effects of weight loss on knee muscle and joint loads during walking in Class III obese adults. We determined through motion capture, force platform measures and biomechanical modeling the effects of weight loss produced by gastric bypass surgery over one year on knee muscle and joint loads during walking at a standard, controlled velocity and at self-selected walking velocities. Weight loss equaling 412 N or 34% of initial body weight reduced maximum knee compressive force by 824 N or 67% of initial body weight when walking at the controlled velocity. These changes represent a 2:1 reduction in knee force relative to weight loss when walking velocity is constrained to the baseline value. However, behavioral adaptations including increased stride length and walking velocity in the self-selected velocity condition attenuated this effect by ∼50% leading to a 392 N or 32% initial body weight reduction in compressive force in the knee joint. Thus, unconstrained walking elicited approximately 1:1 ratio of reduction in knee force relative to weight loss and is more indicative of walking behavior than the standard velocity condition. In conclusion, massive weight loss produces dramatic reductions in knee forces during walking but when patients stride out and walk faster, these favorable reductions become substantially attenuated.

  11. Effect of recovery from muscle strength imbalance in lower limb using four point weight bearing reduction system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Jeong, Ho Choon; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the improvement of muscle strength imbalance in the lower limbs using a four point weight bearing reduction system with a two-belt treadmill. Participants, each having differences in muscle function of the left and right legs of over 20%, were divided into two groups of ten. The participants were involved in experiments progressing 40 minutes per day, 3 days per week, during a period of 4 weeks. The maximal peak torque and average power were measured for testing joint torque in the hip, knee and ankle. The results showed the improvement of muscle imbalance as assessed by the maximal muscle strength was the most effective in the hip joint, while the improvement of muscular reaction was the most effective in the knee joint. We suggest that the method of weight bearing reduction could be sufficient to reduce muscle imbalance in the lower limbs.

  12. Muscle Strength and Weight-Bearing Symmetry Relate to Sit-to-Stand Performance in Individuals with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lomaglio, Melanie J.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of lower extremity joint torques and weight-bearing symmetry to sit-to-stand (STS) performance in individuals with chronic stroke. A motion analysis system and two force plates measured STS duration and weight-bearing symmetry (determined by ground reaction forces) during three self-paced and three fast-paced conditions. An isokinetic dynamometer measured maximum concentric joint torques of the paretic and nonparetic ankle, knee, and hip, which were normalized by body mass. Pearson correlations indicated that (a) paretic ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension torques related to the duration of the self-paced STS condition (r = −0.450, −0.716, respectively), (b) paretic ankle dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, and knee extension torques related to the duration of the fast-paced STS condition (r = −0.466, −0.616, −0.736, respectively), and (c) greater weight-bearing symmetry related to faster STS performance for both self-paced and fast-paced STS conditions (r = −0.565, −0.564, respectively) (p < 0.05). This evidence suggests that paretic muscle strength and the ability to load the paretic limb are important factors underlying the ability to rise from a chair in individuals with chronic stroke. PMID:16139747

  13. Muscle strength and weight-bearing symmetry relate to sit-to-stand performance in individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Lomaglio, Melanie J; Eng, Janice J

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship of lower extremity joint torques and weight-bearing symmetry to sit-to-stand (STS) performance in individuals with chronic stroke. A motion analysis system and two force plates measured STS duration and weight-bearing symmetry (determined by ground reaction forces) during three self-paced and three fast-paced conditions. An isokinetic dynamometer measured maximum concentric joint torques of the paretic and non-paretic ankle, knee, and hip, which were normalized by body mass. Pearson correlations indicated that (a) paretic ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension torques related to the duration of the self-paced STS condition (r = -0.450, -0.716, respectively), (b) paretic ankle dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, and knee extension torques related to the duration of the fast-paced STS condition (r = -0.466, -0.616, -0.736, respectively), and (c) greater weight-bearing symmetry related to faster STS performance for both self-paced and fast-paced STS conditions (r = -0.565, -0.564, respectively) (P < 0.05). This evidence suggests that paretic muscle strength and the ability to load the paretic limb are important factors underlying the ability to rise from a chair in individuals with chronic stroke.

  14. Synergistic ablation does not affect atrophy or altered myosin heavy chain expression in the non-weight bearing soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, J. K.; Talmadge, R. J.; Gosselink, K. L.; Tri, P. N.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the soleus muscle undergoes atrophy and alterations in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition during non-weight bearing in the absence of synergists. Thirty-two female rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), synergistic ablation (ABL) of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles to overload the soleus muscle, hindlimb suspension (HLS), or a combination of synergistic ablation and hindlimb suspension (HLS-ABL). After 28 days of hindlimb suspension, soleus atrophy was more pronounced in HLS (58%) than in HLS-ABL (43%) rats. Compared to C rats, non-weight bearing decreased mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC 49%, 45%, and 7%, respectively, in HLS animals. In addition, de novo expression of fast Type IIx and Type IIb MHC (5% and 2%, respectively) was observed in HLS animals. Similarly, when compared to C rats, mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC decreased 43%, 46%, and 4%, respectively, in HLS-ABL animals. Also, de novo expression of Type IIx (4%) and IIb (1%) MHC was observed. Collectively, these data indicate that the loss of muscle protein and Type I MHC, and the de novo expression of Type IIx and Type IIb MHC in the rat soleus occur independently of the presence of synergists during non-weight bearing. Furthermore, these results confirm the contention that soleus mass and MHC expression are highly sensitive to alterations in mechanical load.

  15. Bone Marrow Lesions and Joint Effusion are Strongly and Independently Associated with Weight-Bearing Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lo, GH; McAlindon, TE; Niu, J; Zhang, Y; Beals, C; Dabrowski, C; Hellio Le Graverand, MP; Hunter, DJ

    2009-01-01

    Objective It is widely believed that there are multiple sources of pain at a tissue level in osteoarthritis (OA). MRIs provide a wealth of anatomic information and may allow identification of specific features associated with pain. We hypothesized that in knees with OA, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), synovitis, and effusion would be associated with weight-bearing and (less so with) non-weight-bearing pain independently. Methods In a cross-sectional study of persons with symptomatic knee OA using univariate and multivariate logistic regressions with maximal BML, effusion, and synovitis defined by Boston Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score as predictors, and knee pain using weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index pain questions as the outcome, we tested the association between MRI findings and knee symptoms Results 160 participants, mean age 61 (±9.9), mean BMI 30.3 (±4.7) and 50% female, stronger associations were seen with weight-bearing compared with non-weight-bearing knee pain with adjusted risk ratios (RRs) of weight-bearing knee pain, for increasing maximal BML scores of 1.0 (referent) (maximal BML = 0), 1.2, 1.9, and 2.0 (p for trend = 0.006). For effusion scores, adjusted ORs of knee pain were 1.0, 1.7, 2.0, and 2.6 (p for trend = 0.0004); and for synovitis scores, adjusted ORs were 1.0, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.9 (p for trend = 0.22). Conclusion Cross-sectionally, maximal BML and effusion scores are independently associated with weight-bearing and less so with non-weight-bearing knee pain, supporting the idea that pain in OA is multifactorial. These MRI features should be considered as possible new treatment targets in knee OA. PMID:19583959

  16. Biofeedback rehabilitation of posture and weight-bearing distribution in stroke: a center of foot pressure analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Zucchella, Chiara; Spicciato, Francesca; Tortola, Paolo; Vecchione, Carmine; Pierelli, Francesco; Bartolo, Michelangelo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Weight bearing on the paretic lower extremity and transfer of weight from one lower extremity to the other are important goals of stroke rehabilitation. Improvements in these limb loading and weight transfer abilities have been shown to relate to improved performance of many functional activities. Unfortunately, valid and practical clinical measures of paretic lower extremity loading and weight transfer have not been identified. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess, through center of foot pressure (CoP) analysis of quiet upright stance control, recovery of paretic limb loading as a measure of weight transfer in early stroke subjects, testing the effectiveness of a targeted rehabilitation intervention based on audio-visual biofeedback. Thirty-seven adults with lower extremity motor impairment following unilateral, non-cerebellar stroke, were tested twice, at an interval of at least one month post stroke and following rehabilitation intervention aimed at correcting their asymmetrical weight bearing. The intervention was performed with (Study Group, SG) or without (Control Group, CG) a postural audio-visual biofeedback approach. Indices of postural stability and of balance control asymmetry were estimated by acquiring the movements of the CoP during quiet upright stance condition with or without visual input (eyes open, EO and eyes closed, EC). Clinical scales were also administered. Both the CG and the SG subjects showed improved control in upright stance posture as documented by significant improvements in the scale scores and indices of stability during both the EO and the EC condition. Only the SG showed a significantly reduced CoP index of asymmetry. The CoP index of asymmetry, correlating with clinical motor scales, is a valid measure of paretic limb loading during stroke recovery. Postural audio-visual biofeedback represented the more effective approach for reducing weight loading asymmetry of the lower limbs in stroke. PMID:25306123

  17. Gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Chester, Victoria L; Biden, Edmund N; Tingley, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Gait analysis, or the study of locomotion, has changed dramatically over the last few decades. Advances in computer technology and data analysis techniques have contributed greatly to the progress of this field. Gait analysis has become a valuable tool in the clinical setting. The ability to objectively quantify motion is essential to our understanding of normal and abnormal movement patterns and the evaluation of treatment effectiveness. This paper will discuss the various experimental and analytical techniques currently used for performing clinical gait analyses at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

  18. Human Muscle Protein Synthetic Responses during Weight-Bearing and Non-Weight-Bearing Exercise: A Comparative Study of Exercise Modes and Recovery Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Pasiakos, Stefan M.; McClung, Holly L.; Margolis, Lee M.; Murphy, Nancy E.; Lin, Gregory G.; Hydren, Jay R.; Young, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of conventional endurance (CE) exercise and essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation on protein turnover are well described. Protein turnover responses to weighted endurance exercise (i.e., load carriage, LC) and EAA may differ from CE, because the mechanical forces and contractile properties of LC and CE likely differ. This study examined muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and whole-body protein turnover in response to LC and CE, with and without EAA supplementation, using stable isotope amino acid tracer infusions. Forty adults (mean ± SD, 22 ± 4 y, 80 ± 10 kg, VO2peak 4.0 ± 0.5 L∙min-1) were randomly assigned to perform 90 min, absolute intensity-matched (2.2 ± 0.1 VO2 L∙m-1) LC (performed on a treadmill wearing a vest equal to 30% of individual body mass, mean ± SD load carried 24 ± 3 kg) or CE (cycle ergometry performed at the same absolute VO2 as LC) exercise, during which EAA (10 g EAA, 3.6 g leucine) or control (CON, non-nutritive) drinks were consumed. Mixed-muscle and myofibrillar MPS were higher during exercise for LC than CE (mode main effect, P < 0.05), independent of dietary treatment. EAA enhanced mixed-muscle and sarcoplasmic MPS during exercise, regardless of mode (drink main effect, P < 0.05). Mixed-muscle and sarcoplasmic MPS were higher in recovery for LC than CE (mode main effect, P < 0.05). No other differences or interactions (mode x drink) were observed. However, EAA attenuated whole-body protein breakdown, increased amino acid oxidation, and enhanced net protein balance in recovery compared to CON, regardless of exercise mode (P < 0.05). These data show that, although whole-body protein turnover responses to absolute VO2-matched LC and CE are the same, LC elicited a greater muscle protein synthetic response than CE. PMID:26474292

  19. Muscle glucose uptake in the rat after suspension with single hindlimb weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Fregosi, Ralph F.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the effect of nonweight-bearing conditions, and the systemic influences of simulated microgravity on rat hindlimb muscles. The results obtained suggest that the increases in hindlimb muscle glucose uptake and extracellular space associated with simulated microgravity persist with hindlimb weightbearing, despite the prevention of muscle atrophy. The mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for these effects are currently unknown.

  20. Bone loss during partial weight bearing (1/6th gravity) is mitigated by resistance and aerobic exercise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, R. D.; Metzger, C. E.; Macias, B. R.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Hogan, H. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Astronauts on long duration missions continue to experience bone loss, as much as 1-2% each month, for up to 4.5 years after a mission. Mechanical loading of bone with exercise has been shown to increase bone formation, mass, and geometry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two exercise protocols during a period of reduced gravitational loading (1/6th body weight) in mice. Since muscle contractions via resistance exercise impart the largest physiological loads on the skeleton, we hypothesized that resistance training (via vertical tower climbing) would better protect against the deleterious musculoskeletal effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing when compared to endurance exercise (treadmill running). Young adult female BALB/cBYJ mice were randomly assigned to three groups: 1/6 g (G/6; n=6), 1/6 g with treadmill running (G/6+RUN; n=8), or 1/6 g with vertical tower climbing (G/6+CLB; n=9). Exercise was performed five times per week. Reduced weight bearing for 21 days was achieved through a novel harness suspension system. Treadmill velocity (12-20 m/min) and daily run time duration (32-51 min) increased incrementally throughout the study. Bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at proximal metaphysis and mid-diaphysis tibia were assessed by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 21 and standard dynamic histomorphometry was performed on undemineralized sections of the mid-diaphysis after tissue harvest. G/6 caused a significant decrease (P<0.001) in proximal tibia metaphysis total vBMD (-9.6%). These reductions of tibia metaphyseal vBMD in G/6 mice were mitigated in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB groups (P<0.05). After 21 days of G/6, we saw an absolute increase in tibia mid-diaphysis vBMD and in distal metaphysis femur vBMD in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB mice (P<0.05). Substantial increases in endocortical and periosteal mineralizing surface (MS/BS) at mid-diaphysis tibia in G/6+CLB demonstrate that

  1. The effect of weight bearing on bone mineral density and bone growth in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Choi, Jung Hwa; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Im, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The present study aims to explore the effect of weight bearing exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone growth in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Twelve children with CP of functional level of gross motor functional classification scale (GMFCS) V and 6 healthy children (control group) were included in the study. Participants underwent a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan to measure the BMD of the femur and full-length anteroposterior radiography to measure the bone length of the femur and tibia at baseline and after 6 months. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: group A with programmed standing exercises and assisted standing for more than 2 hours a day, more than 5 days a week; and group B with conventional physiotherapy with a standing program for 20 minutes a day, 2 to 3 days a week. Results: A 6-month follow-up showed significantly increased BMD on the femur neck in the control group. Although the changes in BMD were not significant in both groups, group A demonstrated an increased trend of BMD, whereas group B showed a decreased trend. Bone length was significantly increased in all 3 groups at the 6-month follow-up. Although this increase was not significant, the change in bone length was greatest in the control group. The smallest changes were observed in group B. Conclusions: Weight bearing exercise may play an important role in increasing or maintaining BMD in children with CP and is also expected to promote bone growth. Programmed standing may be used as an effective treatment method to increase BMD in children with CP. However, further studies with a larger cohort and longer follow-up period are required to reveal further information on the benefit of weight bearing exercise and to develop a detailed program. PMID:28272197

  2. Combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for the assessment of in vivo knee joint kinematics under full weight-bearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Al Hares, Ghaith; Eschweiler, Jörg; Radermacher, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    The development of detailed and specific knowledge on the biomechanical behavior of loaded knee structures has received increased attention in recent years. Stress magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been introduced in previous work to study knee kinematics under load conditions. Previous studies captured the knee movement either in atypical loading supine positions, or in upright positions with help of inclined supporting backrests being insufficient for movement capture under full-body weight-bearing conditions. In this work, we used a combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for measurement and assessment in knee kinematics under full-body weight-bearing in single legged stance. The proposed method is based on registration of high-resolution static magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in supine position with low-resolution data, quasi-static upright-magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in loaded positions for different degrees of knee flexion. The proposed method was applied for the measurement of tibiofemoral kinematics in 10 healthy volunteers. The combined magnetic resonance imaging approach allows the non-invasive measurement of knee kinematics in single legged stance and under physiological loading conditions. We believe that this method can provide enhanced understanding of the loaded knee kinematics.

  3. Resurfacing weight bearing areas of the heel. The role of the dorsalis pedis innervated free tissue transfer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Zuker, R M; Manktelow, R T

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of chronic ulceration following skin graft resurfacing of the weight bearing surface of the heel are presented. All were managed with debridement and coverage with a free innervated dorsalis pedis tissue transfer. The technical refinements that have contributed to the reliability of the flap include careful distal identification of the first dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) and division of the dorsalis pedis artery (DPA) under direct vision below the takeoff of the FDMA. Donor site morbidity has been minimized by taking care to preserve the extensor paratenon as a bed for the subsequent skin graft and by immobilization of the donor foot with plaster and bed rest for 10 days. Four of the patients were followed for 2, 4, 4, and 6 years; one was lost to follow-up. All were active with protective sensation in their flaps. No instances of flap breakdown and no significant donor site morbidity were noted. The dorsalis pedis innervated free tissue transfer is recommended as a reliable procedure for resurfacing weight bearing areas of the foot when simpler methods have failed.

  4. Effect of spaceflight on the non-weight-bearing bones of rat skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Russell, J. E.; Winter, F.; Tran Van, P.; Vignery, A.; Baron, R.; Rosenberg, G. D.; Walker, W. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the integrated growth and remodeling of nonweight-bearing bones (the mandibles, teeth, and ribs) were studied. Rats prelabeled with tetracycline to mark the surfaces of bone and tooth formation were subjected to spaceflight conditions for 18.5 days, followed by further injections of tetracycline on days 6 and 29 postflight.Results show that spaceflight conditions did not alter the rate of periosteal bone formation in the ribs and regions of the mandibles covered by masticatory muscles, although bone formation-calcification rates were found to be impaired at those sites in the jaw that had no contiguous muscle (molar region). The remodeling activity on the alveolar bone around the buccal roots of the molar teeth was found to be significantly reduced. While total Ca, P, and hydroxyproline concentrations in the jaws, incisors, and ribs were normal after spaceflight, it was determined that weightless conditions caused a delay in the maturation of bone mineral and matrix in the jaws. These anomalies were found to be corrected by 29 days postflight. These results indicate that most of the nonweight-bearing bones of the rat skeleton are at risk to the effects of weightlessness.

  5. "Grow the Beard, Wear the Costume": Resisting Weight and Sexual Orientation Stigmas in the Bear Subculture.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Patrick B

    2016-12-01

    Being gay and being overweight are two stigmatized statuses in the United States. A range of work has considered the experience of being stigmatized and the consequences of stereotypes for overweight individuals and sexual minorities, but less research has examined the intersection of these two stigmas among larger gay men or collective efforts to resist such stigma. This study qualitatively examines a subculture of gay men, the bears, to test theoretical models of stigma resistance. The analysis demonstrates the transferability of stigma resistance among multiple stigmatized attributes and the use of multiple strategies to resist one stigma. At the same time, it shows how subcultural dynamics both aid and undermine the resistance toward stigma, and the risk of reinforcing stigma's effect through criticizing others who embody a stereotype. The results also demonstrate how resistance strategies are both empowering and psychologically taxing for stigmatized individuals.

  6. Two Patients with Osteochondral Injury of the Weight-Bearing Portion of the Lateral Femoral Condyle Associated with Lateral Dislocation of the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Atsumi, Satoru; Ichimaru, Shohei; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Complications of patellar dislocation include osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle and patella. Most cases of osteochondral injury occur in the anterior region, which is the non-weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle. We describe two patients with osteochondral injury of the weight-bearing surface of the lateral femoral condyle associated with lateral dislocation of the patella. The patients were 18- and 11-year-old females. Osteochondral injury occurred on the weight-bearing surface distal to the lateral femoral condyle. The presence of a free osteochondral fragment and osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle was confirmed on MRI and reconstruction CT scan. Treatment consisted of osteochondral fragment fixation or microfracture, as well as patellar stabilization. Osteochondral injury was present in the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in both patients, suggesting that the injury was caused by friction between the patella and lateral femoral condyle when the patella was dislocated or reduced at about 90° flexion of the knee joint. These findings indicate that patellar dislocation may occur and osteochondral injury may extend to the weight-bearing portion of the femur even in deep flexion, when the patella is stabilized on the bones of the femoral groove. PMID:25506015

  7. Metric analysis of loading magnitudes at articular and non-articular weight-bearing surfaces in human calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Mahato, Niladri Kumar; Murthy, S Sathiya Narayana

    2013-03-01

    The calcaneus is axially loaded at its articular interface with the talus. A large bulk of this load is transmitted to the ground across the non-articular tubercles at the plantar surface of the bone. A small part of the incumbent load sustained by the calcaneus is directed towards the forefoot at the calcaneo-cuboid junction. This study investigates the proportion of load distributed across the articular and non-articular surfaces of the calcaneus. The present study demonstrates strong and significant correlation between some of the load bearing variables and suggests the need for further investigations to understand the effect of angular aspects of axial loading on the calcaneus. Accounting for the relative distribution of weight across the articular and non-articular areas may enable us to appreciate the internal trabecular structure of the calcaneus in light of its clinical importance.

  8. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  9. Study of the Polycarbonate-Urethane/Metal Contact in Different Positions during Gait Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, a growing number of young and more active patients receive hip replacement. More strenuous activities in such patients involve higher friction and wear rates, with friction on the bearing surface being crucial to ensure arthroplasty survival in the long term. Over the last years, the polycarbonate-urethane has offered a feasible alternative to conventional bearings. A finite element model of a healthy hip joint was developed and adjusted to three gait phases (heel strike, mid-stance, and toe-off), serving as a benchmark for the assessment of the results of joint replacement model. Three equivalent models were made with the polycarbonate-urethane Tribofit system implanted, one for each of the three gait phases, after reproducing a virtual surgery over the respective healthy models. Standard body-weight loads were considered: 230% body-weight toe-off, 275% body-weight mid-stance, and 350% body-weight heel strike. Contact pressures were obtained for the different models. When comparing the results corresponding to the healthy model to polycarbonate-urethane joint, contact areas are similar and so contact pressures are within a narrower value range. In conclusion, polycarbonate-urethane characteristics are similar to those of the joint cartilage. So, it is a favorable alternative to traditional bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty, especially in young patients. PMID:25247180

  10. Evaluation of a bisphosphonate enriched ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for enhanced total joint replacement bearing surface functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright-Walker, Cassandra Jane

    Each year in the United States there is an increasing trend of patients receiving total joint replacement (TJR) procedures. Approximately a half million total knee replacements (TKRs) are performed annually in the United States with increasing prevalence attributed to baby-boomers, obesity, older, and younger patients. This trend is also seen for total hip replacements (THRs) as well. The use of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) inserts in TJRs results in wear particle-induced osteolysis, which is the predominant cause for prosthesis failure and revision surgery. Sub-micron size particle generation is inevitable despite the numerous efforts in improving this bearing material. Work by others has shown that the use of oral and intravenous systemic bisphosphonates (BP) can significantly minimize periprosthetic osteolysis. However, the systemic delivery and the high solubility of BPs results in a predominant portion of the drug being excreted via the kidney without reaching its target, bone. This doctoral research project is focused on the development and evaluation of a novel method to administer BPs locally using the inherent wear of UHMWPE for possible use as an anti-osteolysis treatment. For new materials to be considered, they must be mechanically and tribologically comparable to the current gold standard, UHMWPE. In order to evaluate this material, mechanical, drug elution and tribological experiments were performed to allow assessment of material properties. Tensile tests showed comparable yield stress and pin-on-disk testing showed comparable wear to standard virgin UHMWPE. Further, drug elution tests have shown that BP was released from the enriched material both in static and dynamic conditions. Additionally, an aggressive 2 million cycle total knee simulator experiment has shown statistically similar wear results for the two materials. Overall, this research has provided the groundwork for further characterization and development of a new

  11. Improved gait recognition by gait dynamics normalization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyi; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2006-06-01

    Potential sources for gait biometrics can be seen to derive from two aspects: gait shape and gait dynamics. We show that improved gait recognition can be achieved after normalization of dynamics and focusing on the shape information. We normalize for gait dynamics using a generic walking model, as captured by a population Hidden Markov Model (pHMM) defined for a set of individuals. The states of this pHMM represent gait stances over one gait cycle and the observations are the silhouettes of the corresponding gait stances. For each sequence, we first use Viterbi decoding of the gait dynamics to arrive at one dynamics-normalized, averaged, gait cycle of fixed length. The distance between two sequences is the distance between the two corresponding dynamics-normalized gait cycles, which we quantify by the sum of the distances between the corresponding gait stances. Distances between two silhouettes from the same generic gait stance are computed in the linear discriminant analysis space so as to maximize the discrimination between persons, while minimizing the variations of the same subject under different conditions. The distance computation is constructed so that it is invariant to dilations and erosions of the silhouettes. This helps us handle variations in silhouette shape that can occur with changing imaging conditions. We present results on three different, publicly available, data sets. First, we consider the HumanlD Gait Challenge data set, which is the largest gait benchmarking data set that is available (122 subjects), exercising five different factors, i.e., viewpoint, shoe, surface, carrying condition, and time. We significantly improve the performance across the hard experiments involving surface change and briefcase carrying conditions. Second, we also show improved performance on the UMD gait data set that exercises time variations for 55 subjects. Third, on the CMU Mobo data set, we show results for matching across different walking speeds. It is worth

  12. [Metabolic effects of physical countermeasures against deficient weight-bearing in an experiment with 7-day immersion].

    PubMed

    Markin, A A; Zhuravleva, O A; Morukov, B V; Zabolotskaia, I V; Vostrikova, L V; Kuzichkin, D S

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic effects of physical countermeasures against deficient weight-loading were studied in three groups of 21-30 y.o. volunteers for 7-d dry immersion. Blood serum was investigated for 38 biochemical parameters that characterize myocardium, skeletal musculature, hepatobiliary system, kidney, pancreas, GI tract, prostate, and protein-nucleic, carbohydrate, electrolyte and mineral metabolism. Seven-day DI w/o countermeasures (n = 5) increased concentration of conjugated bilirubin, suppressed activities of muscular (creatine phosphokinase MM) and myocardial enzymes (CPK MB, OBDH), and caused an upward trend in cholesterol, its atherogenic LDP fraction and triglycerides. Mechanic sole stimulation (n = 6) intensified, within the physiological norm, erythrocyte hematolysis raising total bilirubin and potassium. Despite the stimulation, activity of muscle and myocardial enzymes made a decrease. Blood creatinine decreased to a less extent than in the immersed group w/o stimulation, however, lipid parameters did not rise. High-frequency stimulation of the lower leg and hip muscles in the course of immersion (n = 5) was noted to heighten the activity of muscle enzymes and potassium level in blood beyond the physiological norm. Change in creatinine did not reach a statistical significance and lipid metabolism parameters were not different from baseline values. Application of these physical methods of counteracting deficiency of weight bearing did not interfere with redistribution of body liquids due to immersion. Values of the parameters under study were mostly within the normal limits throughout the experimental exposure suggesting absence of pathological developments during DI or in consequence of physical stimulation. Therefore, the reactions were obviously of normal adaptive character.

  13. Phasic-to-tonic shift in trunk muscle activity relative to walking during low-impact weight bearing exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Nick; Gibbon, Karl; Hibbs, Angela; Evetts, Simon; Debuse, Dorothée

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an exercise device, designed to improve the function of lumbopelvic muscles via low-impact weight-bearing exercise, on electromyographic (EMG) activity of lumbopelvic, including abdominal muscles. Surface EMG activity was collected from lumbar multifidus (LM), erector spinae (ES), internal oblique (IO), external oblique (EO) and rectus abdominis (RA) during overground walking (OW) and exercise device (EX) conditions. During walking, most muscles showed peaks in activity which were not seen during EX. Spinal extensors (LM, ES) were more active in EX. Internal oblique and RA were less active in EX. In EX, LM and ES were active for longer than during OW. Conversely, EO and RA were active for a shorter duration in EX than OW. The exercise device showed a phasic-to-tonic shift in activation of both local and global lumbopelvic muscles and promoted increased activation of spinal extensors in relation to walking. These features could make the exercise device a useful rehabilitative tool for populations with lumbopelvic muscle atrophy and dysfunction, including those recovering from deconditioning due to long-term bed rest and microgravity in astronauts.

  14. A comparison between the dimensions of positive transtibial residual limb molds prepared by air pressure casting and weight-bearing casting methods

    PubMed Central

    Hajiaghaei, Behnam; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Creating a socket with proper fit is an important factor to ensure the comfort and control of prosthetic devices. Several techniques are commonly used to cast transtibial stumps but their effect on stump shape deformation is not well understood. This study compares the dimensions, circumferences and volumes of the positive casts and also the socket comfort between two casting methods. Our hypothesis was that the casts prepared by air pressure method have less volume and are more comfortable than those prepared by weight bearing method. Methods: Fifteen transtibial unilateral amputees participated in the study. Two weight bearing and air pressure casting methods were utilized for their residual limbs. The diameters and circumferences of various areas of the residual limbs and positive casts were compared. The volumes of two types of casts were measured by a volumeter and compared. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the sockets fit comfort. Results: Circumferences at 10 and 15 cm below the patella on the casts were significantly smaller in air pressure casting method compared to the weight bearing method (p=0.00 and 0.01 respectively). The volume of the cast in air pressure method was lower than that of the weight bearing method (p=0.006). The amputees found the fit of the sockets prepared by air pressure method more comfortable than the weight bearing sockets (p=0.015). Conclusion: The air pressure casting reduced the circumferences of the distal portion of residual limbs which has more soft tissue and because of its snug fit it provided more comfort for amputees, according to the VAS measurements. PMID:27390711

  15. Marker-free motion correction in weight-bearing cone-beam CT of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Berger, M.; Müller, K.; Aichert, A.; Unberath, M.; Thies, J.; Choi, J.-H.; Fahrig, R.; Maier, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To allow for a purely image-based motion estimation and compensation in weight-bearing cone-beam computed tomography of the knee joint. Methods: Weight-bearing imaging of the knee joint in a standing position poses additional requirements for the image reconstruction algorithm. In contrast to supine scans, patient motion needs to be estimated and compensated. The authors propose a method that is based on 2D/3D registration of left and right femur and tibia segmented from a prior, motion-free reconstruction acquired in supine position. Each segmented bone is first roughly aligned to the motion-corrupted reconstruction of a scan in standing or squatting position. Subsequently, a rigid 2D/3D registration is performed for each bone to each of K projection images, estimating 6 × 4 × K motion parameters. The motion of individual bones is combined into global motion fields using thin-plate-spline extrapolation. These can be incorporated into a motion-compensated reconstruction in the backprojection step. The authors performed visual and quantitative comparisons between a state-of-the-art marker-based (MB) method and two variants of the proposed method using gradient correlation (GC) and normalized gradient information (NGI) as similarity measure for the 2D/3D registration. Results: The authors evaluated their method on four acquisitions under different squatting positions of the same patient. All methods showed substantial improvement in image quality compared to the uncorrected reconstructions. Compared to NGI and MB, the GC method showed increased streaking artifacts due to misregistrations in lateral projection images. NGI and MB showed comparable image quality at the bone regions. Because the markers are attached to the skin, the MB method performed better at the surface of the legs where the authors observed slight streaking of the NGI and GC methods. For a quantitative evaluation, the authors computed the universal quality index (UQI) for all bone regions

  16. Defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis: an evaluation of methods.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Baker, Richard; Lamoreux, Larry W

    2006-08-01

    Minimising measurement variability associated with hip axial rotation and avoiding knee joint angle cross-talk are two fundamental objectives of any method used to define the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis. The aim of this experiment was to compare three different methods of defining this axis: the knee alignment device (KAD) method, a method based on the transepicondylar axis (TEA) and an alternative numerical method (Dynamic). The former two methods are common approaches that have been applied clinically in many quantitative gait analysis laboratories; the latter is an optimisation procedure. A cohort of 20 subjects performed three different functional tasks (normal gait; squat; non-weight bearing knee flexion) on repeated occasions. Three-dimensional hip and knee angles were computed using the three alternative methods of defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis. The repeatability of hip axial rotation measurements during normal gait was found to be significantly better for the Dynamic method (p<0.01). Furthermore, both the variance in the knee varus-valgus kinematic profile and the degree of knee joint angle cross-talk were smallest for the Dynamic method across all functional tasks. The Dynamic method therefore provided superior results in comparison to the KAD and TEA-based methods and thus represents an attractive solution for orientating the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis.

  17. Radiographic and functional results in the treatment of early stages of Charcot neuroarthropathy with a walker boot and immediate weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro; Godoy-Santos, Alexandre Leme; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan; Sposeto, Rafael Barban; Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Nery, Marcia; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the most common gold standards for the treatment of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) in the early Eichenholtz stages I and II is immobilization with the total contact casting and lower limb offloading. However, the total amount of offloading is still debatable. Objectives This study evaluates the clinical and radiographic findings in the treatment of early stages of CN (Eichenholtz stages I and II) with a walker boot and immediate total weight-bearing status. Methods Twenty-two patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and CN of Eichenholtz stages I and II were selected for non-operative treatment. All patients were educated about their condition, and full weight bearing was allowed as tolerated. Patients were monitored on a fortnightly basis in the earlier stages, with clinical examination, temperature measurement, and standardized weight-bearing radiographs. Their American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores were determined before and after the treatment protocol. Results No cutaneous ulcerations or infections were observed in the evaluated cases. The mean measured angles at the beginning and end of the study, although showing relative increase, did not present a statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). Mean AOFAS scores showed a statistically significant improvement by the end of the study (p < 0.005). Conclusion The treatment of early stages of CN (Eichenholtz stages I and II) with emphasis on walker boot and immediate weight bearing has shown a good functional outcome, non-progressive deformity on radiographic assessment, and promising results as a safe treatment option. PMID:24179634

  18. Balancing the Rates of New Bone Formation and Polymer Degradation Enhances Healing of Weight-Bearing Allograft/Polyurethane Composites in Rabbit Femoral Defects

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Jerald E.; Prieto, Edna M.; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J.; Guda, Teja; Wenke, Joseph C.; Bible, Jesse; Holt, Ginger E.

