Science.gov

Sample records for welded joints obtained

  1. Structure of Ti-6Al-4V nanostructured titanium alloy joint obtained by resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenov, V. A.; Kurgan, K. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Gnyusov, S. F.

    2016-01-15

    The structure of weld joints of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V in the initial ultrafine-grained state, obtained by resistance spot welding, is studied using the optical and scanning electron microscopy method and the X-ray structure analysis. The carried out studies show the relationship of the metal structure in the weld zone with main joint zones. The structure in the core zone and the heat affected zone is represented by finely dispersed grains of needle-shaped martensite, differently oriented in these zones. The change in the microhardness in the longitudinal section of the weld joint clearly correlates with structural changes during welding.

  2. About Abnormal Grain Growth in Joints Obtained by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, S. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    Some special features of abnormal grain growth in welded joints of aluminum alloys formed by fiction stir welding (FSW) are studied. The microstructure and the texture of the alloys are determined after welding and annealing at 400, 450 and 500°C for different times. The abnormal grain growth is shown to depend much on the macroscopic inhomogeneity of the structure inside the weld.

  3. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  4. Effect of Multi-repair Welding on Fatigue Performance of Aluminum Alloy Profile Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, You-De; Shi, Chun-Yuan; Tian, Hong-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum alloy profile has been widely used in the manufacture of the rail vehicles. But it's necessary for the repair welding of the welded joints to be conducted because some defects exist in the weld such as porosity, inclusions and incomplete penetrations in the welding processes. In this paper, the influence of the multi-repair welding of 6005A aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints on the fatigue performance are investigated based on the results of fatigue tests. The parameters of curves and the fatigue strength of the welded joints are calculated, and Goodman fatigue limit diagram is also obtained. The results show that fatigue strength of aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints, in condition of 107 cycle life, meet the standard requirement for the as-welded, repair welded state one time or two times respectively.

  5. Effect of weld schedule variation on the weldability and durability of AHSS spot weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishaupt, Eric Raymond

    Tensile strength testing and high cycle fatigue testing of advanced high strength steel spot welded shear lap joints were performed for the various weld conditions. The materials used in this study were DP 980, DP 780 and TRIP 780. The microstructure and microhardness of the shear lap joints were examined in an effort to identify the effect of microstructural changes on the strength and fatigue durability of the spot weld specimens. The occurrence of interfacial failure was recorded for the differing weld processes. Several weld schedules were examined and used to produce shear lap spot weld joints, specifically varying the squeeze force and the average current. The weld force used to produce a spot weld does not have a significant effect on the fracture mode of the specimen given the average current is constant. The average current used to produce a spot weld has a significant effect on the fracture mode of the spot weld for several squeeze forces. Interfacial failure of spot welded TRIP 780 can be mitigated using a certain range of currents when welding. This appears to come as a tradeoff for sacrificing the strength of the joint. Higher values of weld strength were obtainable; however, welds that failed with higher strengths also experienced interfacial failure. A fracture mechanics approach to estimating the high cycle fatigue life of the shear lap specimen is also proposed and represents a conservative estimate of the shear lap specimen durability.

  6. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  7. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  8. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  9. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  10. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  11. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  12. Selection of optimal welding condition for GTA pulse welding in root-pass of V-groove butt joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok-Chul; Kim, Jae-Woong

    2010-12-01

    In the manufacture of high-quality welds or pipeline, a full-penetration weld has to be made along the weld joint. Therefore, root-pass welding is very important, and its conditions have to be selected carefully. In this study, an experimental method for the selection of optimal welding conditions is proposed for gas tungsten arc (GTA) pulse welding in the root pass which is done along the V-grooved butt-weld joint. This method uses response surface analysis in which the width and height of back bead are chosen as quality variables of the weld. The overall desirability function, which is the combined desirability function for the two quality variables, is used as the objective function to obtain the optimal welding conditions. In our experiments, the target values of back bead width and height are 4 mm and zero, respectively, for a V-grooved butt-weld joint of a 7-mm-thick steel plate. The optimal welding conditions could determine the back bead profile (bead width and height) as 4.012 mm and 0.02 mm. From a series of welding tests, it was revealed that a uniform and full-penetration weld bead can be obtained by adopting the optimal welding conditions determined according to the proposed method.

  13. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welded joints. 56.30-5 Section 56.30-5 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-5 Welded joints. (a) General. Welded joints may be used..., then: (1) The backing rings shall be removed and the inside of the joint ground smooth, or (2)...

  14. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welded joints. 56.30-5 Section 56.30-5 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-5 Welded joints. (a) General. Welded joints may be used..., then: (1) The backing rings shall be removed and the inside of the joint ground smooth, or (2)...

  15. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welded joints. 56.30-5 Section 56.30-5 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-5 Welded joints. (a) General. Welded joints may be used..., then: (1) The backing rings shall be removed and the inside of the joint ground smooth, or (2)...

  16. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welded joints. 56.30-5 Section 56.30-5 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-5 Welded joints. (a) General. Welded joints may be used..., then: (1) The backing rings shall be removed and the inside of the joint ground smooth, or (2)...

  17. Effect of soft root weld layer on fracture toughness of under-matched weld joints on Q+T steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Welding of quenched and tempered (Q+T) high strength low alloyed steels can cause weld strength undermatching to satisfy the toughness requirements for the weld deposit. Cost of pre-heating of these steels can be saved if one can prove that use of soft electrodes for root passes do not endanger the overall quality of the joint. By welding of 40 mm thick Q+T structural steel (grade HT 80), over-matched condition had appeared in the root area of the X-groove weld despite of welding consumable which would give entire weld under-matched properties. This is the effect of weld metal alloying by elements from base material. So, the weld joint is not protected against cold cracking especially in the root region, therefore, a high preheating should be used to reduce the possibility of this phenomenon. In this work soft (lower strength) filler metal was used for first two and four root passes of X-joint. In this case root area was also alloyed by elements from base material and obtained mis-matching factor M was higher than it was expected. So, one homogeneous and two non homogeneous weld joints (with two and four soft passes) were considered. Mechanical properties of weld joints were measured by round tensile bars taken from different parts of the weld. The under-matching factor of weld joint with two and four soft root passes was around 0.80--0.90 in the soft root layer. It was expected that uneven strength distribution along the fatigue crack tip line would affect fracture initiation behavior of all three different weld joints. The metallographical post-test sectioning has revealed the initiation points mainly at the lowest weld metal strength.

  18. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  19. A Study of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thick Welded Joints of a Cr - Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. Kon; Chien, Yi Cheng

    2015-07-01

    The effect of stress-relieving tempering on the mechanical properties of a welded joint of a high-strength low-alloy steel SAE 4130 (0.3% C - 1% Cr - 0.25% Mo) obtained by multipass arc welding with nonconsumable electrode is studied. The steel is quenched and tempered before the welding. An optimum tempering mode providing a good combination of the characteristics of strength, ductility and toughness of the welded joint is suggested.

  20. Low Distortion Welded Joints for NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    M. Denault, M Viola, W. England

    2009-02-19

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) required precise positioning of the field coils in order to generate suitable magnetic fields. A set of three modular field coils were assembled to form the Half Field-Period Assemblies (HPA). Final assembly of the HPA required a welded shear plate to join individual coils in the nose region due to the geometric limitations and the strength constraints. Each of the modular coil windings was wound on a stainless steel alloy (Stellalloy) casting. The alloy is similar to austenitic 316 stainless steel. During the initial welding trials, severe distortion, of approximately 1/16", was observed in the joint caused by weld shrinkage. The distortion was well outside the requirements of the design. Solutions were attempted through several simultaneous routes. The joint design was modified, welding processes were changed, and specialized heat reduction techniques were utilized. A final joint design was selected to reduce the amount of weld material needed to be deposited, while maintaining adequate penetration and strength. Several welding processes and techniques using Miller Axcess equipment were utilized that significantly reduced heat input. The final assembly of the HPA was successful. Distortion was controlled to 0.012", well within the acceptable design tolerance range of 0.020" over a 3.5 foot length.

  1. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  2. Towards the problem of forming full strength welded joints on aluminum alloy sheets. Part II: AA7475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Tatiana; Tarasov, Sergey; Eliseev, Alexander; Fortuna, Anastasiya

    2016-11-01

    The microstructural evolution in welded joint zones obtained both by friction stir welding and ultrasonic- assisted friction stir welding on dispersion hardened 7475 aluminum alloy has been examined together with the analysis of mechanical strength and microhardness. It was established that ultrasonic-assisted friction stir provided leveled microhardness profiles across the weld zones as well as higher joint strength as compared to those of standard friction stir welding.

  3. Photosensors used to maintain welding electrode-to-joint alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, J. B.

    1965-01-01

    Photosensors maintain electrode-to-joint alignment in automatic precision arc welding. They detect the presence and relative position of a joint to be welded and actuate a servomechanism to guide the welding head accordingly thus permitting alignment for more than straight line or true circle joints.

  4. Advanced tests of wet welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Pachniuk, I.; Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R.; Szelagowski, P.; Drews, O.

    1994-12-31

    Wet Welding has in former times only been applied to secondary structural components. Nowadays wet welding has become an upcoming repair process due to high process flexibility, its low investment costs and its high versatility. Even the quality of the wet welded joints has been improved remarkably due to intensive and concentrated development activities. However, especially in the North Sea regions owners of offshore structures and classifying authorities still hesitate to recognize the process as a reliable alternative to dry hyperbaric welding repair methods. It therefore requires further activities especially in the field of data development for life prediction of such repaired components. Advanced testing methods are necessary, additional design criteria are to be developed and achievable weldment quality data are to be included in acknowledged and approved standards and recommendations to improve the credibility of the process and to solve the problem of quality assurance for wet welded joints. A comprehensive project, sponsored by the European Community under the Thermie Programme, is in progress to develop new testing procedures to generate the required data and design criteria for the future application of the wet welding process to main components of offshore structures. It is the aim of the project to establish additional fitness for purpose data for this process.

  5. Automated thresholding in radiographic image for welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazid, Haniza; Arof, Hamzah; Yazid, Hafizal

    2012-03-01

    Automated detection of welding defects in radiographic images becomes non-trivial when uneven illumination, contrast and noise are present. In this paper, a new surface thresholding method is introduced to detect defects in radiographic images of welding joints. In the first stage, several image processing techniques namely fuzzy c means clustering, region filling, mean filtering, edge detection, Otsu's thresholding and morphological operations method are utilised to locate the area in which defects might exist. This is followed by the implementation of inverse surface thresholding with partial differential equation to locate isolated areas that represent the defects in the second stage. The proposed method obtained a promising result with high precision.

  6. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  7. Adaptive tracking of weld joints using active contour model in arc-welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeseon; Koh, Kyoungchul; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper presents a vision processing scheme to automatic weld joint tracking in robotic arc welding process. Particular attention is concentrated on its robustness against various optical disturbances, such as arc glares and weld spatters radiating from the melted weld pool. Underlying the developed vision processing is a kind of model-based pattern searching, which is necessarily accompanied by two separate stages of modeling and tracking. In the modeling stage, a syntactic approach is adopted to identify unknown weld joint structure. The joint profile identified in the modeling stage is used as a starting point for successive tracking of variations in the geometry of weld joint during welding, which is automatically achieved by an active contour model technology following feature- based template matching. The performance of the developed scheme is investigated through a series of practical welding experiments.

  8. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  9. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  10. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  11. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  12. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser-arc hybrid welding joint of GH909 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Yan, Fei; Liu, Sang; Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Chunming; Hu, Xiyuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, laser-arc hybrid welding of 10 mm thick low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909 components was carried out to obtain a joint with good performance. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum and other methodologies. The results showed that weld joints with a desirable wineglass-shaped weld profile can be obtained employing appropriate process parameters. The different grains in between the upper central seam and the bottom seam were associated with the temperature gradient, the pool's flow and the welding thermal cycle. MC-type carbides and eutectic phases (γ+Laves) were produced at grain boundaries due to the component segregation during the welding process. In addition, γ‧ strengthening phase presented in the interior of grains, which kept a coherent relationship with the matrix. The lowest hardness value occurred in the weld center, which indicated that it was the weakest section in the whole joint. The average tensile strength of the joints reached to 632.90 MPa, nearly 76.84% of the base metal. The fracture analysis revealed that the fracture mode of the joint was ductile fracture and the main reason for joint failure was as a result of the occurrence of porosities produced in the weld during the welding process.

  14. Dissimilar Al/steel friction stir welding lap joints for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, D.; Spena, P. Russo; Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.

    2016-10-01

    A widespread usage of aluminum alloys for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with automotive steel grades. Dissimilar welding of aluminum alloys and steel grades poses some issues concerning the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, difference in physical and chemical properties of the parent metals, and poor wetting behavior of aluminum. Friction stir welding is considered to be a reasonable solution to obtain sound aluminum/steel joints. A study on the join quality of dissimilar lap joints of steel and aluminum alloy sheets after friction stir welding is proposed here. A low carbon steel is joined with AA6016 aluminum alloy to study preliminarily the feasibility to assembly car-body parts. The joints, welded with tool rotation and feed rate varying in a wide range, have been studied from a visual examination and microstructural point of view. Optical microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of the examined sheets in as-received and welded conditions. Micro-hardness measurements have been carried out to quantitatively analyze the local hardness of the welded joints. Set welding process parameters are identified to assemble without the presence of macroscopic defects the examined steel and aluminum welded parts.

  15. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  16. Frictional properties of jointed welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.

    1981-07-01

    The results of the experiments on simulated joints in welded tuff from the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff warrant the following conclusions: (1) The coefficient of friction of the joints is independent of normal stress at a given sliding velocity. (2) The coefficient of friction increases with both increasing time of stationary contact and decreasing sliding velocity. (3) Time and velocity dependence of friction is due to an increase in the real area of contact on the sliding surface, caused by asperity creep. (4) Joints in water-saturated tuff show a greater time and velocity dependence of friction than those in dehydrated tuff. (5) The enhanced time and velocity dependence of friction with water saturation is a result of increased creep at asperity contacts, which is in turn due to a reduction in the surface indentation hardness by hydrolytic weakening and/or stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Seam-Tracking for Friction Stir Welded Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Paul A.; Hendricks, Christopher E.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, D. M.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Lammlein, David H.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents a method for automatic seam-tracking in friction stir welding (FSW) of lap joints. In this method, tracking is accomplished by weaving the FSW tool back-and-forth perpendicular to the direction of travel during welding and monitoring force and torque signals. Research demonstrates the ability of this method to automatically track weld seam positions. Additionally, tensile and S-bend test result comparisons demonstrate that weaving most likely does not reduce weld quality. Finally, benefits of this weave-based method to FSW of lap joints are discussed and methods for incorporating it into existing friction stir welding control algorithms (such as axial load control) are examined.

  18. Predicting welding distortion in a panel structure with longitudinal stiffeners using inherent deformations obtained by inverse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results.

  19. Yield detection in aluminum welded joints using photostress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambrell, S. C., Jr.; Kavikondala, K.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work using photostress to analyze behavior of aluminum welded joints was useful to determine mechanical properties of the weld and parent materials along the centerline of the joint. It was shown that significant differences exist in the stress-strain characteristics at points beginning at the centerline of the weld and extending for a distance of one inch to either side of the weld. Because of the highly variable behavior detected in the previous work, it was decided to extend the work to investigate behavior of joints 1/8, 1/2, and 1.40 inches thick.

  20. The Influence of Modes of Deposition of Coatings on the Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Steels in Acidic Media;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Selivanov, Y. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, effect of welding on corrosion of welded joints of austenitic steel 12KH18N10T. It is shown that the use of pulsed - arc welding steel 12KH18N10T allows you to create a protective coating with dispersed structure with less thermal impact on the zone of the welded joint. Coating is of such structure allows 1.5 to 6 times to reduce the corrosion rate of welded joints of steel 12KH18N10T in active chemical environments. Pulse the process of deposition of coatings on welded joint of steels can be effectively used for the protection against corrosion in the repair of equipment of chemical industry. The results obtained can be recommended for use when welding a protective corrosion - resistant coatings on working surfaces of equipment of chemical productions.

  1. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Spot-Welded Joints Based on Fracture Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanifard, S.; Bonab, M. A. Mohtadi; Jabbari, Gh.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fatigue crack propagation life of resistance spot welds in tensile-shear specimens is investigated based on the calculation of stress intensity factors and J-integral using three-dimensional finite element method. For comparison, experimental works on 5083-O aluminum alloy spot-welded joints have been carried out to verify the numerical predictions of fatigue crack propagation of welded joints. A lot of analyses have been performed to obtain stress intensity factors and J-integral in tensile-shear specimens of spot-welded joints by using commercial software ANSYS. These gathered data have been formulated by using statistical software SPSS. The results of fatigue propagation life and predicted fatigue crack path revealed very good agreement with the experimental fatigue test data and photograph of cross-section of the fatigued spot-weld specimens.

  2. Properties of welded joints in laser welding of aeronautic aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of the laser welding of the aluminum-lithium alloys (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of the nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by the cold plastic deformation method on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys.

  3. Investigation of Torsional Strength of the VT6 Weld Joint Produced by Linear Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanova, G. R.; Kabirov, R. R.; Karavaeva, M. V.; Ershova, Yu. A.; Zhilyaev, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Results of measurement of torsional strength of the weld joint of the VT6 titanium alloy produced by linear friction welding are presented. For a comparison, the same method was used to test monolithic specimens of the VT6 alloy. Torsional strength values of the weld joint (τUS = 861 MPa and φ = 110°) correspond to the strength of the monolithic material. In this case, the specimens fail along the base metal.

  4. Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Joints Repaired by Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C.; Infante, V.

    2014-04-01

    Fatigue is undoubtedly the most important design criterion in aeronautic structures. Although friction stir-welded joints are characterized by a high mechanical performance, they can enclose some defects, especially in their root. These defects along with the relatively low residual stresses of the friction stir-welding thermomechanical cycle can turn into primary sources of crack initiation. In this context, this article deals with the fatigue behavior of friction stir-welded joints subjected to surface smoothing by grinding improvement technique. The 4-mm-thick aluminum alloy 2024-T351 was used in this study. The fatigue strength of the base material, joints in the as-welded condition, and the sound and defective friction stir-welded joints improved by grinding were investigated in detail. The tests were carried out with a constant amplitude loading and with a stress ratio of R = 0. The fatigue results show that an improvement in fatigue behavior was obtained in the joints repaired by superficial grinding technique. The weld grinding technique is better especially for lower loads and increases the high cycle fatigue strength. The fatigue strength of the improved welded joints was higher than that of the base material.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-07-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  6. Tracking on the joint during the electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, V.; Bogdanov, V.; Belozertsev, V.; Uspenskiy, N.

    2016-11-01

    In the article the description of device, which provides automatic positioning of electron beam relative to joint of welded parts during welding, is given. Extremum seeking based on synchronous detection of sensor signal (X-ray or secondary emission) is realized in the device. Measurements are made when beam goes out of the channel following the welding direction. The application of synchronous detection is possible due to the fact that during joint scanning with electron beam harmonics, carrying data about beam position relative to the joint appear in the joint sensor signal spectrum.

  7. Mechanical behavior study of laser welded joints for DP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are gaining considerable market shares in the automotive industry. The development and application of Dual Phase (DP) steel is just a consistent step towards high-strength steel grades with improved mechanical behavior. Tailor welded blanks with DP steel are promoted in the application of Body-In-White (BIW) structure by the automotive industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that are laser welded together before stamping. Applied cases of tailor welded blanks of high strength steels on the automotive structural parts are investigated in this paper. The mechanical behavior of laser welded joints for DP steel is studied. Microstructure of laser welded joints for DP steel was observed by SEM. Martensite in the weld seam explains the higher strength of welded joints than the base metal. Results show that the strain safety tolerance of laser welded seam for high strength steel can meet the requirement of automobile parts for stamping if the location of laser welded seam is designed reasonably.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  9. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, S. V. Ivanov, K. V. Eliseev, A. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu. Ivanov, A. N. Rubtsov, V. E. Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  10. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 7050-T7451 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, T.; Zhou, W. L.; Li, Z. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    The ultra-high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050-T7451, was friction stir welded at a constant tool rotation speed of 600 rpm. Defect-free welds were successfully obtained at a welding speed of 100 mm/min, but lack-of-penetration defect was formed at a welding speed of 400 mm/min. The as-received material was mainly composed of coarse-deformed grains with some fine recrystallized grains. Fine equiaxed, dynamic, recrystallized grains were developed in the stir zone, and elongated grains were formed in the thermomechanically affected zone with dynamic recovered subgrains. Grain sizes in different regions of friction stir-welded joints varied depending on the welding speed. The sizes and distributions of precipitates changed in different regions of the joint, and wider precipitation free zone was developed in the heat-affected zone compared to that in the base material. Hardness of the heat-affected zone was obviously lower than that of the base material, and the softening region width was related to the welding speed. The tensile strength of the defect-free joints increased with the increasing welding speed, while the lack-of-penetration defect greatly reduced the tensile strength. The tensile fracture path was significantly influenced by the position and orientation of lack-of-penetration defect.

  11. Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

    1980-01-03

    The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  12. Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, Jett B.; Murphy, Jimmy L.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  13. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1930-02-06

    STRENGTH OF WELDED JOINTS IN TUBULAR MEMBERS FOR AIRCRAFT By H. L. WHITTEMORE and W. C. BRUEGGEMAN Bureau of Standards ——— - ..— .-.— .— .— —___ 107346->1...331 331 332 341 341 342 343 343 343 347 347 347 367 .— .— — ● REPORT ~0, 348 STRENGTH OF WELDED JOINTS IN TUBULAR MELMBERS FOR AIRCRAFT By H. L...airoraft welds has been publi~hed)lit ig beh%redthat euch tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerablemdueto the

  14. Residual stress distribution depending on welding sequence in multi-pass welded joints with x-shaped groove

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Hayashi, Makoto; Hattori, Toshio

    2000-02-01

    Residual stress in a large-diameter multi-pass butt-welded pipe joint was calculated for various welding pass sequences by thermal elastic-plastic analysis using the finite element method. The pipe joint used had an X-shaped groove, and the sequences of welding passes were changed. The distribution of residual stress depends on the welding pass sequences. The mechanism that produces residual stress in the welded pipe joint was studied in detail by using a simple prediction model. An optimum welding sequence for preventing stress-corrosion cracking was determined from the residual stress distribution.

  15. Effect of Peculiarities of Heat Transfer, Diffusion and Phase Transformation on Joint Formation During Welding of Dissimilar Materials by High Power Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, Gleb; Klimova, Olga; Valdaytseva, Ekaterina

    The article describes mathematical models of diffusion and thermal processes for welding of dissimilar materials and kinetic model of diffusion-controlled deposition and growth of intermetallic inclusions in the weld. Developed models were combined and implemented in the model of weld joint formation for dissimilar materials. To verify a model the microstructure analysis of weld joints and elemental analysis in the diffusion zone by SEM has been made for welding of systems Fe-Cu, Al-Ti, Fe-Al. The good agreement between calculated and experimental data has been obtained. Examples of developed technologies of welding of dissimilar materials using high-power fiber lasers were discussed also.

  16. Portable power tool machines weld joints in field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spier, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Portable routing machine for cutting precise weld joints required by nonstandard pipe sections used in the field for transfer of cryogenic fluids. This tool is adaptable for various sizes of pipes and has a selection of router bits for different joint configurations.

  17. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittemore, H L; Brueggeman, W C

    1931-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to make available to the aircraft industry authoritative information on the strength, weight, and cost of a number of types of welded joints. This information will, also, assist the aeronautics branch in its work of licensing planes by providing data from which the strength of a given joint may be estimated. As very little material on the strength of aircraft welds has been published, it is believed that such tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerable value to the aircraft industry. Forty joints were welded under procedure specifications and tested to determine their strengths. The weight and time required to fabricate were also measured for each joint.

  18. Characterization of Nitinol Laser-Weld Joints by Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlschlögel, Markus; Gläßel, Gunter; Sanchez, Daniela; Schüßler, Andreas; Dillenz, Alexander; Saal, David; Mayr, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Joining technology is an integral part of today's Nitinol medical device manufacturing. Besides crimping and riveting, laser welding is often applied to join components made from Nitinol to Nitinol, as well as Nitinol components to dissimilar materials. Other Nitinol joining techniques include adhesive bonding, soldering, and brazing. Typically, the performance of joints is assessed by destructive mechanical testing, on a process validation base. In this study, a nondestructive testing method—photothermal radiometry—is applied to characterize small Nitinol laser-weld joints used to connect two wire ends via a sleeve. Two different wire diameters are investigated. Effective joint connection cross sections are visualized using metallography techniques. Results of the nondestructive testing are correlated to data from destructive torsion testing, where the maximum torque at fracture is evaluated for the same joints and criteria for the differentiation of good and poor laser-welding quality by nondestructive testing are established.

  19. Interfacial and Mechanical Behavior of AA5456 Filling Friction-Stir-Welded Lap Joints Using Similar and Dissimilar Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmand, Saleh Alaei; Mirsalehi, Seyyed Ehsan; Omidvar, Hamid; Safarkhanian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-10-01

    In this article, filling friction stir welding (FFSW) of the remaining exit holes of AA5456 alloy friction-stir-welded lap joints was studied. For this purpose, the influences of different rotating speeds, holding times, and pin materials, AA5456 and AA2024, on the metallurgical structure and joint strength were investigated. The observations showed that defect-free lap joints are successfully obtainable by this method using similar and dissimilar consumable pins. The results indicated that the higher rotating speed and holding time adversely affect the weld performance. The best result was achieved for 30 seconds holding time, 500 rpm rotating speed, and AA2024 consumable pin. In this condition, a lap shear strength of 10 pct higher than that of the nonfilled joint, equivalent to about 94 pct of the original defect-free FSW joint, was obtained, whereas the GTAW filled joint showed only approximately 87 pct of the continuous FSW joint strength.

  20. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  1. Solder joint failure localization of welded joint based on acoustic emission beamforming.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiandong; Xiao, Denghong; Shan, Yingchun; Pan, Qiang; He, Tian; Gao, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A localization approach of welded joint damage is proposed based on acoustic emission (AE) beamforming. In this method, a uniform line array is introduced to detect the AE signal of welded joints in specified area. In order to investigate the influence of fillet and crimping commonly existing in a welded plate structure during the AE wave propagation process, the finite element method (FEM) is applied to simulate the behavior of AE wave in the specimen. The simulation localization results indicate that the proposed localization approach can effectively localize AE sources although there exist the fillet and crimping, and it is also validated by the pencil-lead-broken test on rectangular steel tube with welded joints. Finally, the proposed method is adopted to localize the failure of solder joint in operation vibration condition. The proposed method is successful to localize the compact AE source caused by the cracked joint based on wavelet packet transform.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Tension Properties for Al-Cu Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints with GTN Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Sun, Feng-Yang; Cao, Fang-Li; Chen, Shu-Jun; Barkey, Mark E.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical simulation of tensile fracture behavior on Al-Cu alloy friction stir-welded joint was performed with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model. The parameters of the GTN model were studied in each region of the friction stir-welded joint by means of inverse identification. Based on the obtained parameters, the finite element model of the welded joint was built to predict the fracture behavior and tension properties. Good agreement can be found between the numerical and experimental results in the location of the tensile fracture and the mechanical properties.

  3. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  4. Quantitative metal magnetic memory reliability modeling for welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haiyan; Dang, Yongbin; Wang, Ben; Leng, Jiancheng

    2016-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory(MMM) testing has been widely used to detect welded joints. However, load levels, environmental magnetic field, and measurement noises make the MMM data dispersive and bring difficulty to quantitative evaluation. In order to promote the development of quantitative MMM reliability assessment, a new MMM model is presented for welded joints. Steel Q235 welded specimens are tested along the longitudinal and horizontal lines by TSC-2M-8 instrument in the tensile fatigue experiments. The X-ray testing is carried out synchronously to verify the MMM results. It is found that MMM testing can detect the hidden crack earlier than X-ray testing. Moreover, the MMM gradient vector sum K vs is sensitive to the damage degree, especially at early and hidden damage stages. Considering the dispersion of MMM data, the K vs statistical law is investigated, which shows that K vs obeys Gaussian distribution. So K vs is the suitable MMM parameter to establish reliability model of welded joints. At last, the original quantitative MMM reliability model is first presented based on the improved stress strength interference theory. It is shown that the reliability degree R gradually decreases with the decreasing of the residual life ratio T, and the maximal error between prediction reliability degree R 1 and verification reliability degree R 2 is 9.15%. This presented method provides a novel tool of reliability testing and evaluating in practical engineering for welded joints.

  5. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  7. Design consideration for wet welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V.; Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R.; Lafaye, G.

    1996-12-01

    Wet welding has become a joining technique that under certain circumstances can provide results which cannot be distinguished between wet or dry production and the achievable mechanical quality is comparable to dry atmospheric welds. Wet welding is not a process which can be applied easily and which can be properly handled by untrained diver welders. Wet welding is more than any other kind of welding process or procedure a joining technique that requires the full job-concentration and -knowledge of an excellent trained and skilled diver welder throughout the whole production time, who is 100% identifying himself with his task. Furthermore he must be fully aware of the production requirements and possible metallurgical/environmental reactions and outcomes. He must be able to be fully concentrated on the process performance throughout his total work shift. In short: he must be an outstanding expert in his field. The following paper will highlight these subjects and show the necessity of their exact observation to achieve excellent quality in wet welding.

  8. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal and Heat-Affected Zone of Electron Beam-Welded Joints of HG785D Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Jianmin; Tan, Caiwang; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Junqiang

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum electron beam welding (EBW) process was employed to butt weld 10-mm-thick HG785D high-strength steels. The penetration into the steel was adjusted by beam current. Microstructures at weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) regions were comparatively observed. Mechanical properties of the EBWed joints including Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were evaluated. The results indicated that microstructures at the weld metal consisted of coarse lath martensite and a small amount of acicular martensite, while that in the HAZ was tempered sorbite and martensite. The grain size in the weld metal was found to be larger than that in the HAZ, and its proportion in weld metal was higher. The hardness in the weld metal was higher than the HAZ and base metal. The tensile strength and impact toughness in the HAZ was higher than that in the weld metal. All the behaviors were related to microstructure evolution caused by higher cooling rates and state of base metal. The fracture surfaces of tensile and impact tests on the optimized joint were characterized by uniform and ductile dimples. The results differed significantly from that obtained using arc welding process.

  9. High power laser welding of thick steel plates in a horizontal butt joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Yazdian, N.; Ma, J.; Kovacevic, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this investigation, two laser-based welding techniques, autogenous laser welding (ALW) and laser welding assisted with a cold wire (LWACW), were applied to join thick plates of a structural steel (A36) in a horizontal narrow gap butt joint configuration. The main practical parameters including welding method and laser power were varied to get the sound weld with a requirement to achieve a full penetration with the reinforcement at the back side of weld in just one pass. The weld-bead shape, cross-section and mechanical properties were evaluated by profilometer, micro-hardness test and optical microscope. In order to investigate the stability of laser-induced plasma plume, the emitted optical spectra was detected and analyzed by the spectroscopy analysis. It was found that at the laser power of 7 kW a fully penetrated weld with a convex back side of weld could be obtained by the LWACW. The microstructural examinations showed that for the ALW the acicular ferrite and for the LWACW the pearlite were formed in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The prediction of microstructure based on continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram and cooling curves obtained by thermocouple measurement were in good agreement with each other. According to the plasma ionization values obtained from the spectroscopy analysis the plume for both processes was recognized as dominated weakly ionized plasma including the main vaporized elemental composition. At the optimum welding condition (LWACW at the laser power of 7 kW) the fluctuation of the electron temperature was reduced. The spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that at the higher laser power more of the elemental compositions such as Mn and Fe were evaporated.

  10. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    ) Modeling of hybrid laser-GTAW as a preheating source welding process of galvanized steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration (Chapter 6). Experimental results demonstrated that completely defect-free lap joints in galvanized high strength steels can be obtained in a gap-free configuration by using the laser welding process with the GTAW torch preheating and hybrid laser-VPGTAW welding technique. Effects of the welding parameters on the weld quality are discussed. The mechanical properties of the welded joints are studied. A machine vision system and an acoustic emission (AE) signal acquisition system are employed to acquire the images of the molten pool and the emitted AE signals on-line. Furthermore, image processing and Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) techniques are employed to analyze the acquired images of the molten pool and the collected AE signals. The acquisition attempts are composed of (1) monitoring the weld defects by machine vision; (2) monitoring the formation of spatters from the AE signals; (3) detecting the weld modes by the induced plume; and (4) monitoring the instability of the welding process by machine vision. In addition, the numerical results have been validated by the experimental data.

  11. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of 9%Cr/CrMoV Dissimilar Steels Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Lu, Fenggui; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xiaojin; Huo, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Advanced 9%Cr steel with good heat resistance and CrMoV with good toughness were chosen as candidate materials to fabricate combined rotor for steam turbine operating at over 620 °C. But the great difference in base metals properties presents a challenge in achieving sound defect-free joint with optimal properties in dissimilar welded rotor. In this paper, appropriate selection of filler metal, welding parameters, and post-weld heat treatment was combined to successfully weld 1100-mm-diameter 9%Cr/CrMoV dissimilar experimental rotor through ultra-narrow gap submerge arc welding. Some properties such as hardness, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) combined with microstructural characterization qualify the integrity of the weld. Microstructural analysis indicated the presence of high-temperature tempered martensite as the phase responsible for the improved properties obtained in the weld. The Coffin-Manson parameters were obtained by fitting the data in LCF test, while the conditional fatigue strength was derived from the HCF test based on S-N curve. Analysis of hardness profile showed that the lowest value occurred at heat-affected zone adjacent to base metal which represents the appropriate location of fracture for the samples after LCF and HCF tests.

  12. Influence of the Strength Mismatch of a Narrow Gap Welded Joint of SA508 on the Plastic η Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J. M.; Huh, Y.; Seok, C. S.

    2012-11-01

    In this article, the influence of the strength mismatch of a narrow gap welded joint of SA508 on the η factor was evaluated. The η factor is the principal parameter that determines the plastic portion of the J-integral. The specimens for tensile and hardness tests were collected from piping with narrow gap welding and the stress-strain curve and hardness were obtained from those. From these results, the Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) constant was obtained. Also, the finite element analysis was performed with variations in the strength mismatch and the weld width. The η factor equation considering the strength mismatch and the weld width of a narrow gap welded joint was suggested.

  13. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF A TYPICAL WELDED JOINT BETWEEN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF A TYPICAL WELDED JOINT BETWEEN THE MAIN GIRDER AND THE FLOOR BEAM, SHOWING THE ATTACHMENT OF A LATERAL BRACING MEMBER AT THIS POINT, SOUTH GIRDER, PANEL 5, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST Ryan & Wieskamp - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  14. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    and around particle inclusions within the WZ. In the case of FSW aluminum to steel , the structure often seen is one of steel particles dispersed...the microstructure and mechanical performance of dissimilar FSWs between aluminum and steel , this study focuses on the characterization of the...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM - STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in

  15. Microstructure, Hardness, and Residual Stress Distributions in T-Joint Weld of HSLA S500MC Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frih, Intissar; Montay, Guillaume; Adragna, Pierre-Antoine

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the characterization of the microstructure, hardness, and residual stress distributions of MIG-welded high-strength low-alloy S500MC steel. The T-joint weld for 10-mm-thick plates was joined using a two passes MIG welding technology. The contour method was performed to measure longitudinal welding residual stress. The obtained results highlighted a good correlation between the metallurgical phase constituents and hardness distribution within the weld zones. In fact, the presence of bainite and smaller ferrite grain size in the weld-fusion zone might be the reason for the highest hardness measured in this region. A similar trend of the residual stress and hardness distributions was also obtained.

  16. Microstructure, Hardness, and Residual Stress Distributions in T-Joint Weld of HSLA S500MC Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frih, Intissar; Montay, Guillaume; Adragna, Pierre-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the characterization of the microstructure, hardness, and residual stress distributions of MIG-welded high-strength low-alloy S500MC steel. The T-joint weld for 10-mm-thick plates was joined using a two passes MIG welding technology. The contour method was performed to measure longitudinal welding residual stress. The obtained results highlighted a good correlation between the metallurgical phase constituents and hardness distribution within the weld zones. In fact, the presence of bainite and smaller ferrite grain size in the weld-fusion zone might be the reason for the highest hardness measured in this region. A similar trend of the residual stress and hardness distributions was also obtained.

