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Sample records for weld pool size

  1. Determination of a temperature sensor location for monitoring weld pool size in GMAW

    SciTech Connect

    Boo, K.S.; Cho, H.S. . Dept. of Precision Engineering and Mechatronics)

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes a method of determining the optimal sensor location to measure weldment surface temperature, which has a close correlation with weld pool size in the gas metal arc (GMA) welding process. Due to the inherent complexity and nonlinearity in the GMA welding process, the relationship between the weldment surface temperature and the weld pool size varies with the point of measurement. This necessitates an optimal selection of the measurement point to minimize the process nonlinearity effect in estimating the weld pool size from the measured temperature. To determine the optimal sensor location on the top surface of the weldment, the correlation between the measured temperature and the weld pool size is analyzed. The analysis is done by calculating the correlation function, which is based upon an analytical temperature distribution model. To validate the optimal sensor location, a series of GMA bead-on-plate welds are performed on a medium-carbon steel under various welding conditions. A comparison study is given in detail based upon the simulation and experimental results.

  2. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  3. A unified model of coupled arc plasma and weld pool for double electrodes TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Fan, Ding; Huang, Jiankang; Huang, Yong

    2014-07-01

    A three-dimensional model containing tungsten electrodes, arc plasma and a weld pool is presented for double electrodes tungsten inert gas welding. The model is validated by available experimental data. The distributions of temperature, velocity and pressure of the coupled arc plasma are investigated. The current density, heat flux and shear stress over the weld pool are highlighted. The weld pool dynamic is described by taking into account buoyance, Lorentz force, surface tension and plasma drag force. The turbulent effect in the weld pool is also considered. It is found that the temperature and velocity distributions of the coupled arc are not rotationally symmetrical. A similar property is also shown by the arc pressure, current density and heat flux at the anode surface. The surface tension gradient is much larger than the plasma drag force and dominates the convective pattern in the weld pool, thus determining the weld penetration. The anodic heat flux and plasma drag force, as well as the surface tension gradient over the weld pool, determine the weld shape and size. In addition, provided the welding current through one electrode increases and that through the other decreases, keeping the total current unchanged, the coupled arc behaviour and weld pool dynamic change significantly, while the weld shape and size show little change. The results demonstrate the necessity of a unified model in the study of the arc plasma and weld pool.

  4. The distinctive feature of weld joints structure by adding the nanomodifying to the weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhova, Galina; Danilov, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Maxim; Zernin, Evgeny; Kartashov, Evgeny

    2015-10-01

    The experimental studies were carried on for the test samples of welds of the steel 12X18H10T; the results are presented. The effect produced by the nanostructured modifying powders added to the weld pool on the quality of weld joints was examined. The weld joints were obtained by arc welding in argon atmosphere using consumable electrode. Due to the weld pool modification, the dendrite size was found to decrease and a more equilibrium microstructure would form in the weld material.

  5. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  6. Neural Network Modeling of Weld Pool Shape in Pulsed-Laser Aluminum Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Vitek, J.M.

    1998-11-16

    A neural network model was developed to predict the weld pool shape for pulsed-laser aluminum welds. Several different network architectures were examined and the optimum architecture was identified. The neural network was then trained and, in spite of the small size of the training data set, the network accurately predicted the weld pool shape profiles. The neural network output was in the form of four weld pool shape parameters (depth, width, half-width, and area) and these were converted into predicted weld pool profiles with the use of the actual experimental poo1 profiles as templates. It was also shown that the neural network model could reliably predict the change from conduction-mode type shapes to keyhole-mode shapes.

  7. Control of back weld pool shape in MIG welding by using switch back method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, B.; Kaneko, Yasuyoshi; Soeda, Masahiro; Ohshima, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the problem concerning the sensing and controlling of weld pool shape in MIG welding of plate. In the robotic one side MIG welding process without backing plate, for obtaining the good quality of the weld, it is important to control the weld pool shape so as to prevent the melting metal from burning through. The method of controlling the weld pool shape is discussed. The moving torch is repeat switch change, which is named switch back method. The primary welding experimental results have proved that the switch back method is effective and satisfactory for controlling the back weld pool shape in one side MIG welding process without backing plate.

  8. Visual sensing and intelligent control of weld pool dynamics in aluminum alloy pulsed MIG welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Fan, Ding; Huang, An; Wu, Mingliang

    2005-12-01

    Based on Fuzzy controller and expert system (ES), a real-time control system is proposed for improving the stability of the weld pool width in aluminum alloy metal inert gas (MIG) welding. A vision sensing system for taking the image of pool of aluminum alloy has been setup and corresponding image-processing algorithm has been developed to acquire characteristic parameters of the weld pool. The experiments show that the real-time and precision requirements for detecting and control of weld pool width of aluminum alloy MIG welding process could be satisfied by the established system.

  9. Influence of the arc plasma parameters on the weld pool profile in TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropchin, A.; Frolov, V.; Pipa, A. V.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the arc and fluid simulations of the weld pool can be beneficial in the analysis and further development of arc welding processes and welding machines. However, the appropriate coupling of arc and weld pool simulations needs further improvement. The tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process is investigated by simulations including the weld pool. Experiments with optical diagnostics are used for the validation. A coupled computational model of the arc and the weld pool is developed using the software ANSYS CFX. The weld pool model considers the forces acting on the motion of the melt inside and on the surface of the pool, such as Marangoni, drag, electromagnetic forces and buoyancy. The experimental work includes analysis of cross-sections of the workpieces, highspeed video images and spectroscopic measurements. Experiments and calculations have been performed for various currents, distances between electrode and workpiece and nozzle diameters. The studies show the significant impact of material properties like surface tension dependence on temperature as well as of the arc structure on the weld pool behaviour and finally the weld seam depth. The experimental weld pool profiles and plasma temperatures are in good agreement with computational results.

  10. Gravitational effects on weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding on 304 stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum-4 wt.% copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Namhyun

    The objective of the present work was to investigate effects of gravitational (acceleration) level and orientation on Ni 200 alloy (99.5% Ni purity), 304 stainless steel, and Al-4 wt.% Cu alloy during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW). Main characterization was focused on the weld pool shape, microstructure, and solute distribution as a function of gravitational level and orientation. The welds were divided into two classes, i.e., 'stable' and 'unstable' welds, in view of the variation of weld pool shape as a function of gravitational level and orientation. In general, higher arc current and translational GTAW produced more significant effects of gravitational orientation on the weld pool shape than the case of lower arc current and spot welding. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was a secondary factor in determining the stability of weld pool shape. For the 'stable' weld of 304 stainless steel GTAW, the II-U weld showed less convexity in the pool bottom and more depression of the free surface, therefore producing deeper penetration (10--20%) than the case of II-D weld. The II-D weld of 304 stainless steel showed 31% deeper penetration, 28% narrower width, and more hemispherical shape of the weld pool than the case of II-U weld. For GTAW on 304 stainless steel, gravitational level variation from low gravity (LG ≈ 1.2 go) to high gravity (HG ≈ 1.8 go) caused 10% increase in width and 10% decrease in depth while maintaining the overall weld pool volume. Furthermore, LBW on 304 stainless steels showed mostly constant shape of weld pool as a function of gravitational orientation. GTAW on Ni showed similar trends of weld pool shape compared with GTAW on 304 stainless steel, i.e., the weld pool became unstable by showing more penetration in the II-D weld for slower arc translational velocity (V a) and larger weld pool size. However, the Ni weld pool shape had greater stability of the weld pool shape with respect to the gravitational orientation

  11. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  12. A study of arc force, pool depression and weld penetration during gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Guu, A.C. . Dept. of Welding Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Weld pool depression, arc force, weld penetration, and their interrelations have been studied as a function of welding current. Pool depression and welding arc force have been measured simultaneously using a recently developed technique. The authors found quadratic dependence of arc force on current, confirming similar findings in previous studies. Pool depression is essentially zero below a threshold level of current (200 A in this experiment) and then increases quadratically with current. A perfectly linear relation between arc force and pool depression was found in the current range from 200 to 350 A, with pool depression onset at about 0.35 g force (0.34 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]2]N). The total surface tension and gravitational forces were calculated, from the measured surface topography, and found to be about five times that required to balance the arc force at 300 A. Thus electromagnetic and hydrodynamic forces must be taken into account to explain the measured levels of pool depression. The relation between weld penetration and pool depression for different welding currents has been established. Three distinct regimes of weld penetration on weld current were found.

  13. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  14. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  15. Simultaneous vision image sensing of weld pool of pulsed GTAW in multi-orientation in a frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Chen, Shanben; Liu, Xiaodong; Wu, Lin

    2001-09-01

    Welding arc light spectrum in the range of 600nm~700nm basically composes of continuous spectrum without metal spectrum and argon spectrum. The radiation strength of this continuous spectrum is low and smooth, which is benefit for reducing process, and the response sensitivity of CCD camera is high at this wavelength range. So, choose a suitable imaging spectrum window, use the continuous spectrum of this window to illuminate the welding pool and use CCD camera to sample the pool image. The reflection of arc light from liquid metal pool surface is specular reflection, the reflection of arc light from the workpiece surface is diffuse reflection, which improves the contrast of the welding pool image. This kind of vision image sensing method takes full advantage of the arc light as a benefit factor, and realizes to acquire the comprehensive information of the pool only from a single sensing source. Based on the above principle, this paper develops a visual image sensing system for weld zone of pulsed GTAW. The system as a part of the control system for weld shape can realize simultaneous image sensing of front topside, back topside and bottom side weld pool in a frame. Both the topside and bottom images concentrate on the same target of the CCD camera through the visual sensing light path system. The composite filter technology with low sampling image current is used to overcome the influence of arc light. The high quality and clear images of weld zones are acquired, which supply plenty information to study the dynamic process of pulsed GTAW. In addition, in order to extract the actual size parameters of weld pool, the image sensing system is calibrated.

  16. Automatic Welding System of Aluminum Pipe by Monitoring Backside Image of Molten Pool Using Vision Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    An automatic welding system using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding with vision sensor for welding of aluminum pipe was constructed. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position and moving welding torch with the AC welding machine. The monitoring system consists of a vision sensor using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Neural network model for welding speed control were constructed to perform the process automatically. From the experimental results it shows the effectiveness of the control system confirmed by good detection of molten pool and sound weld of experimental result.

  17. Experimental characterization of the weld pool flow in a TIG configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, M.; Masquère, M.; Freton, P.; Franceries, X.; Gonzalez, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process relies on heat transfer between plasma and work piece leading to a metallic weld pool. Combination of different forces produces movements on the molten pool surface. One of our aims is to determine the velocity on the weld pool surface. This provides a set of data that leads to a deeper comprehension of the flow behavior and allows us to validate numerical models used to study TIG parameters. In this paper, two diagnostic methods developed with high speed imaging for the determination of velocity of an AISI 304L stainless steel molten pool are presented. Application of the two methods to a metallic weld pool under helium with a current intensity of 100 A provides velocity values around 0.70 m/s which are in good agreement with literature works.

  18. Use of Aria to simulate laser weld pool dynamics for neutron generator production.

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Martinez, Mario J.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-09-01

    This report documents the results for the FY07 ASC Integrated Codes Level 2 Milestone number 2354. The description for this milestone is, 'Demonstrate level set free surface tracking capabilities in ARIA to simulate the dynamics of the formation and time evolution of a weld pool in laser welding applications for neutron generator production'. The specialized boundary conditions and material properties for the laser welding application were implemented and verified by comparison with existing, two-dimensional applications. Analyses of stationary spot welds and traveling line welds were performed and the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) level set algorithm is assessed by comparison with 3D moving mesh calculations.

  19. Residual Stresses and Critical Initial Flaw Size Analyses of Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Raju, Ivatury, S.; Dawocke, David S.; Cheston, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). A series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on the fatigue life. The purpose of the weld analyses was to model the weld process using a variety of sequences to determine the 'best' sequence in terms of weld residual stresses and distortions. The many factors examined in this study include weld design (single-V, double-V groove), weld sequence, boundary conditions, and material properties, among others. The results of this weld analysis are included with service loads to perform a fatigue and critical initial flaw size evaluation.

  20. Welding deviation detection algorithm based on extremum of molten pool image contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yong; Jiang, Lipei; Li, Yunhua; Xue, Long; Huang, Junfen; Huang, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The welding deviation detection is the basis of robotic tracking welding, but the on-line real-time measurement of welding deviation is still not well solved by the existing methods. There is plenty of information in the gas metal arc welding(GMAW) molten pool images that is very important for the control of welding seam tracking. The physical meaning for the curvature extremum of molten pool contour is revealed by researching the molten pool images, that is, the deviation information points of welding wire center and the molten tip center are the maxima and the local maxima of the contour curvature, and the horizontal welding deviation is the position difference of these two extremum points. A new method of weld deviation detection is presented, including the process of preprocessing molten pool images, extracting and segmenting the contours, obtaining the contour extremum points, and calculating the welding deviation, etc. Extracting the contours is the premise, segmenting the contour lines is the foundation, and obtaining the contour extremum points is the key. The contour images can be extracted with the method of discrete dyadic wavelet transform, which is divided into two sub contours including welding wire and molten tip separately. The curvature value of each point of the two sub contour lines is calculated based on the approximate curvature formula of multi-points for plane curve, and the two points of the curvature extremum are the characteristics needed for the welding deviation calculation. The results of the tests and analyses show that the maximum error of the obtained on-line welding deviation is 2 pixels(0.16 mm), and the algorithm is stable enough to meet the requirements of the pipeline in real-time control at a speed of less than 500 mm/min. The method can be applied to the on-line automatic welding deviation detection.

  1. The influence of arc plasma parameters on the form of a welding pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. Ya.; Toropchin, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of the Marangoni force on the form of a welding pool has been considered. Results of computer simulation of the processes of welding arc generation with a non-consumable tungsten electrode in inert gas are shown. The experimental results are reported and comparatively analyzed. The calculations were carried out in a package of applied programs at various currents.

  2. Melt pool and keyhole behaviour analysis for deep penetration laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbro, R.

    2010-11-01

    One usually defines the main characteristic of the welding performances of a given laser system by its 'penetration curve' that corresponds to the welding depth as a function of the welding speed Vw for a given set of operating parameters. Analysis of a penetration curve is interesting and gives very fruitful results. Coupled with high-speed video imaging of melt pool surface and ejected plume behaviour, the analysis of this penetration curve on a very large range of welding speeds, typically from 0 to 50 m min-1, has allowed us to observe very different and characteristic regimes. These regimes are mainly characterized by the physical processes by which they impede the laser beam penetration inside the material. We show that it is only at rather high welding speeds that these limiting processes are reduced. Consequently, the scaling law of welding depth with welding speed is in agreement with adapted modelling of this process. On the other hand, as the welding speed is reduced, different effects depending on the weld pool dynamics and plume interaction strongly disturb the keyhole stability and are responsible for the deviation of the penetration curve from the previous modelling that agrees with a 1/Vw scaling law. A corresponding criterion for the occurrence of this effect is defined.

  3. The study on sensing of MIG welding pool surface based on structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nansheng; Wang, Yanfeng; Yuan, Youzhi; Luo, Wei; Liu, Xiaorui

    2008-12-01

    The method with sensing of MIG welding pool surface is studied in this paper.The distributing of arc action spectrum, pool reflecting action spectrum and pool radiating action spectrum are analyzed. The radiation is weaker at interzone 500-700nm. So, the structured light source is confirmed to semiconductor laser at wavelength 650nm. Narrow band filter and neutral density filter are mounted on CCD, they are good for restrained the influence of arc. The pool width is studied on small current by experimented, deforming and distributing of structured light are confirmed. The form and sort of splash are studied, the method of reducing and protecting splash are also studied. Welding current is selected properly to restrained splash. Incident angle of structured light is 30 degree. The MIG pool image is captured by CCD. Deformed structured light fringes are reflected the information of the concave or convex of the pool.

  4. Effect of adhesive on molten pool structure and penetration in laser weld bonding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. M.; Ren, D. X.

    2010-09-01

    Laser weld bonding (LWB) is a new hybrid technique that combines adhesive bonding with laser seam welding together, and can achieve higher joint strength than adhesive bonding or laser welding individually. Some new physical phenomena have been observed in this welding method, and the phenomena are different from the normal laser welding process, such as a remarkable deeper penetration in LWB than that in laser welding direct (LWD). The adhesive-induced gas can influence the molten pool structure in front of the keyhole, so that less energy is required for laser keyhole through the upper sheet; thus, higher laser power density can interact with the lower sheet, leading to deeper penetration. Simulation comparison experiments are set to indirectly verify these conclusions above.

  5. Determination and Dependencies of Melt Pool Dimensions in Laser Micro Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patschger, Andreas; Bliedtner, Jens

    Melt pool dimensions such as width and length influence the properties of the resulting weld joint and should be considered when designing the laser welding process. The melt pool width and as a consequence the weld seam width determine the strength of the joint. The melt pool length is directly linked to the solidification time which affects the resulting metallurgical micro structure. The melt pool dimensions can be estimated by given analytical solutions based on the capillary diameter. In order to test the given estimations, melt pool dimensions of bead-on-plate welds in stainless steel foils were measured by means of high speed imaging and microscopy. The welds were obtained by applying different focal diameters between 25 μm and 204 μm to foil thicknesses of 50 μm and 100 μm. As a result, simplified correlations based on the focal diameter are derived which is less complex to determine in practice. Regression analyses ensure a statistical comparability.

  6. Weld pool temperatures of steel S235 while applying a controlled short-circuit gas metal arc welding process and various shielding gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakov, R.; Schöpp, H.; Gött, G.; Sperl, A.; Wilhelm, G.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature determination of liquid metals is difficult and depends strongly on the emissivity. However, the surface temperature distribution of the weld pool is an important characteristic of an arc weld process. As an example, short-arc welding of steel with a cold metal transfer (CMT) process is considered. With optical emission spectroscopy in the spectral region between 660 and 840 nm and absolute calibrated high-speed camera images the relation between temperature and emissivity of the weld pool is determined. This method is used to obtain two-dimensional temperature profiles in the pictures. Results are presented for welding materials (wire G3Si1 on base material S235) using different welding CMT processes with CO2 (100%), Corgon 18 (18% CO2 + 82% Ar), VarigonH6 (93.5% Ar + 6.5% H2) and He (100%) as shielding gases. The different gases are used to study their influence on the weld pool temperature.

  7. Simulation of time-dependent pool shape during laser spot welding: Transient effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlen, Georg; Ludwig, Andreas; Sahm, Peter R.

    2003-12-01

    The shape and depth of the area molten during a welding process is of immense technical importance. This study investigates how the melt pool shape during laser welding is influenced by Marangoni convection and tries to establish general qualitative rules of melt pool dynamics. A parameter study shows how different welding powers lead to extremely different pool shapes. Special attention is paid to transient effects that occur during the melting process as well as after switching off the laser source. It is shown that the final pool shape can depend strongly on the welding duration. The authors use an axisymmetric two-dimensional (2-D) control-volume-method (CVM) code based on the volume-averaged two-phase model of alloy solidification by Ni and Beckermann[1] and the SIMPLER algorithm by Patankar.[2] They calculate the transient distribution of temperatures, phase fractions, flow velocities, pressures, and concentrations of alloying elements in the melt and two solid phases (peritectic solidification) for a stationary laser welding process. Marangoni flow is described using a semiempirical model for the temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. The software was parallelized using the shared memory standard OpenMP.

  8. Reconstructing a three-dimensional P-GMAW weld pool shape from a two-dimensional visual image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangjun, Zhang; Zhihong, Yan; Lin, Wu

    2006-07-01

    The online detection of the three-dimensional (3D) shape of a weld pool is a key unsolved question for weld shape control. In this paper, a method to reconstruct the 3D shape of a weld pool boundary from a two-dimensional (2D) visual image is proposed. Firstly, a new 3D model was developed to describe the weld pool geometry in pulsed gas metal arc welding (P-GMAW). In this model, four parameters could be used to determine the weld pool shape: the maximum width W, the length of the pool tail L, the height of the rear of the pool H and the projection of the rear angle onto the work piece plane θL. Then, the clear weld pool images from the P-GMAW were captured from the upper side, and a series of algorithms were developed to extract the model geometrical parameters from these images. Finally, the 3D shape of the weld pool was reconstructed from the 2D images. The results were then validated with metallograph observations. The measurement error of this method was investigated, and methods for improvement were discussed.

  9. A unified 3D model for an interaction mechanism of the plasma arc, weld pool and keyhole in plasma arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xiaoxia; Wu, ChuanSong; Zhang, Guokai; Chen, Ji

    2015-11-01

    A 3D model is developed to perform numerical investigation on the coupled interaction mechanism of the plasma arc, weld pool and keyhole in plasma arc welding. By considering the traveling of the plasma arc along the welding direction, unified governing equations are solved in the whole domain including the torch, plasma arc, keyhole, weld pool and workpiece, which involves different physical mechanisms in different zones. The local thermodynamic equilibrium-diffusion approximation is used to treat the interface between the plasma arc and weld pool, and the volume-of-fluid method is used to track the evolution of the keyhole wall. The interaction effects between the plasma arc, keyhole and weld pool as well as the heat, mass and pressure transport phenomena in the whole welding domain are quantitatively simulated. It is found that when the torch is moving along the joint line, the axis of the keyhole channel tilts backward, and the envelope of molten metal surrounding the keyhole wall inside the weld pool is unsymmetrical relative to the keyhole channel. The plasma arc welding tests are conducted, and the predicted keyhole dimensions and the fusion zone shape are in agreement with the experimentally measured results.

  10. Temperature and size variabilities of the Western pacific warm pool.

    PubMed

    Yan, X H; Ho, C R; Zheng, Q; Klemas, V

    1992-12-01

    Variabilities in sea-surface temperature and size of the Western Pacific Warm Pool were tracked with 10 years of satellite multichannel sea-surface temperature observations from 1982 to 1991. The results show that both annual mean sea-surface temperature and the size of the warm pool increased from 1983 to 1987 and fluctuated after 1987. Possible causes of these variations include solar irradiance variabilities, EI Niño-Southern Oscillation events, volcanic activities, and global warming.

  11. [Impact of introduction of O2 on the welding arc of gas pool coupled activating TIG].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Guo

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper, Boltzmann plot method was applied to analyze the temperature distributions of the are plasma when the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding was at different coupling degrees with the outer gas being O2. Based on this study of temperature distributions, the changing regularities of are voltage and are appearance were studied. The result shows that compared with traditional TIG welding, the introduction of O2 makes the welding arc constricted slightly, the temperature of the are center build up, and the are voltage increase. When argon being the inner gas, oxygen serving as the outer gas instead of argon makes the are constricted more obviously. When the coupling degree increases from 0 to 2, the temperature of the are center and the are voltage both increase slightly. In the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding the are is constricted not obviously, and the reason why the weld penetration is improved dramatically in the welding of stainless steel is not are constriction. PMID:25095400

  12. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  13. Study on removal of phase lines in welding pool surface shape sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiqing; Liu, Nansheng; Hu, Xian; Ai, Xiaopu; Wei, Sheng; Liu, Xiaorui

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, arc welding pool surface shape sensing becomes a hot spot in the field of welding automation. In order to restore the pool surface shape, we first need to photograph the pool surface, and then extract useful information from the acquired images. In arc welding surface shape sensing system based on structured light projection, the raster images obtained by charge-coupled device (CCD) are seriously affected by strong arc and spatter, etc. resulting in errors of phase unwrapping, and thus seriously affecting the surface shape recovery. To address phase lines of unwrapping errors, this paper presents a two-neighborhood method. First we analyzed the characteristics of phase lines in the phase diagram, then by comparison of phase diagrams or phase difference diagrams processed before and after, the effectiveness of two-neighborhood method was confirmed, finally this method was applied to the actual pool phase diagram processing, experimental results also confirmed this two-neighborhood method is feasible in removal of phase lines.

  14. Unsteady marangoni flow in a molten pool when welding dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Chung, F. K.

    2000-12-01

    The unsteady variations of transport processes in molten pools when welding dissimilar metals are systematically investigated. Convection is driven by Marangoni forces with different directions and magnitudes on a flat free surface. For a clear description without loss of generality, three-dimensional quasi-steady welding is stimulated by an unsteady two-dimensional process. Applying the volume of fluid (VOF) and enthalpy methods to determine the interfaces between the immiscible dissimilar metals and between solid and liquid, the computed results show in detail the unsteady variations in the velocity and temperature fields, the solute concentration on the free surface, and the shapes of the molten regions affected by varying the signs and magnitudes of the surface-tension coefficients. The predicted shapes of the fusion-zone and solute distributions agree with the available experimental results in welding iron to aluminum, copper and iron, and copper to nickle.

  15. Weld Bead Size, Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Alloys Joints Welded by Pulsed Laser Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chuang; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang; Peng, Genchen; Wang, Xian

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed laser spot welding of intersection points of zirconium alloys straps was performed. Weld bead size, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of weld bead were investigated. With the increasing laser peak power or number of shots, the weld width of the beads increased, the protrusion decreased and the dimple increased with further increase in heat input. The fusion zone consisted of a mixture of αZr and residual βZr phases. After annealing treatment, βNb and Zr(Fe, Nb)2 second phase particles were precipitated inter- and intragranular of αZr grains adequately. The oxide thickness of annealed weld bead was about 3.90 μm, decreased by about 18.1% relative to the 4.76 μm of as-welded specimen corroded at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 20 days. The corrosion resistance of annealed specimen was better than that of as-welded specimen, since the second phase particles exerted better corrosion resistance, and the content of Nb in βZr and the fraction of βZr decreased after the annealing treatment.

  16. Weld Bead Size, Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Alloys Joints Welded by Pulsed Laser Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chuang; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang; Peng, Genchen; Wang, Xian

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser spot welding of intersection points of zirconium alloys straps was performed. Weld bead size, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of weld bead were investigated. With the increasing laser peak power or number of shots, the weld width of the beads increased, the protrusion decreased and the dimple increased with further increase in heat input. The fusion zone consisted of a mixture of αZr and residual βZr phases. After annealing treatment, βNb and Zr(Fe, Nb)2 second phase particles were precipitated inter- and intragranular of αZr grains adequately. The oxide thickness of annealed weld bead was about 3.90 μm, decreased by about 18.1% relative to the 4.76 μm of as-welded specimen corroded at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 20 days. The corrosion resistance of annealed specimen was better than that of as-welded specimen, since the second phase particles exerted better corrosion resistance, and the content of Nb in βZr and the fraction of βZr decreased after the annealing treatment.

  17. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  18. Plasma effect on weld pool surface reconstruction by shape-from-polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coniglio, N.; Mathieu, A.

    2014-03-31

    The polarimetric state of the thermal radiations emitted by the weld metal contains geometric information about the emitting surface. Even though the analysed thermal radiation has a wavelength corresponding to a blind spectral window of the arc plasma, the physical presence of the arc plasma itself interferes with the rays radiated by the weld pool surface before attaining the polarimeter, thus modifying the geometric information transported by the ray. In the present work, the effect of the arc plasma-surrounding zone on the polarimetric state and propagation direction of the radiated ray is analyzed. The interaction with the arc plasma zone induces a drop in ray intensity and a refraction of ray optical path.

  19. Ultra-fast in-situ X-ray studies of evolving columnar dendrites in solidifying steel weld pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirihanage, W. U.; Di Michiel, M.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2015-06-01

    High-brilliance polychromatic synchrotron radiation has been used to conduct in-situ studies of the solidification microstructure evolution during simulated welding. The welding simulations were realized by rapidly fusing ∼ 5 mm spot in Fe-Cr-Ni steel. During the solid- liquid-solid phase transformations, a section of the weld pool was placed in an incident 50-150 keV polychromatic synchrotron X-ray beam, in a near-horizontal position at a very low inclination angle. Multiple high-resolution 2D detectors with very high frame rates were utilized to capture time resolved X-ray diffraction data from suitably oriented solid dendrites evolving in the weld pool. Comprehensive analysis of the diffraction data revealed individual and overall dendritic growth characteristics and relevant melt and solid flow dynamics during weld pool solidification, which was completed within 1.5 s. Columnar dendrite tip velocities were estimated from the experimental data and during early stages of solidification were exceeded 4 mm/s. The most remarkable observation revealed through the time-resolved reciprocal space observations are correlated to significant tilting of columnar type dendrites at their root during solidification, presumably caused by convective currents in the weld pool. When the columnar dendrite tilting are transformed to respective metric linear tilting velocities at the dendrite tip; tilting velocities are found to be in the same order of magnitude as the columnar tip growth velocities, suggesting a highly transient nature of growth conditions.

  20. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  1. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated. PMID:23028013

  2. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  3. Inorganic pyrophosphate pool size and turnover rate in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Camerlain, M; McCarty, D J; Silcox, D C; Jung, A

    1975-06-01

    Recent studies have shown elevated inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) levels in most knee joint fluid supernates from patients with pseudogout (PG) or osteoarthritis (OA) and more modestly elevated levels in some supernates from patients with gout or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) relative to PPi levels found in the venous blood plasma of normal or arthritic subjects. We measured the intraarticular PPi pool and its rate of turnover to better understand the significance of the joint fluid-plasma PPi gradient. Preliminary studies in rabbits showed that (32-P)PPi passed from joint space to blood and vice versa without detectable hydrolysis. Incubation of natural or synthetic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) microcrystals with synovial fluid in vitro in the presence of (32P)PPi tracer showed no change in PPi specific activity in the supernate over a 19-h period so that exchange of PPi in solution with that in CPPD microcrystals could be ignored. Clearance rates of (32P)PPi and of (33P)Pi, as determined by serially sampling the catheterized knee joints of volunteers with various types of arthritis over a 3-h period, were nearly identical. The (32P)PPi/(32P)Pi was determined in each sample. A mixture of a large excess of cold PPi did not influence the clearance rate of either nuclide. The quantity of PPi turned over per hous was calculated from the pool size as determined by isotope dilution and the turnover rate. The residual joint fluid nuclide was shown to be (32P)PPi. The PPi pool was generally smaller and the rate of turnover was greater in clinically inflamed joints. The mean plus or minus SEM pool size (mu-moles) and turnover rate (percent/hour) in PG knees was 0.23 plus or minus 0.07 and 117 plus or minus 11.9, hydrolysis rate (%/h) to Pi was 27.7 plus or minus 13.2; in OA knees: 0.45 plus or minus 0.26 and 72 plus or minus 9.2, hydrolysis 6.9 plus or minus 0.9; in gouty knees: 0.8 plus or minus 0.41 and 50 plus or minus 11.6, hydrolysis 9.8 plus or minus 2.8; and in

  4. Improvement of Weld Characteristics by Laser-Arc Double-Sided Welding Compared to Single Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenglong; Zhang, Kezhao; Hu, Xue; Yang, Yuhe; Chen, Yanbin; Wu, Yichao

    2015-11-01

    The single arc welding and laser-arc double-sided welding (LADSW) processes are investigated by virtue of test welds. The impacts of the laser beam during the LADSW process on the weld characteristics are studied from weld geometry, crystal morphology, and the mechanical properties of the joints. Compared with the single arc welding, the LADSW process improves the energy density and reduces the range of arc action, which together leads to a doubling of weld penetration depth. When penetrated by the laser beam, the liquid metal of the arc welding pool experiences severe fluctuations, leading to a finer grain size in the range of 17-26 μm in the LADSW weld, a reduction of nearly 63% compared to the grains in the single arc weld. The tensile strength and elongation-to-failure of the LADSW weld were increased by nearly 10 and 100% over the single arc welding, respectively.

  5. On the Sizes and Lifetimes of Cold Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romps, D. M.; Jeevanjee, N.

    2015-12-01

    Cold pools of air, which are formed by evaporating precipitation, play a critical role in the triggering of new precipitation, especially in unorganized tropical convection. Despite their recognized importance, little effort has been devoted to building simple models of their dynamics. Here, analytical expressions are derived for the radius, height, and buoyancy of a cold pool as a function of time. These expressions give a simple equation for the radius of a cold pool when it terminates by ceasing to be cold. The terminal radius of a cold pool is relatively insensitive to its initial conditions, with a typical maximum radius of about 14 times the initial radius, give or take a factor of two. The terminal time of a cold pool, on the other hand, can vary over orders of magnitude depending on its initial potential and kinetic energy. These predictions are validated against large-eddy simulations.

  6. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS)-Based Models for Predicting the Weld Bead Width and Depth of Penetration from the Infrared Thermal Image of the Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashini, L.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Type 316 LN stainless steel is the major structural material used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding has been developed to increase the depth of penetration because the depth of penetration achievable in single-pass TIG welding is limited. Real-time monitoring and control of weld processes is gaining importance because of the requirement of remoter welding process technologies. Hence, it is essential to develop computational methodologies based on an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) or artificial neural network (ANN) for predicting and controlling the depth of penetration and weld bead width during A-TIG welding of type 316 LN stainless steel. In the current work, A-TIG welding experiments have been carried out on 6-mm-thick plates of 316 LN stainless steel by varying the welding current. During welding, infrared (IR) thermal images of the weld pool have been acquired in real time, and the features have been extracted from the IR thermal images of the weld pool. The welding current values, along with the extracted features such as length, width of the hot spot, thermal area determined from the Gaussian fit, and thermal bead width computed from the first derivative curve were used as inputs, whereas the measured depth of penetration and weld bead width were used as output of the respective models. Accurate ANFIS models have been developed for predicting the depth of penetration and the weld bead width during TIG welding of 6-mm-thick 316 LN stainless steel plates. A good correlation between the measured and predicted values of weld bead width and depth of penetration were observed in the developed models. The performance of the ANFIS models are compared with that of the ANN models.

  7. Estimating the number and sizes of undiscovered oil and gas pools

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study introduces a new specification of oil and gas exploration as a sampling process, in order to estimate the number and sizes of undiscovered oil and gas pools by statistical inference from discovered pools as a sample. Oil and gas exploration is quite unlike drawing samples at random in that actual sampling is sized-biased, subject to truncation of uneconomic pools, and to censorship of discovered pool sizes. The method of estimating the number and sizes of undiscovered pools proposed in this study specifically accounts for these non-random components of exploration as a sampling process, and can be easily implemented using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The method allows for choices between single and multiple point truncation of uneconomic pool sizes, and generalizes quite easily to the bivariate case necessary to analyze plays with pools that contain oil with associated gas. Its usefulness is enhanced by the introduction of powerful tests of fit of the lognormal distribution to the distribution of discovered pool sizes, and of meaningful measures of the uncertainty of estimates of the number and sizes of undiscovered pools. Application of the method to oil and gas plays in the San Juan basin of northwest New Mexico show that it yields quite reasonable and useful results. The method, when applied to data analyzed using other methods of estimating the number and sizes of undiscovered pools, confirms that failure to account for truncation of uneconomic pools will result in an overestimate of the average size of pools in a play. By avoiding this, and other, problems, the proposed estimation procedure should lead to better assessments of a play's potential for future discoveries of economically recoverable oil and gas.