    2014-01-01

    There is a compelling clinical need for bone grafts with initial bone-like mechanical properties that actively remodel for repair of weight-bearing bone defects, such as fractures of the tibial plateau and vertebrae. However, there is a paucity of studies investigating remodeling of weight-bearing bone grafts in preclinical models, and consequently there is limited understanding of the mechanisms by which these grafts remodel in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of the rates of new bone formation, matrix resorption, and polymer degradation on healing of settable weight-bearing polyurethane/allograft composites in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model. The grafts induced progressive healing in vivo, as evidenced by an increase in new bone formation, as well as a decrease in residual allograft and polymer from 6 to 12 weeks. However, the mismatch between the rates of autocatalytic polymer degradation and zero-order (independent of time) new bone formation resulted in incomplete healing in the interior of the composite. Augmentation of the grafts with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 not only increased the rate of new bone formation, but also altered the degradation mechanism of the polymer to approximate a zero-order process. The consequent matching of the rates of new bone formation and polymer degradation resulted in more extensive healing at later time points in all regions of the graft. These observations underscore the importance of balancing the rates of new bone formation and degradation to promote healing of settable weight-bearing bone grafts that maintain bone-like strength, while actively remodeling. PMID:23941405

  19. The effects of ankle mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain and flexibility in pronated-foots subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ki-Seok; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to analyze the effects mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain, and flexibility in pronated-foot subjects. The subjects of this study were 16 chronic low back pain patients. They were randomly divided into the control and experimental group. The experimental group had used the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle active stretching three times per week, for 4 weeks. The control group did same method without an ankle mobilization. The range of flexion and extension motion of the lumbar vertebrae and low back pain degree and difference of weight-bearing were measured before and after the experiment. The model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot significantly improved the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. And the visual analogue scale and distribution of weight-bearing were decreased in both of two groups. In other word, the exercise of this study showed that the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot had positive effects on improving the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. The calf muscle stretching was easy and it is effective in therapy that patients by themselves and helped to recover the balance of the vertebrae to combine ankle mobilization and muscle stretching. PMID:24278874

  20. The effects of ankle mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain and flexibility in pronated-foots subjects.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki-Seok; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to analyze the effects mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain, and flexibility in pronated-foot subjects. The subjects of this study were 16 chronic low back pain patients. They were randomly divided into the control and experimental group. The experimental group had used the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle active stretching three times per week, for 4 weeks. The control group did same method without an ankle mobilization. The range of flexion and extension motion of the lumbar vertebrae and low back pain degree and difference of weight-bearing were measured before and after the experiment. The model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot significantly improved the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. And the visual analogue scale and distribution of weight-bearing were decreased in both of two groups. In other word, the exercise of this study showed that the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot had positive effects on improving the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. The calf muscle stretching was easy and it is effective in therapy that patients by themselves and helped to recover the balance of the vertebrae to combine ankle mobilization and muscle stretching.

  1. Insulin, not glutamine dipeptide, reduces lipases expression and prevents fat wasting and weight loss in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Hely; Silva, Flaviane de Fatima; da Silva, Francemilson Goulart; Silva, Milene Ortiz; Graciano, Maria Fernanda Rodrigues; Martins, Maria Isabel Lovo; Rafael Carpinelli, Ângelo; Mazucco, Tânia Longo; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; de Souza, Helenir Medri

    2017-04-05

    Cachexia is the main cause of mortality in advanced cancer patients. We investigated the effects of insulin (INS) and glutamine dipeptide (GDP), isolated or associated, on cachexia and metabolic changes induced by Walker 256 tumor in rats. INS (NPH, 40 UI/kg, sc) or GDP (1.5g/kg, oral gavage) was once-daily administered during 11 days after tumor cell inoculation. GDP, INS or INS+GDP treatments did not influence the tumor growth. However, INS and INS+GDP prevented retroperitoneal fat wasting and body weight loss of tumor-bearing rats. In consistency, INS and INS+GDP prevented the increased expression of triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), without changing the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue of tumor-bearing rats. INS and INS+GDP also prevented anorexia and hyperlactatemia of tumor-bearing rats. However, INS and INS+GDP accentuated the loss of muscle mass (gastrocnemius, soleus and long digital extensor) without affecting the myostatin expression in the gastrocnemius muscle and blood corticosterone. GDP treatment did not promote beneficial effects. It can be concluded that treatment with INS (INS or INS + GDP), not with GDP, prevented fat wasting and weight loss in tumor-bearing rats without reducing tumor growth. These effects might be attributed to the reduction of lipases expression (ATGL and LHS) and increased food intake. The results show the physiological function of INS in the suppression of lipolysis, induced by cachexia mediators in tumor-bearing rats.

  2. Do external stimuli impact the gait of children with idiopathic toe walking? A study protocol for a within-subject randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cylie M; Michalitsis, Joanne; Murphy, Anna; Rawicki, Barry; Haines, Terry P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Frequently, toe walking gait is the result of disease processes, trauma or neurogenic influences. Idiopathic toe walking (ITW) is, by definition, the diagnosis of a toe walking gait adopted in the absence of one of these medical conditions. Long-term ITW has been associated with reduced ankle range of motion. Reported treatments have included serial casting, Botulinum toxin type A or surgery to improve the ankle range of motion. Investigating the impact of simple and non-invasive treatment options for ITW is important for future research and clinical outcomes. This study investigates the immediate impact of footwear, footwear with orthotics and whole body vibration on ITW to determine if any one intervention improves heel contact and spatial-temporal gait measures. This determination is important for future clinical trials into treatment effectiveness. Methods and analysis Design: this protocol describes a within-subject randomised controlled trial that measures changes in gait following changes in external stimuli. Participants: 15 children diagnosed with an ITW gait will be recruited from the Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation Service at Monash Children's Hospital Toe Walking Clinic provided they have ITW and meet the inclusion criteria. Procedure: participants will have their gait recorded walking barefoot, in usual footwear, a custom-made, full-length carbon fibre orthotic in usual footwear and following whole body vibration. Outcome measures will include the presence of bilateral heel contact preintervention and postintervention, stride length (cm), stride width (cm), left and right stride time (s), left and right stance and swing percentage of the gait cycle, gait velocity (m/s), left and right foot toe in/toe out angle (°) and weight-bearing lunge pre and post each condition. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will be published at the conclusion and have been approved by Southern Health HREC:12102B. Clinical trial registry

  3. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  4. Preoperative gait characterization of patients with ankle arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Khazzam, Michael; Long, Jason T; Marks, Richard M; Harris, Gerald F

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematic changes that occur about the foot and ankle during gait in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). By comparing a normal adult population with what was found in the DJD population we determined how the motion of theses groups differed, thereby characterizing how this pathology affects foot and ankle motion. A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used in conjunction with weight bearing radiographs to obtain three-dimensional motion of the foot and ankle during ambulation. The study was comprised of 34 patients and 35 ankles diagnosed with DJD (19 men and 15 women) of the ankle and 25 patients with normal ankles (13 men and 12 women). Dynamic foot and ankle motion was analyzed using the four-segment Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM). The data from this model resulted in three-dimensional (3D) kinematic parameters in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes as well as spatial-temporal parameters. Patient health status was evaluated using the SF-36 Health Survey and American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. The DJD group showed significant differences (p<0.001) as compared to normals with prolonged stance time, shortened stride length, reduced cadence and a walking speed which was only 66.96% of normal. Overall, kinematic data in the DJD cohort showed significant differences (p<0.001) in all planes of motion for tibial, hindfoot and forefoot motion as compared to normals. The average preoperative AOFAS hindfoot score was 26. DJD of the ankle results in decreased range of motion during gait. This decreased range of motion may be related to several factors including bony deformity, muscle weakness, and attempts to decrease the pain associated with weight bearing. To date there has not been a study which describes the effect of this disease process on motion of the foot and ankle. These findings may prove to be useful in the pre-operative assessment of these patients.

  5. Hardware Development and Locomotion Control Strategy for an Over-Ground Gait Trainer: NaTUre-Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Low, Kin Huat; Qu, Xingda; Lim, Hup Boon; Hoon, Kay Hiang

    2014-01-01

    Therapist-assisted body weight supported (TABWS) gait rehabilitation was introduced two decades ago. The benefit of TABWS in functional recovery of walking in spinal cord injury and stroke patients has been demonstrated and reported. However, shortage of therapists, labor-intensiveness, and short duration of training are some limitations of this approach. To overcome these deficiencies, robotic-assisted gait rehabilitation systems have been suggested. These systems have gained attentions from researchers and clinical practitioner in recent years. To achieve the same objective, an over-ground gait rehabilitation system, NaTUre-gaits, was developed at the Nanyang Technological University. The design was based on a clinical approach to provide four main features, which are pelvic motion, body weight support, over-ground walking experience, and lower limb assistance. These features can be achieved by three main modules of NaTUre-gaits: 1) pelvic assistance mechanism, mobile platform, and robotic orthosis. Predefined gait patterns are required for a robotic assisted system to follow. In this paper, the gait pattern planning for NaTUre-gaits was accomplished by an individual-specific gait pattern prediction model. The model generates gait patterns that resemble natural gait patterns of the targeted subjects. The features of NaTUre-gaits have been demonstrated by walking trials with several subjects. The trials have been evaluated by therapists and doctors. The results show that 10-m walking trial with a reduction in manpower. The task-specific repetitive training approach and natural walking gait patterns were also successfully achieved. PMID:27170876

  6. Validity of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board to assess weight bearing asymmetry during sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task.

    PubMed

    Abujaber, Sumayeh; Gillispie, Gregory; Marmon, Adam; Zeni, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with unilateral lower limb musculoskeletal pathologies. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) has been suggested as a low-cost and widely-available tool to measure weight bearing asymmetry in a clinical environment; however no study has evaluated the validity of this tool during dynamic tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of force measurements acquired from the WBB as compared to laboratory force plates. Thirty-five individuals before, or within 1 year of total joint arthroplasty performed a sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task in two conditions. First, subjects performed the task with both feet placed on a single WBB. Second, the task was repeated with each foot placed on an individual laboratory force plate. Peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) under each foot and the inter-limb symmetry ratio were calculated. Validity was examined using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), regression analysis, 95% limits of agreement and Bland-Altman plots. Force plates and the WBB exhibited excellent agreement for all outcome measurements (ICC=0.83-0.99). Bland-Altman plots showed no obvious relationship between the difference and the mean for the peak VGRF, but there was a consistent trend in which VGRF on the unaffected side was lower and VGRF on the affected side was higher when using the WBB. However, these consistent biases can be adjusted for by utilizing regression equations that estimate the force plate values based on the WBB force. The WBB may serve as a valid, suitable, and low-cost alternative to expensive, laboratory force plates for measuring weight bearing asymmetry in clinical settings.

  7. Validity Of The Nintendo Wii Balance Board To Assess Weight Bearing Asymmetry During Sit-To-Stand And Return-To-Sit Task

    PubMed Central

    Abujaber, Sumayeh; Gillispie, Gregory; Marmon, Adam; Zeni, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with unilateral lower limb musculoskeletal pathologies. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) has been suggested as a low-cost and widely-available tool to measure weight bearing asymmetry in a clinical environment; however no study has evaluated the validity of this tool during dynamic tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of force measurements acquired from the WBB as compared to laboratory force plates. Thirty-five individuals before, or within 1 year of total joint arthroplasty performed a sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task in two conditions. First, subjects performed the task with both feet placed on a single WBB. Second, the task was repeated with each foot placed on an individual laboratory force plate. Peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) under each foot and the inter-limb symmetry ratio were calculated. Validity was examined using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), regression analysis, 95% limits of agreement and Bland-Altman plots. Force plates and the WBB exhibited excellent agreement for all outcome measurements (ICC =0.83–0.99). Bland-Altman plots showed no obvious relationship between the difference and the mean for the peak VGRF, but there was a consistent trend in which VGRF on the unaffected side was lower and VGRF on the affected side was higher when using the WBB. However, these consistent biases can be adjusted for by utilizing regression equations that estimate the force plate values based on the WBB force. The WBB may serve as a valid, suitable, and low-cost alternative to expensive, laboratory force plates for measuring weight bearing asymmetry in clinical settings. PMID:25715680

  8. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and

  9. Biofeedback in Partial Weight Bearing: Usability of Two Different Devices from a Patient’s and Physical Therapist’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    van Lieshout, Remko; Pisters, Martijn F.; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; de Bie, Rob A.; Wouters, Eveline J.; Stukstette, Mirelle J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Partial weight bearing is frequently instructed by physical therapists in patients after lower-limb trauma or surgery. The use of biofeedback devices seems promising to improve the patient’s compliance with weight-bearing instructions. SmartStep and OpenGo-Science are biofeedback devices that provide real-time feedback. For a successful implementation, usability of the devices is a critical aspect and should be tested from a user’s perspective. Aim To describe the usability from the physical therapists’ and a patients’ perspective of Smartstep and OpenGo-Science to provide feedback on partial weight bearing during supervised rehabilitation of patients after lower-limb trauma or surgery. Methods In a convergent mixed-methods design, qualitative and quantitative data were collected. Usability was subdivided into user performance, satisfaction and acceptability. Patients prescribed with partial weight bearing and their physical therapists were asked to use SmartStep and OpenGo-Science during supervised rehabilitation. Usability was qualitatively tested by a think-aloud method and a semi-structured interview and quantitatively tested by the System-Usability-Scale (SUS) and closed questions. For the qualitative data thematic content analyses were used. Results Nine pairs of physical therapists and their patients participated. The mean SUS scores for patients and physical therapists were for SmartStep 70 and 53, and for OpenGo-Science 79 and 81, respectively. Scores were interpreted with the Curved Grading Scale. The qualitative data showed that there were mixed views and perceptions from patients and physical therapists on satisfaction and acceptability. Conclusion This study gives insight in the usability of two biofeedback devices from the patient’s and physical therapist’s perspective. The overall usability from both perspectives seemed to be acceptable for OpenGo-Science. For SmartStep, overall usability seemed only acceptable from the

  10. Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wang, Wenhua; Nilsberth, Camilla; Andersson, Marianne; Lönnroth, Christina; Smedh, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild-type (EP2+/+) or EP2-receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor-bearing EP2 knockout mice compared to tumor-bearing wild-type animals. Microarray profiling of the hypothalamus revealed a relative twofold change in expression of around 35 genes including mRNA transcripts coding for Phospholipase A2 and Prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) in EP2 receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. Prostaglandin D2 synthase levels were increased significantly in EP2 receptor knockouts, suggesting that improved food intake may depend on altered balance of prostaglandin production in hypothalamus since PGE2 and PGD2 display opposing effects in feeding control. PMID:26197930

  11. Gait analysis: clinical facts.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard; Esquenazi, Alberto; Benedetti, Maria G; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-08-01

    Gait analysis is a well-established tool for the quantitative assessment of gait disturbances providing functional diagnosis, assessment for treatment planning, and monitoring of disease progress. There is a large volume of literature on the research use of gait analysis, but evidence on its clinical routine use supports a favorable cost-benefit ratio in a limited number of conditions. Initially gait analysis was introduced to clinical practice to improve the management of children with cerebral palsy. However, there is good evidence to extend its use to patients with various upper motor neuron diseases, and to lower limb amputation. Thereby, the methodology for properly conducting and interpreting the exam is of paramount relevance. Appropriateness of gait analysis prescription and reliability of data obtained are required in the clinical environment. This paper provides an overview on guidelines for managing a clinical gait analysis service and on the principal clinical domains of its application: cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury and lower limb amputation.

  12. Three-dimensional gait analysis can shed new light on walking in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Sébastien; Detrembleur, Christine; Massaad, Firas; Hermans, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    In patients with haemophilia (PWH) (from Greek "blood love"), the long-term consequences of repeated haemarthrosis include cartilage damage and irreversible arthropathy, resulting in severe impairments in locomotion. Quantifying the extent of joint damage is therefore important in order to prevent disease progression and compare the efficacy of treatment strategies. Musculoskeletal impairments in PWH may stem from structural and functional abnormalities, which have traditionally been evaluated radiologically or clinically. However, these examinations are performed in a supine position (i.e., non-weight-bearing condition). We therefore suggest three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) as an innovative approach designed to focus on the functional component of the joint during the act of walking. This is of the utmost importance, as pain induced by weight-bearing activities influences the functional performance of the arthropathic joints significantly. This review endeavors to improve our knowledge of the biomechanical consequences of multiple arthropathies on gait pattern in adult patients with haemophilia using 3DGA. In PWH with arthropathy, the more the joint function was altered, the more the metabolic energy was consumed. 3DGA analysis could highlight the effect of an orthopedic disorder in PWH during walking. Indeed, mechanical and metabolic impairments were correlated to the progressive loss of active mobility into the joints.

  13. Low impact weight-bearing exercise in an upright posture increases the activation of two key local muscles of the lumbo-pelvic region.

    PubMed

    Debuse, Dorothée; Birch, Olivia; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Caplan, Nick

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of exercises have been used to improve the function of the lumbar multifidus (LM) and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles in people with low back pain, but uncertainty remains as to what exactly constitutes meaningful LM and TrA training. We examined the effects of exercising with a new device which combines weight-bearing, an unstable base of support (BOS) (feet), an upright posture with a relatively stable lumbo-pelvic area, and functional lower limb movement, with the aim of exploring which of these elements may be effective, in increasing LM and TrA muscle activity. Twelve non-symptomatic participants had ultrasound images taken of their LM and TrA during a range of conditions, including rest, traditional exercise approaches to LM and TrA recruitment, and exercising on the new device. Our results indicate that an unstable BOS on its own is not enough to increase LM and TrA activity, and that a combination of weight-bearing, an unstable BOS (feet), an upright posture with a relatively stable lumbo-pelvic area, and functional lower limb movement is most effective at increasing LM and TrA activity. This way of exercising appears to recruit LM more effectively than the widely used "swelling" of LM, and to cause automatic TrA and LM recruitment. Importantly, our findings also indicate LM and TrA may have slightly different roles during trunk stabilisation.

  14. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  15. The Pathomechanics Of Calcaneal Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, David H.; Cooper, Les

    1980-07-01

    The data acquisition system employed in our laboratory includes optical, electronic and computer subsystems. Three movie camera freeze the motion for analysis. The film is displayed on a motion analyzer, and the body segment positions are recorded in a three dimensional coordinate system with Graf/pen sonic digitizer. The angular rotations are calculated by computer and automatically plotted. The force plate provides measurements of vertical force, foreaft shear, medial-lateral shear, torque, and center of pressure. Electromyograms are superimposed upon gait movies to permit measurement of muscle phasic activity. The Hycam movie camera si-multaneously films (through separate lens) the subject and oscilloscope. Movement measurements, electromyograms, and floor reaction forces provide the data base for analysis. From a study of the gait changes in five normal subjects following tibial nerve block, and from additional studies of patients with paralysis of the ankle plantar flexors, the pathomechanics of calcaneal gait can be described. Inability to transfer weight to the forward part of the foot produces ankle instability and reduction of contralateral step length. Excessive drop of the center of mass necessitates com-pensatory increased lift energy output through the sound limb to restore the height of the center of mass. Excessive stance phase ankle dorsiflexion produces knee instability requiring prolonged quadriceps muscle phasic activity.

  16. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  17. Reliability of the measures of weight-bearing distribution obtained during quiet stance by digital scales in subjects with and without hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    de Araujo-Barbosa, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; de Menezes, Lidiane Teles; Costa, Abraão Souza; Couto Paz, Clarissa Cardoso Dos Santos; Fachin-Martins, Emerson

    2015-05-01

    Described as an alternative way of assessing weight-bearing asymmetries, the measures obtained from digital scales have been used as an index to classify weight-bearing distribution. This study aimed to describe the intra-test and the test/retest reliability of measures in subjects with and without hemiparesis during quiet stance. The percentage of body weight borne by one limb was calculated for a sample of subjects with hemiparesis and for a control group that was matched by gender and age. A two-way analysis of variance was used to verify the intra-test reliability. This analysis was calculated using the differences between the averages of the measures obtained during single, double or triple trials. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was utilized and data plotted using the Bland-Altman method. The intra-test analysis showed significant differences, only observed in the hemiparesis group, between the measures obtained by single and triple trials. Excellent and moderate ICC values (0.69-0.84) between test and retest were observed in the hemiparesis group, while for control groups ICC values (0.41-0.74) were classified as moderate, progressing from almost poor for measures obtained by a single trial to almost excellent for those obtained by triple trials. In conclusion, good reliability ranging from moderate to excellent classifications was found for participants with and without hemiparesis. Moreover, an improvement of the repeatability was observed with fewer trials for participants with hemiparesis, and with more trials for participants without hemiparesis.

  18. Effect of Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan's mobilization with movement group (n=12) and "weight-bearing with placebo" mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke.

  19. Analysis of trotter gait on the track by accelerometry and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Leleu, C; Gloria, E; Renault, G; Barrey, E

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the correlation between the phases of the limb cycle of trotters on the track and specific points on the acceleration curves obtained from a new gait analysis system. We compared kinematic data obtained by video image analysis and 3-dimensional acceleration recordings made on 3 French trotters in training. They trotted on a race track at speeds of 8.33, 10 and 11.66 m/s, with a final stretch at maximum speed. Their locomotion was recorded with a synchronised video camera at a frame frequency of 200 Hz and with the Equimétrix gait analysis system. The gait variables were calculated using 3-dimension acceleration data recorded at the sternum (dorso-ventral, longitudinal and lateral axes) at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Three phases of the stride were clearly identified on the dorsoventral acceleration signal: hoof-landing, midstance phase and toe-off. Braking and propulsion phases were identified on the corresponding longitudinal acceleration signal. The weight-bearing diagonal was identified by observing the lateral signal. The stride temporal variables (stride, stance, braking and propulsion durations for both diagonals), measured by video analysis and by acceleration signal analysis, were not significantly different (P>0.05). The identification of specific points on the acceleration pattern allowed an accurate temporal analysis of the stride. Potential applications could be the determination of locomotor factors related to racing performance or assessment of locomotor disorders at high speed.

  20. Effect of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan’s mobilization with movement group (n=12) and “weight-bearing with placebo” mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke. PMID:27630424

  1. [Antibiotics and gait disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porro, P; Vinagre-Aragon, A; Zabala-Goiburu, J A

    2016-12-01

    The neurological toxicity of many antibiotics has been reported in a number of articles and clinical notes. In this review antibiotics are classified according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that can give rise to a gait disorder, taking both clinical and experimental data into account. An exhaustive search was conducted in Google Scholar and PubMed with the aim of finding reviews, articles and clinical cases dealing with gait disorders secondary to different antibiotics. The different antibiotics were separated according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that could cause them to trigger a gait disorder. They were classified into antibiotics capable of producing cerebellar ataxia, vestibular ataxia, sensitive ataxia or an extrapyramidal gait disorder. The main aim was to group all the drugs that can give rise to a gait disorder, in order to facilitate the clinical suspicion and, consequently, the management of patients.

  2. Recognition using gait.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2007-09-01

    Gait or an individual's manner of walking, is one approach for recognizing people at a distance. Studies in psychophysics and medicine indicate that humans can recognize people by their gait and have found twenty-four different components to gait that taken together make it a unique signature. Besides not requiring close sensor contact, gait also does not necessarily require a cooperative subject. Using video data of people walking in different scenarios and environmental conditions we develop and test an algorithm that uses shape and motion to identify people from their gait. The algorithm uses dynamic time warping to match stored templates against an unknown sequence of silhouettes extracted from a person walking. While results under similar constraints and conditions are very good, the algorithm quickly degrades with varying conditions such as surface and clothing.

  3. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  4. Growth hormone, IGF-I, and exercise effects on non-weight-bearing fast muscles of hypophysectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, E. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Evans, J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) with or without exercise (ladder climbing) in countering the effects of unweighting on fast muscles of hypophysectomized rats during 10 days of hindlimb suspension were determined. Compared with untreated suspended rats, muscle weights were 16-29% larger in GH-treated and 5-15% larger in IGF-I-treated suspended rats. Exercise alone had no effect on muscle weights. Compared with ambulatory control, the medial gastrocnemius weight in suspended, exercised rats was larger after GH treatment and maintained with IGF-I treatment. The combination of GH or IGF-I plus exercise in suspended rats resulted in an increase in size of each predominant fiber type, i.e., types I, I + IIa and IIa + IIx, in the medial gastrocnemius compared with untreated suspended rats. Normal ambulation or exercise during suspension increased the proportion of fibers expressing embryonic myosin heavy chain in hypophysectomized rats. The phenotype of the medial gastrocnemius was minimally affected by GH, IGF-I, and/or exercise. These results show that there is an IGF-I, as well as a GH, and exercise interactive effect in maintaining medial gastrocnemius fiber size in suspended hypophysectomized rats.

  5. Proteomic Analysis Profile of Engineered Articular Cartilage with Chondrogenic Differentiated Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Loaded Polyglycolic Acid Mesh for Weight-Bearing Area Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lunli; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Yaohao; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Heng; Guo, Fangfang

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of full-thickness defects repair in porcine articular cartilage (AC) weight-bearing area using chondrogenic differentiated autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with a follow-up of 3 and 6 months, which is successive to our previous study on nonweight-bearing area. The isolated ASCs were seeded onto the phosphoglycerate/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) with chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2 weeks as the experimental group prior to implantation in porcine AC defects (8 mm in diameter, deep to subchondral bone), with PGA/PLA only as control. With follow-up time being 3 and 6 months, both neo-cartilages of postimplantation integrated well with the neighboring normal cartilage and subchondral bone histologically in experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue in control group. Immunohistochemical and toluidine blue staining confirmed similar distribution of COL II and glycosaminoglycan in the regenerated cartilage to the native one. A vivid remolding process with repair time was also witnessed in the neo-cartilage as the compressive modulus significantly increased from 70% of the normal cartilage at 3 months to nearly 90% at 6 months, which is similar to our former research. Nevertheless, differences of the regenerated cartilages still could be detected from the native one. Meanwhile, the exact mechanism involved in chondrogenic differentiation from ASCs seeded on PGA/PLA is still unknown. Therefore, proteome is resorted leading to 43 proteins differentially identified from 20 chosen two-dimensional spots, which do help us further our research on some committed factors. In conclusion, the comparison via proteome provided a thorough understanding of mechanisms implicating ASC differentiation toward chondrocytes, which is further substantiated by the present study as a perfect supplement to the former one in nonweight-bearing area. PMID:24044689

  6. Multidirectional transparent support for overground gait training.

    PubMed

    Vallery, H; Lutz, P; von Zitzewitz, J; Rauter, G; Fritschi, M; Everarts, C; Ronsse, R; Curt, A; Bolliger, M

    2013-06-01

    Gait and balance training is an essential ingredient for locomotor rehabilitation of patients with neurological impairments. Robotic overhead support systems may help these patients train, for example by relieving them of part of their body weight. However, there are only very few systems that provide support during overground gait, and these suffer from limited degrees of freedom and/or undesired interaction forces due to uncompensated robot dynamics, namely inertia. Here, we suggest a novel mechanical concept that is based on cable robot technology and that allows three-dimensional gait training while reducing apparent robot dynamics to a minimum. The solution does not suffer from the conventional drawback of cable robots, which is a limited workspace. Instead, displaceable deflection units follow the human subject above a large walking area. These deflection units are not actuated, instead they are implicitly displaced by means of the forces in the cables they deflect. This leads to an underactuated design, because the deflection units cannot be moved arbitrarily. However, the design still allows accurate control of a three-dimensional force vector acting on a human subject during gait. We describe the mechanical concept, the control concept, and we show first experimental results obtained with the device, including the force control performance during robot-supported overground gait of five human subjects without motor impairments.

  7. Technological Advances in Interventions to Enhance Post-Stroke Gait

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Lynne R.; Chae, John

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article provides a comprehensive review of specific rehabilitation interventions used to enhance hemiparetic gait following stroke. Neurologic rehabilitation interventions may be either therapeutic resulting in enhanced motor recovery or compensatory whereby assistance or substitution for neurological deficits results in improved functional performance. Included in this review are lower extremity functional electrical stimulation (FES), body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT), and lower extremity robotic-assisted gait training. These post-stroke gait training therapies are predicated on activity-dependent neuroplasticity which is the concept that cortical reorganization following central nervous system injury may be induced by repetitive, skilled, and cognitively engaging active movement. All three interventions have been trialed extensively in both research and clinical settings to demonstrate a positive effect on various gait parameters and measures of walking performance. However, more evidence is necessary to determine if specific technology-enhanced gait training methods are superior to conventional gait training methods. This review provides an overview of evidence-based research which supports the efficacy of these three interventions to improve gait, as well as provide perspective on future developments to enhance post-stroke gait in neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:23598265

  8. Gait or Walking Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... a device is justified,” says Dr. Aisen. Gait Research & Technology At present, people with walking limitations related to ... independent through physical therapy, exercise, medication, and assistive ... is optimistic that research being done in other conditions, such as spinal ...

  9. Importance of Gait Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... that the prosthetist and therapist remain in close communication when gait train- ing is occurring since any ... of these strategies to get the best outcome. Communication and teamwork between prosthetists and physical thera- pists ...

  10. Symmetrical gait descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunajewski, Adam; Dusza, Jacek J.; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The article presents a proposal for the description of human gait as a periodic and symmetric process. Firstly, the data for researches was obtained in the Laboratory of Group SATI in the School of Engineering of University of Valencia. Then, the periodical model - Mean Double Step (MDS) was made. Finally, on the basis of MDS, the symmetrical models - Left Mean Double Step and Right Mean Double Step (LMDS and RMDS) could be created. The method of various functional extensions was used. Symmetrical gait models can be used to calculate the coefficients of asymmetry at any time or phase of the gait. In this way it is possible to create asymmetry, function which better describes human gait dysfunction. The paper also describes an algorithm for calculating symmetric models, and shows exemplary results based on the experimental data.

  11. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  12. Gait analysis using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications.

  13. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Henning; Werner, Cordula; Bernhardt, Rolf; Hesse, Stefan; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Background Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. Results With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator) or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I). For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS) revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Conclusion Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles of motor relearning

  14. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  15. View Invariant Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Richard D.; Goffredo, Michela; Carter, John N.; Nixon, Mark S.

    Recognition by gait is of particular interest since it is the biometric that is available at the lowest resolution, or when other biometrics are (intentionally) obscured. Gait as a biometric has now shown increasing recognition capability. There are many approaches and these show that recognition can achieve excellent performance on current large databases. The majority of these approaches are planar 2D, largely since the early large databases featured subjects walking in a plane normal to the camera view. To extend deployment capability, we need viewpoint invariant gait biometrics. We describe approaches where viewpoint invariance is achieved by 3D approaches or in 2D. In the first group, the identification relies on parameters extracted from the 3D body deformation during walking. These methods use several video cameras and the 3D reconstruction is achieved after a camera calibration process. On the other hand, the 2D gait biometric approaches use a single camera, usually positioned perpendicular to the subject’s walking direction. Because in real surveillance scenarios a system that operates in an unconstrained environment is necessary, many of the recent gait analysis approaches are orientated toward view-invariant gait recognition.

  16. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjects in vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  17. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  18. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-02-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact.

  19. A Compact Forearm Crutch Based on Force Sensors for Aided Gait: Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Sevillano, José Luis; Ridao-Fernández, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, patients who suffer injuries in some lower member require forearm crutches in order to partially unload weight-bearing. These lesions cause pain in lower limb unloading and their progression should be controlled objectively to avoid significant errors in accuracy and, consequently, complications and after effects in lesions. The design of a new and feasible tool that allows us to control and improve the accuracy of loads exerted on crutches during aided gait is necessary, so as to unburden the lower limbs. In this paper, we describe such a system based on a force sensor, which we have named the GCH System 2.0. Furthermore, we determine the validity and reliability of measurements obtained using this tool via a comparison with the validated AMTI (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA) OR6-7-2000 Platform. An intra-class correlation coefficient demonstrated excellent agreement between the AMTI Platform and the GCH System. A regression line to determine the predictive ability of the GCH system towards the AMTI Platform was found, which obtained a precision of 99.3%. A detailed statistical analysis is presented for all the measurements and also segregated for several requested loads on the crutches (10%, 25% and 50% of body weight). Our results show that our system, designed for assessing loads exerted by patients on forearm crutches during assisted gait, provides valid and reliable measurements of loads. PMID:27338396

  20. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  1. Gait Training Interventions for Lower Extremity Amputees: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Highsmith, M Jason; Andrews, Casey R; Millman, Claire; Fuller, Ashley; Kahle, Jason T; Klenow, Tyler D; Lewis, Katherine L; Bradley, Rachel C; Orriola, John J

    2016-09-01

    Lower extremity (LE) amputation patients who use prostheses have gait asymmetries and altered limb loading and movement strategies when ambulating. Subsequent secondary conditions are believed to be associated with gait deviations and lead to long-term complications that impact function and quality of life as a result. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of evidence supporting gait training interventions and to formulate evidence statements to guide practice and research related to therapeutic gait training for lower extremity amputees. A systematic review of three databases was conducted followed by evaluation of evidence and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES). Eighteen manuscripts were included in the review, which covered two areas of gait training interventions: 1) overground and 2) treadmill-based. Eight EESs were synthesized. Four addressed overground gait training, one covered treadmill training, and three statements addressed both forms of therapy. Due to the gait asymmetries, altered biomechanics, and related secondary consequences associated with LE amputation, gait training interventions are needed along with study of their efficacy. Overground training with verbal or other auditory, manual, and psychological awareness interventions was found to be effective at improving gait. Similarly, treadmill-based training was found to be effective: 1) as a supplement to overground training; 2) independently when augmented with visual feedback and/or body weight support; or 3) as part of a home exercise plan. Gait training approaches studied improved multiple areas of gait, including sagittal and coronal biomechanics, spatiotemporal measures, and distance walked.

  2. Image-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unberath, Mathias; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We previously introduced four fiducial marker-based strategies to compensate for involuntary knee-joint motion during weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of the lower body. 2D methods showed significant reduction of motion- related artifacts, but 3D methods worked best. However, previous methods led to increased examination times and patient discomfort caused by the marker attachment process. Moreover, sub-optimal marker placement may lead to decreased marker detectability and therefore unstable motion estimates. In order to reduce overall patient discomfort, we developed a new image-based 2D projection shifting method. A C-arm cone-beam CT system was used to acquire projection images of five healthy volunteers at various flexion angles. Projection matrices for the horizontal scanning trajectory were calibrated using the Siemens standard PDS-2 phantom. The initial reconstruction was forward projected using maximum-intensity projections (MIP), yielding an estimate of a static scan. This estimate was then used to obtain the 2D projection shifts via registration. For the scan with the most motion, the proposed method reproduced the marker-based results with a mean error of 2.90 mm +/- 1.43 mm (compared to a mean error of 4.10 mm +/- 3.03 mm in the uncorrected case). Bone contour surrounding modeling clay layer was improved. The proposed method is a first step towards automatic image-based, marker-free motion-compensation.

  3. Visual analysis of the effects of load carriage on gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, Michael G.; Ward, James M.; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2005-03-01

    As early as the 1970's it was determined that gait, or the "manner of walking" is an identifying feature of a human being. Since then, extensive research has been done in the field of computer vision to determine how accurately a subject can be identified by gait characteristics. This has necessarily led to the study of how various data collection conditions, such as terrain type, varying camera angles, or a carried briefcase, may affect the identifying features of gait. However, little or no research has been done to question whether such conditions may be inferred from gait analysis. For example, is it possible to determine characteristics of the walking surface simply by looking at statistics derived from the subject's gait? The question to be addressed is whether significant concealed weight distributed on the subject's torso can be discovered through analysis of his gait. Individual trends in subjects in response to increasing concealed weight will be explored, with the objective of finding universal trends that would have obvious security purposes.