  17. Investigation of the Microstructure of Joints of Aluminum Alloys Produced by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-02-01

    Special features of the microstructure of joints of aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-copper alloys produced by friction stir welding are analyzed. It is demonstrated that a layered structure with ultradisperse grains is produced by friction stir welding at the center of the weld joint. An analogy is drawn between the microstructures of joints produced by friction stir welding and surface layer produced by sliding friction.

  18. A self-organizing fuzzy control approach to arc sensor for weld joint tracking in gas metal arc welding of butt joints

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J. ); Kim, J.W.

    1993-02-01

    For the artificial intelligence (AI) approach to automatic control, the fuzzy rule-based control schemes have been successfully applied to the control of complex processes. The arc welding process is one of the processes due to the fact that it possesses complex and nonlinear characteristics such as a moving distributed heat source, a current path and metal transfer. One possible solution to the design of an effective controller suitable for such a process is to use the fuzzy control scheme. The fuzzy rule-based control can easily realize the heuristic rules obtained from human experiences that cannot be expressed in mathematical form. In this study, an arc sensor, which utilizes the electrical signal obtained from the welding arc itself, was developed for CO[sub 2] gas metal arc welding of butt joints using the fuzzy set theory. A simple fuzzy controller without any adaptation was implemented for the weld joint tracking. A set of fixed rules, which was designed based upon the experiments, and a self-organizing fuzzy controller, which could improve the control rules automatically, were examined. Through a series of experiments, the performance and learning action of the proposed self-organizing fuzzy controller were assessed.

  19. Influences of post-weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on studies of the influences of various post-weld heat treatment procedures on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints. Rolled plates of 6-mm thick AA6061 aluminum alloy were used to fabricate the joints. Solution treatment, an artificial aging treatment and a combination of both were given to the welded joints. Tensile properties such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and joint efficiency were evaluated. Microstructures of the welded joints were analyzed using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A simple artificial aging treatment was found to be more beneficial than other treatment methods to enhance the tensile properties of the friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints.

  20. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints with Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Huggett, Daniel J.; Liao, T. Warren; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process where joint properties are dependent on welding process parameters. In the current study three critical process parameters including spindle speed (??), plunge force (????), and welding speed (??) are considered key factors in the determination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of welded aluminum alloy joints. A total of 73 weld schedules were welded and tensile properties were subsequently obtained experimentally. It is observed that all three process parameters have direct influence on UTS of the welded joints. Utilizing experimental data, an optimized adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model has been developed to predict UTS of FSW joints. A total of 1200 models were developed by varying the number of membership functions (MFs), type of MFs, and combination of four input variables (??,??,????,??????) utilizing a MATLAB platform. Note EFI denotes an empirical force index derived from the three process parameters. For comparison, optimized artificial neural network (ANN) models were also developed to predict UTS from FSW process parameters. By comparing ANFIS and ANN predicted results, it was found that optimized ANFIS models provide better results than ANN. This newly developed best ANFIS model could be utilized for prediction of UTS of FSW joints.

  1. Influence of control parameters on the joint tracking performance of a coaxial weld vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, K. J.; Weeks, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of a series of evaluations of a vision-based welding control sensor for the Space Shuttle Main Engine Robotic Welding System is described. The robotic welding system is presently under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This evaluation determines the standard control response parameters necessary for proper trajectory of the welding torch along the joint.

  2. Effect of Welding Speed on Mechanical Properties and the Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir Welded 7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Li, Zhaoxi; Sun, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    The effect of welding speed on the microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and strain-hardening behavior of friction stir welded (FSWed) high-strength AA7075-T651 was investigated. Large intermetallic particles and grains, whose sizes increased at lower welding speeds, were present in the heat-affected zone. FSWed joints fabricated at the higher welding speed or lower strain rates exhibited higher strength, joint efficiency and ductility than those fabricated at lower welding speeds or higher strain rates. A maximum joint efficiency of 97.5% and an elongation to failure of 15.9% were obtained using a welding speed of 400 mm/min at a strain rate of 10-5 s-1. The hardening capacity, strain-hardening exponent and strain-hardening rate of the FSWed joints were significantly higher than those of the base material, but materials exhibited stage III and stage IV hardening characteristics. The results morphology of the fracture surfaces is consistent with the above results.

  3. Control system architecture for robotic welding of tubular joints

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, O.; Holm, H.; Lauridsen, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the architecture of a geometry model and sensor based control system for robotic welding of tubular joints. The functional architecture of the system is described with the main emphasis on the overall mode of operation of the system. Furthermore, it is described how measurements of the physical seam profile are used to update a reference geometry model, and how welding control variables are generated based on the updated reference geometry. Finally, it is illustrated how the use of a reference geometry can improve the flexibility and robustness of the system.

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  5. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  6. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  7. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  8. Prediction of Welded Joint Strength in Plasma Arc Welding: A Comparative Study Using Back-Propagation and Radial Basis Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Kadivendi; Vundavilli, Pandu R.; Manzoor Hussain, M.; Saiteja, M.

    2016-09-01

    Welding input parameters such as current, gas flow rate and torch angle play a significant role in determination of qualitative mechanical properties of weld joint. Traditionally, it is necessary to determine the weld input parameters for every new welded product to obtain a quality weld joint which is time consuming. In the present work, the effect of plasma arc welding parameters on mild steel was studied using a neural network approach. To obtain a response equation that governs the input-output relationships, conventional regression analysis was also performed. The experimental data was constructed based on Taguchi design and the training data required for neural networks were randomly generated, by varying the input variables within their respective ranges. The responses were calculated for each combination of input variables by using the response equations obtained through the conventional regression analysis. The performances in Levenberg-Marquardt back propagation neural network and radial basis neural network (RBNN) were compared on various randomly generated test cases, which are different from the training cases. From the results, it is interesting to note that for the above said test cases RBNN analysis gave improved training results compared to that of feed forward back propagation neural network analysis. Also, RBNN analysis proved a pattern of increasing performance as the data points moved away from the initial input values.

  9. Ultrasonic spot welding of dissimilar materials: characterization of welded joints and parametric optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, M. P.; Sahoo, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    Material joining is one of the key manufacturing processes used to assemble metallic and non-metallic parts for several applications. But the industries are facing many difficulties in joining of thin sheets of dissimilar metals by the conventional welding process because of their differences in chemical composition, physical and mechanical properties. Thus, ultrasonic welding is a solid state joining process used for joining of small elements in microelectronics industries. In this process, acoustic horn and booster are the important assets. The accuracy and strength of the welding depend mainly on their geometry. This proposed work deals with the design and modelling of an acoustic stepped sonotrode with booster using finite element analysis (FEA). From this analysis, the actual length of the horn is obtained by gradually decreasing its theoretical length. The quality of the weld is reckoned by its weld strength and the combinations of different process parameters. These are examined using the principal components coupled with grey relational analysis approach which is showing good agreement between the predicted values with experimental results. Fractographic examination of weld zone and hardness are also used to explore the weld quality.

  10. Effect of Boric Acid Concentration on Viscosity of Slag and Property of Weld Metal Obtained from Underwater Wet Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ning; Guo, Wei; Xu, Changsheng; Du, Yongpeng; Feng, Jicai

    2015-06-01

    Underwater wet welding is a crucial repair and maintenance technology for nuclear plant. A boric acid environment raises a new challenge for the underwater welding maintenance of nuclear plant. This paper places emphasis on studying the influence of a boric acid environment in nuclear plant on the underwater welding process. Several groups of underwater wet welding experiments have been conducted in boric acid aqueous solution with different concentration (0-35000 ppm). The viscosity of the welding slag and the mechanical properties of welds, such as the hardness, strength, and elongation, have been studied. The results show that with increasing boric acid concentration, the viscosity of the slag decreases first and then increases at a lower temperature (less than 1441 °C). However, when the temperature is above 1480 °C, the differences between the viscosity measurements become less pronounced, and the viscosity tends to a constant value. The hardness and ductility of the joints can be enhanced significantly, and the maximum strength of the weld metal can be reached at 2300 ppm.

  11. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  12. Detection of micro gap weld joint by using magneto-optical imaging and Kalman filtering compensated with RBF neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangdong; Chen, Yuquan; You, Deyong; Xiao, Zhenlin; Chen, Xiaohui

    2017-02-01

    An approach for seam tracking of micro gap weld whose width is less than 0.1 mm based on magneto optical (MO) imaging technique during butt-joint laser welding of steel plates is investigated. Kalman filtering(KF) technology with radial basis function(RBF) neural network for weld detection by an MO sensor was applied to track the weld center position. Because the laser welding system process noises and the MO sensor measurement noises were colored noises, the estimation accuracy of traditional KF for seam tracking was degraded by the system model with extreme nonlinearities and could not be solved by the linear state-space model. Also, the statistics characteristics of noises could not be accurately obtained in actual welding. Thus, a RBF neural network was applied to the KF technique to compensate for the weld tracking errors. The neural network can restrain divergence filter and improve the system robustness. In comparison of traditional KF algorithm, the RBF with KF was not only more effectively in improving the weld tracking accuracy but also reduced noise disturbance. Experimental results showed that magneto optical imaging technique could be applied to detect micro gap weld accurately, which provides a novel approach for micro gap seam tracking.

  13. Joint properties of cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy laser-welded to Co-Cr alloy.

    PubMed

    Baba, Naoki; Watanabe, Ikuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hisatsune, Kunihiro; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated the joint properties of Fe-Pt alloy laser-welded to Co-Cr alloy. Cast plates (0.5 x 3.0 x 10 mm) were prepared with Fe-Pt and Co-Cr alloys. Fe-Pt plates were butted against Co-Cr plates and laser-welded using Nd:YAG laser. Control and homogeneously welded specimens were also prepared. Laser welding was performed with and without argon shielding. Tensile testing was conducted, and both fracture force (Ff: N) and elongation (El: %) were recorded. There were no differences in the Ff value between the specimens with and without argon shielding for the welded Fe-Pt/Co-Cr. Lower Ff value of the welded specimen was obtained in the order of Fe-Pt alloy < Fe-Pt/Co-Cr < Co-Cr alloy. The results indicated that Fe-Pt welded to Co-Cr had Ff values between the values of homogeneously welded Fe-Pt and Co-Cr alloys. Argon shielding, on the other hand, had no effect on the weld strength between Fe-Pt and Co-Cr alloys.

  14. Microstructure and Phase Composition of a Low-Power YAG Laser-MAG Welded Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. S.; Kang, L.; Ma, X.

    2008-12-01

    This article presents multipass hybrid welding of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) structure by using the low-power Nd:YAG laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding method. The purpose of this work is to investigate and qualify the effects of multipass hybrid welding of ASS structure on the microstructure, phase composition, weld postheat influence, and weld bead (WB) precipitated phase. The results demonstrated that sound welded joints without any solidification and shrinkage defects could be obtained after welding. The top and the bottom portions of the workpieces were joined completely. At room temperature, the microstructures of different regions in WB were different and the WB microstructures were composed of columnar γ-austenite and δ-ferrite phases. The fraction of δ-ferrite decreased from 20% to 10%, and its morphology changed orderly from lath, skeleton, vermicular to reticular with an increase in the number of welding cycles. Because of the influence of postweld heat, the weld metal phase chemistry at 3 mm distance from the top of the WB surface underwent a notable modification that corresponded to an evolution of the partition coefficients toward the parent metal values. This indicated corrosion resistance of the microstructure is equivalent to that of the parent metal.

  15. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  16. Effects of Mo, Ti and B on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Wet Welding Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duo; Guo, Ning; Xu, Changsheng; Li, Hongliang; Yang, Ke; Feng, Jicai

    2017-03-01

    Alloy components are designed and transferred into weld metal via electrode covering to address the deterioration of the microstructure and mechanical properties of underwater wet welds. Emphasis is placed on studying the effects that the Mo, Ti and B contents have on the microstructure, tensile strength and low-temperature toughness of the underwater wet welding joint. The as-welded metal obtained at a water depth of 3 m is analyzed. The results indicate that the addition of Mo depresses the formation of coarse pro-eutectoid ferrite. However, a higher Mo content (0.609 wt.%) results in the formation of lath-like bainite and martensite, which are harmful to the plasticity and toughness of the weld. Acicular ferrite nucleation increases with the combined addition of Ti and B. The deposited metal with the optimum alloy components ratio achieves good plasticity and toughness while maintaining its tensile strength of 592 MPa, with the impact toughness at 0 °C and elongation reaching 53.34 J and 16.2%, respectively.

  17. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  18. On the microstructure-polarization behavior correlation of a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, G.; Shaikh, H.; Parvathavarthini, N.; George, R. P.; Khatak, H. S.

    2001-08-01

    The use of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel necessitates its fabrication by the process of welding. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is a combination of many microstructures. In the present study, the corrosion properties of the base metal, weld metal, and the various regions of the HAZ are assessed with respect to their microstructures. The various microstructures in the HAZ were simulated by heat treatment of the normalized and tempered base metal at 1463, 1200, and 1138 K for 5 min followed by oil quenching. The microstructure of the base metal in the normalized and tempered condition revealed martensite laths with M23C6 carbides at lath boundaries, and uniform dispersion of fine, acicular M2C. The weld metal showed predominantly martensitic structure with dispersion of carbides. Simulation of the microstructures of the HAZ by heat treatment resulted in the following microstructures: coarse-grained martensite of 75 µm size at 1463 K, fine-grained martensite at 1200 K, and martensite + proeutectoid α-ferrite at 1138 K. In all cases, carbide precipitation was observed in the martensitic matrix. Microhardness measurements of HAZ-simulated base metal showed increasing hardness with increasing heat treatment temperature. The hardness values obtained corresponded very well with the regions of the actual HAZ in the weld joint. Electrochemical polarization studies were carried out on the base metal, weld metal, weldment (base metal + weld metal + HAZ), and the simulated HAZ structures in 0.5 M sulfuric acid solution. Critical current densities ( i crit1 and i crit2), passive current densities ( i pass and i sec-pass), and transpassive potential ( E tp) were the parameters considered for evaluating the corrosion resistance. The HAZ structures simulated at 1463 and 1200 K, corresponding to coarse- and fine-grained martensitic regions of an actual HAZ, had corrosion properties as good as the normalized and tempered base metal. Of the various simulated HAZ

  19. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  20. Grinding assembly, grinding apparatus, weld joint defect repair system, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Eric D.; Watkins, Arthur D.; Bitsoi, Rodney J.; Pace, David P.

    2005-09-27

    A grinding assembly for grinding a weld joint of a workpiece includes a grinder apparatus, a grinder apparatus includes a grinding wheel configured to grind the weld joint, a member configured to receive the grinding wheel, the member being configured to be removably attached to the grinder apparatus, and a sensor assembly configured to detect a contact between the grinding wheel and the workpiece. The grinding assembly also includes a processing circuitry in communication with the grinder apparatus and configured to control operations of the grinder apparatus, the processing circuitry configured to receive weld defect information of the weld joint from an inspection assembly to create a contour grinding profile to grind the weld joint in a predetermined shape based on the received weld defect information, and a manipulator having an end configured to carry the grinder apparatus, the manipulator further configured to operate in multiple dimensions.

  1. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  2. Butt Welding of 2205/X65 Bimetallic Sheet and Study on the Inhomogeneity of the Properties of the Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Ning-Nian; Zhang, Jian-Xun; Wang, Jian-Long; Bi, Zong-Yue

    2017-03-01

    The explosively welded 2205 duplex stainless steel/X65 pipe steel bimetallic sheets were butt jointed by multilayer and multi-pass welding (gas tungsten arc welding for the flyer and gas metal arc welding for the transition and parent layers of the bimetallic sheets). The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint were investigated. The results showed that in the thickness direction, microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint exhibited obvious inhomogeneity. The microstructures of parent filler layers consisted of acicular ferrite, widmanstatten ferrite, and a small amount of blocky ferrite. The microstructure of the transition layer and flyer layer consisted of both austenite and ferrite structures; however, the transition layer of weld had a higher volume fraction of austenite. The results of the microhardness test showed that in both weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the parent filler layers, the average hardness decreased with the increasing (from parent filler layer 1 to parent filler layer 3) welding heat input. The results of hardness test also indicated that the hardness of the WM and the HAZ for the flyer and transition layers was equivalent. The tensile test combined with Digital Specklegram Processing Technology demonstrated that the fracturing of the welded joint started at the HAZ of the flyer, and then the fracture grew toward the base metal of the parent flyer near the parent HAZ. The stratified impact test at -5 °C showed that the WM and HAZ of the flyer exhibited lower impact toughness, and the fracture mode was ductile and brittle mixed fracture.

  3. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  4. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  5. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  6. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  7. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  8. Metallurgical Effects of Shunting Current on Resistance Spot-Welded Joints of AA2219 Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Vardanjani, M.; Araee, A.; Senkara, J.; Jakubowski, J.; Godek, J.

    2016-08-01

    Shunting effect is the loss of electrical current via the secondary circuit provided due to the existence of previous nugget in a series of welding spots. This phenomenon influences on metallurgical aspects of resistance spot-welded (RSW) joints in terms of quality and performance. In this paper RSW joints of AA2219 sheets with 1 mm thickness are investigated metallurgically for shunted and single spots. An electro-thermal finite element analysis is performed on the RSW process of shunted spot and temperature distribution and variation are obtained. These predictions are then compared with experimental micrographs. Three values of 5 mm, 20 mm, and infinite (i.e., single spot) are assumed for welding distance. Numerical and experimental results are matching each other in terms of nugget and HAZ geometry as increasing distance raised nugget size and symmetry of HAZ. In addition, important effect of shunting current on nugget thickness, microstructure, and Copper segregation on HAZ grain boundaries were discovered. A quantitative analysis is also performed about the influence of welding distance on important properties including ratio of nugget thickness and diameter ( r t), ratio of HAZ area on shunted and free side of nugget ( r HA), and ratio of equivalent segregated and total amount of Copper, measured in sample ( r Cu) on HAZ. Increasing distance from 5 mm to infinite, indicated a gain of 111.04, -45.55, and -75.15% in r t, r HA, and r Cu, respectively, while obtained ratios for 20 mm welding distance was suitable compared to single spot.

  9. Type IV Creep Damage Behavior in Gr.91 Steel Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91 steel) is used as a key structural material for boiler components in ultra-supercritical (USC) thermal power plants at approximately 873 K (600 °C). The creep strength of welded joints of this steel decreases as a result of Type IV creep cracking that forms in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under long-term use at high temperatures. The current article aims to elucidate the damage processes and microstructural degradations that take place in the HAZ of these welded joints. Long-term creep tests for base metal, simulated HAZ, and welded joints were conducted at 823 K, 873 K, and 923 K (550 °C, 600 °C, and 650 °C). Furthermore, creep tests of thick welded joint specimens were interrupted at several time steps at 873 K (600 °C) and 90 MPa, after which the distribution and evolution of creep damage inside the plates were measured quantitatively. It was found that creep voids are initiated in the early stages (0.2 of life) of creep rupture life, which coalesce to form a crack at a later stage (0.8 of life). In a fine-grained HAZ, creep damage is concentrated chiefly in an area approximately 20 pct below the surface of the plate. The experimental creep damage distributions coincide closely with the computed results obtained by damage mechanics analysis using the creep properties of a simulated fine-grained HAZ. Both the concentration of creep strain and the high multiaxial stress conditions in the fine-grained HAZ influence the distribution of Type IV creep damage.

  10. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  11. Application of thermal methods for characterization of steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galietti, U.; Palumbo, D.

    2010-06-01

    Despite the large number of proposals in the field of fatigue prediction of welded joints, a globally accepted and unified theory, which applies easily to any load condition, does not exist. Real life components, indeed, differ in geometry and/or type of load from the structural design for which they are regarded by Standards, so that a lot of precautionary safety factors are used that lead to an underestimation of the actual fatigue life of joints. Infrared thermography has a great potential in this field, both from structural and thermomechanical points of view. It enables a full field stress analysis with a sufficient spatial resolution so that the complexity of the stress state at the weld toe and its time evolution are taken into account, emphasizing anomalies that may predict structural failure. A new methods for evaluation fatigue limit damage is presented in this paper and in particular interesting results derived from analysis of the evolution of thermoelastic signal phase. Variations in the value of signal phase indicate a not elastic behaviour and plastic dissipation in the material.

  12. The Diagnostic Method of Inner Parts of Welded Joints at Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarova, O.; Janovec, J.

    2010-06-22

    There is no possibility to check any inner part at real welded joint at nuclear power station (NPS) during operation because any destructive test cannot be used. In practice there is checked surface of weld. There are used four methodical instructions for the check of real welds: 1. The visual inspection, 2. The measurement of hardness, 3. The chemical composition checking and 4. The microstructure replica analysis. It is necessary to know how these information of weld surface are in accordance with characteristics of inner parts of weld. If there is not any difference between surface weld microstructure and internal weld microstructure of experimental weld it is supposed to that there is not any difference in other measured properties of welds. If is changed structural characteristics of microstructure, it is changed also hardness, chemical analysis etc. It was observed that the microstructure of real welds is almost the same with simulated weld and also the surface microstructure of experimental weld is in accordance with microstructure of inner parts of this weld. It can be supposed extension of lifetime of NPS if there is not any difference between replicas microstructure taken after six year operation of NPS and microstructure of inner parts of simulated weld is almost the same with surface microstructure.

  13. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir welded AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabari, S. Sree; Balasubramanian, V.; Malarvizhi, S.; Reddy, G. Madusudhan

    2015-12-01

    AA 2519-T87 is an aluminium alloy that principally contains Cu as an alloying element and is a new grade of Al-Cu alloy system. This material is a potential candidate for light combat military vehicles. Fusion welding of this alloy leads to hot cracking, porosity and alloy segregation in the weld metal region. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process which can overcome the above mentioned problems. However, the FSW of age hardenable aluminium alloys results in poor tensile properties in the as-welded condition (AW). Hence, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is used to enhance deteriorated tensile properties of FSW joints. In this work, the effect of PWHT, namely artificial ageing (AA) and solution treatment (ST) followed by ageing (STA) on the microstructure, tensile properties and microhardness were systematically investigated. The microstructural features of the weld joints were characterised using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tensile strength and microhardness of the joints were correlated with the grain size, precipitate size, shape and its distribution. From the investigation, it was found that STA treatment is beneficial in enhancing the tensile strength of the FSW joints of AA2519-T87 alloy and this is mainly due to the presence of fine and densely distributed precipitates in the stir zone.

  14. Effect of Welding Speed on Joint Features and Lap Shear Properties of Stationary Shoulder FSLWed Alclad 2024 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwu; Li, Zhengwei; Lv, Zan; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-02-01

    Using alclad 2024-T4 aluminum alloy as the research object, stationary shoulder technology was used in friction stir lap welding process to investigate its performance in this study. Joint features and mechanical properties of the lap joints were mainly investigated. Results show that lap joint with smooth surface, without shoulder marks and inner defects can be obtained using the stationary shoulder technology. With increasing the welding speed from 40 to 130 mm/min, effective sheet thickness (EST) at the advancing side (AS) shows rather stable values (from 1.17 to 1.31 mm), EST at the retreating side (RS) increases from 0.57 to 1.13 mm, and stir zone width decreases from 4.95 to 4.44 mm. Lap shear failure load of the SSFSLW joints firstly increases and then decreases with increasing the welding speed. Using 100 mm/min, the maximum failure loads of 15.85 and 9.01 kN were obtained when the RS and AS of the joint bear the main load during the lap shear test. Shear fracture mode and tensile fracture mode can be obtained during the lap shear test. All joints present ductile fracture mode.

  15. Effect of Welding Speed on Joint Features and Lap Shear Properties of Stationary Shoulder FSLWed Alclad 2024 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwu; Li, Zhengwei; Lv, Zan; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-03-01

    Using alclad 2024-T4 aluminum alloy as the research object, stationary shoulder technology was used in friction stir lap welding process to investigate its performance in this study. Joint features and mechanical properties of the lap joints were mainly investigated. Results show that lap joint with smooth surface, without shoulder marks and inner defects can be obtained using the stationary shoulder technology. With increasing the welding speed from 40 to 130 mm/min, effective sheet thickness (EST) at the advancing side (AS) shows rather stable values (from 1.17 to 1.31 mm), EST at the retreating side (RS) increases from 0.57 to 1.13 mm, and stir zone width decreases from 4.95 to 4.44 mm. Lap shear failure load of the SSFSLW joints firstly increases and then decreases with increasing the welding speed. Using 100 mm/min, the maximum failure loads of 15.85 and 9.01 kN were obtained when the RS and AS of the joint bear the main load during the lap shear test. Shear fracture mode and tensile fracture mode can be obtained during the lap shear test. All joints present ductile fracture mode.

  16. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  17. A Study on the compensation margin on butt welding joint of Large Steel plates during Shipbuilding construction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Jeong, H.; Ji, M.; Jeong, K.; Yun, C.; Lee, J.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines the characteristics of butt welding joint shrinkage for shipbuilding and marine structures main plate. The shrinkage strain of butt welding joint which is caused by the process of heat input and cooling, results in the difference between dimensions of the actual parent metal and the dimensions of design. This, in turn, leads to poor quality in the production of ship blocks and reworking through period of correction brings about impediment on improvement of productivity. Through experiments on butt welding joint's shrinkage strain on large structures main plate, the deformation of welding residual stress in the form of I, Y, V was obtained. In addition, the results of experiments indicate that there is limited range of shrinkage in the range of 1 ∼ 2 mm in 11t ∼ 21.5t thickness and the effect of heat transfer of weld appears to be limited within 1000 mm based on one side of seam line so there was limited impact of weight of parent metal on the shrinkage. Finally, it has been learned that Shrinkage margin needs to be applied differently based on groove phenomenon in the design phase in order to minimize shrinkage.

  18. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  19. Integrity of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Chemically Welded Joints Examined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Thesken, John C.; Bunnell, Charles T.; Kurta, Carol E.; Sydenstricker, Mike

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Capillary Flow Experiments (CFE) program is developing experiment payloads to explore fluid interfaces in microgravity on the International Space Station. The information to be gained from the CFE is relevant to the design of fluid-bearing systems in which capillary forces predominate, for example in the passive positioning of liquids in spacecraft fuel tanks. To achieve the science goals of CFE, Glenn researchers constructed several types of experiment vessels. One type of vessel, known as the interior corner flow (ICF), will be used to determine important transients for low-gravity liquid management in a two-phase system. Each vessel has a cylindrical fluid reservoir connected to each end of the test chamber by internal transport tubes, each with a quarter-turn shutoff valve (see the following photograph). These multipiece vessels are made from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) because of its excellent optical properties (i.e., the fluids can be observed easily in the vessel). Because of the complexity of certain vessels, the test chamber had to be manufactured in pieces and welded chemically. Some past experience with adhesive bonded plastic showed that the experiment fluid degraded the adhesive to the point of failure. Therefore, it was necessary to see if the fluid also degraded the chemically welded PMMA joints.

  20. Influences of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welded cast A319 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, M.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-04-01

    Fusion welding of cast A319 (Al-Si-Cu) alloy will lead to many problems including porosity, micro-fissuring, and hot cracking. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be used to weld A319 alloy without these defects. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of FSW process parameters on the tensile strength of A319 alloy welded joints. Joints were made using different combinations of tool rotation speed, welding speed, and axial force, each at four levels. The quality of weld zone was analyzed using macrostructure and microstructure analysis. Tensile strength of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the weld zone microstructure. The joint fabricated with a 1200 rpm tool rotation speed, 40 mm/min welding speed, and 4 kN axial force showed superior tensile strength compared with the other joints.

  1. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of friction stir welded AA- 2014 joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, R.; Bhatty, M. B.; Iqbal, F.; Zaigham, H.; Salam, I.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the effect of processing parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of aluminum AA2014-T6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analyzed. Friction stir welding was carried out on a milling machine. Different samples were produced by varying the tool rotational rates (700, 1000 rpm) and travel speeds (45-105 mm/min). Tensile tests performed at room temperature were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. In order to analyze the microstructural evolution of the material, the welds’ cross-sections were observed under optical microscope. The results shows that the resulting microstructure is free of defects and tensile strength of the welded joints is upto 75% of the base metal strength.

  2. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  3. Effects of Initial Temper Condition and Postweld Heat Treatment on the Properties of Dissimilar Friction-Stir-Welded Joints between AA7075 and AA6061 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İpekoğlu, Güven; Çam, Gürel

    2014-06-01

    In this study, dissimilar AA7075-O/6061-O and AA7075-T6/6061-T6 butt joints were produced by friction stir welding (FSW), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to the joints obtained. The effects of initial temper condition and PWHT on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints were thus investigated. It was demonstrated that sound dissimilar joints can be produced for both temper conditions. A hardness increase in the joint area ( i.e., strength overmatching) was obtained in the joints produced in the O-temper condition, whereas a hardness loss was observed in the joint area of the joints obtained in the T6 temper condition. It was also well demonstrated that PWHT could be used in order to improve the joint properties for both O and T6 joints provided that the joint is defect-free prior to subsequent heat treatment.

  4. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  5. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  6. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints of Gas Transmission Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotinov, V. A.; Farber, V. M.; Morozova, A. N.; Valov, M. A.; Sharipov, G. A.

    2014-09-01

    Astudy is made of the structure and mechanical properties of welded joints of pipes of strength class K60 produced by three different manufacturers. A detailed analysis of the microstructure of the central weld, heat-affected zone, and base metal is performed with a scanning electron microscope by the method of electron back-scattered diffraction.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Welded Ti3Al/Ni-Based Superalloy Joint Using a Ni-Cu Filler Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Qing; Xiong, Hua-Ping; Guo, Shao-Qing; Sun, Bing-Bing; Chen, Bo; Tang, Si-Yi

    2015-02-01

    Dissimilar welding of a Ti3Al-based alloy and a Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 718) was successfully carried out using gas tungsten arc welding technology in this study. With a Ni-Cu alloy as filler material, sound joints have been obtained. The microstructure evolution along the cross section of the dissimilar joint has been revealed based on the results of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffractometer. It is found that the weld/Ti3Al interface is composed of Ti2AlNb matrix dissolved with Ni and Cu, Al(Cu, Ni)2Ti, (Cu, Ni)2Ti, (Nb, Ti) solid solution, and so on. The weld and In718/weld interface mainly consist of (Cu, Ni) solid solutions. The weld exhibits higher microhardness than the two base materials. The average room-temperature tensile strength of the joints reaches 242 MPa and up to 73.6 pct of the value can be maintained at 873 K (600 °C). The brittle intermetallic phase of Ti2AlNb matrix dissolved with Ni and Cu at the weld/Ti3Al interface is the weak link of the joint.

  8. Multi-Response Optimization of Friction-Stir-Welded AA1100 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-06-01

    AA1100 aluminum alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures. Friction stir welding process (FSW) is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. The process and tool parameters of FSW play a major role in deciding the joint characteristics. In this research, the relationships between the FSW parameters (rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter, and tool hardness) and the responses (tensile strength, hardness, and corrosion rate) were established. The optimal welding conditions to maximize the tensile strength and minimize the corrosion rate were identified for AA1100 aluminum alloy and reported here.

  9. The Effect of Weld Profile and Geometries of Butt Weld Joints on Fatigue Life Under Cyclic Tensile Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mukhtar, A. M.; Biermann, H.; Hübner, P.; Henkel, S.

    2011-11-01

    The fatigue life of welded joint was calculated based on numerical integration of simple Paris' law and a reliable solution of the stress intensity factor (SIF). The initial crack length ( a i) was assumed to be equal to 0.1 mm in case of weld toe. This length was satisfactory for different butt joints geometries. The comparisons with the available data from standards and literature were demonstrated. It was shown numerically that the machining of weld reinforcements will increase the fatigue life. The increase of plate thickness decreases the fatigue strength (FAT) and the number of cycles to failure when using the proportional scaling of crack length. The validation processes of the current calculations have been shown. Therefore, it can be concluded that it will prevent the unnecessary waste of time consumed to carry out the experiments.

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Poapongsakorn, Piyamon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonitrided low-carbon steels are resistance welded in various engineering components. However, there are no reports on the microstructure and mechanical properties of their resistance spot welding (RSW) joints. Therefore, various carbonitridings were performed on the low-carbon steel sheets, and then various RSWs were applied to these carbonitrided sheets. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of the welding joint were investigated and discussed. The peak load and failure energy increased with the increases of welding current and fusion zone (FZ) size. At 11 kA welding current, the carbonitrided steel joint had the failure energy of 16 J, i.e., approximately 84 pct of untreated steel joint. FZ of carbonitrided steel joint consisted of ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite, and untempered martensite, i.e., the solid-state transformation products, while the microstructure at the outer surfaces consisted of untempered martensite and retained austenite. The surface hardening of carbonitrided steel after RSW could be maintained, i.e., approximately 810 HV. The results can be applied to carbonitriding and RSW to achieve a good welding joint.

  11. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  12. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  13. Evaluation of Laser Braze-welded Dissimilar Al-Cu Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalen, Pascal; Plapper, Peter

    The thermal joining of Aluminum and Copper is a promising technology towards automotive battery manufacturing. The dissimilar metals Al-Cu are difficult to weld due to their different physicochemical characteristics and the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC), which have reduced mechanical and electric properties. There is a critical thickness of the IMCs where the favored mechanical properties of the base material can be preserved. The laser braze welding principle uses a position and power oscillated laser-beam to reduce the energy input and the intermixture of both materials and therefore achieves minimized IMCs thickness. The evaluation of the weld seam is important to improve the joint performance and enhance the welding process. This paper is focused on the characterization and quantification of the IMCs. Mechanical, electrical and metallurgical methods are presented and performed on Al1050 and SF-Cu joints and precise weld criteria are developed.

  14. Nickel aluminide-copper backing for butt joint welding

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, S.; Muszynski, M.; Chin, B.A.; Nagarajan, S.

    1996-12-31

    Single-side full penetration welding is the primary welding process in shipbuilding. This process requires the use of a backing to support the molten metal. Conventionally, copper has been used as the backing material in the shop and ceramic tiles for jobs on the field. However, copper has shown to contaminate the weld and produce adverse effects and ceramics have shown to produce porosities in the weld. A new backing with an intermetallic layer (NiAl) on the copper surface has been fabricated. The results indicate that this backing could alleviate the contamination problems and produce quality welds.

  15. Microstructural Characteristics of a Stainless Steel/Copper Dissimilar Joint Made by Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Xingke

    2013-08-01

    The microstructures and its formation mechanism of a stainless steel/copper dissimilar joint by laser welding were investigated. It was found that the two modes of joining, i.e., welding-brazing and fusion welding, depend on different processing parameters. In the welding-brazing mode, the interface between copper and the fusion zone has scraggy morphology because the molten pool is frozen by solid copper with high thermal conductivity. The interdiffusion of elements occurs in the neighborhood of the interface, which leads to the metallurgy bond of the mode. In the fusion welding mode, the liquid phase in the fusion zone undergoes not only primary but also secondary liquid separation due to the high cooling rate and high supercooling level of laser welding. Some microcracks generated in the fusion zone by thermal stress mismatch are healed by liquid copper filling.

  16. Relation between hardness and ultrasonic velocity on pipeline steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón, H.; Barrera, G.; Natividad, C.; Salazar, M.; Contreras, A.

    2016-04-01

    In general, the ultrasonic techniques have been used to determine the mechanical properties of materials based on their relationship with metallurgical characteristics. In this research work, the relationship between ultrasonic wave velocity, hardness and the microstructure of steel pipeline welded joints is investigated. Measurements of ultrasonic wave velocity were made as a function of the location across the weld. Hardness measurements were performed in an attempt to correlate with ultrasonic response. In addition, the coarse and dendritic grain structure of the weld material is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Thus, due to the acoustic anisotropy of the crystal, weld material of studied joints is anisotropic too. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of conventional ultrasonic phased array techniques becomes desirable. This technique is proposed to assist pipeline operators in estimating the hardness through ultrasonic measures to evaluate the susceptibility to stress sulphide cracking and hydrogen-induced cracking due to hard spots in steel pipeline welded joints in service. Sound wave velocity and hardness measurements have been carried out on a steel welded joint. For each section of the welding, weld bead, fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal were found to correspond particular values of the ultrasound velocity. These results were correlated with electron microscopy observations of the microstructure and sectorial scan view of welded joints by ultrasonic phased array.

  17. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  18. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    PubMed

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint.

  19. Dual beam Nd:YAG laser welding: influence of lubricants to lap joint welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, M.; Merklein, M.; Otto, A.; Blankl, A.