  8. 10 CFR 905.32 - Resource extensions and resource pool size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource extensions and resource pool size. 905.32 Section... § 905.32 Resource extensions and resource pool size. (a) Western will extend a project-specific percentage of the marketable resource, determined to be available at the time future resource...

  9. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  10. Instantaneous liquid release from a rail tanker: the influence of noise shields on pool shape and pool size.

    PubMed

    Rosmuller, Nils

    2009-05-30

    In the Netherlands, the Betuweline is a dedicated freight railway. It will, among other things, be used for transportation of all kinds of hazardous materials from the Port of Rotterdam to the German Hinterland and vice versa. The line is approximately 150 km long. Alongside the line, more than 100 km noise shields have been constructed. The question is how, and to what extent, this noise shield will affect the pool shape and size of an instantaneous release of a flammable liquid, such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In case of an instantaneous release of liquid from a rail tanker (50 m(3)), both risk analysts and emergency responders use a circular pool shape of about 600 m(2) would result. To assess the influence of a noise shield, a full scale test was conducted on an already constructed part of the Betuweline. A rail tanker was filled with 50 m(3) red-colored environmentally safe liquid. The liquid was instantaneously released. A very peculiar pool shape actually results due to the presence of a noise shield. A zone between the rails and the noise shield (2m wide and 90 m long) is within 2-3 min filled with 15 cm of liquid. The total pool size area was about 750 m(2). Both shape and size deviate substantially from the traditional figures. These insights are both relevant to emergency responders for disaster abatement purposes and to risk analysts for effective modeling purposes. The Dutch Ministry of Transport is examining possible strategies to deal with these results. The results of this study are based upon one single instantaneous release test. In addition, it is valuable to find out what the pool shape and size would be in case of a continuous release from the rail tanker near a noise shield.

  11. Effects of temperature-dependent material properties and shielding gas on molten pool formation during continuous laser welding of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannour, Sana; Abderrazak, Kamel; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges

    2012-11-01

    Laser welding processes are widely used for fabrications in many engineering applications such as aerospace and automotives. In this paper, a moving distributed heat source model based on Goldak's method [1] has been implemented into finite volume thermal simulations in order to predict temperature distributions during the welding process of a magnesium alloy and to study the effects of variations in thermal properties, absorption coefficient and gas shielding on the computed temperature distributions and weld pool dimensions. The main conclusion is the significant effects of varying the thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient of magnesium. Also, it has been seen that the shielding gas, besides its main role of protection against oxidation, has a significant effect on the width of the weld pool. Finally, the obtained results have been compared to the experimental ones and a satisfactory correlation has been observed, indicating the reliability of the model developed in this study.

  12. Low-Temperature Sensitization Behavior of Base, Heat-Affected Zone, and Weld Pool in AISI 304LN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2009-05-01

    Present investigations were focused on low-temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior of 304LN stainless steels considered from pipes of two different thicknesses. The specimens for the present study were taken from solution-annealed pipes (of varying thicknesses) and welded pipes (including the heat-affected zone (HAZ)). The specimens were subjected to thermal aging at 400 °C and 450 °C for different durations ranging from 125 to 8000 hours, to evaluate their sensitization susceptibility. The aging durations were worked out to simulate the 30-to-100-year life of the studied stainless steel at 300 °C using the Arrheneous equation and considering the activation energy of 150 kJ/mol. The thermally aged specimens were characterized for their degree of sensitization (DOS) and susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) by double-loop (DL) electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) and by methods given in the ASTM A262 practices A and E. It has been clearly shown that the weld pool is more sensitive to IGC than are the base and the HAZ at both the aging temperatures (LTS), because they showed IGC cracks during the bending subsequent to the boiling in H2SO4-CuSO4 solution. Both the base and the HAZ of the thicker pipe material showed susceptibility to sensitization, as indicated by the increasing DOS and “dual-type” microstructure during electrolytic oxalic acid (EOA) etching; however, they were found safe from IGC for the studied sensitization times. The susceptibility to sensitization and IGC in the weld pool is related to the presence of copious delta ferrite with chromium diffusivity that is accelerated compared to the austenite phase. The time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) curves were prepared accordingly, based on these results.

  13. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  14. Welding and Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Van Gelder, Rainer; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Consonni, Dario; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Marcus, Michael; Fabianova, Eleonora; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boffetta, Paolo; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. PMID:24052544

  15. Welding and lung cancer in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Van Gelder, Rainer; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Consonni, Dario; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Marcus, Michael; Fabianova, Eleonora; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boffetta, Paolo; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.

  16. Detection and Sizing of Fatigue Cracks in Steel Welds with Advanced Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, E. I.; Mohr, W. C.; Lozev, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Butt-welded specimens were fatigued to produce cracks in the weld heat-affected zone. Advanced eddy current (AEC) techniques were used to detect and size the cracks through a coating. AEC results were compared with magnetic particle and phased-array ultrasonic techniques. Validation through destructive crack measurements was also conducted. Factors such as geometry, surface treatment, and crack tightness interfered with depth sizing. AEC inspection techniques have the potential of providing more accurate and complete sizing flaw data for manufacturing and in-service inspections.

  17. Effect of species pool size on species occurrence frequencies: Musical chairs on islands.

    PubMed

    Diamond, J

    1982-04-01

    If species interactions affect species distributions, then species occurrence frequencies (nu(i)), defined as the fraction of an archipelago's islands that species i inhabits, should vary with species pool size. A "natural experiment" approximating this test is provided by the Bismarck, Solomon, and New Hebrides archipelagoes, whose bird species pools decrease in that order, the species of each archipelago being mostly a subset of those of the next richer archipelago. The average nu for an archipelago's species decreases with archipelago pool size. In the archipelago with the largest pool, most species are on few islands and few species are on most islands, whereas the reverse is true in the archipelago with the smallest pool. For species shared between two or more archipelagoes, nu(i) decreases with pool size or number of species in the same guild. These interarchipelagal differences in nu(i) or average nu reflect differences in level of interspecific competition, which reduces nus in species-rich archipelagoes in two ways: usually, by reducing a species' incidence on small islands and restricting the species to larger islands; less often (for so-called supertramps), by restricting a species to small islands. PMID:16578762

  18. Effect of species pool size on species occurrence frequencies: Musical chairs on islands.

    PubMed

    Diamond, J

    1982-04-01

    If species interactions affect species distributions, then species occurrence frequencies (nu(i)), defined as the fraction of an archipelago's islands that species i inhabits, should vary with species pool size. A "natural experiment" approximating this test is provided by the Bismarck, Solomon, and New Hebrides archipelagoes, whose bird species pools decrease in that order, the species of each archipelago being mostly a subset of those of the next richer archipelago. The average nu for an archipelago's species decreases with archipelago pool size. In the archipelago with the largest pool, most species are on few islands and few species are on most islands, whereas the reverse is true in the archipelago with the smallest pool. For species shared between two or more archipelagoes, nu(i) decreases with pool size or number of species in the same guild. These interarchipelagal differences in nu(i) or average nu reflect differences in level of interspecific competition, which reduces nus in species-rich archipelagoes in two ways: usually, by reducing a species' incidence on small islands and restricting the species to larger islands; less often (for so-called supertramps), by restricting a species to small islands.

  19. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    PubMed

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  20. An approximate likelihood estimator for the prevalence of infections in vectors using pools of varying sizes.

    PubMed

    Santos, James D; Dorgam, Diana

    2016-09-01

    There are several arthropods that can transmit disease to humans. To make inferences about the rate of infection of these arthropods, it is common to collect a large sample of vectors, divide them into groups (called pools), and apply a test to detect infection. This paper presents an approximate likelihood point estimator to rate of infection for pools of different sizes, when the variability of these sizes is small and the infection rate is low. The performance of this estimator was evaluated in four simulated scenarios, created from real experiments selected in the literature. The new estimator performed well in three of these scenarios. As expected, the new estimator performed poorly in the scenario with great variability in the size of the pools for some values of the parameter space. PMID:27159117

  1. Tungsten Carbide Grain Size Computation for WC-Co Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dongran; Cui, Haichao; Xu, Peiquan; Lu, Fenggui

    2016-06-01

    A "two-step" image processing method based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy was used to compute the tungsten carbide (WC) grain size distribution for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds and laser welds. Twenty-four images were collected on randomly set fields per sample located at the top, middle, and bottom of a cross-sectional micrograph. Each field contained 500 to 1500 WC grains. The images were recognized through clustering-based image segmentation and WC grain growth recognition. According to the WC grain size computation and experiments, a simple WC-WC interaction model was developed to explain the WC dissolution, grain growth, and aggregation in welded joints. The WC-WC interaction and blunt corners were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The WC grain size distribution and the effects of heat input E on grain size distribution for the laser samples were discussed. The results indicate that (1) the grain size distribution follows a Gaussian distribution. Grain sizes at the top of the weld were larger than those near the middle and weld root because of power attenuation. (2) Significant WC grain growth occurred during welding as observed in the as-welded micrographs. The average grain size was 11.47 μm in the TIG samples, which was much larger than that in base metal 1 (BM1 2.13 μm). The grain size distribution curves for the TIG samples revealed a broad particle size distribution without fine grains. The average grain size (1.59 μm) in laser samples was larger than that in base metal 2 (BM2 1.01 μm). (3) WC-WC interaction exhibited complex plane, edge, and blunt corner characteristics during grain growth. A WC ( { 1 {bar{{1}}}00} ) to WC ( {0 1 1 {bar{{0}}}} ) edge disappeared and became a blunt plane WC ( { 10 1 {bar{{0}}}} ) , several grains with two- or three-sided planes and edges disappeared into a multi-edge, and a WC-WC merged.

  2. 10 CFR 905.32 - Resource extensions and resource pool size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource extensions and resource pool size. 905.32 Section 905.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative... percentage of the marketable resource, determined to be available at the time future resource...

  3. 10 CFR 905.32 - Resource extensions and resource pool size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource extensions and resource pool size. 905.32 Section 905.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative... percentage of the marketable resource, determined to be available at the time future resource...

  4. 10 CFR 905.32 - Resource extensions and resource pool size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource extensions and resource pool size. 905.32 Section 905.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative... percentage of the marketable resource, determined to be available at the time future resource...

  5. 10 CFR 905.32 - Resource extensions and resource pool size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource extensions and resource pool size. 905.32 Section 905.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative... percentage of the marketable resource, determined to be available at the time future resource...

  6. Nitrogen stress affects the turnover and size of nitrogen pools supplying leaf growth in a grass.

    PubMed

    Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Wild, Melanie; Schnyder, Hans

    2013-08-01

    The effect of nitrogen (N) stress on the pool system supplying currently assimilated and (re)mobilized N for leaf growth of a grass was explored by dynamic ¹⁵N labeling, assessment of total and labeled N import into leaf growth zones, and compartmental analysis of the label import data. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) plants, grown with low or high levels of N fertilization, were labeled with ¹⁵NO₃⁻/¹⁴NO₃⁻ from 2 h to more than 20 d. In both treatments, the tracer time course in N imported into the growth zones fitted a two-pool model (r² > 0.99). This consisted of a "substrate pool," which received N from current uptake and supplied the growth zone, and a recycling/mobilizing "store," which exchanged with the substrate pool. N deficiency halved the leaf elongation rate, decreased N import into the growth zone, lengthened the delay between tracer uptake and its arrival in the growth zone (2.2 h versus 0.9 h), slowed the turnover of the substrate pool (half-life of 3.2 h versus 0.6 h), and increased its size (12.4 μg versus 5.9 μg). The store contained the equivalent of approximately 10 times (low N) and approximately five times (high N) the total daily N import into the growth zone. Its turnover agreed with that of protein turnover. Remarkably, the relative contribution of mobilization to leaf growth was large and similar (approximately 45%) in both treatments. We conclude that turnover and size of the substrate pool are related to the sink strength of the growth zone, whereas the contribution of the store is influenced by partitioning between sinks.

  7. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    PubMed

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop.

  8. Quality of the log-geometric distribution extrapolation for smaller undiscovered oil and gas pool size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chenglin, L.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey procedure for the estimation of the general form of the parent distribution requires that the parameters of the log-geometric distribution be calculated and analyzed for the sensitivity of these parameters to different conditions. In this study, we derive the shape factor of a log-geometric distribution from the ratio of frequencies between adjacent bins. The shape factor has a log straight-line relationship with the ratio of frequencies. Additionally, the calculation equations of a ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary are deduced. For a specific log-geometric distribution, we find that the ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary is the same. We apply our analysis to simulations based on oil and gas pool distributions from four petroleum systems of Alberta, Canada and four generated distributions. Each petroleum system in Alberta has a different shape factor. Generally, the shape factors in the four petroleum systems stabilize with the increase of discovered pool numbers. For a log-geometric distribution, the shape factor becomes stable when discovered pool numbers exceed 50 and the shape factor is influenced by the exploration efficiency when the exploration efficiency is less than 1. The simulation results show that calculated shape factors increase with those of the parent distributions, and undiscovered oil and gas resources estimated through the log-geometric distribution extrapolation are smaller than the actual values. ?? 2010 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  9. Readily releasable pool size changes associated with long term depression

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Yukiko; Stevens, Charles F.

    1998-01-01

    We have estimated, for hippocampal neurons in culture, the size of the autaptic readily releasable pool before and after stimulation of the sort that produces culture long term depression (LTD). This stimulation protocol causes a decrease in the pool size that is proportional to the depression of synaptic currents. To determine if depression in this system is synapse specific rather than general, we have also monitored synaptic transmission between pairs of cultured hippocampal neurons that are autaptically and reciprocally interconnected. We find that the change in synaptic strength is restricted to the synapses on the target neuron that were active during LTD induction. When viewed from the perspective of the presynaptic neuron, however, synapse specificity is partial rather than complete: synapses active during induction that were not on the target neuron were partially depressed. PMID:9448323

  10. Constitutive cylindrospermopsin pool size in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii under different light and CO2 partial pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Pierangelini, Mattia; Sinha, Rati; Willis, Anusuya; Burford, Michele A; Orr, Philip T; Beardall, John; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and 7-deoxy-cylindrospermopsin (dCYN) are potent hepatotoxic alkaloids produced by numerous species of cyanobacteria, including the freshwater Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. C. raciborskii is an invasive cyanobacterium, and the study of how environmental parameters drive CYN production has received significant interest from water managers and health authorities. Light and CO2 affect cell growth and physiology in photoautotrophs, and these are potential regulators of cyanotoxin biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated how light and CO2 affect CYN and dCYN pool size as well as the expression of the key genes, cyrA and cyrK, involved in CYN biosynthesis in a toxic C. raciborskii strain. For cells growing at different light intensities (10 and 100 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), we observed that the rate of CYN pool size production (μCYN) was coupled to the cell division rate (μc) during batch culture. This indicated that CYN pool size under our experimental conditions is constant and cell quotas of CYN (QCYN) and dCYN (QdCYN) are fixed. Moreover, a lack of correlation between expression of cyrA and total CYN cell quotas (QCYNs) suggests that the CYN biosynthesis is regulated posttranscriptionally. Under elevated CO2 (1,300 ppm), we observed minor effects on QCYN and no effects on expression of cyrA and cyrK. We conclude that the CYN pool size is constitutive and not affected by light and CO2 conditions. Thus, C. raciborskii bloom toxicity is determined by the absolute abundance of C. raciborskii cells within the water column and the relative abundance of toxic and nontoxic strains. PMID:25724956

  11. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  12. Increases in plasma pool size of lipoprotein components in copper-deficient hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Othman, A.A.; Rosenstein, F.; Lei, K.Y. )

    1991-03-15

    Twenty-four male Golden Syrian hamsters, were randomly assigned to 2 dietary copper (Cu) treatments; deficient and adequate. Reductions in weight gain, hematocrit and liver Cu as well as increases in heart weight and plasma volume were observed in CD hamsters after 7 weeks of treatment. Plasma very low (VLDL), low (LDL) and high (HDL) density lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation and Sepharose column chromatography. The percentage of total plasma cholesterol carried by LDL was increased from 20 to 24% but was reduced from 71 to 68% for HDL as a result of Cu deficiency. In LDL the % composition of triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PL) was increased by 25% but that of cholesterol was reduced by 13%. The % composition of protein was reduced 24% but that of TG was increased 18% in VLDL by Cu deficiency. Since plasma volume was increased 50% in CD hamsters, the data were expressed as the amount present in the plasma pool corrected for body weight. With the exceptions of smaller increased in VLDL protein and PL as well as the more than threefold increases in LDL TG and PL plasma pool size, the pool size for the rest of the lipoprotein components were increased about twofold in CD hamsters. The lipoprotein data further indicate that Cu deficiency increased the particle number of VLDL, LDL and HDL but enlarged the size of only VLDL and LDL.

  13. Size and age of the non structural carbohydrate pool in boreal trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Trumbore, S.

    2005-12-01

    Autotrophic respiration of trees is supposed to be closely linked to CO2 uptake by photosynthesis on a time scale of days. However, several studies have indicated that roots of boreal trees do not respired carbon (C) with a radiocarbon signature Δ14C similar to that of CO2 in the atmosphere, but C that is 3-4 years old. Also, estimates of gross primary productivity obtained by eddy covariance flux measurements do often not correlate with tree ring width (growth). Both these findings point to the presences of a large non-structural C (NSC) pool within the tree, mainly sugars and starches. The concentration of NSC in tree tissue is considered a measure of C shortage or surplus for growth. Studies indicate that the NSC pool in trees is usually large and relatively constant throughout the year, not affected by e.g. leaf flushing. While estimates of the size of the NSC pool are available for a number of trees from various ecosystems, estimated of its turnover time are lacking. We tested if our finding that boreal trees respire 3-4 year old C is an artifact resulting from the depletion of the NSC pool in excised roots over time. We incubated roots with a diameter of 2-4 mm while they were still attached to the tree, and excised roots after 3 hours, and 1 to 4 days. We sampled CO2 for Δ14C analysis of intact roots, freshly excised roots, and after 1 and 3 days. To obtain an estimate of the NSC pool size and its turnover time in roots of various diameter, we excised and incubated roots of 3 diameters: root hairs with mycorrhizal fungi, 2-4 mm, and 1-2 cm. We followed their respiration over the course of one full day. We will also compare the Δ14C of respired CO2 of freshly root hairs to that of the NSC in the roots. To obtain an estimate of the size and turnover of the whole tree NSC pool, we will measure the Δ14C of NSC in wood. Preliminary results indicate that CO2 fluxes were not correlated to temperature or the initial CO2 concentration in the chamber. While CO2

  14. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  15. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  16. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-03-11

    Described is a manual,portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary coolling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification.

  17. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  18. Investigation of mixing and diffusion processes in hybrid spot laser-MIG keyhole welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2009-05-01

    In hybrid laser-MIG keyhole welding, anti-crack elements can be added into the weld pool through a filler metal in anticipation of compensating mass loss, preventing porosity formation and improving compositional and mechanical properties of the welds. Understanding the mixing and diffusion of the filler metal in the molten pool is vital to achieve these desired objectives. In this study, mathematical models and associated numerical techniques have been developed to investigate the mixing and diffusion processes in hybrid laser-MIG keyhole welding. The transient interactions between droplets and weld pool and dynamics of the melt flow are studied. The effects of key process parameters, such as droplet size (wire diameter), droplet generation frequency (wire feed speed) and droplet impinging speed, on mixing/diffusion are systematically investigated. It was found that compositional homogeneity of the weld pool is determined by the competition between the mixing rate and the solidification rate. A small-size filler droplet together with high generation frequency can increase the latitudinal diffusion of the filler metal into the weld pool, while the large-size droplet along with the low generation frequency helps to get more uniform longitudinal diffusion. Increasing the impinging velocity of the filler droplet can improve the latitudinal diffusion of the filler metal. However, a high impinging velocity can cause a lower diffusion zone in the upper part of the welds. This study provides a good foundation for optimizing the hybrid laser-MIG keyhole welding process to achieve quality welds with desired properties.

  19. Imaging The Leading Edge Of A Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical system integrated into plasma arc welding torch provides image of leading edge of weld pool and welding-arc-initiation point. Welding torch aligned better with joint. System includes coherent bundle of optical fibers and transparent cup.

  20. Measuring size and composition of species pools: a comparison of dark diversity estimates.

    PubMed

    de Bello, Francesco; Fibich, Pavel; Zelený, David; Kopecký, Martin; Mudrák, Ondřej; Chytrý, Milan; Pyšek, Petr; Wild, Jan; Michalcová, Dana; Sádlo, Jiří; Šmilauer, Petr; Lepš, Jan; Pärtel, Meelis

    2016-06-01

    Ecological theory and biodiversity conservation have traditionally relied on the number of species recorded at a site, but it is agreed that site richness represents only a portion of the species that can inhabit particular ecological conditions, that is, the habitat-specific species pool. Knowledge of the species pool at different sites enables meaningful comparisons of biodiversity and provides insights into processes of biodiversity formation. Empirical studies, however, are limited due to conceptual and methodological difficulties in determining both the size and composition of the absent part of species pools, the so-called dark diversity. We used >50,000 vegetation plots from 18 types of habitats throughout the Czech Republic, most of which served as a training dataset and 1083 as a subset of test sites. These data were used to compare predicted results from three quantitative methods with those of previously published expert estimates based on species habitat preferences: (1) species co-occurrence based on Beals' smoothing approach; (2) species ecological requirements, with envelopes around community mean Ellenberg values; and (3) species distribution models, using species environmental niches modeled by Biomod software. Dark diversity estimates were compared at both plot and habitat levels, and each method was applied in different configurations. While there were some differences in the results obtained by different methods, particularly at the plot level, there was a clear convergence, especially at the habitat level. The better convergence at the habitat level reflects less variation in local environmental conditions, whereas variation at the plot level is an effect of each particular method. The co-occurrence agreed closest the expert estimate, followed by the method based on species ecological requirements. We conclude that several analytical methods can estimate species pools of given habitats. However, the strengths and weaknesses of different methods

  1. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  2. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  3. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  4. Monitoring Weld Penetration Optically From Within Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Linsacum, Deron L.; Gutlow, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Photodetector or optical fiber leading to photodetector mounted inside gas/tungsten arc welding torch to monitor arc light reflected from oscillating surface of weld pool. Proposed optical monitoring components preserve compact profile of welding torch, maintained in fixed aim at weld-pool position at end of welding torch, and protected against bumping external objects.

  5. Probabilistic Estimation of Critical Flaw Sizes in the Primary Structure Welds of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Hoge, Peter A.; Patel, B. M.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary structure of the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) launch vehicle is constructed of welded mild steel plates. There is some concern over the possibility of structural failure due to welding flaws. It was considered critical to quantify the impact of uncertainties in residual stress, material porosity, applied loads, and material and crack growth properties on the reliability of the welds during its pre-flight and flight. A criterion--an existing maximum size crack at the weld toe must be smaller than the maximum allowable flaw size--was established to estimate the reliability of the welds. A spectrum of maximum allowable flaw sizes was developed for different possible combinations of all of the above listed variables by performing probabilistic crack growth analyses using the ANSYS finite element analysis code in conjunction with the NASGRO crack growth code. Two alternative methods were used to account for residual stresses: (1) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 41 ksi and a limit was set on the net section flow stress during crack propagation. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if this limit was exceeded during four complete flight cycles, and (2) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 49.6 ksi (the parent material s yield strength) and the net section flow stress limit was ignored. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if catastrophic crack growth occurred during four complete flight cycles. Both surface-crack models and through-crack models were utilized to characterize cracks in the weld toe.

  6. The Bruchpilot cytomatrix determines the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Matkovic, Tanja; Siebert, Matthias; Knoche, Elena; Depner, Harald; Mertel, Sara; Owald, David; Schmidt, Manuela; Thomas, Ulrich; Sickmann, Albert; Kamin, Dirk; Hell, Stefan W; Bürger, Jörg; Hollmann, Christina; Mielke, Thorsten; Wichmann, Carolin; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2013-08-19

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) fuse at a specialized membrane domain called the active zone (AZ), covered by a conserved cytomatrix. How exactly cytomatrix components intersect with SV release remains insufficiently understood. We showed previously that loss of the Drosophila melanogaster ELKS family protein Bruchpilot (BRP) eliminates the cytomatrix (T bar) and declusters Ca(2+) channels. In this paper, we explored additional functions of the cytomatrix, starting with the biochemical identification of two BRP isoforms. Both isoforms alternated in a circular array and were important for proper T-bar formation. Basal transmission was decreased in isoform-specific mutants, which we attributed to a reduction in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of SVs. We also found a corresponding reduction in the number of SVs docked close to the remaining cytomatrix. We propose that the macromolecular architecture created by the alternating pattern of the BRP isoforms determines the number of Ca(2+) channel-coupled SV release slots available per AZ and thereby sets the size of the RRP. PMID:23960145

  7. The Bruchpilot cytomatrix determines the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Matkovic, Tanja; Siebert, Matthias; Knoche, Elena; Depner, Harald; Mertel, Sara; Owald, David; Schmidt, Manuela; Thomas, Ulrich; Sickmann, Albert; Kamin, Dirk; Hell, Stefan W.; Bürger, Jörg; Hollmann, Christina; Mielke, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) fuse at a specialized membrane domain called the active zone (AZ), covered by a conserved cytomatrix. How exactly cytomatrix components intersect with SV release remains insufficiently understood. We showed previously that loss of the Drosophila melanogaster ELKS family protein Bruchpilot (BRP) eliminates the cytomatrix (T bar) and declusters Ca2+ channels. In this paper, we explored additional functions of the cytomatrix, starting with the biochemical identification of two BRP isoforms. Both isoforms alternated in a circular array and were important for proper T-bar formation. Basal transmission was decreased in isoform-specific mutants, which we attributed to a reduction in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of SVs. We also found a corresponding reduction in the number of SVs docked close to the remaining cytomatrix. We propose that the macromolecular architecture created by the alternating pattern of the BRP isoforms determines the number of Ca2+ channel-coupled SV release slots available per AZ and thereby sets the size of the RRP. PMID:23960145

  8. Development of a comprehensive weld process model

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.; Paul, A.

    1997-05-01

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC`s expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three-dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above.

  9. Total-body creatine pool size and skeletal muscle mass determination by creatine-(methyl-D3) dilution in rats.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; Clifton, Lisa G; Poole, James C; Mohammed, Hussein A; Shearer, Todd W; Waitt, Greg M; Hagerty, Laura L; Remlinger, Katja S; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2012-06-01

    There is currently no direct, facile method to determine total-body skeletal muscle mass for the diagnosis and treatment of skeletal muscle wasting conditions such as sarcopenia, cachexia, and disuse. We tested in rats the hypothesis that the enrichment of creatinine-(methyl-d(3)) (D(3)-creatinine) in urine after a defined oral tracer dose of D(3)-creatine can be used to determine creatine pool size and skeletal muscle mass. We determined 1) an oral tracer dose of D(3)-creatine that was completely bioavailable with minimal urinary spillage and sufficient enrichment in the body creatine pool for detection of D(3)-creatine in muscle and D(3)-creatinine in urine, and 2) the time to isotopic steady state. We used cross-sectional studies to compare total creatine pool size determined by the D(3)-creatine dilution method to lean body mass determined by independent methods. The tracer dose of D(3)-creatine (<1 mg/rat) was >99% bioavailable with 0.2-1.2% urinary spillage. Isotopic steady state was achieved within 24-48 h. Creatine pool size calculated from urinary D(3)-creatinine enrichment at 72 h significantly increased with muscle accrual in rat growth, significantly decreased with dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy, was correlated with lean body mass (r = 0.9590; P < 0.0001), and corresponded to predicted total muscle mass. Total-body creatine pool size and skeletal muscle mass can thus be accurately and precisely determined by an orally delivered dose of D(3)-creatine followed by the measurement of D(3)-creatinine enrichment in a single urine sample and is promising as a noninvasive tool for the clinical determination of skeletal muscle mass. PMID:22422801

  10. On the hot cracking susceptibility of a semisolid aluminium 6061 weld: Application of a coupled solidification- thermomechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareie Rajani, H. R.; Phillion, A. B.

    2015-06-01

    A coupled solidification-thermomechanical model is presented that investigates the hot tearing susceptibility of an aluminium 6061 semisolid weld. Two key phenomena are considered: excessive deformation of the semisolid weld, initiating a hot tear, and the ability of the semisolid weld to heal the hot tear by circulation of the molten metal. The model consists of two major modules: weld solidification and thermomechanical analysis. 1) By means of a multi-scale model of solidification, the microstructural evolution of the semisolid weld is simulated in 3D. The semisolid structure, which varies as a function of welding parameters, is composed of solidifying grains and a network of micro liquid channels. The weld solidification module is utilized to obtain the solidification shrinkage. The size of the micro liquid channels is used as an indicator to assess the healing ability of the semisolid weld. 2) Using the finite element method, the mechanical interaction between the weld pool and the base metal is simulated to capture the transient force field deforming the semisolid weld. Thermomechanical stresses and shrinkage stresses are both considered in the analysis; the solidification contractions are extracted from the weld solidification module and applied to the deformation simulation as boundary conditions. Such an analysis enables characterization of the potential for excessive deformation of the weld. The outputs of the model are used to study the effect of welding parameters including welding current and speed, and also welding constraint on the hot cracking susceptibility of an aluminium alloy 6061 semisolid weld.

  11. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  12. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  13. Dynamics of near-alpha titanium welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Brett William

    Typically, when gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is employed to join near-alpha titanium alloys, the resulting weld fusion zone (FZ) is much harder than that of the base metal (BM), thereby leading to lost ductility. The aim of this investigation was to improve FZ ductility of Ti-5Al-1Sn-1V-1Zr-0.8Mo by modifying filler metal chemistry. In this regard, metallic yttrium was added to the filler metal and aluminum concentration reduced. It was believed that additions of yttrium would lead to formation of yttria in the weld melt, thereby promoting heterogeneous nucleation. Since oxygen and aluminum both act as alpha-stabilizers, expected pickup of oxygen during the welding process will be offset by the aluminum reduction. Tensile testing indicated that modified filler metal welds showed a dramatic increase in ductility of the FZ. Fracture toughness testing showed that while JIC values decreased in all welds, the tearing modulus, T, in modified filler metal welds was significantly higher than that of matching filler metal welds. Microhardness mapping of the weld zones illustrated that modified filler metal welds were significantly softer than matching filler metal welds. Microstructural examinations were completed through the use of optical, SEM and TEM studies, indicating that there was a presence of nano-particles in the weld FZ. XPS analysis identified these particles as yttrium oxysulfate. WDS analysis across the welds' heat affected zones demonstrated that there is an internal diffusion of oxygen from the BM into the FZ. Research results indicate yttrium oxysulfide particles form in the weld pool, act as a drag force on the solidification front and limit growth of prior-beta grain boundaries. The reduced prior-beta grain size and removal of interstitial oxygen from the matrix in modified filler metal welds, further enhanced by oxidation of yttrium oxysulfide to yttrium oxysulfate, leads to increased ductility in the weld's FZ. Addition of yttrium to the weld also

  14. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum

  15. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  16. A Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Determining Manganese Composition in Welding Fume as a Function of Primary Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Julie D.; Livi, Kenneth J.T.; Geyh, Alison S.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the physicochemical properties of inhaled nanoparticles influence the resulting toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. This report presents a method using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to measure the Mn content throughout the primary particle size distribution of welding fume particle samples collected on filters for application in exposure and health research. Dark field images were collected to assess the primary particle size distribution and energy-dispersive X-ray and electron energy loss spectroscopy were performed for measurement of Mn composition as a function of primary particle size. A manual method incorporating imaging software was used to measure the primary particle diameter and to select an integration region for compositional analysis within primary particles throughout the size range. To explore the variation in the developed metric, the method was applied to 10 gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fume particle samples of mild steel that were collected under a variety of conditions. The range of Mn composition by particle size was −0.10 to 0.19 %/nm, where a positive estimate indicates greater relative abundance of Mn increasing with primary particle size and a negative estimate conversely indicates decreasing Mn content with size. However, the estimate was only statistically significant (p<0.05) in half of the samples (n=5), which all had a positive estimate. In the remaining samples, no significant trend was measured. Our findings indicate that the method is reproducible and that differences in the abundance of Mn by primary particle size among welding fume samples can be detected. PMID:21625364

  17. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  18. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements. PMID:26082786

  19. X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density and subgrain size in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, Bjorn; Woo, Wanchuck; Zhili, Feng; Edward, Kenik; Ungar, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup 02} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  20. Development of a Comprehensive Weld Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.

    1997-05-01

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC's expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three- dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above. The following technical tasks have been accomplished as part of the CRADA. 1. The LMES welding code has been ported to the Intel Paragon parallel computer at ORNL

  1. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  2. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  3. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  4. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Pavinich, W.A.; Yoon, K.K.; Hour, K.Y.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1999-10-01

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  5. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Critical Flaw Size in ARES I-X Flange-to-Skin Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chell, G. Graham; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Ares 1 Upper Stage Simulator (USS) is being fabricated from welded A516 steel. In order to insure the structural integrity of these welds it is of interest to calculate the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) to establish rational inspection requirements. The CIFS is in turn dependent on the critical final flaw size (CFS), as well as fatigue flaw growth resulting from transportation, handling and service-induced loading. These calculations were made using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), which are thought to be conservative because they are based on a lower bound, so called elastic, fracture toughness determined from tests that displayed significant plasticity. Nevertheless, there was still concern that the yield magnitude stresses generated in the flange-to-skin weld by the combination of axial stresses due to axial forces, fit-up stresses, and weld residual stresses, could give rise to significant flaw-tip plasticity, which might render the LEFM results to be non-conservative. The objective of the present study was to employ Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) to determine CFS values, and then compare these values to CFS values evaluated using LEFM. CFS values were calculated for twelve cases involving surface and embedded flaws, EPFM analyses with and without plastic shakedown of the stresses, LEFM analyses, and various welding residual stress distributions. For the cases examined, the computed CFS values based on elastic analyses were the smallest in all instances where the failures were predicted to be controlled by the fracture toughness. However, in certain cases, the CFS values predicted by the elastic-plastic analyses were smaller than those predicted by the elastic analyses; in these cases the failure criteria were determined by a breakdown in stress intensity factor validity limits for deep flaws (a greater than 0.90t), rather than by the fracture toughness. Plastic relaxation of stresses accompanying shakedown always increases the

  6. A pilot-scale study of Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals from swimming pools via sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E

    2016-02-01

    Cryptosporidium species are the most common cause of gastrointestinal illness in treated recreational water venues. In order to protect public health during swimming, Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals by high-rate sand filtration with six coagulants were evaluated with a 5.5 m(3) pilot-scale swimming pool. A sand filter without coagulation removed 20-63% of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres. Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals exceeded 98% by sand filtration with five of the six tested coagulants. Continuously feeding coagulants A, B, and F (i.e., organic polymers) led to coagulant accumulation in the system and decreased removals over time (<2 days). Coagulant E (polyaluminum chloride) consistently removed more than 90% of microspheres at 30 m/h while the removals dropped to approximately 50% at a filtration rate of 37 m/h. Coagulant C was a chitosan-based product that removed fewer microspheres compared with other products, <75%, under the studied conditions. Results indicated aluminum-based coagulants (coagulants D and E) had an overall performance advantage over the organic polymer based coagulants primarily in terms of their tendency not to accumulate in the water and cease to be effective at improving filter efficiency.