  4. Hindlimb Skeletal Muscle Function and Skeletal Quality and Strength in +/G610C Mice With and Without Weight-Bearing Exercise.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Youngjae; Carleton, Stephanie M; Gentry, Bettina A; Yao, Xiaomei; Ferreira, J Andries; Salamango, Daniel J; Weis, MaryAnn; Oestreich, Arin K; Williams, Ashlee M; McCray, Marcus G; Eyre, David R; Brown, Marybeth; Wang, Yong; Phillips, Charlotte L

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous heritable connective tissue disorder associated with reduced bone mineral density and skeletal fragility. Bone is inherently mechanosensitive, with bone strength being proportional to muscle mass and strength. Physically active healthy children accrue more bone than inactive children. Children with type I OI exhibit decreased exercise capacity and muscle strength compared with healthy peers. It is unknown whether this muscle weakness reflects decreased physical activity or a muscle pathology. In this study, we used heterozygous G610C OI model mice (+/G610C), which model both the genotype and phenotype of a large Amish OI kindred, to evaluate hindlimb muscle function and physical activity levels before evaluating the ability of +/G610C mice to undergo a treadmill exercise regimen. We found +/G610C mice hindlimb muscles do not exhibit compromised muscle function, and their activity levels were not reduced relative to wild-type mice. The +/G610C mice were also able to complete an 8-week treadmill regimen. Biomechanical integrity of control and exercised wild-type and +/G610C femora were analyzed by torsional loading to failure. The greatest skeletal gains in response to exercise were observed in stiffness and the shear modulus of elasticity with alterations in collagen content. Analysis of tibial cortical bone by Raman spectroscopy demonstrated similar crystallinity and mineral/matrix ratios regardless of sex, exercise, and genotype. Together, these findings demonstrate +/G610C OI mice have equivalent muscle function, activity levels, and ability to complete a weight-bearing exercise regimen as wild-type mice. The +/G610C mice exhibited increased femoral stiffness and decreased hydroxyproline with exercise, whereas other biomechanical parameters remain unaffected, suggesting a more rigorous exercise regimen or another exercise modality may be required to improve bone quality of OI mice.

  5. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  6. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation.

  7. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons. PMID:27725941

  8. Assessment of motion of a swing leg and gait rehabilitation with a gravity balancing exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sunil K; Banala, Sai K; Fattah, Abbas; Sangwan, Vivek; Krishnamoorthy, Vijaya; Scholz, John P; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2007-09-01

    The gravity balancing exoskeleton, designed at University of Delaware, Newark, consists of rigid links, joints and springs, which are adjustable to the geometry and inertia of the leg of a human subject wearing it. This passive exoskeleton does not use any motors but is designed to unload the human leg joints from the gravity load over its range-of-motion. The underlying principle of gravity balancing is to make the potential energy of the combined leg-machine system invariant with configuration of the leg. Additionally, parameters of the exoskeleton can be changed to achieve a prescribed level of gravity assistance, from 0% to 100%. The goal of the results reported in this paper is to provide preliminary quantitative assessment of the changes in kinematics and kinetics of the walking gait when a human subject wears such an exoskeleton. The data on kinematics and kinetics were collected on four healthy and three stroke patients who wore this exoskeleton. These data were computed from the joint encoders and interface torque sensors mounted on the exoskeleton. This exoskeleton was also recently used for a six-week training of a chronic stroke patient, where the gravity assistance was progressively reduced from 100% to 0%. The results show a significant improvement in gait of the stroke patient in terms of range-of-motion of the hip and knee, weight bearing on the hemiparetic leg, and speed of walking. Currently, training studies are underway to assess the long-term effects of such a device on gait rehabilitation of hemiparetic stroke patients.

  9. Gait in Very Preterm School-Aged Children in Dual-Task Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Manicolo, Olivia; Perkinson-Gloor, Nadine; Weber, Peter; Grob, Alexander; Lemola, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Objective The control of gait requires executive and attentional functions. As preterm children show executive and attentional deficits compared to full-term children, performing concurrent tasks that impose additional cognitive load may lead to poorer walking performance in preterm compared to full-term children. Knowledge regarding gait in preterm children after early childhood is scarce. We examined straight walking and if it is more affected in very preterm than in full-term children in dual-task paradigms. Study design Twenty preterm children with very low birth-weight (≤ 1500 g), 24 preterm children with birth-weight > 1500 g, and 44 full-term children, born between 2001 and 2006, were investigated. Gait was assessed using an electronic walkway system (GAITRite) while walking without a concurrent task (single-task) and while performing one concurrent (dual-task) or two concurrent (triple-task) tasks. Spatio-temporal gait parameters (gait velocity, cadence, stride length, single support time, double support time), normalized gait parameters (normalized velocity, normalized cadence, normalized stride length) and gait variability parameters (stride velocity variability, stride length variability) were analyzed. Results In dual- and triple-task conditions children showed decreased gait velocity, cadence, stride length, as well as increased single support time, double support time and gait variability compared to single-task walking. Further, results showed systematic decreases in stride velocity variability from preterm children with very low birth weight (≤ 1500 g) to preterm children with birth weight > 1500 g to full-term children. There were no significant interactions between walking conditions and prematurity status. Conclusions Dual and triple tasking affects gait of preterm and full-term children, confirming previous results that walking requires executive and attentional functions. Birth-weight dependent systematic changes in stride velocity

  10. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0870 TITLE: Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool...Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0870 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Rajankumar...produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities providing care for

  11. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities...providing care for wounded service members. In Phase I of the effort, significant work was completed at the University of Iowa Center for Computer- Aided ...Gait Training Tool Introduction The objective of our study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool (APGTT) to aid in

  12. Association between bone stiffness and nutritional biomarkers combined with weight-bearing exercise, physical activity, and sedentary time in preadolescent children. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Diana; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Gianfagna, Francesco; Konstabel, Kenn; Lissner, Lauren; Mårild, Staffan; Molnar, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A; Siani, Alfonso; Sioen, Isabelle; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity (PA) and micronutrients such as calcium (Ca), vitamin D (25OHD), and phosphate (PO) are important determinants of skeletal development. This case-control study examined the association of these nutritional biomarkers and different PA behaviours, such as habitual PA, weight-bearing exercise (WBE) and sedentary time (SED) with bone stiffness (SI) in 1819 2-9-year-old children from the IDEFICS study (2007-2008). SI was measured on the calcaneus using quantitative ultrasound. Serum and urine Ca and PO and serum 25OHD were determined. Children's sports activities were reported by parents using a standardised questionnaire. A subsample of 1089 children had accelerometer-based PA data (counts per minute, cpm). Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SED were estimated. Children with poor SI (below the 15th age-/sex-/height-specific percentile) were defined as cases (N=603). Randomly selected controls (N=1216) were matched by age, sex, and country. Odds ratios (OR) for poor SI were calculated by conditional logistic regression for all biomarkers and PA behaviour variables separately and combined (expressed as tertiles and dichotomised variables, respectively). ORs were adjusted for fat-free mass, dairy product consumption, and daylight duration. We observed increased ORs for no sports (OR=1.39, p<0.05), PA levels below 524 cpm (OR=1.85, p<0.05) and MVPA below 4.2% a day (OR=1.69, p<0.05) compared to WBE, high PA levels (<688 cpm) and high MVPA (6.7%), respectively. SED was not associated with SI. ORs were moderately elevated for low serum Ca and 25OHD. However, biomarkers were not statistically significantly associated with SI and did not modify the association between PA behaviours and SI. Although nutritional biomarkers appear to play a minor role compared to the osteogenic effect of PA and WBE, it is noteworthy that the highest risk for poor SI was observed for no sports or low MVPA combined with lower serum Ca (<2.5 mmol/l) or lower 25OHD (<43.0 nmol/l).

  13. Effects of weight-bearing exercise on a mini-trampoline on foot mobility, plantar pressure and sensation of diabetic neuropathic feet; a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanasamut, Wararom; Pensri, Praneet

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Foot and ankle exercise has been advocated as a preventative approach in reducing the risk of foot ulceration. However, knowledge about the appropriate types and intensity of exercise program for diabetic foot ulcer prevention is still limited. The current study aimed to examine the effects of an eight-week mini-trampoline exercise on improving foot mobility, plantar pressure and sensation of diabetic neuropathic feet. Methods: Twenty-one people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy who had impaired sensation perception were divided into two groups. The exercise group received a foot-care education program plus an eight-week home exercise program using the mini-trampoline (n = 11); whereas a control group received a foot-care education only (n = 10). Measurements were undertaken at the beginning, at the completion of the eight-week program and at a 20-week follow-up. Results: Both groups were similar prior to the study. Subjects in the exercise group significantly increased the range of the first metatarsophalangeal joint in flexion (left: p = 0.040, right: p = 0.012) and extension (left: p = 0.013) of both feet more than controlled subjects. There was a trend for peak plantar pressure at the medial forefoot to decrease in the exercise group (p = 0.016), but not in the control group. At week 20, the number of subjects in the exercise group who improved their vibration perception in their feet notably increased when compared to the control group (left: p = 0.043; right: p = 0.004). Conclusions: This is a preliminary study to document the improvements in foot mobility, plantar pressure and sensation following weight-bearing exercise on a flexible surface in people with diabetic neuropathic feet. Mini-trampoline exercise may be used as an adjunct to other interventions to reduce risk of foot ulceration. A larger sample size is needed to verify these findings. This trial is registered with COA No. 097.2/55. PMID:28326159

  14. Gait and balance disorders.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on one of the most common types of neurologic disorders: altered walking. Walking impairment often reflects disease of the neurologic structures mediating gait, balance or, most often, both. These structures are distributed along the neuraxis. For this reason, this chapter is introduced by a brief description of the neurobiologic underpinning of walking, stressing information that is critical for imaging, namely, the anatomic representation of gait and balance mechanisms. This background is essential not only in order to direct the relevant imaging tools to the regions more likely to be affected but also to interpret correctly imaging findings that may not be related to the walking deficit object of clinical study. The chapter closes with a discussion on how to image some of the most frequent etiologies causing gait or balance impairment. However, it focuses on syndromes not already discussed in other chapters of this volume, such as Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders, already discussed in Chapter 48, or cerebellar ataxia, in Chapter 23, in the previous volume. As regards vascular disease, the spastic hemiplegia most characteristic of brain disease needs little discussion, while the less well-understood effects of microvascular disease are extensively reviewed here, together with the imaging approach.

  15. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    PubMed Central

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-01-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact. PMID:28211509

  16. Expressing gait-line symmetry in able-bodied gait

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Piotr; Wit, Andrzej; Dudziński, Krzysztof; Nolan, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait-lines, or the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the vertical ground reaction force, are a commonly reported parameter in most in-sole measuring systems. However, little is known about what is considered a "normal" or "abnormal" gait-line pattern or level of asymmetry. Furthermore, no reference databases on healthy young populations are available for this parameter. Thus the aim of this study is to provide such reference data in order to allow this tool to be better used in gait analysis. Methods Vertical ground reaction force data during several continuous gait cycles were collected using a Computer Dyno Graphy in-sole system® for 77 healthy young able-bodied subjects. A curve (termed gait-line) was obtained from the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the force. An Asymmetry Coefficient Curve (AsC) was calculated between the mean gait-lines for the left and right foot for each subject. AsC limits of ± 1.96 and 3 standard deviations (SD) from the mean were then calculated. Gait-line data from 5 individual subjects displaying pathological gait due to disorders relating to the discopathy of the lumbar spine (three with considerable plantarflexor weakness, two with considerable dorsiflexor weakness) were compared to the AsC results from the able-bodied group. Results The ± 1.96 SD limit suggested that non-pathological gait falls within 12–16% asymmetry for gait-lines. Those exhibiting pathological gait fell outside both the ± 1.96 and ± 3SD limits at several points during stance. The subjects exhibiting considerable plantarflexor weakness all fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit from 30–50% of foot length to toe-off while those exhibiting considerable dorsiflexor weakness fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit between initial contact to 25–40% of foot length, and then surpassed the ± 3SD limit after 55–80% of foot length. Conclusion This analysis of gait-line asymmetry provides a reference

  17. Gait recognition and walking exercise intensity estimation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Liu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Chu; Jan, Gene Eu; Hsiao, Bo-Tang

    2014-04-04

    Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients' exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter the noise of patients' attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study.

  18. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. Part I. Numerical model-based optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keil, Andreas; Besier, Thor F.; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Maier, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    marker distribution in three scenarios. Results: Average optical-based translational motion for the nine subjects was 2.14 mm (±0.69 mm) and 2.29 mm (±0.63 mm) for the right and left knee, respectively. In the representative central slices of Subject 2, the authors observed 20.30%, 18.30%, and 22.02% improvements in the structural similarity (SSIM) index with 2D shifting, 2D warping, and 3D warping, respectively. The performance of 2D warping improved as the number of markers increased up to 12 while 2D shifting and 3D warping were insensitive to the number of markers used. The minimum required number of markers for 2D shifting, 2D warping, and 3D warping was 4–6, 12, and 8, respectively. An even distribution of markers over the entire field of view provided robust performance for all three correction methods. Conclusions: The authors were able to simulate subject-specific realistic knee movement in weight-bearing positions. This study indicates that involuntary motion can seriously degrade the image quality. The proposed three methods were evaluated with the numerical knee model; 3D warping was shown to outperform the 2D methods. The methods are shown to significantly reduce motion artifacts if an appropriate marker setup is chosen. PMID:24007156

  19. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  20. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  1. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  2. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  3. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  4. Effects of acceleration on gait measures in three horse gaits.

    PubMed

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Zarski, Lila; Aerts, Peter; Clayton, Hilary

    2015-05-01

    Animals switch gaits according to locomotor speed. In terrestrial locomotion, gaits have been defined according to footfall patterns or differences in center of mass (COM) motion, which characterizes mechanisms that are more general and more predictive than footfall patterns. This has generated different variables designed primarily to evaluate steady-speed locomotion, which is easier to standardize in laboratory conditions. However, in the ecology of an animal, steady-state conditions are rare and the ability to accelerate, decelerate and turn is essential. Currently, there are no data available that have tested whether COM variables can be used in accelerative or decelerative conditions. This study used a data set of kinematics and kinetics of horses using three gaits (walk, trot, canter) to evaluate the effects of acceleration (both positive and negative) on commonly used gait descriptors. The goal was to identify variables that distinguish between gaits both at steady state and during acceleration/deceleration. These variables will either be unaffected by acceleration or affected by it in a predictable way. Congruity, phase shift and COM velocity angle did not distinguish between gaits when the dataset included trials in unsteady conditions. Work (positive and negative) and energy recovery distinguished between gaits and showed a clear relationship with acceleration. Hodographs are interesting graphical representations to study COM mechanics, but they are descriptive rather than quantitative. Force angle, collision angle and collision fraction showed a U-shaped relationship with acceleration and seem promising tools for future research in unsteady conditions.

  5. GaitKeeper: A System for Measuring Canine Gait.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Cassim; O'Sullivan, Jack; Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy

    2017-02-08

    It is understood gait has the potential to be used as a window into neurodegenerative disorders, identify markers of subclinical pathology, inform diagnostic algorithms of disease progression and measure the efficacy of interventions. Dogs' gaits are frequently assessed in a veterinary setting to detect signs of lameness. Despite this, a reliable, affordable and objective method to assess lameness in dogs is lacking. Most described canine lameness assessments are subjective, unvalidated and at high risk of bias. This means reliable, early detection of canine gait abnormalities is challenging, which may have detrimental implications for dogs' welfare. In this paper, we draw from approaches and technologies used in human movement science and describe a system for objectively measuring temporal gait characteristics in dogs (step-time, swing-time, stance-time). Asymmetries and variabilities in these characteristics are of known clinical significance when assessing lameness but presently may only be assessed on coarse scales or under highly instrumented environments. The system consists an inertial measurement unit, containing a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope coupled with a standardized walking course. The measurement unit is attached to each leg of the dog under assessment before it is walked around the course. The data by the measurement unit is then processed to identify steps and subsequently, micro-gait characteristics. This method has been tested on a cohort of 19 healthy dogs of various breeds ranging in height from 34.2 cm to 84.9 cm. We report the system as capable of making precise step delineations with detections of initial and final contact times of foot-to-floor to a mean precision of 0.011 s and 0.048 s, respectively. Results are based on analysis of 12,678 foot falls and we report a sensitivity, positive predictive value and F-score of 0.81, 0.83 and 0.82 respectively. To investigate the effect of gait on system performance, the approach was tested

  6. Changes in Midbrain Pain Receptor Expression, Gait and Behavioral Sensitivity in a Rat Model of Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Priscilla Y; Allen, Kyle D; Shamji, Mohammed F; Jing, Liufang; Mata, Brian A; Gabr, Mostafa A; Huebner, Janet L; Kraus, Virginia B; Richardson, William J; Setton, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation may contribute to inflammatory processes that associate with radicular pain and motor deficits. Molecular changes at the affected dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord, and even midbrain, have been documented in rat models of radiculopathy or nerve injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate gait and the expression of key pain receptors in the midbrain in a rodent model of radiculopathy. Radiculopathy was induced by harvesting tail nucleus pulposus (NP) and placing upon the right L5 DRG in rats (NP-treated, n=12). Tail NP was discarded in sham-operated animals (n=12). Mechanical allodynia, weight-bearing, and gait were evaluated in all animals over time. At 1 and 4 weeks after surgery, astrocyte and microglial activation was tested in DRG sections. Midbrain sections were similarly evaluated for immunoreactivity to serotonin (5HT2B), mu-opioid (µ-OR), and metabotropic glutamate (mGluR4 and 5) receptor antibodies. NP-treated animals placed less weight on the affected limb 1 week after surgery and experienced mechanical hypersensitivity over the duration of the study. Astroctye activation was observed at DRGs only at 4 weeks after surgery. Findings for pain receptors in the midbrain of NP-treated rats included an increased expression of 5HT2B at 1, but not 4 weeks; increased expression of µ-OR and mGluR5 at 1 and 4 weeks (periaqueductal gray region only); and no changes in expression of mGluR4 at any point in this study. These observations provide support for the hypothesis that the midbrain responds to DRG injury with a transient change in receptors regulating pain responses. PMID:22962568

  7. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  8. Terminology and forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy; Young, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The use of appropriate terminology is a fundamental aspect of forensic gait analysis. The language used in forensic gait analysis is an amalgam of that used in clinical practice, podiatric biomechanics and the wider field of biomechanics. The result can often be a lack of consistency in the language used, the definitions used and the clarity of the message given. Examples include the use of 'gait' and 'walking' as synonymous terms, confusion between 'step' and 'stride', the mixing of anatomical, positional and pathological descriptors, and inability to describe appropriately movements of major body segments such as the torso. The purpose of this paper is to share the well-established definitions of the fundamental parameters of gait, common to all professions, and advocate their use in forensic gait analysis to establish commonality. The paper provides guidance on the selection and use of appropriate terminology in the description of gait in the forensic context. This paper considers the established definitions of the terms commonly used, identifies those terms which have the potential to confuse readers, and suggests a framework of terminology which should be utilised in forensic gait analysis.

  9. The Latest Lessons Learned from Retrieval Analyses of Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene, Metal-on-Metal, and Alternative Bearing Total Disc Replacements.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven M; Toth, Jeffrey M; Siskey, Ryan; Ciccarelli, Lauren; Macdonald, Dan; Isaza, Jorge; Lanman, Todd; Punt, Ilona; Steinbeck, Marla; Goffin, Jan; van Ooij, André

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge regarding the in vivo performance and periposthetic tissue response of cervical and lumbar total disc replacements (TDRs) continues to expand. This review addresses the following four main questions: 1) What are the latest lessons learned from polyethylene in large joints and how are they relevant to current TDRs? 2) What are the latest lessons learned regarding adverse local tissue reactions from metal-on-metal, CoCr bearings in large joints and how are they relevant to current TDRs? 3) What advancements have been made in understanding the in vivo performance of alternative biomaterials, such as stainless steel and polycarbonate urethane, for TDRs in the past five years? 4) How has retrieval analysis of all these various artificial disc bearing technologies advanced the state of the art in preclinical testing of TDRs? The study of explanted artificial discs and their associated tissues can help inform bearing selection as well as the design of future generations of disc arthroplasty. Analyzing retrieved artificial discs is also essential for validating preclinical test methods.

  10. Gait Training Interventions for Lower Extremity Amputees: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Highsmith, M. Jason; Andrews, Casey R.; Millman, Claire; Fuller, Ashley; Kahle, Jason T.; Klenow, Tyler D.; Lewis, Katherine L.; Bradley, Rachel C.; Orriola, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity (LE) amputation patients who use prostheses have gait asymmetries and altered limb loading and movement strategies when ambulating. Subsequent secondary conditions are believed to be associated with gait deviations and lead to long-term complications that impact function and quality of life as a result. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of evidence supporting gait training interventions and to formulate evidence statements to guide practice and research related to therapeutic gait training for lower extremity amputees. A systematic review of three databases was conducted followed by evaluation of evidence and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES). Eighteen manuscripts were included in the review, which covered two areas of gait training interventions: 1) overground and 2) treadmill-based. Eight EESs were synthesized. Four addressed overground gait training, one covered treadmill training, and three statements addressed both forms of therapy. Due to the gait asymmetries, altered biomechanics, and related secondary consequences associated with LE amputation, gait training interventions are needed along with study of their efficacy. Overground training with verbal or other auditory, manual, and psychological awareness interventions was found to be effective at improving gait. Similarly, treadmill-based training was found to be effective: 1) as a supplement to overground training; 2) independently when augmented with visual feedback and/or body weight support; or 3) as part of a home exercise plan. Gait training approaches studied improved multiple areas of gait, including sagittal and coronal biomechanics, spatiotemporal measures, and distance walked. PMID:28066520

  11. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  12. Patient-specific walking pattern simulation in a gait trajectory guiding device.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Kamrul; Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Seung-Hun; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Khang, Gon

    2009-01-01

    Repetitive training is of much importance for restoring full-fledged gait ability. At present, task-specific repetitive approach has been proved to be the most effective motor learning concept. In this regard, a gait trajectory guiding device with partial body weight support system can be a solution for gait rehabilitation. This paper presents a complete gait study with an objective to implement the motion of a natural walking pattern in the automated foot-boards of a gait trajectory guiding device. In our developed motion algorithm of foot-boards we have concentrated on adaptation of patient-specific true walking trajectory, determination of variable velocity pattern along different degrees of freedom and time-division for simulating different phases of a complete gait cycle. Gait database, collected from disparate sources and previous gait-studies have been used for kinetic and kinematic analysis of human walking. We have modeled those data based on the previous researches done in this area and adopt them for our motion algorithm. A precise velocity pattern and time-division have been described along different axes so that patient's biofeedback and postural stability in different walking phases can be recorded accordingly and motion-correction of the foot-boards can be done in consecutive cycles through iterative learning control algorithm with the help of motion sensors.

  13. Human olfactory mesenchymal stromal cell transplants promote remyelination and earlier improvement in gait co‐ordination after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Susan L.; Toft, Andrew; Griffin, Jacob; M. M. Emraja, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Autologous cell transplantation is a promising strategy for repair of the injured spinal cord. Here we have studied the repair potential of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from the human olfactory mucosa after transplantation into a rodent model of incomplete spinal cord injury. Investigation of peripheral type remyelination at the injury site using immunocytochemistry for P0, showed a more extensive distribution in transplanted compared with control animals. In addition to the typical distribution in the dorsal columns (common to all animals), in transplanted animals only, P0 immunolabelling was consistently detected in white matter lateral and ventral to the injury site. Transplanted animals also showed reduced cavitation. Several functional outcome measures including end‐point electrophysiological testing of dorsal column conduction and weekly behavioural testing of BBB, weight bearing and pain, showed no difference between transplanted and control animals. However, gait analysis revealed an earlier recovery of co‐ordination between forelimb and hindlimb stepping in transplanted animals. This improvement in gait may be associated with the enhanced myelination in ventral and lateral white matter, where fibre tracts important for locomotion reside. Autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells from the olfactory mucosa may therefore be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of spinal cord injury. GLIA 2017 GLIA 2017;65:639–656 PMID:28144983

  14. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  15. Immunostimulatory activities of a low molecular weight antitumoral polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei Murill (LMPAB) in Sarcoma 180 ascitic tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ying-Cai; Liu, Ji-Cheng; Zhao, Xue-Mei; Su, Fu-Qin; Cui, Hong-Xia

    2009-07-01

    LMPAB is a linear beta-(1-3)-glucan we isolated from polysaccharide extract of Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM). Effects of LMPAB on splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity, splenocyte proliferation, index of spleen and thymus, IFN-gamma expression in spleen and the concentration of IL-12, IL-18 and TNF-alpha in serum of S180 ascitic tumor-bearing mice were detected. The results showed that intraperitoneal injection of LMPAB (100 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) significantly increased the thymus index. LMPAB augmented splenic NK cell activity in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). The concanavalin A (3 microg/ ml) stimulated splenocyte proliferation was significantly enhanced by LMPAB at dosages of 50, 100 or 200 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1). Further studies showed that LMPAB (50, 100 or 200 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1), 14d) significantly increased the production of IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-18 and the expression IFN-gamma as determined by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the anti-tumor effects of LMPAB are closely associated with up-regulation of activity of NK cells, expression of IFN-gamma in spleen and the systemic level of IL-12, IL-18 and TNF-alpha in tumor-bearing mice.

  16. GAS BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  17. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  18. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  19. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  20. Development of hybrid bearing system with thrust superconducting magnetic bearing and radial active electromagnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolsky, R.; Pereira, A. S.; de Andrade, R.; David, D. F. B.; Santisteban, J. A.; Stephan, R. M.; Ripper, A.; Gawalek, W.; Habisreuther, T.; Strasser, T.

    A superconducting/electromagnetic hybrid bearing system is currently under development and test. This system consists of a thrust superconducting magnetic bearing and a double radial active electromagnetic bearing/motor devices. The thrust bearing has been designed using NdFeB permanent magnets levitating on a set of superconducting monoliths of YBCO, prepared by top seeded melt texturing technique, which supports the weight of the rotor. The bearing/motor devices were conceived as 4-pole 2-phase induction machine using stator windings for delivering torque and radial positioning simultaneously. Using this superconducting axial bearing and the active bearings for the rotor radial positioning, a fully levitating vertical-shaft inductive machine has been tested. The tests were successful in reaching a controlled levitation up to 6,300 rpm.

  1. Gait disturbances in dystrophic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Thomas G; Kale, Ajit; Amende, Ivo; Tang, Wenlong; McCue, Scott; Bhagavan, Hemmi N; VanDongen, Case G

    2011-01-01

    The delta-sarcoglycan-deficient hamster is an excellent model to study muscular dystrophy. Gait disturbances, important clinically, have not been described in this animal model. We applied ventral plane videography (DigiGait) to analyze gait in BIO TO-2 dystrophic and BIO F1B control hamsters walking on a transparent treadmill belt. Stride length was ∼13% shorter (P < .05) in TO-2 hamsters at 9 months of age compared to F1B hamsters. Hindlimb propulsion duration, an indicator of muscle strength, was shorter in 9-month-old TO-2 (247 ± 8 ms) compared to F1B hamsters (272 ± 11 ms; P < .05). Braking duration, reflecting generation of ground reaction forces, was delayed in 9-month-old TO-2 (147 ± 6 ms) compared to F1B hamsters (126 ± 8 ms; P < .05). Hindpaw eversion, evidence of muscle weakness, was greater in 9-month-old TO-2 than in F1B hamsters (17.7 ± 1.2° versus 8.7 ± 1.6°; P < .05). Incline and decline walking aggravated gait disturbances in TO-2 hamsters at 3 months of age. Several gait deficits were apparent in TO-2 hamsters at 1 month of age. Quantitative gait analysis demonstrates that dystrophic TO-2 hamsters recapitulate functional aspects of human muscular dystrophy. Early detection of gait abnormalities in a convenient animal model may accelerate the development of therapies for muscular dystrophy.

  2. Differences in implementation of gait analysis recommendations based on affiliation with a gait laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tishya A L; Elihu, Koorosh J; Mansour, Shaun; Rethlefsen, Susan A; Ryan, Deirdre D; Smith, Michelle L; Kay, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the extent to which gait analysis recommendations are followed by orthopedic surgeons with varying degrees of affiliation with the gait laboratory. Surgical data were retrospectively examined for 95 patients with cerebral palsy who underwent lower extremity orthopedic surgery following gait analysis. Thirty-three patients were referred by two surgeons directly affiliated with the gait laboratory (direct affiliation), 44 were referred by five surgeons from the same institution but not directly affiliated with the gait laboratory (institutional affiliation), and 18 were referred by 10 surgeons from other institutions (no affiliation). Data on specific surgeries were collected from the gait analysis referral, gait analysis report, and operative notes. Adherence to the gait analysis recommendations was calculated by dividing the number of procedures where the surgery followed the gait analysis recommendation (numerator) by the total number of procedures initially planned, recommended by gait analysis, or done (denominator). Adherence with the gait analysis recommendations was 97%, 94%, and 77% for the direct, institutional, and no affiliation groups, respectively. Procedures recommended for additions to the surgical plan were added 98%, 87%, and 77% of the time. Procedures recommended for elimination were dropped 100%, 89%, and 88% of the time. Of 81 patients who had specific surgical plans prior to gait analysis, changes were implemented in 84% (68/81) following gait analysis recommendations. Gait analysis influences the treatment decisions of surgeons regardless of affiliation with the gait laboratory, although the influence is stronger for surgeons who practice within the same institution as the gait laboratory.

  3. Energy Expenditure During Cane-Assisted Gait in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anamaria; Alves, Ana Claudia Monteiro; de Oliveira, Leda Magalhães; Saad, Marcelo; Natour, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the energy expenditure in patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis while walking with canes of different lengths. METHODS A quasi-experimental study (single-group) was carried out on thirty patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis. An adjustable aluminum cane was used, and three different cane lengths were determined for each subject: C1 – length from the floor to the greater trochanter; C2 – length from the floor to the distal wrist crease; and C3 – length obtained by the formula: height x 0.45 + 0.87 m. Resting and walking heart rates were measured with a Polar hear rate meter. Walking speed was calculated by the time required for the patient to walk 10 m. Gait energy cost was estimated using the physiological cost index, and results were compared. RESULTS The sample consisted of 25 women and five men (average age of 68 years). Statistically significant differences in physiological cost index measurements were observed between unassisted walking and assisted walking with a cane of any length (p<0.001), as well as between walking with a C2-length cane and unassisted walking, and walking with a C1-length cane and walking with a C3-length cane (p=0.001; p = 0.037; p=0.001; respectively). CONCLUSION These data demonstrate that small alterations in the length of canes used for weight-bearing ambulation in patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis increase the energy expenditure measured by the physiological cost index during walking. Further studies are needed for a more precise quantification of the increase in energy expenditure during cane-assisted gait and an assessment of the effectiveness of cane use in relieving pain and improving function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:18438573

  4. Biplane fluoroscopy for hindfoot motion analysis during gait: A model-based evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cross, Janelle A; McHenry, Benjamin D; Molthen, Robert; Exten, Emily; Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Harris, Gerald F

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the accuracy and precision of a biplane fluoroscopy system for model-based tracking of in vivo hindfoot motion during over-ground gait. Gait was simulated by manually manipulating a cadaver foot specimen through a biplane fluoroscopy system attached to a walkway. Three 1.6-mm diameter steel beads were implanted into the specimen to provide marker-based tracking measurements for comparison to model-based tracking. A CT scan was acquired to define a gold standard of implanted bead positions and to create 3D models for model-based tracking. Static and dynamic trials manipulating the specimen through the capture volume were performed. Marker-based tracking error was calculated relative to the gold standard implanted bead positions. The bias, precision, and root-mean-squared (RMS) error of model-based tracking was calculated relative to the marker-based measurements. The overall RMS error of the model-based tracking method averaged 0.43 ± 0.22mm and 0.66 ± 0.43° for static and 0.59 ± 0.10mm and 0.71 ± 0.12° for dynamic trials. The model-based tracking approach represents a non-invasive technique for accurately measuring dynamic hindfoot joint motion during in vivo, weight bearing conditions. The model-based tracking method is recommended for application on the basis of the study results.

  5. Stability in skipping gaits

    PubMed Central

    Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier. PMID:28018651

  6. Stability in skipping gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrada, Emanuel; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier.

  7. Stability in skipping gaits.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier.

  8. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  9. GaitKeeper: A System for Measuring Canine Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Cassim; O’Sullivan, Jack; Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    It is understood gait has the potential to be used as a window into neurodegenerative disorders, identify markers of subclinical pathology, inform diagnostic algorithms of disease progression and measure the efficacy of interventions. Dogs’ gaits are frequently assessed in a veterinary setting to detect signs of lameness. Despite this, a reliable, affordable and objective method to assess lameness in dogs is lacking. Most described canine lameness assessments are subjective, unvalidated and at high risk of bias. This means reliable, early detection of canine gait abnormalities is challenging, which may have detrimental implications for dogs’ welfare. In this paper, we draw from approaches and technologies used in human movement science and describe a system for objectively measuring temporal gait characteristics in dogs (step-time, swing-time, stance-time). Asymmetries and variabilities in these characteristics are of known clinical significance when assessing lameness but presently may only be assessed on coarse scales or under highly instrumented environments. The system consists an inertial measurement unit, containing a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope coupled with a standardized walking course. The measurement unit is attached to each leg of the dog under assessment before it is walked around the course. The data by the measurement unit is then processed to identify steps and subsequently, micro-gait characteristics. This method has been tested on a cohort of 19 healthy dogs of various breeds ranging in height from 34.2 cm to 84.9 cm. We report the system as capable of making precise step delineations with detections of initial and final contact times of foot-to-floor to a mean precision of 0.011 s and 0.048 s, respectively. Results are based on analysis of 12,678 foot falls and we report a sensitivity, positive predictive value and F-score of 0.81, 0.83 and 0.82 respectively. To investigate the effect of gait on system performance, the approach was

  10. Gait analysis in forensic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Peter K.; Simonsen, Erik B.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2007-01-01

    We have combined the basic human ability to recognize other individuals with functional anatomical and biomechanical knowledge, in order to analyze the gait of perpetrators as recorded on surveillance video. The perpetrators are then compared with similar analyses of suspects. At present we give a statement to the police as to whether the perpetrator has a characteristic gait pattern compared to normal gait, and if a suspect has a comparable gait pattern. We have found agreements such as: limping, varus instability in the knee at heel strike, larger lateral flexion of the spinal column to one side than the other, inverted ankle during stance, pronounced sagittal head-movements, and marked head-shoulder posture. Based on these characteristic features, we state whether suspect and perpetrator could have the same identity but it is not possible to positively identify the perpetrator. Nevertheless, we have been involved in several cases where the court has found that this type of gait analysis, especially combined with photogrammetry, was a valuable tool. The primary requisites are surveillance cameras recording with sufficient frequency, ideally about 15 Hz, which are positioned in frontal and preferably also in profile view.