    2007-05-01

    Laser welding is applied in large-volume production since the late eighties and has revolutionized the possibilities of designing and engineering products. Nevertheless, problems appear during application because the operational conditions in industrial environments fluctuate and can influence the welding process negatively. Contaminations, like lubricants and organic solids, are an example of changing conditions in laser beam welding. If a lap joint is welded, these materials have to be removed from the sheets, otherwise pores and surface failures may appear due to keyhole instabilities induced by uncontrolled outgassing. One possibility for solving this problem is the use of two separate laser beams. For producing these two beams several systems are available for all different kind of lasers. A bifocal optic is such a solution for an Nd:YAG laser. By using this system, the laser beam is divided after collimation with a prism. Afterwards the two beams are focussed with a lens to the surface of the sheet and two single spots are produced. If the distance between the two spots is low, one common, elliptical keyhole is created. With this system two different welding strategies are possible. The spots can be oriented parallel or normal to the feed direction. For stabilizing the laser welding of contaminated steel sheets the parallel arrangement is better, because the amount of contamination is nearly the same as in single spot welding but the total volume of the keyhole is greater and so pressure variations due to uncontrolled evaporation of contaminations are lower. In order to prove this theory and to determine the exact effects some investigations were made at the Chair of Manufacturing Technology of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. A 4 kW Nd:YAG laser with a beam parameter product of 25 mm*mrad and a focal distance of 200 mm was used to weld two 1 mm DC04 steel sheets together with a lap joint. Between the sheets a deep drawing lubricant, Castrol FST 6, was

  20. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  1. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-01-01

    In the future, some spacecraft will be so large that they must be assembled on-orbit. These spacecraft will be used for such tasks as manned missions to Mars or used as orbiting platforms for monitoring the Earth or observing the universe. Some large spacecraft will probably consist of planar truss structures to which will be attached special purpose, self-contained modules. The modules will most likely be taken to orbit fully outfitted and ready for use in heavy-lift launch vehicles. The truss members will also similarly be taken to orbit, but most unassembled. The truss structures will need to be assembled robotically because of the high costs and risks of extra-vehicular activities. Some missions will involve very large loads. To date, very few structures of any kind have been constructed in space. Two relatively simple trusses were assembled in the Space Shuttle bay in late 1985. Here the development of a design of a welded joint for on-orbit, robotic truss assembly is described. Mechanical joints for this application have been considered previously. Welded joints have the advantage of allowing the truss members to carry fluids for active cooling or other purposes. In addition, welded joints can be made more efficient structurally than mechanical joints. Also, welded joints require little maintenance (will not shake loose), and have no slop which would cause the structure to shudder under load reversal. The disadvantages of welded joints are that a more sophisticated assembly robot is required, weld flaws may be difficult to detect on-orbit, the welding process is hazardous, and welding introduces contamination to the environment. In addition, welded joints provide less structural damping than do mechanical joints. Welding on-orbit was first investigated aboard a Soyuz-6 mission in 1969 and then during a Skylab electron beam welding experiment in 1973. A hand held electron beam welding apparatus is currently being prepared for use on the MIR space station

  2. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  3. Real time monitoring of spot-welded joints under service load using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ping; Zheng, Botong; Dawood, Mina; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a nondestructive method to evaluate the health status of resistance spot-welded (RSW) joint under service load using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) active sensing system, in which the PZT transducers were used as both actuator and sensor. The physical principle of the approach was validated through a numerical analysis showing that an opening between the faying faces at the welded joint occurred under tension load. The opening decreased the contact area hence reduced the amplitude of the stress wave received by the PZT sensor. Therefore, by comparing the energy index of the signals before and after the loading, the health condition of the joint can be evaluated. Five ST14 steel single lap joint specimens were tested under tension load while being monitored by the PZT sensing system and digital image correlation (DIC) system in real time. The data obtained from the DIC system validated the numerical results. By comparing the energy index of the signal obtained from the PZT sensing system before and after unloading, it was concluded that the RSW joint was intact after being loaded to the service load. The proposed method is promising in evaluating the health condition of RSW joint nondestructively.

  4. Investigation of corrosion of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of corrosion resistance of materials is one of the most important tests that allow determining their functional properties. Among these tests the special group consist electrochemical investigations, which let to accelerate the course of the process. These investigations allow rapidly estimating corrosion processes occurring in metal elements under the influence of the analysed environment. In the paper are presented results of investigations of the resistance to pitting corrosion of the steel of next grades: austenitic 316L and duplex 2205. It was also analysed the corrosion resistance of welded joints of these grades of steel. The investigations were conducted in two different corrosion environments: in the neutral one (3.5 % sodium chloride) and in the aggressive one (0.1 M sulphuric acid VI). The obtained results indicate different resistance of analysed grades of steel and their welded joints in relation to the corrosion environment. The austenitic 316L steel characterizes by the higher resistance to the pitting corrosion in the aggressive environment then the duplex 2205 steel. In the paper are presented results of potentiodynamic tests. They showed that all the specimens are less resistant to pitting corrosion in the environment of sulphuric acid (VI) than in the sodium chloride one. The 2205 steel has higher corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel in 3.5% NaCl. On the other hand, in 0.1 M H2SO4, the 316L steel has a higher corrosion resistance than the 2205 one. The weld has a similar, very good resistance to pitting corrosion like both steels.

  5. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  6. Detailed Microstructural Characterization and Restoration Mechanisms of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel Friction-Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. F. A.; Torres, E. A.; Lippold, J. C.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Duplex stainless steels are successfully used in a wide variety of applications in areas such as the food industry, petrochemical installations, and sea water desalination plants, where high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength are required. However, during fusion welding operations, there can be changes to the favorable microstructure of these materials that compromise their performance. Friction stir welding with a non-consumable pin enables welded joints to be obtained in the solid state, which avoids typical problems associated with solidification of the molten pool, such as segregation of alloying elements and the formation of solidification and liquefaction cracks. In the case of superduplex stainless steels, use of the technique can avoid unbalanced proportions of ferrite and austenite, formation of deleterious second phases, or growth of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone. Consolidated joints with full penetration were obtained for 6-mm-thick plates of UNS S32101 and S32205 duplex stainless steels, and S32750 and S32760 superduplex steels. The welding heat cycles employed avoided the conditions required for formation of deleterious phases, except in the case of the welded joint of the S32760 steel, where SEM images indicated the formation of secondary phases, as corroborated by decreased mechanical performance. Analysis using EBSD and transmission electron microscopy revealed continuous dynamic recrystallization by the formation of cellular arrays of dislocations in the ferrite and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in the austenite. Microtexture evaluation indicated the presence of fibers typical of shear in the thermomechanically affected zone. These fibers were not obviously present in the stir zone, probably due to the intensity of microstructural reformulation to which this region was subjected.

  7. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of MIG Brazed and MIG Welded Joints of Automotive DP600-GI Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Sushovan; Das, Hrishikesh; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Shome, Mahadev

    2016-12-01

    Galvanized dual-phase steel sheets are extensively used by the auto industry for their corrosion resistance property. Welding by the metal inert gas (MIG) process causes degradation of the steel in the vicinity of the joint due to excessive zinc evaporation. In order to minimize Zn loss, the MIG brazing process has been tried out in lap joint configuration over a heat input range of 136-204 J mm-1. The amount of zinc loss, intermetallic formation and corrosion properties in the joint area has been evaluated for both MIG brazing and MIG welding. Corrosion rate of 21 mm year-1 has been reduced to 2 mm year-1 by adopting MIGB in place MIGW. Impedance study has shown that the corrosion mechanism in base metal, MIG brazed and MIG welded joints is dominated by charge transfer, diffusion and mixed mode control processes, respectively.

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Internal Welding Defects and Their Effect on the Tensile Behavior of FSW Joints of AA2198 Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Jolu, Thomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Denquin, Anne; Sennour, Mohamed; Laurent, Anne; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Internal features and defects such as joint line remnant, kissing bond, and those induced by an initial gap between the two parent sheets were investigated in AA2198-T851 friction stir welded joints. They were compared with the parent material and to defect-free welds obtained using a seamless sheet. The cross-weld tensile strength was reduced by the defects by less than 6 pct. The fracture elongation was not significantly affected in view of experimental scatter. Fracture location, however, changed from the thermomechanically affected zone (retreating side) to the defect in the weld nugget for the welds bearing a kissing bond and for some of the gap welds. The kissing bond was shown by EBSD to be an intergranular feature; it fractured under a normal engineering stress close to 260 MPa during an in situ SEM tensile test. Synchrotron tomography after interrupted tensile testing confirmed opening of the kissing bond. For an initial gap of 23 pct of the sheet thickness, intergranular fracture of copper-enriched or oxide-bearing grain boundaries close to the nugget root was evidenced. The stress and strain state of cross-weld specimens loaded under uniaxial tension was assessed using a 3D finite element, multi-material model, determined on the basis of experimental data obtained on the same specimens using digital image correlation.

  10. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; ...

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  11. Fracture toughness of low activation ferritic steel (JLF-1) weld joint at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Inoue, N.; Muroga, T.

    1998-10-01

    A low activation ferritic steel has been developed for a candidate of a structural material of nuclear fusion reactors. Since welding must be performed when the support structures are constructed, fracture toughness of the weld joint has to be characterized as well as the base metal in an engineering sense. In this report, 25 mm thick plates of JLF-1, which contains 9% Cr and 2% W, are butt-welded by a tungsten inert gas (TIG) procedure, and the fracture toughness of the base plate and the weld metal is investigated at room temperature using 1T and 0.5T CT specimens. The base metal reveals high fracture toughness of about 430 kJ/m 2. However, the weld metal showed unstable big pop-ins. One sample fractured in a nearly elastic condition and another sample showed a toughness of over 400 kJ/m 2.

  12. Microstructure evolution of electron beam welded Ti{sub 3}Al-Nb joint

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jicai; Wu Huiqiang . E-mail: huiqiang_wu@hit.edu.cn; He Jingshan; Zhang Bingang

    2005-02-15

    The microstructure evolution characterization in high containing Nb, low Al titanium aluminide alloy of electron beam welded joints was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, TEM and microhardness analysis. The results indicated that the microstructure of the weld metal made with electron beam under the welding conditions employed in this work was predominantly metastable, retaining ordered {beta} phase (namely B2 phase), and was independent of the welding parameters but independent of the size and the orientation of the weld solidification structures. As the heat input is decreased, the cellular structure zone is significantly reduced, and then the crystallizing morphology of fusion zone presented dendritically columnar structure. There existed grain growth coarsening in heat affected zone (HAZ) for insufficient polygonization. Both fusion zone (FZ) and the HAZ had higher microhardness than the base metal.

  13. Laser Beam Oscillation Strategies for Fillet Welds in Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Alexander; Goecke, Sven-F.; Sievi, Pravin; Albert, Florian; Rethmeier, Michael

    Laser beam oscillation opens up new possibilities of influencing the welding process in terms of compensation of tolerances and reduction of process emissions that occur in industrial applications, such as in body-in-white manufacturing. The approaches are to adapt the melt pool width in order to generate sufficient melt volume or to influence melt pool dynamics, e.g. for a better degassing. Welding results are highly dependent on the natural frequency of the melt pool, the used spot diameter and the oscillation speed of the laser beam. The conducted investigations with an oscillated 300 μm laser spot show that oscillation strategies, which are adjusted to the joining situation improve welding result for zero-gap welding as well as for bridging gaps to approximately 0.8 mm. However, a complex set of parameters has to be considered in order to generate proper welding results. This work puts emphasize on introducing them.

  14. Weld joints inspection using multisource data and image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Sikora, R.; Szwagiel, M.; Szydłowski, M.; Waszczuk, P.; Grochowalska, B.; Grzywacz, B.; Misztal, L.

    2017-02-01

    The novel concept of comprehensive weld inspection with use of three sources of data (radiogram image, image composed of laser profilometer 3D data, CCD camera image) and weld images fusion is presented in the paper. The algorithms of data processing aimed at detection and visualization of weld flaws are roughly described. The special attention was paid at presentation and explanation of algorithm for aligning and spatial correction of images composed of data delivered by three independent sources. The results yielded by proposed algorithms for preprocessing of weld images, weld detection, feature extraction, shape extraction, shape matching, filtering, distortion correction, etc. are illustrated with several figures included in the paper. The concise description of designed and implemented laboratory stands is included in the paper too.

  15. Determination of Some Parameters for Fatigue Life in Welded Joints Using Fracture Mechanics Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mukhtar, A. M.; Biermann, H.; Hübner, P.; Henkel, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, the parameters stress intensity factor (SIF), initial and final crack lengths ( a i and a f), crack growth parameters ( C and m), and fatigue strength (FAT) are investigated. The determination of initial crack length seems to be the most serious factor in fatigue life and strength calculations for welded joints. A fracture mechanics approach was used in these calculations based on SIF which was calculated with the finite element method (FEM). The weld toe crack was determined to be equal to 0.1 mm, whereas the weld root crack's length was varied depending on the degree of the weld penetration. These initial crack length values are applicable for all types of joints which have the same crack phenomenon. As based on the above calculated parameters, the new limits of FAT for new geometries which are not listed yet in recommendations can be calculated according to the current approach.

  16. Evaluation of joint interface of friction stir welding between dissimilar metals using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashiko, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Yasui, T.; Takenaka, H.; Todaka, Y.; Fukumoto, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated conductive properties of joint interfaces of friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar metals, stainless steel SUS304 and aluminum A6063, using a SQUID nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. With current injection method, the current maps above the FSW specimens jointed under various conditions were measured by a HTS-SQUID gradiometer. The conductivities of the joint interfaces, which were estimated from the current maps, differed between the joint conditions. By destructive tests using optical microscope, large voids were observed on the joint interfaces with low welding speed that generated excess heating. In case of one specimen, which was welded with welding speed of 500 and 200 mm/min, the conductivity of the former was higher than that of the latter, although the inside voids in the respective regions were not much different. From these results, it is suggested that the current maps were influenced not only by the conductivity of the joint interface but also by inside voids. By hardness test on the SUS boards near the interfaces, only the SUS jointed with 200 mm/min was about half softer than its matrix.

  17. Microstructural investigation of hardfacing weld deposit obtained from CrB paste

    SciTech Connect

    Kr. Ray, S.; Sarker, B.; Kr. Bhattacharya, S. )

    1989-05-01

    Hardfacing weld deposits are used as a protective layer on engineering components and tools subjected to different modes of wear. Cheaper iron-based alloys with chromium and carbon or relatively expensive alloys with some niobium or titanium have long been used as standard hardfacing materials. In recent years boron has substituted the costlier alloying elements and the newly developed Fe-B-C alloys have shown encouraging results. The microstructure of the welded hardfacing deposit is one of the most important factors that determine its performance. The amount, size, distribution and hardness of the individual constituents play important roles in imparting the desired properties. Recently Colomonoy sweat on paste containing fine CrB particles (of about 12 {mu}m average size) suspended in an organic binder has been marketed as the new generation hardfacing material. A thin coating of the paste is applied on the component surface, allowed to dry and welded. The welded deposit has been found to offer good wear resistance in many industrial applications. This paper reports the microstructural investigation of the welded deposit obtained from this paste.

  18. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Junjun Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  19. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2014-05-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  20. Influence of Cu-Interlayer Thickness on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of MIG-Welded Mg-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Sun, D. Q.; Sun, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The joining of AZ31B Mg alloy to Q235 steel was realized by metal inert-gas arc welding using Cu-interlayer. Microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of Mg-steel joints with Cu-interlayer of different thicknesses were investigated. The results indicated that acceptable joints with sound appearance could be obtained by adjusting the thickness to the range of 0.1-0.2 mm. In particular, at the thickness of 0.15 mm, the average tensile strength reached a maximum of 190 MPa, representing a 79% joint efficiency relative to the Mg base metal. Further increasing the thickness would cause more formation of coarse and thick Mg-Cu eutectic structure and Mg-Al-Cu ternary phase, which resulted in the decrease of joint strength. Therefore, the best thickness of Cu-interlayer to obtain high strength of Mg-steel MIG-welded joint was in the range of 0.1-0.15 mm. The average microhardness reached the maximum value in the reaction layer because of the presence of FeAl intermetallic compounds.

  1. Optimizing friction stir welding parameters to maximize tensile strength of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2009-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. In contrast to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and the tool pin profile play a major role in determining the joint strength. An attempt has been made here to develop a mathematical model to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. A central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model has been optimized using the Hooke and Jeeves search technique to maximize the tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  2. Structure and Properties of Thick-Walled Joints of Alloy 1570s Prepared by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, O. V.; Ivanov, S. Yu.; Karkhin, V. A.; Lopota, V. A.; Makhin, I. D.

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of thick-walled joints of Al - Mg - Sc alloy 1570S, prepared by friction stir welding are studied. Joint microstructural and mechanical inhomogeneity are revealed.

  3. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  4. Effect of Postweld Aging Treatment on Fatigue Behavior of Pulsed Current Welded AA7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-04-01

    This article reports the effect of postweld aging treatment on fatigue behavior of pulsed current welded AA 7075 aluminum alloy joints. AA7075 aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of AA7075 aluminum alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 10 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing multipass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt.%)) grade aluminum alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW), and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Rotary bending fatigue testing machine has been used to evaluate fatigue behavior of the welded joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit. Simple postweld aging treatment applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the fatigue performance of the welded joints.

  5. Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructure, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of AA7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Amir Hossein; Nourouzi, Salman

    2014-06-01

    A high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy AA7075-T6 was friction-stir welded with various process parameter combinations incorporating the design of the experiment to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties. A three-factors, five-level central composition design (CCD) has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The friction-stir welding parameters have significant influence on the heat input and temperature profile, which in turn regulates the microstructural and mechanical properties of the joints. The weld thermal cycles and transverse distribution of microhardness of the weld joints were measured, and the tensile properties were tested. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the formation of friction-stir processing zone has been analyzed macroscopically. Also, an equation was derived to predict the final microhardness and tensile properties of the joints, and statistical tools are used to develop the relationships. The results show that the peak temperature during welding of all the joints was up to 713 K (440 °C), which indicates the key role of the tool shoulder diameter in deciding the maximum temperature. From this investigation, it was found that the joint fabricated at a rotational speed of 1050 rpm, welding speed of 100 mm/min, and shoulder diameter of 14 mm exhibited higher mechanical properties compared to the other fabricated joints.

  6. Welding structures in gas tungsten arc-welded zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, T.E.; Saggese, M.E.

    1982-02-01

    Microstructures were obtained by welding tubes to end caps in fuel elements. The final joint properties are influenced by different structural elements including microstructure, porosity, and inclusions. The secondary structure found after welding is Widmanstaetten. Welding thermal cycles are inherently inhomogeneous, affecting both plate width and /beta/ primary grain. 4 refs.

  7. A Water-Drop Method of Hardening of the Welded Joints of Drill Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisuradze, M. V.; Yudin, Yu. V.; Eismondt, Yu. G.

    2015-09-01

    A combined computational and experimental technique is developed for implementing a scientifically based approach to the selection of a technology of heat hardening of welded joints of drill pipes made of steel 25KhGM with the use of water-drop quenching. The basic service characteristics of the water-drop cooling device are presented. An analytic model that relates the parameters of the water-drop quenching device (standard size and number of jets in device, pressure of fed water, distance from the jet nozzle to the cooled surface) to the properties of the welded joint is proposed. With the new technique the construction of a quenching device may be developed and the technology of heat treatment of the welded joints of drill pipes optimized in order to increase the level of mechanical properties.

  8. Prediction of the Properties of Heat-Affected Zone of Welded Joints of Sheets from Aluminum Alloys with Structured Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    Welded joints of light structured sheets from aluminum alloy EN AW-6181-T4 (DIN EN 515) of the Al - Si - Mg system are studied. The welding is performed in an argon environment with a short arc by the method of cold metal transfer (CMT®). The results of the study are used in an amended Leblond model for describing the variation of the properties of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of structured sheets.

  9. Characterization of lap joints laser beam welding of thin AA 2024 sheets with Yb:YAG disk-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Lap joints obtained by overlapping two plates are widely diffused in aerospace industry. Nevertheless, because of natural aging, adhesively bonded and riveted aircraft lap joints may be affected by cracks from rivets, voids or corrosion. Friction stir welding has been proposed as a valid alternative, although large heat affected zones are produced both in the top and the bottom plate due to the pin diameter. Interest has therefore been shown in studying laser lap welding as the laser beam has been proved to be competitive since it allows to concentrate the thermal input and increases productivity and quality. Some challenges arise as a consequence of aluminum low absorptance and high thermal conductivity; furthermore, issues are due to metallurgical challenges such as both micro and macro porosity formation and softening in the fused zone. Welding of AA 2024 thin sheets in a lap joint configuration is discussed in this paper: tests are carried out using a recently developed Trumpf TruDisk 2002 Yb:YAG disk-laser with high beam quality which allows to produce beads with low plates distortion and better penetration. The influence of the processing parameters is discussed considering the fused zone extent and the bead shape. The porosity content as well as the morphological features of the beads have been examined.

  10. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... rings will result in undesirable conditions such as severe stress concentrations, corrosion or erosion.... (2) Socket welds must not be used where severe erosion or crevice corrosion is expected to...

  11. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  12. Weld Bead Size, Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Alloys Joints Welded by Pulsed Laser Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chuang; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang; Peng, Genchen; Wang, Xian

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser spot welding of intersection points of zirconium alloys straps was performed. Weld bead size, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of weld bead were investigated. With the increasing laser peak power or number of shots, the weld width of the beads increased, the protrusion decreased and the dimple increased with further increase in heat input. The fusion zone consisted of a mixture of αZr and residual βZr phases. After annealing treatment, βNb and Zr(Fe, Nb)2 second phase particles were precipitated inter- and intragranular of αZr grains adequately. The oxide thickness of annealed weld bead was about 3.90 μm, decreased by about 18.1% relative to the 4.76 μm of as-welded specimen corroded at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 20 days. The corrosion resistance of annealed specimen was better than that of as-welded specimen, since the second phase particles exerted better corrosion resistance, and the content of Nb in βZr and the fraction of βZr decreased after the annealing treatment.

  13. Modeling and analysis of novel laser weld joint designs using optical ray tracing.

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection of laser energy presents challenges in material processing that can lead to process inefficiency or process instability. Understanding the fundamentals of non-imaging optics and the reflective propagation of laser energy can allow process and weld joint designs to take advantage of these reflections to enhance process efficiency or mitigate detrimental effects. Optical ray tracing may be used within a 3D computer model to evaluate novel joint and fixture designs for laser welding that take advantage of the reflective propagation of laser energy. This modeling work extends that of previous studies by the author and provides comparison with experimental studies performed on highly reflective metals. Practical examples are discussed.

  14. Fiber laser welding of austenitic steel and commercially pure copper butt joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuryntsev, S. V.; Morushkin, A. E.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-03-01

    The fiber laser welding of austenitic stainless steel and commercially pure copper in butt joint configuration without filler or intermediate material is presented. In order to melt stainless steel directly and melt copper via heat conduction a defocused laser beam was used with an offset to stainless steel. During mechanical tests the weld seam was more durable than heat affected zone of copper so samples without defects could be obtained. Three process variants of offset of the laser beam were applied. The following tests were conducted: tensile test of weldment, intermediate layer microhardness, optical metallography, study of the chemical composition of the intermediate layer, fractography. Measurements of electrical resistivity coefficients of stainless steel, copper and copper-stainless steel weldment were made, which can be interpreted or recalculated as the thermal conductivity coefficient. It shows that electrical resistivity coefficient of cooper-stainless steel weldment higher than that of stainless steel. The width of intermediate layer between stainless steel and commercially pure copper was 41-53 μm, microhardness was 128-170 HV0.01.

  15. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  16. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser-Welded Joints of Ti-22Al-25Nb/TA15 Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dalong; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Zhang, Hao; Bu, Xianzheng

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam welding (LBW) was applied to join 1-mm-thick dissimilar titanium alloys, Ti-22Al-25Nb (at.%) and TA15, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were systematically analyzed. Defect-free joints were obtained, and the fusion zone mainly consisted of B2 and martensitic α' phases because of the uneven distribution of the β phase stabilizer and rapid cooling rate of LBW. The phase compositions of the heat-affected zone varied with the different thermal cycles during the welding process. The different microstructures of the dissimilar titanium alloys led to an unsymmetrical hardness profile, with the welded seam exhibiting the lowest value of 271 HV. In room-temperature tensile tests, the fractures all occurred preferentially in the fusion zone. The strengths of the joints were close to those of the base metal but with prominently decreasing ductility. In tensile tests performed at 550 °C, all the joints fractured in the TA15 base metal, and the strength and plasticity of the welds were equivalent to those of the TA15 base metal.

  18. Structure and Microhardness of Cu-Ta Joints Produced by Explosive Welding

    PubMed Central

    Maliutina, Iu. N.; Mali, V. I.; Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Esikov, M. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Skorokhod, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The structure and microhardness of Cu-Ta joints produced by explosive welding were studied. It was found that, during explosive welding, an intermediate layer 20⋯40 μm thick with a finely dispersed heterophase structure, formed between the welded copper and tantalum plates. The structure of the layer was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microvolumes with tantalum particles distributed in a copper matrix and microvolumes of copper particles in a tantalum matrix were detected. The tantalum particles in copper have a size of 5⋯500 nm, with a predominance of 5⋯50 nm particles. A mechanism for the formation of the finely dispersed heterophase structure in explosive welding is proposed. The microhardness of interlayers with the heterophase structure reaches 280 HV, which far exceeds the microhardness of copper (~130 HV) and tantalum (~160 HV). Many twins of deformation origin were found in the structure of the copper plate. The effect of heating temperature in the range from 100 to 900°C on the microhardness of copper, tantalum, and the Cu-Ta welded joint was studied. Upon heating to 900°C, the microhardness of the intermediate layer decreases from 280 to 150 HV. The reduction in the strength properties of the weld material is mainly due to structural transformations in copper. PMID:24453818

  19. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-05-15

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  20. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-05-01

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  1. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  2. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2016-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  3. Effects of welding technology on welding stress based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianke; Jin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process under four different conditions of welding flat butt joints. Welding seams are simulated with birth and death elements. The size and distribution of welding residual stress is obtained in the four kinds of welding conditions by Q345 manganese steel plate butt joint of the work piece. The results shown that when using two-layers welding,the longitudinal and transverse residual stress were reduced;When welding from Middle to both sides,the residual stress distribution will change,and the residual stress in the middle of the work piece was reduced.

  4. A Combined Experimental/Computational Analysis of the Butt-Friction-Stir-Welded AA2139-T8 Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Combined experimental and computational investigations are carried out of the mechanical properties of materials residing in different weld zones of friction stir-welded (FSW) joints of thick plates of AA2139-T8. The experimental portion of the work comprised (a) identification of the weld zones within the FSW joints, through the use of optical-microscopy characterization of a transverse section; (b) validation of the weld zones identified in (a) via the generation of a micro-hardness field over the same transverse section; (c) extracting and subsequently testing miniature tensile specimens from different weld zones; and (d) extracting and testing a larger-size tensile specimen spanning transversely the FSW weld. The computational portion of the work comprised (i) validation of the mechanical properties, as determined experimentally using the miniature tensile specimens, of the material residing within different zones of the FSW joint; and (ii) clarification of the benefits yielded by the knowledge of the local material properties within the FSW joint. These benefits arise from the fact that (a) joint mechanical properties are generally inferior to those of the base metal; (b) the width of the weld in thick metallic-armor is often comparable to the armor thickness, and therefore may represent a significant portion of the armor exposed-surface area; and (c) modeling of the weld-material structural response under loading requires the availability of high-fidelity/validated material constitutive models, and the development of such models requires knowledge of the local weld-material mechanical properties.

  5. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud

    It is advantageous for the transportation industry to use lightweight components in the structure in order to save mass and reduce CO2 emissions. One of the lightest structural metals, magnesium, fulfills the need for mass reduction within the automotive industry. Many of the body structure components in the automotive industry are assembled using joining processes such as fusion welding. Furthermore, laser welding offers a low heat impact, high process rate, joining method which is becoming increasingly popular as the cost for laser systems continues to decrease. However, there is a limited body of work investigating the laser welding of magnesium and therefore, in the current study, different techniques and methods for laser welding of magnesium alloys are numerically and experimentally studied in order to optimize process parameters to achieve high quality welds. A feasibility study was designed in order to study the effect of various laser welding process parameters (such as laser power levels and welding speeds) on weld quality. Three regression models were developed to find the best fit model that relates process parameters to the shear load of the weld. Furthermore, to understand the effect of laser welding parameters on temperature distribution in laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy, a numerical model was developed. A rotary Gaussian volumetric body heat source was applied in this study to obtain the temperature history during the laser welding process. Cross-sectional views of the weld beads, temperature history recorded by thermocouples, and temperature history recorded by infrared camera were used to validate the numerical model. In order to study the real-time dynamic behavior of the molten pool and the keyhole during the welding process, a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was used. In order to observe the presence of pores, prior studies destructively evaluated the weld bead however; in the

  6. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  7. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Yong Tai; Chun, Kwang San

    2013-09-01

    The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  8. Analysis of factors responsible for the accelerated creep rupture of 12% Cr martensitic steel weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Okhapkin, K. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Skutin, V. S.; Zubova, G. E.; Fedotov, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of the investigation of the heat resistance of a 0.07C-12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel of the martensitic-ferritic class, a reduction was revealed in the long-term strength of its welded joints to below the level of the strength of the base metal. To establish the causes for the accelerated failure of the welded joints, an imitation of the thermal cycles was carried out that produce the structure of the heataffected zone using a dilatometer. In the samples with the structure that corresponds to that of the heataffected zone, a local zone of softening was revealed. The investigations of the metal structure using transmission electron microscopy have shown that the reduction in the creep rupture strength was caused by structural changes under the conditions of the thermal cycle of welding upon the staying of the steel in the temperature range between the Ac 1 and Ac 3 points.

  9. Structural Performance Evaluation of Composite-To-Steel Weld Bonded Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Bhavesh; Frame, Barbara J; Dove, Caroline; Fuchs, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    The Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), a collaboration of Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, and the US Department of Energy is conducting a focal project to demonstrate the use of composite materials in high volume structural applications such as an underbody capable of carrying crash loads. One of the critical challenges is to attach the composite part to the steel structure in a high-volume automotive manufacturing environment and meet the complex requirements for crash. Weld-bonding, a combination of adhesive bonding and spot welding, was selected as the primary joining method. A novel concept of bonding doubler steel strips to composite enabled the spot welding to the steel structure, ensuring the compability with the OEM assembly processes. The structural performance of the joint, including durability, was assessed via analytical and physical testing under quasi-static loading at various temperatures. This paper discusses the results of the experiments designed to generate key modeling parameters for Finite Element Analysis of the joint.

  10. Microstructure and Properties of TIG/FSW Welded Joints of a New Al-Zn-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuefeng; Deng, Ying; Peng, Yongyi; Yin, Zhimin; Xu, Guofu

    2013-09-01

    A new Al-Zn-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy with low Sc content was welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) and friction stir welding (FSW) techniques. The microstructure and properties of those two welded joints were investigated by property tests and microstructural observations. The results show that the new Al-Zn-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy has desirable welding property. The ultimate tensile strength and welding coefficient of the TIG joint reach 405 MPa and 76.7%, respectively, and in FSW joint those property values reach 490 MPa and 92.6%, respectively. The studied base metal has a deformed fibrous subgrains structure, many nano-scaled Al3(Sc,Zr) particles, and very fine aging precipitates. In the TIG joint, the fusion zone consists of coarsened dendritic grains and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has fibrous micro-scaled subgrains. The FSW welded joint is characterized by a weld nugget zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and HAZ. Due to plastic deformation around the rotating pin and anti-recrystallized effectiveness of Al3(Sc,Zr) particles, the weld nugget zone has a very fine subgrain structure. The TMAZ experiences some dissolution of aging precipitates. Coarsening of aging precipitates was observed in the HAZ. The better mechanical properties of the FSW joint are derived from a fine subgrain structure and homogeneous chemical compositions.

  11. Joints, fissures, and voids in rhyolite welded ash-flow tuff at Teton damsite, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prostka, Harold J.

    1977-01-01

    Several kinds of joints, fissures, and voids are present in densely welded rhyolite ash-flow tuff at Teton damsite. Older fissures and voids probably were formed in the ash-flow sheet during secondary flowage, which probably was caused by differential compaction or settling over irregular topography. The younger, more abundant fissures are mostly steep cooling joints that probably have been opened farther by horizontal tectonic extension and gravitational creep, perhaps aided by lateral stress relief.

  12. Parallel-gap welding for joints between copper conductors and Kovar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Daniel, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    Welding technique produces more reliable joints than soldering. Investigation used different sizes of copper conductors and component lead ribbons, corrosion protection platings, and melting points of metals being joined. Optimum combination is gold-plated component lead ribbons and solder-plated copper conductors.

  13. Friction stir spot welded joints of 409L stainless steels fabricated by a convex shoulder tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Abu Mowazzem; Hasan, Md. Tariqul; Hong, Sung-Tae; Miles, Michael; Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Han, Heung Nam

    2013-11-01

    Spot joints of ferritic 409L stainless steel are successfully fabricated by friction stir spot welding (FSSW) using a convex shoulder tool. The welding process, microstructure and failure of the FSSW joint are investigated experimentally. During the FSSW process, the Z-force history shows significant variations depending on the contact phenomena between the tool and the joined sheets, while the Z-torque history shows a rather steady increase without pronounced changes in the trend until the initiation of dwelling. Electron back-scatter diffraction suggests that both continuous dynamic recrystallization and recovery occurred in the stir zone during the FSSW process. Observation of the FSSW joint that failed under the given lap shear load shows that the cracks, which are the result of the interfaces between the upper and lower sheets, propagated into the weld along the interfacial surfaces, after which a necking/shear failure occurred. Finally, the rupture of the joint, which was initiated by the necking/shear failure, propagated along the circumference of the weld.

  14. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  15. Robotic gas metal arc welding of small diameter saddle type joints using multi-stripe structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonser, Gary R.; Parker, Graham A.

    1999-11-01

    Single-stripe structured light sensors are widely used in conjunction with arc welding robots for seam-tracking purposes. The interaction of the projected light with the weld joint and component surfaces produces characteristic line shapes with feature points that can be recognized at high speed by an underlying vision system. Unfortunately they are suitable only for the major classes of weld joint typically encountered within industry--long, straight, or gently curving fillet or butt joints. We present a multistripe structured light sensor that detects and measures the position of the saddle type weld joint formed by two small (< 50-mm)-diameter intersecting tubes. The underlying image processing algorithms detect the weld feature points from each stripe along with four calibration points to generate the entire weld path in the robot workcell base coordinate system before welding commences. The system is validated within an existing welding application; detecting 93% of the weld feature points within +/- 0.4 mm when used on 30-mm-diam tubes.

  16. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  17. Development of phased array ultrasonic testing in lieu of radiography for testing complete joint penetration (CJP) welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldipur, P.; Boone, Shane D.

    2014-04-01

    The past decade has seen new, emerging innovation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT). Specifically, multiple manufacturers have produced Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) systems. The PAUT systems embed a matrix of multiple (some up to 128) single transducers into one probe used for scanning elastic materials. Simultaneously exciting multiple transducers offers distinct advantages; depending on the sequencing of transducer excitation, the ultrasonic beam could be steered within the material and multiple beams help develop extra dimensional data to assist with visualization of possible flaws including the discontinuity size, shape and location. Unfortunately, there has not been broad acceptance of PAUT in the bridge fabrication industry because it is currently not a recognized inspection technology in AWS D1.5. One situation in which the technology would excel would be inspection of Complete Joint Penetration (CJP) butt welds. Currently, AWS D1.5 required CJP welds subjected to tensile or reversal stresses only be inspected by Radiographic Testing (RT). However, discontinuities normally seen by RT can also be seen with PAUT. Until specification language is adopted into D1.5, there will continue to be hesitancy to use PAUT for the inspection of CJP butt welds. Developmental work must first be performed to develop the acceptance criteria and the specification language. The developmental work from the inspections carried out on butt-weld specimens and transition butt-weld specimens are presented in this paper. Specific scan plans were developed using the ES-Beam simulation software for each of the test specimens. In depth analysis of PAUT data obtained to determine exact location and sizing information of the defects was performed. The results also present the comparison of results from PAUT to those obtained using conventional UT and radiography.