  7. A pilot-scale study of Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals from swimming pools via sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E

    2016-02-01

    Cryptosporidium species are the most common cause of gastrointestinal illness in treated recreational water venues. In order to protect public health during swimming, Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals by high-rate sand filtration with six coagulants were evaluated with a 5.5 m(3) pilot-scale swimming pool. A sand filter without coagulation removed 20-63% of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres. Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals exceeded 98% by sand filtration with five of the six tested coagulants. Continuously feeding coagulants A, B, and F (i.e., organic polymers) led to coagulant accumulation in the system and decreased removals over time (<2 days). Coagulant E (polyaluminum chloride) consistently removed more than 90% of microspheres at 30 m/h while the removals dropped to approximately 50% at a filtration rate of 37 m/h. Coagulant C was a chitosan-based product that removed fewer microspheres compared with other products, <75%, under the studied conditions. Results indicated aluminum-based coagulants (coagulants D and E) had an overall performance advantage over the organic polymer based coagulants primarily in terms of their tendency not to accumulate in the water and cease to be effective at improving filter efficiency. PMID:26837835

  8. An Improved Method of Capturing the Surface Boundary of a Ti-6Al-4V Fusion Weld Bead for Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. P.; Villa, M.; Sovani, Y.; Panwisawas, C.; Perumal, B.; Ward, R. M.; Brooks, J. W.; Basoalto, H. C.

    2016-02-01

    Weld simulation methods have often employed mathematical functions to describe the size and shape of the molten pool of material transiently present in a weld. However, while these functions can sometimes accurately capture the fusion boundary for certain welding parameters in certain materials, they do not necessarily offer a robust methodology for the more intricate weld pool shapes that can be produced in materials with a very low thermal conductivity, such as the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Cross-sections of steady-state welds can be observed which contain a dramatic narrowing of the pool width at roughly half way in to the depth of the plate of material, and a significant widening again at the base. These effects on the weld pool are likely to do with beam focusing height. However, the resultant intricacy of the pool means that standard formulaic methods to capture the shape may prove relatively unsuccessful. Given how critical the accuracy of pool shape is in determining the mechanical response to the heating, an alternative method is presented. By entering weld pool width measurements for a series of depths in a Cartesian co-ordinate system using FE weld simulation software Sysweld, a more representative weld pool size and shape can be predicted, compared to the standard double ellipsoid method. Results have demonstrated that significant variations in the mid-depth thermal profile are observed between the two, even though the same values for top and bottom pool-widths are entered. Finally, once the benefits of the Cartesian co-ordinate method are demonstrated, the robustness of this approach to predict a variety of weld pool shapes has been demonstrated upon a series of nine weld simulations, where the two key process parameters (welding laser power and travel speed) are explored over a design space ranging from 1.5 to 3 kW and 50 to 200 mm/s. Results suggest that for the faster travel speeds, the more detailed Cartesian co-ordinate method is better, whereas

  9. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB. PMID:27148213

  10. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB. PMID:27148213

  11. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB.

  12. Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera on Isle Royale National Park, USA, compared to mainland species pool and size distribution

    PubMed Central

    DeWalt, R. Edward; South, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Extensive sampling for aquatic insects was conducted in the orders Ephemeroptera (mayflies), Plecoptera (stoneflies), and Trichoptera (caddisflies) (EPT) of Isle Royale National Park (ISRO), Michigan, United States of America, during summer 2013. The island was ice covered until 8,000 to 10,000 years ago and is isolated by 22–70 km distance from the mainland. Two hypotheses were examined: that ISRO EPT richness would be much reduced from the mainland, and that the species colonizing ISRO would be of smaller size than mainland, adults presumably using updrafts to bridge the distance from mainland sources. Data sets were developed for known mainland EPT species and size for those species. The first hypothesis was confirmed with the mainland species pool consisting of 417 EPT, while ISRO is known to support 73 species. Richness of EPT is directly related to the number of specimens examined. Small streams supported five EPT species, while 15–25 species were found in larger streams. Lakeshores had intermediate diversity. The second hypothesis was substantiated for stoneflies, but not for mayflies or caddisflies. Stoneflies apparently are poorer fliers than either of the other two orders. PMID:26692811

  13. Flow Dynamics in Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Lowke, John J.; Tanaka, Manabu

    2008-02-21

    The state of the art for numerical computations has now advanced so that the capability is within sight of calculating weld shapes for any arc current, welding gas, welding material or configuration. Inherent in these calculations is 'flow dynamics' applied to plasma flow in the arc and liquid metal flow in the weld pool. Examples of predictions which are consistent with experiment, are discussed for (1) conventional tungsten inert gas welding, (2) the effect of a fraction of a percent of sulfur in steel, which can increase weld depth by more than a factor of two through changes in the surface tension, (3) the effect of a flux, which can produce increased weld depth due to arc constriction, (4) use of aluminium instead of steel, when the much larger thermal conductivity of aluminium greatly reduces the weld depth and (5) addition of a few percent of hydrogen to argon, which markedly increases weld depth.

  14. Flow Dynamics in Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, John J.; Tanaka, Manabu

    2008-02-01

    The state of the art for numerical computations has now advanced so that the capability is within sight of calculating weld shapes for any arc current, welding gas, welding material or configuration. Inherent in these calculations is "flow dynamics" applied to plasma flow in the arc and liquid metal flow in the weld pool. Examples of predictions which are consistent with experiment, are discussed for (1) conventional tungsten inert gas welding (2) the effect of a fraction of a percent of sulfur in steel, which can increase weld depth by more than a factor of two through changes in the surface tension (3) the effect of a flux, which can produce increased weld depth due to arc constriction (4) use of aluminium instead of steel, when the much larger thermal conductivity of aluminium greatly reduces the weld depth and (5) addition of a few percent of hydrogen to argon, which markedly increases weld depth.

  15. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOEpatents

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  16. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  17. Endogenous Rho-kinase signaling maintains synaptic strength by stabilizing the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    González-Forero, David; Montero, Fernando; García-Morales, Victoria; Domínguez, Germán; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2012-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) regulates neural cell migration, proliferation and survival, dendritic spine morphology, and axon guidance and regeneration. There is, however, little information about whether ROCK modulates the electrical activity and information processing of neuronal circuits. At neonatal stage, ROCKα is expressed in hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and in their afferent inputs, whereas ROCKβ is found in synaptic terminals on HMNs, but not in their somata. Inhibition of endogenous ROCK activity in neonatal rat brainstem slices failed to modulate intrinsic excitability of HMNs, but strongly attenuated the strength of their glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The mechanism acts presynaptically to reduce evoked neurotransmitter release. ROCK inhibition increased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Functional and ultrastructural changes induced by ROCK inhibition were fully prevented/reverted by MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibition. Furthermore, ROCK inhibition drastically reduced the phosphorylated form of p21-associated kinase (PAK), which directly inhibits MLCK. We conclude that endogenous ROCK activity is necessary for the normal performance of motor output commands, because it maintains afferent synaptic strength, by stabilizing the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The mechanism of action involves a tonic inhibition of MLCK, presumably through PAK phosphorylation. This mechanism might be present in adults since unilateral microinjection of ROCK or MLCK inhibitors into the hypoglossal nucleus reduced or increased, respectively, whole XIIth nerve activity.

  18. Salinity and Nitrogen Effects on Photosynthesis, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase and Metabolite Pool Sizes in Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1986-01-01

    Salinity (100 millimolar NaCl) was found to reduce photosynthetic capacity independent of stomatal closure in Phaseolus vulgaris. This reduction was shown to be a consequence of a reduction in the efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase (RuBPCase) rather than a reduction in the leaf content of photosynthetic machinery. In control plants, photosynthesis became RuBP-limited at approximately 1.75 moles RuBP per mole 2-carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate binding sites. Salinization caused the RuBP pool size to reach this limiting value for CO2 fixation at much lower values of intercellular CO2. Plants grown at low nitrogen and ± NaCl became RuBP limited at similar RuBP pool sizes as the high nitrogen-grown plants. At limiting RuBP pool sizes and equal values of intercellular CO2 photosynthetic capacity of salt-stressed plants was less than control plants. This effect of salinity on RuBPCase activity could not be explained by deactivation of the enzyme or inhibitor synthesis. Thus, salinity reduced photosynthetic capacity by reducing both the RuBP pool size by an effect on RuBP regeneration capacity and RuBPCase activity by an unknown mechanism when RuBP was limiting. PMID:16665066

  19. Daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato with added fat tends to increase total body vitamin A pool size in vitamin A depleted Bangladeshi women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the affect of daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP), with or without added fat, on the total body vitamin A (VA) pool size of Bangladeshi women with low initial VA status. Women (n=120) received for 60d either 1) 0 µg RAE/d as boiled white-fleshed sweet potatoes (WFSP) ...

  20. Lowering bile acid pool size with a synthetic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist induces obesity and diabetes through reduced energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Horai, Yasushi; Houten, Sander M; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Sugizaki, Taichi; Arita, Eri; Mataki, Chikage; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Schoonjans, Kristina; Itoh, Hiroshi; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-07-29

    We evaluated the metabolic impact of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation by administering a synthetic FXR agonist (GW4064) to mice in which obesity was induced by a high fat diet. Administration of GW4064 accentuated body weight gain and glucose intolerance induced by the high fat diet and led to a pronounced worsening of the changes in liver and adipose tissue. Mechanistically, treatment with GW4064 decreased bile acid (BA) biosynthesis, BA pool size, and energy expenditure, whereas reconstitution of the BA pool in these GW4064-treated animals by BA administration dose-dependently reverted the metabolic abnormalities. Our data therefore suggest that activation of FXR with synthetic agonists is not useful for long term management of the metabolic syndrome, as it reduces the BA pool size and subsequently decreases energy expenditure, translating as weight gain and insulin resistance. In contrast, expansion of the BA pool size, which can be achieved by BA administration, could be an interesting strategy to manage the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Improvement of reliability of welding by in-process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardt, D.E.; Masubuchi, K.; Paynter, H.M.; Unkel, W.C.

    1983-04-01

    Closed-loop control of the welding variables represents a promising, cost-effective approach to improving weld quality and therefore reducing the total cost of producing welded structures. The ultimate goal is to place all significant weld variables under direct closed-loop control; this contrasts with preprogrammed machines which place the welding equipment under control. As the first step, an overall strategy has been formulated and an investigation of weld pool geometry control for gas tungsten arc process has been completed. The research activities were divided into the areas of arc phenomena, weld pool phenomena, sensing techniques and control activities.

  2. Autogeneous Friction Stir Weld Lack-of-Penetration Defect Detection and Sizing Using Directional Conductivity Measurements with MWM Eddy Current Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil; Zilberstei, Vladimir; Lawson, Ablode; Kinchen, David; Arbegast, William

    2000-01-01

    Al 2195-T8 plate specimens containing Friction Stir Welds (FSW), provided by Lockheed Martin, were inspected using directional conductivity measurements with the MWM sensor. Sensitivity to lack-of-penetration (LOP) defect size has been demonstrated. The feature used to determine defect size was the normalized longitudinal component of the MWM conductivity measurements. This directional conductivity component was insensitive to the presence of a discrete crack. This permitted correlation of MWM conductivity measurements with the LOP defect size as changes in conductivity were apparently associated with metallurgical features within the first 0.020 in. of the LOP defect zone. Transverse directional conductivity measurements also provided an indication of the presence of discrete cracks. Continued efforts are focussed on inspection of a larger set of welded panels and further refinement of LOP characterization tools.

  3. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  4. Nd:YAG laser welding of coated sheet steel

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M.P.; Kerr, H.W.; Weckman, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Coated sheet steels are used extensively in the automotive industry for the fabrication of automobile body components; however, their reduced weldability by the traditional welding processes has led to numerous studies into the use of alternate process such as laser welding. In this paper, we present a modified joint geometry which allows high quality lap welds of coated sheet steels to be made by laser welding processes. Hot-dipped galvanized sheet (16 gauge), with a 60 g/m zinc coating was used in this study. A groove was created in the top sheet of a specimen pair by pressing piano wires of various diameters into the sheet. The specimens were clamped together in a lag-joint configuration such that they were in contacted only along the grove projection. A parametric study was conducted using the variables of welding speed, laser mean power (685 W, 1000 W and 1350 W), and grove size. Weld quality and weld pool dimensions were assessed using metallurgical cross-sections and image analysis techniques. Acceptable quality seam welds were produced in the galvanized sheet steel with both grove sizes when using 1000 W and 1350 W laser mean powers and a range of welding speeds. Results of the shear-tensile tests showed that high loads to failure, with failure occurring in the parent material, were predominately found in welds produced at speeds over 1.2 m/min and when using the high mean laser powers: 1000 W and 1350 W. A modified lap joint geometry, in which a groove is pre-placed in the top sheet of the lap-joint configuration, has been developed which permits laser welding of coated sheet steels. Good quality seam welds have been produced in 16 gauge galvanized sheet steels at speeds up to 2.7 m/min using a 2 kW CW Nd:YAG laser operating at 1350 W laser mean power. Weld quality was not affected by changes in groove size.

  5. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  6. Melting Efficiency During Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, J.C.; Evans, D. M.; Tang, W.; Nunes, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A series of partial penetration Variable Polarity Plasma Arc welds were made at equal power but various combinations of current and voltage on 2219 aluminum. Arc Efficiency was measured calorimetrically and ranged between 48% and 66%. Melting efficiency depends on the weld pool shape. Increased current increases the melting efficiency as it increases the depth to width ratio of the weld pool. Higher currents are thought to raise arc pressure and depress the liquid at the bottom of the weld pool causing a more nearly two dimensional heat flow condition.

  7. A Study on the Welding Characteristics of Tailor Welded Blank Metal Sheets Using GTAW and Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thasanaraphan, Pornsak

    In this study, a computational and experimental effort was carried out to qualitatively understand the weld pool shape, distortion and residual stress for continuous laser welding and manual pulsed gas metal arc welding. For all the welding simulations given in this dissertation, a welding specific finite element package, SYSWELD, is used. This research focuses on the welding behavior observed in light-weight metal structures known as the tailor-welded blanks, TWBs. They are a combination of two or more metal sheets with different thickness and/or different materials that are welded together in a single plane prior to forming, e.g., stamping. They made from the low carbon steel. As laser welding experiment results show, the weld pool shape at the top and bottom surface, is strongly influenced by surface tension, giving it a characteristic hourglass shape. In order to simulate the hourglass shape, a new volumetric heat source model was developed to predict the transient temperature profile and weld pool shape, including the effect of surface tension. Tailor welded blanks with different thicknesses were examined in the laser welding process. All major physical phenomena such as thermal conduction, heat radiation and convection heat losses are taken into account in the model development as well as temperature-dependant thermal and mechanical material properties. The model is validated for the case of butt joint welding of cold rolled steel sheets. The results of the numerical simulations provide temperature distributions representing the shape of the molten pool, distortion and residual stress with varying laser beam power and welding speed. It is demonstrated that the finite element simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment results. This includes the weld pool shape and sheet metal distortion. While there is no experimental data to compare directly with residual stress results, the distorted shape provides an indirect measure of the welding

  8. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  9. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption.

  10. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  11. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  12. Effects of CO2 perturbation on phosphorus pool sizes and uptake in a mesocosm experiment during a low productive summer season in the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nausch, Monika; Bach, Lennart Thomas; Czerny, Jan; Goldstein, Josephine; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Hellemann, Dana; Hornick, Thomas; Achterberg, Eric Pieter; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Studies investigating the effect of increasing CO2 levels on the phosphorus cycle in natural waters are lacking although phosphorus often controls phytoplankton development in many aquatic systems. The aim of our study was to analyse effects of elevated CO2 levels on phosphorus pool sizes and uptake. The phosphorus dynamic was followed in a CO2-manipulation mesocosm experiment in the Storfjärden (western Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea) in summer 2012 and was also studied in the surrounding fjord water. In all mesocosms as well as in surface waters of Storfjärden, dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) concentrations of 0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.23 ± 0.04 µmol L-1, respectively, formed the main fraction of the total P-pool (TP), whereas phosphate (PO4) constituted the lowest fraction with mean concentration of 0.15 ± 0.02 in the mesocosms and 0.17 ± 0.07 µmol L-1 in the fjord. Transformation of PO4 into DOP appeared to be the main pathway of PO4 turnover. About 82 % of PO4 was converted into DOP whereby only 18 % of PO4 was transformed into particulate phosphorus (PP). PO4 uptake rates measured in the mesocosms ranged between 0.6 and 3.9 nmol L-1 h-1. About 86 % of them was realized by the size fraction < 3 µm. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) uptake revealed that additional P was supplied from organic compounds accounting for 25-27 % of P provided by PO4 only. CO2 additions did not cause significant changes in phosphorus (P) pool sizes, DOP composition, and uptake of PO4 and ATP when the whole study period was taken into account. However, significant short-term effects were observed for PO4 and PP pool sizes in CO2 treatments > 1000 µatm during periods when phytoplankton biomass increased. In addition, we found significant relationships (e.g., between PP and Chl a) in the untreated mesocosms which were not observed under high fCO2 conditions. Consequently, it can be hypothesized that the relationship between PP formation and phytoplankton growth changed with CO2 elevation

  13. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  14. The particle size distribution, density, and specific surface area of welding fumes from SMAW and GMAW mild and stainless steel consumables.

    PubMed

    Hewett, P

    1995-02-01

    Particle size distributions were measured for fumes from mild steel (MS) and stainless steel (SS); shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) consumables. Up to six samples of each type of fume were collected in a test chamber using a micro-orifice uniform deposit (cascade) impactor. Bulk samples were collected for bulk fume density and specific surface area analysis. Additional impactor samples were collected using polycarbonate substrates and analyzed for elemental content. The parameters of the underlying mass distributions were estimated using a nonlinear least squares analysis method that fits a smooth curve to the mass fraction distribution histograms of all samples for each type of fume. The mass distributions for all four consumables were unimodal and well described by a lognormal distribution; with the exception of the GMAW-MS and GMAW-SS comparison, they were statistically different. The estimated mass distribution geometric means for the SMAW-MS and SMAW-SS consumables were 0.59 and 0.46 micron aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED), respectively, and 0.25 micron AED for both the GMAW-MS and GMAW-SS consumables. The bulk fume densities and specific surface areas were similar for the SMAW-MS and SMAW-SS consumables and for the GMAW-MS and GMAW-SS consumables, but differed between SMAW and GMAW. The distribution of metals was similar to the mass distributions. Particle size distributions and physical properties of the fumes were considerably different when categorized by welding method. Within each welding method there was little difference between MS and SS fumes.

  15. NAD kinase regulates the size of the NADPH pool and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Alavian, Kambiz N; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Heart, Emma A

    2012-07-15

    NADPH is an important component of the antioxidant defense system and a proposed mediator in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. An increase in the NADPH/NADP(+) ratio has been reported to occur within minutes following the rise in glucose concentration in β-cells. However, 30 min following the increase in glucose, the total NADPH pool also increases through a mechanism not yet characterized. NAD kinase (NADK) catalyzes the de novo formation of NADP(+) by phosphorylation of NAD(+). NAD kinases have been shown to be essential for redox regulation, oxidative stress defense, and survival in bacteria and yeast. However, studies on NADK in eukaryotic cells are scarce, and the function of this enzyme has not been described in β-cells. We employed INS-1 832/13 cells, an insulin-secreting rat β-cell line, and isolated rodent islets to investigate the role of NADK in β-cell metabolic pathways. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of NADK resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the total NADPH pool and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio, suggesting that NADP(+) formed by the NADK-catalyzed reaction is rapidly reduced to NADPH via cytosolic reductases. This increase in the NADPH pool was accompanied by an increase in GSIS in NADK-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, NADK overexpression protected β-cells against oxidative damage by the redox cycling agent menadione and reversed menadione-mediated inhibition of GSIS. Knockdown of NADK via shRNA exerted the opposite effect on all these parameters. These data suggest that NADK kinase regulates intracellular redox and affects insulin secretion and oxidative defense in the β-cell.

  16. NAD kinase regulates the size of the NADPH pool and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Alavian, Kambiz N; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Heart, Emma A

    2012-07-15

    NADPH is an important component of the antioxidant defense system and a proposed mediator in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. An increase in the NADPH/NADP(+) ratio has been reported to occur within minutes following the rise in glucose concentration in β-cells. However, 30 min following the increase in glucose, the total NADPH pool also increases through a mechanism not yet characterized. NAD kinase (NADK) catalyzes the de novo formation of NADP(+) by phosphorylation of NAD(+). NAD kinases have been shown to be essential for redox regulation, oxidative stress defense, and survival in bacteria and yeast. However, studies on NADK in eukaryotic cells are scarce, and the function of this enzyme has not been described in β-cells. We employed INS-1 832/13 cells, an insulin-secreting rat β-cell line, and isolated rodent islets to investigate the role of NADK in β-cell metabolic pathways. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of NADK resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the total NADPH pool and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio, suggesting that NADP(+) formed by the NADK-catalyzed reaction is rapidly reduced to NADPH via cytosolic reductases. This increase in the NADPH pool was accompanied by an increase in GSIS in NADK-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, NADK overexpression protected β-cells against oxidative damage by the redox cycling agent menadione and reversed menadione-mediated inhibition of GSIS. Knockdown of NADK via shRNA exerted the opposite effect on all these parameters. These data suggest that NADK kinase regulates intracellular redox and affects insulin secretion and oxidative defense in the β-cell. PMID:22550069

  17. Microstructure characteristics of laser MIG hybrid welded mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Hu, Qianwu

    2008-07-01

    To deepen the understanding of laser-arc hybrid welding, the weld shape and microstructure characteristics of laser-metal inert gas hybrid welded mild steel were analyzed. The results showed typical hybrid weld could be classified as two parts: the wide upper zone and the narrow nether zone, which were defined as arc zone and laser zone, respectively. In the hybrid weld, the microstructure, alloy element distribution and microhardness all have evident difference between laser zone and arc zone. The microstructure of arc zone consists of coarse columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone is composed of fine equiaxed dendrite in weld center and columnar dendrite around the equiaxed dendrite. Compared to arc zone, laser zone has finer grain size, higher microhardness, smaller alloy element content in the fusion zone and narrower heat affected zone. The discussions demonstrated that the observed difference was caused by the difference of temperature gradient, crystallizing and the effects of arc pressure on the molten pool between laser zone and arc zone.

  18. Ultrasonic vibration aided laser welding of Al alloys: Improvement of laser-welding quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Watanabe, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    1995-03-01

    Using a pulsed YAG laser, meltability of Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Si alloys were investigated by a single-pass irradiation. In order to improve the quality in laser welding, the effectiveness of the Ultrasonic Vibration Laser Welding (UVLW) method proposed in this paper was investigated experimentally. The proposed method was also compared with the traditional welding methods of Normal Laser Welding (NLW) and preHeating Laser Welding (HLW). The welding methods were evaluated from the geometry in the melt zone generated by a single pulse of the laser beam. It was suggested that ultrasonic vibration suppressed welding defects and improved the melt characteristics due to cavitation effects and dispersion of particles in the molten pool during laser welding. The influence on melt characteristics of the melt zone by preheating was also investigated. In these experiments, UVLW was the most useful laser welding method from the point of view of improving the laser welding quality of Al alloys.

  19. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  20. Diets high in resistant starch and arabinoxylan modulate digestion processes and SCFA pool size in the large intestine and faecal microbial composition in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tina S; Lærke, Helle N; Theil, Peter K; Sørensen, Jens F; Saarinen, Markku; Forssten, Sofia; Knudsen, Knud E Bach

    2014-12-14

    The effects of a high level of dietary fibre (DF) either as arabinoxylan (AX) or resistant starch (RS) on digestion processes, SCFA concentration and pool size in various intestinal segments and on the microbial composition in the faeces were studied in a model experiment with pigs. A total of thirty female pigs (body weight 63.1 (sem 4.4) kg) were fed a low-DF, high-fat Western-style control diet (WSD), an AX-rich diet (AXD) or a RS-rich diet (RSD) for 3 weeks. Diet significantly affected the digestibility of DM, protein, fat, NSP and NSP components, and the arabinose:xylose ratio, as well as the disappearance of NSP and AX in the large intestine. RS was mainly digested in the caecum. AX was digested at a slower rate than RS. The digesta from AXD-fed pigs passed from the ileum to the distal colon more than twice as fast as those from WSD-fed pigs, with those from RSD-fed pigs being intermediate (P< 0.001). AXD feeding resulted in a higher number of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Roseburia intestinalis, Blautia coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in the faeces sampled at week 3 of the experimental period (P< 0.05). In the caecum, proximal and mid colon, AXD feeding resulted in a 3- to 5-fold higher pool size of butyrate compared with WSD feeding, with the RSD being intermediate (P <0.001). In conclusion, the RSD and AXD differently affected digestion processes compared with the WSD, and the AXD most efficiently shifted the microbial composition towards butyrogenic species in the faeces and increased the large-intestinal butyrate pool size.

  1. Amino Acid Synthesis in Photosynthesizing Spinach Cells: Effects of Ammonia on Pool Sizes and Rates of Labeling from 14CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peder Olesen; Cornwell, Karen L.; Gee, Sherry L.; Bassham, James A.

    1981-08-01

    In this paper, isolated cells from leaves of Spinacia oleracea have been maintained in a state capable of high rates of photosynthetic CO2 fixation for more than 60 hours. The incorporation of 14CO2 under saturating CO2 conditions into carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids, and the effect of ammonia on this incorporation have been studied. Total incorporation, specific radioactivity, and pool size have been determined as a function of time for most of the protein amino acids and for γ-aminobutyric acid. The measurements of specific radio-activities and of the approaches to 14C “saturation” of some amino acids indicate the presence and relative sizes of metabolically active and passive pools of these amino acids. Added ammonia decreased carbon fixation into carbohydrates and increased fixation into carboxylic acids and amino acids. Different amino acids were, however, affected in different and highly specific ways. Ammonia caused large stimulatory effects in incorporation of 14C into glutamine (a factor of 21), aspartate, asparagine, valine, alanine, arginine, and histidine. No effect or slight decreases were seen in glycine, serine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine labeling. In the case of glutamate, 14C labeling decreased, but specific radioactivity increased. The production of labeled γ-aminobutyric acid was virtually stopped by ammonia. The results indicate that added ammonia stimulates the reactions mediated by pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, as seen with other plant systems. Finally, the data on the effects of added ammonia on total labeling, pool sizes, and specific radioactivities of several amino acids provides a number of indications about the intracellular sites of principal synthesis from carbon skeletons of these amino acids and the selective nature of effects of increased intracellular ammonia concentration on such synthesis.

  2. Effects of CO2 perturbation on phosphorus pool sizes and uptake in a mesocosm experiment during a low productive summer season in the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nausch, M.; Bach, L.; Czerny, J.; Goldstein, J.; Grossart, H. P.; Hellemann, D.; Hornick, T.; Achterberg, E.; Schulz, K.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating the effect of increasing CO2 levels on the phosphorus cycle in natural waters are lacking although phosphorus often controls phytoplankton development in aquatic systems. The aim of our study was to analyze effects of elevated CO2 levels on phosphorus pool sizes and uptake. Therefore, we conducted a CO2-manipulation mesocosm experiment in the Storfjärden (western Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea) in summer 2012. We compared the phosphorus dynamics in different mesocosm treatments but also studied them outside the mesocosms in the surrounding fjord water. In the mesocosms as well as in surface waters of Storfjärden, dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) concentrations of 0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.23 ± 0.04 μmol L-1, respectively, formed the main fraction of the total P-pool (TP), whereas phosphate (PO4) constituted the lowest fraction with mean concentration of 0.15 ± 0.02 μmol L-1 and 0.17 ± 0.07 μmol L-1 in the mesocosms and in the fjord, respectively. Uptake of PO4 ranged between 0.6 and 3.9 nmol L-1 h-1 of which ~ 86 % (mesocosms) and ~ 72 % (fjord) were realized by the size fraction < 3 μm. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) uptake revealed that additional P was supplied from organic compounds accounting for 25-27 % of P provided by PO4 only. CO2 additions did not cause significant changes in phosphorus (P) pool sizes, DOP composition, and uptake of PO4 and ATP when the whole study period was taken into account. About 18 % of PO4 was transformed into POP, whereby the major proportion (~ 82 %) was converted into DOP suggesting that the conversion of PO4 to DOP is the main pathway of the PO4 turnover. We observed that significant relationships (e.g., between POP and Chl a) in the untreated mesocosms vanished under increased fCO2 conditions. Consequently, it can be hypothesized that the relationship between POP formation and phytoplankton growth changed under elevated CO2 conditions. Significant short-term effects were observed for PO4 and particulate

  3. Fancd2 and p21 function independently in maintaining the size of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Schubert, Kathryn; Major, Angela; Sheehan, Andrea M; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Newell, Amy E Hanlon; Benedetti, Eric; Joseph, Eric; Olson, Susan; Grompe, Markus

    2013-09-01

    Fanconi anemia patients suffer from progressive bone marrow failure. An overactive p53 response to DNA damage contributes to the progressive elimination of Fanconi anemia hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), and hence presents a potential target for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether the cell cycle regulatory protein p21 is the primary mediator of the p53-dependent stem cell loss, p21/Fancd2 double-knockout mice were generated. Surprisingly double mutant mice displayed even more severe loss of HSPCs than Fancd2(-/-) single mutants. p21 deletion did not rescue the abnormal cell cycle profile and had no impact on the long-term repopulating potential of Fancd2(-/-) bone marrow cells. Collectively, our data indicate that p21 has an indispensable role in maintaining a normal HSPC pool and suggest that other p53-targeted factors, not p21, mediate the progressive elimination of HSPC in Fanconi anemia.

  4. Remote welding equipment for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, G.W.; Junge, R.

    1995-12-31

    Remote welding equipment and techniques are necessary for maintenance of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). The processes identified for this application includes inside diameter (i.d.) and outside diameter (o.d.) Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of titanium and stainless steel alloys. Welding equipment developed for this application includes some unique features due to the specialized environment of the TPX vessel. Remote features of this equipment must include the ability to acquire and align the parts being welded, perform all welding operations and visually inspect the weld area. Designs for weld heads require the integration of industry proven hardware with the special features include compact size, remote manipulation, remote clamping and alignment, remote vision, full inert gas coverage, arc voltage control, wire feed, programmable weld schedules and failure recovery.

  5. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  6. The radial diffusivity and magnetization transfer pool size ratio are sensitive markers for demyelination in a rat model of type III multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions

    PubMed Central

    Janve, Vaibhav A.; Zu, Zhongliang; Yao, Song-Yi; Li, Ke; Zhang, Fang Lin; Wilson, Kevin; Ou, Xiawei; Does, Mark D.; Subramaniam, Sriram; Gochberg, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Determining biophysical sensitivity and specificity of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging is essential to develop effective imaging metrics of neurodegeneration. Among these metrics apparent pool size ratio (PSR) from quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging and radial diffusivity (RD) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are both known to relate to histological measure of myelin density and integrity. However their relative sensitivities towards quantitative myelin detection are unknown. In this study, we correlated high-resolution quantitative magnetic resonance imaging measures of subvoxel tissue structures with corresponding quantitative myelin histology in a lipopolysacharide (LPS) mediated animal model of MS. Specifically, we acquired quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics (on the same tissue sample) in an animal model system of type III oligodendrogliopathy which lacked prominent lymphocytic infiltration, a system that had not been previously examined with quantitative MRI. We find that the qMT measured apparent pool size ratio (PSR) showed the strongest correlation with a histological measure of myelin content. DTI measured RD showed the next strongest correlation, and other DTI and relaxation parameters (such as the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1f) or fractional anisotropy (FA)) showed considerably weaker correlations with myelin content. PMID:23481461

  7. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  8. Nitrogen in plasmas and steel weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Todd Allen

    Nitrogen concentrations, well above those predicted by Sieverts' Law, are observed during the arc welding of iron and steel. Several models, which take into account the absorption of monatomic nitrogen and a competition between nitrogen absorption and desorption, have been developed. None, though, provides a means for accurately calculating the nitrogen concentration in a steel weldment, as a function of the welding variables. The aim of this work is therefore to develop a comprehensive model to accurately predict the nitrogen concentration in the weld pool and validate the model with experimental data. Transport phenomena, plasma physics, and thermodynamic calculations have been combined to produce realistic calculations of the nitrogen concentration in the weld metal. The computed residual nitrogen concentrations are affected by complex factors, including the amount of nitrogen in the feed gas, the electron temperature distribution above the weld pool, and the nature of the fluid flow in the weld pool. Each of these factors has been taken into consideration here. Of primary importance in the calculation of the nitrogen concentration is the effect of desorption of dissolved nitrogen from the weld pool via bubble formation. Based on a comparison of modeling and experimental results, it is found that a supersaturation of nitrogen in the liquid metal 50 to 100% greater than the equilibrium nitrogen solubility with one atmosphere of diatomic nitrogen at the weld pool surface is required for bubbles to nucleate. These calculated values have been compared with residual nitrogen concentrations measured for various welding conditions. Experimental nitrogen concentrations fall between 400 and 650 ppm, and the manner in which the nitrogen concentration changes with the nitrogen partial pressure in the feed gas is affected by the changes in the welding speed. Model calculations compare favorably with these experimental results. In total, therefore, this work represents the

  9. Why to measure a broad range of city sizes? Analysis of globally pooled data of urban GHG measurements for sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybski, Diego; Sterzel, Till; Reusser, Dominik E.; Fichter, Christina; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2013-04-01

    We have assembled a database of urban GHG emissions from various published sources, including about 200 cities globally. Analyzing this CO2 emission inventory from multiple countries we find power-law relations between the emissions and city size, measured in population. The results suggest that in developing countries large cities emit more CO2 per capita compared to small cities, i.e. they tend to comprise super-linear correlations. For developed countries the results suggest the opposite, i.e. linear or sub-linear correlations, implying better efficiency of large cities. We derive how the total emissions of an entire country relate with the power-law correlations and find that the size of the most populated city is dominating in the case of linear and super-linear correlations, while a transition occurs to sub-linear correlations, where the size of the largest city has no influence. It is important to further substantiate an overview of city emission inventories across a broad range of city sizes and types to further clarify the complex relationships between cities and GHG emissions. On the one hand, we propose a minimum set of meta-information to be reported together with the emission inventories, e.g. for determining comparability among inventories. On the other hand, we propose to fill evident gaps with respect to regions (e.g. sub-Saharan African and South American cities) and types of cities (e.g. small medium and low-income country cities) to allow for a better global overview of city sizes, income, and emissions. We conclude that from the climate change mitigation point of view, urbanization is desirable in developed countries and should be avoided in developing countries, if effinciency increasing mechanisms can not be established. More data acquisition is needed to support our empirical findings.