  11. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-10-26

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  12. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%. PMID:27792181

  13. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  14. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  15. Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF) was designed and built to evaluate compact, lightweight magnetic bearings for use in the SSME's (space shuttle main engine) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen turbopumps. State of the art and tradeoff studies were conducted which indicated that a hybrid permanent magnet bias homopolar magnetic bearing design would be smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than conventional industrial bearings. A test bearing of this type was designed for the test rig for use at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (-320 F). The bearing was fabricated from state-of-the-art materials and incorporated into the CMBTF. Testing at room temperature was accomplished at Avcon's facility. These preliminary tests indicated that this magnetic bearing is a feasible alternative to older bearing technologies. Analyses showed that the hybrid magnetic bearing is one-third the weight, considerably smaller, and uses less power than previous generations of magnetic bearings.

  16. Nonstandard Gaits in Unsteady Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, Michael; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    Marine biology has long inspired the design and engineering of underwater vehicles. The literature examining the kinematics and dynamics of fishes, ranging from undulatory anguilliform swimmers to oscillatory ostraciiform ones, is vast. Past numerical studies of these organisms have principally focused on gaits characterized by sinusoidal pitching and heaving motions. It is conceivable that more sophisticated gaits could perform better in some respects, for example as measured by thrust generation or by cost of transport. This work uses an unsteady boundary-element method to numerically investigate the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of high-Reynolds-number swimmers whose gaits are encoded by Fourier series or by Jacobi elliptic functions. Numerical results are presented with an emphasis on identifying particular wake structures and modes of motion that are associated with optimal swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research through MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  17. Biomechanics of Gait during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. During pregnancy women experience several changes in the body's physiology, morphology, and hormonal system. These changes may affect the balance and body stability and can cause discomfort and pain. The adaptations of the musculoskeletal system due to morphological changes during pregnancy are not fully understood. Few studies clarify the biomechanical changes of gait that occur during pregnancy and in postpartum period. Purposes. The purpose of this review was to analyze the available evidence on the biomechanical adaptations of gait that occur throughout pregnancy and in postpartum period, specifically with regard to the temporal, spatial, kinematic, and kinetic parameters of gait. Methods. Three databases were searched and 9 studies with a follow-up design were retrieved for analysis. Results. Most studies performed temporal, spatial, and kinematic analysis. Only three studies performed kinetic analysis. Conclusion. The adaptation strategies to the anatomical and physiological changes throughout pregnancy are still unclear, particularly in a longitudinal perspective and regarding kinetic parameters. PMID:25587566

  18. Gait and jump analysis in healthy cats using a pressure mat system.

    PubMed

    Stadig, Sarah M; Bergh, Anna K

    2015-06-01

    Physical orthopaedic examination in cats does not always reveal signs of lameness and no objective gait analysis method has yet been standardised for use in cats. The aims of the present study were to define appropriate parameters for pressure mat analyses during walk and jump, and to define reference values for gait parameters of healthy cats. Further, the distribution of the vertical force within the paws and the influence of a non-centred head position were investigated. The hypothesis was that cats have a symmetrical gait, a front/hindlimb asymmetry similar to dogs, and that peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) have high intraclass correlation coefficients, confirming the reliability of these parameters. Data for walking (n = 46) showed gait symmetry indices of close to 1.0, besides PVF front/hind (1.3 ± 0.2). The PVF front/hind for jumping cats (n = 16) was 1.7 ± 0.6. Results from the distribution of the vertical force within the paw (n = 39) showed that the main weight during a strike is transferred from the caudal towards the craniomedial part of the paw. The findings support the hypothesis that healthy cats have similar gait symmetry to healthy dogs and that PVF and VI are reliable gait parameters. In conclusion, the present study provides a reference interval for healthy cats. Further studies are needed to investigate gait parameters in cats with orthopaedic disease.

  19. Pneumatic interactive gait rehabilitation orthosis: design and preliminary testing.

    PubMed

    Belforte, G; Eula, G; Appendino, S; Sirolli, S

    2011-02-01

    Motor rehabilitation techniques based on passive movement of the lower limbs have been developed over the past 15 years. Gait training automation is the latest innovation in these techniques. This paper describes the design and development of a pneumatic interactive gait rehabilitation orthosis (PIGRO), as well as the first experimental results obtained with healthy subjects. PIGRO consists of a modular and size-adaptable exoskeleton, pneumatic actuation systems for the six actuated degrees of freedom (DoF), and a control unit. The foot orthosis and ankle actuation can be removed and/or replaced with orthopaedic shoes so as to permit gait rehabilitation while advancing between parallel bars with ground contact and partial body weight support (i.e. not walking in place). Control logic provides closed-loop position control independently on each joint, with position feedback for each joint in real time. Imposed curves are physiological joint angles: it is also possible to choose between activating one or both legs and to modify curves to obtain different gait patterns if required. The paper concludes with a presentation of experimental results for the device's performance.

  20. [Gait Analysis in Patients with Hip Disorders].

    PubMed

    Urbášek, K; Poul, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the evaluation of both conservative and surgical therapy cannot do without gait analysis. Orthopaedic textbooks, with some exceptions, deal in great detail with a thorough clinical examination of the patient but gait assessment is mentioned only marginally. More attention is paid to gait analysis in rehabilitation medicine. Motion and gait analysis laboratories equipped with optoelectronic cameras and force platforms were first developed for cerebral palsy children. Recently, several studies have been published on the use of these methods in disorders of hip and knee joints or spine diseases. Key words: gait analysis, hip joint.

  1. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  2. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  3. Multi-resolution entropy analysis of gait symmetry in neurological degenerative diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Wang, Jue; He, Ping

    2008-04-01

    Gait rhythm of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been studied focusing on the fractal and correlation properties of stride time fluctuations. In this study, we investigated gait asymmetry in these diseases using the multi-resolution entropy analysis of stance time fluctuations. Since stance time is likely to exhibit fluctuations across multiple spatial and temporal scales, the data series were decomposed into appropriate levels by applying stationary wavelet transform. The similarity between two corresponding wavelet coefficient series in terms of their regularities at each level was quantified based on a modified sample entropy method and a weighted sum was then used as gait symmetry index. We found that gait symmetry in subjects with PD and HD, especially with ALS is significantly disturbed. This method may be useful in characterizing certain pathologies of motor control and, possibly, in monitoring disease progression and evaluating the effect of an individual treatment.

  4. Nonlinear dynamical model of human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Scafetta, Nicola

    2003-05-01

    We present a nonlinear dynamical model of the human gait control system in a variety of gait regimes. The stride-interval time series in normal human gait is characterized by slightly multifractal fluctuations. The fractal nature of the fluctuations becomes more pronounced under both an increase and decrease in the average gait. Moreover, the long-range memory in these fluctuations is lost when the gait is keyed on a metronome. Human locomotion is controlled by a network of neurons capable of producing a correlated syncopated output. The central nervous system is coupled to the motocontrol system, and together they control the locomotion of the gait cycle itself. The metronomic gait is simulated by a forced nonlinear oscillator with a periodic external force associated with the conscious act of walking in a particular way.

  5. Composite Bear Canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. Richard; Jara, Steve; Suffel, Susan

    2003-01-01

    To many national park campers and mountain climbers saving their foods in a safe and unbreakable storage container without worrying being attacked by a bear is a challenging task. In some parks, the park rangers have mandated that park visitors rent a bear canister for their food storage. Commercially available bear canisters are made of ABS plastic, weigh 2.8 pounds, and have a 180 cubic inch capacity for food storage. A new design with similar capacity was conducted in this study to reduce its weight and make it a stiffer and stronger canister. Two prototypes incorporating carbon prepreg with and without honeycomb constructions were manufactured using hand lay-up and vacuum bag forming techniques. A 6061-T6-aluminum ring was machined to dimensions in order to reinforce the opening area of the canister. Physical properties (weight and volume) along with mechanical properties (flexural strength and specific allowable moment) of the newly fabricated canisters are compared against the commercial ones. The composite canister weighs only 56% of the ABS one can withstand 9 times of the force greater. The advantages and limitations of using composite bear canisters will be discussed in the presentation.

  6. A study of passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise effects on local muscles and whole body oxidative metabolism: a comparison with simulated horse riding, bicycle, and walking exercise

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We have developed an exercise machine prototype for increasing exercise intensity by means of passively exercising lower limb muscles. The purpose of the present study was to compare the passive exercise intensity of our newly-developed machine with the intensities of different types of exercises. We also attempted to measure muscle activity to study how these forms of exercise affected individual parts of the body. Methods Subjects were 14 healthy men with the following demographics: age 30 years, height 171.5 cm, weight 68.3 kg. They performed 4 types of exercise: Passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise (PWLLE), Simulated horse riding exercise (SHRE), Bicycle exercise, and Walking exercise, as described below at an interval of one week or longer. Oxygen uptake, blood pressure, heart rate, and electromyogram (EMG) were measured or recorded during exercise. At rest prior to exercise and immediately after the end of each exercise intensity, the oxygenated hemoglobin levels of the lower limb muscles were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy to calculate the rate of decline. This rate of decline was obtained immediately after exercise as well as at rest to calculate oxygen consumption of the lower limb muscles as expressed as a ratio of a post-exercise rate of decline to a resting one. Results The heart rate and oxygen uptake observed in PWLLE during maximal intensity were comparable to that of a 20-watt bicycle exercise or 2 km/hr walking exercise. Maximal intensity PWLLE was found to provoke muscle activity comparable to an 80-watt bicycle or 6 km/hr walking exercise. As was the case with the EMG results, during maximal intensity PWLLE, the rectus femoris muscle consumed oxygen in amounts identical to that of an 80-watt bicycle or a 6 km/hr walking exercise. Conclusion Passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise using our trial machine could provide approximately 3 MET of exercise and the thigh exhibited muscle activity equivalent to that of 80-watt

  7. Footwear and Foam Surface Alter Gait Initiation of Typical Subjects.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Sacco, Isabel de Camargo Neves; Nora, Fernanda Grazielle da Silva Azevedo; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation is the task commonly used to investigate the anticipatory postural adjustments necessary to begin a new gait cycle from the standing position. In this study, we analyzed whether and how foot-floor interface characteristics influence the gait initiation process. For this purpose, 25 undergraduate students were evaluated while performing a gait initiation task in three experimental conditions: barefoot on a hard surface (barefoot condition), barefoot on a soft surface (foam condition), and shod on a hard surface (shod condition). Two force plates were used to acquire ground reaction forces and moments for each foot separately. A statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis was performed in COP time series. We compared the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) resultant center of pressure (COP) paths and average velocities, the force peaks under the right and left foot, and the COP integral x force impulse for three different phases: the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) phase (Phase 1), the swing-foot unloading phase (Phase 2), and the support-foot unloading phase (Phase 3). In Phase 1, significantly smaller ML COP paths and velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. Significantly smaller ML COP paths were also found in Phase 2 for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. In Phase 3, increased AP COP velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. SPM analysis revealed significant differences for vector COP time series in the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. The foam condition limited the impulse-generating capacity of COP shift and produced smaller ML force peaks, resulting in limitations to body-weight transfer from the swing to the support foot. The results suggest that footwear and a soft surface affect COP and impose certain features of gait initiation, especially in the ML direction of

  8. Footwear and Foam Surface Alter Gait Initiation of Typical Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Sacco, Isabel de Camargo Neves; Nora, Fernanda Grazielle da Silva Azevedo; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation is the task commonly used to investigate the anticipatory postural adjustments necessary to begin a new gait cycle from the standing position. In this study, we analyzed whether and how foot-floor interface characteristics influence the gait initiation process. For this purpose, 25 undergraduate students were evaluated while performing a gait initiation task in three experimental conditions: barefoot on a hard surface (barefoot condition), barefoot on a soft surface (foam condition), and shod on a hard surface (shod condition). Two force plates were used to acquire ground reaction forces and moments for each foot separately. A statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis was performed in COP time series. We compared the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) resultant center of pressure (COP) paths and average velocities, the force peaks under the right and left foot, and the COP integral x force impulse for three different phases: the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) phase (Phase 1), the swing-foot unloading phase (Phase 2), and the support-foot unloading phase (Phase 3). In Phase 1, significantly smaller ML COP paths and velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. Significantly smaller ML COP paths were also found in Phase 2 for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. In Phase 3, increased AP COP velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. SPM analysis revealed significant differences for vector COP time series in the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. The foam condition limited the impulse-generating capacity of COP shift and produced smaller ML force peaks, resulting in limitations to body-weight transfer from the swing to the support foot. The results suggest that footwear and a soft surface affect COP and impose certain features of gait initiation, especially in the ML direction of

  9. Reduction in bearing size due to superconductors in magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Lewis, Paul; Dill, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A design concept that reduces the size of magnetic bearings is assessed. The small size will enable magnetic bearings to fit into limited available bearing volume of cryogenic machinery. The design concept, called SUPERC, uses (high Tc) superconductors or high-purity aluminum conductors in windings instead of copper. The relatively high-current density of these conductors reduces the slot radial thickness for windings, which reduces the size of the bearings. MTI developed a sizing program called SUPERC that translates the high-current density of these conductors into smaller sized bearings. This program was used to size a superconducting bearing to carry a 500 lb. load. The sizes of magnetic bearings needed by various design concepts are as follows: SUPERC design concept = 3.75 in.; magnet-bias design concept = 5.25 in.; and all electromagnet design concept = 7.0 in. These results indicate that the SUPERC design concept can significantly reduce the size of the bearing. This reduction, in turn, reduces the weight and yields a lighter bearing. Since the superconductors have inherently near-zero resistance, they are also expected to save power needed for operation considerably.

  10. Development Aspects of a Robotised Gait Trainer for Neurological Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    of the robotised gait training machine. Keywords - gait rehabilitation, gait trainer, gait analysis , robot, compliance control I. INTRODUCTION...pp. 423-428, 2000. [6] D.A. Winter, Biomechanics and motor control of human movement, 2 nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1990. [7] J. Perry, Gait Analysis , Slack

  11. Neuromuscular adjustments of gait associated with unstable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanenko, Y. P.; d'Avella, A.; Serrao, M.; Ranavolo, A.; Draicchio, F.; Cappellini, G.; Casali, C.; Lacquaniti, F.

    2015-01-01

    A compact description of coordinated muscle activity is provided by the factorization of electromyographic (EMG) signals. With the use of this approach, it has consistently been shown that multimuscle activity during human locomotion can be accounted for by four to five modules, each one comprised of a basic pattern timed at a different phase of gait cycle and the weighting coefficients of synergistic muscle activations. These modules are flexible, in so far as the timing of patterns and the amplitude of weightings can change as a function of gait speed and mode. Here we consider the adjustments of the locomotor modules related to unstable walking conditions. We compared three different conditions, i.e., locomotion of healthy subjects on slippery ground (SL) and on narrow beam (NB) and of cerebellar ataxic (CA) patients on normal ground. Motor modules were computed from the EMG signals of 12 muscles of the right lower limb using non-negative matrix factorization. The unstable gait of SL, NB, and CA showed significant changes compared with controls in the stride length, stride width, range of angular motion, and trunk oscillations. In most subjects of all three unstable conditions, >70% of the overall variation of EMG waveforms was accounted for by four modules that were characterized by a widening of muscle activity patterns. This suggests that the nervous system adopts the strategy of prolonging the duration of basic muscle activity patterns to cope with unstable conditions resulting from either slippery ground, reduced support surface, or pathology. PMID:26378199

  12. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection for Spastic Equinovarus Foot in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Effects on Gait and Foot Pressure Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Young; Jung, Soojin; Rha, Dong-wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of intramuscular Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on gait and dynamic foot pressure distribution in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with dynamic equinovarus foot. Materials and Methods Twenty-five legs of 25 children with CP were investigated in this study. BoNT-A was injected into the gastrocnemius (GCM) and tibialis posterior (TP) muscles under the guidance of ultrasonography. The effects of the toxin were clinically assessed using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and modified Tardieu scale (MTS), and a computerized gait analysis and dynamic foot pressure measurements using the F-scan system were also performed before injection and at 1 and 4 months after injection. Results Spasticity of the ankle plantar-flexor in both the MAS and MTS was significantly reduced at both 1 and 4 months after injection. On dynamic foot pressure measurements, the center of pressure index and coronal index, which represent the asymmetrical weight-bearing of the medial and lateral columns of the foot, significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection. The dynamic foot pressure index, total contact area, contact length and hind foot contact width all increased at 1 month after injection, suggesting better heel contact. Ankle kinematic data were significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection, and ankle power generation was significantly increased at 4 months after injection compared to baseline data. Conclusion Using a computerized gait analysis and foot scan, this study revealed significant benefits of BoNT-A injection into the GCM and TP muscles for dynamic equinovarus foot in children with spastic CP. PMID:26847306

  13. Improved Superconducting Magnetic Rotary Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Royston, James

    1992-01-01

    Improved magnetic rotary bearings designed by exploiting properties of type-II superconducting materials. Depending on design and application, bearing provides fixed or adjustable compensation for lateral vector component of weight or other lateral load on rotor. Allows applied magnetic field to penetrate partially in clusters of field lines, with concomitant establishment of undamped circulating electrical currents within material. Type-II superconductors have critical magnetic fields and critical temperatures greater than type-I superconductors.

  14. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  15. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  16. Ankle arthrodesis. Long-term follow-up with gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J M; Schwartz, E; Simon, S R

    1979-10-01

    A functional assessment of twelve patients after ankle arthrodesis for post-traumatic arthritis was carried out by means of an extensive clinical evaluation and gait analysis after an average follow-up of eight years. A weighted point system was developed to grade ankle function clinically. The data on gait analysis were examined to determine the effect of arthrodesis of the ankle on the over-all pattern of walking. Under conditions of normal daily living while wearing shoes, all patients functioned well after arthrodesis. The gait-analysis data obtained with the patients wearing shoes showed excellent gait characteristics, and the ankle motion that had been lost was compensated for by: (1) motion of the small joints of the ipsilateral foot; (2) altered motion of the ankle in the contralateral limb; and (3) appropriate footwear. While the patients were walking barefooted, some adverse effects of fusion of the ankle were evident. Velocity of gait was slowed and the length of stride was shortened in all twelve patients. One patient whose ankle had been fused in an equinus position had a back-knee deformity during stance phase, and another walked only on his toes when he was without shoes. The gait patterns of all patients were markedly improved when they were wearing shoes with appropriate heel heights.

  17. Lever arm dysfunction in cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal structures act as lever arms during walking. Muscle activity and the ground reaction against gravity exert forces on the skeleton, which generate torque (moments) around joints. These lead to the sequence of movements which form normal human gait. Skeletal deformities in cerebral palsy (CP) affect the function of bones as lever arms and compromise gait. Lever arm dysfunction should be carefully considered when contemplating treatment to improve gait in children with CP.

  18. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    capture sequences was provided by MPL to CCAD and OGAL. CCAD’s work focused on imposing these sequences on the SantosTM digital human avatar . An...capture sequences was provided by MPL to CCAD and OGAL. CCAD’s work focused on imposing these sequences on the Santos digital human avatar . An initial...levels of the patients. In addition, the differences in ability to detect variations in gait conditions for skinned avatar vs. line-skeletal avatar

  19. Residual Elimination Algorithm Enhancements to Improve Foot Motion Tracking During Forward Dynamic Simulations of Gait.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer N; Hass, Chris J; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-11-01

    Patient-specific gait optimizations capable of predicting post-treatment changes in joint motions and loads could improve treatment design for gait-related disorders. To maximize potential clinical utility, such optimizations should utilize full-body three-dimensional patient-specific musculoskeletal models, generate dynamically consistent gait motions that reproduce pretreatment marker measurements closely, and achieve accurate foot motion tracking to permit deformable foot-ground contact modeling. This study enhances an existing residual elimination algorithm (REA) Remy, C. D., and Thelen, D. G., 2009, “Optimal Estimation of Dynamically Consistent Kinematics and Kinetics for Forward Dynamic Simulation of Gait,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(3), p. 031005) to achieve all three requirements within a single gait optimization framework. We investigated four primary enhancements to the original REA: (1) manual modification of tracked marker weights, (2) automatic modification of tracked joint acceleration curves, (3) automatic modification of algorithm feedback gains, and (4) automatic calibration of model joint and inertial parameter values. We evaluated the enhanced REA using a full-body three-dimensional dynamic skeletal model and movement data collected from a subject who performed four distinct gait patterns: walking, marching, running, and bounding. When all four enhancements were implemented together, the enhanced REA achieved dynamic consistency with lower marker tracking errors for all segments, especially the feet (mean root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 3.1 versus 18.4 mm), compared to the original REA. When the enhancements were implemented separately and in combinations, the most important one was automatic modification of tracked joint acceleration curves, while the least important enhancement was automatic modification of algorithm feedback gains. The enhanced REA provides a framework for future gait optimization studies that seek to predict subject

  20. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; M. Kilbourne, Brandon; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa. PMID:26333477

  1. Gait recognition based on integral outline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Guan; Fang, Lv

    2017-02-01

    Biometric identification technology replaces traditional security technology, which has become a trend, and gait recognition also has become a hot spot of research because its feature is difficult to imitate and theft. This paper presents a gait recognition system based on integral outline of human body. The system has three important aspects: the preprocessing of gait image, feature extraction and classification. Finally, using a method of polling to evaluate the performance of the system, and summarizing the problems existing in the gait recognition and the direction of development in the future.

  2. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A; Kilbourne, Brandon M; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-09-03

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa.

  3. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  4. Gait-related cerebral alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Anke H; Leunissen, Inge; Bakker, Maaike; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Freezing of gait is a common, debilitating feature of Parkinson's disease. We have studied gait planning in patients with freezing of gait, using motor imagery of walking in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging. This approach exploits the large neural overlap that exists between planning and imagining a movement. In addition, it avoids confounds introduced by brain responses to altered motor performance and somatosensory feedback during actual freezing episodes. We included 24 patients with Parkinson's disease: 12 patients with freezing of gait, 12 matched patients without freezing of gait and 21 matched healthy controls. Subjects performed two previously validated tasks--motor imagery of gait and a visual imagery control task. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, we quantified imagery performance by measuring the time required to imagine walking on paths of different widths and lengths. In addition, we used voxel-based morphometry to test whether between-group differences in imagery-related activity were related to structural differences. Imagery times indicated that patients with freezing of gait, patients without freezing of gait and controls engaged in motor imagery of gait, with matched task performance. During motor imagery of gait, patients with freezing of gait showed more activity than patients without freezing of gait in the mesencephalic locomotor region. Patients with freezing of gait also tended to have decreased responses in mesial frontal and posterior parietal regions. Furthermore, patients with freezing of gait had grey matter atrophy in a small portion of the mesencephalic locomotor region. The gait-related hyperactivity of the mesencephalic locomotor region correlated with clinical parameters (freezing of gait severity and disease duration), but not with the degree of atrophy. These results indicate that patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait have structural and functional alterations in the

  5. Use of an arm weight-bearing combined with upper-limb reaching apparatus to facilitate motor paralysis recovery in an incomplete spinal cord injury patient: a single case report

    PubMed Central

    Hoei, Takashi; Kawahira, Kazumi; Fukuda, Hidefumi; Sihgenobu, Keizo; Shimodozono, Megumi; Ogura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Training using an arm weight-bearing device combined with upper-limb reaching apparatus to facilitate motor paralysis recovery, named the “Reaching Robot”, as well as Repetitive Facilitation Exercise were applied to a patient with severe impairment of the shoulder and elbow due to incomplete spinal cord injury and the effects were examined. [Subjects and Methods] A 66-year-old man with incomplete spinal cord injury participated in an upper extremity rehabilitation program involving a Reaching Robot. The program was comprised of active motor suspension, continuous low amplitude neuromuscular electrical stimulation and functional vibratory stimulation, as well as Repetitive Facilitation Exercise combined with continuous low amplitude neuromuscular electrical stimulation. This protocol used a crossover design following an A1-B1-A2-B2. “A” consisted of 2 weeks of Repetitive Facilitation Exercise, and “B” consisted of 2 weeks of Reaching Robot training. [Results] Improvements were observed after all sessions. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion improved after 2 weeks of Reaching Robot sessions only. There were no adverse events. [Conclusion] Reaching Robot training for severe paretic upper-extremity after incomplete spinal cord injury was a safe and effective treatment. Reaching Robot training may be useful for rehabilitation of paretic upper-extremity after incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:28210068

  6. Optimal Synchronizability of Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, N. A. M.; Seybold, H.; Baram, R. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-02-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine-tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)PLEEE81539-3755]. We show that, in analogy, the synchronizability of bearings can be maximized by counterbalancing the number of contacts and the inertia of their constituting rotor disks through the mass-radius relation, m˜rα, with an optimal exponent α=α× which converges to unity for a large number of rotors. Under this condition, and regardless of the presence of a long-tailed distribution of disk radii composing the mechanical system, the average participation per disk is maximized and the energy dissipation rate is homogeneously distributed among elementary rotors.

  7. Camshaft bearing arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Aoi, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1986-06-10

    A bearing arrangement is described for the camshaft of an internal combustion engine or the like which camshaft is formed along its length in axial order with a first bearing surface, a first cam lobe, a second bearing surface, a second cam lobe, a third bearing surface, a third cam lobe and a fourth bearing surface, the improvement comprising first bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the first bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface, second bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the second bearing surface and journaling the second bearing surface, third bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the third bearing surface and journaling the third bearing surface, and fourth bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the fourth bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface.

  8. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  9. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  10. Application of the Gillette Gait Index, Gait Deviation Index and Gait Profile Score to multiple clinical pediatric populations.

    PubMed

    McMulkin, Mark L; MacWilliams, Bruce A

    2015-02-01

    Gait indices are now commonly used to assess overall pathology and outcomes from studies with instrumented gait analyses. There are differences in how these indices are calculated and therefore inherent differences in their sensitivities to detect changes or differences between groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the three most commonly used gait indices, Gillette Gait Index (GGI), Gait Deviation Index (GDI), and Gait Profile Score (GPS), comparing the statistical sensitivity and the ability to make meaningful interpretations of the clinical results. In addition, the GDI*, a log transformed and scaled version of the GPS score which closely matches the GDI was examined. For seven previous or ongoing studies representing varying gait pathologies seen in clinical laboratories, the GGI, GDI, and GPS/GDI* were calculated retrospectively. The GDI and GPS/GDI* proved to be the most sensitive measures in assessing differences pre/post-treatment or from a control population. A power analysis revealed the GDI and GDI* to be the most sensitive statistical measures (lowest sample sizes required). Subjectively, the GDI and GDI* interpretation seemed to be the most intuitive measure for assessing clinical changes. However, the gait variable sub-scores of the GPS determined several statistical differences which were not previously noted and was the only index tool for quantifying the relative contributions of specific joints or planes of motion. The GGI did not offer any advantages over the other two indices.

  11. Underwater gait analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Daniele; Pavan, Davide; Morris, Meg; Guiotto, Annamaria; Iansek, Robert; Fortuna, Sofia; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi

    2017-02-01

    Although hydrotherapy is one of the physical therapies adopted to optimize gait rehabilitation in people with Parkinson disease, the quantitative measurement of gait-related outcomes has not been provided yet. This work aims to document the gait improvements in a group of parkinsonians after a hydrotherapy program through 2D and 3D underwater and on land gait analysis. Thirty-four parkinsonians and twenty-two controls were enrolled, divided into two different cohorts. In the first one, 2 groups of patients underwent underwater or land based walking training; controls underwent underwater walking training. Hence pre-treatment 2D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed, together with post-treatment on land gait analysis. Considering that current literature documented a reduced movement amplitude in parkinsonians across all lower limb joints in all movement planes, 3D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed on a second cohort of subjects (10 parkinsonians and 10 controls) who underwent underwater gait training. Baseline land 2D and 3D gait analysis in parkinsonians showed shorter stride length and slower speed than controls, in agreement with previous findings. Comparison between underwater and on land gait analysis showed reduction in stride length, cadence and speed on both parkinsonians and controls. Although patients who underwent underwater treatment exhibited significant changes on spatiotemporal parameters and sagittal plane lower limb kinematics, 3D gait analysis documented a significant (p<0.05) improvement in all movement planes. These data deserve attention for research directions promoting the optimal recovery and maintenance of walking ability.

  12. Advances In Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum reviews state of technology of magnetic bearings, focusing mainly on attractive bearings rather than repulsive, eddy-current, or Lorentz bearings. Attractive bearings offer greater load capacities and preferred for aerospace machinery.

  13. Dynamic knee loads during gait predict proximal tibial bone distribution.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, D E; Sumner, D R; Andriacchi, T P; Sugar, D A

    1998-05-01

    This study tested the validity of the prediction of dynamic knee loads based on gait measurements. The relationship between the predicted loads at the knee and the distribution of bone between the medial and lateral sides of the tibia was examined. The motion and external forces and moments at the knee were measured during gait and a statically determinate muscle model was used to predict the corresponding forces on the medial and lateral tibial plateaus. In particular, the relationship between the knee adduction moment during gait and the ratio or distribution of medial to lateral tibial bone mineral content was studied. Bone mineral content was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in four regions, two proximal regions 20 mm in height, one medial and one lateral and two distal regions 20 mm in height, one medial and one lateral. The best single predictor of the medial lateral ratio of proximal bone mineral content (bone distribution) was the adduction moment (R2=0.31, p=0.003). Adding weight (negative coefficient. p=0.0004) and the ratio of the average predicted peak force on the medial plateau to the predicted peak force on the lateral plateau (positive coefficient, p=0.0033) to the regression model significantly increased the ability to predict the proximal medial lateral bone distribution (R2=0.72, p=0.0001). Distally neither the subject characteristics nor the gait moments and predicted forces were significant predictors of the bone distribution. The lack of a correlation distally may be reflective of the forces being more evenly distributed further from the tibial plateau. While it has long been suggested that the adduction moment is the primary determinate of the distribution of load between the medial and lateral plateaus, this is the first evidence of its relationship to the underlying bone distribution.

  14. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  15. Diabetic Foot Biomechanics and Gait Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, James S.; Najafi, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot complications represent significant morbidity and precede most of the lower extremity amputations performed. Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes shown to affect gait. Glycosylation of soft tissues can also affect gait. The purpose of this review article is to highlight the changes in gait for persons with diabetes and highlight the effects of glycosylation on soft tissues at the foot–ground interface. Methods PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EBSCOhost® on-line databases were searched for articles pertaining to diabetes and gait. Bibliographies from relevant manuscripts were also searched. Findings Patients with diabetes frequently exhibit a conservative gait strategy where there is slower walking speed, wider base of gait, and prolonged double support time. Glycosylation affects are observed in the lower extremities. Initially, skin thickness decreases and skin hardness increases; tendons thicken; muscles atrophy and exhibit activation delays; bones become less dense; joints have limited mobility; and fat pads are less thick, demonstrate fibrotic atrophy, migrate distally, and may be stiffer. Interpretation In conclusion, there do appear to be gait changes in patients with diabetes. These changes, coupled with local soft tissue changes from advanced glycosylated end products, also alter a patient’s gait, putting them at risk of foot ulceration. Better elucidation of these changes throughout the entire spectrum of diabetes disease can help design better treatments and potentially reduce the unnecessarily high prevalence of foot ulcers and amputation. PMID:20663446

  16. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF BILATERAL PATELLAR LUXATION IN AN AMERICAN BLACK BEAR CUB (URSUS AMERICANUS).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Katarina R; Desmarchelier, Marion R; Bailey, Trina R

    2015-06-01

    A wild orphaned male American black bear cub ( Ursus americanus ) presented with hind limb gait abnormalities and was found to have bilateral grade 3 laterally luxating patellas. There were no other significant abnormalities detected on neurologic, radiographic, or hematologic examinations. The trochlear grooves were deepened with a chondroplasty, and the redundant soft tissues imbricated. There was a marked improvement in the bear's gait postoperatively, with an apparent full return to function. To the authors' knowledge, patellar luxation has not been reported in the Ursidae family, and the success in this case suggests that this technique may be used in large wild or captive carnivore cubs.

  17. Research on gait-based human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youguo

    Gait recognition refers to automatic identification of individual based on his/her style of walking. This paper proposes a gait recognition method based on Continuous Hidden Markov Model with Mixture of Gaussians(G-CHMM). First, we initialize a Gaussian mix model for training image sequence with K-means algorithm, then train the HMM parameters using a Baum-Welch algorithm. These gait feature sequences can be trained and obtain a Continuous HMM for every person, therefore, the 7 key frames and the obtained HMM can represent each person's gait sequence. Finally, the recognition is achieved by Front algorithm. The experiments made on CASIA gait databases obtain comparatively high correction identification ratio and comparatively strong robustness for variety of bodily angle.