  18. Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints and Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints: A Review of the Literature to July 1, 1936

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1936-12-02

    the fatigue limits (see Appendix B, Tables 2 and 4). Kater also found that welded St 52, in the form of unstiffened I beams, gave a higher fatigue...4" flange, 11" web) which withstood 2 x 10u cycles at 29,400 psi. The welded I-bee.s tested by Kater (133) withstood 3 x i06 cycles at a lorer...using compressed air hammers, impact pendulums , and alternat. ing-bend devices. -79- Thustin (211) showed the value of pulsating tension tests on m

  19. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  20. Joint properties of cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy laser welded to gold alloys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Nguyen, Khoi; Benson, P Andrew; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the joint properties of a cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy (Fe-36 at % Pt) laser welded to three gold alloys. The gold alloys used were ADA Type II and Type IV gold alloys, and an Ag-based (Ag-Au) gold alloy. Cast plates (0.5 x 3.0 x 10 mm) were prepared for each alloy. After the cast Fe-Pt plates were heat treated, they were butted against each of the three alloys and then laser welded with Nd:YAG laser at 200 V. Homogeneously welded specimens were also prepared for each alloy. Tensile testing was conducted at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure load (N) and elongation (%) were recorded. After tensile testing, the fractured surfaces were examined with the use of SEM. The failure-load values of the group of alloys welded homogeneously were ranked in the order of: Ag-Au alloy > Type IV alloy > Type II alloy > Fe-Pt alloy. The Type IV alloy welded to Fe-Pt alloy had the highest failure-load value among the three alloys tested. The elongation results tended to follow a similar pattern. The results of this study indicated that Type IV gold alloy is a suitable alloy for metal frameworks to which cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy is laser welded.

  1. Development of temper-bead technique applied to dissimilar welded joints of nuclear pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Makoto; Umemoto, Tadahiro; Matsusita, Akitake; Shiraiwa, Takanori

    1996-06-01

    When nuclear pressure vessels made of low-alloy steel (P-3 Group 3) need repair or modification, technical standards for welding of electrical structures should be applied, and then postweld heat treatment (PWHT) should be done. However, cases in which PWHT is impractical are theoretically possible due to a variety of restrictions. To deal with such a problem, there is a regulation for repair weld technique, without PWHT, in accordance with ASME B and PV Code. This method is called temper-bead technique, which gives the weldments sufficient toughness by tempering the hardened zone of the heat-affected zone on the first layer of the base metal using the heat of the following weld beads. Because there is no regulation in Japan covering this method, a procedure is required to perform it under a special license, after a verification test has been passed. An attempt has been made to develop a method, on the supposition that the temper-bead technique is adopted for replacement of what is called dissimilar welded joints, so that a nickel base alloy is buildup welded at the tip of the nozzle of the low-alloy steel pressure vessel, and a stainless steel pipe is butt welded.

  2. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I.

    2013-01-15

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  3. Low Cycle and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of Friction Welded Dissimilar Superalloys Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Motoki; Sano, Atsushi; Tran, Tra Hung; Okazaki, Masakazu; Sekihara, Masaru

    The high temperature strengths of the dissimilar friction welded superalloys joint between the cast polycrystalline Mar-M247 and the forged IN718 alloys have been investigated under low cycle and thermo-mechanical fatigue loadings, in comparison with those of the base metals. The experiments showed that the lives of the dissimilar joints were significantly influenced by the test conditions and loading modes. Not only the lives themselves but also the failure positions and mechanisms were sensitive to the loading mode. The fracture behaviors depending on the loading modes and test conditions were discussed, based on the macroscopic elastic follow-up mechanism and the microstructural inhomogeneity in the friction weld joint.

  4. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the fatigue behaviour in a welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaguer, P.; Estrada, R.

    2014-07-01

    Welded joints are an important part in structures. For this reason, it is always necessary to know the behaviour of them under cyclic loads. In this paper a S - N curve of a butt welded joint of the AISI 1015 steel and Cuban manufacturing E6013 electrode is showed. Fatigue tests were made in an universal testing machine MTS810. The stress ratio used in the test was 0,1. Flaws in the fatigue specimens were characterized by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy. SolidWorks 2013 software was used to modeling the specimens geometry, while to simulate the fatigue behaviour Simulation was used. The joint fatigue limit is 178 MPa, and a cut point at 2 039 093 cycles. Some points of the simulations are inside of the 95% confidence band.

  5. Study on fatigue crack propagation characteristics around welded joint interface in complexed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Akihiko; Suzuki, Naoyuki; Maeda, Yoshio; Mawari, Toshio; Matsuoka, Saburo; Nishijima, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    Marine structures are often constructed by welding, and they are subject to repeated loading such as waves and mechanical vibrations which can create fatigue cracks and consequently break the structures. Fatigue crack propagation properties of welded joints are studied under random loading in the air, synthetic sea water, and compressive cycling. It was found that the most crucial factor that controls fatigue crack propagation was high tensile residual stress fields of welded joints. This stress constantly kept the cracks open, simplifying fatigue crack propagation, and therefore, the rate of crack propagation could be assessed with high accuracy. In the transverse matching welded joints with cracks in the center, crack closure did not occur due to the tensile residual stress constantly induced at the crack ends in the center of the test samples. Fatigue crack propagation was accelerated both in artificial sea water and in compressive cycling compared to that in the air, and the fatigue lowest values were about half. Serious crack closures occurred in compressive cycling in which dry hours exceeded 45 minutes, and the fatigue crack propagation rate deteriorated remarkably. Mean fatigue crack propagation rate under the random loading is estimated precisely using equivalent stress intensity factor limit.

  6. Geometry and Material Constraint Effects on Creep Crack Growth Behavior in Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wang, G. Z.; Xuan, F. Z.; Tu, S. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the geometry and material constraint effects on creep crack growth (CCG) and behavior in welded joints were investigated. The CCG paths and rates of two kinds of specimen geometry (C(T) and M(T)) with initial cracks located at soft HAZ (heat-affected zone with lower creep strength) and different material mismatches were simulated. The effect of constraint on creep crack initiation (CCI) time was discussed. The results show that there exists interaction between geometry and material constraints in terms of their effects on CCG rate and CCI time of welded joints. Under the condition of low geometry constraint, the effect of material constraint on CCG rate and CCI time becomes more obvious. Higher material constraint can promote CCG due to the formation of higher stress triaxiality around crack tip. Higher geometry constraint can increase CCG rate and reduce CCI time of welded joints. Both geometry and material constraints should be considered in creep life assessment and design for high-temperature welded components.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of friction-welded joints in tial turbocharger components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. G.; Kropf, A. J.; Vissers, D. R.; Sun, W. M.; Katsoudas, J.; Yang, N.; Fei, D.

    2012-05-01

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) is an advanced intermetallic material and is being investigated for application in turbocharger components for diesel engines. A TiAl turbocharger rotor consists of a cast TiAl turbine wheel and a Ti-alloy shaft that are joined by friction welding. Although friction welding is an established industrial process, it is still challenging to join dissimilar materials especially for brittle intermetallics. These joints are therefore required to be inspected using a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. In this study, synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) developed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was used for NDE characterization of friction-welded joint in three TiAl turbocharger rotors. The filtered synchrotron X-ray source has high peak energies to penetrate thick metallic materials, and the detector (imager) has high spatial resolutions to resolve small flaws. The CT inspections revealed detailed 3D crack distributions within poorly welded joints. The crack detection sensitivity and resolution was calibrated and found to be correlated well with destructive examination.

  8. Numerical and experimental study of the weld joints formation in welding foam materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bezginov, Roman O. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Krektuleva, Raisa A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Mishin, Mikhail A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Cherepanov, Oleg I. Cherepanov, Roman O.

    2014-11-14

    A numerical analysis of fusion welding of steel- and aluminum-based foam materials is carried out. The schemes of the structured and stochastic pore distribution are considered. The research results were used to conduct the experiments which confirmed the reliability of the numerical calculations.

  9. Mechanical characteristics and microstructure of weld joint of high-temperature martensitic steel containing 9% Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Ya. E.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and mechanical characteristics of a weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel (0.097 C, 0.17.Si, 0.54 Mn, 8.75 Cr, 0.21 Ni, 0.51 Mo, 0.07 Nb, 0.23 V, 0.004 N, 0.003 B, 1.6 W, 0.15 Cu, and Fe for balance, wt %) have been studied; the joint was produced by hand welding in an argon atmosphere using 03Kh20N45M7G6B welding wire (0.3 C, 20 Cr, 45 Ni, 7 Mo, 6 Mn, and 1 Nb, wt %). The weld joint is divided into the zone of the base metal, a thermal effect zone, which consists of zones that contain fine and coarse original austenitic grains, and the zone of seam metal. It has been shown that the weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel possesses high strength characteristics at the room temperature under static loading and a satisfactorily impact toughness, which has the minimum value of 30 J/cm2 in the zone of the seam metal and does not depend on the temperature. With a decrease in the temperature from the room temperature to 253 K, a ductile-brittle transition occurs in the thermal effect zone. Creep tests carried out at the temperature of 923 K have shown that the long-term strength of the weld seam is lower than that of the base material in the entire stress range being tested. At stresses of 140 MPa or higher, the acceleration of creep in the weld seam is observed, while at low stresses of about 120 MPa, the rates of creep in the weld seam and in the base metal remain similar until the transition to the stage of accelerated fracture occurs. The difference in the values of the long-term strength is due to premature fracture, which occurs in the thermal effect zone with the finegrained structure.

  10. Analysing the strength of friction stir spot welded joints of aluminium alloy by fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivarasu, M.; Karthick, K. P.; Abirama Sundar, A.; Gokulachandran, J.

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a recent joining technique developed for spot welding of thin metal sheets. This process currently finds application in automotive, aerospace, marine and sheet metal industry. In this work, the effect of FSSW process parameters namely tool rotation speed, shoulder diameter and dwell time on Tensile shear failure load (TSFL) is investigated. Box-Behnken design is selected for conducting experiments. Fuzzy based soft computing is used to develop a model for TSFL of AA6061 joints fabricated by FSSW. The interaction of the process parameters on TSFL is also presented.

  11. Friction stir welding joint of dissimilar materials between AZ31B magnesium and 6061 aluminum alloys: Microstructure studies and mechanical characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Izadi, H.; Saeid, T.; Kokabi, A.H.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-03-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining dissimilar alloys, which can dramatically reduce grain sizes and offer high mechanical joint efficiency. Lap FSW joints between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloy sheets were made at various tool rotation and travel speeds. Rotation and travel speeds varied between 560–1400 r/min and 16–40 mm/min respectively, where the ratio between these parameters was such that nearly constant pitch distances were applied during welding. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to investigate the microstructures of the joints welded. Intermetallic phases including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β) were detected in the weld zone (WZ). For different tool rotation speeds, the morphology of the microstructure in the stir zone changed significantly with travel speed. Lap shear tensile test results indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds to 1400 r/min and 40 mm/min, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum. Microhardness measurements and tensile stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW parameters and mainly depended on the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. In addition, a debonding failure mode in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld nugget was investigated by SEM and surface fracture studies indicated that the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone controlled the failure mode. XRD analysis of the fracture surface indicated the presence of brittle intermetallic compounds including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β). - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Mg joint was obtained by lap friction stir welding technique. • Effect of rotation and travel speeds on the formation of intermetallic

  12. Corrosion Behavior of Top and Bottom Surfaces for Single-Side and Double-Side Friction Stir Welded 7085-T7651 Aluminum Alloy Thick Plate Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Thick plate joints of 7085-T7451 aluminum alloy were obtained through both single-side and double-side friction stir welding (SS or DS-FSW). The chloride ions effects on the corrosion behavior of the top and bottom surfaces of the joints were examined by cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that the corrosion susceptibility was suppressed significantly in the weld nugget zone, while the base material and heat-affected zone were prone to be corrosion attacked. For the SS-FSWed joint, the top surface showed a higher corrosion resistance than that of the bottom surface, but the larger corrosive heterogeneity was observed between the top and bottom surfaces compared with the two welds of DS-FSWed joint, which was confirmed by the morphology of corrosion attack. A deep insight on the microstructure of the joints indicates that the intermetallic particles played a key role in the corrosion behavior of the FSWed AA7085 aluminum alloy joints in chloride solution.

  13. Corrosion Behavior of Top and Bottom Surfaces for Single-Side and Double-Side Friction Stir Welded 7085-T7651 Aluminum Alloy Thick Plate Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xiaoli

    2017-03-01

    Thick plate joints of 7085-T7451 aluminum alloy were obtained through both single-side and double-side friction stir welding (SS or DS-FSW). The chloride ions effects on the corrosion behavior of the top and bottom surfaces of the joints were examined by cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that the corrosion susceptibility was suppressed significantly in the weld nugget zone, while the base material and heat-affected zone were prone to be corrosion attacked. For the SS-FSWed joint, the top surface showed a higher corrosion resistance than that of the bottom surface, but the larger corrosive heterogeneity was observed between the top and bottom surfaces compared with the two welds of DS-FSWed joint, which was confirmed by the morphology of corrosion attack. A deep insight on the microstructure of the joints indicates that the intermetallic particles played a key role in the corrosion behavior of the FSWed AA7085 aluminum alloy joints in chloride solution.

  14. Site-Dependent Tension Properties of Inertia Friction-Welded Joints Made From Dissimilar Ni-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Semiatin, S. L.; Woodward, C.

    2015-03-01

    Microstructure, tensile properties, and fracture behavior of the inertia friction weld joints of dissimilar superalloys, cast Mar-M247 and wrought LSHR, were studied to assess the weld quality. Tensile tests were conducted at 23 and 704 °C on the samples containing different areas of the weld interface of the same welded material. The stress-strain curves were registered at different axial distances from the weld interface. In all tested samples, plastic deformation was localized on Mar-M247 side, outside the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the resistance to plastic deformation of Mar-M247 increased with a decrease in the distance from the weld interface inside HAZ. Only elastic deformation occurred on the LSHR side. Fracture occurred on the Mar-M247 side, outside HAZ, or at the weld interface. In the latter case, welding defects in the form of clusters of nanometer-sized oxide and carbide particles were observed at the fracture surfaces. These results revealed that the IFW process is capable of producing the weld joints between Mar-M247 and LSHR with the fracture strength higher than that of Mar-M247. However, optimization of the IFW processing parameters is required to minimize clustering of oxide/carbide particles at the weld interface in this alloy pair.

  15. Reasons for crack nucleation in welded joints of main gas-pipelines after a long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruschak, P. O.; Bishchak, R. T.; Shlapak, L. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    A crack of operational origin in the welded joint of the main gas pipeline is analyzed. The reasons for its nucleation and impact on technological microdefects that were formed earlier during the welding are found. Micromechanisms and stages of nucleation and propagation of the crack are investigated.

  16. Hybrid joints manufactured by ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW) - corrosion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.; Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Wolter, B.

    2017-03-01

    To realize lightweight structures of material combinations like aluminum/magnesium and aluminum/steel an Ultrasound Enhanced Friction Stir Welding (USE-FSW) process was used. This process has a beneficial influence on the resulting microstructure (elimination of the brittle intermetallic phase Al3Mg2 as coherent layer) and the mechanical properties (increased tensile strength) of Al/Mg-joints and was now also applied for Al/steel-hybrid joints. Besides the mechanical properties the corrosion properties of the hybrid joints may play a significant role concerning the later use of the hybrid materials. Therefore, the corrosion properties of various hybrid joints have been investigated by different methods. With the Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP) Volta potential differences between the base alloys and the welded area were investigated in air. The two-dimensional color-plots illustrate not only the Volta potential differences between the different phases but also their oxidation properties in air during the measurement time. Electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarization) have been carried out for the investigation of the corrosion properties of the FSW and USE-FSW hybrid joints in 0.5 molar NaCl solution. A three electrode setup within a mini-cell was used to enable measurements on different areas of the joints. This allows to observe the corrosion activity of the base alloys and the nugget phase separately. Differences between Al/steel-hybrid joints processed with and without ultrasound enhancement are discussed and compared with Al/Mg-hybrids.

  17. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, D. J.; Teufel, L. W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates.

  18. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  19. Influence of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welding joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Jianli

    2017-02-01

    The influences of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel joints welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with different shielding gas compositions were studied by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization methods The adding 2% N2 in shielding gas facilitated primary austenite formation in GTAW weld metal (WM) and suppressed Cr2N precipitation in GTAW weld root. In the HAZ, the banded microstructure disappeared while the coarse ferrite grains maintained same orientation as the banded ferrite in the BM. In the WM, the ferrite had one single orientation throughout a grain, whereas several families of austenite appeared. The austenite both in BM and WM enriched in Ni and nitro`gen, while Cr and Mo were concentrated in the ferrite and thus no element showed clear dendritic distribution in the WM (ER2209 and E2209T1). In addition, the secondary austenite had higher Ni content but lower Cr and Mo content than the primary austenite. The N2-supplemented shielding gas promoted nitrogen solid-solution in the primary and secondary austenite. Furthermore, the secondary austenite had relatively lower pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) than the ferrite and primary austenite, thereby resulting in its preferential corrosion. The Cr2N precipitation led to relatively poor resistance to pitting corrosion in three HAZs and pure Ar shielding GTAW weld root. The N2-supplemented shielding gas improved pitting corrosion resistance of GTAW joint by increasing PREN of secondary austenite and suppressing Cr2N precipitation. In addition, the FCAW WM had much poorer resistance to pitting corrosion than the GTAW WM due to many O-Ti-Si-Mn inclusions. In the BM, since the austenite with lower PREN compared

  20. Mechanical and interfacial characterization of laser welded Co-Cr alloy with different joint configurations

    PubMed Central

    Kokolis, John; Chakmakchi, Makdad; Theocharopoulos, Antonios; Prombonas, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The mechanical and interfacial characterization of laser welded Co-Cr alloy with two different joint designs. MATERIALS AND METHODS Dumbbell cast specimens (n=30) were divided into 3 groups (R, I, K, n=10). Group R consisted of intact specimens, group I of specimens sectioned with a straight cut, and group K of specimens with a 45° bevel made at the one welding edge. The microstructure and the elemental distributions of alloy and welding regions were examined by an SEM/EDX analysis and then specimens were loaded in tension up to fracture. The tensile strength (TS) and elongation (ε) were determined and statistically compared among groups employing 1-way ANOVA, SNK multiple comparison test (α=.05) and Weibull analysis where Weibull modulus m and characteristic strength σο were identified. Fractured surfaces were imaged by a SEM. RESULTS SEM/EDX analysis showed that cast alloy consists of two phases with differences in mean atomic number contrast, while no mean atomic number was identified for welded regions. EDX analysis revealed an increased Cr and Mo content at the alloy-joint interface. All mechanical properties of group I (TS, ε, m and σο) were found inferior to R while group K showed intermediated values without significant differences to R and I, apart from elongation with group R. The fractured surfaces of all groups showed extensive dendritic pattern although with a finer structure in the case of welded groups. CONCLUSION The K shape joint configuration should be preferred over the I, as it demonstrates improved mechanical strength and survival probability. PMID:25722836

  1. Characteristics of AZ31 Mg alloy joint using automatic TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-tao; Zhou, Ji-xue; Zhao, Dong-qing; Liu, Yun-teng; Wu, Jian-hua; Yang, Yuan-sheng; Ma, Bai-chang; Zhuang, Hai-hua

    2017-01-01

    The automatic tungsten-inert gas welding (ATIGW) of AZ31 Mg alloys was performed using a six-axis robot. The evolution of the microstructure and texture of the AZ31 auto-welded joints was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. The ATIGW process resulted in coarse recrystallized grains in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and epitaxial growth of columnar grains in the fusion zone (FZ). Substantial changes of texture between the base material (BM) and the FZ were detected. The {0002} basal plane in the BM was largely parallel to the sheet rolling plane, whereas the c-axis of the crystal lattice in the FZ inclined approximately 25° with respect to the welding direction. The maximum pole density increased from 9.45 in the BM to 12.9 in the FZ. The microhardness distribution, tensile properties, and fracture features of the AZ31 auto-welded joints were also investigated.

  2. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints.

  3. The use of ion beam cleaning to obtain high quality cold welds with minimal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Moore, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A variation of cold welding is described which utilizes an ion beam to clean mating surfaces prior to joining in a vacuum environment. High quality solid state welds were produced with minimal deformation.

  4. Numerical study of electron beam welded butt joints with the GTN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Haoyun; Schmauder, Siegfried; Weber, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    The fracture behavior of S355NL electron beam welded steel joints is investigated experimentally and numerically. The simulation of crack propagation in an electron beam welded steel joint was performed with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model. A parameter study of the GTN model was adopted which reveals the influence of parameters on the material behavior of notched round and compact tension specimens. Based on the combined method of metallographic investigations and numerical calibration, the GTN parameters were fixed. The same parameters were used to predict the ductile fracture of compact tension specimens with the initial crack located at different locations. Good match can be found between the numerical and experimental results in the form of force versus Crack Opening Displacement as well as fracture resistance curves.

  5. Electron-microscopic examination of the transition zone of aluminum-tantalum bimetallic joints (explosion welding)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, A. Yu.; Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Elkina, O. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Plotnikov, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    A study of the structure of an aluminum-tantalum joint and a comparison of this structure with the structures of iron-silver and copper-tantalum joints have revealed the following processes of the interpenetration of the materials that occur during explosion welding: the formation of protrusions, the injection of particles of one material into the other, and the formation of zones of local melting. Regardless of the mutual solubility of the metals being welded, two types of fragmentation occur, i.e., (1) a granulating fragmentation (GF), which includes the formation, explosion-governed (EG) dispersion, and partial consolidation of particles, and (2) the fragmentation that is usually observed during severe plastic deformation. It is important that this traditional fragmentation is not accompanied by the formation and EG dispersion of particles. This feature allows one to easily distinguish these types of fragmentation (traditional and GF fragmentation).

  6. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendrana, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2017-01-01

    AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy) has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW) parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE), analysis of variance (ANOVA), response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  7. Double global optimum genetic algorithm-particle swarm optimization-based welding robot path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewu; Shi, Yingpan; Ding, Dongyan; Gu, Xingsheng

    2016-02-01

    Spot-welding robots have a wide range of applications in manufacturing industries. There are usually many weld joints in a welding task, and a reasonable welding path to traverse these weld joints has a significant impact on welding efficiency. Traditional manual path planning techniques can handle a few weld joints effectively, but when the number of weld joints is large, it is difficult to obtain the optimal path. The traditional manual path planning method is also time consuming and inefficient, and cannot guarantee optimality. Double global optimum genetic algorithm-particle swarm optimization (GA-PSO) based on the GA and PSO algorithms is proposed to solve the welding robot path planning problem, where the shortest collision-free paths are used as the criteria to optimize the welding path. Besides algorithm effectiveness analysis and verification, the simulation results indicate that the algorithm has strong searching ability and practicality, and is suitable for welding robot path planning.

  8. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.; Teufel, L.W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass. In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates. Testing was done in a servo-controlled machine at axial displacement rates of 5 x 10{sup -5} cm/sec, and confining pressures ranging from 10 to 40 MPa. For the jointed samples four modes of slip were identified. First, stable sliding accompanied by a steady rate of AE. Second, stick-slip with a sharp drop in load, large displacements but no premonitory AE or slip. Third, stick-slip, as in mode 2, but with premonitory AE and slip. Fourth, slow stick-slip where the load dropped and the displacements increased but the process was slow and culminated in stable sliding. Mode 4 exhibited premonitory AE and slip and after the event, a steady rate of AE during sliding. There seemed to be no way to predict which mode would occur at a given point in the test. In all cases where stable or unstable slip occurred there was a corresponding occurrence of AE. This indicates that slip is related to damage to the joint surfaces and adjacent material. Monitoring AE would be a useful method of detecting slip.

  9. Improvement of ultrasonic characteristics in butt-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel using magnetic stirring method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanosaki, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Arakawa, T.

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic Stirring Method of Tungsten Inert Gas(TIG) Welding are applied to butt-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel. The purpose of this method is to refine the welded structure and to improve the ultrasonic characteristics. In the conventional method of ultrasonic test in austenitic stainless steel weldments, dendritic solidification structure of weldment prevents smooth ultrasonic beam transmission. The tests are performed in three welding conditions; One is conventional TIG welding (without magnetic stirring), the other two are TIG welding using magnetic stirring method. Each test piece is evaluated by observing macro structure of cross section and by several ultrasonic tests examining pulse amplitudes, beam path length and proceeding beam direction. The detectability of artificial notches in weldment is also investigated and compared.

  10. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of single and double pass Aluminum AA6061 friction stir weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. H.; Shah, L. H.; Ishak, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the effect of single pass (SP), double sided pass (DSP) and normal double pass (NDP) method on friction stir welding of aluminum AA6061. Two pieces of AA6061 alloy with thickness of 6 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The rotational speeds that were used in this study were 800 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1200 rpm, respectively. The welding speed is fixed to 100 mm/min. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Tensile test and Vickers hardness test were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen. Mechanical property analysis results indicate that at low rotational speeds, defects such as surface lack of fill and tunneling in the welded area can be observed. Vickers hardness of specimens however did not vary much when rotational speed is varied. Welded specimens using single pass method shows higher tensile strength and hardness value compared to both double pass methods up to 180.61 MPa. Moreover, DSP showed better tensile test and hardness test compared to NDP method. The optimum parameters were found to be single pass method with 1200 rpm of rotational speed. Therefore economically sound to only perform SP method to obtain maximum tensile strength for AA6061 FSW with thickness of 6 mm.

  11. Welding of a corrosion-resistant composite material based on VT14 titanium alloy obtained using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Chakin, I. K.; Komarov, P. N.; Ruktuev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates the possibility of inert gas arc welding of a double layer composite material on a titanium base with an anti-corrosive layer obtained by fused deposition of a powder mix containing tantalum and niobium over a titanium base using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere. Butt welding and fillet welding options were tested with two types of edge preparation. Welds were subjected to a metallographic examination including a structural study and an analysis of the chemical and phase composition of the welds. A conclusion was made regarding the possibility of using welding for manufacturing of items from the investigated composite material.

  12. Microstructure and Hardness Profiles of Bifocal Laser-Welded DP-HSLA Steel Overlap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajcar, A.; Matter, P.; Stano, S.; Wilk, Z.; Różański, M.

    2017-03-01

    The article presents results related to the bifocal laser welding of overlap joints made of HSLA and DP high-strength steels. The joints were made using a disk laser and a head enabling the 50-50% distribution of laser power. The effects of the laser welding rates and the distance between laser spots on morphological features and hardness profiles were analyzed. It was established that the positioning of beams at angles of 0° or 90° determined the hardness of the individual zones of the joints, without causing significant differences in microstructures of the steels. Microstructural features were inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Both steels revealed primarily martensitic-bainitic microstructures in the fusion zone and in the heat-affected zone. Mixed multiphase microstructures were revealed in the inter-critical heat-affected zone of the joint. The research involved the determination of parameters making it possible to reduce the hardness of joints and prevent the formation of the soft zone in the dual-phase steel.

  13. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  14. The Microstructure and Gamma Prime Distributions in Inertia Friction Welded Joint of P/M Superalloy FGH96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Shen, Wenfei; Zhang, Liwen; Xia, Yingnan; Li, Ruiqin

    2017-03-01

    A gamma prime (γ') precipitation ( 35% in volume)-hardened powder metallurgy (P/M) superalloy FGH96 was welded using inertia friction welding (IFW). The microstructure and γ' distributions in the joints in two conditions, hot isostatic pressed state and solution-treated and aged state, were characterized. The recrystallization of grains, the dissolution and re-precipitation of γ' in the joints were discussed in terms of the temperature evolutions which were calculated by finite element model analysis. Regardless of the initial states, fully recrystallized fine grain structure formed at welded zone. Meanwhile, very fine γ' precipitations were re-precipitated at the welded zone. These recrystallized grain structure and fine re-precipitated γ' resulted in increasing hardness of IFW joint while making the hardness dependent on the microstructure and γ' precipitation.

  15. Physical Nature of the Processes in Structure Forming, Phase and Chemical Composition of pipe Permanent Joints when MMA Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Sadykov, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    The paper outlines peculiarities of structure formation, phase and chemical composition in regard to heat content in molten electrode metal beads when pipe steel (steel 09G2S) welding using power sources with various energy characteristics. Mathematical calculations indicate an inverter power source provides minor heat content into the bead of electrode metal when welding. Experimental research has pointed at 4-9 % increase in impact strength of joints produced using an inverter power source in comparison with samples produced applying a diode rectifier. The following factors can possibly give rise to the increasing impact strength: difference in microstructures of weld joints, up to 50% shortening ferritic plates in metal of weld joint, change in dimensions of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone by as much as 17.5 %, and decrease in the extent of heat-affected zone by 50%.

  16. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  17. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  18. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of MIG Welding of T-Joints of Thin Aluminum Plates for Top Class Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzi, Enrico; Colombini, Elena; Panari, Davide; Vergnano, Alberto; Leali, Francesco; Veronesi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The integration of experiments with numerical simulations can efficiently support a quick evaluation of the welded joint. In this work, the MIG welding operation on aluminum T-joint thin plate has been studied by the integration of both simulation and experiments. The aim of the paper is to enlarge the global database, to promote the use of thin aluminum sheets in automotive body industries and to provide new data. Since the welding of aluminum thin plates is difficult to control due to high speed of the heat source and high heat flows during heating and cooling, a simulation model could be considered an effective design tool to predict the real phenomena. This integrated approach enables new evaluation possibilities on MIG-welded thin aluminum T-joints, as correspondence between the extension of the microstructural zones and the simulation parameters, material hardness, transient 3D temperature distribution on the surface and inside the material, stresses, strains, and deformations. The results of the mechanical simulations are comparable with the experimental measurements along the welding path, especially considering the variability of the process. The results could well predict the welding-induced distortion, which together with local heating during welding must be anticipated and subsequently minimized and counterbalance.

  19. Reactor cooling water expansion joint bellows: The role of the seam weld in fatigue crack development

    SciTech Connect

    West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The secondary cooling water system pressure boundary of Savannah River Site reactors includes expansion joints utilizing a thin-wall bellows. While successfully used for over thirty years, an occasional replacement has been required because of the development of small, circumferential fatigue cracks in a bellows convolute. One such crack was recently shown to have initiated from a weld heat-affected zone liquation microcrack. The crack, initially open to the outer surface of the rolled and seam welded cylindrical bellows section, was closed when cold forming of the convolutes placed the outer surface in residual compression. However, the bellows was placed in tension when installed, and the tensile stresses reopened the microcrack. This five to eight grain diameter microcrack was extended by ductile fatigue processes. Initial extension was by relatively rapid propagation through the large-grained weld metal, followed by slower extension through the fine-grained base metal. A significant through-wall crack was not developed until the crack extended into the base metal on both sides of the weld. Leakage of cooling water was subsequently detected and the bellows removed and a replacement installed.

  20. The influence of radiation on the properties of welds and joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A. A.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of radiation on mechanical properties of candidate structural materials for the first wall and breeder blanket of fusion reactors is reviewed. The emphasis is placed on austenitic stainless steel type 316L and its weld metals; design parameters considered are similar to those currently specified for the Next European Torus, namely, irradiation doses ≤15 dpa, temperatures ≤ 400°C, number of pulse cycles ≈10 5 and hold times ≤15 mn. The effect of irradiation on other materials, including austenitic stainless steel Type 304L, weld metal Type 308L and ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr-Mo), as well as other service conditions such as temperatures as high as 550°C are also briefly discussed. The data collected and presented in this review are those usually measured before and after irradiation, through tensile, impact toughness, fracture toughness, fatigue, creep-fatigue and fatigue crack propagation testing. In each case the influence of irradiation parameters on the observed changes are discussed and relative conclusions are drawn. The most important observation made is the lack of medium dose irradiation data on the weld metal and in particular on the electron beam welded joints.

  1. Effects of aging treatment and heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of TIG-welded 6061-T6 alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Shen, Jun; Tang, Qin; Wu, Cui-ping; Zhou, Yan-bing

    2013-03-01

    Aging treatment and various heat input conditions were adopted to investigate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of TIG welded 6061-T6 alloy joints by microstructural observations, microhardness tests, and tensile tests. With an increase in heat input, the width of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases and grains in the fusion zone (FZ) coarsen. Moreover, the hardness of the HAZ decreases, whereas that of the FZ decreases initially and then increases with an increase in heat input. Low heat input results in the low ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints due to the presence of partial penetrations and pores in the welded joints. After a simple artificial aging treatment at 175°C for 8 h, the microstructure of the welded joints changes slightly. The mechanical properties of the welded joints enhance significantly after the aging process as few precipitates distribute in the welded seam.

  2. Heat and fluid flow in complex joints during gas metal arc welding—Part I: Numerical model of fillet welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Kim, C.-H.; DebRoy, T.

    2004-05-01

    Gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding is one of the most important processes for metal joining because of its high productivity and amiability to automation. This welding process is characterized by the complicated V-shaped joint geometry, a deformable weld pool surface, and the additions of hot metal droplets. In the present work, a three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to examine the temperature profiles, velocity fields, weld pool shape and size, and the nature of the solidified weld bead geometry during GMA fillet welding. The model solved the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using a boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate system. Apart from the direct transport of heat from the welding arc, additional heat from the metal droplets was modeled considering a volumetric heat source. The deformation of the weld pool surface was calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. Part I of this article is focused on the details of the numerical model such as coordinate transformation and calculation of volumetric heat source and free surface profile. An application of the model to GMA fillet welding of mild steel is described in an accompanying article (W. Zhang, C.-H. Kim and T. DebRoy, J. Appl Phys. 95, 5220 (2004)).

  3. Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.E.; Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

  4. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Dissimilar Friction Stir-Welded AA5083-AA7B04 Butt Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ding, Hua; Cai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jingwei; Li, Jizhong

    2016-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been used for joining AA5083 and AA7B04 alloy sheets with the aim of studying the microstructure and the mechanical properties of dissimilar FSW joints obtained by varying the initial base metal state of AA7B04 alloy. The results show that the initial base metal state has a significant impact on the material flow during dissimilar FSW. As compared with the joints placing hard alloy (artificially aged AA7B04-AA or naturally aged AA7B04-NA) on the retreating side, it becomes easier transporting AA5083 from advancing side to retreating side when soft alloy (annealed AA7B04-O) is placed on the retreating side. The atomic diffusion does not occur at the interface between AA5083 and AA7B04, indicating that the mixing of the two materials is merely mechanical. Grain refinement is observed in the stir zone. The failure location during tensile tests is different depending on the initial base metal state. The joints (AA5083/AA7B04-AA and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the base metal on the soft material side which corresponds to the minimum values in hardness profiles. Differently, the joints (AA5083/AA5083 and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the stir zone due to the presence of defects including "zigzag line," kissing bond and discontinuous voids.

  5. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Dissimilar Friction Stir-Welded AA5083-AA7B04 Butt Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ding, Hua; Cai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jingwei; Li, Jizhong

    2017-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been used for joining AA5083 and AA7B04 alloy sheets with the aim of studying the microstructure and the mechanical properties of dissimilar FSW joints obtained by varying the initial base metal state of AA7B04 alloy. The results show that the initial base metal state has a significant impact on the material flow during dissimilar FSW. As compared with the joints placing hard alloy (artificially aged AA7B04-AA or naturally aged AA7B04-NA) on the retreating side, it becomes easier transporting AA5083 from advancing side to retreating side when soft alloy (annealed AA7B04-O) is placed on the retreating side. The atomic diffusion does not occur at the interface between AA5083 and AA7B04, indicating that the mixing of the two materials is merely mechanical. Grain refinement is observed in the stir zone. The failure location during tensile tests is different depending on the initial base metal state. The joints (AA5083/AA7B04-AA and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the base metal on the soft material side which corresponds to the minimum values in hardness profiles. Differently, the joints (AA5083/AA5083 and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the stir zone due to the presence of defects including "zigzag line," kissing bond and discontinuous voids.

  6. Increasing Strength and Operational Reliability of Fixed Joints of Tubes by MMA Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Schlyakhova, G. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents peculiar properties of structure formation, phase and chemical composition while welding of low-alloy steel 09MnSi2-l depending on the dynamic characteristics of power sources of different types. Proper selection of power sources enables to decrease burning of alloy elements in metal of weld (Mn by 14% and Si by 17% of the weight ratio), to obtain more homogenous structure of deposited metal, to reduce length of heat-affected zone by 50% and to improve impact strength by 4-9%.

  7. Tensile and Fatigue Properties of Single and Multiple Dissimilar Welded Joints of DP980 and HSLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Q. L.; Parkes, D.; Westerbaan, D.; Nayak, S. S.; Zhou, Y.; Saha, D. C.; Liu, D.; Goodwin, F.; Bhole, S.; Chen, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    The present study focused on single and multiple dissimilar joints between DP980 and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) galvanized steels. The tensile properties of the dissimilar joint between the strong DP980 and the relatively soft HSLA reflected only the properties of HSLA with plastic deformation, and final fracture took place entirely in HSLA. The fatigue properties of the dissimilar joints were more intriguing, with the strong DP980 outperforming at high stress amplitude and the ductile HSLA outperforming at low stress amplitude. For different load amplitudes, fatigue failure occurred in different materials and at different locations. The fatigue strength of DP980 was more negatively impaired by weld defects than that of HSLA.