  10. Delineation of biochemical, molecular, and physiological changes accompanying bile acid pool size restoration in Cyp7a1−/− mice fed low levels of cholic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan D.; Repa, Joyce J.; Russell, David W.; Dietschy, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initiating and rate-limiting enzyme in the neutral pathway that coverts cholesterol to primary bile acids (BA). CYP7A1-deficient (Cyp7a1−/−) mice have a depleted BA pool, diminished intestinal cholesterol absorption, accelerated fecal sterol loss, and increased intestinal cholesterol synthesis. To determine the molecular and physiological effects of restoring the BA pool in this model, adult female Cyp7a1−/− mice and matching Cyp7a1+/+ controls were fed diets containing cholic acid (CA) at modest levels [0.015, 0.030, and 0.060% (wt/wt)] for 15–18 days. A level of just 0.03% provided a CA intake of ∼12 μmol (4.8 mg) per day per 100 g body wt and was sufficient in the Cyp7a1−/− mice to normalize BA pool size, fecal BA excretion, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal sterol excretion but caused a significant rise in the cholesterol concentration in the small intestine and liver, as well as a marked inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in these organs. In parallel with these metabolic changes, there were marked shifts in intestinal and hepatic expression levels for many target genes of the BA sensor farnesoid X receptor, as well as genes involved in cholesterol transport, especially ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG8. In Cyp7a1+/+ mice, this level of CA supplementation did not significantly disrupt BA or cholesterol metabolism, except for an increase in fecal BA excretion and marginal changes in mRNA expression for some BA synthetic enzymes. These findings underscore the importance of using moderate dietary BA levels in studies with animal models. PMID:22628034

  11. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  12. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  13. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  14. Influence of Joint Configuration on the Strength of Laser Welded Presshardened Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügler, H.; Mittelstädt, C.; Vollertsen, F.

    Presshardened steel is used in nowadays automotive production. Due to its high strength, sheet thicknesses can be reduced which results in decreasing weight of car body components. However, because of microstructure softening and coating agglomerations in the seam, welding is still a challenge. In this paper laser beam welding of 22MnB5 with varying energy input per irradiated area is presented. It is found that increasing energy input per seam length reduces tensile strength. Using a small spot size of 200 μm, tensile strength of 1434 N/mm2 can be reached in bead on plate welds. In lap welds tensile strength is limited because of coating particles agglomerating at the melt pool border line. However, the resulting strength is higher when using several small weld seams than using one seam with the same total seam width. With three weld seams, each 0.5mm in width, tensile strength of 911N/mm2 is reached in lap welding.

  15. Contribution to study of heat transfer and fluid flow during GTA welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudadje, Koffi; Delalondre, Clarisse; Médale, Marc; Carpreau, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the effect of surface-active elements especially sulfur on weld pool shape has been reported. In our contribution, we analyze the influence of the weld pool chemical composition (Mn, Si, …), welding energy, sulphur gradient and electromagnetic effect. The computed results are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results, indicating the validity of the modeling approach.

  16. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  17. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  18. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  19. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  20. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  1. Development and application of specially-focused ultrasonic transducers to location and sizing of defects in 75 mm- to 127 mm-thick austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Benson, S.; McKinley, B.J.; Carodiskey, T.

    1992-08-01

    Special UT transducer parts, capable of focusing incident signals within a 25 mm {times} 25 mm {times} 25 mm volume in an austenitic stainless weld metal at depths that varied from 25 mm to 127 mm, were developed and demonstrated to be capable of detecting a defect with cross section equivalent to that of a 4.76 mm-dia flat-bottom hole. Defect length sizing could be accomplished to {plus_minus}50% for 100% of the time and to {plus_minus}25% on selected defect types as follows: porosity groups, 100%; cracks, 67%; combined slag and porosity, 60%; and linear slag indications, 59%. Extensive linear elastic-fracture-mechanics analyses were performed to establish allowable defect sizes at functions of stress, based on a cyclic-life criterion of 10{sup 3} full power cycles of the MFTF-B magnet system. These defect sizes were used to determine which UT indicating were to be removed and repaired and which were to be retained and their recorded sizes and locations.

  2. Understanding metal vaporizaiton from laser welding.

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, Tarasankar; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; He, Xiuli; Norris, Jerome T.

    2003-09-01

    The production of metal vapor as a consequence of high intensity laser irradiation is a serious concern in laser welding. Despite the widespread use of lasers in manufacturing, little fundamental understanding of laser/material interaction in the weld pool exists. Laser welding experiments on 304 stainless steel have been completed which have advanced our fundamental understanding of the magnitude and the parameter dependence of metal vaporization in laser spot welding. Calculations using a three-dimensional, transient, numerical model were used to compare with the experimental results. Convection played a very important role in the heat transfer especially towards the end of the laser pulse. The peak temperatures and velocities increased significantly with the laser power density. The liquid flow is mainly driven by the surface tension and to a much less extent, by the buoyancy force. Heat transfer by conduction is important when the liquid velocity is small at the beginning of the pulse and during weld pool solidification. The effective temperature determined from the vapor composition was found to be close to the numerically computed peak temperature at the weld pool surface. At very high power densities, the computed temperatures at the weld pool surface were found to be higher than the boiling point of 304 stainless steel. As a result, vaporization of alloying elements resulted from both total pressure and concentration gradients. The calculations showed that the vaporization was concentrated in a small region under the laser beam where the temperature was very high.

  3. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  4. Examination of the physical processes associated with the keyhole region of variable polarity plasma arc welds in aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. This study examined the effects of oxide, halide, and sulfate additions to the weld plate on the keyhole and the weld pool. Changes in both the arc plasma character and the bead morphology were correlated to the chemical environment of the weld. Pool behavior was observed by adding flow markers to actual VPPA welds. A low temperature analog to the welding process was developed. The results of the study indicate that oxygen, even at low partial pressures, can disrupt the stable keyhole and weld pool. The results also indicate that the Marangoni surface tension driven flows dominate the weld pool over the range of welding currents studied.

  5. Laser-TIG Welding of Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulsky, I.; Somonov, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of investigation the technological opportunity of laser-TIG welding of titanium alloys. The experimental stand for implementation of process with the capability to feed a filler wire was made. The research of the nature of transfer the filler wire into the welding pool has been demonstrated. The influence of distance between the electrode and the surface of the welded plates on the stability of the arc was shown. The relationship between welding velocity, the position of focal plane of the laser beam and the stability of penetration of plates was determined.

  6. Virtual welding equipment for simulation of GMAW processes with integration of power source regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Zabirov, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    A two dimensional transient numerical analysis and computational module for simulation of electrical and thermal characteristics during electrode melting and metal transfer involved in Gas-Metal-Arc-Welding (GMAW) processes is presented. Solution of non-linear transient heat transfer equation is carried out using a control volume finite difference technique. The computational module also includes controlling and regulation algorithms of industrial welding power sources. The simulation results are the current and voltage waveforms, mean voltage drops at different parts of circuit, total electric power, cathode, anode and arc powers and arc length. We describe application of the model for normal process (constant voltage) and for pulsed processes with U/I and I/I-modulation modes. The comparisons with experimental waveforms of current and voltage show that the model predicts current, voltage and electric power with a high accuracy. The model is used in simulation package SimWeld for calculation of heat flux into the work-piece and the weld seam formation. From the calculated heat flux and weld pool sizes, an equivalent volumetric heat source according to Goldak model, can be generated. The method was implemented and investigated with the simulation software SimWeld developed by the ISF at RWTH Aachen University.

  7. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  8. Size Distribution and Estimated Respiratory Deposition of Total Chromium, Hexavalent Chromium, Manganese, and Nickel in Gas Metal Arc Welding Fume Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Chisholm, William P.; Keane, Michael J.; Cumpston, Amy; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the mass of total Cr, Cr(VI), Mn, and Ni in 15 size fractions for mild and stainless steel gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes. Samples were collected using a nano multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) with polyvinyl chloride filters on each stage. The filters were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) were experimentally calculated and percent recoveries were measured from spiked metals in solution and dry, certified welding-fume reference material. The fraction of Cr(VI) in total Cr was estimated by calculating the ratio of Cr(VI) to total Cr mass for each particle size range. Expected, regional deposition of each metal was estimated according to respiratory-deposition models. The weight percent (standard deviation) of Mn in mild steel fumes was 9.2% (6.8%). For stainless steel fumes, the weight percentages were 8.4% (5.4%) for total Cr, 12.2% (6.5%) for Mn, 2.1% (1.5%) for Ni and 0.5% (0.4%) for Cr(VI). All metals presented a fraction between 0.04 and 0.6 μm. Total Cr and Ni presented an additional fraction <0.03 μm. On average 6% of the Cr was found in the Cr(VI) valence state. There was no statistical difference between the smallest and largest mean Cr(VI) to total Cr mass ratio (p-value D 0.19), hence our analysis does not show that particle size affects the contribution of Cr(VI) to total Cr. The predicted total respiratory deposition for the metal particles was ∼25%. The sites of principal deposition were the head airways (7–10%) and the alveolar region (11–14%). Estimated Cr(VI) deposition was highest in the alveolar region (14%). PMID:26848207

  9. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  10. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  11. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    . However, some of the energy will be absorbed by the plate before it reaches the metal drop. Based on the theoretical calculations, it was determined that during a weld cutting exercise, the titanium alloy would be the most difficult to detach molten metal droplets followed by stainless steel and then by aluminum. The results of the experimental effort have shown that molten metal will detach if large enough of a hammer blow is applied to the weld sample plate during the full penetration welding and cutting exercises. However, no molten metal detachments occurred as a result of the filler wire snap-out tests from the weld puddle since it was too difficult to cause the metal to flick-out from the pool. Molten metal detachments, though not large in size, did result from the direct application of the electron beam on the end of the filler weld wire.

  12. Heat transfer and fluid flow during keyhole mode laser welding of tantalum, Ti 6Al 4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R.; Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Roy, T. Deb

    2007-09-01

    Because of the complexity of several simultaneous physical processes, most heat transfer models of keyhole mode laser welding require some simplifications to make the calculations tractable. The simplifications often limit the applicability of each model to the specific materials systems for which the model is developed. In this work, a rigorous, yet computationally efficient, keyhole model is developed and tested on tantalum, Ti-6Al-4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium. Unlike previous models, this one combines an existing model to calculate keyhole shape and size with numerical fluid flow and heat transfer calculations in the weld pool. The calculations of the keyhole profile involved a point-by-point heat balance at the keyhole walls considering multiple reflections of the laser beam in the vapour cavity. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are then solved in three dimensions assuming that the temperatures at the keyhole wall reach the boiling point of the different metals or alloys. A turbulence model based on Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis was used to estimate the effective viscosity and thermal conductivity in the liquid region. The calculated weld cross-sections agreed well with the experimental results for each metal and alloy system examined here. In each case, the weld pool geometry was affected by the thermal diffusivity, absorption coefficient, and the melting and boiling points, among the various physical properties of the alloy. The model was also used to better understand solidification phenomena and calculate the solidification parameters at the trailing edge of the weld pool. These calculations indicate that the solidification structure became less dendritic and coarser with decreasing weld velocities over the range of speeds investigated in this study. Overall, the keyhole weld model provides satisfactory simulations of the weld geometries and solidification sub-structures for diverse engineering metals and alloys.

  13. The effect of welding direction in CO2 LASER - MIG hybrid welding of mild steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilash, M.; Senthil kumar, D.; Padmanabham, G.; Paniprabhakar; Padmanaban, R.; Thirumalini, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, hybrid laser-arc welding process has been studied based on the relative position of the laser and the arc (i.e. laser-leading and arc-leading arrangement) and, the effects of welding parameters, such as the laser power, arc current, arc voltage and the welding speed on the weld bead were investigated. The study indicates that the welding direction has a significant effect on the weld bead and weld pool behaviour. The result shows that laserleading configuration shows better bead characteristics when compared to arc-leading configuration. This is because in the laser-leading case molten metal flow is inward, while in the arc-leading case the metal flow is outward leading to variation in solidification front resulting in lack of synergic effects of both processes.

  14. In-process monitoring and adaptive control for gap in micro butt welding with pulsed YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Kito, Masayuki; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-05-01

    A gap is one of the most important issues to be solved in laser welding of a micro butt joint, because the gap results in welding defects such as underfilling or a non-bonded joint. In-process monitoring and adaptive control has been expected as one of the useful procedures for the stable production of sound laser welds without defects. The objective of this research is to evaluate the availability of in-process monitoring and adaptive control in micro butt welding of pure titanium rods with a pulsed neodymium : yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd : YAG) laser beam of a 150 µm spot diameter. It was revealed that a 45 µm narrow gap was detected by the remarkable jump in a reflected light intensity due to the formation of the molten pool which could bridge the gap. Heat radiation signal levels increased in proportion to the sizes of molten pools or penetration depths for the respective laser powers. As for adaptive control, the laser peak power was controlled on the basis of the reflected light or the heat radiation signals to stably produce a sound deeply penetrated weld reduced underfilling. In the case of a 100 µm gap, the underfilling was greatly reduced by half smaller than those made with a conventional rectangular pulse shape in seam welding as well as spot welding with a pulsed Nd : YAG laser beam. Consequently, the adaptive control of the laser peak power on the basis of in-process monitoring could reduce the harmful effects due to a gap in micro butt laser welding with a pulsed laser beam.

  15. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  16. Welding polarity effects on weld spatters and bead geometry of hyperbaric dry GMAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Long; Wu, Jinming; Huang, Junfen; Huang, Jiqiang; Zou, Yong; Liu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Welding polarity has influence on welding stability to some extent, but the specific relationship between welding polarity and weld quality has not been found, especially under the hyperbaric environment. Based on a hyperbaric dry welding experiment system, gas metal arc welding(GMAW) experiments with direct current electrode positive(DCEP) and direct current electrode negative(DCEN) operations are carried out under the ambient pressures of 0.1 MPa, 0.4 MPa, 0.7 MPa and 1.0 MPa to find the influence rule of different welding polarities on welding spatters and weld bead geometry. The effects of welding polarities on the weld bead geometry such as the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are discussed. The experimental results show that the welding spatters gradually grow in quantity and size for GMAW with DCEP, while GMAW with DCEN can produce fewer spatters comparatively with the increase of the ambient pressure. Compared with DCEP, the welding current and arc voltage waveforms for DCEN is more stable and the distribution of welding current probability density for DCEN is more concentrated under the hyperbaric environment. When the ambient pressure is increased from 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa, the effects of welding polarities on the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are as follows: an increase of 0.8 mm for the weld reinforcement is produced by GMAW with DCEN and 1.3 mm by GMAW with DCEP, a decrease of 7.2 mm for the weld width is produced by DCEN and 6.1 mm by DCEP; and an increase of 3.9 mm for the penetration is produced by DCEN and 1.9 mm by DCEP. The proposed research indicates that the desirable stability in the welding procedure can be achieved by GMAW with DCEN operation under the hyperbaric environment.

  17. RIM1 and RIM2 redundantly determine Ca2+ channel density and readily releasable pool size at a large hindbrain synapse.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunyun; Babai, Norbert; Kaeser, Pascal; Südhof, Thomas C; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The localization and density of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels at active zones are essential for the amount and kinetics of transmitter release at synapses. RIM proteins are scaffolding proteins at the active zone that bind to several other presynaptic proteins, including voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel α-subunits. The long isoforms of RIM proteins, which contain NH2-terminal Rab3- and Munc13-interacting domains, as well as a central PDZ domain and two COOH-terminal C2 domains, are encoded by two genes, Rim1 and Rim2. Here, we used the ideal accessibility of the large calyx of Held synapse for direct presynaptic electrophysiology to investigate whether the two Rim genes have redundant, or separate, functions in determining the presynaptic Ca(2+) channel density, and the size of a readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP). Quantitative PCR showed that cochlear nucleus neurons, which include calyx of Held generating neurons, express both RIM1 and RIM2. Conditional genetic inactivation of RIM2 at the calyx of Held led to a subtle reduction in presynaptic Ca(2+) current density, whereas deletion of RIM1 was ineffective. The release efficiency of brief presynaptic Ca(2+) "tail" currents and the RRP were unaffected in conditional single RIM1 and RIM2 knockout (KO) mice, whereas both parameters were strongly reduced in RIM1/2 double KO mice. Thus, despite a somewhat more decisive role for RIM2 in determining presynaptic Ca(2+) channel density, RIM1 and RIM2 can overall replace each other's presynaptic functions at a large relay synapse in the hindbrain, the calyx of Held.

  18. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  19. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  20. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes.

  1. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes. PMID:25455190

  2. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  3. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchioni, G.; Montanari, R.; Tata, M. E.; Pilloni, L.

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  4. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process developed and patented by The Welding Institute in Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding has been implemented in the aerospace industry in the fabrication of longitudinal welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks. As the industry looks to implement friction stir welding in circumferential welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks, techniques to close out the termination hole associated with retracting the pin tool are being evaluated. Friction pull plug welding is under development as a one means of closing out the termination hole. A friction pull plug weld placed in a friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite, plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size in the test or service environments. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in two aluminum alloy friction plug weld configurations is presented.

  5. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  6. Absorbed zinc and exchangeable zinc pool size are greater in Pakistani infants receiving traditional complementary foods with zinc-fortified micronutrient powder.

    PubMed

    Ariff, Shabina; Krebs, Nancy F; Soofi, Sajid; Westcott, Jamie; Bhatti, Zaid; Tabassum, Farhana; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-01-01

    Adequacy of zinc intake from breast milk alone becomes marginal in relation to infant requirements by around 6 mo of age. Simple and cost-effective strategies are needed at the population level to ensure adequate intakes of zinc in infants and toddlers in populations at risk of zinc deficiency. We determined the amount of absorbed zinc (AZ) from a micronutrient powder (MNP) without and with 10 mg of zinc (MNP+Zn) added to local complementary foods used in Pakistan and the impact on the exchangeable zinc pool (EZP) size. As a nested study within a large, prospective, cluster randomized trial, 6-mo-old infants were randomly assigned to receive MNP or MNP+Zn. Stable isotope methodology was applied after ∼3 and 9 mo of use to measure AZ from MNP-fortified test meals of rice-lentils (khitchri) and EZP. Nineteen infants per group completed the first metabolic studies and 14 and 17 infants in the MNP and MNP+Zn groups, respectively, completed the follow-up studies. AZs were (mean ± SD) 0.1 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.5 mg at the first point for the MNP and MNP+Zn groups, respectively (P < 0.001); results were nearly identical at the follow-up measurement. EZP did not differ between groups at the first measurement but was less in the MNP group (3.7 ± 0.6 mg/kg) than in the MNP+Zn group (4.5 ± 1.0 mg/kg) at the second measurement (P = 0.01). These data confirm that the MNP+Zn in khitchri were well absorbed and after 1 y of home fortification, zinc status assessed by EZP was significantly better for the MNP+Zn group. Additional field studies may be necessary to ascertain the adequacy of this dose for infants at high risk of deficiency. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00705445.

  7. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  8. Highly efficient welding power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thommes, J. M.

    1980-09-01

    The results and findings of an energy efficient welding power development project are presented. The power source developed is to be used for electric arc welding processes in which 3.5 trillion Btu of energy can be saved annually. The power source developed incorporates the use of switch mode power supply techniques in order to convert industrial supply mains to appropriate welding voltages and currents. A series capacitor switch mode power circuit was the circuit technique chosen in order to optimize energy efficiency, costs, reliability, size/weight, and welding performance. Test results demonstrated an effective efficiency (taking into account idle power consumption) of 80 to 91 percent for the energy efficient power source while the conventional types of power sources tested ranged from 41 to 74 percent efficiency. Line power factor was also improved for the energy efficient power source. Field tests indicated additional refinements of weld process performance and power source audible noise emission reduction could be beneficial.

  9. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  10. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  11. Coaxial monitoring of the fibre laser lap welding of Zn-coated steel sheets using an auxiliary illuminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Chenglei; Tan, Lipeng; Li, Shichun

    2013-09-01

    In the laser welding process, weld defects are often caused by many factors, such as variations in the laser power, welding speed and gaps between two workpieces. In an auto-welding system, the on-line monitoring of the welding quality is very important in avoiding weld defects. In this paper, an on-line coaxial monitoring system with an auxiliary illuminant was built for the fibre laser welding of galvanised steel; images of the weld pool were taken during the welding process. Profiles of the weld pool and the keyhole were obtained by processing the images using the region-growing algorithm and the Canny algorithm. In this research, we used the on-line monitored weld pool width to monitor the weld surface width. The weld penetration status was divided into the three categories of incompletely penetrated, moderately penetrated and over-penetrated using the value of d (diameter at the bottom of the keyhole)/D (diameter at the top of the keyhole). Thus, the weld width and weld penetration status of fibre laser welding can be monitored on-line.

  12. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  13. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  14. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  15. In-process discontinuity detection during friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Amber

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities (e.g., voids) during friction stir welding. Friction stir welding is inherently cost-effective, however, the need for significant weld inspection can make the process cost-prohibitive. A new approach to weld inspection is required -- where an in-situ characterization of weld quality can be obtained, reducing the need for post-process inspection. Friction stir welds with discontinuity and without discontinuity were created. In this work, discontinuities are generated by reducing the friction stir tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "colder" welds. During the welds, forces are measured. Discontinuity sizes for welds are measured by computerized tomography. The relationship between the force transients and the discontinuity sizes indicate that the force measurement during friction stir welding can be effectively used for detecting discontinuities in friction stir welds. The normalized force transient data and normalized discontinuity size are correlated to develop a criterion for discontinuity detection. Additional welds are performed to validate the discontinuity detection method. The discontinuity sizes estimated by the force measurement based method are in good agreement with the discontinuity sizes measured by computerized tomography. These results show that the force measurement based discontinuity detection model method can be effectively used to detect discontinuities during friction stir welding.

  16. Improving Processes of Mechanized Pulsed Arc Welding of Low-Frequency Range Variation of Mode Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Solodskiy, S. A.; Ulyanova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology of low-frequency modulation of the arc current in MAG and MIG welding is presented. The technology provides control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of formation and crystallization of the weld pool. Conducting theoretical studies allowed formulating the basic criteria for obtaining strong permanent joints for high-duty structures, providing conditions for more equilibrium structure of the deposited metal and the smaller width of the HAZ. The stabilization of time of the formation and crystallization of the weld pool improves the formation of the weld and increases productivity in welding thin sheet metal.

  17. Internal Wire Guide For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Wire kept in shielding gas, preventing oxidation. Guide inside gas cup of gas/tungsten-arc welding torch feeds filler wire to weld pool along line parallel to axis of torch. Eliminates problem of how to place and orient torch to provide clearance for external wire guide.

  18. Fundamental study of molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizota, Hirohisa; Nagashima, Yoshiaki; Obana, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system has been developed. The molten pool depth distribution is evaluated by comparing the times taken by the ultrasonic wave to propagate through a molten pool and a solid-phase and through only the solid-phase near the molten pool. Maximum molten pool depths on a flat type-304 stainless-steel plate, formed with a gas tungsten arc welding machine for different welding currents from 70 to 150 A, were derived within an error of ±0.5 mm.

  19. Carbon concentrations and transformations in peatland pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Pippa; Holden, Joseph; Baird, Andrew; Turner, Edward; Dooling, Gemma; Billett, Mike; McKenzie, Rebecca; Leith, Fraser; Dinsmore, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Peatland pools may act as important features for aquatic and gaseous carbon production, transformation and release. Peatland restoration often results in new pools being created. Here we compare aquatic carbon concentrations in nearby natural and artificial pool systems monitored at three sites in northern Scotland over a three-year period. We found significant differences in pool water carbon concentrations between pool types with larger dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in artificial pools. The differences were strong for all sites and occurred in all seasons. Importantly, the DOC outflows from natural pools were markedly lower than the DOC flowing into natural pools showing that processes in these pools were transforming and removing the DOC. These effects were not found in the artificial pools. Data on the composition of the DOC (absorbance ratios, specific ultraviolet absorbance) suggested that natural pools tended to have DOC that had been processed, and was older (radiocarbon dating) while the DOC in artificial pools was young and had not undergone much biochemical processing. Slope position was an important factor influencing pool DOC with those pools with a longer upslope contributing area and collecting water with a longer hillslope residence time having larger DOC concentrations. Dissolved methane (CH4) concentrations were not significantly different between pool types but the concentrations were always above atmospheric levels with values ˜ 200 times atmospheric concentrations not uncommon. Dissolved CO2 concentrations in the artificial pools were extremely large; typically ˜20 times atmospheric levels while those in natural pools were typically only just above atmospheric levels. The pools were strong sources of CH4 and CO2 evasion from the peat system. The smaller size of the artificial pools means that more of their CO2 is stored in the water until it reaches the stream system, while the larger natural pools have

  20. NIR-camera-based online diagnostics of laser beam welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsch, Friedhelm; Braun, Holger; Keßler, Steffen; Pfitzner, Dieter; Rominger, Volker

    2012-03-01

    We have developed an on-axis camera-based online sensor system for laser beam welding diagnostics that detects the thermal radiation in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range between 1200 and 1700 nm. In addition to a sensor in the visible (VIS) range, our camera detects the thermal radiation of the weld pool more clearly, and it is also sensible to the radiation of the solidified weld seam. The NIR images are analyzed by real-time image processing. Features are extracted from the images and evaluated to characterize the welding process. Keyhole and weld pool analysis complement VIS diagnostics, whereas the observation of the weld seam and heat affected zone with an NIR camera allows online heat flux thermography. By this means we are able to detect bad joints in overlap weldings ("false friends") online during the welding process.

  1. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals

    PubMed Central

    Cena, L. G.; Chisholm, W. P.; Keane, M. J.; Chen, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8–199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10–51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40–105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5–1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm. PMID:25985454

  2. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    PubMed

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm. PMID:25985454

  3. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    PubMed

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm.

  4. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  5. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  6. Keyhole and weld shapes for plasma arc welding under normal and zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keanini, R. G.; Rubinsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    A first order study of the interfacial (keyhole) shape between a penetrating argon plasma arc jet and a stationary liquid metal weld pool is presented. The interface is determined using the Young-Laplace equation by assuming that the plasma jet behaves as a one-dimensional ideal gas flow and by neglecting flow within the weld pool. The solution for the keyhole shape allows an approximate determination of the liquid-solid metal phase boundary location based on the assumption that the liquid melt is a stagnant thermal boundary layer. Parametric studies examine the effect of plasma mass flow rate, initial plasma enthalpy, liquid metal surface tension, and jet shear on weldment shape under both normal and zero gravity. Among the more important findings of this study is that keyhole and weld geometries are minimally affected by gravity, suggesting that data gathered under gravity can be used in planning in-space welding.

  7. Smaller Coaxial-View Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Coaxial-view torch for gas/tungsten arc welding has only two-thirds length and width of its predecessor. Shape and size similar to that of commercial arc-welding torch (Linde HW-27 or equivalent), even though it contains lens system. Collet that holds electrode has unique design allowing greater passage of light. Used in small spaces previously inaccessible, also introduced into production welding operations with minimum of disturbance.

  8. Electrode carrying wire for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a hollow tungsten electrode including a ceramic liner and forms the filler metal wire guide. The wire is fed through the tungsten electrode thereby reducing the size of the torch to eliminate clearance problems which exist with external wire guides. Since the wire is preheated from the tungsten more wire may be fed into the weld puddle, and the wire will not oxidize because it is always within the shielding gas.

  9. Effect of Weld Characteristic on Mechanical Strength of Laser-Arc, Hybrid-Welded Al-Mg-Si-Mn Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-08-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) was employed to improve the tensile properties of the joints of 8-mm-thick Al-Mg-Si-Mn alloy (AA6082) using Al-5Mg filler wire. The weld microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscope, electron backscattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy in detail. The LAHW joints with pore-free and high-tensile performances were obtained. The strength enhancement of the fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the LAHW joint was mainly attributed to the grain refinement strengthening and the precipitation strengthening, respectively. The microstructure characteristics were related to the effects of laser-arc interaction on the energy transfer within the molten pool. The arc caused the majority of laser energy to dissipate out of the keyhole, and then it reduced the heat input. The lower heat input refined the grain size, weakened the overaging effect, and thus improved the tensile strength.

  10. Effect of Weld Characteristic on Mechanical Strength of Laser-Arc Hybrid-Welded Al-Mg-Si-Mn Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) was employed to improve the tensile properties of the joints of 8-mm-thick Al-Mg-Si-Mn alloy (AA6082) using Al-5Mg filler wire. The weld microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscope, electron backscattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy in detail. The LAHW joints with pore-free and high-tensile performances were obtained. The strength enhancement of the fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the LAHW joint was mainly attributed to the grain refinement strengthening and the precipitation strengthening, respectively. The microstructure characteristics were related to the effects of laser-arc interaction on the energy transfer within the molten pool. The arc caused the majority of laser energy to dissipate out of the keyhole, and then it reduced the heat input. The lower heat input refined the grain size, weakened the overaging effect, and thus improved the tensile strength.

  11. Swimming pools soak up the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoghi, D.; Hesse, P.; Schiller, T.

    1996-05-01

    Solar pool heaters survived the boom and bust solar years of the 1970s and 1980s. Today they are even popular and cost-effective in parts of the country where many people think solar is impractical. This article discusses the following topics: how solar pool heaters work; types of solar pool heater collectors; collector and pump sizing; collector siting and mounting; systems costs and economics; pool covers. 3 figs.

  12. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  13. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    PubMed

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  14. Welding method combining laser welding and MIG welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hamasaki, M.

    1985-03-26

    Welding of deep penetration is obtained in a sustrate by a method which comprises first melting the joint portion of the substrates by MIG welding and then focusing a laser beam in the bottom surface of a crater formed in consequence of the MIG welding thereby effecting laser welding of the crater.

  15. Laser welding of fused quartz

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  16. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  17. A Laser-Based Vision System for Weld Quality Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2011-01-01

    Welding is a very complex process in which the final weld quality can be affected by many process parameters. In order to inspect the weld quality and detect the presence of various weld defects, different methods and systems are studied and developed. In this paper, a laser-based vision system is developed for non-destructive weld quality inspection. The vision sensor is designed based on the principle of laser triangulation. By processing the images acquired from the vision sensor, the geometrical features of the weld can be obtained. Through the visual analysis of the acquired 3D profiles of the weld, the presences as well as the positions and sizes of the weld defects can be accurately identified and therefore, the non-destructive weld quality inspection can be achieved. PMID:22344308

  18. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of welding fume derived particles generated from real time welding processes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cali; Demokritou, Philip; Shafer, Martin; Christiani, David

    2013-01-01

    Welding fume particles have been well studied in the past; however, most studies have examined welding fumes generated from machine models rather than actual exposures. Furthermore, the link between physicochemical and toxicological properties of welding fume particles has not been well understood. This study aims to investigate the physicochemical properties of particles derived during real time welding processes generated during actual welding processes and to assess the particle size specific toxicological properties. A compact cascade impactor (Harvard CCI) was stationed within the welding booth to sample particles by size. Size fractionated particles were extracted and used for both off-line physicochemical analysis and in vitro cellular toxicological characterization. Each size fraction was analyzed for ions, elemental compositions, and mass concentration. Furthermore, real time optical particle monitors (DustTrak™, TSI Inc., Shoreview, Minn.) were used in the same welding booth to collect real time PM2.5 particle number concentration data. The sampled particles were extracted from the polyurethane foam (PUF) impaction substrates using a previously developed and validated protocol, and used in a cellular assay to assess oxidative stress. By mass, welding aerosols were found to be in coarse (PM 2.5–10), and fine (PM 0.1–2.5) size ranges. Most of the water soluble (WS) metals presented higher concentrations in the coarse size range with some exceptions such as sodium, which presented elevated concentration in the PM 0.1 size range. In vitro data showed size specific dependency, with the fine and ultrafine size ranges having the highest reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity. Additionally, this study suggests a possible correlation between welders' experience, the welding procedure and equipment used and particles generated from welding fumes. Mass concentrations and total metal and water soluble metal concentrations of welding fume particles may be

  19. Heat transfer and fluid flow during electron beam welding of 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R.; Burgardt, P.; Milewski, J. O.; Lienert, T. J.; Roy, T. Deb

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) of two important engineering alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn, was studied experimentally and theoretically. The temperatures at several monitoring locations in the specimens were measured as a function of time during welding and the cross-sections of the welds were examined by optical microscopy. The theoretical research involved numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow during EBW. The model output included temperature and velocity fields, fusion zone geometry and temperature versus time results. The numerically computed fusion zone geometry and the temperature versus time plots were compared with the corresponding experimentally determined values for each weld. Both the experimental and the modelling results were compared with the corresponding results for the keyhole mode laser beam welding (LBW). Both experimental and modelling results demonstrate that the fusion zone size in Ti-6Al-4V alloy was larger than that of the 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel during both the electron beam and laser welding. Higher boiling point and lower solid state thermal conductivity of Ti-6Al-4V contributed to higher peak temperatures in Ti-6Al-4V welds compared with 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel welds. In the EBW of both the alloys, there were significant velocities of liquid metal along the keyhole wall driven by the Marangoni convection. In contrast, during LBW, the velocities along the keyhole wall were negligible. Convective heat transfer was important in the transport of heat in the weld pool during both the laser and the EBW. The computed keyhole wall temperatures during EBW at low pressures were lower than those during the LBW at atmospheric pressure for identical heat input.