  18. Effectiveness of elastic band-type ankle–foot orthoses on postural control in poststroke elderly patients as determined using combined measurement of the stability index and body weight-bearing ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Sim, Woo Sang; Won, Byeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor recovery of postural stability poststroke is the primary cause of impairment in activities and social participation in elderly stroke survivors. The purpose of our study was to experimentally evaluate the effectiveness of our new elastic ankle–foot orthosis (AFO), compared to a traditional AFO fabricated with hard plastic, in improving postural stability in elderly chronic stroke survivors. Patients and methods Postural stability was evaluated in ten chronic stroke patients, 55.7±8.43 years old. Postural stability was evaluated using the standardized methods of the Biodex Balance System combined with a foot pressure system, under three experimental conditions, no AFO, rigid plastic AFO, and elastic AFO (E-AFO). The following dependent variables of postural stability were analyzed: plantar pressure under the paretic and nonparetic foot, area of the center of balance (COB) and % time spent in each location, distance traveled by the COB away from the body center, distance traveled by the center of pressure, and calculated index of overall stability, as well as indices anterior–posterior and medial–lateral stability. Results Both AFO designs improved all indices of postural stability. Compared to the rigid plastic AFO, the E-AFO produced additional positive effects in controlling anterior–posterior body sway, equalizing weight bearing through the paretic and nonparetic limbs, and restraining the displacement of the center of pressure and of the COB. Conclusion Based on our outcomes, we recommend the prescription of E-AFOs as part of a physiotherapy rehabilitation program to promote recovery of postural stability poststroke. When possible, therapeutic outcomes should be documented using the Biodex Balance System and foot pressure system, as used in our study, to provide evidence needed to support the development of a larger controlled trial to generate high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of E-AFOs. PMID:26622174

  19. Investigation of first ray mobility during gait by kinematic fluoroscopic imaging-a novel method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that sagittal instability at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level is a primary factor for hallux valgus and that sagittal instability increases with the progression of the deformity. The assessment of the degree of vertical instability is usually made by clinical evaluation while any measurements mostly refer to a static assessment of medial ray mobility (i.e. the plantar/dorsal flexion in the sagittal plane). Testing methods currently available cannot attribute the degree of mobility to the corresponding anatomical joints making up the medial column of the foot. The aim of this study was to develop a technique which allows for a quantification of the in-vivo sagittal mobility of the joints of the medial foot column during the roll-over process under full weight bearing. Methods Mobility of first ray bones was investigated by dynamic distortion-free fluoroscopy (25 frames/s) of 14 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with manifested clinical instability of the first ray. A CAD-based evaluation method allowed the determination of mobility and relative displacements and rotations of the first ray bones within the sagittal plane during the stance phase of gait. Results Total flexion of the first ray was found to be 13.63 (SD 6.14) mm with the healthy volunteers and 13.06 (SD 8.01) mm with the patients (resolution: 0.245 mm/pixel). The dorsiflexion angle was 5.27 (SD 2.34) degrees in the healthy volunteers and increased to 5.56 (SD 3.37) degrees in the patients. Maximum rotations were found at the naviculo-cuneiform joints and least at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level in both groups. Conclusions Dynamic fluoroscopic assessment has been shown to be a valuable tool for characterisation of the kinematics of the joints of the medial foot column during gait. A significant difference in first ray flexion and angular rotation between the patients and healthy volunteers however could not be found. PMID:22316084

  20. Duck gait: Relationship to hip angle, bone ash, bone density, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Robison, Cara I; Rice, Meredith; Makagon, Maja M; Karcher, Darrin M

    2015-05-01

    The rapid growth meat birds, including ducks, undergo requires skeletal integrity; however, fast growth may not be conducive to adequate bone structure. A relationship likely exists between skeletal changes and duck mobility. Reduced mobility in meat ducks may have impacts on welfare and production. This study examined the relationships among gait score, bone parameters, and hip angle. Commercial Pekin ducks, ages 14 d (n = 100), 21 d (n = 100), and 32 d (n = 100) were weighed and gait scored with a 3-point gait score system by an observer as they walked over a Tekscan gait analysis system. Gait was scored as GS0, GS1, or GS2 with a score of GS0 defined as good walking ability and a score of GS2 as poorest walking ability. Ducks were humanely euthanized, full body scanned using quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and the right femur and tibia were extracted. Leg bones were cleaned, measured, fat extracted, and ashed. QCT scans were rendered to create computerized 3D models where pelvic hip angles and bone density were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted using PROC MIXED with age and gait score in the model. Body weight increased with age, but within an age, body weight decreased as walking ability became worse (P < 0.01). As expected, linear increases in tibia and femur bone width and length were observed as the ducks aged (P < 0.01). Right and left hip angle increased with duck age (P < 0.01). Additionally, ducks with a GS2 had wider hip angles opposed to ducks with a GS0 (P < 0.01). Bone density increased linearly with both age and gait score (P < 0.05). Femur ash content was lowest in 32-day-old ducks and ducks with GS1 and GS2 (P < 0.0001). Tibia ash content increased with age, but decreased as gait score increased (P < 0.001). The observation that right hip angle changed with gait scores merits further investigation into the relationship between duck mobility and skeletal changes during growth.

  1. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  2. The effects of head movement and walking speed on gait parameters in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Sunkarat, Somporn; Khamsaen, Khanamporn; Meeyan, Kitti; Treleaven, Julia

    2014-04-01

    It has been documented that neck pain can influence sensorimotor function. However, little is known about the effects of head movement and walking speed on gait characteristics in patients with neck pain. The aim of this study was to determine gait characteristics of patients with neck pain during walking with different head movements and gait speeds as compared to a control group without neck pain. Twenty women aged between 18 and 59 years with chronic neck pain (>3 months) and 20 healthy controls of similar age, weight and height were recruited into the study. Participants with neck pain completed the Neck Disability Index and Visual Analogue Pain Scale. The experiment consisted of two walking sessions. The first session included walking with head straight, head up-down, and head turns from side to side. The second session included walking at comfortable and maximum speeds. Each trial was performed twice. Gait parameters measured using GAITRite walkway system were step length, stride length, step time, stride time, step width, cadence and gait speed. Patients with chronic neck pain demonstrated a narrower step width, a shorter step length and a slower gait speed during walking with the head movements and at maximum speed compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). Maximum gait speed was moderately correlated with pain intensity and disability (p < 0.01). The results suggest that patients with chronic neck pain have gait disturbances. This supports the notion that assessment of gait should be addressed in patients with persistent neck pain.

  3. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ∼0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running).

  4. Functional gait evaluation of collagen chitosan nerve guides for sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minal; Vandevord, Pamela J; Matthew, Howard W; Desilva, Stephen; Wu, Bin; Wooley, Paul H

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this work was to use a functional gait analysis technique to evaluate sciatic nerve repair through tissue-engineered nerve guides in a rodent animal model. The nerve guides were fabricated by blending collagen with chitosan material and evaluated over a 12-week period for motor and sensory nerve recovery assessed by gait analysis and behavioral testing. Gastrocnemius muscle weight measurements were obtained at the end of each experimental time point and correlated to motor nerve recovery. Functional gait analysis studied both the stance and swing phase angle formations during a normal gait cycle. During the stance phase, functional results revealed that blended nerve guides promoted increased motor nerve recovery than unblended chitosan nerve guides. Similar results were obtained from behavioral tests, indicating that blended nerve guides created increased sensitivity to applied stimulus compared to unblended nerve guides. Muscle strength also correlated with functional recovery and was significantly higher when compared to the unblended nerve guides. From this study, we conclude that collagen-blended chitosan nerve guides enhanced motor and sensory nerve recovery assayed through gait and behavioral testing compared to unblended nerve guides.

  5. The Impact of Different Types of Assistive Devices on Gait Measures and Safety in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Susan E.; Kostyk, Sandra K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gait and balance impairments lead to frequent falls and injuries in individuals with Huntington's disease (HD). Assistive devices (ADs) such as canes and walkers are often prescribed to prevent falls, but their efficacy is unknown. We systematically examined the effects of different types of ADs on quantitative gait measures during walking in a straight path and around obstacles. Methods Spatial and temporal gait parameters were measured in 21 subjects with HD as they walked across a GAITRite walkway under 7 conditions (i.e., using no AD and 6 commonly prescribed ADs: a cane, a weighted cane, a standard walker, and a 2, 3 or 4 wheeled walker). Subjects also were timed and observed for number of stumbles and falls while walking around two obstacles in a figure-of-eight pattern. Results Gait measure variability (i.e., coefficient of variation), an indicator of fall risk, was consistently better when using the 4WW compared to other ADs. Subjects also walked the fastest and had the fewest number of stumbles and falls when using the 4WW in the figure-of-eight course. Subjects walked significantly slower using ADs compared to no AD both across the GAITRite and in the figure-of-eight. Measures reflecting gait stability and safety improved with the 4WW but were made worse by some other ADs. PMID:22363511

  6. Complex muscle vibration patterns to induce gait-like lower-limb movements: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Cyril; Kemlin, Claire; Lazert, David; Gagnon, Dany; Dyer, Joseph-Omer; Forget, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Muscle vibrations can induce motor responses and illusions of complex movements. However, inducing gait-like cyclical movements and illusions requires the application of multiple fast alternating vibrations to lower-limb muscles. The objectives were (1) to test the feasibility of delivering complex vibrations in a time-organized manner and (2) to illustrate the possibility of inducing alternate gait-in-place-like movements using these vibrations. Patterns of vibration, produced by 12 vibrators applied bilaterally on the flexor and extensor muscle groups of the lower limbs, were based on normal gait kinematics. We tested 1 s and 2 s cycle patterns of vibration. Vibrator responses were assessed using auto- and crosscorrelations and frequency analyses based on accelerometry measurements, and compared between patterns. High auto- (>0.8) and crosscorrelation (>0.6) coefficients demonstrated a good response by the vibrators to the control signal. Vibrations induced cyclical, low-amplitude stepping-in-place movements that mimicked alternate walking movements with both legs, with 1 s and 2 s cycle durations, in one nondisabled participant and one participant with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale B spinal cord injury standing, relaxed, with body-weight support. Electromechanical vibrators can deliver complex cyclical vibrations and trigger gait-like lower-limb movements. These results warrant the application of these vibration patterns on individuals with sensorimotor impairments to test their potential in gait rehabilitation.

  7. The connection between anthropometry and gait harmony unveiled through the lens of the golden ratio.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Morone, Giovanni; Bini, Fabiano; Fusco, Augusto; Paolucci, Stefano; Marinozzi, Franco

    2016-01-26

    In nature, many systems have a harmonic organization due to their fractal structure related to an irrational number called golden ratio. That is a constant proportion found in phases of human gait cycle, and is also found in the lengths of human body segments. In this study we tested if artificial alterations in anthropometric proportions may alter gait proportions. Twenty healthy subjects (29.15±5.66years) were enrolled in this study and asked to walk normally and with special shoes altering their anthropometric proportions. Further, to test if the relationship between gait phases and anthropometry could be due to the pendular mechanism of walking, subjects were also asked to walk with extra masses located on their shanks. Results showed that the artificial alteration of body segment proportions affected the gait ratio based on the proportion of time between stance and swing (p=0.015). Conversely, no changes occurred during walking in weighted condition (p=0.394). These results confirm the connection between anthropometric proportions and gait ratio, and suggest the idea that humans may have evolved into the actual anthropometric proportions for favoring a walking having a golden ratio based harmony, but research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  8. Biomechanics and analysis of running gait.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sheila A; Bhat, Krishna P

    2005-08-01

    Physical activity, including running, is important to general health by way of prevention of chronic illnesses and their precursors. To keep runners healthy, it is paramount that one has sound knowledge of the biomechanics of running and assessment of running gait. More so, improving performance in competitive runners is based in sound training and rehabilitation practices that are rooted firmly in biomechanical principles. This article summarized the biomechanics of running and the means with which one can evaluate running gait. The gait assessment techniques for collecting and analyzing kinetic and kinematic data can provide insights into injury prevention and treatment and performance enhancement.

  9. Robust Gait Recognition by Integrating Inertial and RGBD Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qin; Ni, Lihao; Wang, Qian; Li, Qingquan; Wang, Song

    2017-03-29

    Gait has been considered as a promising and unique biometric for person identification. Traditionally, gait data are collected using either color sensors, such as a CCD camera, depth sensors, such as a Microsoft Kinect, or inertial sensors, such as an accelerometer. However, a single type of sensors may only capture part of the dynamic gait features and make the gait recognition sensitive to complex covariate conditions, leading to fragile gait-based person identification systems. In this paper, we propose to combine all three types of sensors for gait data collection and gait recognition, which can be used for important identification applications, such as identity recognition to access a restricted building or area. We propose two new algorithms, namely EigenGait and TrajGait, to extract gait features from the inertial data and the RGBD (color and depth) data, respectively. Specifically, EigenGait extracts general gait dynamics from the accelerometer readings in the eigenspace and TrajGait extracts more detailed subdynamics by analyzing 3-D dense trajectories. Finally, both extracted features are fed into a supervised classifier for gait recognition and person identification. Experiments on 50 subjects, with comparisons to several other state-of-the-art gait-recognition approaches, show that the proposed approach can achieve higher recognition accuracy and robustness.

  10. Variations in kinematics during clinical gait analysis in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, Céline; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-temporal and kinematic joint parameters were analyzed during 3 groups of consecutive gait trials (1-3, 4-6 and 7-9). Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables from the joint kinematic waveforms and to identify the parts of the gait cycle which changed during the gait analysis session. The results showed that i) spontaneous gait velocity and the other spatio-temporal parameters significantly increased, and ii) gait variability decreased, over the last 6 gait trials compared to the first 3, for hemiplegic patients but not healthy subjects. Principal component analysis revealed changes in the sagittal waveforms of the hip, knee and ankle for hemiplegic patients after the first 3 gait trials. These results suggest that at the beginning of the gait analysis session, stroke patients exhibited phase of adaptation,characterized by a "cautious gait" but no fatigue was observed.

  11. Gait recognition based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy image for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ta-Wei; Hu, Wu-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a method for recognizing human identity using gait features based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy images (GEIs). Identity recognition by gait generally involves gait representation, extraction, and classification. In this work, a modified GEI convolved with an ensemble of Gabor wavelets is proposed as a gait feature. Principal component analysis is then used to project the Gabor-wavelet-based gait features into a lower-dimension feature space for subsequent classification. Finally, support vector machine classifiers based on a radial basis function kernel are trained and utilized to recognize human identity. The major contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) the consideration of the shadow effect to yield a more complete segmentation of gait silhouettes; (2) the utilization of motion estimation to track people when walkers overlap; and (3) the derivation of modified GEIs to extract more useful gait information. Extensive performance evaluation shows a great improvement of recognition accuracy due to the use of shadow removal, motion estimation, and gait representation using the modified GEIs and Gabor wavelets.

  12. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    or unclothed  avatars ,  stick figures, or even skeletal models to support their analyses. The system will also allow trainees to  isolate specific...CCAD’s work focused on imposing these sequences on the Santos digital  human  avatar . An initial user interface for the training application was also...ability to detect variations in gait conditions for  skinned  avatar  vs. line‐skeletal  avatar , concurrent (side‐by‐side) image representation vs

  13. Modification of spastic gait through mechanical damping.

    PubMed

    Maki, B E; Rosen, M J; Simon, S R

    1985-01-01

    The effect of dissipative mechanical loads on spastic gait has been studied, to evaluate the feasibility of using mechanically damped orthoses to effect functional improvements in the gait of spastic patients. This concept is based on a hypothesis citing uninhibited, velocity-dependent stretch reflexes as a possible causal factor in spastic gait abnormalities, such as equinus and back-kneeing. In order to screen potential experimental subjects and to quantify velocity-dependent reflex behaviour, ankle rotation experiments and filmed gait analysis were performed. The results supported the existence of a velocity threshold. Orthosis simulation experiments were performed with one spastic subject, using a wearable, computer-controlled, electromechanical, below-knee orthosis simulator to apply a variety of damping loads to the ankle as the subject walked. Results indicated that appropriate damping can improve local joint kinematics. The damping causes a reduction in muscle stretch velocity which apparently results in reduced spastic reflex activity.

  14. Toward understanding the limits of gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongyi; Malave, Laura; Osuntogun, Adebola; Sudhakar, Preksha; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2004-08-01

    Most state of the art video-based gait recognition algorithms start from binary silhouettes. These silhouettes, defined as foreground regions, are usually detected by background subtraction methods, which results in holes or missed parts due to similarity of foreground and background color, and boundary errors due to video compression artifacts. Errors in low-level representation make it hard to understand the effect of certain conditions, such as surface and time, on gait recognition. In this paper, we present a part-level, manual silhouette database consisting of 71 subjects, over one gait cycle, with differences in surface, shoe-type, carrying condition, and time. We have a total of about 11,000 manual silhouette frames. The purpose of this manual silhouette database is twofold. First, this is a resource that we make available at http://www.GaitChallenge.org for use by the gait community to test and design better silhouette detection algorithms. These silhouettes can also be used to learn gait dynamics. Second, using the baseline gait recognition algorithm, which was specified along with the HumanID Gait Challenge problem, we show that performance from manual silhouettes is similar and only sometimes better than that from automated silhouettes detected by statistical background subtraction. Low performances when comparing sequences with differences in walking surfaces and time-variation are not fully explained by silhouette quality. We also study the recognition power in each body part and show that recognition based on just the legs is equal to that from the whole silhouette. There is also significant recognition power in the head and torso shape.

  15. A brain-spine interface alleviating gait deficits after spinal cord injury in primates.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Borton, David; Wagner, Fabien; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Buse, Nicolas; Gandar, Jerome; Barraud, Quentin; Xing, David; Rey, Elodie; Duis, Simone; Jianzhong, Yang; Ko, Wai Kin D; Li, Qin; Detemple, Peter; Denison, Tim; Micera, Silvestro; Bezard, Erwan; Bloch, Jocelyne; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-11-10

    Spinal cord injury disrupts the communication between the brain and the spinal circuits that orchestrate movement. To bypass the lesion, brain-computer interfaces have directly linked cortical activity to electrical stimulation of muscles, and have thus restored grasping abilities after hand paralysis. Theoretically, this strategy could also restore control over leg muscle activity for walking. However, replicating the complex sequence of individual muscle activation patterns underlying natural and adaptive locomotor movements poses formidable conceptual and technological challenges. Recently, it was shown in rats that epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord can reproduce the natural activation of synergistic muscle groups producing locomotion. Here we interface leg motor cortex activity with epidural electrical stimulation protocols to establish a brain-spine interface that alleviated gait deficits after a spinal cord injury in non-human primates. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were implanted with an intracortical microelectrode array in the leg area of the motor cortex and with a spinal cord stimulation system composed of a spatially selective epidural implant and a pulse generator with real-time triggering capabilities. We designed and implemented wireless control systems that linked online neural decoding of extension and flexion motor states with stimulation protocols promoting these movements. These systems allowed the monkeys to behave freely without any restrictions or constraining tethered electronics. After validation of the brain-spine interface in intact (uninjured) monkeys, we performed a unilateral corticospinal tract lesion at the thoracic level. As early as six days post-injury and without prior training of the monkeys, the brain-spine interface restored weight-bearing locomotion of the paralysed leg on a treadmill and overground. The implantable components integrated in the brain-spine interface have all been approved for

  16. Gait training facilitates central drive to ankle dorsiflexors in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon Francis; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-03-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy. The main underlying cause of these problems is early damage and lack of maturation of the corticospinal tract. In the present study we investigated whether 4 weeks of daily treadmill training with an incline may facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve the control of the ankle joint in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Classification System I:6, II:6, III:4) aged 5-14 years old, were recruited for the study. Evaluation of gait ability and intramuscular coherence was made twice before and twice after training with an interval of 1 month. Gait kinematics were recorded by 3D video analysis during treadmill walking with a velocity chosen by the child at the first evaluation. Foot pressure was measured by force sensitive foot soles during treadmill and over ground walking. EMG-EMG coherence was calculated from two separate electrode recordings placed over the tibialis anterior muscle. Training involved 30 min of walking daily on a treadmill with an incline for 30 days. Gait training was accompanied by significant increases in gait speed, incline on the treadmill, the maximal voluntary dorsiflexion torque, the number and amplitude of toe lifts late in the swing phase during gait and the weight exerted on the heel during the early stance phase of the gait cycle. EMG-EMG coherence in the beta and gamma frequency bands recorded from tibialis anterior muscle increased significantly when compared to coherence before training. The largest changes in coherence with training were observed for children <10 years of age. Importantly, in contrast to training-induced EMG increases, the increase in coherence was maintained at the follow-up measurement 1 month after training. Changes in the strength of coherence in the beta and gamma band were positively correlated with improvements in the subjects' ability to lift the toes in the swing phase. These

  17. Altered vision destabilizes gait in older persons.

    PubMed

    Helbostad, Jorunn L; Vereijken, Beatrix; Hesseberg, Karin; Sletvold, Olav

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of dim light and four experimentally induced changes in vision on gait speed and footfall and trunk parameters in older persons walking on level ground. Using a quasi-experimental design, gait characteristics were assessed in full light, dim light, and in dim light combined with manipulations resulting in reduced depth vision, double vision, blurred vision, and tunnel vision, respectively. A convenience sample of 24 home-dwelling older women and men (mean age 78.5 years, SD 3.4) with normal vision for their age and able to walk at least 10 m without assistance participated. Outcome measures were gait speed and spatial and temporal parameters of footfall and trunk acceleration, derived from an electronic gait mat and accelerometers. Dim light alone had no effect. Vision manipulations combined with dim light had effect on most footfall parameters but few trunk parameters. The largest effects were found regarding double and tunnel vision. Men increased and women decreased gait speed following manipulations (p=0.017), with gender differences also in stride velocity variability (p=0.017) and inter-stride medio-lateral trunk acceleration variability (p=0.014). Gender effects were related to differences in body height and physical functioning. Results indicate that visual problems lead to a more cautious and unstable gait pattern even under relatively simple conditions. This points to the importance of assessing vision in older persons and correcting visual impairments where possible.

  18. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  19. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Snekkenes, Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration) of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion) under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  20. ES and H-compatible lubrication for duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Two ES and H-compatible lubricants (environment, safety, and health) for duplex bearing applications and one hybrid material duplex bearing were evaluated and compared against duplex bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in strong link mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid duplex bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, duplex bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and duplex bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. Bearings with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls performed worse than bearings lubricated with Vydax, but their performance would still be acceptable for most applications. Bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers had varying amounts of film on the bearings. This affected the performance of the bearings. Bearings with a uniform coating performed to acceptable levels, but bearings with no visible MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers did not perform as well as bearings with the other coatings. Unless process controls are incorporated in the sputtering process or the bearings are screened, they do not appear to be acceptable for duplex bearing applications.

  1. Correlation between balance and gait according to pelvic displacement in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seon Woong; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations of balance and gait according to pelvic displacement in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 58 stroke patients who had been admitted to a hospital. [Methods] A Global Postural System was used to measure pelvic displacement. To measure the balance ability, a Tetrax balance system was used to measure the weight distribution index and stability index. Gait ability was measured during the 10-Meter Walking Test and Figure-of-8 Walk Test. [Results] The results of this study showed that was significant positive correlation between the anterior superior iliac spine height difference in pelvic displacement and the weight distribution index and significant positive correlation between the posterior superior iliac spine height difference and the stability index in the normal position with the eyes closed. Statistically significant positive correlation also was found between the anterior superior iliac spine height difference and the straight and curved gait ability. [Conclusion] The increased pelvic displacement in stroke patients results in a decrease in balance ability and gait speed. This suggests that control of pelvic displacement is necessary before functional training for patients with stroke. PMID:26311948

  2. Effects of Spaceflight and Hindlimb Suspension on the Posture and Gait of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. A.; Corcoran, M.; Daunton, N. G.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Instability of posture and gait in astronauts following spaceflight (SF) is thought to result from muscle atrophy and from changes in sensory-motor integration in the CNS (central nervous system) that occur during adaptation to microgravity (micro-G). Individuals are thought to have developed, during SF, adaptive changes for the processing of proprioceptive, vestibular and visual sensory inputs with reduced weighting of gravity-based signals and increased weighting of visual and tactile cues. This sensory-motor rearrangement in the CNS apparently occurs to optimize neuromuscular system function for effective movement and postural control in micro-G. However, these adaptive changes are inappropriate for the 1 g environment and lead to disruptions in posture and gait on return to Earth. Few reports are available on the effects of SF on the motor behavior of animals. Rats studied following 18.5 - 19.5 days of SF in the COSMOS program were described as being ..'inert, apathetic, slow'.. and generally unstable. The hindlimbs of these rats were ..'thrust out from the body with fingers pulled apart and the shin unnaturally pronated'. On the 6th postflight day motor behavior was described as similar to that observed in preflight observations. Improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to these changes can be obtained in animal models through detailed analysis of neural and molecular mechanisms related to gait. To begin this process the posture and gait of rats were examined following exposure to either SF or hindlimb suspension (HLS), and during recovery from these conditions.

  3. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling.

    PubMed

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  4. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  5. Changes in Post-Stroke Gait Biomechanics Induced by One Session of Gait Training.

    PubMed

    Kesar, T M; Reisman, D S; Higginson, J S; Awad, L N; Binder-Macleod, S A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether one session of targeted locomotor training can induce measurable improvements in the post-stroke gait impairments. Thirteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis participated in one locomotor training session combining fast treadmill training and functional electrical stimulation (FES) of ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscles. Three dimensional gait analysis was performed to assess within-session changes (after versus before training) in gait biomechanics at the subject's self-selected speed without FES. Our results showed that one session of locomotor training resulted in significant improvements in peak anterior ground reaction force (AGRF) and AGRF integral for the paretic leg. Additionally, individual subject data showed that a majority of study participants demonstrated improvements in the primary outcome variables following the training session. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that a single session of intense, targeted post-stroke locomotor retraining can induce significant improvements in post-stroke gait biomechanics. We posit that the within-session changes induced by a single exposure to gait training can be used to predict whether an individual is responsive to a particular gait intervention, and aid with the development of individualized gait retraining strategies. Future studies are needed to determine whether these single-session improvements in biomechanics are accompanied by short-term changes in corticospinal excitability, and whether single-session responses can serve as predictors for the longer-term effects of the intervention with other targeted gait interventions.

  6. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  7. Modulation of gait coordination by subthalamic stimulation improves freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herzog, Jan; Seifert, Elena; Stolze, Henning; Falk, Daniela; Reese, René; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther

    2011-04-01

    The effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on gait coordination and freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease is incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which modulation of symmetry and coordination between legs by subthalamic deep brain stimulation alters the frequency and duration of freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease. We recruited 13 post-subthalamic deep brain stimulation patients with Parkinson's disease with off freezing of gait and evaluated them in the following 4 conditions: subthalamic deep brain stimulation on (ON) and stimulation off (OFF), 50% reduction of stimulation voltage for the leg with shorter step length (worse side reduction) and for the leg with longer step length (better side reduction). Gait analysis was performed on a treadmill and recorded by an optoelectronic analysis system. We measured frequency and duration of freezing of gait episodes. Bilateral coordination of gait was assessed by the Phase Coordination Index, quantifying the ability to generate antiphase stepping. From the OFF to the ON state, freezing of gait improved in frequency (2.0 ± 0.4 to 1.4 ± 0.5 episodes) and duration (12.2 ± 2.6 to 2.6 ± 0.8 seconds; P = .005). Compared with the ON state, only better side reduction further reduced freezing of gait frequency (0.2 ± 0.2) and duration of episodes (0.2 ± 0.2 seconds; P = .03); worse side reduction did not change frequency (1.3 ± 0.4) but increased freezing of gait duration (5.2 ± 2.1 seconds). The better side reduction-associated improvements were accompanied by normalization of gait coordination, as measured by phase coordination index (16.5% ± 6.0%), which was significantly lower than in the other 3 conditions. Reduction of stimulation voltage in the side contralateral to the leg with longer step length improves frequency and duration of freezing of gait through normalization of gait symmetry and coordination in subthalamic deep brain

  8. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings.

  9. Magnetic bearing systems for gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Iannello, V.

    1995-12-31

    As the thrust-to-weight ratio for next generation gas turbine engines is increased, engine designers are requiring lower weight, higher temperature lubrication systems. Magnetic bearing systems are under development to meet these needs. This paper describes some of the advanced features of these systems.

  10. Attempt toward a development of aquatic exercise device for gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Komatsu, Fumie; Takagi, Motoki; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2014-05-23

    Abstract Purpose: To develop an aquatic exercise device to facilitate locomotive motor output and achieve repetitive physiological gait patterns to improve movement dysfunctions. Methods: A custom designed leg movement apparatus (LMA) consisted of closed 4-linkage mechanisms and one-length changeable link using a spring. Three-dimensional motions and electromyographic (EMG) activities were recorded in eight healthy subjects to evaluate the reproducibility of the physiological gait patterns using the LMA with or without a spring apparatus in water. Results: Using the LMA with a spring apparatus compared to walking in water, the foot trajectories and the time course of the elevation angles in each lower limb joint kinematics were preserved. The time-series of the EMG showed reciprocal modulation between agonist and antagonist muscle groups in the hip and ankle joints. However, the amplitudes of the tibialis anterior muscle in the first half and rectus femoris in the last half of the movement cycle were reduced using the LMA with a spring apparatus. Conclusion: We developed a novel aquatic exercise device to reproduce physiological gait patterns. The LMA with a spring apparatus would be particularly valuable in therapy for movement dysfunctions to facilitate locomotive motor outputs. Implications for Rehabilitation The leg movement apparatus with spring for underwater use (LMA) would be effective gait training to induce the locomotor-like EMG activities. Hydrotherapy with the LMA has advantages over the partial body weight support treadmill training on land with a robotic device; (1) the LMA is electrically and mechanically safe, and (2) the LMA would require self-effort to generate the gait pattern for movement disorders, or also enable passive gait training by the physiotherapists.

  11. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  12. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  13. A Validated Smartphone-Based Assessment of Gait and Gait Variability in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Yee Sien; Zhu, Shenggao; Tan, Dawn M.; Anderson, Boyd; Schlaug, Gottfried; Wang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Background A well-established connection exists between increased gait variability and greater fall likelihood in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, a portable, validated means of quantifying gait variability (and testing the efficacy of any intervention) remains lacking. Furthermore, although rhythmic auditory cueing continues to receive attention as a promising gait therapy for PD, its widespread delivery remains bottlenecked. The present paper describes a smartphone-based mobile application (“SmartMOVE”) to address both needs. Methods The accuracy of smartphone-based gait analysis (utilizing the smartphone’s built-in tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope to calculate successive step times and step lengths) was validated against two heel contact–based measurement devices: heel-mounted footswitch sensors (to capture step times) and an instrumented pressure sensor mat (to capture step lengths). 12 PD patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls walked along a 26-m path during self-paced and metronome-cued conditions, with all three devices recording simultaneously. Results Four outcome measures of gait and gait variability were calculated. Mixed-factorial analysis of variance revealed several instances in which between-group differences (e.g., increased gait variability in PD patients relative to healthy controls) yielded medium-to-large effect sizes (eta-squared values), and cueing-mediated changes (e.g., decreased gait variability when PD patients walked with auditory cues) yielded small-to-medium effect sizes—while at the same time, device-related measurement error yielded small-to-negligible effect sizes. Conclusion These findings highlight specific opportunities for smartphone-based gait analysis to serve as an alternative to conventional gait analysis methods (e.g., footswitch systems or sensor-embedded walkways), particularly when those methods are cost-prohibitive, cumbersome, or inconvenient. PMID:26517720

  14. Modeling and simulation of normal and hemiparetic gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengas, Lely A.; Camargo, Esperanza; Sanchez, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Gait is the collective term for the two types of bipedal locomotion, walking and running. This paper is focused on walking. The analysis of human gait is of interest to many different disciplines, including biomechanics, human-movement science, rehabilitation and medicine in general. Here we present a new model that is capable of reproducing the properties of walking, normal and pathological. The aim of this paper is to establish the biomechanical principles that underlie human walking by using Lagrange method. The constraint forces of Rayleigh dissipation function, through which to consider the effect on the tissues in the gait, are included. Depending on the value of the factor present in the Rayleigh dissipation function, both normal and pathological gait can be simulated. First of all, we apply it in the normal gait and then in the permanent hemiparetic gait. Anthropometric data of adult person are used by simulation, and it is possible to use anthropometric data for children but is necessary to consider existing table of anthropometric data. Validation of these models includes simulations of passive dynamic gait that walk on level ground. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective of gait analysis, focusing on the kinematics and kinetics of gait. There have been studies and simulations to show normal human gait, but few of them have focused on abnormal, especially hemiparetic gait. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with gait measurements show that the model can reproduce the significant characteristics of normal gait.

  15. On the imitation of CP gait patterns by healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Taysir; Megrot, Fabrice; Fradet, Laetitia; Marin, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    The comparison of gait imitated by healthy subjects with real pathological CP gaits is expected to contribute to a better distinction between primary deviations directly induced by neurological troubles and secondary compensatory deviations in relation with the biomechanics of the pathological gait. However, the ability of healthy subjects for imitating typical CP gaits such as "jump" or "crouch" gaits still remains to be determined. The present study proposes to investigate healthy subjects imitating these typical CP gait patterns. 10 healthy adult subjects performed three types of gait: one "normal" and two imitated "jump" and "crouch" gaits. Kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle were computed in the sagittal plane. Rectified normalized EMG was also analysed. Our data were compared with reference data. For the statistical analysis, the coefficient of multicorrelation has been used. It has been demonstrated that healthy subjects were able to voluntarily modify their gait pattern with a high level of intra-session and inter-subject reproducibility as quantified by a CMC values higher than 0.76 for all parameters. The comparison with literature reference data showed that healthy subjects not could perfectly reproduce a CP gait, however could only simulate the main characteristics of "crouch" and "jump" gaits pattern. As a perspective, pathological gaits imitated by healthy subjects could be used as valuable additional material to analyse the relationship between a voluntarily modified posture and the altered muscle activation to explore a new paradigm on pathological gait pattern analysis and musculoskeletal modelling.

  16. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  17. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  18. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  19. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  20. Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Alston L.

    1993-01-01

    Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps offer high reliability and low cost. The fundamental cryogenic foil bearing technology has been validated in both liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. High load capacity, excellent rotor dynamics, and negligible bearing wear after over 100 starts and stops, and over many hours of testing, were observed in both fluids. An experimental liquid hydrogen foil bearing turbopump was also successfully demonstrated. The results indicate excellent stability, high reliability, wide throttle-ability, low bearing cooling flow, and two-phase bearing operability. A liquid oxygen foil bearing turbopump has been built and is being tested at NASA MSFC.

  1. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  2. Treadmill training with partial body weight support after stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Restoration and improvement of gait after stroke are major aspects of neurorehabilitation. Mobilization out of the bed into the wheelchair and verticalisation with the help of a standing frame are first steps. With the patient cardiovascular stable, gait restoration is put on the agenda. Instead of tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory maneuvers, patients should practice complex gait cycles repetitively. Treadmill training with partial body weight support enables the harness-secured patients to practice numerous steps assisted by two or three therapists. In controlled studies, it proved equally effective as walking on the floor. Gait machines, as the Lokomat or the Gait Trainer GTI, intend to relieve the strenuous effort for the therapists. For the GTI, several controlled trials showed a superior effect in acute stroke patients with respect to walking ability and velocity. For the ambulatory patient, aerobic treadmill training is effective to improve speed and endurance without worsening gait quality. Belt velocity and inclination are gradually increased so that the patients reach a predefined target heart rate. On the belt, patients walk more symmetrically, and higher velocities result in a facilitation of paretic muscles and render gait more efficient. In summary, gait rehabilitation has seen dramatic changes over the last years. More is to be expected.

  3. Predisability And Gait Patterns In Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Joe; Xue, Xiaonan

    2010-01-01

    Presence of performance inconsistency during repeated assessments of gait may reflect underlying subclinical disease, and help shed light on the earliest stages of disablement. We studied inter-session fluctuations on three selected gait measures (velocity, stride length, and stride length variability) during normal pace walking as well as during a cognitively demanding ‘walking while talking’ condition using a repeated measurement burst design (six sessions within a 2-week period) in 71 nondisabled and nondemented community residing older adults, 40 with predisability (does activities of daily living unassisted but with difficulty). Subjects with predisability had slower gait velocity and shorter stride length on both the normal and walking while talking conditions at baseline compared to nondisabled subjects. However, there was no significant pattern of fluctuations across the six sessions on the three selected gait variables comparing the two groups during normal walking as well as on the walking while talking conditions. Our findings support consistency of gait measurements during the earliest stages of disability. PMID:21050762

  4. Gait information flow indicates complex motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Dirk; Kletzin, Ulf; Adler, Daniela; Adler, Steffen; Meissner, Winfried; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2005-08-01

    Gait-related back movements require coordination of multiple extremities including the flexible trunk. Ageing and chronic back pain influence these adjustments. These complex coordinations can advantageously be quantified by information theoretically based communication measures such as the gait information flow (GIF). Nine back pain patients (aged 61+/-10 yr) and 12 controls (aged 38+/-10 yr) were investigated during normal walking across a distance of 300 m. The back movements were measured as distances between characteristic points (cervical spine CS, thoracic spine TS, lumbar spine LS) by the sonoSens Monitor, a system for mobile motion analysis. Gait information flow and regularity indices (RI1: short prediction horizon of 100 ms, RI2: longer prediction horizon of walking period) were assessed as communication characteristics. All indices were non-parametrically tested for group differences. Sensitivity and specificity were assessed by bivariate logistic regression models. We found regularity indices systematically dependent on measurement points, information flow horizon and groups. In the patients RI1 was increased, but RI2 was decreased in comparison to the control group. These results quantitatively characterize the altered complex communication in the patients. We conclude that ageing and/or chronic back pain related dysfunctions of gait can advantageously be monitored by gait information flow characteristics of back movements measured as distances between characteristics points at the back surface.