  8. Tensile and Fatigue Properties of Single and Multiple Dissimilar Welded Joints of DP980 and HSLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Q. L.; Parkes, D.; Westerbaan, D.; Nayak, S. S.; Zhou, Y.; Saha, D. C.; Liu, D.; Goodwin, F.; Bhole, S.; Chen, D. L.

    2017-02-01

    The present study focused on single and multiple dissimilar joints between DP980 and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) galvanized steels. The tensile properties of the dissimilar joint between the strong DP980 and the relatively soft HSLA reflected only the properties of HSLA with plastic deformation, and final fracture took place entirely in HSLA. The fatigue properties of the dissimilar joints were more intriguing, with the strong DP980 outperforming at high stress amplitude and the ductile HSLA outperforming at low stress amplitude. For different load amplitudes, fatigue failure occurred in different materials and at different locations. The fatigue strength of DP980 was more negatively impaired by weld defects than that of HSLA.

  9. First samples of Ti and Nb tubes explosion welding joint with stainless steel for ILC 1.8 K cryomodule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabirov, B. M.; Budagov, J. A.; Shirkov, G. D.

    2013-07-01

    The world first samples of Ti and Nb tubes joint with stainless steel ones by an explosion welding by the JINR-VNIIEF-FNAL-INFN cooperation were manufactured in the frame of ILC R&D programe. An applying methods of relaxation of residual tensions (after explosion and electron beam welding), macro- and microanalyses of welding seam and cryogenic tests of the samples produced manifest the achievement of high mechanic strength (≈250 MPa/share) of welding seam, solidity and leak absence on 10-10 l atm/s level at 1.8 K. The explosion welding technology and methods introducing to industrial manufacturing of the 4-th generation of cryomodule of TESLA TYPE DESIGN can exclude the Ti—communications, connect the Nb—cavity with stainless steel vessel and reduce significantly the accelerator cost.

  10. Influence of Heat Input on the Content of Delta Ferrite in the Structure of 304L Stainless Steel GTA Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejč, Pavol; Kubíček, Rastislav

    2011-12-01

    Welding of austenitic stainless steel has its specific issues, even when the weldability is considered good. The main problems of austenitic stainless steel welding are connected with its metallurgical weldability. The amount of the components presented in the structure of stainless steel welded joint affect its properties, therefore the understanding of the behavior of stainless steel during its welding is important for successful processing and allows the fabricators the possibility to manage the resulting issues. This paper is focused on the influence of heat input on the structural changes in GTA welded joints of austenitic stainless steel designated: ASTM SA TP 304L.

  11. Corrosion resistance of a laser spot-welded joint of NiTi wire in simulated human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Da-Zhi

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate corrosion resistance of a laser spot-welded joint of NiTi alloy wires using potentiodynamic tests in Hank's solution at different PH values and the PH 7.4 NaCl solution for different Cl- concentrations. Scanning electron microscope observations were carried out before and after potentiodynamic tests. The composition of a laser spot-welded joint and base metal were characterized by using an electron probe microanalyzer. The results of potentiodynamic tests showed that corrosion resistance of a laser spot-welded joint of NiTi alloy wire was better than that of base metal, which exhibited a little higher breakdown potential and passive range, and a little lower passive current density. Corrosion resistances of a laser spot-welded joint and base metal decreased with increasing of the Cl- concentration and PH value. The improvement of corrosion resistance of the laser spot-welded joint was due to the decrease of the surface defects and the increase of the Ti/Ni ratio.

  12. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  13. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  14. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  15. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  16. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile strength and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded butt joints of AA2014-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-08-01

    Friction stir welded (FSWed) joints of aluminum alloys exhibited a hardness drop in both the advancing side (AS) and retreating side (RS) of the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) due to the thermal cycle involved in the FSW process. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to overcome this problem by post weld heat treatment (PWHT) methods. FSW butt (FSWB) joints of Al-Cu (AA2014-T6) alloy were PWHT by two methods such as simple artificial aging (AA) and solution treatment followed by artificial aging (STA). Of these two treatments, STA was found to be more beneficial than the simple aging treatment to improve the tensile properties of the FSW joints of AA2014 aluminum alloy.

  17. Properties of the joints of sheets of 1565ch alloy in combination with other aluminum alloys that were performed by friction welding with mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drits, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and properties of the butt-welded joints of a 1565ch M aluminum alloy with AMg5, AMg6, AV (60661), and 7021 alloys that were performed by friction welding with mixing are studied. The mechanical properties of these joints and their fracture zones are determined as functions of a combination of the alloys to be joined. These alloys are found to have good weldability under friction welding with mixing.

  18. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  19. Microstructural characterisation of interfaces in magnetic pulse welded aluminum/aluminum joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiev, S.; Pabst, C.; F-X Wagner, M.; Groche, P.

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic pulse welding provides novel and useful solutions in the field of multi-material structures. The joining occurs through the high-energy mechanical impact of metal sheets, which leads to a strong, cohesive, metallic bonding between the sheets. The high- velocity collision results in changes of the microstructure in the regions adjacent to the interface. The aim of this work is the microstructural characterization of the interface and the welding zone of Al/Al joints. One typical interface is analysed by optical and electron microscopy and using the electron backscatter diffraction technique. Our results show that the interface exhibits a well-known type of wavy weld geometry. Moreover, the formation of an intermediate layer that is different from the bulk aluminium structure is observed. The microstructure of this intermediate layer consists of ultrafine grains and in some regions exhibits a columnar grain structure. It is likely that this special microstructure (which plays an important role in determining the cohesive, continuous bonding between the metal sheets) is formed through a rapid melting and crystallisation process in the interface region.

  20. Formation of porous inner architecture at the interface of magnetic pulse welded Al/Cu joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapanathan, T.; Raoelison, R. N.; Yang, K.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-10-01

    Porous inner architecture has been revealed at the interface of magnetic pulse welded aluminum/copper (Al/Cu) joints. These materials could serve the purpose of heterogeneous architectured materials, while their makeup of inner architecture of porous interface with the pore sizes of sub-micron to a few microns, could offer potential attributes in energy storage application. Two welding cases with various impact intensities are compared. An input voltage of 6.5 kV with an initial air gap of 1.5 mm and a higher voltage of 7.5 kV with a large initial air gap of 5 mm are respectively considered as two cases with low and high velocity impacts. Overall morphology of the porous medium was revealed at the interface either in layered or pocketed structures. The allocation of the porous zone and pore sizes vary with the impact condition. The low velocity impact welding conditions also produces smaller pores compared to the high velocity impact case, where the pore sizes varies in submicron to a few microns (<10μm). By investigating the potential mechanism of the porous zone formation, it was identified that a combined phenomena of cavitation and coalescence play a major role in nucleation and growth of the pores where a rapid cooling that eventually freezes the porous structure at the interface.

  1. Investigation of influence of friction stir welding regimes on the features of mass transfer and temperature distribution in forming welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurov, S. V.; Shilko, E. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    Computer simulation by the movable cellular automaton method was performed to study the influence of friction stir welding regimes on the features of intensive mass transfer and temperature distribution in forming welded joints. The calculation results showed that there is a range of optimal values of the ratio of the angular velocity to the welding speed which provides sufficient mass transfer to form a welded joint with a minimum volume content of defects. The use of the optimal FSW regimes allows to obtain joints without significant overheating of the welded materials.

  2. Changes in the Structure and Properties of Welded Joints of Low-Alloy Steels, Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, V. N.; Kovenskiy, I. M.; Kuskov, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    Time-varying loads negatively affect the properties and structure of materials. Structural failures typically occur at loads below the yield point. In this work, fatigue tests of welded joints of low-alloy steels were carried out in an asymmetric cycle at loads of 60 and 80% of the yield strength. The stress ratio was 0.8-0.9. On the basis of the results of the tests, equations linking the number of cycles to failure with test parameters were obtained. Such equations can be used for estimating the residual life of elements both under construction and in operation. It has been found that the failure is not instantaneous. Specimens of steels continue to resist variable loads for 4000 - 26000 cycles to failure, depending on steel grade and the parameters of the test. Under operating conditions, it gives an opportunity to discover the onset of failure and dispose of the defective part or to replace the entire structure. A standard technique was used to measure the microhardness on the fractured specimens. The distance between the nearest indentations was 0.2 mm. The results of the measurements were plotted in graphs of ahardness change characteristic for all steels under study. A microhardness “step” has been discovered in areas with high dislocation density, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate stage of the investigation is the development of recommendations for determining the moment of failure of welded constructions with a probability of 95%.

  3. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  4. Columnar jointing in vapor-phase-altered, non-welded Cerro Galán Ignimbrite, Paycuqui, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Lesti, Chiara; Cas, Ray A.F.; Porreca, Massimiliano; Viramonte, Jose G.; Folkes, Christopher B.; Giordano, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Columnar jointing is thought to occur primarily in lavas and welded pyroclastic flow deposits. However, the non-welded Cerro Galán Ignimbrite at Paycuqui, Argentina, contains well-developed columnar joints that are instead due to high-temperature vapor-phase alteration of the deposit, where devitrification and vapor-phase crystallization have increased the density and cohesion of the upper half of the section. Thermal remanent magnetization analyses of entrained lithic clasts indicate high emplacement temperatures, above 630°C, but the lack of welding textures indicates temperatures below the glass transition temperature. In order to remain below the glass transition at 630°C, the minimum cooling rate prior to deposition was 3.0 × 10−3–8.5 × 10−2°C/min (depending on the experimental data used for comparison). Alternatively, if the deposit was emplaced above the glass transition temperature, conductive cooling alone was insufficient to prevent welding. Crack patterns (average, 4.5 sides to each polygon) and column diameters (average, 75 cm) are consistent with relatively rapid cooling, where advective heat loss due to vapor fluxing increases cooling over simple conductive heat transfer. The presence of regularly spaced, complex radiating joint patterns is consistent with fumarolic gas rise, where volatiles originated in the valley-confined drainage system below. Joint spacing is a proxy for cooling rates and is controlled by depositional thickness/valley width. We suggest that the formation of joints in high-temperature, non-welded deposits is aided by the presence of underlying external water, where vapor transfer causes crystallization in pore spaces, densifies the deposit, and helps prevent welding.

  5. Microstructure and Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by PAW + GTAW Combined Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan

    2016-10-01

    The combined double-pass process of plasma arc welding (PAW) + gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was performed on 304 austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 12 mm. Results indicated that two different morphologies of ferrite (e.g., lathy δ-ferrite and skeletal δ-ferrite) were formed within the austenite matrix in PAW weld metal (PAW-WM). GTAW weld metal (GTAW-WM) was mainly composed of fine austenite and skeletal δ-ferrite. In transition zone between PAW-WM and GTAW-WM, epitaxial growth contributed to cellular dendritic crystals transforming into columnar crystals. The tensile strength of joint is about 700 MPa. The impact toughness of WM varied from 281 J (20 °C) to 122 (-196 °C), while the impact toughness of heat-affected zone (HAZ) varied from 205 J (20 °C) to 112 J (-196 °C).

  6. Influence of Temperature and Chloride Concentration on Passivation Mechanism and Corrosion of a DSS2209 Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Hania; Azzaz, Mohamed; Djeghlal, Mohamed Elamine

    2016-10-01

    The passivity behavior of a 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis and EIS measurements. In order to evaluate the contribution of temperature, chloride concentration and microstructure, a sequence of polarization tests were carried out in aerated NaCl solutions selected according to robust design of a three level-three factors Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. Analysis of signal-to-noise ratio and ANOVA were achieved on all measured data, and the contribution of every control factor was estimated. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint is related to the evolution of the passive film formed on the surface. It was found that the passive film on the welded zone possessed n- and p-type semiconductor characteristics. With the increase of solution temperature and chlorides concentration, the corrosion resistance of the passive film is more affected in the weldment than in the base metal.

  7. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  8. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  9. Genesis of the columnar joints from welded tuff in Mount Mudeung National Geopark, Republic of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Huh, Min; Yi, Keewook; Lee, Changyeol

    2015-09-01

    Mount Mudeung National Geopark (MMNG), Gwangju, Republic of Korea (1187 masl), is known for its huge, broad occurrences of columnar jointed colonnades in the Cretaceous Mudeungsan Tuff. To understand the genesis of columnar joints infilling a volcanic vent, integrated geochemical and geophysical studies were conducted. Most colonnades in the Geopark are located in regions higher than 700 masl and show elevation-dependent variations in the mean face width of the columns. These mean widths are approximately 1.7, 1.3, 2.9, and 1.2 m for the summit (>1100 masl), upper (950-1100 masl), lower (850-950 masl), and lowest (700-850 masl) colonnades, respectively. This variation implies that columnar jointing resulted from discontinuous tuff depositions on relatively planar ground, which is associated with caldera structures and landslides from the emptied caldera rim. Geochemical analyses of major, minor, and trace elements show that the andesitic-dacitic Mudeungsan Tuff resulted from the arc magmatism associated with subduction of the Izanagi Plate and involved crustal components. Few geochemical variations of the Mudeungsan Tuff indicate that tuff originated from a single magma chamber. U-Pb age dating indicates that the Mudeungsan Tuff was deposited at ~85 Ma except for the Chotdae-bong colonnades, which were dated to ~87 Ma. However, a scaling analysis of the elevation-dependent variations of face widths and simplified numerical model calculations indicate that the variation in face widths with elevation indicates the sequential emplacement, cooling, and compaction of separate welded tuffs. Thus, the welded tuffs of MMNG can be thought to be formed by three discontinuous large explosive eruptions with periods of repose after each eruption. These tuffs include 1) the highest-elevation columnar joints of colonnades in the summit area (>1100 m), corresponding to the lower colonnades of the third tuff; 2) the intermediate-elevation columnar joints of colonnades

  10. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  11. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of high power ultrasonic spot welded aluminum alloy AA6111–TiAl6V4 dissimilar joints

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.Q. Robson, J.D.; Ciuca, O.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2014-11-15

    Aluminum alloy AA6111 and TiAl6V4 dissimilar alloys were successfully welded by high power ultrasonic spot welding. No visible intermetallic reaction layer was detected in as-welded AA6111/TiAl6V4 welds, even when transmission electron microscopy was used. The effects of welding time and natural aging on peak load and fracture energy were investigated. The peak load and fracture energy of welds increased with an increase in welding time and then reached a plateau. The lap shear strength (peak load) can reach the same level as that of similar Al–Al joints. After natural aging, the fracture mode of welds transferred from ductile fracture of the softened aluminum to interfacial failure due to the strength recovery of AA6111. - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Ti welds were produced by high power ultrasonic spot welding. • No visible intermetallic reaction layer was detected on weld interface. • The lap shear strength can reach the same level as that of similar Al–Al joints. • The fracture mode becomes interfacial failure after natural aging.

  12. Microstructure and Fatigue Properties of Ultrasonic Spot Welded Joints of Aluminum 5754 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, F. A.; Macwan, A.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of ultrasonic spot welded joints of aluminum 5754 alloy for automotive applications. A unique "necklace"-type structure with very fine equiaxed grains was observed to form along the weld line due to the mechanical interlocking coupled with the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. The maximum lap shear tensile strength of 85 MPa and the fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles) were achieved. The tensile fracture occurred at the Al/Al interface in the case of lower energy inputs, and at the edge of nugget zone in the case of higher energy inputs. The maximum cyclic stress for the transition of fatigue fracture mode from the transverse through-thickness crack growth to the interfacial failure increased with increasing energy input. Fatigue crack propagation was mainly characterized by the formation of fatigue striations, which usually appeared perpendicular to the fatigue crack propagation.

  13. Change of nonlinear acoustics in ASME grade 122 steel welded joint during creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Toshihiro; Honma, Takumi; Ishii, Yutaka; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Hirao, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we described the changes of two nonlinear acoustic characterizations; resonant frequency shift and three-wave interaction, with electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) throughout the creep life in the welded joints of ASME Grade 122, one of high Cr ferritic heat resisting steels. EMAR was a combination of the resonant acoustic technique with a non-contact electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). These nonlinear acoustic parameters decreased from the start to 50% of creep life. After slightly increased, they rapidly increased from 80% of creep life to rupture. We interpreted these phenomena in terms of dislocation recovery, recrystallization, and restructuring related to the initiation and growth of creep void, with support from the SEM and TEM observation.

  14. Fatigue Strength and Related Characteristics of Aircraft Joints I : Comparison of Spot-Weld and Rivet Patterns in 24s-t Alclad and 75s-t Alclad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, H W; Jackson, L R; Grover, H J; Beaver, W W

    1944-01-01

    Report contains detailed results of a number of fatigue tests on spot-welded joints in aluminum alloys. The tests described include: (1) fatigue tests on spot-welded lap joints in sheets of unequal thickness of alclad 24s-t. These tests indicate that the fatigue strength of a spot-welded joint in sheets of two different gages is slightly higher than that of a similar joint in two sheets of the thinner gage but definitely lower than that of a similar joint in two sheets of the thicker gage. (2) Fatigue tests on spot-welded alclad 75s-t spot-welded lap-joint specimens of alclad 75s-t were not any stronger in fatigue than similar specimens of alclad 24s-t. (3) Fatigue tests on lap-joint specimens spot -welded after various surface preparations--these included ac welding wire-brushed surfaces, dc welding wire-brushed surfaces, and dc welding chemically cleaned surfaces. While the ac welds were strongest statically, the dc welds on wire-brushed surfaces were strongest in fatigue. Specimens prepared in this way were very nearly as strong as the best riveted specimens tested for comparison. (4) Fatigue tests on specimens spot-welded with varying voltage so as to include a wide range of static spot-weld strengths. The fatigue strengths were in the same order as the static strengths but showed less range. (author)

  15. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding of Different Dissimilar Joints of Steel and Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, Oliver; Pfeifer, Ronny; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan

    Due to the enormous potential of weight saving, and the consequential reduction of pollutant emissions, the use of hybrid components made of steel and aluminum alloys is increasing steadily, especially concerning automotive lightweight construction. However, thermal joining of steel and aluminum is still being researched, due to a limited solubility of the binary system of iron and aluminum causing the formation of hard and brittle intermetallic phases, which decrease the strength and the formability of the dissimilar seam. The presented results show the investigation of laser beam welding for joining different dissimilar hybrid components of the steel materials HX220LAD+Z100, 22MnB5+AS150 and 1.4301, as well as the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4 as a lap joint. Among other things, the influences of the energy per unit length, the material grade, the sheet thickness t, the weld type (lap weld, fillet weld) and the arrangement of the base materials in a lap joint (aluminum-sided irradiation, steel-sided irradiation) on the achievable strengths are analyzed. The characterization of the dissimilar joints includes tensile shear tests and metallographic analyses, depending on the energy per unit length.

  16. Comparative study on twinning characteristics during two post-weld compression paths and their effects on joint enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Xin, Renlong; Li, Dongrong; Sun, Liyun; Liu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential in Mg alloys. However, the texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) is usually complicated for Mg alloys, which deterioriates the joint performance. In this study, the texture distribution in SZ was tailored by applying two kinds of post-weld compression deformation along normal direction (ND) or welding direction (WD) of the FSWed AZ31 Mg alloy plates. The twinning behavior and texture change in the various regions of SZ were then evaluated by electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) characterization. The effect of texture change on the joint performance was discussed in terms of Schmid factors (SFs) for basal slip and extension twinning. The results showed that profuse extension twins were formed through the whole SZ for the sample subjected to compression along ND, whereas they were observed mainly in SZ-side for the sample compressed along WD. Most of the twins were present in the forms of twin bands or chains. The directions of the twin bands or chains were related to the habit plane traces of selected twin variants. The ND post-weld compression had better strengthening effects on the joints compared to the WD compression, and the underline mechanism was discussed. PMID:28008982

  17. Comparative study on twinning characteristics during two post-weld compression paths and their effects on joint enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe; Xin, Renlong; Li, Dongrong; Sun, Liyun; Liu, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential in Mg alloys. However, the texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) is usually complicated for Mg alloys, which deterioriates the joint performance. In this study, the texture distribution in SZ was tailored by applying two kinds of post-weld compression deformation along normal direction (ND) or welding direction (WD) of the FSWed AZ31 Mg alloy plates. The twinning behavior and texture change in the various regions of SZ were then evaluated by electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) characterization. The effect of texture change on the joint performance was discussed in terms of Schmid factors (SFs) for basal slip and extension twinning. The results showed that profuse extension twins were formed through the whole SZ for the sample subjected to compression along ND, whereas they were observed mainly in SZ-side for the sample compressed along WD. Most of the twins were present in the forms of twin bands or chains. The directions of the twin bands or chains were related to the habit plane traces of selected twin variants. The ND post-weld compression had better strengthening effects on the joints compared to the WD compression, and the underline mechanism was discussed.

  18. Comparative study on twinning characteristics during two post-weld compression paths and their effects on joint enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Xin, Renlong; Li, Dongrong; Sun, Liyun; Liu, Qing

    2016-12-23

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential in Mg alloys. However, the texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) is usually complicated for Mg alloys, which deterioriates the joint performance. In this study, the texture distribution in SZ was tailored by applying two kinds of post-weld compression deformation along normal direction (ND) or welding direction (WD) of the FSWed AZ31 Mg alloy plates. The twinning behavior and texture change in the various regions of SZ were then evaluated by electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) characterization. The effect of texture change on the joint performance was discussed in terms of Schmid factors (SFs) for basal slip and extension twinning. The results showed that profuse extension twins were formed through the whole SZ for the sample subjected to compression along ND, whereas they were observed mainly in SZ-side for the sample compressed along WD. Most of the twins were present in the forms of twin bands or chains. The directions of the twin bands or chains were related to the habit plane traces of selected twin variants. The ND post-weld compression had better strengthening effects on the joints compared to the WD compression, and the underline mechanism was discussed.

  19. Properties of Welded Joints from Alloy Zr - 2.5 % Nb after Electron-Beam Local Thermocycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. N.; Plyshevskii, M. I.; Melyukov, V. V.; Korepanov, A. G.; Rassoshkina, N. S.; Uvarov, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    Modes of electron-beam local thermocycling treatment of welded joints of ∅ 88 × 4 mm pipes from alloy É125 (Zr - 2.5 % Nb) are tested. The structure of the welds is studied. The characteristics of mechanical properties are determined under tension and static and dynamic bending. The corrosion resistance is determined in long-term tests in an autoclave with water at 285 °C and in fast tests in an autoclave at 360 °C for 336 h in accordance with the International Standard.

  20. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  1. Optimization of Laser Keyhole Welding Strategies of Dissimilar Metals by FEM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Navas, Virginia; Leunda, Josu; Lambarri, Jon; Sanz, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Laser keyhole welding of dissimilar metals has been simulated to study the effect of welding strategies (laser beam displacements and tilts) and combination of metals to be welded on final quality of the joints. Molten pool geometry and welding penetration have been studied but special attention has been paid to final joint material properties, such as microstructure/phases and hardness, and especially to the residual stress state because it greatly conditions the service life of laser-welded components. For a fixed strategy (laser beam perpendicular to the joint) austenitic to carbon steel laser welding leads to residual stresses at the joint area very similar to those obtained in austenitic to martensitic steel welding, but welding of steel to Inconel 718 results in steeper residual stress gradients and higher area at the joint with detrimental tensile stresses. Therefore, when the difference in thermo-mechanical properties of the metals to be welded is higher, the stress state generated is more detrimental for the service life of the component, and consequently more relevant is the optimization of welding strategy. In laser keyhole welding of austenitic to martensitic stainless steel and austenitic to carbon steel, the optimum welding strategy is displacing the laser beam 1 mm toward the austenitic steel. In the case of austenitic steel to Inconel welding, the optimum welding strategy consists in setting the heat source tilted 45 deg and moved 2 mm toward the austenitic steel.

  2. Effects of Welding Parameters Onto Keyhole Geometry for Partial Penetration Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vänskä, M.; Abt, F.; Weber, R.; Salminen, A.; Graf, T.

    The material and parameters like welding speed and laser beam parameters define the geometry of the keyhole. The keyhole geometry affects the weld geometry, such as width and depth, and in some cases it should be considered when selecting welding parameters. In-situ X-ray videography makes it possible to obtain time-and space resolved information about the keyhole geometry during the welding process. This paper describes the partial penetration laser welding experiments and shows the effects of a welding speed and a focal point position change onto some geometry values of the keyhole. Two different joint types were used, bead on plate to simulate a very good machined joint preparation and laser cut I-butt joint.

  3. Examination of irradiated 304L stainless steel to 6061-T6 aluminum inertia welded transition joints after irradiation in a spallation neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    2000-04-28

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) designed and fabricated tritium target/blanket assemblies which were irradiated for six months at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Cooling water was supplied to the assemblies through 1 inch diameter 304L Stainless Steel (SS) tubing. To attach the 304L SS tubing to the modules a 304L SS to 6061-T6 Aluminum (Al) inertia welded transition joint was used. These SS/Al inertia weld transition joints simulate expected transition joints in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Target/Blanket where as many as a thousand SS/Al weld transition joints will be used. Materials compatibility between the 304L SS and the 6061-T6 Al in the spallation neutron environment is a major concern as well as the corrosion associated with the cooling water flowing through the piping. The irradiated inertia weld examination will be discussed.

  4. Effects of loading methods on microstructure of diffusion welded joint of AZ31B/Cu with Ni interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, S. M.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Du, C.; Hu, J.

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion brazing was carried out to weld AZ31B magnesium alloy and copper with Ni foil interlayer under different loading methods that are divided into intermittent gradient pressure, gradient pressure and constant pressure. The microstructure and element diffusion of welded joint were analyzed by SEM and EDS. The results show that the AZ31B/Cu can achieve good bonded joint composed of brazing seam zone and magnesium substrate grain boundary penetration zone at 500 °C for 20 min. The loading methods have great influence on the thickness of brazing seam zone, microstructure and α-Mg grain size of the welded joint. At intermittent gradient pressure, the brazing seam zone reaches the biggest width of 0.18 mm, and the microstructure of brazing seam zone is composed of Cu11Mg10Ni9, (α-Mg+Mg2Cu+Mg2Ni)eutectic structure and α-Mg. Under gradient pressure, the width of brazing seam zone reduces, and the microstructure of brazing seam zone is mainly dominated by (α-Mg+Mg2Cu+Mg2Ni)eutectic structure and Cu11Mg10Ni9 compounds closed magnesium matrix. When using constant pressure, the microstructure of joint is similar to that under intermittent gradient pressure, the brazing seam zone reaches the smallest width of 0.11 mm, and the size of α-Mg grains reduces.

  5. Thermal modeling and adaptive control of scan welding

    SciTech Connect

    Doumanidis, C.C.

    1998-11-01

    This article introduces scan welding as a redesign of classical joining methods, employing automation technology to ensure the overall geometric, material and mechanical integrity of the joint. This is obtained by real-time control of the welding temperature field by a proper dynamic heat input distribution on the weld surface. This distribution is implemented in scan welding by a single torch, sweeping the joint surface by a controlled reciprocating motion, and power adjusted by feedback of infrared temperature measurements in-process. An off-line numerical simulation of the thermal field in scan welding is established, as well as a linearized multivariable model with real-time parameter identification. An adaptive thermal control scheme is thus implemented and validated--both computationally and experimentally on a robotic plasma arc welding (PAW) station. The resulting thermal features related to the generated material structure and properties of the joint are finally analyzed in scan welding tests and simulations.

  6. Improvement in Joint Strength of Spray-Deposited Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy in Underwater Friction Stir Welding by Altered Temperature of Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Haimei; Yan, Keng; Wang, Qingzhao; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    We improved the joint properties of spray-deposited Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy during underwater friction stir welding at cooling media temperatures of 8.6, 24.8 and 58.6 °C, respectively. The joint welded at high temperature (58.6 °C) showed a high tensile strength (467.18 MPa) and improved elongation. Its thermal cycle indicates preheating and slow cooling, which created a mild and uniform temperature gradient on both sides of the joint. DSC, SEM and EDS, and XRD analyses indicate that high-temperature cooling medium facilitated re-dissolution of the strengthening phases in the matrix, to strengthen the joint. Al32(Mg,Zn)49 exhibited a semi-coherent structure with matrix detected in the joint welded in a high-temperature medium. The high-temperature cooling medium is most efficient for joint optimization.

  7. Laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Liu, Wei; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-08-01

    Laser-based welding of thick 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) plates in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar is very challenging because the porosity and cracks are easily generated in the welds. The backing bar blocked the keyhole opening at the bottom surface through which the entrapped gas could escape, and the keyhole was unstable and collapsed overtime in a deep partially penetrated welding conditions resulting in the formation of pores easily. Moreover, the fast cooling rate prompted the ferrite transform to austenite which induced cracking. Two-pass welding procedure was developed to join 17-4 PH martensitic SS. The laser welding assisted by a filler wire, as the first pass, was used to weld the groove shoulder. The added filler wire could absorb a part of the laser beam energy; resulting in the decreased weld depth-to-width ratio and relieved intensive restraint at the weld root. A hybrid laser-arc welding or a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was used to fill the groove as the second pass. Nitrogen was introduced to stabilize the keyhole and mitigate the porosity. Preheating was used to decrease the cooling rate and mitigate the cracking during laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic SS plates.

  8. Method of welding joint in closed vessel improves quality of seam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, R.; Levoe, C.

    1964-01-01

    To facilitate welding of closed vessels, a metal backup strip is used at the junction inside the vessel. After welding from the outside, this strip is dissolved by a chemically reactive solvent poured through a filler hole into the vessel.

  9. Development and application of a photogrammetric endoscopic system for measurement of misalignment and internal profile of welded joints in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertazzi G., Armando, Jr.; Hofmann, Allan C.; Fantin, Analucia V.; Santos, João M. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a new optical system to measure internal cylindrical surfaces combining photogrammetry and fringe projection. The device uses two identical cameras, equipped with spherical and conical lenses, facing each other and aligned with the optical axis. A 360° helical fringe projector is used to project a sequence of phase shifted helical fringe pattern in the inner surface to be measured. The phase patterns are used to identify corresponding points and to reconstruct the surface in a regular cylindrical mesh using an alternative approach. A prototype was built, calibrated and tested. The paper presents the results of an application where two welded joints were measured in a 150 mm (6") diameter pipe. The goal was to inspect for defects in the internal part of the welding seams and to measure the transversal misalignment between the jointed parts.

  10. Enhancing the Lifetime of Welded Joints Using the Protective Coating and Causes the Formation of Defects in Them*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    The paper shows the efficacy of eutectic Nickel coatings for protecting welded joints of steels against corrosion. It increases with increasing content of the eutectic and chemical compounds at the grain boundaries γ-solid solution based on Nickel. Refinement of the structure of the coatings and reduce their heterogeneity allows to increase the protective properties and durability of welded joints against corrosion. It is established that the probability of formation of cracks in the coatings increases with their thickness, intensity of heating and cooling after reflow, and also with increasing content of the eutectic and chemical compounds at the grain boundaries γ-solid solution based on Nickel. Shown to prevent the formation of cracks in the coatings when they are melt you can use optimal modes of heating and cooling of the composition. Modification of the structure of the coatings by grinding them and reducing heterogeneity allows to improve the resistance to crack formation and protective properties of welded joints against corrosion.

  11. Optimization of FS Welding Parameters for Improving Mechanical Behavior of AA2024-T351 Joints Based on Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C.; Infante, V.

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the design of an experiment technique, the Taguchi method, has been used to optimize the friction stir welding (FSW) parameters for improving mechanical behavior of AA2024-T351 joints. The parameters considered were vertical downward forging force, tool travel speed, and probe length. An orthogonal array of L9 (34) was used; ANOVA analyses were carried out to identify the significant factors affecting tensile strength (Global Efficiency to Tensile Strength—GETS), bending strength (Global Efficiency to Bending—GEB), and hardness field. The percentage contribution of each parameter was also determined. As a result of the Taguchi analysis in this study, the probe length is the most significant parameter on GETS, and the tool travel speed is the most important parameter affecting both the GEB and the hardness field. An algebraic model for predicting the best mechanical performance, namely fatigue resistance, was developed and the optimal FSW combination was determined using this model. The results obtained were validated by conducting confirmation tests, the results of which verify the adequacy and effectiveness of this approach.

  12. Pursuing low joint resistivity in Cu-stabilized REBa2Cu3O δ coated conductor tapes by the ultrasonic weld-solder hybrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Jong-min; Dedicatoria, Marlon J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of a coated conductor tape joint with good quality and low joint resistivity, R sj, in terms of transport and mechanical properties, was attempted by direct bonding at the interface of the Cu-Cu stabilizers in overlapped GdBCO CC tapes. In this study, we attempted to achieve a low R sj by introducing hybrid joining, soldering and ultrasonic welding (UW), and its mechanism was analyzed theoretically. Coated conductor tapes were experimentally joined using various methods of soldering, UW, and combinations of the two. As a result, a much lower R sj of about 57 nΩ · cm2 was obtained for RCE-DR-processed GdBCO CC tape joints using the hybrid joining method. The mechanical properties of the jointed CC tapes were also evaluated at room temperature and 77 K under self-field. Load-displacement curves of joined CC tapes followed the curve of the single CC tape. Critical current and joint resistance, R j, of hybrid-joined CC tape were retained after double bending at room temperature up to 20 mm bending diameter.

  13. Effect of Intermetallic Compound Phases on the Mechanical Properties of the Dissimilar Al/Cu Friction Stir Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodir, S. A.; Ahmed, M. M. Z.; Ahmed, Essam; Mohamed, Shaymaa M. R.; Abdel-Aleem, H.

    2016-11-01

    Types and distribution of intermetallic compound phases and their effects on the mechanical properties of dissimilar Al/Cu friction stir welded joints were investigated. Three different rotation speeds of 1000, 1200 and 1400 rpm were used with two welding speeds of 20 and 50 mm/min. The results show that the microstructures inside the stir zone were greatly affected by the rotation speed. Complex layered structures that containing intermetallic compound phases such as CuAl2, Al4Cu9 were formed in the stir zone. Their amount found to be increased with increasing rotation speed. However, the increasing of the rotation speed slightly lowered the hardness of the stir zone. Many sharp hardness peaks in the stir zones were found as a result of the intermetallic compounds formed, and the highest peaks of 420 Hv were observed at a rotation speed of 1400 rpm. The joints ultimate tensile strength reached a maximum value of 105 MPa at the rotation speed of 1200 rpm and travel speed of 20 mm/min with the joint efficiency ranged between 88 and 96% of the aluminum base metal. At the travel speed of 50 mm/min, the maximum value of the ultimate tensile strength was 96 MPa at rotation speed of 1400 rpm with the joint efficiency ranged between 79 and 90%. The fracture surfaces of tensile test specimens showed no evidence for the effect of the brittle intermetallic compounds in the stir zones on the tensile strength of the joints.

  14. Studies on Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of 316LN SS Multi-Pass Weld Joints Fabricated with Two Different Electrode Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Kumar, J. Ganesh; Parida, P. K.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2017-02-01

    Effect of electrode size on creep deformation and rupture behavior has been assessed by carrying out creep tests at 923 K (650 °C) over the stress range 140 to 225 MPa on 316LN stainless steel weld joints fabricated employing 2.5 and 4 mm diameter electrodes. The multi-pass welding technique not only changes the morphology of delta ferrite from vermicular to globular in the previous weld bead region near to the weld bead interface, but also subjects the region to thermo-mechanical heat treatment to generate appreciable strength gradient. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis revealed significant localized strain gradients in regions adjoining the weld pass interface for the joint fabricated with large electrode size. Larger electrode diameter joint exhibited higher creep rupture strength than the smaller diameter electrode joint. However, both the joints had lower creep rupture strength than the base metal. Failure in the joints was associated with microstructural instability in the fusion zone, and the vermicular delta ferrite zone was more prone to creep cavitation. Larger electrode diameter joint was found to be more resistant to failure caused by creep cavitation than the smaller diameter electrode joint. This has been attributed to the larger strength gradient between the beads and significant separation between the cavity prone vermicular delta ferrite zones which hindered the cavity growth. Close proximity of cavitated zones in smaller electrode joint facilitated their faster coalescence leading to more reduction in creep rupture strength. Failure location in the joints was found to depend on the electrode size and applied stress. The change in failure location has been assessed on performing finite element analysis of stress distribution across the joint on incorporating tensile and creep strengths of different constituents of joints, estimated by ball indentation and impression creep testing techniques.