  20. PENETRATION AND DEFECT FORMATION IN HIGH CURRENT ARC WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    MENDEZ,P.F.; EAGAR, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    The work performed during the three previous years can be roughly divided into two main categories: (1) development of advanced modeling techniques; and (2) modeling of arc welding process. The work in the first category comprised the development of the Order of Magnitude Scaling (OMS) technique, which is complementary to numerical modeling techniques such as finite elements, but it provides approximate formulas instead of just numerical results. Borrowing concepts from OMS, another modeling technique based on empirical data was also developed. During this stage special software was also developed. The second category comprised the application of OMS to the three main subsystems of arc welding: the weld pool, the arc, and the electrode. For each of these subsystems they found scaling laws and regimes. With this knowledge, they analyzed the generation of weld pool defects during high current arc welding, proposed a mechanistic description of the process, and possible solutions.

  1. Weld repair method for aluminum lithium seam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William Floyd (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel John (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium plates are butt-welded by juxtaposing the plates and making a preliminary weld from the rear or root side of the seam. An initial weld is then made from the face side of the seam, which may cause a defect in the root portion. A full-size X-ray is made and overlain over the seam to identify the defects. The defect is removed from the root side, and rewelded. Material is then removed from the face side, and the cavity is rewelded. The procedure repeats, alternating from the root side to the face side, until the weld is sound.

  2. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  3. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  4. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  5. Mechanisms giving increased weld depth due to a flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Tanaka, M.; Ushio, M.

    2005-09-01

    It is known that for 'tungsten inert gas' welding of stainless steel, the weld depth can be increased by a factor of two or more if a thin layer of flux powder is initially coated on the steel. Numerical predictions from a unified electrode-arc-weldpool model are made elucidating the possible role of three different mechanisms previously proposed to explain this effect, and we also examine a new fourth possible mechanism, namely the effect that the flux is an electrical insulator. (1) Calculations support the suggestion that if the dissolved flux in the weld pool changes the temperature dependence of the surface tension to increase rather than decrease with temperature, the direction of convective circulation within the weld pool can change from radially outwards to radially inwards, leading to an increased weld depth of the order of 2 mm. (2) The effect of electron attachment to flux vapour in the arc, if the vapour contains an attaching gas such as oxygen, is found to have a negligible effect in producing arc constriction and thus a higher current density to increase weld depth. (3) Our treatment assumes that the surface of the weld pool is undepressed by the arc, so that we have not examined the suggestion that increased weld depth is caused by the flux lowering surface tension and thus increasing depression of the weld pool surface. But experimental observations indicate that such depression is negligible for currents of less than 200 A. (4) If the flux produces an insulating layer on the metal surface, calculations indicate that there can be a marked increase in weld depth of the order of 5 mm or more due to the flux blocking the current in the outer regions of the arc thus producing a higher current density at the arc centre. Furthermore these calculations indicate that the flux causes an arc spot to form at the anode, in agreement with similar experimental observations of an anode spot in the presence of a flux.

  6. Welding Curtains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  7. Structure/property relationships in multipass GMA welding of beryllium.

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, P. W.; Hults, W. L.; Thoma, D. J.; Dave, V. R.; Kelly, A. M.; Pappin, P. A.; Cola, M. J.; Burgardt, P.

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium is an interesting metal that has a strength to weight ratio six times that of steel. Because of its unique mechanical properties, beryllium is used in aerospace applications such as satellites. In addition, beryllium is also used in x-ray windows because it is nearly transparent to x-rays. Joining of beryllium has been studied for decades (Ref.l). Typically joining processes include braze-welding (either with gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc), soldering, brazing, and electron beam welding. Cracking which resulted from electron beam welding was recently studied to provide structure/property relationships in autogenous welds (Ref. 2). Braze-welding utilizes a welding arc to melt filler, and only a small amount of base metal is melted and incorporated into the weld pool. Very little has been done to characterize the braze-weld in terms of the structure/property relationships, especially with reference to multipass welding. Thus, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple passes on microstructure, weld metal composition, and resulting material properties for beryllium welded with aluminum-silicon filler metal.

  8. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding To Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  9. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  10. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  11. Towards a Map of Solidification Cracking Risk in Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo, María-Asunción Valiente; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Hurtig, Kjell; Karlsson, Leif; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    In this work, two series of specimens with Hammar and Svensson's Cr- and Ni-equivalents (Creq+Nieq) = 35 and 45 wt% were used to cover a wide range of austenitic grades. These were laser welded with different energy inputs achieving cooling rates in the range of 103 °C/s to 104 °C/s. As high cooling rates and rapid solidification conditions could favour fully austenitic solidification and therefore raise susceptibility to solidification cracking, the solidification modes of the laser welded specimens were compared to the ones experienced by the same alloys under arc welding conditions. It was found that high cooling rates experienced in laser welding promoted fully austenitic solidification for a wider range of compositions, for example specimens with (Creq+Nieq) = 35% under arc welding cooling conditions at 10 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.30, whilst the same specimens laser cooled at 103 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.50 and those cooled at 104 °C/s showed it up to Creq/Nieq = 1.68. Therefore, high cooling rates extended the solidification cracking risk to a wider range of Creq/Nieq values. This work also compares the cooling rates experimentally determined by thermocouples to the computed cooling rates calculated by a highly-advanced computational model. The distance between the thermocouple's wires and the thermal resistance of thermocouples together with the small size of the weld pools proved to be practical limitations in the experimental determination of cooling rates. However, an excellent agreement was found between computed and experimental solidus isotherms at high energy input settings. For low energy input settings cooling rate was in the order of magnitude of 104 °C/s, whilst for high energy input settings cooling rate was found to be in the order of magnitude of 103 °C/s.

  12. A Genetic Cascade of let-7-ncl-1-fib-1 Modulates Nucleolar Size and rRNA Pool in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Pey-Tsyr; Chen, Po-Hsiang; Lee, Ching-Ming; Chu, Yu-De; Yu, Hsiang; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Tsai, Yi-Tzang; Lee, Chi-Chang; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chan, Shih-Peng; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis takes place in the nucleolus, the size of which is often coordinated with cell growth and development. However, how metazoans control nucleolar size remains largely unknown. Caenorhabditis elegans provides a good model to address this question owing to distinct tissue distribution of nucleolar sizes and a mutant, ncl-1, which exhibits larger nucleoli than wild-type worms. Here, through a series of loss-of-function analyses, we report that the nucleolar size is regulated by a circuitry composed of microRNA let-7, translation repressor NCL-1, and a major nucleolar pre-rRNA processing protein FIB-1/fibrillarin. In cooperation with RNA binding proteins PUF and NOS, NCL-1 suppressed the translation of FIB-1/fibrillarin, while let-7 targeted the 3’UTR of ncl-1 and inhibited its expression. Consequently, the abundance of FIB-1 is tightly controlled and correlated with the nucleolar size. Together, our findings highlight a novel genetic cascade by which post-transcriptional regulators interplay in developmental control of nucleolar size and function. PMID:26492166

  13. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... insist that the following rules are followed: Keep toys away from the pool when the pool is ... after each use. No tricycles or other riding toys at poolside. No electrical appliances near the pool. ...

  14. Experimental and simulation studies on laser conduction welding of AA5083 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, M. J.; Lamas, M. I.; Yáñez, A.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Boukha, Z.; Botana, F. J.

    In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical model was developed to study laser welding in an aluminium alloy (AA5083). The CFD model was used to solve the governing equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, so as to obtain the morphology, velocity field and temperature field of the melted zone in steady state. The predicted dimensions of the weld pool agreed well with experimental results obtained on laser conduction welding with a (CW) high power diode laser. The study allowed to determine the effect of different surface treatment (sandblasting, black painting) on the laser absorptivity of the alloy and analyze the heat transfer mechanism within the weld pool.

  15. THE OUTDOOR POOL

    PubMed Central

    Craster, Charles V.

    1919-01-01

    That almost any bit of water will serve for a wading pool seems to be the idea in practice. Dr. Craster has tested such pools and finds that they need to be as well constructed as bathing pools and as well cared for. Chlorination is necessary when they can not otherwise be controlled. ImagesPOOL I.POOL II.POOL III.p826-a PMID:18010192

  16. Preliminary Study on the Formability of a Laser-Welded Superplastic Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorgente, D.; Corizzo, O.; Brandizzi, M.; Tricarico, L.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the effect of the laser-material interaction on the formability of a superplastic aluminum alloy was investigated. In applications such as Tailor-Welded Blanks and in the manufacturing of very large components with a complex shape, laser welding combined with superplastic forming may be a very fitting industrial tool. Bead on plate tests were carried out in order to simulate the laser-welding process and then, free inflation tests were performed to evaluate the compatibility of these two processing techniques. The Al-Mg alloy used in this work has a very small grain size which ensures the superplastic behavior. With the aim of preserving this peculiarity, the following aspects on the formability were investigated: (i) the surface condition of the bead before the forming test (with and without the removal of the excess of metal); (ii) the effect of the travel speed of the laser source on the mean grain size; (iii) the introduction of a refiner, commonly used in aluminum casts, in the molten pool in order to further reduce the mean grain size.

  17. Effect of welding parameters on high-power diode laser welding on thin sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Antti; Jansson, Anssi; Kujanpaa, Veli

    2003-06-01

    High power diode laser (HPDL) is the newest laser tool for industrial manufacturing. The most promising areas of application of HPDL are thin sheet welding and hardening. The HPDL has several advantages and disadvantages compared to lasers CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers currently used for welding. There is quite a few industrial applications in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. A typical industrial installation consists of a HPDL, an industrial robot, work piece manipulation and safety enclosures. The HPDL welding process is at this moment conduction limited and has therefore different parameters than the keyhole welding. In this study the basic HPDL welding parameters and the effect of the parameters on the welding process, weld quality and efficiency are examined. Joint types tested are butt joint and fillet lap joint. The parameters tested are beam intensity, welding speed, spot size, beam impingement angle. The materials tested are common carbon steel and stainless steel. By the experiments carried out it can be seen that all of these parameters have an effect on the weld quality and the absorption of the laser power during welding. The higher the beam intensity is the shorter also the throughput time is. However, in case of fillet joint the maximum welding speed and best visual out look are achieved with totally different set of parameters. Based on these experiments it can, however, be seen that reliable welding parameters can be established for the welding of various industrial products. The beam quality of the diode laser is not optimum for high speed keyhole welding but it is a flexible tool to be used for different joint types.

  18. Strength training increases the size of the satellite cell pool in type I and II fibres of chronically painful trapezius muscle in females

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Abigail L; Andersen, Lars L; Frandsen, Ulrik; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While strength training has been shown to be effective in mediating hypertrophy and reducing pain in trapezius myalgia, responses at the cellular level have not previously been studied. This study investigated the potential of strength training targeting the affected muscles (SST, n = 18) and general fitness training (GFT, n = 16) to augment the satellite cell (SC) and macrophage pools in the trapezius muscles of women diagnosed with trapezius myalgia. A group receiving general health information (REF, n = 8) served as a control. Muscle biopsies were collected from the trapezius muscles of the 42 women (age 44 ± 8 years; mean ± SD) before and after the 10 week intervention period and were analysed by immunohistochemistry for SCs, macrophages and myonuclei. The SC content of type I and II fibres was observed to increase significantly from baseline by 65% and 164%, respectively, with SST (P < 0.0001), together with a significant correlation between the baseline number of SCs and the extent of hypertrophy (r = −0.669, P = 0.005). SST also resulted in a 74% enhancement of the trapezius macrophage content (P < 0.01), accompanied by evidence for the presence of an increased number of actively dividing cells (Ki67+) post-SST (P < 0.001). GFT resulted in a significant 23% increase in the SC content of type II fibres, when expressed relative to myonuclear number only (P < 0.05). No changes in the number of myonuclei per fibre or myonuclear domain were detected in any group. These findings provide strong support at the cellular level for the potential of SST to induce a strong myogenic response in this population. PMID:21946848

  19. Demographic consequences of terrestrial habitat loss for pool-breeding amphibians: predicting extinction risks associated with inadequate size of buffer zones.

    PubMed

    Harper, Elizabeth B; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2008-10-01

    Much of the biodiversity associated with isolated wetlands requires aquatic and terrestrial habitat to maintain viable populations. Current federal wetland regulations in the United States do not protect isolated wetlands or extend protection to surrounding terrestrial habitat. Consequently, some land managers, city planners, and policy makers at the state and local levels are making an effort to protect these wetland and neighboring upland habitats. Balancing human land-use and habitat conservation is challenging, and well-informed land-use policy is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the specific risks of varying amounts of habitat loss. Using projections of wood frog (Rana sylvatica) and spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) populations, we related the amount of high-quality terrestrial habitat surrounding isolated wetlands to the decline and risk of extinction of local amphibian populations. These simulations showed that current state-level wetland regulations protecting 30 m or less of surrounding terrestrial habitat are inadequate to support viable populations of pool-breeding amphibians. We also found that species with different life-history strategies responded differently to the loss and degradation of terrestrial habitat. The wood frog, with a short life span and high fecundity, was most sensitive to habitat loss and isolation, whereas the longer-lived spotted salamander with lower fecundity was most sensitive to habitat degradation that lowered adult survival rates. Our model results demonstrate that a high probability of local amphibian population persistence requires sufficient terrestrial habitat, the maintenance of habitat quality, and connectivity among local populations. Our results emphasize the essential role of adequate terrestrial habitat to the maintenance of wetland biodiversity and ecosystem function and offer a means of quantifying the risks associated with terrestrial habitat loss and degradation.

  20. Electroslag and electrogas welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    These two new joining methods perform welding in the vertical position, and therein lies the secret of their impressive advantages in material handling, in weld preparation, in welding speed, in freedom from distortion, and in weld soundness. Once the work has been set in the proper vertical position for welding, no further plate handling is required. The molten filler metal is held in place by copper shoes or dams, and the weld is completed in one pass.

  1. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards for Electron Beam Welding in the Space Environment: Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Bhat, B.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment are analyzed. A weld pool detachment parameter specifying conditions for pool detachment by impact is derived and corroborated by experimental evidence. Impact detachment for the pool is unlikely. Impact detachment for a drop of metal on the end of the weld wire may be possible under extreme conditions. Other potential causes of molten metal detachment considered, vaporization pressure forces and wire flickout from the pool, did not appear to present significant detachment threats.

  2. Field comparison of three inhalable samplers (IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 and Button) for welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Zugasti, Agurtzane; Montes, Natividad; Rojo, José M; Quintana, M José

    2012-02-01

    Inhalable sampler efficiency depends on the aerodynamic size of the airborne particles to be sampled and the wind speed. The aim of this study was to compare the behaviour of three personal inhalable samplers for welding fumes generated by Manual Metal Arc (MMA) and Metal Active Gas (MAG) processes. The selected samplers were the ones available in Spain when the study began: IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 (GSP) and Button. Sampling was carried out in a welding training center that provided a homogeneous workplace environment. The static sampling assembly used allowed the placement of 12 samplers and 2 cascade impactors simultaneously. 183 samples were collected throughout 2009 and 2010. The range of welding fumes' mass concentrations was from 2 mg m(-3) to 5 mg m(-3). The pooled variation coefficients for the three inhalable samplers were less than or equal to 3.0%. Welding particle size distribution was characterized by a bimodal log-normal distribution, with MMADs of 0.7 μm and 8.2 μm. For these welding aerosols, the Button and the GSP samplers showed a similar performance (P = 0.598). The mean mass concentration ratio was 1.00 ± 0.01. The IOM sampler showed a different performance (P < 0.001). The mean mass concentration ratios were 0.90 ± 0.01 for Button/IOM and 0.92 ± 0.02 for GSP/IOM. This information is useful to consider the measurements accomplished by the IOM, GSP or Button samplers together, in order to assess the exposure at workplaces over time or to study exposure levels in a specific industrial activity, as welding operations. PMID:22037834

  3. Field comparison of three inhalable samplers (IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 and Button) for welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Zugasti, Agurtzane; Montes, Natividad; Rojo, José M; Quintana, M José

    2012-02-01

    Inhalable sampler efficiency depends on the aerodynamic size of the airborne particles to be sampled and the wind speed. The aim of this study was to compare the behaviour of three personal inhalable samplers for welding fumes generated by Manual Metal Arc (MMA) and Metal Active Gas (MAG) processes. The selected samplers were the ones available in Spain when the study began: IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 (GSP) and Button. Sampling was carried out in a welding training center that provided a homogeneous workplace environment. The static sampling assembly used allowed the placement of 12 samplers and 2 cascade impactors simultaneously. 183 samples were collected throughout 2009 and 2010. The range of welding fumes' mass concentrations was from 2 mg m(-3) to 5 mg m(-3). The pooled variation coefficients for the three inhalable samplers were less than or equal to 3.0%. Welding particle size distribution was characterized by a bimodal log-normal distribution, with MMADs of 0.7 μm and 8.2 μm. For these welding aerosols, the Button and the GSP samplers showed a similar performance (P = 0.598). The mean mass concentration ratio was 1.00 ± 0.01. The IOM sampler showed a different performance (P < 0.001). The mean mass concentration ratios were 0.90 ± 0.01 for Button/IOM and 0.92 ± 0.02 for GSP/IOM. This information is useful to consider the measurements accomplished by the IOM, GSP or Button samplers together, in order to assess the exposure at workplaces over time or to study exposure levels in a specific industrial activity, as welding operations.

  4. Optimization of Laser Keyhole Welding Strategies of Dissimilar Metals by FEM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Navas, Virginia; Leunda, Josu; Lambarri, Jon; Sanz, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Laser keyhole welding of dissimilar metals has been simulated to study the effect of welding strategies (laser beam displacements and tilts) and combination of metals to be welded on final quality of the joints. Molten pool geometry and welding penetration have been studied but special attention has been paid to final joint material properties, such as microstructure/phases and hardness, and especially to the residual stress state because it greatly conditions the service life of laser-welded components. For a fixed strategy (laser beam perpendicular to the joint) austenitic to carbon steel laser welding leads to residual stresses at the joint area very similar to those obtained in austenitic to martensitic steel welding, but welding of steel to Inconel 718 results in steeper residual stress gradients and higher area at the joint with detrimental tensile stresses. Therefore, when the difference in thermo-mechanical properties of the metals to be welded is higher, the stress state generated is more detrimental for the service life of the component, and consequently more relevant is the optimization of welding strategy. In laser keyhole welding of austenitic to martensitic stainless steel and austenitic to carbon steel, the optimum welding strategy is displacing the laser beam 1 mm toward the austenitic steel. In the case of austenitic steel to Inconel welding, the optimum welding strategy consists in setting the heat source tilted 45 deg and moved 2 mm toward the austenitic steel.

  5. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    PubMed

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders. PMID:22997412

  6. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    PubMed

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders.

  7. WELDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.; DeWitt, D.E.; Nelson, I.V.

    1963-04-23

    This patent covers an arrangement for replacing air in a welding chamber with an inert gas. This operation usually is time-consuming because of the tendency of the inert gas to mix with the air being removed from the welding chamber. The chamber is open at the bottom and has at its top a cover and a porous plate a little below the cover. The inert gas is admitted to the chamber through two screened openings in the cover. On passing through the porous plate, the gas acts as a piston extending across the chamber and moving downwardly to expel the air through the lower open end of the chamber, with a minimum of mixing with the air being expelled. (AEC)

  8. WELDING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  9. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  10. Modeling of plasma and thermo-fluid transport in hybrid welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, Brandon D.

    Hybrid welding combines a laser beam and electrical arc in order to join metals within a single pass at welding speeds on the order of 1 m min -1. Neither autonomous laser nor arc welding can achieve the weld geometry obtained from hybrid welding for the same process parameters. Depending upon the process parameters, hybrid weld depth and width can each be on the order of 5 mm. The ability to produce a wide weld bead increases gap tolerance for square joints which can reduce machining costs and joint fitting difficulty. The weld geometry and fast welding speed of hybrid welding make it a good choice for application in ship, pipeline, and aerospace welding. Heat transfer and fluid flow influence weld metal mixing, cooling rates, and weld bead geometry. Cooling rate affects weld microstructure and subsequent weld mechanical properties. Fluid flow and heat transfer in the liquid weld pool are affected by laser and arc energy absorption. The laser and arc generate plasmas which can influence arc and laser energy absorption. Metal vapors introduced from the keyhole, a vapor filled cavity formed near the laser focal point, influence arc plasma light emission and energy absorption. However, hybrid welding plasma properties near the opening of the keyhole are not known nor is the influence of arc power and heat source separation understood. A sound understanding of these processes is important to consistently achieving sound weldments. By varying process parameters during welding, it is possible to better understand their influence on temperature profiles, weld metal mixing, cooling rates, and plasma properties. The current literature has shown that important process parameters for hybrid welding include: arc power, laser power, and heat source separation distance. However, their influence on weld temperatures, fluid flow, cooling rates, and plasma properties are not well understood. Modeling has shown to be a successful means of better understanding the influence of

  11. Daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato for 60 days increased plasma β-carotene concentration but did not increase total body vitamin A pool size in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Kazi M; Brown, Kenneth H; Jamil, Maleka; Peerson, Janet M; Keenan, Alison H; Newman, John W; Haskell, Marjorie J

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the effect of daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSP), with or without added fat, on the vitamin A (VA) status of Bangladeshi women with low initial VA status. Women (n = 30/group) received one of the following for 6 d/wk over 10 wk: 1) 0 μg retinol activity equivalents (RAE)/d as boiled white-fleshed sweet potatoes (WFSP) and a corn oil capsule, 2) 600 μg RAE/d as boiled OFSP and a corn oil capsule, 3) fried OFSP and a corn oil capsule, or 4) boiled WFSP and a retinyl palmitate capsule in addition to their home diets. Plasma concentrations of retinol and β-carotene and total body VA pool size were assessed before and after the 60-d intervention. Initial and final plasma retinol concentrations (mean ± SD) were 0.75 ± 0.18 μmol/L and 0.84 ± 0.19 μmol/L, respectively (P = 0.31); final means did not differ by group. Initial and final plasma β-carotene concentrations were 0.10 ± 00 μmol/L and 0.18 ± 0.09 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.0001); final mean plasma β-carotene concentrations were higher in groups that received OFSP (P < 0.0001), and final mean plasma β-carotene was marginally higher in the group that received fried OFSP compared with boiled OFSP (P = 0.07). Initial and final total body VA pool sizes were 0.060 ± 0.047 mmol and 0.091 ± 0.070 mmol, respectively (P = 0.05, n = 110) and did not differ by group. Despite an increase in plasma β-carotene concentration, the impact of OFSP on VA status appears to be limited in Bangladeshi women residing in a resource-poor community.

  12. Daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato for 60 days increased plasma β-carotene concentration but did not increase total body vitamin A pool size in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Kazi M; Brown, Kenneth H; Jamil, Maleka; Peerson, Janet M; Keenan, Alison H; Newman, John W; Haskell, Marjorie J

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the effect of daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSP), with or without added fat, on the vitamin A (VA) status of Bangladeshi women with low initial VA status. Women (n = 30/group) received one of the following for 6 d/wk over 10 wk: 1) 0 μg retinol activity equivalents (RAE)/d as boiled white-fleshed sweet potatoes (WFSP) and a corn oil capsule, 2) 600 μg RAE/d as boiled OFSP and a corn oil capsule, 3) fried OFSP and a corn oil capsule, or 4) boiled WFSP and a retinyl palmitate capsule in addition to their home diets. Plasma concentrations of retinol and β-carotene and total body VA pool size were assessed before and after the 60-d intervention. Initial and final plasma retinol concentrations (mean ± SD) were 0.75 ± 0.18 μmol/L and 0.84 ± 0.19 μmol/L, respectively (P = 0.31); final means did not differ by group. Initial and final plasma β-carotene concentrations were 0.10 ± 00 μmol/L and 0.18 ± 0.09 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.0001); final mean plasma β-carotene concentrations were higher in groups that received OFSP (P < 0.0001), and final mean plasma β-carotene was marginally higher in the group that received fried OFSP compared with boiled OFSP (P = 0.07). Initial and final total body VA pool sizes were 0.060 ± 0.047 mmol and 0.091 ± 0.070 mmol, respectively (P = 0.05, n = 110) and did not differ by group. Despite an increase in plasma β-carotene concentration, the impact of OFSP on VA status appears to be limited in Bangladeshi women residing in a resource-poor community. PMID:22933750

  13. Analysis of microstructural development in single crystal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Boatner, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dendritic microstructure produced in autogenously welded single crystals Fe-15Ni-15Cr has been performed in order to investigate the relationship between growth crystallography and solidification behavior. From a geometrical analysis relating the dendrite growth velocities to the weld velocity, it has been shown that, at a given point of the melt pool surface, selection of the preferred dendrite trunk growth direction occurs according to a minimum velocity (i.e., minimum undercooling) criterion. Knowing the growth rate of the selected dendrite orientation, the dendrite tip radius and the dendrite trunk spacing have been computed using recent theories of rapid solidification of ternary systems. The predicted dendrite growth orientation and spacing have been successfully compared to experimental observations made on electron beam and laser welds, thus clearly demonstrating the effect of crystallography on the microstructural development during weld pool solidification. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  14. A Quantitative Model of Keyhole Instability Induced Porosity in Laser Welding of Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wen

    2014-06-01

    Quantitative prediction of the porosity defects in deep penetration laser welding has generally been considered as a very challenging task. In this study, a quantitative model of porosity defects induced by keyhole instability in partial penetration CO2 laser welding of a titanium alloy is proposed. The three-dimensional keyhole instability, weld pool dynamics, and pore formation are determined by direct numerical simulation, and the results are compared to prior experimental results. It is shown that the simulated keyhole depth fluctuations could represent the variation trends in the number and average size of pores for the studied process conditions. Moreover, it is found that it is possible to use the predicted keyhole depth fluctuations as a quantitative measure of the average size of porosity. The results also suggest that due to the shadowing effect of keyhole wall humps, the rapid cooling of the surface of the keyhole tip before keyhole collapse could lead to a substantial decrease in vapor pressure inside the keyhole tip, which is suggested to be the mechanism by which shielding gas enters into the porosity.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  16. Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

  17. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  18. Microstructure of AA 2024 fixed joints formed by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welded butt joints on 2024T3 alloy have been obtained using different process parameters. The microstructures of all the weld joint zones have been examined and such structural parameters as grain size, particle size and volume content of particles have been determined in order to find correlations with the microhardness of the corresponding zones of the weld.

  19. Introduction to Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  20. Thin plate gap bridging study for Nd:YAG pulsed laser lap welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Robert Allen; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; Bernal, John E.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01

    In an on going study of gap bridging for thin plate Nd:YAG laser lap welds, empirical data, high speed imaging, and computer modeling were utilized to better understand surface physics attributed to the formation and solidification of a weld pool. Experimental data indicates better gap bridging can be achieved through optimized laser parameters such as pulse length, duration, and energy. Long pulse durations at low energies generating low peak powers were found to create the highest percent of gap bridging ability. At constant peak power, gap-bridging ability was further improved by using a smaller spot diameter resulting in higher irradiances. Hence, welding in focus is preferable for bridging gaps. Gas shielding was also found to greatly impact gap-bridging ability. Gapped lap welds that could not be bridged with UHP Argon gas shielding, were easily bridged when left unshielded and exposed to only air. Incident weld angle and joint offset were also investigated for their ability to improve gap bridging. Optical filters and brightlight surface illumination enabled high-speed imaging to capture the fluid dynamics of a forming and solidifying weld pool. The effects of various laser parameters and the weld pool's interaction with the laser beam could also be observed utilizing the high-speed imaging. The work described is used to develop and validate a computer model with improved weld pool physics. Finite element models have been used to derive insight into the physics of gap bridging. The dynamics of the fluid motion within the weld pool in conjunction with the free surface physics have been the primary focus of the modeling efforts. Surface tension has been found to be a more significant factor in determining final weld pool shape than expected.

  1. The lack of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor desensitisation in alphaT3-1 cells is not due to GnRH receptor reserve or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate pool size.

    PubMed

    Forrest-Owen, W; Willars, G B; Nahorski, S R; Assefa, D; Davidson, J S; Hislop, J; McArdle, C A

    1999-01-25

    The phospholipase C (PLC)-activating gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor is thought not to rapidly desensitise in alphaT3-1 cells. This extremely unusual characteristic raises the concern that it might be a feature of the cell type, rather than the receptor per se. Here we have used video imaging to establish whether the effects of endogenous PLC-activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) on Ca2+ ion concentration [Ca2+]i desensitise in these cells. Oxytocin, endothelin-1, methacholine, and UTP all caused [Ca2+]i increases which underwent rapid homologous desensitisation in that they were transient and responses to repeat stimuli were attenuated whereas subsequent responses to GnRH were not. To test whether receptor reserve obscures functional desensitisation of GnRH receptors, a photoaffinity antagonist (Pant-1), was used to effect a partial and irreversible receptor blockade. UV crosslinking in medium with 1000 nM Pant-1 reduced GnRH receptor number to 20 +/- 5% and reduced maximal buserelin-stimulated [3H]IP(X) accumulation to 57 +/- 5%, demonstrating removal of receptor reserve. In control alphaT3-1 cells the initial rate of GnRH-stimulated [3H]IP(X) accumulation was maintained for at least 5 min and GnRH caused a sustained increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 mass (confirming the resistance of GnRH receptors to desensitisation) and Pant-1 pre-treatment reduced the magnitude of these responses without altering their temporal profiles. In alphaT3-1 cells stably transfected with recombinant human muscarinic receptors (alphaT3-1/M3), responses to methacholine were characteristic of desensitising GPCRs (transient Ins(1,4,5)P3 and curvilinear [3H]IP(X) responses) and were unaltered by Pant-1. To test the relevance of phospholipid pool size, alphaT3-1/M3 cells were pre-treated with GnRH or methacholine in medium with LiCl (to deplete PtdIns(4,5)P2 pools). These pre-treatments reduced subsequent responses to methacholine and GnRH comparably, indicating access to a

  2. Development of models for welding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, J.R.; Hayer, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    The modeling of welding processes offers considerable potential for help with manufacturing problems but a complete definition of any welding process offers many challenges. However, the modular structure of MARC, and the diverse range of capabilities offered, create a good opportunity for development in this area. This paper discusses these problems and describes techniques used to overcome some of them. Models have been developed to simulate gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding with a moving heat source. Fortran routines for subroutines FLUX and FORCDT have been written to generate a moving heat source. Sequential element activation has permitted the simulation of GTA welding with cold wire feed (CWF), as in filling of a machined weld groove. A program which generates History Definition blocks necessary for this type of welding model is also described in this paper. Semi-infinite heat transfer elements were used to get accurate temperature histories while keeping the size of the model manageable. Time-temperature histories and isothermal contours compare well with experimental measurements, although many areas for improvement and refinement remain. Results have been used to anticipate the necessity for weld parameter changes after part redesign, and the electron beam model relates closely to situations in which information is needed for the minimization of peak temperatures on the underside of the welded part. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Optical Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Gas/tungsten-arc welding torch supports electrode at center while enabling viewing of weld area along torch axis. Gas torch accommodates lens and optical fibers, all part of vision system for welding robot. Welding torch includes spoked structure in central bore of optical body. Structure supports welding electrode, carries electric current to it, and takes heat away from it. Spokes formed by drilling six holes 60 degrees apart around center line of torch.

  4. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  5. Heat transfer from internally heated hemispherical pools

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Ellsion, P.G.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on heat transfer from internally heated ZnSO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O pools to the walls of hemispherical containers. This experimental technique provides data for a heat transfer system that has to date been only theoretically treated. Three different sizes of copper hemispherical containers were used: 240, 280, 320 mm in diameter. The pool container served both as a heat transfer surface and as an electrode. The opposing electrode was a copper disk, 50 mm in diameter located at the top of the pool in the center. The top surface of the pool was open to the atmosphere.

  6. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  7. Weld geometry strength effect in 2219-T87 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Novak, H. L.; Mcilwain, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of the effect of geometry on the mechanical properties of a butt weld joint is worked out based upon the soft interlayer weld model. Tensile tests of 45 TIG butt welds and 6 EB beads-on-plate in 1/4-in. 2219-T87 aluminum plate made under a wide range of heat sink and power input conditions are analyzed using this theory. The analysis indicates that purely geometrical effects dominate in determining variations in weld joint strength with heat sink and power input. Variations in weld dimensions with cooling rate are significant as well as with power input. Weld size is suggested as a better indicator of the condition of a weld joint than energy input.

  8. Variations in welding characteristics within the Plinian air-fall deposit of the Middle Pumice eruption, Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Julie Ann; Gertisser, Ralf

    2012-04-01

    The welded Plinian air-fall deposit of the Middle Pumice A (MP-A) eruption, Santorini, Greece (144.6 ka), was analysed in order to document welding characteristics and determine the factors that control welding due to the sintering of hot ash- to block-sized pyroclasts. There are vertical and lateral variations in welding intensity, with welding increasing upwards within deposit sections and decreasing laterally away from the source. Four welding grades are distinguished: a = densely-welded, b = slightly-welded, c = tack-welded, and d = non-welded. Lateral welding zones are defined by the highest welding grade observed: zone A = densely-welded (< 0.25 km from the source); zone B = slightly-welded (0.25-1.26 km); zone C = tack-welded (1.26-3.7 km), and zone D = non-welded (> 3.7 km). Pumice density increases (and porosity decreases) with welding, with the most densely-welded part having a density of 2290 kg m- 3 and a porosity of 5%. Distal, non-welded pumices have a density of 370 kg m- 3 and porosities of > 75%. Clast oblateness varies from 0.79 in the densely-welded proximal deposit sections to 0.54 in the distal, non-welded deposits in southern Thera. Strain, determined using the Rf/ϕ method, indicates that the deposit is moderately flattened but relatively undeformed. The MP-A deposit is dacitic to andesitic in composition, becoming more mafic with stratigraphic height, where the degree of welding is highest. Welding is controlled by geochemical variations, compactional load and local variations in accumulation rate and clast sizes.

  9. Television Monitoring System for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallow, K.; Gordon, S.

    1986-01-01

    Welding process in visually inaccessible spots viewed and recorded. Television system enables monitoring of welding in visually inaccessible locations. System assists welding operations and provide video record, used for weld analysis and welder training.