  5. The asymmetric gait toenail unit sign.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Casal, German; Appel, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to resolve a diagnostic problem and report toenail unit changes attributable to shoe friction that resemble onychomycosis, but that are fungus-negative, and identify common skeletal causes in patients with an asymmetric walking gait. X-ray and clinical feet inspections were performed to evaluate skeletal components that change normal foot biodynamics. Forty-nine patients, all dermatophyte-negative, were reviewed. All patients were those seen in our private practice who demonstrated skeletal and toenail unit abnormalities such as onycholysis, nail bed keratosis resembling distal subungual onychomycosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, distal toe skin keratosis, a diagnostic nail plate shape, as well as several skeletal abnormalities. The clinical abnormalities of the asymmetric gait syndrome include onycholysis, nail bed keratosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, and a diagnostic nail plate shape. By the patient's history, the skeletal findings that were present worsened with age and, in many patients, they were familial. Onychomycosis does not lead to an asymmetric gait nail problem, asymmetric gait toenail does not favor dermatophyte infection, and not all nail dystrophies are the result of an asymmetric walking gait.

  6. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-09-10

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, 'scrunching', which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  7. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  8. Computational intelligent gait-phase detection system to identify pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Chathuri M; Senanayake, S M N Arosha

    2010-09-01

    An intelligent gait-phase detection algorithm based on kinematic and kinetic parameters is presented in this paper. The gait parameters do not vary distinctly for each gait phase; therefore, it is complex to differentiate gait phases with respect to a threshold value. To overcome this intricacy, the concept of fuzzy logic was applied to detect gait phases with respect to fuzzy membership values. A real-time data-acquisition system was developed consisting of four force-sensitive resistors and two inertial sensors to obtain foot-pressure patterns and knee flexion/extension angle, respectively. The detected gait phases could be further analyzed to identify abnormality occurrences, and hence, is applicable to determine accurate timing for feedback. The large amount of data required for quality gait analysis necessitates the utilization of information technology to store, manage, and extract required information. Therefore, a software application was developed for real-time acquisition of sensor data, data processing, database management, and a user-friendly graphical-user interface as a tool to simplify the task of clinicians. The experiments carried out to validate the proposed system are presented along with the results analysis for normal and pathological walking patterns.

  9. Afferent control of human stance and gait: evidence for blocking of group I afferents during gait.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Quintern, J; Berger, W

    1985-01-01

    The cerebral potentials (c.p.) evoked by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve during stance and in the various phases of gait of normal subjects were compared with the c.p. and leg muscle e.m.g. responses evoked by perturbations of stance and gait. Over the whole step cycle of gait the c.p. evoked by an electrical stimulus were of smaller amplitude (3 microV and 9 microV, respectively) than that seen in the stance condition, and appeared with a longer latency (mean times to first positive peak: 63 and 43 ms, respectively). When the electrical stimulus was applied during stance after ischaemic blockade of group I afferents, the c.p. were similar to those evoked during gait. The c.p. evoked by perturbations were larger in amplitude than those produced by the electrical stimulus, but similar in latencies in both gait and stance (mean 26 microV and 40 microV; 65 ms and 42 ms, respectively) and configurations. The large gastrocnemius e.m.g. responses evoked by the stance and gait perturbations arose with a latency of 65 to 70 ms. Only in the stance condition was a smaller, shorter latency (40 ms) response seen. It is concluded that during gait the signals of group I afferents are blocked at both segmental and supraspinal levels which was tested by tibial nerve stimulation. It is suggested that the e.m.g. responses induced in the leg by gait perturbations are evoked by group II afferents and mediated via a spinal pathway. The c.p. evoked during gait most probably reflect the processing of this group II input by supraspinal motor centres for the coordination of widespread arm and trunk muscle activation, necessary to restablish body equilibrium.

  10. Human Odometry Verifies the Symmetry Perspective on Bipedal Gaits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, M. T.; Harrison, Steven J.; Frank, Till D.; Carello, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Bipedal gaits have been classified on the basis of the group symmetry of the minimal network of identical differential equations (alias "cells") required to model them. Primary gaits are characterized by dihedral symmetry, whereas secondary gaits are characterized by a lower, cyclic symmetry. This fact was used in a test of human…

  11. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  12. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running.

    PubMed

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback.

  13. Design of a controlled-brake orthosis for FES-aided gait.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, M; Durfee, W K

    1996-03-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a means of restoring gait to individuals with spinal cord injury, but the performance of most FES-aided gait systems is hampered by the rapid muscle fatigue which results from stimulated muscle contraction and the inadequate control of joint torques necessary to produce desired limb trajectories. The controlled-brake orthosis (CBO) addresses these limitations by utilizing FES in combination with a long-leg brace that contains controllable friction brakes at the knees and hips. A laboratory version of the CBO utilizing computer-controlled magnetic particle brakes at the joints was designed and constructed, and preliminary results with a single spinal cord injury (SCI) subject have demonstrated reduced fatigue and more repeatable gait trajectories when compared to FES-aided gait without the brace. Significant work remains to demonstrate the efficacy of the concept across a wide range of SCI subjects and to design a system which meets appropriate user requirements of size, weight, cosmesis, ease of use and cost. The primary purpose of the paper is to detail the design of the CBO.

  14. Effects of 8 weeks of mat-based Pilates exercise on gait in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Roh, SuYeon; Gil, Ho Jong; Yoon, Sukhoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week program of Pilates exercise on gait in chronic hemiplegia patients and to determine whether or not it can be used for rehabilitation in postsrtoke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty individuals with unilateral chronic hemiparetic stroke (age, 66.1 ± 4.4 yrs; height, 162.3 ± 8.3 cm; weight, 67.4 ± 12.3 kg) participated in this study and were randomly allocated equally to either a Pilates exercise group or a control group. To identify the effects of Pilates exercise, a 3-D motion analysis with 8 infrared cameras was performed. [Results] For the gait parameters, improvements were found in the Pilates exercise group for all variables, and statistical significance was observed for stride length, gait velocity, knee range of motion and hip range of motion. For the asymmetry indexes, insignificant improvements were found for all variables in the Pilates exercise group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, an 8-week program of Pilates exercise had a positive influence on improving the gait ability of poststroke patients, and the intervention could be applied to poststroke patients with various levels of physical disability by adjusting the intensity of training. PMID:27799706

  15. Effects of 8 weeks of mat-based Pilates exercise on gait in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Roh, SuYeon; Gil, Ho Jong; Yoon, Sukhoon

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week program of Pilates exercise on gait in chronic hemiplegia patients and to determine whether or not it can be used for rehabilitation in postsrtoke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty individuals with unilateral chronic hemiparetic stroke (age, 66.1 ± 4.4 yrs; height, 162.3 ± 8.3 cm; weight, 67.4 ± 12.3 kg) participated in this study and were randomly allocated equally to either a Pilates exercise group or a control group. To identify the effects of Pilates exercise, a 3-D motion analysis with 8 infrared cameras was performed. [Results] For the gait parameters, improvements were found in the Pilates exercise group for all variables, and statistical significance was observed for stride length, gait velocity, knee range of motion and hip range of motion. For the asymmetry indexes, insignificant improvements were found for all variables in the Pilates exercise group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, an 8-week program of Pilates exercise had a positive influence on improving the gait ability of poststroke patients, and the intervention could be applied to poststroke patients with various levels of physical disability by adjusting the intensity of training.

  16. Kinematics and kinetics of gait on stilts: identification of risk factors associated with construction stilt use.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Sharon S; Pan, Christopher S; Bhattacharya, Amit

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated kinematics and kinetic strategies and identified risk factors associated with gait on stilts. A six-camera motion-analysis system and two force platforms were used to test 20 construction workers for straight walking or turning, with or without carrying tools while wearing safety shoes or stilts at different heights. The results indicated that gait on stilts is characterised by increases in stride length, step width and the percentage of double support period, decreases in cadence, minimum foot clearance and a weaker heel-strike and push-off. Stilts place greater joint loadings on lower extremities to compensate for the added weight and limitation in joint mobility. Smaller foot clearances found for gait on stilts constitute an increased risk for tripping over obstacles. Workers may need to avoid prolonged use of stilts to alleviate stresses on the joints. This study was conducted to determine to what extent stilts alter the gait strategies and to explain the compensatory movements. Prior to this study, there has been little substantive research to evaluate the stresses and potential injuries associated with stilts.

  17. A stochastic model of human gait dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; M. Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Ch. Ivanov, Plamen; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a stochastic model of gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, that reproduces distinctive statistical properties of normal human walking. By tuning one model parameter, the transition (hopping) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood-including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation. The model also generates time series with multifractal spectra whose broadness depends only on this parameter. Moreover, we find that the volatility exponent increases monotonically as a function of the width of the multifractal spectrum, suggesting the possibility of a change in multifractality with maturation.

  18. Periodic gaits for the CMU ambler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Swaminathan; Dwivedi, Suren N.

    1989-01-01

    The configuration of the Carnegie Mellon University Ambler, a six legged autonomous walking vehicle for exploring Mars, enables the recovery of a trailing leg past the leading leg to reduce the energy expenditure in terrain interactions. Gaits developed for this unprecedented configuration are described. A stability criterion was developed which ensures stability of the vehicle in the event of failure of any one of the supporting legs. Periodic gaits developed for the Ambler utilize the Ambler's unique abilities, and continuously satisfy the stability criterion.

  19. Gait analysis by high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-05-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via electromyography, i.e., the measurement of muscle activity. Physics, biology, and mathematics come together in this practical investigation work at a rather high level. It shows that science learning at school can resemble science practice in research laboratories, provided that students have adequate tools.

  20. Is angular momentum in the horizontal plane during gait a controlled variable?

    PubMed

    Thielemans, Valerie; Meyns, Pieter; Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that angular momentum in the horizontal plane during human gait is controlled (i.e., kept minimal). However, this has not been explored in conditions when angular momentum of different segments is manipulated explicitly. In order to examine the behavior of angular momentum, 12 participants walked in 17 conditions in which angular momentum of either the arms or legs was manipulated. Subjects walked at different step lengths, different speeds and with an additional weight on either the wrist or ankle. Angular momentum of total body, arms and legs was calculated from gait kinematics. Increasing step length increased total body and leg angular momentum. When weight was added to the limbs, arm and leg angular momentum were affected and counteracted each other, so that total body angular momentum did not change. Moreover, increasing walking speed increased arm, leg and total body angular momentum. Thus, it may be concluded that if angular momentum is controlled (which only seems to be the case for conditions when weights are added), it is not strictly controlled in all gait conditions (as it may increase by walking faster/with larger steps).

  1. Parkinson's disease classification using gait analysis via deterministic learning.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Qinghui; Wang, Ying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-10-28

    Gait analysis plays an important role in maintaining the well-being of human mobility and health care, and is a valuable tool for obtaining quantitative information on motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this paper, we propose a method to classify (diagnose) patients with PD and healthy control subjects using gait analysis via deterministic learning theory. The classification approach consists of two phases: a training phase and a classification phase. In the training phase, gait characteristics represented by the gait dynamics are derived from the vertical ground reaction forces under the usual and self-selected paces of the subjects. The gait dynamics underlying gait patterns of healthy controls and PD patients are locally accurately approximated by radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. The obtained knowledge of approximated gait dynamics is stored in constant RBF networks. The gait patterns of healthy controls and PD patients constitute a training set. In the classification phase, a bank of dynamical estimators is constructed for all the training gait patterns. Prior knowledge of gait dynamics represented by the constant RBF networks is embedded in the estimators. By comparing the set of estimators with a test gait pattern of a certain PD patient to be classified (diagnosed), a set of classification errors are generated. The average L1 norms of the errors are taken as the classification measure between the dynamics of the training gait patterns and the dynamics of the test PD gait pattern according to the smallest error principle. When the gait patterns of 93 PD patients and 73 healthy controls are classified with five-fold cross-validation method, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the results are 96.39%, 96.77% and 95.89%, respectively. Based on the results, it may be claimed that the features and the classifiers used in the present study could effectively separate the gait patterns between the groups of PD patients and healthy

  2. Investigating Science through Bears (and Teddy Bears).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karlene Ray

    1997-01-01

    Presents cooperative classroom projects using science as the initial basis for the study of bears. These projects may also involve other areas of the curriculum such as mathematics, art, and music. "Black Bear" activities include following a park ranger to study our National Parks and researching and building a full-sized brown bear…

  3. Gait analysis in lower-limb amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Gait analysis combined with sound clinical judgment plays an important role in elucidating the factors involved in the pathologic prosthetic gait and the selection and effects of available interventions to optimize it. Detailed clinical evaluation of walking contributes to the analysis of the prosthetic gait, but evaluation in the gait laboratory using kinetic and kinematic data is often necessary to quantify and identify the particular contributions of the variables impacting the gait with confidence and assess the results of such intervention. The same approach can be considered when selecting prosthetic components and assessing leg length in this patient population.

  4. Fluctuation and synchronization of gait intervals and gait force profiles distinguish stages of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Ronny; Plotnik, Meir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on the long-term fluctuation and phase synchronization properties of gait timing (series of interstride intervals) as well as gait force profiles (series characterizing the morphological changes between the steps). We find that the fluctuations in the gait timing are significantly larger for PD patients and early PD patients, who were not treated yet with medication, compared to age-matched healthy controls. Simultaneously, the long-term correlations and the phase synchronization of right and left leg are significantly reduced in both types of PD patients. Surprisingly, long-term correlations of the gait force profiles are relatively weak for treated PD patients and healthy controls, while they are significantly larger for early PD patients. The results support the idea that timing and morphology of recordings obtained from a complex system can contain complementary information. PMID:18163154

  5. Fluctuation and synchronization of gait intervals and gait force profiles distinguish stages of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Ronny; Plotnik, Meir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on the long-term fluctuation and phase synchronization properties of gait timing (series of interstride intervals) as well as gait force profiles (series characterizing the morphological changes between the steps). We find that the fluctuations in the gait timing are significantly larger for PD patients and early PD patients, who were not treated yet with medication, compared to age-matched healthy controls. Simultaneously, the long-term correlations and the phase synchronization of right and left leg are significantly reduced in both types of PD patients. Surprisingly, long-term correlations of the gait force profiles are relatively weak for treated PD patients and healthy controls, while they are significantly larger for early PD patients. The results support the idea that timing and morphology of recordings obtained from a complex system can contain complementary information.

  6. Design, simulation and modelling of auxiliary exoskeleton to improve human gait cycle.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, O; Maleki, A; Jamshidi, N

    2017-03-01

    Exoskeleton is a walking assistance device that improves human gait cycle through providing auxiliary force and transferring physical load to the stronger muscles. This device takes the natural state of organ and follows its natural movement. Exoskeleton functions as an auxiliary device to help those with disabilities in hip and knee such as devotees, elderly farmers and agricultural machinery operators who suffer from knee complications. In this research, an exoskeleton designed with two screw jacks at knee and hip joints. To simulate extension and flexion movements of the leg joints, bearings were used at the end of hip and knee joints. The generated torque and motion angles of these joints obtained as well as the displacement curves of screw jacks in the gait cycle. Then, the human gait cycle was simulated in stance and swing phases and the obtained torque curves were compared. The results indicated that they followed the natural circle of the generated torque in joints with a little difference from each other. The maximum displacement obtained 4 and 6 cm in hip and knee joints jack respectively. The maximum torques in hip and knee joints were generated in foot contact phase. Also the minimum torques in hip and knee joints were generated in toe off and heel off phases respectively.

  7. Introduction to magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skowronski, Lori; Bisese, Anne

    1993-01-01

    Multi-axis suspension has several advantages over single axis system, in that it provides control of an object with precision in two or three orthogonal axes. In this report, we discuss the primary use of magnetic-bearing suspension and it's relevance to what was formally known as NASA's Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). This system is an experimental pointing system with applications for the space shuttle and the space station programs. The objectives behind this magnetic suspension research project are to provide insight to the use of the ASPS configuration, to control the solar panels of the space station. This is important to maintain the correct position of the panels in relation to the sun and orbiting space station for the continuous supply of solar energy. Since the panels are suspended, they can be aligned with minimum outside interference. The approach of using magnetic suspension technology guarantees mechanical isolation since there are no contacting surfaces. This isolation reduces vibration transmission and mechanical wear which in turn extends the life of the payload and of the carrier. It should be noted that ASPS has a high pointing accuracy along the line of 0.01 arc-second. This research will be done in a laboratory setting by incorporating five bearing stations and one motion control station. We will attempt to suspend an object of dead weight similar to that of a solar panel. The long term applications may include deep-space navigation, fire control in weapon systems, and an improved mass transit system.

  8. Estimates of gastrocnemius muscle length during simulated pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Rao, Smita; Dietz, Fred; Yack, H John

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare estimates of gastrocnemius muscle length (GML) obtained using a segmented versus straight-line model in children. Kinematic data were acquired on eleven typically developing children as they walked under the following conditions: normal gait, crouch gait, equinus gait, and crouch with equinus gait. Maximum and minimum GML, and GML change were calculated using two models: straight-line and segmented. A two-way RMANOVA was used to compare GML characteristics. Results indicated that maximum GML and GML change during simulated pathological gait patterns were influenced by model used to calculate gastrocnemius muscle length (interaction: P = .004 and P = .026). Maximum GML was lower in the simulated gait patterns compared with normal gait (P < .001). Maximum GML was higher with the segmented model compared with the straight-line model (P = .030). Using either model, GML change in equinus gait and crouch with equinus gait was lower compared with normal gait (P < .001). Overall, minimum GML estimated with the segmented model was higher compared with the straight-line model (P < .01). The key findings of our study indicate that GML is significantly affected by both gait pattern and method of estimation. The GML estimates tended to be lower with the straight-line model versus the segmented model.

  9. [Three-Dimensional Ultrasonic Gait Analysis in Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed

    Putzhammer, Albert; Heindl, Bernhard; Müller, Jürgen; Broll, Karin; Pfeiff, Liane; Perfahl, Maria; Hess, Linda; Koch, Horst

    2003-05-01

    Schizophrenic disorders as well as neuroleptic treatment can affect locomotion. The study assessed the influence of neuroleptic treatment on human gait via ultrasonic topometric gait analysis. In a control sample the test system proved high test-retest-reliability. Spatial and temporal gait parameters were assessed in schizophrenic patients without neuroleptic treatment (n = 12) and under treatment with conventional neuroleptics (n = 14) and re-assessed after treatment change to the atypical neuroleptic olanzapine in a repeated measures design. After switch from conventional neuroleptics to olanzapine patients showed an increase of gait velocity (p gait is affected by conventional neuroleptic treatment. The degree of impairment can be objectively measured by testing spatio-temporal and kinematic gait parameters via three-dimensional ultrasonic gait analysis.

  10. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The capability to quantify gait characteristics through a wireless accelerometer iPod application in an effectively autonomous environment may alleviate the progressive strain on highly specific medical resources. The iPod consists of the inherent attributes imperative for robust gait quantification, such as a three dimensional accelerometer, data storage, flexible software, and the capacity for wireless transmission of the gait data through email. Based on the synthesis of the integral components of the iPod, a wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics has been tested and evaluated in an essentially autonomous environment. The quantified gait acceleration waveforms were wirelessly transmitted using email for postprocessing. The site for the gait experiment occurred in a remote location relative to the location where the postprocessing was conducted. The wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics demonstrated sufficient accuracy and consistency.

  12. Losses of Superconductor Journal Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Hull, J. R.; Han, S. C.; Jeong, N. H.; Oh, J. M.; Sung, T. H.

    2004-06-01

    A high-temperature superconductor (HTS) journal bearing was studied for rotational loss. Two HTS bearings support the rotor at top and bottom. The rotor weight is 4 kg and the length is about 300 mm. Both the top and bottom bearings have two permanent magnet (PM) rings with an iron pole piece separating them. Each HTS journal bearing is composed of six pieces of superconductor blocks of size 35×25×10 mm. The HTS blocks are encased in a cryochamber through which liquid nitrogen flows. The inner spool of the cryochamber is made from G-10 to reduce eddy current loss, and the rest of the cryochamber is stainless steel. The magnetic field from the PM rings is < 10 mT on the stainless part. The rotational drag was measured over the same speed range at several chamber pressures. Results indicate that a chamber pressure of 0.4 mtorr is sufficiently low to minimize windage loss, and the 10 mT design criterion for the magnetic field on the stainless part of the cryochamber is too high.

  13. Gait identification from invisible shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Yumi; Uchino, Koji; Kurazume, Ryo; Stoica, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces a person identification system that uses as input the shadow images of a walking person, as projected by multiple lights(in this application invisible/infrared lights); the system uses a database of examples of shadows images of a number of people who walk. While it is accepted that personal identification has a higher correct classification rate if views from multiple cameras are used, most systems use only one camera, mainly because (i) Installation in real-world environments is easier, less cameras and no need to synchronize cameras, (ii) Computational cost is reduced. In the proposed system, we obtain the advantages of multiple viewpoints with a single camera and additional light sources. More specific, we install multiple infrared lights to project shadows of a subject on the ground and a camera with an infrared transmitting filter mounted in the ceiling inside of a building. Shadow areas, which are projections of one's body on the ground by multiple lights, can be considered as body areas captured from different viewpoints; thus, the proposed system is able to capture multiple projections of the body from a single camera. We explored in other papers the use of sunproduced shadow for identification of people walking freely in the outdoor. In this paper the application scenario is a system installed at the airport in the areas that precedes the immigration checkpoint. Japan already has health monitoring cameras focused on approaching individuals, to determine their health condition; the here described system would also be installed in such a controlled area with restricted walk corridors of walk and controlled lighting. Gait is a remote biometrics and can provide early warning; on another hand it can be used as corroborating evidence in a multi-modal biometrics system. A database of images including shadows for a set of 28 walking people was collected, and the features extracted from shadow areas by affine moment invariants, after which

  14. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  15. Primary and secondary gait deviations of stroke survivors and their association with gait performance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Woo-Ram; Tack, Gye-Rae; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chun, Sung-Kuk; Kim, Jin-Wook; Mun, Kyung-Ryoul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Stroke survivors exhibit abnormal pelvic motion and significantly deteriorated gait performance. Although the gait of stroke survivors has been evaluated at the primary level pertaining to ankle, knee, and hip motions, secondary deviations involving the pelvic motions are strongly related to the primary level. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the kinematic differences of the primary and secondary joints and to identify mechanism differences that alter the gait performance of stroke survivors. [Subjects and Methods] Five healthy subjects and five stroke survivors were recruited. All the subjects were instructed to walk at a self-selected speed. The joint kinematics and gait parameters were calculated. [Results] For the stroke survivors, the range of motion of the primary-joint motions were significantly reduced, and the secondary-joint motions were significantly increased. Additionally, for the healthy subjects, the primary joint kinematics were the main factors ensuring gait performance, whereas for the stoke survivors, the secondary-joint motions were the main factors. [Conclusion] The results indicate that while increasing the range of motion of primary-joint movements is the main target to achieve, there is a strong need to constrain and support pelvic motions in order to improve the outcome of gait rehabilitation. PMID:27799710

  16. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  17. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control.

    PubMed

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling.

  18. The gait of unilateral transfemoral amputees.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, A M; Schrama, J; Fidler, V; Eisma, W H

    1994-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the gait of persons with a unilateral transfemoral amputation by means of a questionnaire, gait analysis and measurement of energy expenditure, and to find correlations among the variables studied. The study included 29 transfemoral amputees amputated for other reasons than a chronic vascular disease. The patients were assessed using the following methods: 1) A questionnaire rating the walking distance and walking difficulty in different circumstances. 2) Gait analysis measuring temporal variables and goniometry of hips and knees. 3) Measurement of energy expenditure during sitting and walking. Scores on the questionnaire showed a correlation with socket design, a negative correlation with age and energy expenditure, and a positive correlation with fast speed. The gait of transfemoral amputees was asymmetrical as far as temporal variables were concerned, and for most amputees also for the range of motion of hip and knee. The walking speed of the amputees was lower than that of non-amputees and showed a positive correlation with hip extension-flexion range of motion and a negative correlation with age and stride time. The energy expenditure of the amputees during ambulation was higher than that of non-amputees, and seemed to correlate with residual limb length and the hip abduction-adduction range of motion.

  19. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    PubMed Central

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling. PMID:28122432

  20. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  1. Effects of frontal and sagittal thorax attitudes in gait on trunk and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickaël; Leardini, Alberto; Belvedere, Claudio; Farahpour, Nader; Allard, Paul

    2015-10-01

    While sagittal trunk inclinations alter upper body biomechanics, little is known about the extent of frontal trunk bending on upper body and pelvis kinematics in adults during gait and its relation to sagittal trunk inclinations. The objective was to determine the effect of the mean lateral trunk attitude on upper body and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics during gait in asymptomatic subjects. Three gait cycles were collected in 30 subjects using a motion analysis system (Vicon 612) and an established protocol. Sub-groups were formed based on the mean thorax lateral bending angle, bending side, and also sagittal tilt. These were compared based on 38 peak angles identified on pelvis, thorax and shoulder kinematics using MANOVAs. A main effect for bending side (p = 0.038) was found, especially for thorax peak angles. Statistics revealed also a significant interaction (p = 0.04993) between bending side and tilt for the thorax sagittal inclination during body-weight transfer. These results reinforce the existence of different gait patterns, which correlate upper body and pelvis motion measures. The results also suggest that frontal and sagittal trunk attitude should be considered carefully when treating a patient with impaired gait.

  2. Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA): A Method to Characterize the Spatiotemporal Pattern of Rat Gait.

    PubMed

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Pettengill, Travis R; Turner, Sara M F; Streeter, Kristi A; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Fuller, David D; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-03-01

    While rodent gait analysis can quantify the behavioral consequences of disease, significant methodological differences exist between analysis platforms and little validation has been performed to understand or mitigate these sources of variance. By providing the algorithms used to quantify gait, open-source gait analysis software can be validated and used to explore methodological differences. Our group is introducing, for the first time, a fully-automated, open-source method for the characterization of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns, termed Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA). This study describes how AGATHA identifies gait events, validates AGATHA relative to manual digitization methods, and utilizes AGATHA to detect gait compensations in orthopaedic and spinal cord injury models. To validate AGATHA against manual digitization, results from videos of rodent gait, recorded at 1000 frames per second (fps), were compared. To assess one common source of variance (the effects of video frame rate), these 1000 fps videos were re-sampled to mimic several lower fps and compared again. While spatial variables were indistinguishable between AGATHA and manual digitization, low video frame rates resulted in temporal errors for both methods. At frame rates over 125 fps, AGATHA achieved a comparable accuracy and precision to manual digitization for all gait variables. Moreover, AGATHA detected unique gait changes in each injury model. These data demonstrate AGATHA is an accurate and precise platform for the analysis of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns.

  3. The effects of eggshell temperature fluctuations during incubation on welfare status and gait score of broilers.

    PubMed

    Ipek, A; Sozcu, A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of different eggshell temperatures (EST); low (33.3 to 36.7°C), control (37.8 to 38.2°C), and high (38.9 to 40.0°C) during 10 to 18 days of incubation on welfare status including foot pad dermatitis (FPD), hock dermatitis (HD) and feathering status, and gait score in broilers. Score 2, 4, and 5 of FPD were found to be similar among the treatment groups, whereas a score of 3 was found to be higher in the control and high EST groups (27.7% and 29.2%) compred to the low EST group (16.9%). The eggshell temperature fluctuations were significantly affected the incidence of HD, whereas broiler sex did not. All of the broilers in the high EST group had HD with various scores, while a percentage of 21.1% and 6.9% of broilers had the score 1 of HD in the low and control EST groups, respectively. Feathering status showed a difference between body parts including wing, neck, back, and vent and also a general mean score of broilers from low EST treatment had the highest score for feathering. A higher incidence of gait score was observed in broilers from the control EST treatment than low and high EST groups. This can be attributed to a higher live weight of broilers from the control EST group. On the other hand, the incidence of a gait score of 3 and 4 was found for broilers from control and high EST treatment groups. Male and female broilers from the high EST group had the higher gait score. In conclusion, gait score and welfare status of broilers were affected by fluctuations in EST between 10 and 18 days of incubation.

  4. Gait comparison of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasties with healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G. G.; Kotti, M.; Wiik, A. V.; Collins, R.; Brevadt, M. J.; Strachan, R. K.; Cobb, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare the gait of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with healthy controls, using a machine-learning approach. Patients and Methods 145 participants (121 healthy controls, 12 patients with cruciate-retaining TKA, and 12 with mobile-bearing medial UKA) were recruited. The TKA and UKA patients were a minimum of 12 months post-operative, and matched for pattern and severity of arthrosis, age, and body mass index. Participants walked on an instrumented treadmill until their maximum walking speed was reached. Temporospatial gait parameters, and vertical ground reaction force data, were captured at each speed. Oxford knee scores (OKS) were also collected. An ensemble of trees algorithm was used to analyse the data: 27 gait variables were used to train classification trees for each speed, with a binary output prediction of whether these variables were derived from a UKA or TKA patient. Healthy control gait data was then tested by the decision trees at each speed and a final classification (UKA or TKA) reached for each subject in a majority voting manner over all gait cycles and speeds. Top walking speed was also recorded. Results 92% of the healthy controls were classified by the decision tree as a UKA, 5% as a TKA, and 3% were unclassified. There was no significant difference in OKS between the UKA and TKA patients (p = 0.077). Top walking speed in TKA patients (1.6 m/s; 1.3 to 2.1) was significantly lower than that of both the UKA group (2.2 m/s; 1.8 to 2.7) and healthy controls (2.2 m/s; 1.5 to 2.7; p < 0.001). Conclusion UKA results in a more physiological gait compared with TKA, and a higher top walking speed. This difference in function was not detected by the OKS. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):16–21. PMID:27694511

  5. Wear performance of large-diameter differential-hardness hip bearings.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C Lowry; DeBoer, David; Corpe, R Scott; Nambu, Satya; Carroll, Michael; Timmerman, Irina

    2008-09-01

    We hypothesized that differential-hardness hard-on-hard bearings would generate less wear debris compared with like-hardness metal-on-metal (M-o-M) bearings. We conducted wear testing on 3 types of large-diameter hard hip bearings: (1) contemporary cast-on-cast ("like" hardness) M-o-M; (2) differential-hardness M-o-M; and (3) differential-hardness ceramic-on-metal. A simulated gait profile ranging from 200 to 2000 N was applied to the bearings at a frequency of 1 Hz for 5 Mc. All bearings were tested in an anatomically inverted position in 90% alpha calf serum. Both differential-hardness bearing systems produced lower run-in wear rates (90%-97%), steady-state wear rate (45%-84%), and total metal wear (68%-88%) compared with the like-hardness bearing system. The ceramic-on-metal bearings exhibited the least wear followed by differential-hardness M-o-M bearings; like-hardness M-o-M bearings exhibited the greatest amount of wear. These findings support our hypothesis that differential-hardness hip bearing systems produce less metallic wear debris than those with like hardness and may result in lower metal ion release in vivo.

  6. Gait, cost and time implications for changing from PTB to ICEX sockets.

    PubMed

    Datta, D; Harris, I; Heller, B; Howitt, J; Martin, R

    2004-08-01

    The ICEX system (Ossur, Iceland), allows a socket to be manufactured directly onto the stump and is thought to provide improved comfort due to better pressure distribution whilst being easier to fit and manufacture. The aims of this project were to a) compare gait performance by measuring several gait characteristics, b) compare production and fitting times, c) investigate financial implications and d) attempt to gauge the amputees' subjective opinions of socket comfort. A randomised, controlled trial was conducted on 27 trans-tibial amputees with an existing patellar tendon bearing (PTB) socket on the Endolite system (Chas A. Blatchford, UK). Twenty one (21) subjects completed the study. Of these, 10 in the control group received new PTB sockets while 11 in the experimental group received ICEX. Gait analysis wearing existing sockets was performed and kinetic data obtained from a force plate. This was repeated with the new sockets after a 6 week period of adjustment. Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical evaluations with a significance level of 5%. Subjects were asked to score their prosthesis for comfort using the Socket Comfort Score (Hanspal et al., 2003) and the frequency of visits for socket adjustments over a three-month period post-delivery of the sockets was recorded. This study demonstrates no significant difference in any of the gait parameters measured. Though the time required to manufacture a PTB prosthesis was found to be considerably longer than the ICEX, the overall cost for producing the ICEX was significantly greater. Subjects showed only minor comfort preference for the ICEX design and there was no significant difference in the mean number of visits for socket adjustments. In view of the considerable additional cost of providing ICEX and the lack of evidence of improvement in any parameter tested, the routine provision of ICEX prostheses to unselected trans-tibial amputees cannot be recommended.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  8. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  9. Gait-Based Human Recognition by Classification of Cyclostationary Processes on Nonlinear Shape Manifolds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    IDENTIFICATION USING GAIT ANALYSIS In this section we present a statistical framework for per- forming gait analysis and its use in human recognition. Human gait...EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS 5.1 Experimental Setup As an application of gait analysis , we used a night-vision or infrared, (IR) video camera to observe human gait. In

  10. Muscle strength training to improve gait function in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Eek, Meta Nyström; Tranberg, Roy; Zügner, Roland; Alkema, Kristina; Beckung, Eva

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of muscle strength training on gait outcomes in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children (two females, 14 males, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-II, mean age 12y 6mo, range 9y 4mo-15y 4mo) underwent muscle strength measurement using a handheld device, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) assessment, three-dimensional gait analysis, joint range of motion assessment, and grading of spasticity before and after 8 weeks of training. All participants had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia and could walk without aids. Training consisted of exercises for lower extremity muscles with free weights, rubber bands, and body weight for resistance, three times a week. Values for muscle strength below normal were identified in all children; this was most pronounced at the ankle, followed by the hip muscles. After training, muscle strength and GMFM scores increased, velocity was unchanged, stride length increased, and cadence was reduced. There was an increase in hip extensor moment and power generated at push off. Eight weeks of muscle strength training can increase muscle strength and improve gait function.

  11. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight share What It Takes to Lose Weight: Calorie Basics When you’re trying to lose weight... ... wcdapps.hhs.gov/Badges/Handlers/Badge.ashx?js=0&widgetname=betobaccofreew200short</NOFRAMES& ...