  15. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  16. Microstructural characterization and hardness properties of electric resistance welding titanium joints for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Ceschini, Lorella; Boromei, Iuri; Morri, Alessandro; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Degidi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The electric resistance welding procedure is used to join a titanium bar with specific implant abutments in order to produce a framework directly in the oral cavity of the patient. This investigation studied the effects of the welding process on microstructure and hardness properties of commercially pure (CP2 and CP4) Ti components. Different welding powers and cooling procedures were applied to bars and abutments, normally used to produce the framework, in order to simulate the clinical intraoral welding procedure. The analyses highlighted that the joining process did not induce appreciable changes in the geometry of the abutments. However, because of unavoidable microstructural modifications in the welded zones, the hardness decreased to values lower than those of the unwelded CP2 and CP4 Ti grades, irrespective of the welding environments and parameters.

  17. The structure and properties of filler metal-free laser beam welded joints in steel S700MC subjected to TMCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górka, Jacek; Stano, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The research-related tests aimed to determine the effect of filer-metal free laser beam welding on the structure and properties of 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP). The nondestructive tests revealed that the welded joints represented quality level B according to the requirements of standard 13919-1. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The tests of thin foils performed using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope revealed that filler metal-free welding led to the increased amount of alloying microagents (Ti and Nb) in the weld (particularly near fusion line) in comparison with welding performed using a filler metal. The significant content of hardening phases in the welds during cooling resulted in considerable precipitation hardening through finedispersive (Ti,Nb)(C,N) type precipitates (several nm in size) leading to the deterioration of plastic properties. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The increase in the concentration of microagents responsible for steel hardening (Ti and Nb) also contributed to the decrease in weld toughness being below the allowed value of 25 J/cm2.

  18. The ways of reliability enhancement of welded metal structures for critical applications in the conditions of low climatic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu. N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Gladkovsky, S. V.; Golikov, N. I.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies how the energy parameters of an effective welding technology based on adaptive pulse-arc welding method influence the microstructure, mechanical characteristics and fatigue strength of low carbon steel 09G2S welded joint. It is established that the application of the adaptive pulse-arc welding method with modulated current (CMW) as compared to the welding method with direct current (DCW) allows one to obtain a welded joint of this steel with high reserve impact strength, dynamic fracture toughness and fatigue strength of metallic structures at operation temperatures up to -60°C.

  19. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  20. Application prospects for impact machines in the area of strengthening of joint welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, AD; Galay, MS

    2017-02-01

    Effect of vibropercussion plastic strengthening on microhardness and depth of strengthening of tread areas of railway welds is experimentally studied. It is found that improvement of hardness of railway welds requires impact treatment of welds with a unit blow energy of 20 J by an indenter with a cylindrical flat end 55 mm in radius. Under the specified energy impact, a surface layer is formed with the microhardness of 5800–6100 MPa and the strengthened thickness of 1.8–2 mm. The implementation of the technology for vibropercussion plastic strengthening of railway welds needs a moble unit with an electromagnetic drive to be designed.

  1. Weld-Bead Shaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.

    1990-01-01

    Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld bead per hour.

  2. Influence of Zn Interlayer on Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TIG Lap-Welded Mg/Al Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiong; Wang, Kehong

    2016-03-01

    This study explored 6061 Al alloy and AZ31B Mg alloy joined by TIG lap welding with Zn foils of varying thicknesses, with the additional Zn element being imported into the fusion zone to alloy the weld seam. The microstructures and chemical composition in the fusion zone near the Mg substrate were examined by SEM and EDS, and tensile shear strength tests were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties of the Al/Mg joints, as well as the fracture surfaces, and phase compositions. The results revealed that the introduction of an appropriate amount of Zn transition layer improves the microstructure of Mg/Al joints and effectively reduces the formation of Mg-Al intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The most common IMCs in the fusion zone near the Mg substrate were Mg-Zn and Mg-Al-Zn IMCs. The type and distribution of IMCs generated in the weld zone differed according to Zn additions; Zn interlayer thickness of 0.4 mm improved the sample's mechanical properties considerably compared to thicknesses of less than 0.4 mm; however, any further increase in Zn interlayer thickness of above 0.4 mm caused mechanical properties to deteriorate.

  3. A Nondestructive Evaluation Method: Measuring the Fixed Strength of Spot-Welded Joint Points by Surface Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Keitaro; Inoue, Hirofumi; Yang, Sung-Mo; Iwata, Masahiro; Ike, Natsuko

    2013-04-01

    Destructive tests are generally applied to evaluate the fixed strength of spot-welding nuggets of zinc-plated steel (which is a widely used primary structural material for automobiles). These destructive tests, however, are expensive and time-consuming. This paper proposes a nondestructive method for evaluating the fixed strength of the welded joints using surface electrical resistance. A direct current nugget-tester and probes have been developed by the authors for this purpose. The proposed nondestructive method uses the relative decrease in surface electrical resistance, α. The proposed method also considers the effect of the corona bond. The nugget diameter is estimated by two factors: RQuota, which is calculated from variation of resistance, and a constant that represents the area of the corona bond. Since the maximum tensile strength is correlated with the nugget diameter, it can be inferred from the estimated nugget diameter. When appropriate measuring conditions for the surface electrical resistance are chosen, the proposed method can effectively evaluate the fixed strength of the spot-welded joints even if the steel sheet is zinc-plated.

  4. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated Al–MgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the Mg–Al dissimilar joint. - Highlights: • Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. • The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. • The formation of Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  5. Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

    2006-08-01

    The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

  6. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  7. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  8. Mechanical Characteristics of 9% Ni Steel Welded Joint for Lng Storage Tank at Cryogenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Kyu-Taek; Kim, Young-Kyun

    To confirm the safety performance of LNG storage tank, the change in fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness within X-grooved weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of newly developed 9% Ni steel, which was SMAW welded, was investigated. These materials were produced by QT (quenching, tempering) heat treatment. The weld metal specimens were prepared by taking the same weld procedure applied in actual inner shell of LNG storage tank. All tests were performed in the temperature ranging from R.T. and -162°C. The fatigue crack growth behavior was carried out using CT specimen. Investigation has been carried out to study the influence of temperature and weld effect on fatigue crack growth behavior. Also, Fracture surfaces after tests were observe by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  9. A statistical approach to nondestructive testing of laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, H.A.

    1983-07-01

    A statistical analysis of the data obtained from a relatively new nondestructive technique for laser welding is presented. The technique is one in which information relating to the quality of the welded joint is extracted from the high intensity plume which is generated from the materials that are welded. The system is such that the detected plume is processed to give a numerical value associated with the material vaporization and consequently, the weld quality. Optimum thresholds for the region in which a weld can be considered as acceptable are determined based on the Neyman-Pearson criterion and Bayes rule.

  10. Effect of Shoulder Size on Weld Properties of Dissimilar Metal Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinlabi, E. T.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports a research study that shows the effect of shoulder diameter size on the resulting weld properties of dissimilar friction stir welds between 5754 aluminum alloy (AA) and C11000 copper (Cu). Welds were produced using three different shoulder diameter tools: 15, 18, and 25 mm by varying the rotational speed between 600 and 1200 rpm and the traverse speed between 50 and 300 mm/min to achieve the best result. Each parameter combination was chosen to represent different heat input conditions (low, intermediates and high). The welds were characterized through microstructural evaluation, tensile testing, microhardness measurements, x-ray diffraction analysis, and electrical resistivity. Microstructural evaluation of the welds revealed that the welds produced consisted of all the friction stir welding (FSW) microstructure zones with organized flow lines comprising mixture layers of aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) at the Stir Zones. The average Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the welds considered ranged from 178 to 208 MPa. Higher Vickers microhardness values were measured at the joint interfaces of all the welds because of the presence of intermetallic compounds in these regions. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of Al4Cu9 and Al2Cu intermetallics at the interfacial regions, and low electrical resistivities were obtained at the joint interfaces. An optimized parameter setting for FSW of Al and Cu was obtained at the weld produced at 950 rpm and 50 mm/min with the 18-mm shoulder diameter tool.

  11. Heat treatment of welded joints of steel 0.3С-1Cr-1Si produced by high-power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuryntsev, S. V.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the welded joints of steel grade 0.3С-1Cr-1Si produced by 30 kW power fiber lasers was investigated in the paper. The speed of the welding process was 20 mm/s. Heat treatment was carried out on two levels, quenching with subsequent middle tempering and high tempering. The samples were examined before and after heat treatment, macro- and microstructure were studied using SEM, UTS, three points bent test, microhardness. The effect of heat treatment was significant: it allowed reduction of the weld hardness of considerably and enhancement of its ductility.

  12. Effects of CaF2 Coating on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Tungsten Inert Gas Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Wang, Linzhi; Peng, Dong; Wang, Dan

    2012-11-01

    The effects of CaF2 coating on the macromorphologies of the welded seams were studied by morphological analysis. Microstructures and mechanical properties of butt joints welded with different amounts of CaF2 coatings were investigated using optical microscopy and tensile tests. The welding defects formed in the welded seams and the fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. An increase in the amount of CaF2 coating deteriorated the appearances of the welded seams but it improved the weld penetration depth and the depth/width ( D/ W) ratio of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded joints. The α-Mg grains and Mg17(Al,Zn)12 intermetallic compound (IMC) were coarser in the case of a higher amount of CaF2 coating. The increase in the amount of CaF2 coating reduced the porosities and total length of solidification cracks in the fusion zone (FZ). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) value and elongation increased at first and then decreased sharply.

  13. Hot cracking of welded joints of the 7CrMoVTiB 10-10 (T/P24) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamiec, J.

    2011-05-01

    Bainitic steel 7CrMoVTiB10-10 is one the newest steels for waterwalls of modern industrial boilers [1]. In Europe, attempts have been made to make butt welded joints of pipes made of this steel of the diameter up to 51 mm and thickness up to 8 mm. Many cracks have been observed in the welded joint, both during welding and transport and storage [2-4]. The reasons of cracking and the prevention methods have not been investigated. No comprehensive research is carried out in Europe in order to automate the welding process of the industrial boiler elements made of modern bainitic steel, such as 7CrMoVTiB10-10. There is no information about its overall, operative and local weldability, influence of heat treatment, as well as about resistance of the joints to cracking during welding and use. The paper presents experience of Energoinstal SA from development of technology and production of waterwalls of boilers made of the 7CrMoVTiB 10-10 steel on a multi-head automatic welder for submerged arc welding.

  14. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  15. Study of weld offset in longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. S.; Brunair, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of rocket engine structures such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet X-rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered in this report. Using the FEM and beamlike plate approximations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thicknesses on both sides of the joint. Following the study, some conclusions are derived for the weld offsets.

  16. Effect of Interfacial Microstructure Evolution on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Al-Cu Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, P.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2015-07-01

    The interfacial microstructure evolution of Al-Cu joints during friction stir welding and post-welding annealing and its influence on the tensile strength and the fracture behavior were investigated in detail. An obvious interface including three sub-layers of α-Al, Al2Cu, and Al4Cu9 intermetallic compound (IMC) layers is generated in the as-FSW joint. With the development of annealing process, the α-Al layer disappeared and a new IMC layer of AlCu formed between initial two IMC layers of Al2Cu and Al4Cu9. The growth rate of IMC layers was diffusion controlled before the formation of Kirkendall voids, with activation energy of 117 kJ/mol. When the total thickness of IMC layers was less than the critical value of 2.5 μm, the FSW joints fractured at the heat-affected zone of Al side with a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of ~100 MPa. When the thickness of IMC layers exceeded 2.5 μm, the joints fractured at the interface. For relatively thin IMC layer, the joints exhibited a slightly decreased UTS of ~90 MPa and an inter-granular fracture mode with crack propagating mainly between the Al2Cu and AlCu IMC layers. However, when the IMC layer was very thick, crack propagated in the whole IMC layers and the fracture exhibited trans-granular mode with a greatly decreased UTS of 50-60 MPa.

  17. Radiographic detection of defects in friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AMg5M

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu. Kolubaev, Evgeny A.; Rubtsov, Valery E.

    2014-11-14

    In order to reveal weld defects specific to friction stir welding we undertook radiographic inspection of AMg5M aluminum alloy welded joints. Weld defects in the form of voids have been revealed in the weld obtained under the non-optimal rotation and feed rate. Both shape and size of these defects have been confirmed by examining metallographically successive sections prepared in the weld plane as well as in the plane transversal to the tool feed direction. Linear defects have been also found in the sections that are not seen in the radiographic images. Both the preferable localization and origination of the defects have been analyzed.

  18. Intelligent Modeling Combining Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System and Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Welding Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowtham, K. N.; Vasudevan, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is used as a structural material for steam generator components of power plants. Generally, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is preferred for welding of these steels in which the depth of penetration achievable during autogenous welding is limited. Therefore, activated flux TIG (A-TIG) welding, a novel welding technique, has been developed in-house to increase the depth of penetration. In modified 9Cr-1Mo steel joints produced by the A-TIG welding process, weld bead width, depth of penetration, and heat-affected zone (HAZ) width play an important role in determining the mechanical properties as well as the performance of the weld joints during service. To obtain the desired weld bead geometry and HAZ width, it becomes important to set the welding process parameters. In this work, adaptative neuro fuzzy inference system is used to develop independent models correlating the welding process parameters like current, voltage, and torch speed with weld bead shape parameters like depth of penetration, bead width, and HAZ width. Then a genetic algorithm is employed to determine the optimum A-TIG welding process parameters to obtain the desired weld bead shape parameters and HAZ width.

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Pulsed Laser Beam Welded Ti-2Al-1.5Mn Titanium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiuyang; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties in the pulsed laser beam welded joints of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy thin sheet were investigated in this study. The results show that the original α + β-phases and the transformed α + α'-phases are found in the partially transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) together with the remaining β-phase, and the microhardness gradually enhances in the region as the result of the increase of α'-phase. The martensitic α'-phase and the remaining β-phase are detected in the fully transformed HAZ and the fusion zone (FZ), and the highest microhardness is found in these regions in virtue of the dominant α'-phase structure. The fine α'-phase appeared in the FZ results in higher average microhardness at high welding speed. Moreover, similar to the results of microhardness test, the tensile test results mean that the HAZ and FZ are stronger than the base metal (BM). Therefore, pulsed laser beam welding is feasible for joining thin sheet of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy.

  20. Effects of porosity on weld-joint tensile strength of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Tensile properties in defect-free weldments of aluminum alloys 2014-T6 and 2219-T87 (sheet and plate) are shown to be related to the level or concentration of induced simulated porosity. The scatter diagram shows that the ultimate tensile strength of the weldments displays the most pronounced linear relationship with the level of porosity. The relationships between yield strength or elongation and porosity are either trivial or inconsequential in the lower and intermediate levels of porosity content. In highly concentrated levels of porosity, both yield strength and elongation values decrease markedly. Correlation coefficients were obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate tensile strength and pore level. The coefficients were greater, indicating a better correlation, using a pore area accumulation concept or pore volume accumulation than the accumulation of the pore diameters. These relationships provide a useful tool for assessing the existing aerospace radiographic acceptance standards with respect to permissible porosity. In addition, these relationships, in combination with known design load requirements, will serve as an engineering guideline in determining when a weld repair is necessary based on accumulative pore level as detected by radiographic techniques.

  1. Experimental study of cyclic creep and high-cycle fatigue of welded joints of St3 steel by the DIC technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kibitkin, Vladimir V. Solodushkin, Andrey I. Pleshanov, Vasily S.

    2015-10-27

    In the paper the mechanisms of plastic deformation and fracture of welded joints of steel St3 were investigated at high-cycle fatigue and cyclic creep by the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The evolution of strain rate is studied for the following regions: base metal, HAZ, and fusion zone. This strain rate evolution can be considered as a mechanical response of material. Three stages of deformation evolution are shown: deformation hardening (I), fatigue crack initiation (II), and the last stage is related to main crack (III). Two criteria are offered to evaluate the current mechanical state of welded joints.

  2. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-26

    plates of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL-STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding ( FSW ) process using a...b 124 c FSW 194 d High Hardness Steel (HHS) base material 1034 e GMAW f tbd g AA6061/HHS FSW joint 176 8 a Kaiser Aluminum Certified Test...bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum

  3. Sheet metal welding using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi; Kullberg, Gunnar; Skoog, Hans

    This paper presents a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot system for spot and seam welding of mild steel sheets. The study evaluates the laser beams behaviour for welding, and then investigates pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot and seam welding processes. High pulse power intensity is needed to initiate the key-hole welding process and a threshold pulse energy to reach full penetration. In seam welding, a weld consists of successive overlapping spots. Both high pulse energy and high average power are needed to keep the key-hole welding going. A 70% overlap is used to define overlapping spot welding as seam welding and to optimize process parameters because a high tensile strength joint compatible with the strength of the base material can be obtained when the overlap is ≥ 70%; at the same time a smooth seam with full penetration is obtained. In these cases, the joints in pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding are comparable in strength to those obtained with CO 2 laser welding. Robot positioning and motion accuracies can meet the demands of Nd: YAG laser sheet metal welding, but its cornering accuracy affects the welding processes. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the YAG laser-robot system for production in the automotive industry.

  4. Weld joint concepts for on-orbit repair of Space Station Freedom fluid system tube assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is an independent satellite, not depending upon another spacecraft for power, attitude control, or thermal regulation, it has a variety of tubular, fluid-carrying assemblies on-board. The systems of interest in this analysis provide breathing air (oxygen and nitrogen), a working fluid (two-phase anhydrous ammonia) for thermal control, and a monopropellant (hydrazine) for station reboost. The tube assemblies run both internally and externally with respect to the habitats. They are found in up to 50 ft. continuous lengths constructed of mostly AISI 316L stainless steel tubing, but also including some Inconel 625 nickel-iron and Monel 400 nickel-copper alloy tubing. The outer diameters (OD) of the tubes range from 0.25-1.25 inches, and the wall thickness between 0.028-.095 inches. The system operational pressures range from 377 psi (for the thermal control system) to 3400 psi (for the high pressure oxygen and nitrogen supply lines in the ECLSS). SSF is designed for a fifteen to thirty year mission. It is likely that the tubular assemblies (TA's) will sustain damage or fail during this lifetime such that they require repair or replacement. The nature of the damage will be combinations of punctures, chips, scratches, and creases and may be cosmetic or actually leaking. The causes of these hypothetical problems are postulated to be: (1) faulty or fatigued fluid joints--both QD's and butt-welds; (2) micro-meteoroid impacts; (3) collison with another man-made object; and (4) over-pressure strain or burst (system origin). While the current NASA baseline may be to temporarily patch the lines by clamping metal c-sections over the defect, and then perform high pressure injection of a sealing compound, it is clear that permanent repair of the line(s) is necessary. This permanent repair could be to replace the entire TA in the segment, or perhaps the segment itself, both alternatives being extremely expensive and risky. The former would likely

  5. Weld joint concepts for on-orbit repair of Space Station Freedom fluid system tube assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Steven D.

    1993-11-01

    Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is an independent satellite, not depending upon another spacecraft for power, attitude control, or thermal regulation, it has a variety of tubular, fluid-carrying assemblies on-board. The systems of interest in this analysis provide breathing air (oxygen and nitrogen), a working fluid (two-phase anhydrous ammonia) for thermal control, and a monopropellant (hydrazine) for station reboost. The tube assemblies run both internally and externally with respect to the habitats. They are found in up to 50 ft. continuous lengths constructed of mostly AISI 316L stainless steel tubing, but also including some Inconel 625 nickel-iron and Monel 400 nickel-copper alloy tubing. The outer diameters (OD) of the tubes range from 0.25-1.25 inches, and the wall thickness between 0.028-.095 inches. The system operational pressures range from 377 psi (for the thermal control system) to 3400 psi (for the high pressure oxygen and nitrogen supply lines in the ECLSS). SSF is designed for a fifteen to thirty year mission. It is likely that the tubular assemblies (TA's) will sustain damage or fail during this lifetime such that they require repair or replacement. The nature of the damage will be combinations of punctures, chips, scratches, and creases and may be cosmetic or actually leaking. The causes of these hypothetical problems are postulated to be: (1) faulty or fatigued fluid joints--both QD's and butt-welds; (2) micro-meteoroid impacts; (3) collison with another man-made object; and (4) over-pressure strain or burst (system origin). While the current NASA baseline may be to temporarily patch the lines by clamping metal c-sections over the defect, and then perform high pressure injection of a sealing compound, it is clear that permanent repair of the line(s) is necessary. This permanent repair could be to replace the entire TA in the segment, or perhaps the segment itself, both alternatives being extremely expensive and risky. The former would likely

  6. Experimental comparison of the MIG, friction stir welding, cold metal transfer and hybrid laser-MIG processes for AA 6005-T6 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Serafino; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Sergio; Gallone, Antonello; Viscido, Lucio; Filice, Luigino; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of welded joints of AA 6005-T6 aluminum alloy obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and cold metal transfer (CMT) welding were analyzed. The performance of hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welded joints were identified using tensile, bending, shear and fatigue life tests. Taking into account the process conditions and requirements, hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welding processes were compared with friction stir welding (FSW) and conventional metal inert gas (MIG) welding processes, shown in a previous work, to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the processes for welding applications of studied Al alloy. Better tensile, bending and shear strength and fatigue life behavior were obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and FSW welded joints compared with conventional MIG processes.

  7. Influences of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of AA5456 (AlMg5) at Different Lap Joint Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishevar, M. R.; Mohandesi, J. Aghazadeh; Omidvar, H.; Safarkhanian, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is suitable for joining series 5000 alloys because no fusion welding problems arise for the alloys in this process. The present study examined the effects of double-pass welding and tool rotational and travel speeds for the second-pass welding on the mechanical and microstructural properties of friction stir lap welding of AA5456 (AlMg5)-H321 (5 mm thickness) and AA5456 (AlMg5)-O (2.5 mm thickness). The first pass of all specimens was performed at a rotational speed of 650 rpm and a travel speed of 50 mm/min. The second pass was performed at rotational speeds of 250, 450, and 650 rpm and travel speeds of 25, 50, and 75 mm/min. The results showed that the second pass changed the grain sizes in the center of the nugget zone compared with the first pass. It was observed that the size of the hooking defect of the double-pass-welded specimens was higher than that for the single-pass-welded specimen. The size of the hooking defect was found to be a function of the rotational and travel speeds. The optimal joint tensile shear properties were achieved at a rotational speed of 250 rpm and travel a speed of 75 mm/min.

  8. Welded Permanent Fittings for Titanium Hydraulic Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FITTINGS, *HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, RIVETED JOINTS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, PIPES , JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, COLD WORKING, PRESSURE, RUPTURE, ARC WELDING , INERT...GAS WELDING , RADIOGRAPHY, STRESS RELIEVING, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  9. Impact of mechanical heterogeneity on joint density in a welded ignimbrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soden, A. M.; Lunn, R. J.; Shipton, Z. K.

    2016-08-01

    Joints are conduits for groundwater, hydrocarbons and hydrothermal fluids. Robust fluid flow models rely on accurate characterisation of joint networks, in particular joint density. It is generally assumed that the predominant factor controlling joint density in layered stratigraphy is the thickness of the mechanical layer where the joints occur. Mechanical heterogeneity within the layer is considered a lesser influence on joint formation. We analysed the frequency and distribution of joints within a single 12-m thick ignimbrite layer to identify the controls on joint geometry and distribution. The observed joint distribution is not related to the thickness of the ignimbrite layer. Rather, joint initiation, propagation and termination are controlled by the shape, spatial distribution and mechanical properties of fiamme, which are present within the ignimbrite. The observations and analysis presented here demonstrate that models of joint distribution, particularly in thicker layers, that do not fully account for mechanical heterogeneity are likely to underestimate joint density, the spatial variability of joint distribution and the complex joint geometries that result. Consequently, we recommend that characterisation of a layer's compositional and material properties improves predictions of subsurface joint density in rock layers that are mechanically heterogeneous.

  10. The Teleost Intramandibular Joint: A mechanism That Allows Fish to Obtain Prey Unavailable to Suction Feeders.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Alice C; Staab, Katie; Moran, Clinton; Ferry, Lara A

    2015-07-01

    Although the majority of teleost fishes possess a fused lower jaw (or mandible), some lineages have acquired a secondary joint in the lower jaw, termed the intramandibular joint (IMJ). The IMJ is a new module that formed within the already exceptionally complex teleost head, and disarticulation of two bony elements of the mandible potentially creates a "double-jointed" jaw. The apparent independent acquisition of this new functional module in divergent lineages raises a suite of questions. (1) How many teleostean lineages contain IMJ-bearing species? (2) Does the IMJ serve the same purpose in all teleosts? (3) Is the IMJ associated with altered feeding kinematics? (4) Do IMJ-bearing fishes experience trade-offs in other aspects of feeding performance? (5) Is the IMJ used to procure prey that are otherwise unavailable? The IMJ is probably under-reported, but has been documented in at least 10 lineages within the Teleostei. Across diverse IMJ-bearing lineages, this secondary joint in the lower jaw serves a variety of functions, including: generating dynamic out-levers that allow fish to apply additional force to a food item during jaw closing; allowing fish to "pick" individual prey items with pincer-like jaws; and facilitating contact with the substrate by altering the size and orientation of the gape. There are no consistent changes in feeding kinematics in IMJ-bearing species relative to their sister taxa; however, some IMJ-bearing taxa produce very slow movements during the capture of food, which may compromise their ability to move prey into the mouth via suction. Despite diversity in behavior, all IMJ-bearing lineages have the ability to remove foods that are physically attached to the substrate or to bite off pieces from sessile organisms. Because such prey cannot be drawn into the mouth by suction, the IMJ provides a new mechanism that enables fish to obtain food that otherwise would be unavailable.

  11. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  12. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  13. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  14. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  15. Evolution of Microstructure and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of AA2219 Plate to Ring Weld Joints in 3.5 Wt Pct NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, A.; Narayanan, P. Ramesh; Sharma, S. C.

    2016-04-01

    AA2219 aluminum alloy plate (T87) and ring (T851) were joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using multi-pass welding. The mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of the above base metals (BMs) in different directions (L, LT, and ST) were examined. Similarly, the weld metal joined by plate to plate and plate to ring (PR) joints was evaluated. The results revealed that the mechanical properties of the ring were comparatively lower than the plate. This was found to be due to the extremely coarse grain size of the ring along with severe Cu-rich segregation along the grain boundaries when compared to the plate material. The SCC resistance of the base and weldments were found to be good and not susceptible to SCC. This was shown to be due to high values of SCC index (>0.9) and the typical ductile cracking morphology of the BM and the weld joints after SCC test in the environment (3.5 wt pct NaCl) when compared to test performed in the control environment (air). However, the corrosion resistance of the weld interface between the FZ and ring was inferior to the FZ-plate interface.

  16. Calibration of 3D ALE finite element model from experiments on friction stir welding of lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Gastebois, Sabrina; Dubourg, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In order to support the design of such a complex process like Friction Stir Welding (FSW) for the aeronautic industry, numerical simulation software requires (1) developing an efficient and accurate Finite Element (F.E.) formulation that allows predicting welding defects, (2) properly modeling the thermo-mechanical complexity of the FSW process and (3) calibrating the F.E. model from accurate measurements from FSW experiments. This work uses a parallel ALE formulation developed in the Forge® F.E. code to model the different possible defects (flashes and worm holes), while pin and shoulder threads are modeled by a new friction law at the tool / material interface. FSW experiments require using a complex tool with scroll on shoulder, which is instrumented for providing sensitive thermal data close to the joint. Calibration of unknown material thermal coefficients, constitutive equations parameters and friction model from measured forces, torques and temperatures is carried out using two F.E. models, Eulerian and ALE, to reach a satisfactory agreement assessed by the proper sensitivity of the simulation to process parameters.

  17. An optimization method for defects reduction in fiber laser keyhole welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuewei; Jiang, Ping; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Li, Peigen; Mi, Gaoyang; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Laser welding has been widely used in automotive, power, chemical, nuclear and aerospace industries. The quality of welded joints is closely related to the existing defects which are primarily determined by the welding process parameters. This paper proposes a defects optimization method that takes the formation mechanism of welding defects and weld geometric features into consideration. The analysis of welding defects formation mechanism aims to investigate the relationship between welding defects and process parameters, and weld features are considered to identify the optimal process parameters for the desired welded joints with minimum defects. The improved back-propagation neural network possessing good modeling for nonlinear problems is adopted to establish the mathematical model and the obtained model is solved by genetic algorithm. The proposed method is validated by macroweld profile, microstructure and microhardness in the confirmation tests. The results show that the proposed method is effective at reducing welding defects and obtaining high-quality joints for fiber laser keyhole welding in practical production.

  18. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  19. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  20. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  1. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fusion welded. Head-to-shell joints must be forge welded on class DOT-106A tanks and fusion welded on... AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b)...

  2. Fatigue crack initiation life prediction in high strength structural steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoteaux, A.; Fardoun, F.; Degallaix, S.; Sauvage, F.

    1995-02-01

    The local approach method is used to calculate the fatigue crack initiation/early crack growth lives (N(i)) in high strength structural steel weldments. Weld-toe geometries, welding residual stresses and HAZ (heat affected zone) cyclic mechanical properties are taken into account in the N(i) estimation procedure. Fatigue crack initiation lives are calculated from either a Basquin type or a Manson-Coffin type equation. The local (HAZ) stress and strain amplitudes and the local mean stress are determined from an analysis based on the Neuber rule and the Molski-Glinka energy approach. The accuracy of the different methods is evaluated and discussed. Finally the previous methods are used with HAZ cyclic mechanical properties estimated from hardness measurements.

  3. Effect of Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints in Twin Roll Cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel; Kasman, Sefika

    2013-10-01

    Twin roll cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates were butt welded with the friction stir welding process which employed a non-consumable tool, tilted by 1.5° and 3° with respect to the plate normal, rotated in a clockwise direction at 400 and 800 rpm, while traversing at a fixed rate of 80 mm/min along the weld line. Microstructural observations and microhardness tests were performed on sections perpendicular to the tool traverse direction. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature on samples cut perpendicular to the weld line. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates improved with increasing tool rotation speed and decreasing tool tilt angle. This marked improvement in ultimate tensile strength is attributed to the increase in the heat input owing to an increased frictional heat generation. There appears to be a perfect correlation between the ultimate tensile strength and the size of the weld zone. The fracture surfaces of the base plate and the welded plates are distinctly different. The former is dominated by dimples typical of ductile fractures. A vast majority of the intermetallic particles inside the weld zones are too small to generate dimples during a tensile test. The fracture surface of the welded plates is thus characterized by occasional dimples that are elongated in the same direction suggesting a tensile tearing mechanism.

  4. Effect of Dwell Time on Joint Interface Microstructure and Strength of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot-Welded Al-5083 and St-12 Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereiduni, Eskandar; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Najafi, Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Joining of Al-5083 alloy sheet to St-12 steel sheet was performed using a new friction stir spot welding (FSSW) technique in which the tool pin tip did not enter lower steel sheet. Effect of dwell time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was studied by various methods including microhardness measurements, shear test, stereo and light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Results indicated that compared to the conventional FSSW process, stronger joints can be achieved by this FSSW technique. Cross-sectional observation of the failed specimens indicated the occurrence of final fracture from the circumference of the tool pin where the Al sheet thickness was decreased as a result of the tool pin penetration. However, microhardness measurements introduced these fracture locations as the hardest regions of the Al part of welds. In addition to the Al3Fe and Al5Fe2 intermetallic compounds reported in the literature to form at the interface of dissimilar Al/steel joints, a third layer of AlFe intermetallic compound was also identified adjacent to the steel side of welds. Enhancement of the dwell time from 5 to 15 seconds increased the intermetallic layer thickness from 1.7 to 3 µm and resulted in the formation of harder stirred zone. This consequently increased the strength of the weld.

  5. Effect of Dwell Time on Joint Interface Microstructure and Strength of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot-Welded Al-5083 and St-12 Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereiduni, Eskandar; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Najafi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Joining of Al-5083 alloy sheet to St-12 steel sheet was performed using a new friction stir spot welding (FSSW) technique in which the tool pin tip did not enter lower steel sheet. Effect of dwell time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was studied by various methods including microhardness measurements, shear test, stereo and light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Results indicated that compared to the conventional FSSW process, stronger joints can be achieved by this FSSW technique. Cross-sectional observation of the failed specimens indicated the occurrence of final fracture from the circumference of the tool pin where the Al sheet thickness was decreased as a result of the tool pin penetration. However, microhardness measurements introduced these fracture locations as the hardest regions of the Al part of welds. In addition to the Al3Fe and Al5Fe2 intermetallic compounds reported in the literature to form at the interface of dissimilar Al/steel joints, a third layer of AlFe intermetallic compound was also identified adjacent to the steel side of welds. Enhancement of the dwell time from 5 to 15 seconds increased the intermetallic layer thickness from 1.7 to 3 µm and resulted in the formation of harder stirred zone. This consequently increased the strength of the weld.

  6. Microstructural Investigation and Evaluation of Mechanical Properties in Friction Stir Welded Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    collegiate lecturer. 175 1. Introduction/Background Aluminum is becoming an increasingly desirable structural metal for replacing steel due to...is needed. Friction stir welding ( FSW ) is a solid-state joining technique developed in 1991 (1) and currently used extensively in aluminum alloys...Typical Aluminum FSW Tool 176 are a result of dynamic recrystallization and are very dependent on the stir parameters. Hirata et al. (3) showed that

  7. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  8. Extended electrode technique. [gas metal arc welding of metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaper, V. D.; Pollack, A.

    1972-01-01

    The extended electrode technique is a unique welding process which utilizes manual gas-metal-arc (GMAW) semi-automatic equipment and close, square butt joints to effectively produce a weld. The technique takes advantage of the resistance heating of the electode extension to effect the root pass. Weldments as large as 72-X30-X2-inch have been fabricated with this technique under normal shipyard welding conditions. Mechanical properties and explosion bulge tests indicate that satisfactory results are obtained with this process. Potential savings of approximately 50 percent can be achieved in flat welding and repair of heavy structural steel members.

  9. Virtual Welding — Applying Science to Welding Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhishang; Cao, Zhenning; Chen, X. L.; Ludewig, Howard W.

    2004-06-01

    Welding practice has traditionally been treated as an art and in most cases experience based trial-and-error experimentation has been the major approach to establish a feasible welding procedure. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding welding phenomena based on numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts include simulation of the weld pool formation, weld microstructure evolution, and welding induced residual stress and distortion. The numerical models based on interdisciplinary applied sciences (e.g. heat transfer and fluid flow, materials science, mechanical engineering, and fracture mechanics) have provided detailed insights into welding process and guidance in design of high performance welded-joints and cost effective welding process. The concept of "Virtual Welding," which is a simulation package based on interdisciplinary applied science and multi-scale numerical models, is proposed in this paper. Examples are provided to demonstrate the applications of "Virtual Welding" in industrial practices for high performance welds and reduced manufacturing cost.

  10. Capillary flow weld-bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention of a weld-bonding technique for titanium plates was described. This involves fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spot-welding and applying a bead of adhesive along the edge of the resistance spot-welded joint which upon heating, flows and fills the separation between the joint components.

  11. Metallographic structure, mechanical properties, and process parameter optimization of 5A06 joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted refill friction stir spot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-bo; Qiao, Feng-bin; Guo, Li-jie; Qiu, Xiong-er

    2017-02-01

    Novel hybrid refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) assisted with ultrasonic oscillation was introduced to 5A06 aluminum alloy joints. The metallographic structure and mechanical properties of 5A06 aluminum alloy RFSSW joints formed without ultrasonic assistance and with lateral and longitudinal ultrasonic assistance were compared, and the ultrasonic-assisted RFSSW process parameters were optimized. The results show that compared with lateral ultrasonic oscillation, longitudinal ultrasonic oscillation strengthens the horizontal bonding ligament in the joint and has a stronger effect on the joint's shear strength. By contrast, lateral ultrasonic oscillation strengthens the vertical bonding ligament and is more effective in increasing the joint's tensile strength. The maximum shear strength of ultrasonic-assisted RFSSW 5A06 aluminum alloy joints is as high as 8761 N, and the maximum tensile strength is 3679 N when the joints are formed at a tool rotating speed of 2000 r/min, a welding time of 3.5 s, a penetration depth of 0.2 mm, and an axial pressure of 11 kN.