  10. Welding-fume-induced transmission loss in tapered optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ji-Haeng

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a method for sensing welding fumes in real time. This method is based on the results of nanoparticle-induced optical-fiber loss experiments that show that the losses are determined by the nanoparticle density and the taper waist. The tapered fiber is obtained by applying heat radiated from hot quartz, and monitoring is done in real time. First, the durability of the tapered fiber during the welding process is proven. Then, the loss is categorized by using the sizes of welding fume particles. The sensitivity to welding fumes increases with increasing size of the particles; consequently, the dimension of the taper waist decreases.

  11. Welding Phenomenon and Removal Mechanism of Aluminum-Oxide Films by Space GHTA Welding Process in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Ekuni, Tomohide; Kamei, Misa; Tsukuda, Yoshiyuki; Terajima, Noboru; Yamashita, Masahiro; Imagawa, Kichiro; Masubuchi, Koichi

    Aluminum alloys have been widely used in constructing various space structures including the ISS (International Space Station) and launch vehicles. In order to apply the welding technology in space, welding experiments on aluminum alloy were performed using by the GHTA (Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc) welding processes using an inverter controlled DC/AC GTA welding machine in vacuum. We observed the removal mechanism of aluminum-oxide films on molten metal in detail during the welding using a high-speed video camera. As a result, it is clarified that the impact arc pressure produced by pulsed current mechanically crushes and removes aluminum-oxide films on the molten pool. This removal mechanism of aluminum-oxide films is completely different from a removal mechanism by cleaning action.

  12. Laser weld jig

    SciTech Connect

    Haupt, D.L.; Van Blarigan, P.

    1982-11-09

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  13. Laser weld jig

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  14. Welded solar cell interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  15. The science of pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  16. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  17. Internal wire guide for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a filler metal wire guide positioned within the torch, and within the shielding gas nozzle. The wire guide is adjacent to the tungsten electrode and has a ceramic liner through which the wire is fed. This reduces the size of the torch and eliminates the outside clearance problems that exit with external wire guides. Additionally, since the wire is always within the shielding gas, oxidizing of the wire is eliminated.

  18. Ultrasonic assessment of tension shear strength in resistance spot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghanizadeh, Abbas

    2015-05-01

    Resistance spot welding is extensively used to join sheet steel in the automotive industry. Ultrasonic non-destructive techniques for evaluation of the mechanical properties of resistance spot welding are presented. The aim of this study is to develop the capability of the ultrasonic techniques as an efficient tool in the assessment of the welding characterization. Previous researches have indicated that the measurements of ultrasonic attenuation are sensitive to grain- size variations in an extensive range of metallic alloys. Other researchers have frequently described grain sizes which are able to have significant effects on the physical characteristics of the material. This research provides a novel method to estimate the tension-shear strengths of the resistance spot welding directly from the ultrasonic attenuation measurements. The effects of spot welding parameters on the ultrasonic waves are further investigated. The results confirm that it is possible to determine the spot welding parameters for individual quality by using ultrasonic test.

  19. A CO2 Laser Weld Shape-Predicting Neural Network

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Knorovsky, G.A.

    1998-10-05

    We describe two artificial neural networks (ANN) which predict CO2 partial penetration laser welds on grade 304 stainless steel. Given the laser irradiance and travel speed, one ANN (direct) predicts the resulting weld's depth, width, overall shape, energy transfer efficiency, melting efficiency and porosity likelihood in the weld fusion zone. Given the weld size and shape, the second ANN (inverse) predicts the irradiance and travel speed necessary to provide such a weld. The ANNs used 3 nodal layers and perception-type neurons. For the first ANN, with 2 inputs and 17 outputs (12 for shape, and 5 for size, efficiencies and porosity predictions), 12 to 17 intermediate layer neurons were necessary, while for the second, with 14 inputs and 2 outputs, 25 were necessary. Besides their description, data interpretation and weld schedule development via the ANNs will be shown.

  20. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  1. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of a Rare-Earth Containing ZEK100 Magnesium Alloy: Effect of Welding Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macwan, A.; Chen, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic spot welding was used to join a low rare-earth containing ZEK100 Mg alloy at different levels of welding energy, and tensile lap shear tests were conducted to evaluate the failure strength in relation to the microstructural changes. It was observed that dynamic recrystallization occurred in the nugget zone; the grain size increased and microhardness decreased with increasing welding energy arising from the increasing interface temperature and strain rate. The weld interface experienced severe plastic deformation at a high strain rate from ~500 to ~2100 s-1 with increasing welding energy from 500 to 2000 J. A relationship between grain size and Zener-Hollomon parameter, and a Hall-Petch-type relationship between microhardness and grain size were established. The tensile lap shear strength and failure energy were observed to first increase with increasing welding energy, reach the maximum values at 1500 J, and then decrease with a further increase in the welding energy. The samples welded at a welding energy ≤1500 J exhibited an interfacial failure mode, while nugget pull-out occurred in the samples welded at a welding energy above 1500 J. The fracture surfaces showed typical shear failure. Low-temperature tests at 233 K (-40 °C) showed no significant effect on the strength and failure mode of joints welded at the optimal welding energy of 1500 J. Elevated temperature tests at 453 K (180 °C) revealed a lower failure load but a higher failure energy due to the increased deformability, and showed a mixed mode of partial interfacial failure and partial nugget pull-out.

  2. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  3. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  4. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    SciTech Connect

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-12-31

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied.

  5. poolMC: Smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Typically, pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments implies mixing mRNA from several biological-replicate samples before hybridization onto a microarray chip. Here we describe an alternative smart pooling strategy in which different samples, not necessarily biological replicates, are pooled in an information theoretic efficient way. Further, each sample is tested on multiple chips, but always in pools made up of different samples. The end goal is to exploit the compressibility of microarray data to reduce the number of chips used and increase the robustness to noise in measurements. Results A theoretical framework to perform smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments was established and the software implementation of the pooling and decoding algorithms was developed in MATLAB. A proof-of-concept smart pooled experiment was performed using validated biological samples on commercially available gene chips. Differential-expression analysis of the smart pooled data was performed and compared against the unpooled control experiment. Conclusions The theoretical developments and experimental demonstration in this paper provide a useful starting point to investigate smart pooling of mRNA samples in microarray experiments. Although the smart pooled experiment did not compare favorably with the control, the experiment highlighted important conditions for the successful implementation of smart pooling - linearity of measurements, sparsity in data, and large experiment size. PMID:20525223

  6. Cognitive high speed defect detection and classification in MWIR images of laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapido, Yago L.; Rodriguez-Araújo, Jorge; García-Díaz, Antón; Castro, Gemma; Vidal, Félix; Romero, Pablo; Vergara, Germán.

    2015-07-01

    We present a novel approach for real-time defect detection and classification in laser welding processes based on the use of uncooled PbSe image sensors working in the MWIR range. The spatial evolution of the melt pool was recorded and analyzed during several welding procedures. A machine learning approach was developed to classify welding defects. Principal components analysis (PCA) is used for dimensionality reduction of the melt pool data. This enhances classification results and enables on-line classification rates close to 1 kHz with non-optimized code prototyped in Python. These results point to the feasibility of real-time defect detection.

  7. Radiographic detection of defects in friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AMg5M

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu. Kolubaev, Evgeny A.; Rubtsov, Valery E.

    2014-11-14

    In order to reveal weld defects specific to friction stir welding we undertook radiographic inspection of AMg5M aluminum alloy welded joints. Weld defects in the form of voids have been revealed in the weld obtained under the non-optimal rotation and feed rate. Both shape and size of these defects have been confirmed by examining metallographically successive sections prepared in the weld plane as well as in the plane transversal to the tool feed direction. Linear defects have been also found in the sections that are not seen in the radiographic images. Both the preferable localization and origination of the defects have been analyzed.

  8. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  9. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  10. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  11. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  12. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates... Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of...

  13. The Effect of Yttrium on Ti-5111 Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, B. W.; Oberson, P. G.; Ankem, S.

    2011-05-01

    Much interest has developed in the near- α titanium alloy Ti-5Al-1Sn-1V-1Zr-0.8Mo (Ti-5111) for naval applications. When gas tungsten arc welded with filler metal that has the same chemical composition as the base metal, however, the weld FZ tends to be harder and less ductile than the base metal, which may make the weld susceptible to failure. This behavior may be attributed to the presence of oxygen impurities and the large prior- β grain size in the weld. In this investigation, the addition of a small amount of yttrium to the weld filler metal can decrease hardening and increase the ductility of Ti-5111 welds, which is beneficial for weld performance. Microstructural and chemical analyses of unmodified and yttrium-modified Ti-5111 welds are presented along with results from mechanical testing of the welds.

  14. Performance Study and Dynamic Optimization Design for Thread Pool Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dongping Xu

    2004-12-19

    Thread pools have been widely used by many multithreaded applications. However, the determination of the pool size according to the application behavior still remains problematic. To automate this process, in this thesis we have developed a set of performance metrics for quantitatively analyzing thread pool performance. For our experiments, we built a thread pool system which provides a general framework for thread pool research. Based on this simulation environment, we studied the performance impact brought by the thread pool on different multithreaded applications. Additionally, the correlations between internal characterizations of thread pools and their throughput were also examined. We then proposed and evaluated a heuristic algorithm to dynamically determine the optimal thread pool size. The simulation results show that this approach is effective in improving overall application performance.

  15. Welding in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A; Schrenk, M

    1928-01-01

    The present article attempts to explain the principles for the production of a perfect weld and to throw light on the unexplained problems. Moreover, it is intended to elucidate the possibilities of testing the strength and reliability of welded parts.

  16. Effect of Pre- and Post-weld Heat Treatments on Linear Friction Welded Ti-5553

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanjara, Priti; Dalgaard, Elvi; Gholipour, Javad; Cao, Xinjin; Cuddy, Jonathan; Jonas, John J.

    2014-10-01

    Linear friction welding allows solid-state joining of near-beta ( β) titanium alloy Ti-5553 (Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr). In the as-welded condition, the weld zone (WZ) exhibits β grain refinement and marked softening as compared with Ti-5553 in the solution heat treated and aged condition. The softening of the weldment is attributed to the depletion of the strengthening alpha ( α) phase in the WZ and the adjacent thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Specifically, in near- β titanium alloys, the strength of the material mainly depends on the shape, size, distribution, and fraction of the primary α and other decomposition products of the β phase. Hence, a combination of pre- and post-weld heat treatments were applied to determine the conditions that allow mitigating the α phase depletion in the WZ and TMAZ of the welds. The mechanical response of the welded samples to the heat treatments was determined by performing microhardness measurements and tensile testing at room temperature with an automated 3D deformation measurement system. It was found that though the joint efficiency in the as-welded condition was high (96 pct), strain localization and failure occurred in the TMAZ. The application of post-weld solution heat treatment with aging was effective in restoring α, increasing the joint efficiency (97 to 99 pct) and inducing strain localization and failure in the parent material region.

  17. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  18. Infrared Thermography For Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Lucky, Brian D.; Spiegel, Lyle B.; Hudyma, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared imaging and image-data-processing system shows temperatures of joint during welding and provides data from which rates of heating and cooling determined. Information used to control welding parameters to ensure reliable joints, in materials which microstructures and associated metallurgical and mechanical properties depend strongly on rates of heating and cooling. Applicable to variety of processes, including tungsten/inert-gas welding; plasma, laser, and resistance welding; cutting; and brazing.

  19. Critical Initial Flaw Size Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Cheston, Derrick J.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The USS consists of several "tuna can" segments that are approximately 216 inches in diameter, 115 inches tall, and 0.5 inches thick. A 6 inch wide by 1 inch thick flange is welded to the skin and is used to fasten adjacent tuna cans. A schematic of a "tuna can" and the location of the flange-to-skin weld are shown in Figure 1. Gussets (shown in yellow in Figure 1) are welded to the skin and flange every 10 degrees around the circumference of the "tuna can". The flange-to-skin weld is a flux core butt weld with a fillet weld on the inside surface, as illustrated in Figure 2. The welding process may create loss of fusion defects in the weld that could develop into fatigue cracks and jeopardize the structural integrity of the Ares I-X vehicle. The CIFS analysis was conducted to determine the largest crack in the weld region that will not grow to failure within 4 lifetimes, as specified by NASA standard 5001 & 5019 [1].

  20. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. 178.68... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.68 Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4E cylinder is a welded aluminum cylinder with a water...

  1. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. 178.68... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.68 Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4E cylinder is a welded aluminum cylinder with a water capacity...

  2. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. 178.68... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.68 Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4E cylinder is a welded aluminum cylinder with a water capacity...

  3. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. 178.68... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.68 Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4E cylinder is a welded aluminum cylinder with a water capacity...

  4. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. 178.68... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.68 Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4E cylinder is a welded aluminum cylinder with a water capacity...

  5. 46 CFR 52.05-30 - Minimum requirements for attachment welds (modifies PW-16).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum requirements for attachment welds (modifies PW... requirements for attachment welds (modifies PW-16). (a) The location and minimum size of attachment welds...

  6. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  7. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded

  8. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  9. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  10. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  11. Welding Course Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  12. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  13. Determination of momentum as a mean of quantifying the mechanical energy delivered by droplets during MIG/MAG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, A.; Rodrigues, C. E. A. L.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to propose and assess, under the light of modern techniques for arc visualization and welding parameter monitoring, a parameter that would quantify properly the effect of the droplets reaching the pool over the bead penetration during MIG/MAG welding (GMAW). High-speed filming shadowgraphy, synchronized with the electrical signals, was used. Dedicated computational programs were employed to measure arc lengths and size, frequency, acceleration and speed of the droplets. Calibration of the system by employing metallic spheres was used to guaranty the performance of the image recording and measurement programs. Statistics were employed for sampling size determination. A non-common approach to correlate Momentum to bead geometry is propose and discussed. The methodology was assessed through MIG/MAG bead-on-plate welds shielded with an Ar+5%O{2} blend, at three levels of currents and arc lengths. It was concluded that the proposed parameter denominated in this paper as “Effective Momentum” is the one which better represents the action of the droplets over bead formation.

  14. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  15. Analysis of hybrid Nd:Yag laser-MAG arc welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guen, E.; Fabbro, R.; Carin, M.; Coste, F.; Le Masson, P.

    2011-10-01

    In the hybrid laser-arc welding process, a laser beam and an electric arc are coupled in order to combine the advantages of both processes: high welding speed, low thermal load and high depth penetration thanks to the laser; less demanding on joint preparation/fit-up, typical of arc welding. Thus the hybrid laser-MIG/MAG (Metal Inert or Active Gas) arc welding has very interesting properties: the improvement of productivity results in higher welding speeds, thicker welded materials, joint fit-up allowance, better stability of molten pool and improvement of joint metallurgical quality. The understanding of the main relevant involved physical processes are therefore necessary if one wants for example elaborate adequate simulations of this process. Also, for an efficient use of this process, it is necessary to precisely understand the complex physical phenomena that govern this welding technique. This paper investigates the analysis of the effect of the main operating parameters for the laser alone, MAG alone and hybrid Laser/MAG welding processes. The use of a high speed video camera allows us to precisely characterize the melt pool 3D geometry such as the measurements of its depression and its length and the phenomena occurring inside the melt pool through keyhole-melt pool-droplet interaction. These experimental results will form a database that is used for the validation of a three-dimensional thermal model of the hybrid welding process for a rather wide range of operating parameters where the 3-D geometry of the melt pool is taken into account.

  16. A study on the influence of ultrasonic processing on microstructure during laser welding phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. D.; Hu, F. Y.; Cui, A. Y.; Li, H. B.

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes new welding technology that combines ultrasonic processing across different phases based on laser welding (UPPLW) and laser processing technology. The welding experiment used a 1.5 mm thick titanium alloy. The specimen was made metallographically prepared and the microstructural grain size of the welded joint was rated by metallurgical processing software, verifying that this new process can refine grains and improve joint properties.

  17. Evaluation of solar cell welds by scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Frey, W. E.; Baraona, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Scanning laser acoustic microscopy was used to nondestructively evaluate solar cell interconnect bonds made by resistance welding. Both copper-silver and silver-silver welds were analyzed. The bonds were produced either by a conventional parallel-gap welding technique using rectangular electrodes or new annular gap design with a circular electrode cross section. With the scanning laser acoustic microscope, it was possible to produce a real time television image which reveales the weld configuration as it relates to electrode geometry. The effect of electrode misalinement with the surface of the cell was also determined. A preliminary metallographic analysis was performed on selected welds to establish the relationship between actual size and shape of the weld area and the information available from acoustic micrographs.

  18. Development of an intelligent system for cooling rate and fill control in GMAW. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Einerson, C.J.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Taylor, P.L. ); Moore, K.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is developed in which the welding system detects certain existing conditions and adjusts the process in accordance to pre-specified rules. This strategy is used to control the reinforcement and weld bead centerline cooling rate during welding. Relationships between heat and mass transfer rates to the base metal and the required electrode speed and welding speed for specific open circuit voltages are taught to a artificial neural network. Control rules are programmed into a fuzzy logic system. TRADITOINAL CONTROL OF THE GMAW PROCESS is based on the use of explicit welding procedures detailing allowable parameter ranges on a pass by pass basis for a given weld. The present work is an exploration of a completely different approach to welding control. In this work the objectives are to produce welds having desired weld bead reinforcements while maintaining the weld bead centerline cooling rate at preselected values. The need for this specific control is related to fabrication requirements for specific types of pressure vessels. The control strategy involves measuring weld joint transverse cross-sectional area ahead of the welding torch and the weld bead centerline cooling rate behind the weld pool, both by means of video (2), calculating the required process parameters necessary to obtain the needed heat and mass transfer rates (in appropriate dimensions) by means of an artificial neural network, and controlling the heat transfer rate by means of a fuzzy logic controller (3). The result is a welding machine that senses the welding conditions and responds to those conditions on the basis of logical rules, as opposed to producing a weld based on a specific procedure.

  19. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  20. Simulation of deep water wet weld microstructures using electrodes with high oxidizing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The properties of underwater wet (UWW) welds are greatly affected by water depth. Ibarra and Olson [1] showed that the oxygen content of the weld increases with increasing depth while the amount of deoxidants such as Mn and Si decreases. This change in chemical composition adversely affects both the tensile strength and toughness of the weld. The present research was designed to understand the influence of oxidizing ingredients in the electrode covering on the chemical composition, weld bead appearance and microstructure of wet welds. Changes in the ability of the electrode to supply oxygen to the weld pool were made through modifications of the hematite to rutile (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}) ratio in the covering.The weld deposited by the rutile electrode (no hematite addition) presented the lowest oxygen content (1700 ppm). When the oxidizing character of the electrode increased the concentration of inclusions, mainly FeO, in the weld also increased. However, the increase in oxygen pickup was not monotonous but reached a `saturation` value at approximately 2100 ppm. These results suggest that the microstructure and properties of wet welds deposited at great depths by rutile electrodes will be similar to those made by oxidizing electrodes at much shallower depths. Hence studying oxidizing electrodes and improving their properties will help the development of electrodes for wet welding at greater depths. It is also a much cheaper way of `simulating` welding at higher pressures.

  1. Influence of sulfur and welding conditions on penetration in thin strip stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, P.R. ); Brooks, R.F.; Mills, K.C. . Division of Materials Metrology)

    1995-02-01

    Welding trials and surface tension measurements have been carried out on 304 stainless steels with sulfur (S) contents between 20 and 100 ppm. Surface tension measurements, determined by the levitated drop method, indicated that the temperature coefficient of surface tension (d[gamma]/dT) changed from negative to positive values at S contents exceeding approximately 50 ppm. Strips with a thickness of approximately 1 mm were GTA welded on both single-electrode, small-scale and multi-electrode industrial-scale units. Welding speeds of 1 to 2 m min[sup [minus]1] were used on the small-scale unit and up to 5 m min[sup [minus]1] on the industrial unit. The weld penetration was found to increase, for both full and partial penetration welds, with (1) increasing sulfur contents; and (2) increasing linear energy. On the small scale-unit markedly higher penetration was observed in heats with S contents > 60 ppm. But the influence of S contents was only of minor importance for welds obtained on the industrial unit. It was found that the similar weld geometry could be obtained for both low ([<=] 60 ppm) and high (> 60 ppm) sulfur contents by careful adjustment of welding parameters. The observed changes in weld geometry are consistent with the proposition that the fluid flow in the weld pool is dominated by thermo-capillary (Marangoni) forces during the GTA welding of thin strips.

  2. Welding of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Activated Tungsten Inert Gas Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, E.; Ebrahimi, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of the most notable techniques which are developed recently. This technique, known as A-TIG welding, increases the penetration depth and improves the productivity of the TIG welding. In the present study, four oxide fluxes (SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO) were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth/width ratio and mechanical property of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The effect of coating density of activating flux on the weld pool shape and oxygen content in the weld after the welding process was studied systematically. Experimental results indicated that the maximum depth/width ratio of stainless steel activated TIG weld was obtained when the coating density was 2.6, 1.3, 2, and 7.8 mg/cm2 for SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO, respectively. The certain range of oxygen content dissolved in the weld, led to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. TIG welding with active fluxes can increase the delta-ferrite content and improves the mechanical strength of the welded joint.

  3. Mathematical model for evaluating the Krebs cycle flux with non-constant glutamate-pool size by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Evidence for the existence of two types of Krebs cycles in cells.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Beganton, F; Nguyen, T T; Bouet, F; Herve, M

    1996-12-01

    A practical method using matrix operations is proposed for studying the isotopic transformation of glutamate, or any other metabolite isotopomers, in the Krebs cycle. Two mathematical models were constructed for evaluating the Krebs cycle flux where the enrichment of [2-13C]acetyl-CoA is not 100% and the total glutamate concentration remains constant or varies during incubation. A comparative study of [1-13C]glucose metabolism was subsequently carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells from two different strains (ATCC-9763 and NCYC-239) by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and biochemical techniques. The results show that there are two types of Krebs cycles in cells. The first is represented by the ATCC cells which contain a small amount of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and hence the flux in the Krebs cycle is negligible. With [1-13C]glucose as a carbon source, the 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate exhibit the C2 and C4 resonances that are almost equivalent and much greater than that of the C3. Labeled metabolites derived from [1-13C]glucose enter the Krebs cycle at two points: oxaloacetate and citrate. The second cell type is represented by NCYC-239. The C2 and C3 areas are equivalent and smaller than the C4 resonance. The results suggest that labeled metabolites enter the Krebs cycle only at the citrate level via acetyl-CoA, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase is present but pyruvate carboxylase is virtually absent or inactivated. When both are incubated with glucose, the total concentration of glutamate was found to decrease with the incubation time. The fraction of glutamate in isotopic exchange with the Krebs cycle in NCYC-239 cells is about 2.6% and the reduction in glutamate concentration is about 0.5%/min. Using our model, with a variable glutamate pool size, good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data is obtained.

  4. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2016-09-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  5. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  6. Multiphysical Modeling of Transport Phenomena During Laser Welding of Dissimilar Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métais, A.; Matteï, S.; Tomashchuk, I.; Gaied, S.

    The success of new high-strength steels allows attaining equivalent performances with lower thicknesses and significant weight reduction. The welding of new couples of steel grades requires development and control of joining processes. Thanks to high precision and good flexibility, laser welding became one of the most used processes for joining of dissimilar welded blanks. The prediction of the local chemical composition in the weld formed between dissimilar steels in function of the welding parameters is essential because the dilution rate and the distribution of alloying elements in the melted zone determines the final tensile strength of the weld. The goal of the present study is to create and to validate a multiphysical numerical model studying the mixing of dissimilar steels in laser weld pool. A 3D modelling of heat transfer, turbulent flow and transport of species provides a better understanding of diffusion and convective mixing in laser weld pool. The present model allows predicting the weld geometry and element distribution. The model has been developed based on steady keyhole approximation and solved in quasi-stationary form in order to reduce the computation time. Turbulent flow formulation was applied to calculate velocity field. Fick law for diluted species was used to simulate the transport of alloying elements in the weld pool. To validate the model, a number of experiments have been performed: tests using pure 100 μm thick Ni foils like tracer and weld between a rich and poor manganese steels. SEM-EDX analysis of chemical composition has been carried out to obtain quantitative mapping of Ni and Mn distributions in the melted zone. The results of simulations have been found in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    involved determining the room-temperature tensile and elastic-plastic fracture-toughness properties of the bobbin-tool friction-stir welds after a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging heat-treatment. These mechanical properties were used to conduct fracture-mechanics analyses to determine critical flaw sizes. Phased-array and conventional ultrasonic non-destructive examination was used to demonstrate that no flaws that match or exceed the calculated critical flaw-sizes exist in or near the friction-stir welds.

  8. Processing-Microstructure Relationships in Friction Stir Welding of MA956 Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Bradford W.; Menon, E. Sarath K.; McNelley, Terry R.; Brewer, Luke N.; El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.; Mahoney, Murray W.; Sanderson, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive set of processing-microstructure relationships is presented for friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened MA956 steel. Eight rotational speed/traverse speed combinations were used to produce friction stir welds on MA956 plates using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Weld conditions with high thermal input produced defect-free, full-penetration welds. Electron backscatter diffraction results showed a significant increase in grain size, a persistent body centered cubic torsional texture in the stir zone, and a sharp transition in grain size across the thermo-mechanically affected zone sensitive to weld parameters. Micro-indentation showed an asymmetric reduction in hardness across a transverse section of the weld. This gradient in hardness was greatly increased with higher heat inputs. The decrease in hardness after welding correlates directly with the increase in grain size and may be explained with a Hall-Petch type relationship.

  9. Laser Overlap Welding of Zinc-coated Steel on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Hamed Tasalloti; Kah, Paul; Martikainen, Jukka

    Local reinforcement of aluminum with laser welded patches of zinc-coated steel can effectively contribute to crashworthiness, durability and weight reduction of car body. However, the weld between Zn-coated steel and aluminum is commonly susceptible to defects such as spatter, cavity and crack. The vaporization of Zn is commonly known as the main source of instability in the weld pool and cavity formation, especially in a lap joint configuration. Cracks are mainly due to the brittle intermetallic compounds growing at the weld interface of aluminum and steel. This study provides a review on the main metallurgical and mechanical concerns regarding laser overlap welding of Zn-coated steel on Al-alloy and the methods used by researchers to avoid the weld defects related to the vaporization of Zn and the poor metallurgical compatibility between steel and aluminum.

  10. Optimal welding of beta titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K R; Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J

    1987-09-01

    Today the orthodontist is confronted by an array of new orthodontic wire materials that, when applied to appliance design, can vastly increase the flexibility and versatility of therapy. Welded joints, especially for the newer titanium alloy wires, provide a means to extend the useful applications of these materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum settings for electrical resistance welding of various configurations of titanium-molybdenum (TMA) wires. Specimens were of a t-joint configuration and were mechanically tested in torsion to simulate the failure mode most often observed in clinical practice. Variables included wire size, wire orientation, and welding voltage. Results indicated that excellent welds can be obtained with very little loss of strength and ductility in the area of the weld joint. Torsional loads at failure were at least 90% of the unwelded base material. Although a wide range of voltage settings resulted in high-strength welds, typically a narrow range of voltages yielded optimal ductility.

  11. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  12. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  13. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  14. Welding of Mo-Based Alloy Using Electron Beam and Laser-GTAW Hybrid Welding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Kumar, Santosh; Tewari, Raghvendra; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, welding of TZM (molybdenum-based alloy) plates in square-butt configuration was carried out using electron beam and laser-GTAW hybrid power sources. Microstructures of weld joint containing three zones—parent metal, heat-affected zone, and fusion zone—were clearly identified when examined through optical and scanning electron microscopy. The weld joints were found to be sound with very wide fusion and heat-affected zones. The microstructure of the fusion zone was coarse-grained. as-solidified microstructure, while the microstructure of heat-affected zone was the recrystallized microstructure with reduction in grain size as distance from the fusion line increased. Microhardness profile using Vickers hardness tester was obtained across the weld region, and the tensile properties of the weld joints were evaluated by performing room temperature tensile test and fracture was examined using scanning electron microscope. Joint coefficient of the weld joints were ~40 to 45 pct of that of the parent metals with nonmeasurable tensile ductility with predominantly transgranular mode of fracture indicating weakness along the grain boundary. Detailed orientation imaging and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to understand the most dominating factor in introducing weld joint brittleness.

  15. Welding and joining: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of NASA-developed technology in welding and joining. Topics discussed include welding equipment, techniques in welding, general bonding, joining techniques, and clamps and holding fixtures.

  16. Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating area. Non-original spa pool is partially visible on right. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  18. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  19. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  20. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  1. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation....

  2. Automated Weld Characterization Using the Thermoelectric Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effective assessment of the integrity of welds is a complicated NDE problem that continues to be a challenge. To be able to completely characterize a weld, detailed knowledge of its tensile strength, ductility, hardness, microstructure, macrostructure, and chemical composition is needed. NDE techniques which can provide information on any of these features are extremely important. In this paper, we examine a seldom used approach based on the thermoelectric (TE) effect for characterizing welds and their associated heat affected zone (HAZ). The thermoelectric method monitors the thermoelectric power which is sensitive to small changes in the kinetics of the conduction electrons near the Fermi surface that can be caused by changes in the local microstructure. The technique has been applied to metal sorting, quality testing, flaw detection, thickness gauging of layers, and microscopic structural analysis. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique for characterizing welds, a series of tungsten-inert-gas welded Inconel-718 samples were scanned with a computer controlled TE probe. The samples were then analyzed using a scanning electron microscope and Rockwell hardness tests to characterize the weld and the associated HAZ. We then correlated the results with the TE measurements to provide quantitative information on the size of the HAZ and the degree of hardness of the material in the weld region. This provides potentially valuable information on the strength and fatigue life of the weld. We begin the paper by providing a brief review of the TE technique and then highlight some of the factors that can effect the measurements. Next, we provide an overview of the experimental procedure and discuss the results. Finally, we summarize our findings and consider areas for future research.

  3. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  4. Low-Temperature Friction-Stir Welding of 2024 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, S.; Li, Y.; Murr, L. E.; Brown, D.; McClure, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Solid state friction-stir welding (FSW) has been demonstrated to involve dynamic recrystallization producing ultra-fine, equiaxed grain structures to facilitate superplastic deformation as the welding or joining mechanism. However, the average residual, equiaxed, grain size in the weld zone has ranged from roughly 0.5 micron to slightly more than 10 micron, and the larger weld zone grain sizes have been characterized as residual or static grain growth as a consequence of the temperatures in the weld zone (where center-line temperatures in the FSW of 6061 Al have been shown to be as high as 480C or -0.8 T(sub M) where T(sub M) is the absolute melting temperature)). In addition, the average residual weld zone grain size has been observed to increase near the top of the weld, and to decrease with distance on either side of the weld-zone centerline, an d this corresponds roughly to temperature variations within the weld zone. The residual grain size also generally decreases with decreasing FSW tool rotation speed. These observations are consistent with the general rules for recrystallization where the recrystallized grain size decreases with increasing strain (or deformation) at constant strain rate, or with increasing strain-rate, or with increasing strain rate at constant strain; especially at lower ambient temperatures, (or annealing temperatures). Since the recrystallization temperature also decreases with increasing strain rate, the FSW process is somewhat complicated because the ambient temperature, the frictional heating fraction, and the adiabatic heating fraction )proportional to the product of strain and strain-rate) will all influence both the recrystallization and growth within the FSW zone. Significantly reducing the ambient temperature of the base metal or work pieces to be welded would be expected to reduce the residual weld-zone grain size. The practical consequences of this temperature reduction would be the achievement of low temperature welding. This

  5. GMA-laser Hybrid Welding of High-strength Fine-grain Structural Steel with an Inductive Preheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Seffer, Oliver; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    The industrial useof GMA-laser hybrid welding has increased in the last 10 years, due to the brilliant quality of the laser beam radiation, and higher laser output powers. GMA-laser hybrid welding processes operate in a common molten pool. The combination of the laser beam and the arc results in improved welding speed, penetration depth, heat affected zone and gap bridgeability. Single-layer, GMA-laser hybrid welding processes have been developed for high-strength fine-grain structural steels with a grade of S690QL and a thickness of 15 mm and 20 mm. In addition, the welding process is assisted by an integrated, inductive preheating process to improve the mechanical properties of the welding seam. By using the determined parameters regarding the energy per unit length, and the preheating temperature, welding seams with high quality can be achieved.

  6. An integrated meso-scale numerical model of melting and solidification in laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, G.; Tong, M.; Browne, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present an integrated numerical model for the simulation of laser spot welding of an aluminium alloy at meso-scale in 2D. This model deals with the melting of the parent materials which form the weld pool and the subsequent solidification of the liquid metal in the pool, during the welding process. The melting of the parent materials due to the applied heating power is an important phenomenon, which determines the conditions at the onset of solidification, such as the geometry of the weld pool and the distribution of the temperature field. An enthalpy method is employed to predict the melting during the heating phase of welding. A Gaussian distribution is used to model the heat input from the laser. Once the laser beam is switched off and the melting halts, solidification commences. The UCD front tracking model [1,2] for alloy solidification is applied to predict the advancement of the columnar dendritic front, and a volume-averaging formulation is used to simulate nucleation and growth of equiaxed dendrites. A mechanical blocking criterion is used to define dendrite coherency, and the columnar-to-equiaxed transition within the weld pool is predicted.

  7. Friction Stir Weld Restart+Reweld Repair Allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A friction stir weld (FSW) repair method has been developed and successfully implemented on Al 2195 plate material for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank (ET). The method includes restarting the friction stir weld in the termination hole of the original weld followed by two reweld passes. Room temperature and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties exceeded minimum FSW design strength and compared well with the development data. Simulated service test results also compared closely to historical data for initial FSW, confirming no change to the critical flaw size or inspection requirements for the repaired weld. Testing of VPPA fusion/FSW intersection weld specimens exhibited acceptable strength and exceeded the minimum design value. Porosity, when present at the intersection was on the root side toe of the fusion weld, the "worst case" being 0.7 inch long. While such porosity may be removed by sanding, this "worst case" porosity condition was tested "as is" and demonstrated that porosity did not negatively affect the strength of the intersection weld. Large, 15-inch "wide panels" FSW repair welds were tested to demonstrate strength and evaluate residual stresses using photo stress analysis. All results exceeded design minimums, and photo stress analysis showed no significant stress gradients due to the presence of the restart and multi-pass FSW repair weld.