  12. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    weighted and unweighted walking metabolic rates can be estimated in field settings using simple, inexpensive wearable technologies. Metabolic rates...our walking model and to continue to work toward the final algorithm and publication of a walking test for predicting aerobic fitness . The...number of subjects tested in the last year was limited and targeted toward enrolling highly aerobically fit subjects needed for objective two

  13. Gait in 5-year-old children with idiopathic clubfoot

    PubMed Central

    Lööf, Elin; Andriesse, Hanneke; André, Marie; Böhm, Stephanie; Broström, Eva W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Idiopathic clubfoot can be bilateral or unilateral; however, most studies of gait have assessed clubfoot cases as one uniform group. The contralateral foot in children with unilateral clubfoot has shown deviations in pedobarographic measurements, but it is seldom included in studies of gait. We evaluated gait in children with idiopathic clubfoot, concentrating on foot involvement. Patients and methods Three-dimensional gait analyses of 59 children, mean age 5.4 years, with bilateral (n = 30) or unilateral (n = 29) idiopathic clubfoot were stratified into groups of bilateral, unilateral, or contralateral feet. Age-matched controls (n = 28) were evaluated for comparison. Gait assessment included: (1) discrete kinematic and kinetic parameters, and (2) gait deviation index for kinematics (GDI) and kinetics (GDI-k). Results No differences in gait were found between bilateral and unilateral idiopathic clubfoot, but both groups deviated when compared to controls. Compared to control feet, contralateral feet showed no deviations in discrete gait parameters, but discrepancies were evident in relation to unilateral clubfoot, causing gait asymmetries in children with unilateral involvement. However, all groups deviated significantly from control feet according to GDI and GDI-k. Interpretation Bilateral and unilateral idiopathic clubfoot cases show the same persistent deviations in gait, mainly regarding reduced plantarflexion. Nevertheless, knowledge of foot involvement is important as children with unilateral clubfoot show gait asymmetries, which might give an impression of poorer deviations. The results of GDI/GDI-k indicate global gait adaptations of the contralateral foot, so the foot should preferably not be used as a reference for gait. PMID:27331243

  14. Kinematic Analysis Quantifies Gait Abnormalities Associated with Lameness in Broiler Chickens and Identifies Evolutionary Gait Differences

    PubMed Central

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C.; Nicol, Christine J.; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E.; Weeks, Claire A.; Colborne, G. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with

  15. Influence of different safety shoes on gait and plantar pressure: a standardized examination of workers in the automotive industry

    PubMed Central

    Ochsmann, Elke; Noll, Ulrike; Ellegast, Rolf; Hermanns, Ingo; Kraus, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Working conditions, such as walking and standing on hard surfaces, can increase the development of musculoskeletal complaints. At the interface between flooring and musculoskeletal system, safety shoes may play an important role in the well-being of employees. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different safety shoes on gait and plantar pressure distributions on industrial flooring. Methods: Twenty automotive workers were individually fitted out with three different pairs of safety shoes ( "normal" shoes, cushioned shoes, and midfoot bearing shoes). They walked at a given speed of 1.5 m/s. The CUELA measuring system and shoe insoles were used for gait analysis and plantar pressure measurements, respectively. Statistical analysis was conducted by ANOVA analysis for repeated measures. Results: Walking with cushioned safety shoes or a midfoot bearing safety shoe led to a significant decrease of the average trunk inclination (p<0.005). Furthermore, the average hip flexion angle decreased for cushioned shoes as well as midfoot bearing shoes (p<0.002). The range of motion of the knee joint increased for cushioned shoes. As expected, plantar pressure distributions varied significantly between cushioned or midfoot bearing shoes and shoes without ergonomic components. Conclusion: The overall function of safety shoes is the avoidance of injury in case of an industrial accident, but in addition, safety shoes could be a long-term preventive instrument for maintaining health of the employees' musculoskeletal system, as they are able to affect gait parameters. Further research needs to focus on safety shoes in working situations. PMID:27488038

  16. Identifying clinically meaningful benchmarks for gait improvement after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C

    2016-01-01

    There are no established benchmarks for gait mechanics after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study sought to identify minimum clinically important postoperative (MCIP) or minimum clinically important improvement (MCII) values for self-selected walking speed, sagittal plane dynamic hip range of motion (HROM) (peak flexion-peak extension) and peak hip adduction moments measured during quantitative gait analysis. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative data collected during quantitative gait analysis, along with Harris Hip Scores (HHS), for 145 subjects were collected from a motion analysis data repository. The MCIP (or MCII) was defined as the 75th percentile mark on a plot of the cumulative percent of subjects with HHS ≥ 80 versus the postoperative value (or change) in the respective variable. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Logistic regression was used to test the association of age, sex, BMI, and preoperative HHS with benchmarks. The MCIP of speed was 1.34 m/s (95%CI 1.30, 1.37); MCII was 0.32 (0.30, 0.35) m/s. The HROM MCIP was 30.0° (29.4°, 30.7°); MCII was 13.3° (12.1°, 14.8°). The adduction moment MCIP was 4.2% Body Weight × Height (4.0, 4.4); MCII was 0.87 (0.57, 1.17) % Body Weight × Height. Women were more likely to achieve MCII for HROM and MCIP for adduction moment (ORs 2.4-11.6, p ≤ 0.031). Lower BMI predicted HROM and adduction moment MCIPs (ORs 0.85-0.88, p ≤ 0.015). Lower preoperative HHS predicted speed, HROM and adduction moment MCIIs (ORs 0.95-0.97, p ≤ 0.012). With further validation, clinically-relevant gait benchmarks can enhance efforts to improve THA outcomes.

  17. Gait analysis of a radial symmetrical hexapod robot based on parallel mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Ding, Xilun

    2014-09-01

    Most gait studies of multi-legged robots in past neglected the dexterity of robot body and the relationship between stride length and body height. This paper investigates the performance of a radial symmetrical hexapod robot based on the dexterity of parallel mechanism. Assuming the constraints between the supporting feet and the ground with hinges, the supporting legs and the hexapod body are taken as a parallel mechanism, and each swing leg is regarded as a serial manipulator. The hexapod robot can be considered as a series of hybrid serial-parallel mechanisms while walking on the ground. Locomotion performance can be got by analyzing these equivalent mechanisms. The kinematics of the whole robotic system is established, and the influence of foothold position on the workspace of robot body is analyzed. A new method to calculate the stride length of multi-legged robots is proposed by analyzing the relationship between the workspaces of two adjacent equivalent parallel mechanisms in one gait cycle. Referring to service region and service sphere, weight service sphere and weight service region are put forward to evaluate the dexterity of robot body. The dexterity of single point in workspace and the dexterity distribution in vertical and horizontal projection plane are demonstrated. Simulation shows when the foothold offset goes up to 174 mm, the dexterity of robot body achieves its maximum value 0.1644 in mixed gait. The proposed methods based on parallel mechanisms can be used to calculate the stride length and the dexterity of multi-legged robot, and provide new approach to determine the stride length, body height, footholds in gait planning of multi-legged robot.

  18. The golden ratio of gait harmony: repetitive proportions of repetitive gait phases.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Fusco, Augusto; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number φ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with φ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from φ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait.

  19. Modeling effects of sagittal-plane hip joint stiffness on reciprocating gait orthosis-assisted gait.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William Brett; Fatone, Stefania; Gard, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Upright ambulation is believed to improve quality of life for persons with lower-limb paralysis (LLP). However, ambulatory orthoses for persons with LLP, like reciprocating gait orthoses (RGOs), result in a slow, exhausting gait. Increasing the hip joint stiffness of these devices may improve the efficiency of RGO-assisted gait. The small, diverse population of RGO users makes subject recruitment challenging for clinical investigations. Therefore, we developed a lower-limb paralysis simulator (LLPS) that enabled nondisabled persons to exhibit characteristics of RGO-assisted gait, thereby serving as surrogate models for research. For this study, tests were conducted to determine the effects of increased hip joint stiffness on gait of nondisabled persons walking with the LLPS. A motion capture system, force plates, and spirometer were used to measure the hip flexion, crutch ground reaction forces (GRFs), and oxygen consumption of subjects as they walked with four different hip joint stiffness settings. Increasing the hip joint stiffness decreased hip flexion during ambulation but did not appear to affect the crutch GRFs. Walking speed was observed to initially increase with increases in hip joint stiffness, and then decrease. These findings suggest that increasing hip joint stiffness may increase walking speed for RGO users.

  20. The Golden Ratio of Gait Harmony: Repetitive Proportions of Repetitive Gait Phases

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number ϕ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with ϕ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from ϕ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait. PMID:23862161

  1. Changes in Gait Variability From First Steps to Adulthood: Normative Data for the Gait Variability Index.

    PubMed

    Gouelle, Arnaud; Leroux, Julien; Bredin, Jonathan; Mégrot, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The process of learning to walk is ongoing throughout childhood. The Gait Variability Index (GVI; A. Gouelle et al., 2013) has been proposed to quantify the variability of spatiotemporal parameters (STP) during gait. The authors' aim was to evaluate the GVI and STP of healthy children and teenagers to (a) determine changes in the GVI with age and to derive normal values in children and (b) to evaluate the influence of STP on the GVI. A total of 140 typically developing children from 1 to 17 years old were categorized into 7 groups of 20 based on age. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were recorded using an electronic walkway. GVI increased and STP changed with age. In the children-teenagers group, the GVI was positively related to step length, speed, and negatively to cadence. Following normalization by lower limb length, correlations were no longer significant. In contrast, raw base of support was not correlated with the GVI but normalized base of support was. A multiple linear regression showed that only age had a direct impact on the GVI, indicating that gait continues to change after 6-7 years. These changes were only demonstrated by the GVI, highlighting its usefulness for the evaluation of gait in young populations.

  2. Gait analysis in prosthetics: opinions, ideas and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Rietman, J S; Postema, K; Geertzen, J H B

    2002-04-01

    A review was performed of the literature of the last eleven years (1990-2000) with the topic: "clinical use of instrumented gait analysis in patients wearing a prosthesis of the lower limb". To this end a literature search was performed in Embase, Medline and Recal. Forty-five (45) articles were identified for study from which 34 were reviewed. The reviews were divided into five subtopics: 1) adaptive strategies in gait (12 studies); 2) the influence of different parts of the prosthesis on gait (12 studies); 3) pressure measurements in the socket in gait studies (4 studies); 4) the influence of the mass of the prostheses on gait (5 studies); 5) energy considerations in gait (2 studies). A considerable part of the studies concerned the adaptive strategies of the amputee in walking and running and the evaluation of different prosthetic feet. All aspects and outcomes were reviewed concerning the clinical relevance.

  3. Estimated ground reaction force in normal and pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Winiarski, Sławomir; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja

    2009-01-01

    In clinical gait analysis, ground reaction force (GRF) is the gait parameter which can validate the state of disorder of the patient's movement. The purpose of this study was to explore the possibilities of employing the GRF derived from kinematics of the center of gravity (COG) in the study of dynamics of human gait. Gait data was collected for healthy able-bodied men and women and patients after ACL reconstruction who use larger lateral COG excursions during gait. Reasonable agreement between methods was found in fore-aft and vertical directions, where the methods differed by an average of less than 10% in either direction. Based on model predictions of the body's COG trajectory during walking, algorithms were developed to determine spatio-temporal gait parameters related to GRF characteristics. The suitability of calculating ground reaction forces using COG displacement in a patient population is questioned.

  4. Autonomous Evolution of Dynamic Gaits with Two Quadruped Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Takamura, Seichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A challenging task that must be accomplished for every legged robot is creating the walking and running behaviors needed for it to move. In this paper we describe our system for autonomously evolving dynamic gaits on two of Sony's quadruped robots. Our evolutionary algorithm runs on board the robot and uses the robot's sensors to compute the quality of a gait without assistance from the experimenter. First we show the evolution of a pace and trot gait on the OPEN-R prototype robot. With the fastest gait, the robot moves at over 10/min/min., which is more than forty body-lengths/min. While these first gaits are somewhat sensitive to the robot and environment in which they are evolved, we then show the evolution of robust dynamic gaits, one of which is used on the ERS-110, the first consumer version of AIBO.

  5. Stability of an underactuated bipedal gait.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Sangwan, V; Taneja, A; Seth, B

    2007-01-01

    A self-excited biped walking mechanism consisting of two legs that are connected in series at the hip joint through a servomotor is studied as a cyclic system with collisions. A torque proportional to angle between the shank of the swinging leg and the vertical is seen to sustain a gait. Each leg has a thigh and a shank connected at a passive knee joint that has a knee stopper restricting hyperextension similar to the human knee. A mathematical model for the dynamics of the system including the impact equations is used to analyse the stability of the system through examination of phase plane plots. Attractor lines along which the system approaches stability have been identified. A leg length for optimal stability has been identified. The biological basis for the proposed system has been identified by comparison with human gait.

  6. A polynomial function of gait performance.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, Salvatore; Galli, Manuela; Nolfe, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical data processing method is presented that represents a further step in gait analysis. The proposed polynomial regression analysis is reliable in assessing differences in the same patient and even on the same day. The program also calculates the confidence interval of the whole curve. The procedure was applied to normal subjects in order to collect normative data. When a new subject is tested, the polynomial function obtained is graphically superimposed on control data. Should the new curve fall within the limits described by normative data, it is considered to be equivalent. The procedure can be applied to the same subject, either normal or pathological, for retesting kinematic characteristics. The gait cycle is analyzed as a whole, not point-by-point. Ten normal subjects and two patients, one with recent- and the other with late-onset hemiplegia, were tested. Multiple baseline evaluation is recommended before the start of a rehabilitation program.

  7. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  8. Neglected Alkaptonuric Patient Presenting with Steppage Gait

    PubMed Central

    Mirzashahi, Babak; Tafakhori, Abbas; Najafi, Arvin; Farzan, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Even though intervertebral disc degeneration can be found in the natural course of alkaptonuria, detection of the disease by black disc color change in a patient without any other presentation of alkaptonuria is an exceptionally rare condition. We have reported a very rare case of alkaptonuria presented with low back pain and steppage gait in a 51-year-old male with a complaint of chronic low-back pain and steppage gait who was operated on for prolapsed lumbar disc herniation. Intraoperatively his lumbar disk was discovered to be black. The alkaptonuria diagnosis was considered after histopathological examination of the black disc material and elevated urinary concentration of homogentisic acid confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, this presentation has not been reported previously in literature. PMID:27200402

  9. Extraction and Classification of Human Gait Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Hu; Tan, Wooi-Haw; Tong, Hau-Lee; Abdullah, Junaidi; Komiya, Ryoichi

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed for extracting human gait features from a walking human based on the silhouette images. The approach consists of six stages: clearing the background noise of image by morphological opening; measuring of the width and height of the human silhouette; dividing the enhanced human silhouette into six body segments based on anatomical knowledge; applying morphological skeleton to obtain the body skeleton; applying Hough transform to obtain the joint angles from the body segment skeletons; and measuring the distance between the bottom of right leg and left leg from the body segment skeletons. The angles of joints, step-size together with the height and width of the human silhouette are collected and used for gait analysis. The experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed system is feasible and achieved satisfactory results.

  10. Treatment of gait ignition failure with ropinirole.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Oram, Alexis N; Stewart, Jonathan T; Bero, Kim; Hoffmann, Michael W

    2014-10-01

    Gait ignition failure (GIF) is a syndrome characterized by hesitation or inability to initiate gait from a static position. It may occur in a variety of conditions, including normal pressure hydrocephalus, subcortical vascular disease, parkinsonian syndromes and a variety of focal lesions. Previous information on the treatment of GIF has been primarily anecdotal, but there have been a few reports of response to dopamine agonists. We report a 63-year-old man with anoxic encephalopathy who developed GIF nine years after the initial anoxic insult. The patient's GIF responded robustly, albeit transiently, to ropinirole. MRI was unrevealing, but a positron emission tomography scan showed hypometabolism in the deep frontal ACA/MCA watershed area; this may have disconnected the basal ganglia from the motor cortex and/or interrupted dopaminergic mesocortical transmission. Our understanding of the pathophysiology and the treatment of GIF remains limited, but there may be at least a limited therapeutic role for dopamine agonists.

  11. Treatment of Gait Ignition Failure with Ropinirole

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Oram, Alexis N.; Stewart, Jonathan T.; Bero, Kim; Hoffmann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Gait ignition failure (GIF) is a syndrome characterized by hesitation or inability to initiate gait from a static position. It may occur in a variety of conditions, including normal pressure hydrocephalus, subcortical vascular disease, parkinsonian syndromes and a variety of focal lesions. Previous information on the treatment of GIF has been primarily anecdotal, but there have been a few reports of response to dopamine agonists. We report a 63-year-old man with anoxic encephalopathy who developed GIF nine years after the initial anoxic insult. The patient’s GIF responded robustly, albeit transiently, to ropinirole. MRI was unrevealing, but a positron emission tomography scan showed hypometabolism in the deep frontal ACA/MCA watershed area; this may have disconnected the basal ganglia from the motor cortex and/or interrupted dopaminergic mesocortical transmission. Our understanding of the pathophysiology and the treatment of GIF remains limited, but there may be at least a limited therapeutic role for dopamine agonists. PMID:25360234

  12. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  13. A portable system with sample rate of 250 Hz for characterization of knee and hip angles in the sagittal plane during gait

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gait analysis and research have been developed to obtain characteristics of movement patterns of people while walking. However, traditional measuring systems present different drawbacks that reduce their use and application. Among those drawbacks one can find: high price, low sampling frequency and limiting number of steps to be analyzed. Traditional measuring gait systems carry out their measurement at frequencies oscillating between 60 to 100 Hz. It can be argued about the need of higher sampling rates for gait measurements. However small displacements of the knee or hip for example, cannot be seen with low frequencies required a more detailed sampling and higher frequency sampling. Bearing this in mind, in this paper is presented a 250 Hz system based on accelerometers for gait measurement, and the particularities of knee and hip angles during gait are highlighted. Methods The system was designed with a PCI data acquisition card instrumented with an FPGA to achieve a rate sample of 250 Hz. The accelerometers were placed in thighs and legs to calculate the joint angles of hip and knee in the sagittal plane. The angles were estimated using the acceleration polygon method without integrating the acceleration and without filters. Results The gait of thirty healthy people of Mexican phenotype was analyzed over a flat floor free of obstacles. The results showed the gait phases and particularities associated with the walking style and people's laterality; the movement patterns were similar in the thirty persons. Based on the results, the particularities as the maximum amplitude in the angles and the shape in the movement patterns were related to the anthropometry and people phenotype. Conclusions The sampling frequency was essential to record 340 samples in single gait cycle and so registering the gait cycle with its particularities. In this work were recorded an average of 8 to 10 gait cycles, and the results showed variation regarding works carried out

  14. Gait patterns associated with thyroid function: The Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Arjola; Chaker, Layal; Darweesh, Sirwan K. L.; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H.; van der Geest, Jos N.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Peeters, Robin P.

    2016-01-01

    Gait is an important health indicator and poor gait is strongly associated with disability and risk of falls. Thyroid dysfunction is suggested as a potential determinant of gait deterioration, but this has not been explored in a population-based study. We therefore investigated the association of thyroid function with gait patterns in 2645 participants from the Rotterdam Study with data available on TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), FT4 (free thyroxine) and gait, without known thyroid disease or dementia. The primary outcome was Global gait (standardized Z-score), while secondary outcomes included gait domains (Rhythm, Variability, Phases, Pace, Base of support, Tandem, Turning) and velocity. Gait was assessed by electronic walkway. Multivariable regression models revealed an inverted U-shaped association of TSH (p < 0.001), but no association of FT4 concentrations with Global gait (p = 0.2). TSH levels were positively associated with Base of support (p = 0.01) and followed an inverted U-shaped curve with Tandem (p = 0.002) and velocity (p = 0.02). Clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism were associated with worse Global gait than euthyroidism (β = −0.61; CI = −1.03, −0.18; p = 0.004 and β = −0.13; CI = −0.26, −0.00; p = 0.04, respectively). In euthyroid participants, higher thyroid function was associated with worse gait patterns. In conclusion, both low and high thyroid function are associated with alterations in Global gait, Tandem, Base of support and velocity. PMID:27966590

  15. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  16. Evaluating alternative gait strategies using evolutionary robotics.

    PubMed

    Sellers, William I; Dennis, Louise A; W -J, Wang; Crompton, Robin H

    2004-05-01

    Evolutionary robotics is a branch of artificial intelligence concerned with the automatic generation of autonomous robots. Usually the form of the robot is predefined and various computational techniques are used to control the machine's behaviour. One aspect is the spontaneous generation of walking in legged robots and this can be used to investigate the mechanical requirements for efficient walking in bipeds. This paper demonstrates a bipedal simulator that spontaneously generates walking and running gaits. The model can be customized to represent a range of hominoid morphologies and used to predict performance parameters such as preferred speed and metabolic energy cost. Because it does not require any motion capture data it is particularly suitable for investigating locomotion in fossil animals. The predictions for modern humans are highly accurate in terms of energy cost for a given speed and thus the values predicted for other bipeds are likely to be good estimates. To illustrate this the cost of transport is calculated for Australopithecus afarensis. The model allows the degree of maximum extension at the knee to be varied causing the model to adopt walking gaits varying from chimpanzee-like to human-like. The energy costs associated with these gait choices can thus be calculated and this information used to evaluate possible locomotor strategies in early hominids.

  17. Gait patterns for crime fighting: statistical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Bělašková, Silvie; Adámek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The criminality is omnipresent during the human history. Modern technology brings novel opportunities for identification of a perpetrator. One of these opportunities is an analysis of video recordings, which may be taken during the crime itself or before/after the crime. The video analysis can be classed as identification analyses, respectively identification of a person via externals. The bipedal locomotion focuses on human movement on the basis of their anatomical-physiological features. Nowadays, the human gait is tested by many laboratories to learn whether the identification via bipedal locomotion is possible or not. The aim of our study is to use 2D components out of 3D data from the VICON Mocap system for deep statistical analyses. This paper introduces recent results of a fundamental study focused on various gait patterns during different conditions. The study contains data from 12 participants. Curves obtained from these measurements were sorted, averaged and statistically tested to estimate the stability and distinctiveness of this biometrics. Results show satisfactory distinctness of some chosen points, while some do not embody significant difference. However, results presented in this paper are of initial phase of further deeper and more exacting analyses of gait patterns under different conditions.

  18. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  19. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  20. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  1. Managing variability in the summary and comparison of gait data

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tom; Young, Scott; Redekop, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Variability in quantitative gait data arises from many potential sources, including natural temporal dynamics of neuromotor control, pathologies of the neurological or musculoskeletal systems, the effects of aging, as well as variations in the external environment, assistive devices, instrumentation or data collection methodologies. In light of this variability, unidimensional, cycle-based gait variables such as stride period should be viewed as random variables and prototypical single-cycle kinematic or kinetic curves ought to be considered as random functions of time. Within this framework, we exemplify some practical solutions to a number of commonly encountered analytical challenges in dealing with gait variability. On the topic of univariate gait variables, robust estimation is proposed as a means of coping with contaminated gait data, and the summary of non-normally distributed gait data is demonstrated by way of empirical examples. On the summary of gait curves, we discuss methods to manage undesirable phase variation and non-robust spread estimates. To overcome the limitations of conventional comparisons among curve landmarks or parameters, we propose as a viable alternative, the combination of curve registration, robust estimation, and formal statistical testing of curves as coherent units. On the basis of these discussions, we provide heuristic guidelines for the summary of gait variables and the comparison of gait curves. PMID:16053523

  2. Hölder exponent spectra for human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.; Griffin, L.; West, B. J.

    2003-10-01

    The stride interval time series in normal human gait is not strictly constant, but fluctuates from step to step in a complex manner. More precisely, it has been shown that the control process for human gait is a fractal random phenomenon, that is, one with a long-term memory. Herein we study the Hölder exponent spectra for the slow, normal and fast gaits of 10 young healthy men in both free and metronomically triggered conditions and establish that the stride interval time series is more complex than a monofractal phenomenon. A slightly multifractal and non-stationary time series under the three different gait conditions emerges.

  3. Enhanced data consistency of a portable gait measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-I.; Chiang, Y. P.

    2013-11-01

    A gait measurement system is a useful tool for rehabilitation applications. Such a system is used to conduct gait experiments in large workplaces such as laboratories where gait measurement equipment can be permanently installed. However, a gait measurement system should be portable if it is to be used in clinics or community centers for aged people. In a portable gait measurement system, the workspace is limited and landmarks on a subject may not be visible to the cameras during experiments. Thus, we propose a virtual-marker function to obtain positions of unseen landmarks for maintaining data consistency. This work develops a portable clinical gait measurement system consisting of lightweight motion capture devices, force plates, and a walkway assembled from plywood boards. We evaluated the portable clinic gait system with 11 normal subjects in three consecutive days in a limited experimental space. Results of gait analysis based on the verification of within-day and between-day coefficients of multiple correlations show that the proposed portable gait system is reliable.

  4. Reliability of gait in multiple sclerosis over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Klaren, Rachel E; Pilutti, Lara A; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Motl, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Gait impairment is ubiquitous in multiple sclerosis (MS) and is often characterized by alterations in spatiotemporal parameters of gait. There is limited information concerning reliability of spatiotemporal gait parameters over clinical timescales (e.g. 6 months). The current report provides novel evidence that gait parameters of 74 ambulatory persons with MS with mild-to-moderate disability are reliable over 6-months (ICC's for overall sample range from 0.56 to 0.91) in the absence of any intervention above and beyond standard care. Such data can inform clinical decision-making and power analyses for designing RCTs (i.e., sample size estimates) involving persons with MS.

  5. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  6. An electric motor with magnetic bearings: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    Because same magnetic flux is used to control rotor as to drive it, size, weight, and power required are minimized. Constant total current keeps motor torque invarient, and absence of mechanical bearings eliminates wear and reduces frictional power loss.

  7. Crouched gait in myelomeningocele: a comparison between the degree of knee flexion contracture in the clinical examination and during gait.

    PubMed

    Moen, Todd; Gryfakis, Nicholas; Dias, Luciano; Lemke, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate, in patients with low lumbar and sacral level myelomeningocele who have knee flexion contractures, whether there are significant differences between the degree of knee flexion contracture measured clinically and the degree of actual knee flexion during gait, measured by computerized gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups, those who walked with ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) alone and those who walked with AFOs and crutches. In both groups, the patient's knee flexion contractures were measured clinically, and the degree of knee flexion was measured dynamically at two representative points in the gait cycle. In both groups and at both points of the gait cycle, the degree of knee flexion during gait was significantly greater than the degree of clinical knee flexion contracture. This should be taken into account when evaluating the crouch gait of children with myelomeningocele and planning the proper treatment.

  8. Wear analysis of unicondylar mobile bearing and fixed bearing knee systems: a knee simulator study.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, J Philippe; Jakubowitz, Eike; Reinders, Jörn; Lietz, Eva; Moradi, Babak; Hofmann, Kerstin; Sonntag, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Unicondylar knee arthroplasty is an attractive alternative to total knee arthroplasty for selected patients with osteoarthritis. Mobile bearing knee designs have been developed to improve knee kinematics, lower contact stresses and reduced wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene compared with fixed bearing designs. This study compared in vitro wear behavior of fixed and mobile unicondylar bearing designs. Analysis was performed using a force-controlled AMTI knee simulator according to ISO 14243-1:2002(E). The wear volume of the implants was determined gravimetrically. Optical surface characterization and an estimation of wear particle size and morphology were performed. Implant kinematic data for both designs were determined. The wear rates averaged 10.7 ± 0.59 mg per 10(6) cycles for the medial and 5.38 ± 0.63 mg per 10(6) cycles for the lateral components of the mobile bearings, compared with 7.51 ± 0.29 mg per 10(6) cycles and 3.04 ± 0.35 mg per 10(6) cycles for the fixed bearings. The mobile bearings therefore exhibited higher wear rates (P<0.01) compared with the fixed bearings. The tibial polyethylene inserts of the mobile bearings showed pronounced backside wear at the inferior surface. The kinematics of both designs was similar. However, anterior-posterior translation was lower in the mobile bearings. The wear particles were mainly elongated and small in size for both designs (P=0.462). This study shows that wear may play an important role in unicondylar mobile bearing knee designs. Advantages of unicondylar mobile designs compared with fixed bearing designs, which have been proposed in terms of wear behavior and improved kinematics, could not be confirmed.

  9. Gait patterns comparison of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy to those of control subjects considering the effect of gait velocity.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie; Houde, Sylvie; Gagnon, Denis

    2010-07-01

    3D analysis of the gait of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was the topic of only a few studies and none of these considered the effect of gait velocity on the gait parameters of children with DMD. Gait parameters of 11 children with DMD were compared to those of 14 control children while considering the effect of gait velocity using 3D biomechanical analysis. Kinematic and kinetic gait parameters were measured using an Optotrak motion analysis system and AMTI force plates embedded in the floor. The data profiles of children with DMD walking at natural gait velocity were compared to those of the control children who walked at both natural and slow gait velocities. When both groups walked at similar velocity, children with DMD had higher cadence and shorter step length. They demonstrated a lower hip extension moment as well as a minimal or absent knee extension moment. At the ankle, a dorsiflexion moment was absent at heel strike due to the anterior location of the center of pressure. The magnitude of the medio-lateral ground reaction force was higher in children with DMD. Despite this increase, the hip abductor moment was lower. Hip power generation was also observed at the mid-stance in DMD children. These results suggest that most of the modifications observed are strategies used by children with DMD to cope with possible muscle weakness in order to provide support, propulsion and balance of the body during gait.

  10. Low cost lobed bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Separate sectors for each lobed area of the bearing are assembled into the bearing housing individually and bolted tightly against the housing inside diameter. The center of a grinding wheel and the center of the housing are offset, resulting in the desired inner radius and tilt of the sector.

  11. Damper bearing rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1990-01-01

    High side loads reduce the life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. High stiffness damper seals were recommended to reduce the loads on the pump and turbine end bearings in the HPOTP. The seals designed for use on the pump end are expected to adequately reduce the bearing loads; the predicted performance of the planned turbine end seal is marginal. An alternative to the suggested turbine end seal design is a damper bearing with radial holes from the pressurized center of the turbopump rotor, feeding a smooth land region between two rough-stator/smooth-rotor annular seals. An analysis was prepared to predict the leakage and rotor dynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and added mass) of the damper bearing. Governing equations of the seal analysis modified to model the damper bearing; differences between the upstream conditions of the damper bearing and a typical annular seal; prediction of the damper bearing analysis; and assumptions of the analysis which require further investigation are described.

  12. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  13. Cylindrical bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1981-01-01

    Program CYBEAN computes behavior of rolling-element bearings including effects of bearing geometry, shaft misalinement, and temperature. Accurate assessment is possible for various outer-ring and housing configurations. CYBEAN is structured for coordinated execution of modules that perform specific analytical tasks. It is written in FORTRAN IV for use on the UNIVAC 1100/40 computer.

  14. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O'Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite(®) system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns.

  15. Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... it comes to weight loss, there's no lack of fad diets promising fast results. But such diets limit your nutritional intake, can be unhealthy, and tend to fail ...

  16. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Together Understanding Adult Overweight & Obesity About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity More Weight Management Topics Healthy ... Sleep Apnea Weight Management Topics About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity Being Healthy is a Big ...

  17. Influence of unilateral weight on bilateral cyclograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer Costa, Juan José; Dusza, Jacek J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the results of gait parameters as a function of unilateral weight. The object of the research was a woman walking on a stationary surface and carrying in his hand weights from 0 to 15 kg. Her movement was recorded by 6 cameras recording the location of 34 markers placed at appropriate points in the body. 3D reconstruction was performed for each of the reflecting markers. Tested signals were changes in the value the joint angles of ankle, knee and hip. On the basis of about 6 cycles of movement of each load, a model for the average gait cycle was developed. The result of the experiments are graphs of changes the joint angles as a function of time, bilateral cyclograms, synchronized bilateral cyclograms and regression lines. The conclusion of the study is to determine how one-sided load affects gait asymmetry. Simple and easy to interpret method of presentation of results were also shown. Studies were conducted using VICON system.

  18. Arcturus and the Bears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, E.

    2009-08-01

    Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes. The ancient Greek name Arktouros means Bear Guard. The star, however, is not close to Ursa Maior (Big She-Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little She-Bear), as the name would suggest. This curious discrepancy could be explained by the star proper motion, assuming the name Bear Guard is a remote cultural heritage. The proper motion analysis could allow us to get an insight also into an ancient myth regarding Ursa Maior. Though we cannot explain scientifically such a myth, some interesting suggestions can be obtained about its possible origin, in the context of the present knowledge of the importance of the cult of the bear both during the Palaeolithic times and for several primitive populations of modern times, as shown by the ethnological studies.

  19. A Novel Application of Eddy Current Braking for Functional Strength Training During Gait.

    PubMed

    Washabaugh, Edward P; Claflin, Edward S; Gillespie, R Brent; Krishnan, Chandramouli

    2016-09-01

    Functional strength training is becoming increasingly popular when rehabilitating individuals with neurological injury such as stroke or cerebral palsy. Typically, resistance during walking is provided using cable robots or weights that are secured to the distal shank of the subject. However, there exists no device that is wearable and capable of providing resistance across the joint, allowing over ground gait training. In this study, we created a lightweight and wearable device using eddy current braking to provide resistance to the knee. We then validated the device by having subjects wear it during a walking task through varying resistance levels. Electromyography and kinematics were collected to assess the biomechanical effects of the device on the wearer. We found that eddy current braking provided resistance levels suitable for functional strength training of leg muscles in a package that is both lightweight and wearable. Applying resistive forces at the knee joint during gait resulted in significant increases in muscle activation of many of the muscles tested. A brief period of training also resulted in significant aftereffects once the resistance was removed. These results support the feasibility of the device for functional strength training during gait. Future research is warranted to test the clinical potential of the device in an injured population.