  12. Hybrid Al/steel-joints manufactured by ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW): Process comparison, nondestructive testing and microscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2017-03-01

    The process of friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative joining technique, which proved its potential in joining dissimilar metals that are poorly fusion weldable. This ability opens a wide range for applications in industrial fields, where weight reduction by partial substitution of conventional materials through lightweight materials is a current central aim. As a consequence of this, the realization of aluminum / steel-joints is of great interest. For this material compound, several friction stir welds were carried out by different researchers for varying Al/steel-joints, whereas the definition of optimal process parameters as well as the increase of mechanical properties was in the focus of the studies. To achieve further improved properties for this dissimilar joint a newly developed hybrid process named “ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW)” was applied. In this paper the resulting properties of Al/steel-joints using FSW and USE-FSW will be presented and compared. Furthermore, first results by using the nondestructive testing method “computer laminography” to analyze the developed joining area will be shown supplemented by detailed light-microscopic investigations, scanning electron microscopic analysis, and EDX.

  13. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  14. Formation of a diffusion-based intermetallic interface layer in friction stir welded dissimilar Al-Cu lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marstatt, R.; Krutzlinger, M.; Luderschmid, J.; Zaeh, M. F.; Haider, F.

    2017-03-01

    The joining of dissimilar metals is an important issue in modern lightweight design. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is suitable for this task since the solidus temperature is usually not exceeded during the process. As a consequence, dissimilar joints can be produced with a minimum of deteriorating intermetallic phases. The latest studies showed the formation of intermetallic layers at the bonding interface with no significant negative influence on the seam quality. In this study, those intermetallic nanolayers at the interface of aluminium / copper lap joints were analysed. For the experiments, the commercially pure alloys EN AW-1050 and CW008A were chosen. The process temperature changed with respect to the parameter setup and was measured at different locations of the seam. The intermetallic layers at the interface were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The experiments show that the thickness of the interlayer clearly correlates with the process temperature using an Arrhenius equation. It is supposed, that the rotating probe removes the oxide layers of the metal surfaces and a metallic bonding between the Al- and the Cu-phase is formed. Due to the elevated temperature after the probe has passed, the intermetallic layer has emerged by interdiffusion.

  15. Mechanical properties and microstructure of F-82H welded joints using CO{sub 2} laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanouchi, N.; Shiba, K.

    1996-10-01

    The laser welding of F-82H was successfully conducted. The heat affected zone of the welding, was about 21 mm width. It was quite adequate to make small specimens, such as SS-3 type sheet tensile specimen.

  16. Local mechanical properties of Alloy 82/182 dissimilar weld joint between SA508 Gr.1a and F316 SS at RT and 320C

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jin Weon

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the variations of local mechanical and microstructural properties in dissimilar metal weld joints consisting of the SA508 Gr.1a ferritic steel, Alloy 82/182 filler metal, and F316 austenitic stainless steel. Flat or round tensile specimens and transmission electron microscopy disks were taken from the base metals, welds, and heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the joints and tested at room temperature (RT) and/or at 320 C. The tensile test results indicated that the mechanical property was relatively uniform within each material zone, but varied considerably between different zones. Further, significant variations were observed both in the austenitic HAZ of F316 SS and in the ferritic HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a. The yield stress (YS) of the weld metal was under-matched with respect to the HAZs of SA508 Gr.1a and F316 SS by 0.78 to 0.92, although the YS was over-matched with respect to both base metals. The minimum ductility occurred in the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1 at both test temperatures. The plastic instability stress also varied considerably in the weld joints, with minimum values occurring in the SA508 Gr.1a base metal at RT and in the HAZ of F316 SS at 320 C, suggesting that the probability of ductile failure caused by a unstable deformation at the Alloy 82/182 buttering layer is low. Within the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a, the gradient of the YS and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was significant, primarily because of the different microstructures produced by the phase transformation during the welding process. The increment of YS was unexpectedly high in the HAZ of F316 SS, which was explained by the strain hardening induced by a strain mismatch between the weldment and the base metal. This was confirmed by the transmission electron micrographs showing high dislocation density in the HAZ.

  17. Summary of Results of Tests Made by Aluminum Research Laboratories of Spot-welded Joints and Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARTMANN E C; Stickley, G W

    1942-01-01

    Available information concerning spot welding as a means of joining aluminum-alloy parts has been summarized and comparisons have been made of the relative merits of spot-welded and riveted aluminum-alloy structural elements. The results indicated that spot welding was as satisfactory as riveting insofar as resistance to static loads is concerned. Spot welds showed slightly lower resistance to impact loads but definitely lower resistance to repeated loads than rivets.

  18. A study on the control of melting ratio to increase mechanical properties of laser welded joints between AISI 440C and AISI 430F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romoli, L.; Rashed, C. A. A.; Lovicu, G.; Ishak, R.

    2015-05-01

    Laser beam welding of dissimilar AISI 440C and AISI 430F stainless steels was investigated in a circular constrained configuration. The beam incidence angle and the offset of the focusing position respect to the contact point between the two materials were used as main control parameters to vary the melting ratio inside the seam. The objective of the study is twofold: to avoid surface microcracks related to the high percentage of carbon of the martensitic steel and to enhance the shear strength of the weld by making it less brittle. To reach this scope the effects of incidence angle and offset on weld bead geometry and melting ratio were studied by means of metallographic analyses, microstructure and microhardness characterization. As last step, the weld mechanical strength was tested by tensile-shear stress test on the whole seam. Experiments demonstrated that varying incidence angle and offsetting the focal position is a reliable method to modify the melting ratio and maintaining the expected resistance length at the material interface, as well. It was found that increasing the percentage of ferritic steel into the joint has beneficial effects on the weld quality and on the shear resistance. The critical carbon content determining the mechanical properties in the fusion zone can be calculated by taking into account the melting ratio.

  19. Characterization of the tensile properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloy joints based on axial force, traverse speed, and rotational speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Biranchi; Garg, A.; Jian, Zhang; Heidarzadeh, Akbar; Gao, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) process has gained attention in recent years because of its advantages over the conventional fusion welding process. These advantages include the absence of heat formation in the affected zone and the absence of large distortion, porosity, oxidation, and cracking. Experimental investigations are necessary to understand the physical behavior that causes the high tensile strength of welded joints of different metals and alloys. Existing literature indicates that tensile properties exhibit strong dependence on the rotational speed, traverse speed, and axial force of the tool that was used. Therefore, this study introduces the experimental procedure for measuring tensile properties, namely, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and tensile elongation of the welded AA 7020 Al alloy. Experimental findings suggest that a welded part with high UTS can be achieved at a lower heat input compared with the high heat input condition. A numerical approach based on genetic programming is employed to produce the functional relationships between tensile properties and the three inputs (rotational speed, traverse speed, and axial force) of the FSW process. The formulated models were validated based on the experimental data, using the statistical metrics. The effect of the three inputs on the tensile properties was investigated using 2D and 3D analyses. A high UTS was achieved, including a rotational speed of 1050 r/min and traverse speed of 95 mm/min. The results also indicate that 8 kN axial force should be set prior to the FSW process.

  20. Finite volume modeling of laser assisted friction stir welding of 2017A-T451 aluminum alloy for enhanced sustainability of welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimouni, Oussama; Badji, Riad; Hadji, Mohamed; Kouadri-Henni, Afia

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on a new welding modification friction stir welding, using a preheating during the welding phase. This method utilizes laser energy to pre-heat the workpiece to a localized area at the front of the FSW tool, thereby reducing the temperature gradient over a localized area in advance of the tool. The amount of heat generated during welding determines the quality of the weld. Therefore the understanding of the temperature distribution is required to determine the optimal method of welding parameters. In this study, a two-dimensional model of an aluminum alloy plate coupled to a circular laser source is developed, using FLUENT software that is based on the finite volume method, also the geometry of the pin of the FSW tool was modified in several configurations to highlight the effect of the geometry of the tool on the temperature distribution in the welded plate. The model developed can be used to better understand the process, predict process performance and to determine the optimal parameters of the process.

  1. Residual stress measurements of tension leg platform tendon welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Results of fatigue test of prototype welded tendons showed that fatigue life was greatly reduced for the weld repaired joint. Since tensile residual stresses near the fusion boundary were suspected to cause the fatigue life reduction, these residual stresses were measured. Residual stresses of girth welded tendon pipes for a tension leg platform (TLP) were obtained for various fabrication conditions. The stresses were measured experimentally using the blind hole drilling (BHD) technique, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Barkhausen Noise (BHN) method. The results of these measurements illustrate the reliability of each measurement technique. Effects of joint configuration, weld repair, weld cap grinding, and pre-fatigue test on residual stresses were discussed.

  2. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    There is a high interest for the high strength-to-weight ratio with good ductility for the welds of advanced alloys. The concern about the welding of thick materials (Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and 5xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys) has stimulated the development of manufacturing processes to overcome the associated issues. The need to weld the dissimilar materials (AHSS and aluminum alloys) is also required for some specific applications in different industries. Hence, the requirement in the development of a state-of-the-art welding procedure can be helpful to fulfill the constraints. Among the welding methods hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) has shown to be an effective method to join thick and difficult-to-weld materials. This process benefits from both advantages of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and laser welding processes. The interaction of the arc and laser can help to have enough penetration of weld in thick plates. However, as the welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys and steels is very difficult because of the formation of brittle intermetallics the present work proposed a procedure to effectively join the alloys. The reports showed that the explosively welded aluminum alloys to steels have the highest toughness, and that could be used as an "insert" (TRICLAD) for welding the thick plates of AHSS to aluminum alloys. Therefore, the HLAW of the TRICLAD-Flange side (Aluminum alloy (AA 5456)) to the Web side (Aluminum alloys (AA 6061 and AA 5456)) and the TRICLAD-Flange side (ASTM A516) to the Web side (AHSS) was studied in the present work. However, there are many issues related to HLAW of the dissimilar steels as well as dissimilar aluminum alloys that have to be resolved in order to obtain sound welds. To address the challenges, the most recent welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels were studied and the microstructural development, mechanical properties, and on-line monitoring of the welding processes were discussed as well

  3. Prediction of the Grain-Microstructure Evolution Within a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) Joint via the Use of the Monte Carlo Simulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Avuthu, V.; Galgalikar, R.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-09-01

    A thermo-mechanical finite element analysis of the friction stir welding (FSW) process is carried out and the evolution of the material state (e.g., temperature, the extent of plastic deformation, etc.) monitored. Subsequently, the finite-element results are used as input to a Monte-Carlo simulation algorithm in order to predict the evolution of the grain microstructure within different weld zones, during the FSW process and the subsequent cooling of the material within the weld to room temperature. To help delineate different weld zones, (a) temperature and deformation fields during the welding process, and during the subsequent cooling, are monitored; and (b) competition between the grain growth (driven by the reduction in the total grain-boundary surface area) and dynamic-recrystallization grain refinement (driven by the replacement of highly deformed material with an effectively "dislocation-free" material) is simulated. The results obtained clearly revealed that different weld zones form as a result of different outcomes of the competition between the grain growth and grain refinement processes.

  4. Effect of plate width on the growth and coalescence of fatigue cracks in plate-to-plate welded T-joints

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, R.; Burns, D.J.; Lambert, S.B.; Lecsek, R.L.; Mohaupt, U.H.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of plate width on the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks in plate-to-plate T-joints with loading transverse attachment plates and flat fillet-like weld profiles was investigated in a series of constant amplitude fatigue tests. There was no observable effect of plate width on initiation life, propagating life, or total fatigue life, but plate width had a significant effect on crack shape development and crack growth rates. More cracks initiated along the weld toes of wider joints. As a result, the aspect ratios of dominant surface cracks were lower in wider joints, and the dominant surface cracks propagated faster through the thickness of wider base plates. However, there was a greater propensity for edge cracking in narrower specimens because fatigue cracks initiated closer to the free edges of such joints. This offset the faster growth of dominant surface cracks in wider joints so that there was no net effect of plate width on propagation life. A multiple crack linear elastic fracture mechanics model successfully simulated these differences in crack shape development behavior.

  5. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  6. Influence of Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded Joints on Growth and Properties of Microarc Oxidation Coatings on AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingfang; Li, Yongliang; Xue, Wenbin; Yang, Chaolin; Qu, Yao; Hua, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic coatings on friction stir welded (FSW) joints of AZ31B magnesium alloy were fabricated by microarc oxidation (MAO) method in silicate electrolyte. Microstructure, phase constituents, microhardness and electrochemical corrosion behaviors of bare and coated magnesium alloys at different zones of FSW joints for different oxidation time were investigated. The influence of microstructure at different zones on the growth of MAO coatings was analyzed. The results show that the MAO coatings on FSW joints are uniform, and they have almost the same morphology, phase constituents, hardness and corrosion resistance at base metal, stir zone and heat-affected zone. The properties of MAO coatings are independent on the microstructures of AZ31B alloy. In addition, the microstructures of magnesium alloy near the coating/alloy interface at different zones of FSW joint was not changed by microarc discharge process.

  7. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  8. Effect of long-term aging on microstructure and local behavior in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ming-Liang Wang, De-Qiang; Xuan, Fu-Zhen

    2014-01-15

    Evolution of microstructure, micro-hardness and micro-tensile strength behavior was investigated in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint after the artificial aging at 350 °C for 3000 h. After detailed characterization of microstructures in optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the change of martensite–bainite constituent promotes more homogeneous microstructure distribution. The aging treatment facilitates redistribution of carbon and chromium elements along the welded joint, and the micro-hardness is increased slightly through the welds due to enrichment of carbon. The types of precipitates in the weldment mainly include M{sub 3}C, MC, M{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The carbides in base metal, weld metal and coarse-grained heat-affected zone are prone to change from ellipsoidal to platelet form whereas more uniform spherical carbides are observed in the fine-grained zone. Precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} near the fusion line, and formation of MC and M{sub 2}C, are responsible for the tensile strength decrease and its smooth distribution in the aged heat-affected zone. This implies that the thermal aging can relieve strength mismatch in the weldments. - Highlights: • Microstructure homogeneity improved in HAZ after long-term aging. • Tensile strength decreased in HAZ due to precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. • Strength mismatch in NiCrMoV steel welds was relieved after aging at 350 °C × 3000 h.

  9. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  10. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  11. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  12. Multi-response optimization of CO 2 laser-welding process of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyounis, K. Y.; Olabi, A. G.; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2008-02-01

    Recently, laser welding of austenitic stainless steel has received great attention in industry. This is due to its widespread application in petroleum refinement stations, power plants, the pharmaceutical industry and also in households. Therefore, mechanical properties should be controlled to obtain good welded joints. The welding process should be optimized by the proper mathematical models. In this research, the tensile strength and impact strength along with the joint-operating cost of laser-welded butt joints made of AISI304 was investigated. Design-expert software was used to establish the design matrix and to analyze the experimental data. The relationships between the laser-welding parameters (laser power, welding speed and focal point position) and the three responses (tensile strength, impact strength and joint-operating cost) were established. Also, the optimization capabilities in design-expert software were used to optimize the welding process. The developed mathematical models were tested for adequacy using analysis of variance and other adequacy measures. In this investigation, the optimal welding conditions were identified in order to increase the productivity and minimize the total operating cost. Overlay graphs were plotted by superimposing the contours for the various response surfaces. The process parameters effect was determined and the optimal welding combinations were tabulated.

  13. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in the cylindrical... welded butt joint. (b) The closure for openings and the circumferential closing joints in the cylindrical portion of the outer jacket, including head to shell joints, may be a single welded butt joint using...

  14. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in the cylindrical... welded butt joint. (b) The closure for openings and the circumferential closing joints in the cylindrical portion of the outer jacket, including head to shell joints, may be a single welded butt joint using...

  15. Development of the weld-braze joining process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, was developed which combines resistance spot welding and brazing. Resistance spot welding is used to position and aline the parts, as well as to establish a suitable faying-surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed at elevated temperature by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process was used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints by using 3003 aluminum braze alloy and should be applicable to other metal-braze systems. Test results obtained on single-overlap and hat-stiffened panel specimens show that weld-brazed joints were superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling compared with joints fabricated by conventional means. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joint is hermetically sealed by the braze material, which may eliminate many of the sealing problems encountered with riveted or spot welded structures. The relative ease of fabrication associated with the weld-brazing process may make it cost effective over conventional joining techniques.

  16. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacob, S.; MAli, M. A.; Ahsan, Q.; Ariffin, N.; Ali, R.; Arshad, A.; Wahab, M. I. A.; Ismail, S. A.; Roji, NS M.; Din, W. B. W.; Zakaria, M. H.; Abdullah, A.; Yusof, M. I.; Kamarulzaman, K. Z.; Mahyuddin, A.; Hamzah, M. N.; Roslan, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld.

  17. A newly developed snow vehicle (SM100S) for Antarctica. Part 3: Low temperature toughness of the welded joints of the structural steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakui, Shin; Nakajima, Masashi

    1992-11-01

    For the purpose of developing a new snow vehicle (common use at temperature about -50 C) for the deep ice coring project at Dome Fuji, East Antarctica, the low temperature toughness of the welded joints of structural steel was investigated. It is empirically well known that in case of vehicles employed in a cold air temperature of about -50 C, the low temperature brittle fracture of the structural members does not take place, if one uses semi-killed or killed steel, for which 50 percent FATT's (fracture appearance transition temperature) of the Charpy impact test is about -50 C and Charpy impact values at -50 C are 20 to 29 J/sq cm. In the present report, the Charpy impact test has been performed for both single pass SMAW (shield metal arc welding) and CO2 arc welded joints of JIS (Japan Industrial Standards) steels of SS400, SL2N255, STPL380, and STPL450. The test results show that the JIS steels of SL2N255 and STPL450 can be used for the new vehicle, considering their toughness.

  18. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-17

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  19. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh R., V.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  20. Autonomous Mobile Robot System for Monitoring and Control of Penetration during Fixed Pipes Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Masahiro; Suga, Yasuo; Mori, Kazuhiro

    In order to obtain sound welded joints in the welding of horizontal fixed pipes, it is important to control the back bead width in the first pass. However, it is difficult to obtain optimum back bead width, because the proper welding conditions change with welding position. In this paper, in order to fully automatize the welding of fixed pipes, a new method is developed to control the back bead width with monitoring the shape and dimensions of the molten pool from the reverse side by autonomous mobile robot system. This robot has spherical shape so as to move in a complex route including curved pipe, elbow joint and so on. It has also a camera to observe inner surface of pipe and recognize a route in which the robot moves. The robot moves to welding point in the pipe, and monitors the reverse side shape of molten pool during welding. The host computer processes the images of molten pool acquired by the robot vision system, and calculates the optimum welding conditions to realize adaptive control of welding. As a result of the welding control experiments, the effectiveness of this system for the penetration control of fixed pipes is demonstrated.

  1. Thermal analysis of friction welding process in relation to the welding of YSZ-alumina composite and 6061 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uday, M. B.; Fauzi, M. N. Ahmad; Zuhailawati, H.; Ismail, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical data for heat generation by friction welding, based on different parameters of the contact condition between two dissimilar materials. The ceramic composite of Al2O3-YSZ and 6061 Al alloy, which is the example of joining materials by friction welding was used in the experiments. Alumina rods containing 0, 25 and 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia were produced by slip casting in Plaster of Paris molds and subsequently sintered at 1600 °C. The diameter of both the ceramic and metal rods was 16 mm. Rotational speeds for friction welding were between 630 and 2500 rpm. As a result, different data was evaluated for obtaining joint properties and operating conditions, and obtained results are useful in modeling the welding process and reliability joint under various conditions.

  2. Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Microstructural Evolution and Joint Efficiency of a WE43 Alloy During Friction Stir Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    microstructure during friction stir welding ( FSW ). The overall kinetics of microstructural evolution is location sensitive and the effect of the...determining the spatial and temporal evolution of the microstructure during friction stir welding ( FSW ). The overall kinetics of microstructural...strength, contributing factors and evolution path as a function of alloy chemistry during FSW . The thermal stability of the precipitates strongly

  3. Weld-bonded titanium structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Creedon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Structurally stronger titanium articles are produced by a weld-bonding technique comprising fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spotwelding and curing an adhesive interspersed between the spot-weld nuggets. This weld-bonding may be employed to form lap joints or to stiffen titanium metal plates.

  4. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  5. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  6. Controlling conditions for wet welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.

    1985-11-01

    Wet welding is finding increased use for repairing and maintaining vessel hulls around the world. Users are developing new methods and procedures to expand the technology. A wet welded joint underwater can be made as strong as one welded in a dry habitat, but at a greatly reduced cost. The design of the joint for wet welding and the procedures that need to be followed are outlined. In designing for wet welding, high tensile strength, ease of access, and over-design should be considered.

  7. Welding blades to rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoklo, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described to form T-joints between dissimilar thickness parts by magnetic force upset welding. This type of resistance welding is used to join compressor and turbine parts which thereby reduces the weight and cost of jet engines.

  8. Development of an intelligent system for cooling rate and fill control in GMAW. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Einerson, C.J.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Taylor, P.L. ); Moore, K.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is developed in which the welding system detects certain existing conditions and adjusts the process in accordance to pre-specified rules. This strategy is used to control the reinforcement and weld bead centerline cooling rate during welding. Relationships between heat and mass transfer rates to the base metal and the required electrode speed and welding speed for specific open circuit voltages are taught to a artificial neural network. Control rules are programmed into a fuzzy logic system. TRADITOINAL CONTROL OF THE GMAW PROCESS is based on the use of explicit welding procedures detailing allowable parameter ranges on a pass by pass basis for a given weld. The present work is an exploration of a completely different approach to welding control. In this work the objectives are to produce welds having desired weld bead reinforcements while maintaining the weld bead centerline cooling rate at preselected values. The need for this specific control is related to fabrication requirements for specific types of pressure vessels. The control strategy involves measuring weld joint transverse cross-sectional area ahead of the welding torch and the weld bead centerline cooling rate behind the weld pool, both by means of video (2), calculating the required process parameters necessary to obtain the needed heat and mass transfer rates (in appropriate dimensions) by means of an artificial neural network, and controlling the heat transfer rate by means of a fuzzy logic controller (3). The result is a welding machine that senses the welding conditions and responds to those conditions on the basis of logical rules, as opposed to producing a weld based on a specific procedure.

  9. Simulation model of Al-Ti dissimilar laser welding-brazing and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behúlová, M.; Babalová, E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Formation of dissimilar weld joints of light metals and alloys including Al-Ti joints is interesting mainly due to demands on the weight reduction and corrosion resistance of components and structures in automotive, aircraft, aeronautic and other industries. Joining of Al-Ti alloys represents quite difficult problem. Generally, the fusion welding of these materials can lead to the development of different metastable phases and formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. The paper deals with numerical simulation of the laser welding-brazing process of titanium Grade 2 and EN AW 5083 aluminum alloy sheets using the 5087 aluminum filler wire. Simulation model for welding-brazing of testing samples with the dimensions of 50 × 100 × 2 mm was developed in order to perform numerical experiments applying variable welding parameters and to design proper combination of these parameters for formation of sound Al-Ti welded-brazed joints. Thermal properties of welded materials in the dependence on temperature were computed using JMatPro software. The conical model of the heat source was exploited for description of the heat input to the weld due to the moving laser beam source. The sample cooling by convection and radiation to the surrounding air and shielding argon gas was taken into account. Developed simulation model was verified by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with the temperatures measured during real experiments of laser welding-brazing by the TruDisk 4002 disk laser.

  10. Parametric study in weld mismatch of longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. L.; Brunair, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of pressure vessels such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet x rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered. Using the finite element method and mathematical formulations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thickness on both sides of the joint. From the study, the finite element results and theoretical solutions are presented.

  11. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  12. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  13. Study on the Formation and Characterization of the Intermetallics in Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Ghosh, R. N.; Pal, T. K.

    2014-10-01

    Multimaterial fabrication such as joining of steel and aluminum is currently prominent in a variety of industries. Friction stir welding is a novel solid-state welding process that causes good joint strength between steel and aluminum. However, the phenomenon contributing significant strength at the interface is not yet clear. In the present study, the interface of the friction stir lap-welded aluminum and coated steel sheet having joint strength maximum (71.4 pct of steel base metal) and minimum, respectively, under two parameter combinations, i.e., 1000 rpm 50 mm min-1 and 500 rpm 100 mm min-1, was exclusively characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), concentration profile, and elemental mapping by electron-probe microanalysis. A TEM-assisted EDS study identifies the morphologies of large size Al13Fe4 and small size Fe3Al-type intermetallic compounds at the interface. The diffusion-induced intermetallic growth (thickness) measured from a backscattered image and concentration profile agreed well with the numerically calculated one. The growth of these two phases at 1000 rpm 50 mm min-1 is attributed to the slower cooling rate (~3.5 K/s) with higher diffusion time (44 seconds) along the interface in comparison to the same for 500 rpm 100 mm min-1 with faster cooling rate (~10 K/s) and less diffusion time (13.6 seconds). The formation of thermodynamically stable and hard intermetallic phase Al13Fe4 at 1000 rpm and travel speed 50 mm min-1 in amounts higher than 500 rpm and a travel speed of 100 mm min-1 results in better joint strength, i.e., 71.4 pct, of the steel base metal.

  14. Mechanical Properties, Corrosion Behavior, and Microstructures of a MIG-Welded 7020 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Cao, Xiaowu; Xu, Guofu; Deng, Ying; Tang, Lei; Yin, Zhimin

    2016-03-01

    7020 aluminum alloy plates were welded by metal inert gas welding method, with the ER5183 welding wire containing Zr and ER5356 welding wire without Zr, respectively. The mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and microstructures of these two welded joints were investigated. The tensile strength and ductilities of the joints are inferior to those of base alloy, and the lowest hardness is obtained in the welded zone, while the heat-affected zones are more sensitive to corrosion than the base metal and welded zones. The base metal shows a deformed subgrains microstructure, and the heat-affected zones still remain in elongated shape, where the soften zones form as a result of η' (MgZn2) coarsening. Two welded zones are mainly characterized by as-cast structure; however, grains are refined and a zone of equiaxed grains forms along the bonding boundary due to the Zr addition into ER5183 Al alloy. Accordingly, the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in this zone of the joint with ER5183 exhibit better than those of the joint with ER5356.

  15. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  16. Modeling of plasma and thermo-fluid transport in hybrid welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, Brandon D.

    Hybrid welding combines a laser beam and electrical arc in order to join metals within a single pass at welding speeds on the order of 1 m min -1. Neither autonomous laser nor arc welding can achieve the weld geometry obtained from hybrid welding for the same process parameters. Depending upon the process parameters, hybrid weld depth and width can each be on the order of 5 mm. The ability to produce a wide weld bead increases gap tolerance for square joints which can reduce machining costs and joint fitting difficulty. The weld geometry and fast welding speed of hybrid welding make it a good choice for application in ship, pipeline, and aerospace welding. Heat transfer and fluid flow influence weld metal mixing, cooling rates, and weld bead geometry. Cooling rate affects weld microstructure and subsequent weld mechanical properties. Fluid flow and heat transfer in the liquid weld pool are affected by laser and arc energy absorption. The laser and arc generate plasmas which can influence arc and laser energy absorption. Metal vapors introduced from the keyhole, a vapor filled cavity formed near the laser focal point, influence arc plasma light emission and energy absorption. However, hybrid welding plasma properties near the opening of the keyhole are not known nor is the influence of arc power and heat source separation understood. A sound understanding of these processes is important to consistently achieving sound weldments. By varying process parameters during welding, it is possible to better understand their influence on temperature profiles, weld metal mixing, cooling rates, and plasma properties. The current literature has shown that important process parameters for hybrid welding include: arc power, laser power, and heat source separation distance. However, their influence on weld temperatures, fluid flow, cooling rates, and plasma properties are not well understood. Modeling has shown to be a successful means of better understanding the influence of

  17. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  18. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  19. Effect of external applied steady magnetic field on the morphology of laser welding joint of 4-mm 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Zhou, Junjie; Sun, Weihua; Chen, Jicheng; Wei, Yanhong

    2017-01-01

    Additional external steady magnetic fields were applied to investigate the influence of a steady magnetic field aligned perpendicular to the welding direction during laser beam welding of 2024 aluminum alloy. The flow pattern in the molten pool and the weld seam geometry were significantly changed by the induced Lorentz force distribution in the liquid metal. It revealed that the application of a steady magnetic field to laser beam welding was helpful to the suppression of the characteristic wineglass-shape and the depth-to-width ratio because of the Marangoni convection. The microstructures and component distributions at various laser power and magnetic field intensity were analyzed too. It was indicated that the suppression of the Marangoni convection by Lorentz force was beneficial to accumulation of component and grain coarsening near the fusion line.

  20. Microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of laser-TIG hybrid welded dissimilar joints of Ti-22Al-27Nb and TA15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kezhao; Lei, Zhenglong; Chen, Yanbin; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Laser-TIG-hybrid-welding (TIG - tungsten inert gas) process was successfully applied to investigate the microstructure and tensile properties of Ti-22Al-27Nb/TA15 dissimilar joints. The HAZ of the arc zone in Ti-22Al-27Nb was characterized by three different regions: single B2, B2+α2 and B2+α2+O, while the single B2 phase region was absent in the HAZ of the laser zone. As for the HAZ in TA15 alloy, the microstructure mainly contained acicular α‧ martensites near the fusion line and partially remained the lamellar structure near the base metal. The fusion zone consisted of B2 phase due to the relatively high content of β phase stabilizing elements and fast cooling rate during the welding process. The tensile strength of the welds was higher than that of TA15 alloy because of the fully B2 microstructure in the fusion zone, and the fracture preferentially occurred on the base metal of TA15 alloy during the tensile tests at room temperature and 650 °C.

  1. New explosive seam welding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Recently developed techniques provide totally-confined linear explosive seam welding and produce scarf joint with linear explosive seam welding. Linear ribbon explosives are utilized in making narrow, continuous, airtight joints in variety of aluminum alloys, titanium, copper, brass, and stainless steel.

  2. Internal Filler-Wire Feed For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding contains lengthwise channel for feeding filler wire to weld joint. Channel makes it unnecessary to feed wire through guides outside electrode, conserving valuable space near weld and protects wire from deformation by contact with other parts in vicinity of weld. Helpful in robotic or automatic welding.

  3. General Mechanical Repair. Welding. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Five units on welding are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are the following: introduction to oxyacetylene welding, oxyacetylene welding positions and applications, use of the cutting torch, introduction to shielded metal arc welding, and welding joints and positions. Each instructional unit generally contains eight components:…

  4. Fatigue Performance of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Sang, Yan; Jiang, Cindy; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue performance of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joints of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are compared and analyzed. The steel studied included a number of different grades of AHSS and baseline mild steels: DP600, DP780, DP980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron steel, fully hardened boron steels, HSLA690 and DR210 (a mild steel). Fatigue testing was conducted under a number of nominal stress ranges to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. A two-phase analytical model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. It was found that there are appreciable differences in the fatigue S/N curves among different AHSS joints made using the same welding practices, suggesting that the local microstructure in the weld toe and root region plays non-negligible role in the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. Changes in weld parameters can influence the joint characteristics which in turn influence fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of those of higher strength AHSS. The analytical model is capable of reasonably predicting the fatigue performance of welds made with various steel grades in this study.

  5. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  6. Welding of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Activated Tungsten Inert Gas Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, E.; Ebrahimi, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of the most notable techniques which are developed recently. This technique, known as A-TIG welding, increases the penetration depth and improves the productivity of the TIG welding. In the present study, four oxide fluxes (SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO) were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth/width ratio and mechanical property of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The effect of coating density of activating flux on the weld pool shape and oxygen content in the weld after the welding process was studied systematically. Experimental results indicated that the maximum depth/width ratio of stainless steel activated TIG weld was obtained when the coating density was 2.6, 1.3, 2, and 7.8 mg/cm2 for SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO, respectively. The certain range of oxygen content dissolved in the weld, led to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. TIG welding with active fluxes can increase the delta-ferrite content and improves the mechanical strength of the welded joint.

  7. Microstructural characterization of an SA508–309L/308L–316L domestic dissimilar metal welded safe-end joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2014-11-15

    The microstructure of an SA508–309L/308L–316L domestic dissimilar metal welded safe-end joint was characterized in this work by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (with electron back scattering diffraction) and micro-hardness testing. Epitaxial growth and competitive growth are evident in the 308L–316L fusion boundary regions. A martensite layer, carbon-depleted zones, and type-II and type-I boundaries are found in the SA508–309L fusion boundary regions, while only martensite and austenite mixed zones are observed in the SA508–308L fusion boundary regions. The microstructure near the fusion boundary and the microstructure transition in the SA508 heat affected zone are quite complex. Both for SA508–309L/308L and 308L–316L, the highest residual strain is located on the outside of the weldment. The residual strain and the grain boundary character distribution change with increasing distance from the fusion boundary in the heat affected zone of 316L. Micro-hardness measurements also reveal non-uniform mechanical properties across the weldment. - Highlights: • The microstructure of SA508 HAZ, especially near the FB, is very complex. • The outside of the dissimilar metal welded joint has the highest residual. • The micro-hardness distributions along the DMWJ are non-uniform.

  8. Environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of an Alloy182/SA 508 Cl.2 dissimilar metal weld joint in simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.; Shoji, T.; Peng, Q. J.; Takeda, Y.; Lu, Z. P.

    2008-08-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue behaviour perpendicular and parallel to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 Nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent SA 508 Cl.2 low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of a simulated dissimilar metal weld joint was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing interdendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of interdendritic SCC crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under constant or periodical partial unloading conditions for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the interdendritic SCC crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base metal of the adjacent low-alloy steel. The observed SCC cracking behaviour at the interface correlates excellently with the field experience of such dissimilar metal weld joints, where SCC cracking was usually confined to the Alloy 182 weld metal.

  9. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-07-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  10. Microstructural Characterizations with EDAX Analysis of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, S.; Rao, V. S.

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports the microstructural characteristics of dissimilar friction stir welds with AA7075T651 and AA6061T651. Dissimilar friction stir welds between AA7075T651 and AA6061T651 were produced by varying the rotational speeds between 800 and 1,000 rpm and the welding speeds between 90 and 110 mm/min. The welds were characterized through optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Three different tool profiles (taper cylindrical threaded, taper square threaded and simple square) were used for this investigation and in that taper cylindrical threaded tool with process parameters 900 rpm and 100 mm/min were found to have maximum tensile strength of 205 MPa for the dissimilar butt joints. The SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis reveals the metallurgical bonding achieved at the joint interfaces of the welds produced. The good mixing of both the materials joined was obtained at lower welding and higher rotational speed while the tunnel defect was found to be common in the welds produced irrespective of the tool pin profiles and process parameters due to insufficient axial load with 0° tilt angle.

  11. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  12. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded and Bolted Cold Plates with Al/Cu Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Suresh, M.; Sibi Varshan, M.

    2015-05-01

    An attempt is made to design and fabricate a cold plate with aluminum-copper dissimilar interface joined by friction stir welding. Optimum welding conditions for obtaining sound-quality corner and T joints with an aluminum-copper interface were established. Welded cross sections of the friction stir welded cold plate were analyzed to understand the bonding characteristics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to evaluate the fluid-flow characteristics and thermal resistance of friction stir welded cold plate and the resulted are compared with the conventional bolted cold plate configuration. For CFD modeling of a cold plate with a dissimilar interface, a new methodology is proposed. From the CFD analysis and experimental results, it is observed that friction stir welded cold plate offered better thermal performance compared to the bolted cold plate and it is due to the metallurgical bonding at the aluminum-copper interface with the dispersion of copper particles.