  8. A simulation model for estimating probabilities of defects in welds

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, O.J.V.; Khaleel, M.A.; Simonen, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    In recent work for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Rolls-Royce and Associates, Ltd., has adapted an existing model for piping welds to address welds in reactor pressure vessels. This paper describes the flaw estimation methodology as it applies to flaws in reactor pressure vessel welds (but not flaws in base metal or flaws associated with the cladding process). Details of the associated computer software (RR-PRODIGAL) are provided. The approach uses expert elicitation and mathematical modeling to simulate the steps in manufacturing a weld and the errors that lead to different types of weld defects. The defects that may initiate in weld beads include center cracks, lack of fusion, slag, pores with tails, and cracks in heat affected zones. Various welding processes are addressed including submerged metal arc welding. The model simulates the effects of both radiographic and dye penetrant surface inspections. Output from the simulation gives occurrence frequencies for defects as a function of both flaw size and flaw location (surface connected and buried flaws). Numerical results are presented to show the effects of submerged metal arc versus manual metal arc weld processes.

  9. Dual wire welding torch and method

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  10. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  11. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  12. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  13. The morphological evolution of the axial structure and the curved columnar grain in the weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Rihong; Lu, Shanping; Dong, Wenchao; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2015-12-01

    The competitive growth of microstructures in the entire weld pool for both the Al-Cu alloy and the pure aluminum was simulated by the cellular automata method to comparatively investigate the micro-mechanisms for the morphological evolution of the axial structure and the curved columnar grain in the weld. The competitive mechanism of grains during the epitaxial growth and the morphological evolution of the grain structure in the weld with various welding speeds were studied. The results indicate that both the thermal conditions and the solidification characteristic of the weld metal exert an important influence on the grain competition and the resulting structure in the weld. For the Al-Cu alloy, the dendritic structure with a large S/L interface curvature appears during the epitaxial growth. The preferential orientation affects the competition result obviously. Owing to the anisotropic growth kinetics, the straight axial structure forms at low welding speeds. With the increase of the welding speed, the width of the axial region decreases and eventually disappears. For the pure aluminum, the S/L interface during the epitaxial growth is planar, and the grain competition is controlled by the thermal conditions completely. The columnar grains curve gradually to follow the highest temperature gradient direction at low welding speeds and become straight at high welding speeds.

  14. Manganese Content Control in Weld Metal During MAG Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the welding current and method of gas shielding in MAG welding on the content of manganese is considered in the paper. Results of study of the welded specimens of steels 45 when applying welding wire of different formulas and different types of gas shielding (traditional shielding and double-jet shielding) are given. It is found that in MAG welding the value of the welding current and the speed of the gas flow from the welding nozzle have a considerable impact on the chemical composition of the weld metal. The consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding provides the directed gas-dynamics in the welding area and enables controlling the electrode metal transfer and the chemical composition of a weld.

  15. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  16. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  17. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma ... Risks include exposure to swimming pools, salt water aquariums, or ocean fish. ... Wash hands and arms thoroughly after cleaning aquariums. Or, wear rubber gloves when cleaning.

  18. Analysis of effect of temperature gradients on surface-tension phenomena in gas-tungsten-arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.A.; Chien, P.S.J.

    1982-10-01

    Fluid motion directed by surface tension is considered as a contributor to heat penetration in a weld pool. The potential phenomena at the gas-liquid interface were analyzed, and the dependence of surface motion on temperature in the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding process was examined. An existing heat-transfer model was used and was able to predict weld size to +- 50% of the actual value. A momentum-transfer equation was derived by considering the contribution of Lorentz force. The momentum boundary condition was developed and was able to predict the Marangoni effect. The magnitude of surface-tension-driven force is comparable to the gravitational force on one gram. An empirical approach was proposed to couple heat-transfer and momentum-transfer phenomena. A dimensional analysis identified the pertinent dimensionless groups as Reynolds, Weber, Froude, Peclet, and Power numbers and a dimensionless velocity. A simplified form of the correction was developed by combining dimensionless groups to yield a correlation with the Bond, Prandtl, and modified power numbers. Future experimental work was proposed to test the functionality of the dimensionless groups.

  19. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  20. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, D.

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  1. Effects of Sealing Run Welding with Defocused Laser Beam on the Quality of T-joint Fillet Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unt, Anna; Poutiainen, Ilkka; Salminen, Antti

    Fillet weld is the predominant weld type used for connecting different elements e.g. in shipbuilding, offshore and bridge structures. One of prevalent research questions is the structural integrity of the welded joint. Post weld improvement techniques are being actively researched, as high stress areas like an incomplete penetration on the root side or fluctuations in penetration depth cannot be avoided. Development of laser and laser-arc hybrid welding processes have greatly contributed to increase of production capacity and reduction of heat-induced distortions by producing single pass full penetration welds in thin- and medium thickness structural steel parts. Present study addresses the issue of how to improve the quality of the fillet welds by welding the sealing run on the root side with defocused laser beam. Welds having incomplete or excessive penetration were produced with several beam angles and laser beam spot sizes on surface. As a conclusion, significant decrease or even complete elimination of the seam irregularities, which act as the failure starting points during service, is achieved.

  2. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  3. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for Far-Side Examinations of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system austenitic piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements for near side inspection. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm (24inch) diameter, 36mm (1.42inch) thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches ranged in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through-wall to 64% through-wall. The welds were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that phased-array methods were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, the notches and flaws through the welds. The ultrasonic results were insensitive to the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  4. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  5. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  6. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  7. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  8. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  9. A Lossless hybrid wavelet-fractal compression for welding radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Mekhalfa, Faiza; Avanaki, Mohammad R N; Berkani, Daoud

    2016-01-01

    In this work a lossless wavelet-fractal image coder is proposed. The process starts by compressing and decompressing the original image using wavelet transformation and fractal coding algorithm. The decompressed image is removed from the original one to obtain a residual image which is coded by using Huffman algorithm. Simulation results show that with the proposed scheme, we achieve an infinite peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) with higher compression ratio compared to typical lossless method. Moreover, the use of wavelet transform speeds up the fractal compression algorithm by reducing the size of the domain pool. The compression results of several welding radiographic images using the proposed scheme are evaluated quantitatively and compared with the results of Huffman coding algorithm.

  10. A Lossless hybrid wavelet-fractal compression for welding radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Mekhalfa, Faiza; Avanaki, Mohammad R N; Berkani, Daoud

    2016-01-01

    In this work a lossless wavelet-fractal image coder is proposed. The process starts by compressing and decompressing the original image using wavelet transformation and fractal coding algorithm. The decompressed image is removed from the original one to obtain a residual image which is coded by using Huffman algorithm. Simulation results show that with the proposed scheme, we achieve an infinite peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) with higher compression ratio compared to typical lossless method. Moreover, the use of wavelet transform speeds up the fractal compression algorithm by reducing the size of the domain pool. The compression results of several welding radiographic images using the proposed scheme are evaluated quantitatively and compared with the results of Huffman coding algorithm. PMID:26890900

  11. Autogeneous Laser and Hybrid Laser Arc Welding of T-joint Low Alloy Steel with Fiber Laser Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unt, A.; Lappalainen, E.; Salminen, A.

    This paper is focused on the welding of low alloy steels S355 and AH36 in thicknesses 6, 8 and 10 mm in T-joint configuration using either autogeneous laser welding or laser-arc hybrid welding (HLAW) with high power fiber lasers. The aim was to obtain understanding of the factors influencing the size of the fillet and weld geometry through methodologically studying effects of laser power, welding speed, beam alignment relative to surface, air gap, focal point position and order of processes (in case of HLAW) and to get a B quality class welds in all thicknesses after parameter optimization.

  12. The hydrology of natural and artificial bog pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Joseph; Turner, Ed; McKenzie, Rebecca; Baird, Andy; Billett, Mike; Chapman, Pippa; Dinsmore, Kerry; Dooling, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    Twelve bog pools were monitored over a 3.5-year period (2012-2015) in the Cross Lochs blanket peatland in the Flow Country of northern Scotland. Six pools were located in a natural pool complex while the other six were in an adjacent area where the peat had been ditched in the 1970s. The ditches had been subsequently dammed with peat in 2002 resulting in dozens of artificial pools along each ditch, with one pool upslope of each dam. The natural pools ranged in area from 15 m2 to 850 m2, while the artificial pools are a more uniform size at c.3 - 4 m2. Following a dry first summer, water levels in the 12 pools were lower throughout the subsequent winter and spring than they were in proceeding years showing strong inter-annual variability in pool levels even for winter months. Over the three year study, water level fluctuations in the natural pools were very different to those in the artificial pools. The natural pools showed subdued responses to rainfall and, after rainfall, slow falls in water level dominated by evaporation; the hydraulic conductivity of the peat was very low at depths of 30 and 50 cm below the peat surface around the pools (median values of 2.49 × 10-5 and 1.09 × 10-5 cm s-1 respectively). The artificial pools had much larger monthly interquartile ranges of water levels and a greater rise and fall of pool water level in response to each individual rainfall event compared with the natural pools. Thus the biogeochemistry and carbon cycling processes that occur within the natural pools is not likely to be replicated in the artificial pools as their hydrological behaviour is quite different. Slope position was a factor in terms of hydrological response of pools with those further downslope having higher relative water levels for longer periods of time compared to upslope pools. Thus we anticipate that local biogeochemical processes in and around bog pools may be impacted by slope position and by whether they are natural pools or artificial pools

  13. How to map your industry's profit pool.

    PubMed

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    Many managers chart strategy without a full understanding of the sources and distribution of profits in their industry. Sometimes they focus their sights on revenues instead of profits, mistakenly assuming that revenue growth will eventually translate into profit growth. In other cases, they simply lack the data or the analytical tools required to isolate and measure variations in profitability. In this Manager's Tool Kit, the authors present a way to think clearly about where the money's being made in any industry. They describe a framework for analyzing how profits are distributed among the activities that form an industry's value chain. Such an analysis can provide a company's managers with a rich understanding of their industry's profit structure--what the authors call its profit pool--enabling them to identify which activities are generating disproportionately large or small shares of profits. Even more important, a profit-pool map opens a window onto the underlying structure of the industry, helping managers see the various forces that are determining the distribution of profits. As such, a profit-pool map provides a solid basis for strategic thinking. Mapping a profit pool involves four steps: defining the boundaries of the pool, estimating the pool's overall size, estimating the size of each value-chain activity in the pool, and checking and reconciling the calculations. The authors briefly describe each step and then apply the process by providing a detailed example of a hypothetical retail bank. They conclude by looking at ways of organizing the data in chart form as a first step toward plotting a profit-pool strategy.

  14. Performance Study of Swimming Pool Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a controlled laboratory study on the efficiency and emissions of swimming pool heaters based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected variations in operational parameters. Swimming pool heater sales trends have indicated a significant decline in the number of conventional natural gas-fired swimming pool heaters (NGPH). On Long Island the decline has been quite sharp, on the order of 50%, in new installations since 2001. The major portion of the decline has been offset by a significant increase in the sales of electric powered heat pump pool heaters (HPPH) that have been gaining market favor. National Grid contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to measure performance factors in order to compare the relative energy, environmental and economic consequences of using one technology versus the other. A field study was deemed inappropriate because of the wide range of differences in actual load variations (pool size), geographic orientations, ground plantings and shading variations, number of hours of use, seasonal use variations, occupancy patterns, hour of the day use patterns, temperature selection, etc. A decision was made to perform a controlled laboratory study based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected operational variations in parameters. Critical to this are the frequency of use, temperature selection, and sizing of the heater to the associated pool heating loads. This would be accomplished by installing a limited amount of relatively simple compact field data acquisition units on selected pool installations. This data included gas usage when available and alternately heater power or gas consumption rates were inferred from the manufacturer's specifications when direct metering was not available in the field. Figure 1 illustrates a typical pool heater installation layout.

  15. To pool or not to pool

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.

    1998-07-01

    In world electricity markets, third party access to transmission and distribution networks on non-discriminatory terms is available to generators and retail suppliers. Some market participants may believe that they are able to negotiate better terms and more market share through bilateral contracts than they would be able to obtain in a pool. Hence such companies will either argue against the development of a pool or seek to make membership of it optional. These companies are therefore seeking to ensure their continued ability to exercise their market power. Inevitably, those companies who would suffer in this form of market will advocate a more transparent arrangement where the market power of other organizations is curbed. The physical nature of the country and plant is also an important factor. Hydro-electric plant can, within water limitations, react very quickly to changing demand. These plant do not therefore require elaborate operating schedules hence market prices can be set ignoring physical plant characteristics. The ability of fossil fuel plant to respond is highly dependent on the operating condition of the plant. These generators need to plan their operations well in advance hence prices cannot be set in complete disregard of the generating plants' ability to meet the resulting schedule. The development of competitive markets is not, however, solely driven by commercial issues. Political and economic considerations such as stranded assets and the protection of indigenous industries, such as coal mines, can greatly influence the nature of the markets. Most countries have accepted the wisdom of having some form of pool. The choice of market mechanism will therefore be driven by: Physical constraints of the country infrastructure and plant; Market power of participants; and Political pressures on the Government. Of these factors political pressures tend to carry the greatest influence.

  16. Associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease (PD) using meta-analyses of data from cohort, case-control, and mortality studies. Methods: Epidemiologic studies related to welding or manganese exposure and PD were identified in a PubMed search, article references, published reviews, and abstracts. Inclusion criteria were 1) cohort, case-control, or mortality study with relative risk (RR), odds ratio (OR), or mortality OR (MOR) and 95 confidence intervals (95% CI); 2) RR, OR, and MOR matched or adjusted for age and sex; 3) valid study design and analysis. When participants of a study were a subgroup of those in a larger study, only results of the larger study were included to assure independence of datasets. Pooled RR/OR estimates and 95% CIs were obtained using random effects models; heterogeneity of study effects were evaluated using the Q statistic and I2 index in fixed effect models. Results: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria for the welding meta-analysis and 3 studies for the manganese exposure meta-analysis. The pooled RR for the association between welding and PD for all study designs was 0.86 (95% CI 0.80–0.92), with absence of between-study heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0). Effect measures for cohort, case-control, and mortality studies were similar (0.91, 0.82, 0.87). For the association between manganese exposure and PD, the pooled OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.41–1.42). Conclusions: Welding and manganese exposure are not associated with increased PD risk. Possible explanations for the inverse association between welding and PD include confounding by smoking, healthy worker effect, and hormesis. PMID:22965675

  17. Solidification microstructures in single-crystal stainless steel melt pools

    SciTech Connect

    Sipf, J.B.; Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.

    1994-03-01

    Development of microstructure of stationary melt pools of oriented stainless steel single crystals (70%Fe-15%Ni-15%Cr was analyzed. Stationary melt pools were formed by electron-beam and gas-tungsten-arc heating on (001), (011), and (111) oriented planes of the austenitic, fcc-alloy crystals. Characterization and analysis of resulting microstructure was carried out for each crystallographic plane and welding method. Results showed that crystallography which favors ``easy growth`` along the <100> family of directions is a controlling factor in the microstructural formation along with the melt-pool shape. The microstructure was found to depend on the melting method, since each method forms a unique melt-pool shape. These results are used in making a three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure for each plane and melting method employed. This investigation also suggests avenues for future research into the microstructural properties of electron-beam welds as well as providing an experimental basis for mathematical models for the prediction of solidification microstructures.

  18. Microstructural Aspects in FSW and TIG Welding of Cast ZE41A Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, magnesium ZE41A alloy plates were butt joined through friction stir welding (FSW) and Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Process-induced microstructures were investigated by optical and SEM observations, EDX microanalysis and microhardness measurements. The effect of a post-welded T5 heat treatment on FSW joints was also assessed. Sound joints were produced by means of both techniques. Different elemental distributions and grain sizes were found, whereas microhardness profiles reflect microstructural changes. Post-welding heat treatment did not induce significant alterations in elemental distribution. The FSW-treated joint showed a more homogeneous hardness profile than the as-welded FSW joint.

  19. Manually Operated Welding Wire Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A manual welding wire feeder apparatus comprising a bendable elongate metal frame with a feed roller mounted at the center thereof for rotation about an axis transverse to the longitudinal axis of the frame. The frame ends are turned up as tabs and each provided with openings in alignment with each other and the mid-width center of the roller surface. The tab openings are sized to accommodate welding wire and each extends to a side edge of the tab, both opening on the same side of the frame, whereby welding wire can be side-loaded onto the frame. On the side of the frame, opposite the roller a lock ring handle is attached tangentially and is rotatable about the attachment point and an axis perpendicular to the frame. The device is grasped in the hand normally used to hold the wire. A finger is placed through the loop ring and the frame positioned across the palm and lower fingers. The thumb is positioned atop the wire so it can be moved from the back of the frame across the roller, and towards the front. In doing so, the wire is advanced at a steady rate in axial alignment with the tab openings and roller. To accommodate different wire diameters the frame is bendable about its center in the plane of the frame axis and wire so as to keep the wire in sufficient tension against the roller and to keep the wire fixed when the frame is tilted and thumb pressure released.

  20. Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Steel: Heat Input, Microstructure, and Mechanical Property Co-relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Md. M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Prabhu, N.; Ghosh, M.

    2015-09-01

    Friction stir welding was performed to join carbon steel plates at tool rotational rate of 800-1400 rpm. Microstructure and microhardness of welded specimens were evaluated across weld centerline. Torque base index, peak temperature, cooling rate, strain, strain rate, volumetric material flow rate, and width of extruded zone at weld nugget were calculated. Peak temperature at weld nugget was ~1300-1360 K. At this temperature, ferrite transformed to austenite during welding. Austenite was decomposed in to ferrite and bainite at cooling rate of ~4-7.5 K/s. The presence of bainite was endorsed by increment in microhardness with respect to base material. Ferrite grain size at weld nugget was finer in comparison to as-received alloy. With the increment in tool rotational rate strain, strain rate, total heat input, and peak temperature at weld nugget were increased. High temperature at weld nugget promoted increment in ferrite grain size and reduction in area fraction of bainite. Heat-affected zone also experienced phase transformation and exhibited enhancement in ferrite grain size in comparison to base alloy at all welding parameters with marginal drop in microhardness. Maximum joint strength was obtained at the tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm. Increment in tool rational rate reduced the joint efficiency owing to increment in ferrite grain size and reduction in pearlite area fraction at heat-affected zone.

  2. The Transportable Auxin Pool 1

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, R. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1970-01-01

    Evidences from experiments with stem sections of sunflower seedlings suggest that the transport of auxin may be limited by a restricted pool size of transportable auxin and restrictions in the availability of transport sites. A steady state of transport is observed over a range of lengths of stem sections, and over a wide range of auxin contents. The capacity of the sections to transport a pulse of auxin declines with aging after cutting, 50% decline occurring at about 10+ hours; the transportability of a pulse of auxin declines rapidly after the completion of uptake, 50% decline occurring at about 1 hour. A chase treatment with unlabeled auxin does not alter transport, but a pretreatment with auxin depressed subsequent transport for about 1 hour. In depleted tissues such pretreatment is not inhibitory but rather is promotive of transport. The interpretation offered is that transport is limited by the pool size and transport sites, and roles for these factors are suggested in relation to the auxin transport gradient and the tropistic responses. PMID:16657273

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE: Modelling of thermal plasmas for arc welding: the role of the shielding gas properties and of metal vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. B.; Tanaka, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Tashiro, S.; Sato, T.; Lowke, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The methods used to model thermal plasmas, including treatments of diffusion in arcs in gas mixtures, are reviewed. The influence of thermophysical properties on the parameters of tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welding arcs, particularly those that affect the weld pool, is investigated using a two-dimensional model in which the arc, anode and cathode are included self-consistently. The effect of changing each of six thermophysical properties on the characteristics of an argon TIG arc is assessed. The influence of the product of specific heat and mass density is found to be particularly important in determining the arc constriction. By examining the influence of the different properties on the heat flux density, current density and shear stress at the anode, it is concluded that the weld pool depth can be increased by using shielding gases with high specific heat, thermal conductivity and viscosity. The effect of metal vapour on the arc and weld pool properties is assessed. The most important effect of the metal vapour is found to be the increased electrical conductivity at low temperatures, which leads to lower heat flux density and current density at the weld pool, implying a shallower weld pool.

  4. Analysis and validation of laser spot weld-induced distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Kanouff, M.P.; Maccallum, D.O.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1999-12-09

    Laser spot welding is an ideal process for joining small parts with tight tolerances on weld size, location, and distortion, particularly those with near-by heat sensitive features. It is also key to understanding the overlapping laser spot seam welding process. Rather than attempting to simulate the laser beam-to-part coupling (particularly if a keyhole occurs), it was measured by calorimetry. This data was then used to calculate the thermal and structural response of a laser spot welded SS304 disk using the finite element method. Five combinations of process parameter values were studied. Calculations were compared to experimental data for temperature and distortion profiles measured by thermocouples and surface profiling. Results are discussed in terms of experimental and modeling factors. The authors then suggest appropriate parameters for laser spot welding.

  5. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size andmore » shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.« less

  6. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Paul E.

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size and shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.

  7. Fine welding with lasers.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  8. Welding blades to rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoklo, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described to form T-joints between dissimilar thickness parts by magnetic force upset welding. This type of resistance welding is used to join compressor and turbine parts which thereby reduces the weight and cost of jet engines.

  9. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys.

  10. Removing Welding Fumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Lloyd J.; Hall, Vandel L.

    1987-01-01

    Portable exhaust duct for machining and welding shops removes oil mist, dust, smoke, and fumes. Duct used with shop exhaust system, inlets of which placed at various convenient locations in shop floor. Flanged connector on underside of wheeled base links flexible tube to exhaust system under floor. Made especially for welding in room with low ceiling.

  11. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  12. NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to demonstrate the cycle life capability of welded solar cell modules relative to a soldered solar cell module in a simulated low earth orbit thermal environment. A total of five 18-cell welded (parallel gap resistance welding) modules, three 18-cell soldered modules, and eighteen single cell samples were fabricated using 2 x 4 cm silicon solar cells from ASEC, fused silica cover glass from OCLI, silver plated Invar interconnectors, DC 93-500 adhesive, and Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton flexible substrate material. Zero degree pull strength ranged from 2.4 to 5.7 lbs for front welded contacts (40 samples), and 3.5 to 6.2 lbs for back welded contacts (40 samples). Solar cell cross sections show solid state welding on both front and rear contacts. The 18-cell welded modules have a specific power of 124 W/kg and an area power density of 142 W/sq m (both at 28 C). Three welded and one soldered module were thermal cycle tested in a thermal vacuum chamber simulating a low earth orbit thermal environment.

  13. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    Designed to be a workable guide for instructors serving the occupational needs of various categories of disadvantaged and handicapped students, this welding curriculum contains fourteen units of self-paced and self-contained instructional materials. The instructional units cover the following topics: job opportunities in welding, safety rules in…

  14. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  15. Welding: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    Intended for use by all welding instructors in the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, this guide provides a sequential listing of course content and scope. A course description provides a brief overview of the content of the courses offered in the welding program. General course objectives are then listed. Outlines of the course content are…

  16. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  17. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  18. Arc Reflector For Welding Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Arc-light reflector for through-the-torch welding vision system designed expressly for use in welding ducts of small diameter. Cylindrical reflector positioned to reflect light diffusely from welding arc onto nearby surface of workpiece for most advantageous viewing along axis of welding torch.

  19. Multihole Arc-Welding Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaim, Benji D.

    1989-01-01

    Modified orifice for variable-polarity plasma-arc welding directs welding plume so it creates clean, even welds on both Inconel(R) and aluminum alloys. Includes eight holes to relieve back pressure in plasma. Quality of welds on ferrous and nonferrous alloys improved as result.

  20. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  1. Ultrasonic seam welding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Darner, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    Ultrasonic seam welding has been evaluated for making continuous seam welds on aluminum and copper-foil conductors. A seam welding system has been designed and fabricated, weldable material combinations have been identified, and the process parameters for welding materials applicable to flat cable production have been established.

  2. Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E.; Figert, John D.; Rybicki, Daniel J.; Burns, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility. This method of heat treatment is a superior alternative to a specification-required heat treatment that caused the formation of large columnar grains, which are undesired. Workpieces subjected to the prior heat treatment exhibited elongations <2 percent, and standard three-point bend specimens shattered. The development of the present heat treatment method was guided partly by the principles that (1) by minimizing grain sizes and relieving deformation stresses, one can minimize or eliminate stress corrosion cracking and (2) the key to maximizing strength and eliminating residual stresses is to perform post-weld solution heating for as long a time as possible while incurring little or no development of large columnar grains in friction stir weld nuggets. It is necessary to perform some of the solution heat treatment (to soften the alloy and improve machine welding parameters) before welding. The following is an example of thickness- dependent pre- and post-weld heat treatments according to the present method: For plates 0.270 in. (approx.6.86 mm) thick milled from plates 4.5 in. (114.3 mm) thick, perform pre-weld solution heating at 890 F (477 C) for 1 hour, then cool in air. After friction stir welding, perform solution heating for 10 minutes, quench, hold at room temperature for 96 hours, then age at 250 F (121 C) for 5 hours followed by 325 F (163 C) for 27 hours.

  3. Stress analysis of the welds in the girder

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.

    1997-12-01

    The girder at the back of each module plays an important structural role in the assembly of the Tilecalorimeter barrel. It is important, therefore, to clearly understand the welds within the girder. In order to understand the stresses in the welds, a 2-dimensional finite element model has been constructed of the girder cross section similar to the model that has been previously used by J. Blocki to analyze the girder. The current European welding norms do not require stress concentrations within welds to be considered except under fatigue loading conditions. Since this is not the case for this design, the use of the average stress in sizing the welds is allowed under the European welding norms. An analysis of the welds by V. Romanov that only considered the average stress, showed that the average weld stress was 38N/mm{sup 2}, well within acceptable limits. However, it should be kept in mind that the forces on the welds vary significantly along the length of the girder so the average stress may not be an adequate method of analyzing these welds. In addition, since these welds are so critical to the structural integrity of the Tilecalorimeter, it is desirable to examine stress concentrations even though this is not required by the european norms. Therefore, it is recommended that a 30mm wide bar as shown in Figure 3 be used on the ten modules that see the highest load from the cryostat. This is a very simple and low-cost modification to a small number of girders that will provide significant additional safety.

  4. Effect of welding position on porosity formation in aluminum alloy welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haryung, J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    Program investigates the effects of varied welding positions on weld qualities. Progressive changes in bead geometry occur as the weld plane angle is varied from upslope to downslope. The gravitational effect on the weld puddle varies greatly with welding position.

  5. Vernal Pool Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nancy; Colburn, Betsy

    This curriculum guide accompanies Certified: A Citizen's Step-by-Step Guide to Protecting Vernal Pools which is designed to train volunteers in the process of identifying vernal pool habitat so that as many of these pools as possible can be certified by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program. Vernal pools are a kind of…

  6. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  7. Welding Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A system originally designed for welding components of the huge Space Shuttle external tank led to a laser-based automated welder for industrial use. A laser sensor tracks the seam where two pieces of metal are to be joined, measures gaps, misfits and automatically corrects welding of torch distance and height. A small industrial computer translates the sensor's information to the weld head and records and displays weld data for control purposes and analysis. The system was modified for commercial use by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Martin Marietta and Applied Research, Inc., which produces the commercial system. Applications are in industrial welding processes that require repetitive operations and a high degree of reliability.

  8. Method for welding beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

  9. LPT. EBOR (TAN646) interior, installing reactor in STF pool ("vault"). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR (TAN-646) interior, installing reactor in STF pool ("vault"). Pressure vessel shows core barrel and outlet nozzle (next to man below) to inner duct weld, which is prepared and in position for stress relieving. Camera facing southeast. Photographer: Comiskey. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-239 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  11. Study on microstructure and mechanical properties of 304 stainless steel joints by TIG, laser and laser -TIG hybrid welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2010-04-01

    This paper investigated the microstructure and mechanical properties of 304 stainless steel joints by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, laser welding and laser-TIG hybrid welding. The X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the phase composition, while the microscopy was conducted to study the microstructure characters of joints. Finally, tensile tests were performed and the fracture surfaces were analyzed. The results showed that the joint by laser welding had highest tensile strength and smallest dendrite size in all joints, while the joint by TIG welding had lowest tensile strength, biggest dendrite size. Furthermore, transition zone and heat affected zone can be observed in the joint of TIG welding. The fractograph observation showed that the TIG welding joint existed as cup-cone shaped fracture, while the laser welding and hybrid welding joints existed as pure-shear fracture. The laser welding and hybrid welding are suitable for welding 304 stainless steel owing to their high welding speed and excellent mechanical properties.

  12. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer.

  13. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer. PMID:8199684

  14. Weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-03-03

    A literature review was made. In spite of similarities between abrasive wear and solid particle erosion, weld overlay hardfacing alloys that exhibit high abrasion resistance may not necessarily have good erosion resistance. The performance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys in erosive environments has not been studied in detail. It is believed that primary-solidified hard phases such as carbides and intermetallic compounds have a strong influence on erosion resistance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys. However, relationships between size, shape, and volume fraction of hard phases in a hardfacing alloys and erosion resistance were not established. Almost all hardfacing alloys can be separated into two major groups based upon chemical compositions of the primary solidified hard phases: (a) carbide hardening alloys (Co-base/carbide, WC-Co and some Fe base superalloys); and (b) intermetallic hardening alloys (Ni-base alloys, austenitic steels, iron-aluminides).

  15. Investment Policies and Concepts for Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Robert L.

    1973-01-01

    Investment and endowment policies for educational institutions are shown to be greatly influenced by the size of the endowment and of the school budget. Administration of pooled funds is discussed with particular reference to procedures at Smith College. Establishment of an independent investment committee, separate from the finance committee, is…

  16. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  17. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, B. F.; Dupont, J. N.; Marder, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Research is being conducted to develop criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in circulated fluidized beds. Twelve weld overlay alloys were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using plasma arc welding. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. All selected coatings were erosion tested at 400C and their erosion resistance and microstructure evaluated. Steady state erosion rates were similar for several weld overlay coatings (Ultimet, Inconel-625, Iron-Aluminide, 316L SS, and High Chromium Cast Iron) and were considerably lower than the remaining coating evaluated. These coatings had different base (Co, Fe, Ni-base). No correlations were found between room temperature microhardness of the weld overlay coatings and their erosion resistance at elevated temperature, although this criteria is often thought to be an indicator of erosion resistance. It was suggested that the coatings that showed similar erosion rates may have similar mechanical properties such as fracture strength, toughness and work hardening rates at this temperature. During the past quarter, Iron-Aluminide, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings were selected for more detailed investigations based upon the preliminary erosion test results. Microhardness tests were performed on eroded samples to determine the size of the work hardened zone and change in coatings hardness due to erosion. The work hardened zone was correlated with erosion resistance of the coatings. Additional Iron-Aluminide, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates.

  18. Characterisation of fume from hyperbaric welding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, John A. S.; Semple, Sean; Duffin, Rodger; Kelly, Frank; Seldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea

    2009-02-01

    We report preliminary work characterising dust from hyperbaric welding trials carried out at increased pressure in a helium and oxygen atmosphere. Particle size and concentration were measured during welding. Samples for quartz and metal analysis and toxicity assessment were taken from a filter in the local fume extraction system. The residue of dust after metal extraction by nitric acid in hydrogen peroxide predominantly a non-metallic white powder assumed to be dust from welding rod coatings and thermal insulation material. Metallic analysis showed predominantly calcium, from the welding rod coating, and period 4 transition metals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and titanium (inductively coupled mass spectrometry, Agilent 7500c). The presence of zirconium indicated a contribution from grinding. The fume was nanoparticulate in nature with a mean particle diameter of 20-30 nm (MSI Inc WPS 1000XP). It showed an intermediate level of oxidative potential regarding the low-molecular weight respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and caused release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 in a human lung A 549 epithelial cell culture with no indication of cytotoxicity. The study findings have strong implications for the measurement techniques needed to assess fume exposure in hyperbaric welding and the provision of respiratory protection.

  19. An introduction to mid-Atlantic seasonal pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.J.; Jung, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal pools, also known as vernal ponds, provide important ecological services to the mid-Atlantic region. This publication serves as an introduction to seasonal pool ecology and management; it also provides tools for exploring seasonal pools, including a full-color field guide to wildlife. Seasonal pools are defined as having four distinctive features: surface water isolation, periodic drying, small size and shallow depth, and support of a characteristic biological community. Seasonal pools experience regular drying that excludes populations of predatory fish. Thus, pools in the mid-Atlantic region provide critical breeding habitat for amphibian and invertebrate species (e.g., spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), wood frog (Rana sylvatica), and fairy shrimp (Order Anostraca)) that would be at increased risk of predation in more permanent waters. The distinctive features of seasonal pools also make them vulnerable to human disturbance. In the mid-Atlantic region, land-use changes pose the greatest challenges to seasonal pool conservation. Seasonal pools are threatened by direct loss (e.g., filling or draining of the pool) as well as by destruction and fragmentation of adjoining terrestrial habitat. Many of the species that depend on seasonal pools for breeding spend the majority of their lives in the surrounding lands that extend a radius of 1000 feet or more from the pools; these vital habitats are being transected by roads and converted to other land uses. Other threats to seasonal pools include biological introductions and removals, mosquito control practices, amphibian diseases, atmospheric deposition, and climate change. The authors recommend a three-pronged strategy for seasonal pool conservation and management in the mid-Atlantic region: education and research, inventory and monitoring of seasonal pools, and landscape-level planning and management.

  20. On the weldability, composition, and hardness of pulsed and continuous Nd:YAG laser welds in aluminum alloys 6061,5456, and 5086

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Fuerschbach, P. W.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys 6061, 5456, and 5086 was studied from a perspective of alloying element vaporization, hot cracking susceptibility, and resultant mechanical properties. Both continuous wave and pulsed Nd.YAG laser welds were investigated. It was found that Mg was vaporized during welding, the extent of which was a function of the weld travel speed. Calculations based upon evaporation theory, and assuming a regular solution model, resulted in an estimation of weld pool surface temperatures from 1080 to 1970 K for the continuous wave welds. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds were observed to be extremely susceptible to weld metal hot cracking whereas continuous wave Nd:YAG laser welds were crack-free. The hardness of 6061 welds was affected by the Mg vaporization such that base metal strengths could not be achieved by subsequent re-heat treatment to the T6 condition. This loss in hardness was attributed to a reduced ability of the alloy to precipitation harden due to a lower Mg concentration. In the cases of 5456 and 5086, when samples containing welds were processed to the O condition, the weld metal had reduced hardness relative to the base metal. This loss of hardness was also attributed to the loss of Mg in these welds, resulting in reduced solid solution strengthening.