  20. A systematic review of the efficacy of gait rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tania; Eng, Janice J; Wolfe, Dalton L; Hsieh, Jane T; Whittaker, Maura

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To systematically review the evidence for the efficacy of different rehabilitation strategies on functional ambulation following spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS A keyword literature search of original articles was used to identify published literature evaluating the effectiveness of any treatment or therapy on functional ambulation in people with SCI. The rigor and quality of each study were scored on standardized scales by two independent reviewers. RESULTS The search yielded 160 articles, of which 119 were excluded for not meeting our inclusion criteria. The remaining 41 articles covered various strategies for improving gait: bodyweight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) (n=12), functional electrical stimulation (FES) (n=7), braces/orthoses (n=10), or a combination of these (n=12). There is strong evidence from randomized controlled trials that functional ambulation outcomes following body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) are comparable to an equivalent intensity of overground gait training in sub-acute SCI. In chronic SCI, evidence from pre-test/post-test studies shows that BWSTT may be effective in improving functional ambulation. Pre-test/post-test or post-test only studies provide evidence that FES may augment functional ambulation in sub-acute/chronic SCI while braces may afford particular benefits to people with complete SCI to stand up and ambulate with assistive devices. CONCLUSIONS Rehabilitation strategies that facilitate repeated practice of gait offer the greatest benefits to functional ambulation in sub-acute or chronic SCI. Supportive devices may augment functional ambulation particularly in people with incomplete SCI. PMID:22915835

  1. A systematic review of the efficacy of gait rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tania; Eng, Janice J; Wolfe, Dalton L; Hsieh, Jane T; Whittaker, Maura

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the evidence for the efficacy of different rehabilitation strategies on functional ambulation following spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS: A keyword literature search of original articles was used to identify published literature evaluating the effectiveness of any treatment or therapy on functional ambulation in people with SCI. The rigor and quality of each study were scored on standardized scales by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: The search yielded 160 articles, of which 119 were excluded for not meeting our inclusion criteria. The remaining 41 articles covered various strategies for improving gait: bodyweight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) (n=12), functional electrical stimulation (FES) (n=7), braces/orthoses (n=10), or a combination of these (n=12). There is strong evidence from randomized controlled trials that functional ambulation outcomes following body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) are comparable to an equivalent intensity of overground gait training in sub-acute SCI. In chronic SCI, evidence from pre-test/post-test studies shows that BWSTT may be effective in improving functional ambulation. Pre-test/post-test or post-test only studies provide evidence that FES may augment functional ambulation in sub-acute/chronic SCI while braces may afford particular benefits to people with complete SCI to stand up and ambulate with assistive devices. CONCLUSIONS: Rehabilitation strategies that facilitate repeated practice of gait offer the greatest benefits to functional ambulation in sub-acute or chronic SCI. Supportive devices may augment functional ambulation particularly in people with incomplete SCI.

  2. Rotordynamics and bearing design of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen Jeng

    2012-05-01

    Turbochargers have gained significant attention in recent years. They are already widely used in automotive, locomotive, and marine applications with diesel engines. They are also applied in the aerospace application to increase the engine performance now. The turbochargers used in automotive and aerospace industry are very light-weight with operating speeds above 100,000 rpm. The turbochargers used in locomotive and marine applications are relatively heavy in size and power compared to the automotive and aerospace applications, and the maximum continuous operating speeds are around 30,000 rpm depending on the diesel engine power rating. Floating ring bushings, semi-floating dampers, ball bearings, and ball bearings with dampers are commonly used in automotive applications for small turbochargers. However, these bearings may not be appropriate for large turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Instead, multi-lobed bearings with and without squeeze film dampers are commonly used in these heavy-duty turbochargers. This paper deals with the rotordynamic characteristics of larger turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Various bearing designs are discussed. Bearing design parameters are studied and optimal values are suggested. Test results are also presented to support the analytical simulation.

  3. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%–18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  4. Quantitative gait measurement with pulse-Doppler radar for passive in-home gait assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%-18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment.

  5. The use of laboratory gait analysis for understanding gait deterioration in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Khan, Fary; Lee, Peter Vs; Galea, Mary P

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory gait analysis or three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA), which uses motion capture, force plates and electromyography (EMG), has allowed a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of gait deterioration in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). This review will summarize the current knowledge on multiple sclerosis (MS)-related changes in kinematics (angles), kinetics (forces) and electromyographic (muscle activation) patterns and how these measures can be used as markers of disease progression. We will also discuss the potential causes of slower walking in PwMS and the implications for 3DGA. Finally, we will describe new technologies and methods that will increase precision and clinical utilization of 3DGA in PwMS. Overall, 3DGA studies have shown that functionality of the ankle joint is the most affected during walking and that compensatory actions to maintain a functional speed may be insufficient in PwMS. However, altered gait patterns may be a strategy to increase stability as balance is also affected in PwMS.

  6. Gait Transitions in Human Infants: Coping with Extremes of Treadmill Speed

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Erin V.; Patrick, Susan K.; Yang, Jaynie F.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal pattern generators in quadrupedal animals can coordinate different forms of locomotion, like trotting or galloping, by altering coordination between the limbs (interlimb coordination). In the human system, infants have been used to study the subcortical control of gait, since the cerebral cortex and corticospinal tract are immature early in life. Like other animals, human infants can modify interlimb coordination to jump or step. Do human infants possess functional neuronal circuitry necessary to modify coordination within a limb (intralimb coordination) in order to generate distinct forms of alternating bipedal gait, such as walking and running? We monitored twenty-eight infants (7–12 months) stepping on a treadmill at speeds ranging between 0.06–2.36 m/s, and seventeen adults (22–47 years) walking or running at speeds spanning the walk-to-run transition. Six of the adults were tested with body weight support to mimic the conditions of infant stepping. We found that infants could accommodate a wide range of speeds by altering stride length and frequency, similar to adults. Moreover, as the treadmill speed increased, we observed periods of flight during which neither foot was in ground contact in infants and in adults. However, while adults modified other aspects of intralimb coordination and the mechanics of progression to transition to a running gait, infants did not make comparable changes. The lack of evidence for distinct walking and running patterns in infants suggests that the expression of different functional, alternating gait patterns in humans may require neuromuscular maturation and a period of learning post-independent walking. PMID:26828941

  7. Carrying shopping bags does not alter static postural stability and gait parameters in healthy older females.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Food shopping is an important aspect of maintaining independence and social interaction in older age. Carriage of shopping bags alters the body's weight distribution which, depending on load distribution, could potentially increase instability during standing and walking. The study examined the effect of carrying UK style shopping bags on static postural stability and gait in healthy older and young females. Nine older (71.0±6.0 years) and 10 young (26.7±5.2 years) females were assessed in five conditions carrying no bags, one 1.5kg bag in each hand, one 3kg bag in each hand, one 1.5kg bag in preferred hand, one 3kg bag in preferred hand. Antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, and 95% ellipse area from a 30s quiet standing were used for postural stability assessment. Stride length and its coefficient of variation, total double support time, step asymmetry and gait stability ratio were calculated from 1min treadmill walking at self-selected speed for gait assessment. Carrying shopping bags did not negatively affect postural stability or gait variables, in either group. Further, in older individuals, a decrease in sway velocity was found when holding bags during the postural stability assessment (p<0.05), suggesting that carriage of bags, irrespective of the load distribution, may have a stabilising effect during quiet standing. These results should help to alleviate concerns regarding safety of carrying shopping bags and help encourage shopping, both as a social and as a physical activity.

  8. Peripheral neuropathy does not alter the fractal dynamics of stride intervals of gait.

    PubMed

    Gates, Deanna H; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect (if any) of significant sensory loss on the long-range correlations normally observed in the stride intervals of human gait. Fourteen patients with severe peripheral neuropathy and 12 gender-, age-, height-, and weight-matched nondiabetic controls participated. Subjects walked around an approximately 200-m open-level walkway for 10 min at their comfortable pace. Continuous knee joint kinematics were recorded and used to calculate a stride interval time series for each subject. Power spectral density and detrended fluctuation analyses were used to determine whether these stride intervals exhibited long-range correlations. If the loss of long-range correlations indicates deterioration of the central control of gait, then changes in peripheral sensation should have no effect. If instead the loss of long-range correlations is a consequence of a general inability to regulate gait cycle timing, then a similar loss should occur in patients with peripheral locomotor disorders. Both power spectral density analyses and detrended fluctuation analyses showed that temporal correlations in the stride times of neuropathic and control subjects were statistically identical (P = 0.954 and P = 0.974, respectively), despite slower gait speeds (P = 0.008) and increased stride time variability (P = 0.036) among the neuropathy patients. All subjects in both groups exhibited long-range correlations. These findings demonstrate that the normal long-range correlation structure of stride intervals is unaltered by significant peripheral sensory loss. This further supports the hypothesis that the central nervous system is involved in the regulation of long-range correlations.

  9. A Novel Shear Reduction Insole Effect on the Thermal Response to Walking Stress, Balance, and Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ammanath, Peethambaran; Le, Tima; Luring, Christopher; Wensman, Jeffrey; Grewal, Gurtej S.; Najafi, Bijan; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Shear stresses have been implicated in the formation of diabetes-related foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a novel shear-reducing insole on the thermal response to walking, balance, and gait. Twenty-seven diabetes peripheral neuropathy patients were enrolled and asked to take 200 steps in both intervention and standard insoles. Thermal foot images of the feet were taken at baseline (1) following a 5-minute temperature acclimatization and (2) after walking. Testing order was randomized, and a 5-minute washout period was used between testing each insole condition. Sudomotor function was also assessed. Gait and balance were measured under single and dual task conditions using a validated body worn sensor system. The mean age was 65.1 years, height was 67.3 inches, weight was 218 pounds, and body mass index was 33.9, 48% were female, and 82% had type 2 diabetes. After walking in both insole conditions, foot temperatures increased significantly in standard insoles. The intervention insole significantly reduced forefoot and midfoot temperature increases (64.1%, P = .008; 48%, P = .046) compared to standard insoles. There were significant negative correlations with sudomotor function and baseline temperatures (r = .53-.57). The intervention demonstrated 10.4% less gait initiation double support time compared to standard insoles (P = .05). There were no differences in static balance measures. We found significantly lower forefoot and midfoot temperature increases following walking with shear-reducing insoles compared to standard insoles. We also found improvements in gait. These findings merit future study for the prevention of foot ulcer. PMID:25107709

  10. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability. PMID:26340634

  11. Instrumenting gait with an accelerometer: A system and algorithm examination

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, A.; Del Din, S.; Barry, G.; Mathers, J.C.; Rochester, L.

    2015-01-01

    Gait is an important clinical assessment tool since changes in gait may reflect changes in general health. Measurement of gait is a complex process which has been restricted to the laboratory until relatively recently. The application of an inexpensive body worn sensor with appropriate gait algorithms (BWM) is an attractive alternative and offers the potential to assess gait in any setting. In this study we investigated the use of a low-cost BWM, compared to laboratory reference using a robust testing protocol in both younger and older adults. We observed that the BWM is a valid tool for estimating total step count and mean spatio-temporal gait characteristics however agreement for variability and asymmetry results was poor. We conducted a detailed investigation to explain the poor agreement between systems and determined it was due to inherent differences between the systems rather than inability of the sensor to measure the gait characteristics. The results highlight caution in the choice of reference system for validation studies. The BWM used in this study has the potential to gather longitudinal (real-world) spatio-temporal gait data that could be readily used in large lifestyle-based intervention studies, but further refinement of the algorithm(s) is required. PMID:25749552

  12. Adaptive impedance control of a robotic orthosis for gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q; Jamwal, Prashant K

    2013-06-01

    Intervention of robotic devices in the field of physical gait therapy can help in providing repetitive, systematic, and economically viable training sessions. Interactive or assist-as-needed (AAN) gait training encourages patient voluntary participation in the robotic gait training process which may aid in rapid motor function recovery. In this paper, a lightweight robotic gait training orthosis with two actuated and four passive degrees of freedom (DOFs) is proposed. The actuated DOFs were powered by pneumatic muscle actuators. An AAN gait training paradigm based on adaptive impedance control was developed to provide interactive robotic gait training. The proposed adaptive impedance control scheme adapts the robotic assistance according to the disability level and voluntary participation of human subjects. The robotic orthosis was operated in two gait training modes, namely, inactive mode and active mode, to evaluate the performance of the proposed control scheme. The adaptive impedance control scheme was evaluated on ten neurologically intact subjects. The experimental results demonstrate that an increase in voluntary participation of human subjects resulted in a decrease of the robotic assistance and vice versa. Further clinical evaluations with neurologically impaired subjects are required to establish the therapeutic efficacy of the adaptive-impedance-control-based AAN gait training strategy.

  13. Dependence of gait parameters on height in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Nascimbeni, Alberto; Di Nardo, Francesco; Fioretti, Sandro; Burattini, Laura; Knaflitz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In clinical gait analysis is fundamental to have access to normative data, to be used as a reference in the interpretation of pathological walking. In a paediatric population this may be complicated by the dependence of gait parameters on child growth. The aim of this work is to provide the correlations of spatial-temporal gait parameters with children's height. We obtained the regression lines of cadence, double support, and gait phases, with respect to height, from a sample of 85 normally typically developing children aged 6 to 11. Our analysis of gait phases was not limited to the traditional analysis of stance and swing, but rather focused on the sub-phases of stance - heel contact, flat foot contact, push off - which proved to be an innovative approach to gait analysis. Heel contact decreased, flat foot contact increased and push off remained essentially unchanged with respect to children's height. These results may be useful in the interpretation of gait data in developing children, and the regression lines obtained may be used to normalize their gait parameters.

  14. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B

    2015-09-02

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability.

  15. DRAG: a database for recognition and analasys of gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchi, Prem; Hiremagalur, Raghu Ram V.; Huang, Helen; Carhart, Michael; He, Jiping; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2003-11-01

    A novel approach is proposed for creating a standardized and comprehensive database for gait analysis. The field of gait analysis is gaining increasing attention for applications such as visual surveillance, human-computer interfaces, and gait recognition and rehabilitation. Numerous algorithms have been developed for analyzing and processing gait data; however, a standard database for their systematic evaluation does not exist. Instead, existing gait databases consist of subsets of kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic activity recordings by different investigators, at separate laboratories, and under varying conditions. Thus, the existing databases are neither homogenous nor sufficiently populated to statistically validate the algorithms. In this paper, a methodology for creating a database is presented, which can be used as a common ground to test the performance of algorithms that rely upon external marker data, ground reaction loading data, and/or video images. The database consists of: (1) synchronized motion-capture data (3D marker data) obtained using external markers, (2) computed joint angles, and (3) ground reaction loading acquired with plantar pressure insoles. This database could be easily expanded to include synchronized video, which will facilitate further development of video-based algorithms for motion tracking. This eventually could lead to the realization of markerless gait tracking. Such a system would have extensive applications in gait recognition, as well as gait rehabilitation. The entire database (marker, angle, and force data) will be placed in the public domain, and made available for downloads over the World Wide Web.

  16. Inter-Trial Gait Variability Reduction Using Continous Curve Registration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    curves. This is an important consideration. Using multivariate analysis in able-bodied gait analysis , Vardaxis et al. [11] have shown that subjects...examination of data from gait analysis of persons with stroke. Phys Ther 1998; 78: 814-28. [3] Eng JJ and Winter DA. Kinetic analysis of the lower limb

  17. Touchdown Ball-Bearing System for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Price, Robert; Gelotte, Erik; Singer, Herbert B.

    2003-01-01

    The torque-limited touchdown bearing system (TLTBS) is a backup mechanical-bearing system for a high-speed rotary machine in which the rotor shaft is supported by magnetic bearings in steady-state normal operation. The TLTBS provides ball-bearing support to augment or supplant the magnetic bearings during startup, shutdown, or failure of the magnetic bearings. The TLTBS also provides support in the presence of conditions (in particular, rotational acceleration) that make it difficult or impossible to control the magnetic bearings or in which the magnetic bearings are not strong enough (e.g., when the side load against the rotor exceeds the available lateral magnetic force).

  18. HTS magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, Frank N.; Flögel-Delor, Uta; Rothfeld, Rolf; Wippich, Dieter; Riedel, Thomas

    2002-08-01

    Radial HTS magnetic bearings (SMB) up to 200 mm size are developed and tested in prototype fast rotating machines to demonstrate the potential to replace conventional bearings. The individual rotational bearing components HTS and PM, their physical interaction and technology is reviewed. Characterisation experiments are conducted to understand the rotor dynamic behaviour. In terms of unbalance and critical speeds the suspended wheels and rotors compare favourably with conventional bearing devices. The rationale of our present bearing technology lies in the assembling of both low-speed magnetic bearings for centrifugal and wafer processing units up to 20,000 rpm as well as a high-speed optical mirror accelerated to rim speed of more than 500 m/s (174,000 rpm) confirming stable low-drag and low energy operation. Two new-type U shaped semicircle HTS bearings coupled each with a 6 W/80 K cryocooler of the Stirling type allow the contact-free operation of a Si wafer carrier in semiconductor wet processes.

  19. Conceptual Design and Feasibility of Foil Bearings for Rotorcraft Engines: Hot Core Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include oil-free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit.. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This overview presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section. In addition, system level foil bearing testing capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented along with analysis work being conducted under NRA Cooperative Agreements.

  20. Is adult gait less susceptible than paediatric gait to hip joint centre regression equation error?

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Hosking, J; O'Brien, T

    2016-03-01

    Hip joint centre (HJC) regression equation error during paediatric gait has recently been shown to have clinical significance. In relation to adult gait, it has been inferred that comparable errors with children in absolute HJC position may in fact result in less significant kinematic and kinetic error. This study investigated the clinical agreement of three commonly used regression equation sets (Bell et al., Davis et al. and Orthotrak) for adult subjects against the equations of Harrington et al. The relationship between HJC position error and subject size was also investigated for the Davis et al. set. Full 3-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 12 healthy adult subjects with data for each set compared to Harrington et al. The Gait Profile Score, Gait Variable Score and GDI-kinetic were used to assess clinical significance while differences in HJC position between the Davis and Harrington sets were compared to leg length and subject height using regression analysis. A number of statistically significant differences were present in absolute HJC position. However, all sets fell below the clinically significant thresholds (GPS <1.6°, GDI-Kinetic <3.6 points). Linear regression revealed a statistically significant relationship for both increasing leg length and increasing subject height with decreasing error in anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions. Results confirm a negligible clinical error for adult subjects suggesting that any of the examined sets could be used interchangeably. Decreasing error with both increasing leg length and increasing subject height suggests that the Davis set should be used cautiously on smaller subjects.

  1. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  2. A Grassmann graph embedding framework for gait analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connie, Tee; Goh, Michael Kah Ong; Teoh, Andrew Beng Jin

    2014-12-01

    Gait recognition is important in a wide range of monitoring and surveillance applications. Gait information has often been used as evidence when other biometrics is indiscernible in the surveillance footage. Building on recent advances of the subspace-based approaches, we consider the problem of gait recognition on the Grassmann manifold. We show that by embedding the manifold into reproducing kernel Hilbert space and applying the mechanics of graph embedding on such manifold, significant performance improvement can be obtained. In this work, the gait recognition problem is studied in a unified way applicable for both supervised and unsupervised configurations. Sparse representation is further incorporated in the learning mechanism to adaptively harness the local structure of the data. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can tolerate variations in appearance for gait identification effectively.

  3. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany Y; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    2014-10-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models.

  4. [A modular method for automated evaluation of gait analysis data].

    PubMed

    Loose, T; Malberg, H; Mikut, R; Dieterle, J; Schablowski, M; Wolf, S; Abel, R; Döderlein, L; Rupp, R

    2002-01-01

    A modular methodology for automated gait data evaluation: The aim of Instrumented Gait Analysis is to measure data such as joint kinematics or kinetics during gait in a quantitative way. The data evaluation for clinical purposes is often performed by experienced physicians (diagnosis of specific motion dysfunction, planning and validation of therapy). Due to subjective evaluation and complexity of the pathologies, there exists no objective, standardized data analysis method for these tasks. This article covers the development of a modular, computer-based methodology to quantify the degree of pathological gait in comparison to normal behavior, as well as to automatically search for interpretable gait abnormalities and to visualize the results. The outcomes are demonstrated with two different patient groups.

  5. Summary measures for clinical gait analysis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Instrumented 3D-gait analysis (3D-GA) is an important method used to obtain information that is crucial for establishing the level of functional limitation due to pathology, observing its evolution over time and evaluating rehabilitative intervention effects. However, a typical 3D-GA evaluation produces a vast amount of data, and despite its objectivity, its use is complicated, and the data interpretation is difficult. It is even more difficult to obtain an overview on patient cohorts for a comparison. Moreover, there is a growing awareness of the need for a concise index, specifically, a single measure of the 'quality' of a particular gait pattern. Several gait summary measures, which have been used in conjunction with 3D-GA, have been proposed to objectify clinical impression, quantify the degree of gait deviation from normal, stratify the severity of pathology, document the changes in gait patterns over time and evaluate interventions.

  6. Connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus in parkinsonian freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Schweder, Patrick M; Hansen, Peter C; Green, Alex L; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Stein, John; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2010-10-06

    Parkinson's disease (PD) may involve sudden unintended arrests in gait or failure to initiate gait, known as gait freezing. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been found to be an effective therapy for this phenomenon. In this study, we characterized the connectivity of the PPN freezing of gait (FOG) patients, compared with non-FOG PD and healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Differences in PPN connectivity profiles of the study groups were shown in the cerebellum and pons. The PPN showed connectivity with the cerebellum in controls and non-FOG PD. FOG patients showed absence of cerebellar connectivity, and increased visibility of the decussation of corticopontine fibres in the anterior pons. The findings suggest that corticopontine projections, which cross at the pons are increased in gait freezing, highlighting the importance and role of corticopontine-cerebellar pathways in the pathophysiology of this phenomenon.

  7. Gait dynamics in Parkinson’s disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    PubMed Central

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties. PMID:19566273

  8. Ball and Roller Bearings. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    The manual provides a subject reference for ball and roller bearings. The following topics are included: (1) bearing nomenclature, (2) bearing uses, (3) bearing capacities, (4) shop area working conditions, (5) bearing removal, (6) bearing cleaning and inspection, (7) bearing replacement, (8) bearing lubrication, (9) bearing installation, (10)…

  9. Powered lower limb orthoses for gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Daniel P.; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Domingo, Antoinette

    2006-01-01

    Bodyweight supported treadmill training has become a prominent gait rehabilitation method in leading rehabilitation centers. This type of locomotor training has many functional benefits but the labor costs are considerable. To reduce therapist effort, several groups have developed large robotic devices for assisting treadmill stepping. A complementary approach that has not been adequately explored is to use powered lower limb orthoses for locomotor training. Recent advances in robotic technology have made lightweight powered orthoses feasible and practical. An advantage to using powered orthoses as rehabilitation aids is they allow practice starting, turning, stopping, and avoiding obstacles during overground walking. PMID:16568153

  10. Gait analysis and validation using voxel data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Stone, Erik; Dai, Wenqing; Skubic, Marjorie; Keller, James

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for extracting gait parameters including walking speed, step time and step length from a three-dimensional voxel reconstruction, which is built from two calibrated camera views. These parameters are validated with a GAITRite Electronic mat and a Vicon motion capture system. Experiments were conducted in which subjects walked across the GAITRite mat at various speeds while the Vicon cameras recorded the motion of reflective markers attached to subjects' shoes, and our two calibrated cameras captured the images. Excellent agreements were found for walking speed. Step time and step length were also found to have good agreement given the limitation of frame rate and voxel resolution.

  11. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  12. Arkansas black bear hunter survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pharris, Larry D.; Clark, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to black bear (Ursus americanus) hunters in Arkansas following the 1980-84 bear seasons to determine participation, hunter success, and number of bears observed by hunters. Man-days of hunting to harvest a bear ranged from 148 to 671 and hunter success ranged from 0.4% to 2.2%. With the exception of 1980, number of permits issued, man-days of bear hunting, and bears harvested appear affected by hunting permit cost. 

  13. Crowd-Sourced Amputee Gait Data: A Feasibility Study Using YouTube Videos of Unilateral Trans-Femoral Gait

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, James; Gunarathne, Nuwan; Howard, David; Kenney, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Collecting large datasets of amputee gait data is notoriously difficult. Additionally, collecting data on less prevalent amputations or on gait activities other than level walking and running on hard surfaces is rarely attempted. However, with the wealth of user-generated content on the Internet, the scope for collecting amputee gait data from alternative sources other than traditional gait labs is intriguing. Here we investigate the potential of YouTube videos to provide gait data on amputee walking. We use an example dataset of trans-femoral amputees level walking at self-selected speeds to collect temporal gait parameters and calculate gait asymmetry. We compare our YouTube data with typical literature values, and show that our methodology produces results that are highly comparable to data collected in a traditional manner. The similarity between the results of our novel methodology and literature values lends confidence to our technique. Nevertheless, clear challenges with the collection and interpretation of crowd-sourced gait data remain, including long term access to datasets, and a lack of validity and reliability studies in this area. PMID:27764226

  14. DMRT3 is associated with gait type in Mangalarga Marchador horses, but does not control gait ability.

    PubMed

    Patterson, L; Staiger, E A; Brooks, S A

    2015-04-01

    The Mangalarga Marchador (MM) is a Brazilian horse breed known for a uniquely smooth gait. A recent publication described a mutation in the DMRT3 gene that the authors claim controls the ability to perform lateral patterned gaits (Andersson et al. 2012). We tested 81 MM samples for the DMRT3 mutation using extracted DNA from hair bulbs using a novel RFLP. Horses were phenotypically categorized by their gait type (batida or picada), as recorded by the Brazilian Mangalarga Marchador Breeders Association (ABCCMM). Statistical analysis using the plink toolset (Purcell, 2007) revealed significant association between gait type and the DMRT3 mutation (P = 2.3e-22). Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium suggests that selective pressure for gait type is altering allele frequencies in this breed (P = 1.00e-5). These results indicate that this polymorphism may be useful for genotype-assisted selection for gait type within this breed. As both batida and picada MM horses can perform lateral gaits, the DMRT3 mutation is not the only locus responsible for the lateral gait pattern.

  15. Wearable Device-Based Gait Recognition Using Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Images and a Convolutional Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongjia; Zhou, Suiping

    2017-01-01

    The widespread installation of inertial sensors in smartphones and other wearable devices provides a valuable opportunity to identify people by analyzing their gait patterns, for either cooperative or non-cooperative circumstances. However, it is still a challenging task to reliably extract discriminative features for gait recognition with noisy and complex data sequences collected from casually worn wearable devices like smartphones. To cope with this problem, we propose a novel image-based gait recognition approach using the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) without the need to manually extract discriminative features. The CNN’s input image, which is encoded straightforwardly from the inertial sensor data sequences, is called Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Image (AE-GDI). AE-GDI is a new two-dimensional representation of gait dynamics, which is invariant to rotation and translation. The performance of the proposed approach in gait authentication and gait labeling is evaluated using two datasets: (1) the McGill University dataset, which is collected under realistic conditions; and (2) the Osaka University dataset with the largest number of subjects. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves competitive recognition accuracy over existing approaches and provides an effective parametric solution for identification among a large number of subjects by gait patterns. PMID:28264503

  16. Overground robot assisted gait trainer for the treatment of drug-resistant freezing of gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Weis, Luca; Zabeo, Letizia; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Biundo, Roberta; Facchini, Silvia; Rossi, Simonetta; Masiero, Stefano; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-08-15

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a frequent and disabling feature of Parkinson disease (PD). Gait rehabilitation assisted by electromechanical devices, such as training on treadmill associated with sensory cues or assisted by gait orthosis have been shown to improve FOG. Overground robot assisted gait training (RGT) has been recently tested in patients with PD with improvement of several gait parameters. We here evaluated the effectiveness of RGT on FOG severity and gait abnormalities in PD patients. Eighteen patients with FOG resistant to dopaminergic medications were treated with 15 sessions of RGT and underwent an extensive clinical evaluation before and after treatment. The main outcome measures were FOG questionnaire (FOGQ) global score and specific tasks for gait assessment, namely 10 meter walking test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and 360° narrow turns (360 NT). Balance was also evaluated through Fear of Falling Efficacy Scale (FFES), assessing self perceived stability and Berg Balance Scale (BBS), for objective examination. After treatment, FOGQ score was significantly reduced (P=0.023). We also found a significant reduction of time needed to complete TUG, 10 MWT, and 360 NT (P=0.009, 0.004 and 0.04, respectively). By contrast the number of steps and the number of freezing episodes recorded at each gait task did not change. FFES and BBS scores also improved, with positive repercussions on performance on daily activity and quality of life. Our results indicate that RGT is a useful strategy for the treatment of drug refractory FOG.

  17. Mechanical loading with or without weight-bearing activity: influence on bone strength index in elite female adolescent athletes engaged in water polo, gymnastics, and track-and-field.

    PubMed

    Greene, David A; Naughton, Geraldine A; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Moresi, Mark; Ducher, Gaele

    2012-09-01

    Bone health is considered not to benefit from water-based sports because of their weight-supported nature, but available evidence primarily relies on DXA technology. Our purpose was to investigate musculoskeletal health in the upper and lower body in well-trained adolescent female athletes using pQCT and compare these athletes with less-active, age- and sex-matched peers. Bone mineral content, volumetric cortical and trabecular BMD, total and cortical area, and bone strength index were assessed at the distal and proximal tibia and radius in four groups of adolescent females (mean age, 14.9 years) including water polo players (n = 30), gymnasts (n = 25), track-and-field athletes (n = 34), and nonactive controls (n = 28). Water polo players did not show any benefit in bone strength index or muscle size in the lower leg when compared with controls. In contrast, gymnasts showed 60.1 % and 53.4 % greater bone strength index at the distal and proximal tibia, respectively, than nonactive females (p < 0.05). Similarly, track-and-field athletes displayed 33.9 % and 14.7 % greater bone strength index at the distal and proximal tibia, respectively, compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the upper body, water polo players had 31.9 % greater bone strength index at the distal radius, but not the radial shaft, and 15.2 % larger forearm muscle cross-sectional area than controls (p < 0.05). The greatest musculoskeletal benefits in the upper body were found in gymnasts. In conclusion, despite training at an elite level, female water polo players did not show any benefits in musculoskeletal health in the lower leg and only limited benefits in the upper body when compared with nonactive girls.

  18. Weighted Automata and Weighted Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droste, Manfred; Gastin, Paul

    In automata theory, a fundamental result of Büchi and Elgot states that the recognizable languages are precisely the ones definable by sentences of monadic second order logic. We will present a generalization of this result to the context of weighted automata. We develop syntax and semantics of a quantitative logic; like the behaviors of weighted automata, the semantics of sentences of our logic are formal power series describing ‘how often’ the sentence is true for a given word. Our main result shows that if the weights are taken in an arbitrary semiring, then the behaviors of weighted automata are precisely the series definable by sentences of our quantitative logic. We achieve a similar characterization for weighted Büchi automata acting on infinite words, if the underlying semiring satisfies suitable completeness assumptions. Moreover, if the semiring is additively locally finite or locally finite, then natural extensions of our weighted logic still have the same expressive power as weighted automata.

  19. Probabilistic Gait Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbelien, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore,…

  20. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of arthritic disorders: reviews and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lakes, E H; Allen, K D

    2016-11-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool to understand behavioral changes in preclinical arthritis models. While observational scoring and spatiotemporal gait parameters are the most widely performed gait analyses in rodents, commercially available systems can now provide quantitative assessments of spatiotemporal patterns. However, inconsistencies remain between testing platforms, and laboratories often select different gait pattern descriptors to report in the literature. Rodent gait can also be described through kinetic and kinematic analyses, but systems to analyze rodent kinetics and kinematics are typically custom made and often require sensitive, custom equipment. While the use of rodent gait analysis rapidly expands, it is important to remember that, while rodent gait analysis is a relatively modern behavioral assay, the study of quadrupedal gait is not new. Nearly all gait parameters are correlated, and a collection of gait parameters is needed to understand a compensatory gait pattern used by the animal. As such, a change in a single gait parameter is unlikely to tell the full biomechanical story; and to effectively use gait analysis, one must consider how multiple different parameters contribute to an altered gait pattern. The goal of this article is to review rodent gait analysis techniques and provide recommendations on how to use these technologies in rodent arthritis models, including discussions on the strengths and limitations of observational scoring, spatiotemporal, kinetic, and kinematic measures. Recognizing rodent gait analysis is an evolving tool, we also provide technical recommendations we hope will improve the utility of these analyses in the future.

  1. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  2. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  3. Roller bearing geometry design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  4. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  5. High speed hybrid bearing comprising a fluid bearing and a rolling bearing convected in series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of an antifriction bearing and a process by which its fatigue life may be extended. The method involves a rotating shaft supported by a fluid bearing and a rolling element bearing coupled in series. Each bearing turns at a fraction of the rotational speed of the shaft. The fluid bearing is preferably conical, thereby providing thrust and radial load support in a single bearing structure.

  6. Size and growth patterns of the Yellowstone grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Bonnie M.

    1987-01-01

    Weights and/or measurements of 151 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) captured 261 times were recorded from 1975 to 1985. Males were consistently heavier than females within all age classes beginning at age 2. Mean weight for 65 captive males (5+ years old) was 192 kg and 135 kg for 63 adult females (5+ years old). Mean monthly weights by sex and age class indicated adults lost weight from den emergence through July, generally regaining emergence weight by August. Weaned yearlings lost weight July-Septmber, whereas unweaned yearlings gained weight during the same period. Sexual dimorphism in body measurements within age classes was apparent in cubs and became significant in all body measurements by age 3. Girth was the measurement most closely correlated with weight for both males and females. Adults feeding at garbage dumps weighted more than bears relying on natural food sources. Bears were smaller and weighed less in this study than during the period 1959-70, when major dumps were available as a food source. Mean annual weights of nondump females were highly correlated with annual habitat productivity indices for Yellowstone Park. Correlations between mean adult female weight an cub litter size (r) = 0.92) and mean age at 1st cub production (r = -0.52) were apparent. In general, females with reliable high-energy foods tended to attain larger body sizes, mature at an earlier age, and have larger cub litters than females using relatively low-energy foods.

  7. Influence of load and carrying method on gait, specifically pelvic movement

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Eun-Ju; Lee, Hyun-Ok; Kwon, Yu-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine how carrying methods and load affects pelvic movement while walking. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen healthy subjects (age 20.68 ± 1.95 years, height 167.56 ± 8.46 cm, weight 60.25 ± 9.37 kg) volunteered. The items carried included a hand bag, shoulder bag, cross bag, and a back pack. The load weights were 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of body weight. G-Walk was used to record and analyze pelvic movement while the participants walked with different loads. [Results] In the case of hand bags and shoulder bags, pelvic tilt increased along with weight. In particular, when compared with the 0%, 5% and 10% load conditions, the 15% load of a hand bag induced a significant increase. Pelvic rotation showed a tendency to decrease as the weight increased. [Conclusion] Lateral pelvic tilt is thought to increase when the weight exceeds 15% of body weight, thereby resulting in decreased efficiency of gait. The pelvic rotation is thought to decrease as the weight increases, causing restricted upper limb movements. PMID:27512264

  8. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  9. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  10. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  11. Turtle mimetic soft robot with two swimming gaits.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Kim, Min-Soo; Rodrigue, Hugo; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Shim, Jae-Eul; Kim, Min-Cheol; Chu, Won-Shik; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-05-04

    This paper presents a biomimetic turtle flipper actuator consisting of a shape memory alloy composite structure for implementation in a turtle-inspired autonomous underwater vehicle. Based on the analysis of the Chelonia mydas, the flipper actuator was divided into three segments containing a scaffold structure fabricated using a 3D printer. According to the filament stacking sequence of the scaffold structure in the actuator, different actuating motions can be realized and three different types of scaffold structures were proposed to replicate the moti