  13. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  14. Comparative and Joint Analysis of Two Metagenomic Datasets from a Biogas Fermenter Obtained by 454-Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jaenicke, Sebastian; Ander, Christina; Bekel, Thomas; Bisdorf, Regina; Dröge, Marcus; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Jünemann, Sebastian; Kaiser, Olaf; Krause, Lutz; Tille, Felix; Zakrzewski, Martha; Pühler, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Biogas production from renewable resources is attracting increased attention as an alternative energy source due to the limited availability of traditional fossil fuels. Many countries are promoting the use of alternative energy sources for sustainable energy production. In this study, a metagenome from a production-scale biogas fermenter was analysed employing Roche's GS FLX Titanium technology and compared to a previous dataset obtained from the same community DNA sample that was sequenced on the GS FLX platform. Taxonomic profiling based on 16S rRNA-specific sequences and an Environmental Gene Tag (EGT) analysis employing CARMA demonstrated that both approaches benefit from the longer read lengths obtained on the Titanium platform. Results confirmed Clostridia as the most prevalent taxonomic class, whereas species of the order Methanomicrobiales are dominant among methanogenic Archaea. However, the analyses also identified additional taxa that were missed by the previous study, including members of the genera Streptococcus, Acetivibrio, Garciella, Tissierella, and Gelria, which might also play a role in the fermentation process leading to the formation of methane. Taking advantage of the CARMA feature to correlate taxonomic information of sequences with their assigned functions, it appeared that Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, dominate within the functional context of polysaccharide degradation whereas Methanomicrobiales represent the most abundant taxonomic group responsible for methane production. Clostridia is the most important class involved in the reductive CoA pathway (Wood-Ljungdahl pathway) that is characteristic for acetogenesis. Based on binning of 16S rRNA-specific sequences allocated to the dominant genus Methanoculleus, it could be shown that this genus is represented by several different species. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences placed them in close proximity to the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanoculleus

  15. Corrosion behavior of the friction-stir-welded joints of 2A14-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hai-long; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Da-tong; Zhuang, Qian-yu

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of friction-stir-welded 2A14-T6 aluminum alloy was investigated by immersion testing in immersion exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) solution. Electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were employed for analyzing the corrosion mechanism. The results show that, compared to the base material, the corrosion resistance of the friction-stir welds is greatly improved, and the weld nugget has the highest corrosion resistance. The pitting susceptibility originates from the edge of Al-Cu-Fe-Mn-Si phase particles as the cathode compared to the matrix due to their high self-corrosion potential. No corrosion activity is observed around the θ phase (Al2Cu) after 2 h of immersion in EXCO solution.

  16. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  17. WELDING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  18. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing: Weld Optimization for Aluminum 6061, Development of Scarf Joints for Aluminum Sheet Metal, and Joining of High Strength Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a low temperature, solid-state manufacturing process that enables the creation of layered, solid metal structures with designed anisotropies and embedded materials. As a low temperature process, UAM enables the creation of active composites containing smart materials, components with embedded sensors, thermal management devices, and many others. The focus of this work is on the improvement and characterization of UAM aluminum structures, advancing the capabilities of ultrasonic joining into sheet geometries, and examination of dissimilar material joints using the technology. Optimized process parameters for Al 6061 were identified via a design of experiments study indicating a weld amplitude of 32.8 synum and a weld speed of 200 in/min as optimal. Weld force and temperature were not significant within the levels studied. A methodology of creating large scale builds is proposed, including a prescribed random stacking sequence and overlap of 0.0035 in. (0.0889 mm) for foils to minimize voids and maximize mechanical strength. Utilization of heat treatments is shown to significantly increase mechanical properties of UAM builds, within 90% of bulk material. The applied loads during the UAM process were investigated to determine the stress fields and plastic deformation induced during the process. Modeling of the contact mechanics via Hertzian contact equations shows that significant stress is applied via sonotrode contact in the process. Contact modeling using finite element analysis (FEA), including plasticity, indicates that 5000 N normal loads result in plastic deformation in bulk aluminum foil, while at 3000 N no plastic deformation occurs. FEA studies on the applied loads during the process, specifically a 3000 N normal force and 2000 N shear force, show that high stresses and plastic deformation occur at the edges of a welded foil, and base of the UAM build. Microstructural investigations of heat treated foils confirms

  19. Customized orbital welding meets the challenge of titanium welding

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Titanium has emerged as the material of choice for tubing used in surface condensers around the world in both new and retrofit configurations. A major worldwide supplier of steam surface condensers to the electric utility industry, Senior Engineering is finding an increased use of titanium tubes and tube sheets in condenser specifications. When compared to other alloys, titanium`s light weight is efficient in design, handling, transportation and installation activities. Additionally, it maintains a stable price structure. Senior Engineering implements an orbital welding process using fusion gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) for its titanium tube-to-tube sheet welding. Orbital welding involves the use of a welding apparatus placed inside a tube or pipe to automatically and precisely weld a 360-deg joint. When welding manually, a welder stops several times during the weld due to the large amount of time and fatigue involved in achieving 360-deg welds, which results in lack of fusion. An automated orbital welding system, however, can accomplish the task as one continuous weld. This reduces process time and decreases lack of fusion. The orbital welding systems, featuring a microprocessor-based controller, an inverter-based power supply, an expandable mandrel and a customized torch shroud, reduced welding labor by 35%. The improved labor efficiency justified the addition of two more of the systems in January 1996.

  20. Study of the structure and properties of laser-welded joints of the Al-Mg-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Antenorova, N. P.; Senaeva, E. I.

    2015-12-01

    The macro- and microstructures, the distribution of chemical elements and of the values of the microhardness over the width of the zones of remelting and heat-affected zone have been studied after the laser welding of sheets of an Al-Mg-Li alloy. It has been shown that the material of the zone of remelting (1.2 mm thick) represents in itself finely dispersed misoriented dendrites, in the primary branches of which particles of the strengthening δ' phase (Al3Li) with dimensions of no more than 10 nm and in the interdendrite spaces, dispersed particles of the S phase (Al2MgLi and FeAl2) have been revealed. The hardness of the material of the zone of remelting was 108-123 HV 0.05; the hardness of the basic alloy, 150-162 HV 0.05. In the heat-affected zones of thickness 2 mm, the primary recrystallization occurred only in a narrow zone directly at the boundary with the weld. The strength of the welded junction was 470-490 MPa, which corresponds to the regulated degree of strength of the aluminum alloys of this class. The relative elongation of the material of the weld proved to be considerably less than that in the alloy matrix because of the microporosity of the weld material. It is shown that the convective stirring of the melt in the welding pool upon the laser welding made it possible to avoid the appearance of macroscopic defects, but on the microlevel there are observed micropores in the form of spheres with dimensions of 5-50 μm. The solidification of the alloy occurred in such a way that the dendrites had time to grow around the gas bubbles prior to their collapse, forming a sufficiently strong carcass. Inside the dendritic carcass, there have been revealed coarse inclusions (to 200 μm) that consist of oxides (Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, SiO2, CaO), of an iron-based alloy, and of the host aluminum alloy.

  1. Bond Strength of Gold Alloys Laser Welded to Cobalt-Chromium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneously-welded groups showed inferior fracture load compared to corresponding control groups, except for Co-Cr. In the specimens welded heterogeneously to Co-Cr, Type IV was the greatest, followed by low-gold and Type II. There was no statistical difference (P<0.05) in fracture load between Type II control and that welded to Co-Cr. Higher elongations were obtained for Type II in all conditions, whereas the lowest elongation occurred for low-gold welded to Co-Cr. This study indicated that, of the three gold alloys tested, the Type IV gold alloy was the most suitable alloy for laser-welding to Co-Cr. PMID:19088892

  2. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Khurana, M. K.; Yadav, Pradeep K.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the application of Taguchi method combined with grey relational analysis to optimize the process parameters of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 1020 carbon steels for multiple quality characteristics (bead width, bead height, weld penetration and heat affected zone). An orthogonal array of L9 has been implemented to fabrication of joints. The experiments have been conducted according to the combination of voltage (V), current (A) and welding speed (Ws). The results revealed that the welding speed is most significant process parameter. By analyzing the grey relational grades, optimal parameters are obtained and significant factors are known using ANOVA analysis. The welding parameters such as speed, welding current and voltage have been optimized for material AISI 1020 using GMAW process. To fortify the robustness of experimental design, a confirmation test was performed at selected optimal process parameter setting. Observations from this method may be useful for automotive sub-assemblies, shipbuilding and vessel fabricators and operators to obtain optimal welding conditions.

  3. Method for welding beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

  4. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  5. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  6. Review of Fillet Weld Strength Parameters for Shipbuilding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-ACED 356M ASSACHUJSETTS INST OF TECH CAMRaIDOS DEPT OF OCEAN E-EcTC Pft 13110 REVIEW OF FILLET WELD STREMOYN PARAMETERS FOR SHIPSUILOINS. RU) FES...hours are devoted to welding . A further analysis indicated that 75 percent of the welded joints were fillet welded . Inasmuch as the requirements of...fillet weld sizes have not been revised for many years, the Ship Structure Committee considered a review and analysis of current marine fillet weld

  7. Towards the problem of forming full strength welded joints on aluminum alloy sheets. Part I: AA2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sergey; Eliseev, Alexander; Kalashnikova, Tatiana; Kolubaev, Evgeny

    2016-11-01

    This work shows the microstructural evolution of solid solution grains and secondary phase precipitates in the stirring zones of ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) and standard friction stir welding (FSW). As shown, fine spherical AlMgCu precipitates dominate in FSW stirring zone whereas nanosized Al2MgCu (S-phase) platelets ones are the main finding in UAFSW sample. The mechanical strength of AA2024 is provided by precipitation of coherent intermetallic S-phase particles. The dominating amount of S-phase precipitates in UAFSW sample provided the ultimate stress level close to that of the base metal, i.e. 402 MPa as compared to 302 MPa of FSW sample. These values constituted 93 and 85%, respectively, of the base metal strength.

  8. Laser Spot Welding of Copper-aluminum Joints Using a Pulsed Dual Wavelength Laser at 532 and 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritt, Peter; Hagenlocher, Christian; Kizler, Christine; Weber, Rudolf; Rüttimann, Christoph; Graf, Thomas

    A modulated pulsed laser source emitting green and infrared laser light is used to join the dissimilar metals copper and aluminum. The resultant dynamic welding process is analyzed using the back reflected laser light and high speed video observations of the interaction zone. Different pulse shapes are applied to influence the melt pool dynamics and thereby the forming grain structure and intermetallic phases. The results of high-speed images and back-reflections prove that a modulation of the pulse shape is transferred to oscillations of the melt pool at the applied frequency. The outcome of the melt pool oscillation is shown by the metallurgically prepared cross-section, which indicates different solidification lines and grain shapes. An energy-dispersivex-ray analysis shows the mixture and the resultant distribution of the two metals, copper and aluminum, within the spot weld. It can be seen that the mixture is homogenized the observed melt pool oscillations.

  9. SNL/SRNL Joint Project on degradation of mechanical properties in structural metals and welds for GTS reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Ronevich, Joseph Allen; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; West, Scott; Morgan, Mike

    2015-12-01

    This project was intended to enable SNL-CA to produce appropriate specimens of relevant stainless steels for testing and perform baseline testing of weld heat-affected zone and weld fusion zone. One of the key deliverables in this project was to establish a procedure for fracture testing stainless steel weld fusion zone and heat affected zones that were pre-charged with hydrogen. Following the establishment of the procedure, a round robin was planned between SNL-CA and SRNL to ensure testing consistency between laboratories. SNL-CA and SRNL would then develop a comprehensive test plan, which would include tritium exposures of several years at SRNL on samples delivered by SNL-CA. Testing would follow the procedures developed at SNL-CA. SRNL will also purchase tritium charging vessels to perform the tritium exposures. Although comprehensive understanding of isotope-induced fracture in GTS reservoir materials is a several year effort, the FY15 work would enabled us to jump-start the tests and initiate long-term tritium exposures to aid comprehensive future investigations. Development of a procedure and laboratory testing consistency between SNL-CA and SNRL ensures reliability in results as future evaluations are performed on aluminum alloys and potentially additively-manufactured components.

  10. Thermal stir welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  11. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  12. Seam tracking performance of a Coaxial Weld Vision System and pulsed welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, K. J.; Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a continuation of a series of tests on the Coaxial Weld Vision System at MSFC. The ability of the system to compensate for transients associated with pulsed current welding is analyzed. Using the standard image processing approach for root pass seam tracking, the system is also tested for the ability to track the toe of a previous weld bead, for tracking multiple pass weld joints. This Coaxial Weld Vision System was developed by the Ohio State University (OSU) Center for Welding Research and is a part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Robotic Welding Development System at MSFC.

  13. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  14. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the...

  15. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints shall be fusion... § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b)...

  16. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the...

  17. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints must be fusion... subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy of the...

  18. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints... W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall...

  19. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11...-11 Welding. (a) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in... subchapter). (d) Each welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR...

  20. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints... of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b)...

  1. Differences in skeletal components of temporomandibular joint of an early medieval and contemporary Croatian population obtained by different methods.

    PubMed

    Kranjcic, Josip; Slaus, Mario; Persic, Sanja; Vodanovic, Marin; Vojvodic, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The anatomical configuration of the TMJ allows for a large range of mandibular movements as well as transmission of masticatory forces and loads to the skull base. The measurements of the TMJ's anatomical structures and their interpretations contribute to the understanding of how pathological changes, tooth loss, and the type of diet (changing throughout human history) can affect biomechanical conditions of the masticatory system and the TMJ. The human TMJ and its constituent parts are still the subject of extensive investigation and comparisons of measurement methods are being made in order to determine the most precise and suitable measurement methods. The aim of this study has been to examine the morphology of skeletal components of TMJ of an early medieval population (EMP) in Croatia and to compare measured values with TMJ values of the contemporary Croatian population (CP) using various methods of measurement. The study was performed on 30 EMP specimens - human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 55 years, and 30 CP human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 65 years. Only fully preserved specimens (in measured areas) were included. The articular eminence (AE) inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal using two methods. Also, the AE height (glenoid fossa depth) and the length of the curved line - highest to the lowest point of the AE were measured. Measurements were performed on lateral skull photographs, panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms using VistaMetrix software on skull images. The results were statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical software. No statistically significant differences were obtained for AE parameters between the EMP and CP populations independent of age and gender. However, statistically significant (p<0.05) differences were revealed when comparing results of three different measuring methods. It could not be determined which of

  2. Crustal structure of the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco obtained by joint inversion of seismic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor, A.; Maceira, M.; Gallart, J.; Topo-Iberia Working Group

    2012-04-01

    We present a model of the three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure underneath the Iberian Peninsula and Moroco obtained by joint inversion of surface-wave dispersion measurements and gravity observations. Surface-wave dispersion measurements are sensitive to smooth lateral variations of shear-wave velocities; gravity measurements provide information on shallow, broad-wavenumber and and deep, long-wavenumber density variations. We use an empirical relationship between density and seismic velocities to allow the single, joint inversion of both datasets. By combining these two independent types of observations we obtain a self-consistent three-dimensional shear-velocity-density model with increased resolution of shallow structures. The dispersion dataset consists of high-resolution group and phase velocity maps of Rayleigh waves at periods from 6 to 35 s. These maps were obtained from cross-correlations of seismic ambient noise between stations from temporary broadband experiments in the region (IberArray, PICASSO) complemented with stations from permanent regional networks. Gravity observations are extracted from the global gravity model derived from the GRACE satellite mission as well as gravity anomaly maps provided by the Spanish Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) and other regional studies. Preliminary results show the main structural elements of the Iberian crust, including the Iberian Massif, Alpine orogens (Pyrenees, Betics) and major sedimentary basins (Gulf of Cadiz, Valencia Trough, Guadalquivir and Ebro). The Pyrenees and the Iberian Chain are imaged as relatively high velocities, in contrast with the Betic Cordillera, which is characterized by low velocities. The most prominent low velocity anomalies in the Iberian Peninsula are related to the Guadalquivir basin, the flysch units of the Campo de Gibraltar, and the sediments of the Gulf of Cadiz. Other smaller features such as the Ronda Peridotite and West Alboran basin are also well imaged. This

  3. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  4. Effects of Different Filler Metals on the Mechanical Behaviors of GTA Welded AA7A52(T6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Fengyuan; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Lin, Jianjun; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2014-06-01

    ER4043, ER5356, and AA7A52 on behalf of the Al-Si, Al-Mg, and Al-Zn-Mg-based welding material, respectively, were chosen as the filler metal to weld AA7A52(T6) plates by GTAW. The variance in mechanical performances of the joints caused by the various filler materials was investigated with reference to the SEM and EDS test results for the weld seam and the fracture surface. Failure was found in the seam for all the welded joints. With regard to the joint obtained with ER4043 welding wire, the total elongation was limited by the brittle intergranular compound Mg2Si of which Mg was introduced by convection mass transfer. As for the other two welds, the content ratio of Zn and Mg was found to play the dominant role in deciding the mechanical properties of the intergranular Mg-Zn compounds which were responsible for the tensile behavior of the joints. The content ratio (wt.%) of beyond 2:1 gave birth to the strengthening phase MgZn2 leading to a ductile fracture. Cr in the seam obtained with AA7A52 filler metal was found to enhance the strength of the joint through isolated particles.

  5. Effect of tool pin features on process response variables during friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabby, Reza; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A. P.

    2015-05-13

    In this article, the effect of pin features and orientation/placement of the materials on advancing side were investigated for friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar aluminum alloys AA2050 and AA6061. Pins for FSW were produced with a 2.12 mm pitch thread having three flats/flutes. Three sets of rotational speed/welding speed were used to perform a series of welds in a butt joint arrangement. The results show that, joint quality, process response variables and welding temperature are highly affected by pin features and material orientation in FSW. Defect free joints with effective material transportation in the weld nugget zone were obtained when welding was performed with AA2050 on the advancing side. The tool also encounters less in-plane reaction force for welding with 2050 on the advancing side. Pin with thread+3 flats produces quality welds at low rotational and travel speed regardless of the location of alloys on advancing or retreating side.

  6. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, David Alan; Grant, Glenn J; Dahl, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  7. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  8. A New Perspective on Fatigue Performance of Advanced High- Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min; Jiang, Cindy; Sang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Weld fatigue performance is a critical aspect for application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) in automotive body structures. A comparative study has been conducted to evaluate the fatigue life of AHSS welds. The material studied included seven AHSS of various strength levels - DP 600, DP 780, DP 980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron and fully hardened boron steels. Two conventional steels, HSLA 590 and DR 210, were also included for baseline comparison. Lap fillet welds were made on 2-mm nominal thick sheets by the gas metal arc welding process (GMAW). Fatigue test was conducted under a number of stress levels to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. It was found that, unlike in the static and impact loading conditions, the fatigue performance of AHSS is not influenced by the HAZ softening in AHSS. There are appreciable differences in the fatigue lives among different AHSS. Changes in weld parameters can influence the fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of these of higher strength AHSS. A model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. The validity of the model is benchmarked with the experimental results. This model is capable to capture the effects of weld geometry and weld microstructure and strength on the fatigue performance experimentally observed. The theoretical basis and application of the newly developed fatigue modeling methodology will be discussed.

  9. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  10. Numerical Study for Gta Weld Shape Variation by Coupling Welding Arc and Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    A numerical modeling of the welding arc and weld pool is studied for moving GTA welding to investigate the effect of the surface active element oxygen and the plasma drag force on the weld shape. Based on the 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux, current density and plasma drag force are obtained under different welding currents. Numerical calculations to the weld pool development are carried out for moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen contents 30 ppm and 220 ppm, respectively. The results show that the plasma drag force is another dominating driving force affecting the liquid pool flow pattern, except for the Marangoni force. The different welding currents will change the temperature distribution and plasma drag force on the pool surface, and affect the strength of Marangoni convection and the weld shape. The weld D/W ratio initially increases, followed by a constant value around 0.5 with the increasing welding current under high oxygen content. The weld D/W ratio under the low oxygen content slightly decreases with the increasing welding current. The predicted weld shape by simulation agrees well with experimental results.

  11. Microstructure, Tensile Properties and Work Hardening Behavior of GTA-Welded Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, H.; Shamanian, M.; Emadi, R.; Saeidi, N.

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, microstructure, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of a DP700 steel after gas tungsten arc welding were investigated. Formation of bainite in the fusion zone resulted in a hardness increase compared to that for the base metal (BM), whereas tempering of the pre-existing martensite in the subcritical heat-affected zone (HAZ) led to softening. The GTA-welded joint exhibited a continuous yielding behavior and a yield strength close to that for the BM, while its ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were lower than those for the BM owing to the formation of soft zone in the HAZ. A joint efficiency of about 81% was obtained for the GTA-welded joint, and it failed in the softened HAZ. Analysis of work hardening based on the Kocks-Mecking approach showed one stage of hardening behavior corresponding to the stage III for both the DP700 BM and welded sample. It was also revealed that the DP700 BM has larger values of work hardening exponent and magnitude of work hardening compared with the welded sample. Analysis of fractured surfaces showed that the dominant fracture mode for both the DP700 BM and welded joint was ductile.

  12. Microstructure, Tensile Properties and Work Hardening Behavior of GTA-Welded Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, H.; Shamanian, M.; Emadi, R.; Saeidi, N.

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, microstructure, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of a DP700 steel after gas tungsten arc welding were investigated. Formation of bainite in the fusion zone resulted in a hardness increase compared to that for the base metal (BM), whereas tempering of the pre-existing martensite in the subcritical heat-affected zone (HAZ) led to softening. The GTA-welded joint exhibited a continuous yielding behavior and a yield strength close to that for the BM, while its ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were lower than those for the BM owing to the formation of soft zone in the HAZ. A joint efficiency of about 81% was obtained for the GTA-welded joint, and it failed in the softened HAZ. Analysis of work hardening based on the Kocks-Mecking approach showed one stage of hardening behavior corresponding to the stage III for both the DP700 BM and welded sample. It was also revealed that the DP700 BM has larger values of work hardening exponent and magnitude of work hardening compared with the welded sample. Analysis of fractured surfaces showed that the dominant fracture mode for both the DP700 BM and welded joint was ductile.

  13. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  14. Real-time sensing and monitoring in robotic gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Gao, J. Q.; Hu, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in robotic gas metal arc welding. The butt-joint test pieces with simulated large gaps are used to intentionally introduce step disturbance of welding conditions. During the welding process, the welding voltage and current signals are sampled and processed on-line to extract the characteristic information reflecting the process quality. After the first statistical processing, it is found that seven statistical parameters (the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding voltage; the mean, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding current) show variations during the step disturbance. Through the second statistical processing of the means of the welding voltage for subgroups of continuous measurement, the statistical control chart is obtained, and an SPC (statistical process control)-based on-line identifying method is developed. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rates for normal and abnormal welding conditions are 100% and 95%, respectively.

  15. Wire-Guide Manipulator For Automated Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Tim; White, Kevin; Gordon, Steve; Emerich, Dave; Richardson, Dave; Faulkner, Mike; Stafford, Dave; Mccutcheon, Kim; Neal, Ken; Milly, Pete

    1994-01-01

    Compact motor drive positions guide for welding filler wire. Drive part of automated wire feeder in partly or fully automated welding system. Drive unit contains three parallel subunits. Rotations of lead screws in three subunits coordinated to obtain desired motions in three degrees of freedom. Suitable for both variable-polarity plasma arc welding and gas/tungsten arc welding.

  16. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    95] K. Kimapong1, T. Watanabe, Effect of welding process parameters on mechanical property of FSW lap joint between aluminum alloy and steel ...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 1 UNCLASSIFIED Welding of aluminum alloys to steels : an overview M. Mazar...welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels . The microstructural development, mechanical properties and application of the joints are discussed

  17. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  18. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  19. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  20. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  1. Laser transmission welding of ABS: Effect of CNTs concentration and process parameters on material integrity and weld formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Gadea, C.

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports a study of the laser transmission welding of polymeric joints composed by two ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) sheets, one transparent (natural ABS) and the other absorbent (filled by different percentages of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)). The objective of this work is to analyze the effect of process parameters and CNTs concentrations on weld formation and mechanical resistance of the weld joints.

  2. Automatic Orbital Welding Head for Shipboard Use where Accessibility is Limited.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    reverse elde, it necesayand Identify by block rnumber) Automatic Orbital Welding Automatic Pipe Welding Pulsed Current GTA Welding 20. ABSTRACT...demonstrated that state-of-the-art automatic pipe /tube welding techniques can be miniaturized to weld hard-to-reach joints. Plans to continue with a full...making pipe /tube welds with the prototype. (3) Private industry has the ability to produce specific automatic orbital welding heads for space limited

  3. Research on key influence factors of laser overlap welding of automobile body galvanized steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genyu; Mei, Lifang; Zhang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Zujian

    2013-02-01

    In views of structure characteristics of the auto-body parts, the influences of the beam incident angle and joint gap on the performance of laser overlap welded joints were investigated. The experimental results indicate that there were the critical values of beam incident angle and joint gap during laser overlap welding of galvanized steel. The thickness of sheet and the width of joint had a certain influence on the critical beam incident angle and the limit joint gap. With regard to thicker sheet, the limit joint gap can increase appropriately, but the critical beam incident angle should not be too big. With narrow weld width, the laser beam incident angle can increase appropriately, but the joint gap should not be bigger. Additionally, the critical beam incident angle and the limit joint gap were varied with the thickness of the upper sheet. The tensile-shear tests show that the maximum tensile-shear strength of the joint can be obtained with an optimized beam incident angle and joint gap.

  4. Assessing the Impact of Sequencing Practicums for Welding in Agricultural Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Malcolm; Pate, Michael L.; Lawver, Rebecca G.; Warnick, Brian K.; Dai, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of sequencing practicums for welding on students' ability to perform a 1F (flat position-fillet lap joint) weld on low-carbon steel. Participants were randomly assigned a specific practice sequence of welding for using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). A total of 71 participants…

  5. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  6. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys.

  7. Displaced electrode process for welding

    DOEpatents

    Heichel, L.J.

    1975-08-26

    A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

  8. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  9. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  10. Sensitivity of the stability of a waste emplacement drift to variation in assumed rock joint parameters in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, M.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of a numerical analysis to determine the effects of variation of rock joint parameters on stability of waste disposal rooms for vertical emplacement. Conditions and parameters used were taken from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design report (MacDougall et al., 1987). Mechanical results are presented which illustrate the predicted distribution of stress, joint slip, and room deformations for times of initial excavation and after 50 years heating. 82 refs., 93 figs.

  11. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  12. Parametric optimisation and microstructural analysis on high power Yb-fibre laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.; Chen, L.; Davies, C. M.; Dear, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this work thin sheets of Ti-6Al-4V were full penetration welded using a 5 kW fibre laser in order to evaluate the effectiveness of high power fibre laser as a welding processing tool for welding Ti-6Al-4V with the requirements of the aircraft industry and to determine the effect of welding parameters including laser power, welding speed and beam focal position on the weld microstructure, bead profile and weld quality. It involved establishing an understanding of the influence of welding parameters on microstructural change, welding defects, and the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM) of fibre laser welded joints. The optimum range of welding parameters which produced welds without cracking and porosity were identified. The influence of the welding parameters on the weld joint heterogeneity was characterised by conducting detailed microstructural analysis.

  13. Spot-Welding Gun With Adjustable Pneumatic Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed spot-welding gun equipped with pneumatic spring, which could be bellows or piston and cylinder, exerts force independent of position along stroke. Applies accurate controlled force to joint welded, without precise positioning at critical position within stroke.

  14. Solid state welding of dispersion-strengthened nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Two-step solid state welding cycle applied to carefully prepared surfaces of an unrecrystallized alloy prevents loss of parent-metal strength at weld joint of dispersion-strengthened, nickel-chromium alloy.

  15. Effect of parameters in diode laser welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpaeae, Veli; Maaranen, Petteri; Kostamo, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel sheets and ordinary cold-rolled carbon steel sheets with variable thickness were welded with 1 kW diode laser. Different weld joints were utilized. The optimal parameters for each case were determined. The joints were examined by metallography and mechanical testing. The results show that diode laser is an optimal tool for sheet metal welding, when a considerable narrow weld is aimed. The edges prepared by mechanical sheering are acceptable as the joint preparation. The tensile strength and ductility of all the joints were acceptable and on the same level or better than that of base metal. The shielding gas seems to play a much higher role than in conventional laser welding (CO2 or Nd:YAG laser welding). When using the non-oxidizing shielding gas (nitrogen or argon), the welding speed to be reached is much slower than when welding without any shielding gas. This is probably due to the increase of absorption by oxygen.

  16. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  17. Recommended Aluminum Pipe Welding Procedures for Corps of Engineers Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    tungsten -arc welding process) (4) Use of the extended land joint configuration; O-s (5) Use of current limits set by the Aluminum Association and ALCOA. ~0...Design Used for the 1-In. Schedule 10 Pipe 9 3 Typical Metal Weld Made Using Gas Tungsten -Arc Welding 11 4 Typical Small-Diameter Pipe Tensile Test...aluminum pipe commonly Approach used in military applications (Table 1). The gas Available literature on aluminum welding was tungsten -arc welding

  18. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  19. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Talia, G.E.

    1996-02-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. (1) In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  20. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds [1]. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. [1] In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  1. Residual Stresses and Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded AZ31B-H24 Magnesium Alloy in Lap Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Bhukya Srinivasa; Cao, Xinjin; Wanjara, Priti; Friedman, Jacob; Chen, Daolun

    2015-08-01

    AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy sheets with a thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded in lap configuration using two tool rotational rates of 1000 and 1500 rpm and two welding speeds of 10 and 20 mm/s. The residual stresses in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the weldments were determined using X-ray diffraction. The shear tensile behavior of the lap joints was evaluated at low [233 K (-40 °C)], room [298 K (25 °C)], and elevated [453 K (180 °C)] temperatures. The failure load was highest for the lower heat input condition that was obtained at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s for all the test temperatures, due to the smaller hooking height, larger effective sheet thickness, and lower tensile residual stresses, as compared to the other two welding conditions that were conducted at a higher tool rotational rate or lower welding speed. The lap joints usually fractured on the advancing side of the top sheet near the interface between the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the stir zone. Elevated temperature testing of the weld assembled at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s led to the failure along the sheet interface in shear fracture mode due to the high integrity of the joint that exhibited large plastic deformation and higher total energy absorption.

  2. Verifying root fusion in electron-beam welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S.; Kleint, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Ultrasonic equipment and x-y recorder indicate where back side of joint is properly welded. Wire waveguide placed in groove at root of joint to be welded is fused when joint is adequately penetrated. Ultransonic signal moving down waveguide is reflected where guide is melted. Change in reflected-signal arrival time with change in weld-head position is nearly constant unless joint is incompletely penetrated. Method permits determination of penetration depth in preweld samples without opening vacuum chamber and sectioning weld. Technique is particularly valuable when back side of joint is inaccessible.

  3. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  4. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  5. Investigation into Microstructures of Maraging Steel 250 Weldments and Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Fawad; Baloch, Rasheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Bilal; Naz, Nausheen

    2010-03-01

    This study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of microstructures obtained by multipass gas tungsten arc welding in maraging steel grade 250. Metallography and microhardness measurements were carried out on sheet and welded joints in as-welded and post-weld aged conditions. It was found that there was a significant amount of reverted austenite formed on cell boundaries of weld metal after aging at 758-823 K for 3-5 h, and was stable at room temperature. Aging at higher temperatures led to an increase in the continuous network of patchy austenite along the cell boundaries. The reason for the above, in our opinion, is the concentrational heterogeneity which characterizes the microstructure of maraging steel welds. No reverted austenite was observed in as-welded specimens. Solution annealing at 1093 K for 1 h did not completely eliminate the chemical heterogeneity associated with weld structures. However, homogenizing at 1373 K produced homogenous structure that on subsequent aging produces austenite-free lath martensitic structure.

  6. Aircraft and ground vehicle friction correlation test results obtained under winter runway conditions during joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Aircraft and ground vehicle friction data collected during the Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program under winter runway conditions are discussed and test results are summarized. The relationship between the different ground vehicle friction measurements obtained on compacted snow- and ice-covered conditions is defined together with the correlation to aircraft tire friction performance under similar runway conditions.

  7. Diode laser welding of high yield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The following article describes results of investigations on influence of laser welding parameters on the weld shape, quality and mechanical properties of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel for cold forming S420MC (according to EN 10149 - 3 and 060XLK according to ASTM) welded with high power diode laser HPDL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 with rectangular laser beam spot and 2.2 kW output power, and 808 nm wavelength. The investigations at the initial stage were focused on detailed analysis of influence of the basic laser welding parameters such as laser power and welding speed on the shape and quality of single bead produced during bead-on-plate welding. Then the optimal parameters were chosen for laser welding of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of the thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel sheets for cold forming S420MC. The test joints were prepared as single square groove and one-side laser welded without an additional material, at a flat position. Edges of steel sheets were melted in argon atmosphere by the laser beam focused on the top joint surface. The test welded joints were investigated by visual inspection, metallographic examinations, mechanical tests such as tensile tests and bending tests. It was found that the high power diode laser may be applied successfully for one-side welding of the S420MC steel butt joints. Additionally it was found that in the optimal range of laser welding parameters the high quality joint were produced.

  8. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process developed and patented by The Welding Institute in Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding has been implemented in the aerospace industry in the fabrication of longitudinal welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks. As the industry looks to implement friction stir welding in circumferential welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks, techniques to close out the termination hole associated with retracting the pin tool are being evaluated. Friction pull plug welding is under development as a one means of closing out the termination hole. A friction pull plug weld placed in a friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite, plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size in the test or service environments. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in two aluminum alloy friction plug weld configurations is presented.

  9. Advances in welding science - a perspective

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Babu, S.S.; DebRoy, T.

    1995-02-01

    The ultimate goal of welding technology is to improve the joint integrity and increase productivity. Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based tailoring of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes.

  10. Weld-brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  11. Design and technology parameters influence on durability for heat exchangers tube to tubesheet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripeanu, R. G.

    2017-02-01

    The main failures of heat exchangers are: corrosion of tubes and jacket, tubes blockage and failures of tube to tubesheet joints also by corrosion. The most critical zone is tube to tubesheet joints. Depending on types of tube to tubesheet joints, in order to better respect conditions of tension and compression, this paper analyses the tubesheet holes shapes, smooth and with a grove, on corrosion behavior. In the case of welding tubes with tubesheet, welding parameters modify corrosion behavior. Were realized welded joints by three welding regimes and tested at corrosion in two media, tap water and industrial water. Were tested also samples made of smooth tubes, finned tubes and tubes coated with a passive product as applied by a heat exchanger manufacturer. For all samples, the roughness parameters were measured, before and after the corrosion tests. The obtained corrosion rates show that stress values and their distribution along the joint modify the corrosion behavior. The optimum welding parameters were established in order to increase the joint durability. The paper has shown that passive product used is not proper chosen and the technology of obtaining rolled thread pipes diminishes tubes’ durability by increasing the corrosion rate.

  12. Effect of welding parameters on high-power diode laser welding on thin sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Antti; Jansson, Anssi; Kujanpaa, Veli

    2003-06-01

    High power diode laser (HPDL) is the newest laser tool for industrial manufacturing. The most promising areas of application of HPDL are thin sheet welding and hardening. The HPDL has several advantages and disadvantages compared to lasers CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers currently used for welding. There is quite a few industrial applications in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. A typical industrial installation consists of a HPDL, an industrial robot, work piece manipulation and safety enclosures. The HPDL welding process is at this moment conduction limited and has therefore different parameters than the keyhole welding. In this study the basic HPDL welding parameters and the effect of the parameters on the welding process, weld quality and efficiency are examined. Joint types tested are butt joint and fillet lap joint. The parameters tested are beam intensity, welding speed, spot size, beam impingement angle. The materials tested are common carbon steel and stainless steel. By the experiments carried out it can be seen that all of these parameters have an effect on the weld quality and the absorption of the laser power during welding. The higher the beam intensity is the shorter also the throughput time is. However, in case of fillet joint the maximum welding speed and best visual out look are achieved with totally different set of parameters. Based on these experiments it can, however, be seen that reliable welding parameters can be established for the welding of various industrial products. The beam quality of the diode laser is not optimum for high speed keyhole welding but it is a flexible tool to be used for different joint types.

  13. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  14. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  15. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  16. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  17. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  18. Mössbauer characterization of joints of steel pieces in transient liquid phase bonding experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Luozzo, N.; Martínez Stenger, P. F.; Canal, J. P.; Fontana, M. R.; Arcondo, B.

    2011-11-01

    Joining of seamless, low carbon, steel tubes were performed by means of Transient Liquid Phase Bonding process employing a foil of Fe-Si-B metallic glass as filler material. The influence of the main parameters of the process was evaluated: temperature, holding time, pressure and post weld heat treatment. Powder samples were obtained from the joint of tubes and characterized employing Mössbauer Spectroscopy in transmission geometry. The sampling was performed both in tubes successfully welded and in those which show joint defects. The results obtained are correlated with the obtained microstructure and the diffusion of Si and B during the process.

  19. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. Fourth quarter, FY 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-19

    Progress is reported in research on the automated welding of heavy steel plate for the fabrication of pressure vessels. Information is included on: torch and shield adaptation; mechanical control of the welding process; welding parameters; joint design; filler wire optimizaton; nondestructive testing of welds; and weld repair. (LCL)

  20. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…