  1. Exposure to Inhalable, Respirable, and Ultrafine Particles in Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m−3 for inhalable and 1.29 mg m−3 for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m−3). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  2. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  3. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  4. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1. Technical report, October 1993-March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.L.; Krotz, P.D.; Todd, D.T.; Liaw, Y.K.

    1995-03-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process`s ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  5. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  6. CO2 laser welding of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, Mohammed; Masse, Jean Eric; Mathieu, J. F.; Barreau, Gerard; Autric, Michel L.

    2000-02-01

    on the obtained beads. For a given laser power, we considered that the welding speed as well as the focal position strongly influence the macroscopic and microscopic welding aspect, whereas the dependence with the flow of the protection gas is weak. For WE43, the bead appears correct in the macroscopic scale for a laser power of 2 kW, a speed of 2 m/min, a focal position on the metal surface or 1 mm under; and an output helium gas of 50 l/min. For RZ5, a correct weld is obtained with a 3 kW laser power, a welding speed of 2 m/min, a focal position of 1.5 mm under the surface and a 50 l/min output helium gas. The microscopic examination showed that the size of the grains has clearly reduced (reduction factor can be up to 35) without formation of porosities, neither cracks nor inclusions; indeed the measured Vickers microhardness of the weld bead is slightly higher than the basic metal. Experiments show that we obtained adequate parameters for high quality welding without using filler material. In future, we plan to weld at higher speed by optimizing the various parameters of the laser welding (power, focal position welding speed and gas flow, ...). Furthermore, we will try to weld samples with a thickness superior than 4 mm.

  7. Exploring infrared sensoring for real time welding defects monitoring in GTAW.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Sadek C A; Franco, Fernand Díaz

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an infrared sensor for monitoring the welding pool temperature in a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process. The purpose of the study is to develop a real time system control. It is known that the arc welding pool temperature is related to the weld penetration depth; therefore, by monitoring the temperature, the arc pool temperature and penetration depth are also monitored. Various experiments were performed; in some of them the current was varied and the temperature changes were registered, in others, defects were induced throughout the path of the weld bead for a fixed current. These simulated defects resulted in abrupt changes in the average temperature values, thus providing an indication of the presence of a defect. The data has been registered with an acquisition card. To identify defects in the samples under infrared emissions, the timing series were analyzed through graphics and statistic methods. The selection of this technique demonstrates the potential for infrared emission as a welding monitoring parameter sensor.

  8. Weld analysis and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  9. Argon-Hydrogen Shielding Gas Mixtures for Activating Flux-Assisted Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Her-Yueh

    2010-11-01

    Using activating flux for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve penetration capability is a well-established technique. Argon is an inert gas and the one most widely used as a shielding gas for GTAW. For the most austenitic stainless steels, pure argon does not provide adequate weld penetration. Argon-hydrogen mixtures give a more even heat input to the workpiece, increasing the arc voltage, which tends to increase the volume of molten material in the weld pool as well as the weld depth-to-width ratio. Great interest has been shown in the interaction between activating flux and the hydrogen concentration in an argon-based shielding gas. In this study, the weld morphology, the arc profile, the retained delta ferrite content, the angular distortion, and the microstructures were examined. The application of an activating flux combining argon and hydrogen for GTAW is important in the industry. The results of this study are presented here.

  10. A combined enthalpy / front tracking method for modelling melting and solidification in laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, G.; Mirihanage, W. U.; Tong, M.; Browne, D. J.

    2012-07-01

    The authors present an integrated meso-scale 2D numerical model for the simulation of laser spot welding of a Fe-Cr-Ni steel. The melting of the parent materials due to the applied heating power is an important phenomenon, leading to the formation of the weld pool and the subsequent conditions from which solidification proceeds. This model deals with the dynamic formation of the weld pool whereby melting may be occurring at a given location while solidification has already commenced elsewhere throughout the weld pool. Considering both melting and possible simultaneous solidification in this manner ensures a more accurate simulation of temperature distribution. A source based enthalpy method is employed throughout the calculation domain in order to integrate the melting model with the UCD front tracking model for alloy solidification. Melting is tracked via interpolation of the liquidus isotherm, while solidification is treated via both the tracking of the advancing columnar dendritic front, and the nucleation and growth of equiaxed dendrites using a volume-averaging formulation. Heterogeneous nucleation is assumed to take place on TiN grain refiner particles at a grain refiner density of 1000 particles per mm2. A mechanical blocking criterion is used to define dendrite coherency, and the columnar-to-equiaxed transition within the weld pool is predicted.

  11. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  12. The Future of Pooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  13. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  14. DROWNING IN DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS? ASSESSING SWIMMING POOL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of treated water for swimming pools has made swimming a year round activity, widely enjoyed for leisure as well as exercise. Swimming pools can be found in different kinds and sizes in public areas, hotels and spas, or at private homes. In Germany ~250-300 million...

  15. Resistance seam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, D.L. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Considerable insight and understanding were achieved in regard to the influence of all of the weld parameters on the seam weld processes at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Several mechanical improvements were made in the seam weld equipment. The electrode design was modified to include glass bead blasting of the periphery. This greatly improved the electrode performance consistency. Also, the new electrode design defined a refurbishing process that allowed the electrodes to be used up to three times. Originally, the electrodes were discarded after one use. A substantial cost savings resulted form this improvement. A O to 1500 ampere current transformer was inserted in the weld circuit to monitor weld current during the weld as an additional process control element. The transformer is also used to calibrate the weld power supply. A monocular microscope with a cross hair reticle was added to allow more precise electrode alignment. Other improvements included increased brush spring force and the addition of a 5 to 1 gear reduction on the electrode drive motor. 5 refs.

  16. Surface preparation effects on GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld penetration in JBK-75 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.D.; Heiple, C.R.; Sturgill, P.L.; Robertson, A.M.; Jamsay, R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of GTA welds on JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface (weld groove) preparation produced substantial changes in the penetration characteristics and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent weld penetration (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander result from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any improvement in penetration. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, and increase the surface oxide thickness. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Similar results were observed with changes in filler wire surface oxide thickness, caused by changes in wire production conditions. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of Tensile Strength of Partial Penetration Butt Welded Joints by Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hiroshi; Kaji, Atsushi

    Partial penetration butt welded joints are widely used because they require relatively less weld metal for fabrication. However, incomplete penetration acts as a crack-like flaw. When the size of flaw in a material is known, the tensile strength of the material can be evaluated using fracture mechanics. This paper deals with a practical method of estimating the size of flaw (the incomplete penetration of a partial penetration butt welded joint) by ultrasonic testing (UT). The refraction angle of the probe and the method of UT are discussed. In addition, tensile strengths of welded joints are evaluated using fracture mechanics, and are found to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. Contribution to arc plasma modeling for welding TIG application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, Damien; Delalondre, Clarisse; Carpreau, Jean-Michel; Chéron, B. G.; Boubert, J.-P.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model that simulates transferred energy by a welding thermal plasma to the weld pool. This energy transfer allows materials melting. The originality of our model is to include the modeling of transition zones and the vaporization of the anode. The cathodic and anodic areas are taken into account in the model by means of heat balance at the gas-solid interfaces. We report the heating and cooling effects they induce on the solid (cathode, anode) and plasma. Code_Saturne® the CFD software developed at EDF R&D is used for this work Comparisons between simulations and measurements of temperature and electron density confirm the model assumptions for TIG welding.

  19. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  20. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  1. Robotics for welding research

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G.; Jones, J.

    1984-09-01

    The welding metallurgy research and education program at Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is helping industries make the transition toward automation by training students in robotics. Industry's interest is primarily in pick and place operations, although robotics can increase efficiency in areas other than production. Training students to develop fully automated robotic welding systems will usher in new curriculum requirements in the area of computers and microprocessors. The Puma 560 robot is CSM's newest acquisition for welding research 5 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  3. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  4. Thermal stir welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  5. Effects of shielding gas hydrogen content on the arc behavior in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoien, M.I.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    The primary role of the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is to protect the weld pool and tungsten electrode from the oxygen and nitrogen in the surrounding atmosphere. Traditionally inert gases such as argon and helium have been used, either as pure gases or mixed with each other. However, additions of small amounts of hydrogen have been reported to improve weld bead penetration and enable higher welding speeds to be used. The present work was performed to investigate the effect of small hydrogen additions on the arc behavior in GTAW, and to further the fundamental understanding of the effect of shielding gas on arc characteristics. GTAW bead-on-plate welds were made on 12.5 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm Type 304 stainless steel test coupons. The welding current, voltage, and their variations were continuously monitored during welding. After welding, each test coupon was sectioned and prepared using standard metallographic techniques and etched in Vilella`s etch for macroexamination of the weld bead cross section. Bead width, depth, and cross-sectional area were measured using a LECO image analysator system. The influence of hydrogen content in an argon has tungsten arc was characterized. The electrical behavior of the arc, including the arc resistance, was measured as a function of current and hydrogen content. A better fundamental understanding of arc behavior and energy transfer was achieved using these experimental gas mixes. The results allow the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) Small additions of hydrogen in the argon based shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding significantly change the weld bead geometry due to changes in the arc column. (2) Selection of the right argon, hydrogen shielding gas mixture to give the optimum arc column characteristics for a given condition can improve weld quality and increase productivity. (3) The resistance of the arc column was found to be an adequate parameter to describe the arc column behavior.

  6. Fiber Laser Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy: The Effect of Welding Speed on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, S. H.; Chen, D. L.; Bhole, S. D.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing microstructural change and evaluating tensile and fatigue properties of fiber laser welded AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy with special attention to the effect of welding speed. Laser welding led to the formation of equiaxed dendrites in the fusion zone and columnar dendrites near the fusion zone boundary along with divorced eutectic Mg17Al12 particles and recrystallized grains in the heat-affected zone. The lowest hardness across the weld appeared in the fusion zone. Although the yield strength, ductility, and fatigue life decreased, the hardening capacity increased after laser welding, with a joint efficiency reaching about 90 pct. A higher welding speed resulted in a narrower fusion zone, smaller grain size, higher yield strength, and longer fatigue life, as well as a slightly lower strain-hardening capacity mainly because of the smaller grain sizes. Tensile fracture occurred in the fusion zone, whereas fatigue failure appeared essentially in between the heat-affected zone and the fusion zone. Fatigue cracks initiated from the near-surface welding defects and propagated by the formation of fatigue striations together with secondary cracks.

  7. Eddy current inspection of weld defects in tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katragadda, G.; Lord, W.

    1992-01-01

    An approach using differential probes for the inspection of weld defects in tubing is studied. Finite element analysis is used to model the weld regions and defects. Impedance plane signals are predicted for different weld defect types and compared wherever possible with signals from actual welds in tubing. Results show that detection and sizing of defects in tubing is possible using differential eddy current techniques. The phase angle of the impedance plane trajectory gives a good indication of the sizing of the crack. Data on the type of defect can be obtained from the shape of the impedance plane trajectory and the phase. Depending on the skin depth, detection of outer wall, inner wall, and subsurface defects is possible.

  8. Analysis of ripple formation in single crystal spot welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaz, M.; Corrigan, D.; Boatner, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    Stationary spot welds have been made at the (001) surface of Fe-l5%Ni-15%Cr single crystals using a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA). On the top surface of the spot welds, very regular and concentric ripples were observed after solidification by differential interference color microscopy. Their height (typically 1--5 micrometers and spacing, typically approximately 60 micrometers) decreased with the radius of the pool. These ripples were successfully accounted for in terms of capillary-wave theory using the fundamental mode frequency f(sub 0) given by the first zero of the zero-order Bessel function. The spacing d between the ripples was then equated to v(sub s)/f(sub 0), where v(sub s) is the solidification rate. From the measured ripple spacing, the velocity of the pool was deduced as a function of the radius, and this velocity was in good agreement with the results of a heat-flow simulation.

  9. Measurement of workpiece temperature during welding for welding robot control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illegrams, P. F. A.

    MIG/MAG welding robot seam tracking system based on a symetrically noncontact temperature measurement is presented. Using literature in formation on temperature distribution during welding, a model for the prediction of the behavior of a pyrometer twin is constructed. The temperature difference between the measuring points constitutes the signal for a position control of the twin holding welding torch. As temperature measurement is made impossible by radiation originating from the welding arc, this is done during intermittent welding in time intervals in which the welding arc is switched off.

  10. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  11. Laser beam welding of Waspaloy: Characterization and corrosion behavior evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoja Razavi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a study on Nd:YAG laser welding of Waspaloy sheets has been made. Microstructures, phase changes and hardness of the laser joint were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and vickers microhardness (HV0.3). Corrosion behavior of the weldment at low temperature in 3.5%wt NaCl solution at room temperature was also investigated using open circuit potential and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests. Hot corrosion studies were conducted on samples in the molten salt environment (Na2SO4-60%V2O5) at 900 °C for 50 h. Results indicated that the microstructure of weld zone was mainly dendritic grown epitaxially in the direction perpendicular to the weld boundary and heat transfer. Moreover, the Ti-Mo carbide particles were observed in the structure of the weld zone and base metal. The average size of carbides formed in the base metal (2.97±0.5 μm) was larger than that of the weld zone (0.95±0.2 μm). XRD patterns of the weld zone and base metal showed that the laser welding did not alter the phase structure of the weld zone, being in γ-Ni(Cr) single phase. Microhardness profile showed that the hardness values of the weld zone (210-261 HV) were lower than that of the base metal (323-330 HV). Electrochemical and hot corrosion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal was greater than the base metal in both room and high temperatures.

  12. Mitigating Abnormal Grain Growth for Friction Stir Welded Al-Li 2195 Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Russell, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Formability and abnormal grain growth (AGG) are the two major issues that have been encountered for Al alloy spun formed dome development using friction stir welded blanks. Material properties that have significant influence on the formability include forming range and strain hardening exponent. In this study, tensile tests were performed for two 2195 friction stir weld parameter sets at 400 F to study the effects of post weld anneal on the forming range and strain hardening exponent. It was found that the formability can be enhanced by applying a newly developed post weld anneal to heat treat the friction stir welded panels. This new post weld anneal leads to a higher forming range and much improved strain hardening exponent. AGG in the weld nugget is known to cause a significant reduction of ductility and fracture toughness. This study also investigated how AGG may be influenced by the heating rate to the solution heat treatment temperature. After post-weld annealing, friction stir welds were strained to 15% and 39% by compression at 400 F before they were subjected to SHT at 950 F for 1 hour. Salt bath SHT is very effective in reducing the grain size as it helps arrest the onset of AGG and promote normal recrystallization and grain growth. However, heat treating a 18 ft dome using a salt bath is not practical. Efforts are continuing at Marshall Space Flight Center to identify the welding parameters and heat treating parameters that can help mitigate the AGG in the friction stir welds.

  13. Numerical simulation and control of welding distortion for double floor structure of high speed train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wen-Chao; Lu, Shan-Ping; Lu, Hao; Li, Dian-Zhong; Rong, Li-Jian; Li, Yi-Yi

    2014-12-01

    The welding heat source models and the plastic tension zone sizes of a typical weld joint involved in the double floor structure of high speed train under different welding parameters were calculated by a thermal-elastic-plastic FEM analysis based on SYSWELD code. Then, the welding distortion of floor structure was predicted using a linear elastic FEM and shrinkage method based on Weld Planner software. The effects of welding sequence, clamping configuration and reverse deformation on welding distortion of floor structure were examined numerically. The results indicate that the established elastic FEM model for floor structure is reliable for predicting the distribution of welding distortion in view of the good agreement between the calculated results and the measured distortion for real double floor structure. Compared with the welding sequence, the clamping configuration and the reverse deformation have a significant influence on the welding distortion of floor structure. In the case of 30 mm reverse deformation, the maximum deformation can be reduced about 70% in comparison to an actual welding process.

  14. The Effect of Welding Parameters on the Tensile-Shear Performance of Dissimilar DP600/St14 Resistance Spot Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouranvari, M.; Marashi, S. P. H.; Mousavizadeh, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the correlations between the weld macrostructure, the microstructure, failure mode and the mechanical properties (peak load and energy absorption) of dissimilar low carbon steel/dual phase steel (DP600) resistance spot weld. Three distinct failure modes were observed during tensile-shear test: interfacial, pullout and partial thickness-partial pullout failure mode. Results showed that before expulsion, there was a direct relationship between FZ size and mechanical properties. However, on expulsion, peak load and particularly energy absorption were significantly reduced. The reduction of the failure energy was related to PT-PP failure mode. For similar weld size, peak load and energy absorption of the spot welds in PT-PP failure mode was significantly lower than PF mode.

  15. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  16. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  17. Characterization of the Microstructures and the Cryogenic Mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soon Il; Bae, Sang Hyun; Do, Jeong Hyeon; Jo, Chang Yong; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2016-02-01

    The microstructures and the cryogenic mechanical properties of electron beam (EB) welds between cast and forged Inconel 718 superalloys with a thickness of 10 mm were investigated in comparison with gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. EB welding with a heat input lower than 250 J/mm caused the formation of liquation microfissuring in the cast-side heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of the EB welds. HAZ liquation microfissuring appeared to be associated with the constitutional liquation of primary NbC carbides at the grain boundaries. Compared with the GTA welding process, the EB welding produced welds with superior microstructure, exhibiting fine dendritic structure associated with the reduction in size and fraction of the Laves phase due to the rapid cooling rate. This result was responsible for the superior mechanical properties of the EB welds at 77 K (-196 °C). Laves particles in both welds were found to provide the preferential site for the crack initiation and propagation, leading to a significant decrease in the Charpy impact toughness at 77 K (-196 °C). Crack initiation and propagation induced by Charpy impact testing were discussed in terms of the dendrite arm spacing, the Laves size and the dislocation structure ahead of the crack arisen from the fractured Laves phase in the two welds.

  18. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  19. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  20. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  1. Allergic to Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To identify the allergy problem of a 36-year old swimming instructor, who experiences heavy itching and rashes whenever she comes in contact with pool water. Patch tests were performed with European standard series and materials from the work floor. A positive patch test to aluminum chloride and flocculant was observed. Occupational dermatitis is, based on a contact allergy to aluminum chloride in the flocculant. PMID:22993713

  2. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  3. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  4. Impact of the Weld Geometry on the Stress Intensity Factor of the Welded T-Joint Exposed to the Tensile Force and the Bending Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djoković, Jelena M.; Nikolić, Ružica R.; Bujňák, Ján

    2015-12-01

    In this paper it is analyzed the welded T-joint exposed to the axial tensile force and the bending moment, for determining the impact of the weld geometry on the fracture mechanics parameters. The stress intensity factor was calculated analytically, based on the concept of the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), by application of the Mathematica® programming routine. The presence of the weld was taken into account through the corresponding correction factors. The results show that increase of the size of the triangular welds leads to decrease of the stress intensity factor, while the SIF increases with increase of the welds' width. The ratio of the two welded plates' thicknesses shows that plate thicknesses do not exhibit significant influence on the stress intensity factor behavior.

  5. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  6. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  7. Weld radiograph enigmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  8. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  9. Habitat species pools for phylogenetic structure in microbes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Soininen, Janne; Shen, Ji

    2013-06-01

    The processes underlying the phylogenetic structure of the biotic communities are typically scale-dependent and thus often poorly resolved. Illustrated by the study of macroorganisms, it is suggested that the relative influence of ecological processes on the phylogenetic structure of the communities can be inferred by the geographical definition of the species pools. However, given the high dispersal ability of microbes, the spatial delineation of the species pool may not be that practical for microbial taxa. This idea is supported by the observational data on bacteria along an elevational gradient. Significant negative values of standardized effect size of the mean nearest taxon distance were consistently observed for different sized species pools considered. Reviewing the reports on microbial phylogenetic structure so far, we suggested that the 'habitat species pools' are perhaps more important for microbes than spatial delineated 'regional species pools'. PMID:23754726

  10. Thermal plasma properties for Ar-Al, Ar-Fe and Ar-Cu mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: I. Net emission coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.

    2013-10-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of the net emission coefficient (NEC) of Ar-Al, Ar-Fe and Ar-Cu mixtures at atmospheric pressure for arc welding processes. The results are given in data tables for temperatures between 3 kK and 30 kK, for five plasma thicknesses (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 mm) and ten concentrations of metallic vapours (pure gas, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and pure metal vapours in mass proportions). The results are in good agreement with most of the works published on the subject for such mixtures. They highlight the influence of three parameters on the radiation of the plasma: the NEC is directly related to temperature and inversely related to plasma radius and is highly sensitive to the presence of metal vapours. Finally, numerical data are supplied in tables in order to develop accurate computational modelling of welding arc and to estimate both qualitatively and quantitatively the influence of each metallic vapour on the size and on the shape of the weld pool.

  11. Online NIR diagnostic of laser welding processes and its potential for quality assuring sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsch, Friedhelm; Braun, Holger; Keβler, Steffen; Pfitzner, Dieter; Rominger, Volker

    2014-02-01

    We have integrated an imaging thermographic sensor into commercial welding optics for observation of the weld zone. Key element of the sensor is an InGaAs-camera that detects the thermal radiation of the welding process in the wavelength range of 1,200 to 1,700 nm. This is well suited to record images of the keyhole, the melt pool and the thermal trace. The sensor was integrated to the welding heads for on-axis observation to minimize the interfering contour to ensure easy adaption to industrial processes. The welding heads used were established industrial-grade TRUMPF optics: a BEO fixed optics with 280 mm focal length, or a TRUMPF PFO-3D scanner optics with 450 mm focal length. We used a TRUMPF TruDisk 16002 16kW-thin disk laser that transmits its power through a 200 μm core diameter light cable. The images were recorded and features of the various process zones were evaluated by image processing. It turns out that almost all weld faults can be clearly detected in the NIR images. Quantitative features like the dimension of the melt pool and the thermal trace can be derived from the captured images. They are correlated to process input parameters as well as to process results. In contrast to observation in the visible spectrum the NIR camera records the melt pool without auxiliary illumination. As an unrivaled attribute of the NIR sensor it supports an online heat flow thermography of the seam and allows identifying missing fusion ("false friends") of lap joints virtually during the welding process. Automated weld fault detection and documentation is possible by online image processing which sets the basis for comprehensive data documentation for quality assurance and traceability.

  12. Relationship between apposition pressure during welding and tensile strength of the acute weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2001-05-01

    Dye-assisted photothermal welding is a technique used to close wounds by thermally cross-linking collagen across apposed tissue edges. For a successful weld, not only do laser parameters have to be optimized, but also apposition of the incision has to be consistent and controlled. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the applied apposition pressure (i.e., the compressive force holding the wound closed during the welding procedure divided by the area of the skin-to-skin interface) and the tensile strength of the wound following the welding procedure. By using a clamping device made of two complementary pieces, each 3 cm wide with a row of 10 equally spaced blunt wire mesh tips, the apposition pressure along a 2-cm-long incision in each albino guinea pig was quantified using a 127-micrometers -thick load cell and varied from 0-1.8 kgf/cm2. A continuous wave, Nd:YAG laser emitting 10.0 W of 1.06-micrometers radiation from a 600-micrometers -diameter fiber irradiating a 5-mm-diameter spot size was scanned across the incision in order to deliver 300 J of total energy. As the apposition pressure of the incisions was increased, the resulting tensile strength of welded skin increased in a sigmoidal manner. For this welding technique, an apposition pressure of at least 1.2 kgf/cm2 is necessary to obtain maximum weld strength of the skin (2.56+/- 0.36 kg/cm2).

  13. A study of narrow gap laser welding for thick plates using the multi-layer and multi-pass method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Tianjiao; Wang, Chunming; Yan, Fei; Shao, Xinyu; Hu, Xiyuan; Li, Jianmin

    2014-12-01

    This paper details a new method that combines laser autogenous welding, laser wire filling welding and hybrid laser-GMAW welding to weld 30 mm thick plate using a multi-layer, multi-pass process. A “Y” shaped groove was used to create the joint. Research was also performed to optimize the groove size and the processing parameters. Laser autogenous welding is first used to create the backing weld. The lower, narrowest part of the groove is then welded using laser wire filling welding. Finally, the upper part of the groove is welded using laser-GMAW hybrid welding. Additionally, the wire feeding and droplet transfer behaviors are observed by high speed photography. The two main conclusions from this work are: the wire is often biased towards the side walls, resulting in a lack of fusion at the joint and the creation of other defects for larger groove sizes. Additionally, this results in the droplet transfer behavior becoming unstable, leading to a poor weld appearance for smaller groove sizes.

  14. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations of hybrid laser arc welding of aluminum alloys in the thick T-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazar Atabaki, M.; Nikodinovski, M.; Chenier, P.; Ma, J.; Liu, W.; Kovacevic, R.

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, a numerical finite element model was developed to simulate the hybrid laser arc welding of different aluminum alloys, namely 5××× to 6××× series. The numerical simulation has been considered two double-ellipsoidal heat sources for the gas metal arc welding and laser welding. The offset distance of the metal arc welding and laser showed a significant effect on the molten pool geometry, the heat distribution and penetration depth during the welding process. It was confirmed that when the offset distance is within the critical distance the laser and arc share the molten pool and specific amount of penetration and dilution can be achieved. The models and experiments show that the off-distance between the two heat sources and shoulder width have considerable influence on the penetration depth and appearance of the weld beads. The experiments also indicate that the laser power, arc voltage and type of the filler metal can effectively determine the final properties of the bonds, specifically the bead appearance and microhardness of the joints. The experiments verified the numerical simulation as the thermocouples assist to comprehend the amount of heat distribution on the T-joint coupons. The role of the welding parameters on the mechanism of the hybrid laser welding of the aluminum alloys was also discussed.

  16. Stud arc welding in a magnetic field - Investigation of the influences on the arc motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartz-Behrend, K.; Marqués, J. L.; Forster, G.; Jenicek, A.; Müller, M.; Cramer, H.; Jilg, A.; Soyer, H.; Schein, J.

    2014-11-01

    Stud arc welding is widely used in the construction industry. For welding of studs with a diameter larger than 14 mm a ceramic ferrule is usually necessary in order to protect the weld pool. Disadvantages of using such a ferrule are that more metal is molten than necessary for a high quality welded joint and that the ferrule is a consumable generally thrown away after the welding operation. Investigations show that the ferrule can be omitted when the welding is carried out in a radially symmetric magnetic field within a shielding gas atmosphere. Due to the Lorentz force the arc is laterally shifted so that a very uniform and controlled melting of the stud contact surface as well as of the work piece can be achieved. In this paper a simplified physical model is presented describing how the parameters welding current, flux density of the magnetic field, radius of the arc and mass density of the shielding gas influence the velocity of the arc motion. The resulting equation is subsequently verified by comparing it to optical measurements of the arc motion. The proposed model can be used to optimize the required field distribution for the magnetic field stud welding process.

  17. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser-arc hybrid welding joint of GH909 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Yan, Fei; Liu, Sang; Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Chunming; Hu, Xiyuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, laser-arc hybrid welding of 10 mm thick low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909 components was carried out to obtain a joint with good performance. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum and other methodologies. The results showed that weld joints with a desirable wineglass-shaped weld profile can be obtained employing appropriate process parameters. The different grains in between the upper central seam and the bottom seam were associated with the temperature gradient, the pool's flow and the welding thermal cycle. MC-type carbides and eutectic phases (γ+Laves) were produced at grain boundaries due to the component segregation during the welding process. In addition, γ‧ strengthening phase presented in the interior of grains, which kept a coherent relationship with the matrix. The lowest hardness value occurred in the weld center, which indicated that it was the weakest section in the whole joint. The average tensile strength of the joints reached to 632.90 MPa, nearly 76.84% of the base metal. The fracture analysis revealed that the fracture mode of the joint was ductile fracture and the main reason for joint failure was as a result of the occurrence of porosities produced in the weld during the welding process.

  19. Study of fatigue behavior of longitudinal welded pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simion, P.; Dia, V.; Istrate, B.; Hrituleac, G.; Hrituleac, I.; Munteanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    During transport and storage of the various fluids, welded pipes are subjected to cyclic loading due to pressure fluctuations that often exceed the prescribed values for normal operation. These cyclic loading can significantly reduce the life of the pipes; as a result the design should be based on the fatigue strength not only on static resistance. In general the fatigue strength of pipes is dependent by strength, pipe geometry and surface quality. In case of the electric longitudinal welded pipes, the fatigue strength is significantly limited by concentration of residual stress and the size of existing defects in the weld seam. This paper presents the fatigue behaviour of the electric welded pipes by high frequency, under conditions that simulate real operating conditions pipes. Fatigue testing was performed on welded pipes made of micro alloyed carbon steels. Some of these pipes were previously subjected to a heat treatment of normalization, in order to also determine the influence of heat treatment on the fatigue strength of welded pipes. To determine and correlate the different factors affecting the fatigue strength, welded pipes were also subjected to various tests: tensile tests, impact tests, measurement of micro hardness, microstructural analysis by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Pre-weld heat treatment improves welds in Rene 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of Rene 41 prior to welding reduces the incidence of cracking during post-weld heat treatment. The microstructure formed during the slow cooling rate favors elevated temperature ductility. Some vestiges of this microstructure are apparently retained during welding and thus enhance strain-age crack resistance in air.

  1. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  2. Microstructure-Fracture Behavior Relationships of Slot-Welded Rail Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allie, Aldinton; Aglan, Heshmat; Fateh, Mahmood

    2011-09-01

    Microstructural analyses of the parent pearlitic and bainitic rail steels were performed, and the results were compared with the microstructure of the welded pearlitic and bainitic steels. An increase in the ASTM grain size number of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) for both pearlitic and bainitic slot welds was observed. The microstructural features that were identified in the weldment of both slot-welded steels were very similar. This was expected since the same welding wire was used to weld both rail steels. The weld consisted of mainly ferrite and had similar grain size. The fusion zones of the welded pearlitic and bainitic rail steels were examined after flexural tests to determine if there were any cracks present due to improper or weak fusion. Examination of the entire fusion zone under high optical magnification revealed no cracks, indicating that a perfect fusion was achieved. The three-point flexural behavior of the parent pearlitic and bainitic steels was evaluated and compared with that of the slot-welded steels. It was found that that the welded pearlitic steel has superior fracture resistance properties when compared to the parent pearlitic steel. The average fracture resistance of the parent pearlitic steel was 79 MPa√m compared to 119 MPa√m for the welded pearlitic steel. The slot-welded bainitic steel, however, showed similar fracture resistance properties to the parent bainitic steel with average values of 121 and 128 MPa√m, respectively. The failure mechanism of the welded and parent pearlitic and bainitic steels was also identified. Microvoid coalescence was observed in both welded rail steel samples. This was manifested by dimpled features, which are associated with ductile failure.

  3. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  4. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  5. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  7. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  8. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  9. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  10. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  11. A three-pool model dissecting readily releasable pool replenishment at the calyx of held.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Ge, Jian-long; Hao, Mei; Sun, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Xin-sheng; Zhu, Jian-bing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Pan-tong; Lin, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2015-03-31

    Although vesicle replenishment is critical in maintaining exo-endocytosis recycling, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that both rapid and slow endocytosis recycle into a very large recycling pool instead of within the readily releasable pool (RRP), and the time course of RRP replenishment is slowed down by more intense stimulation. This finding contradicts the calcium/calmodulin-dependence of RRP replenishment. Here we address this issue and report a three-pool model for RRP replenishment at a central synapse. Both rapid and slow endocytosis provide vesicles to a large reserve pool (RP) ~42.3 times the RRP size. When moving from the RP to the RRP, vesicles entered an intermediate pool (IP) ~2.7 times the RRP size with slow RP-IP kinetics and fast IP-RRP kinetics, which was responsible for the well-established slow and rapid components of RRP replenishment. Depletion of the IP caused the slower RRP replenishment observed after intense stimulation. These results establish, for the first time, a realistic cycling model with all parameters measured, revealing the contribution of each cycling step in synaptic transmission. The results call for modification of the current view of the vesicle recycling steps and their roles.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Stationary AC Tungsten Inert Gas Welding of Aluminum Plate in Consideration of Oxide Layer Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu

    An unified numerical simulation model of AC TIG welding of the aluminum plate considering energy balance among the electrode, the arc and the base metal and employing an analytical model for calculating cleaning rate of the oxide layer has been developed for investigating heat transport properties and weld pool formation process in AC TIG welding of aluminum plate. As a result of this simulation, it was shown that although the heat flux from the arc onto the base metal increases in EN (Electrode Negative) phase due to the electron condensation, that in EP (Electrode Positive) phase conversely decreases because mainly of cooling caused by the electron emission. Furthermore, the validity of the simulation model was confirmed by comparing to experimental results such as the arc voltage, the area of cleaning zone and the shape of weld pool.

  13. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  14. Item Pool Design for an Operational Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei; Reckase, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    For computerized adaptive tests (CATs) to work well, they must have an item pool with sufficient numbers of good quality items. Many researchers have pointed out that, in developing item pools for CATs, not only is the item pool size important but also the distribution of item parameters and practical considerations such as content distribution…

  15. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  16. The influence of metallurgy on the formation of welding aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anthony T

    2002-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that insoluble ultrafine aerosols (ie., particles whose physical diameters are less than 100 nm) may cause adverse health effects due to their small size, and that toxicological response may be more appropriately represented by particle number or particle surface area. Unfortunately, current exposure criteria and the associated air-sampling techniques are primarily mass-based. Welding processes are high-temperature operations that generate substantial number concentrations of ultrafine aerosols. Welding aerosols are formed primarily through the nucleation of metal vapors followed by competing growth mechanisms such as coagulation and condensation. Experimental results and mathematical tools are presented to illustrate how welding metallurgy influences the chemical aspects and dynamic processes that initiate and evolve the resultant aerosol. This research suggests that a fundamental understanding of metallurgy and aerosol physics can be exploited to suppress the formation of undesirable chemical species as well as the amount of aerosol generated during a welding process.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  18. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  19. Grain Refinement in Al-Mg-Si Alloy TIG Welds Using Transverse Mechanical Arc Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    2012-11-01

    Reduction in grain size in weld fusion zones (FZs) presents the advantages of increased resistance to solidification cracking and improvement in mechanical properties. Transverse mechanical arc oscillation was employed to obtain grain refinement in the weldment during tungsten inert gas welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis was carried out on AA6061-AA4043 filler metal tungsten inert gas welds. Grain size, texture evolution, misorientation distribution, and aspect ratio of weld metal, PMZ, and BM have been observed at fixed arc oscillation amplitude and at three different frequencies levels. Arc oscillation showed grain size reduction and texture formation. Fine-grained arc oscillated welds exhibited better yield and ultimate tensile strengths and significant improvement in percent elongation. The obtained results were attributed to reduction in equivalent circular diameter of grains and increase in number of subgrain network structure of low angle grain boundaries.

  20. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.