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Sample records for western medicine treatment

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa Treatment with Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Peng, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Current management of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) includes an attempt at slowing down the degenerative process through therapies that use either Western or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Novel therapies in Western medicine (WM) include use of tailor-made gene therapy, transplantation of stem cells, or neuroprotection treatment. TCM treatment includes two major approaches. These are orally applied herbal decoctions and acupuncture. In fact, all TCM treatments are based on the differentiation of a symptom-complex, which is the characteristic essence of TCM. Thus, diagnosed RP may be treated via the liver, the kidney, and the spleen. The principle behind these treatments is to invigorate the blood and brighten the eyes by toning up the liver and the kidney. Also treatments to cope with deficiencies in the two concepts that are unique and fundamental to TCM are considered: Qi or "vital energy" and Yin and Yang or the harmony of all the opposite elements and forces that make up existence. In particular, the Qi deficiency that results from blood stasis is addressed in these treatments. This paper also puts forward the existing problems and the prospect of the future development on integrating TCM with WM.

  2. [Efficacy and safety of smiltiorrhizadepsidesal combined with conventional western medicine treatment for stable angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Lian-Xin; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, Chinese patent medicines such as smiltiorrhizadepsidesal(SMDS) injection are combined with western medicine to achieve good clinical efficacy for stable angina pectoris(SAP). SMDS is prepared by the water-soluble active ingredients extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza, with the functions of promoting blood circulation, removing blood stasis and activating blood vessels, and it is used to treat type ⅠSAP and type ⅡSAP. The efficacy and safety of SMDS combined with simple routine western medicine for SAP were investigated by searching PubMed, EMbase, the Cochrane Library, CNKI, VIP, WanFang Data and CBM Database. SMDS combined with conventional western medicine treatment showed better efficacy for SAP as compared with western medicine alone, and better than other traditional Chinese medicines(such as Danshen injection and compound Danshen injection) combined with conventional western medicine. It was found that SMDS had a positive role in reducing blood viscosity, atherosclerosis, and improving microcirculation. The reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of SMDS combined with conventional western medicine therapy in clinical research were basically the same with ADRs reported by spontaneous reporting system(SRS) warning signals. Overall, SMDS combined with conventional western medicine had low incidence of ADR and no serious ADR occurred for SAP treatment in clinical trials. Currently, some drugs related to cardiovascular diseases such as ascinepazidemaleate injection, sodium succinate, propafenone hydrochloride and papaverine hydrochloride injection combined with SMDS have incompatibility, which should be highly emphasized in clinical use. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. Treatment of refractory diabetic gastroparesis: Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine therapies.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bing; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Jun-Ling; Zhao, Lin-Hua; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2014-06-07

    Refractory diabetic gastroparesis (DGP), a disorder that occurs in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, is associated with severe symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting, and results in an economic burden on the health care system. In this article, the basic characteristics of refractory DGP are reviewed, followed by a discussion of therapeutic modalities, which encompasses the definitions and clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of refractory DGP. The diagnostic standards assumed in this study are those set forth in the published literature due to the absence of recognized diagnosis criteria that have been assessed by an international organization. The therapeutic modalities for refractory DGP are as follows: drug therapy, nutritional support, gastric electrical stimulation, pyloric botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic or surgical therapy, and traditional Chinese treatment. The therapeutic modalities may be used alone or in combination. The use of traditional Chinese treatments is prevalent in China. The effectiveness of these therapies appears to be supported by preliminary evidence and clinical experience, although the mechanisms that underlie these effects will require further research. The purpose of this article is to explore the potential of combined Western and traditional Chinese medicine treatment methods for improved patient outcomes in refractory DGP.

  4. Western herbal medicine consultations for common menstrual problems; practitioner experiences and perceptions of treatment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Carole; Adams, Jon; Frawley, Jane; Hickman, Louise; Sibbritt, David

    2018-03-01

    To explore the prevalence with which Australian Western herbalists treat menstrual problems and their related treatment, experiences, perceptions, and interreferral practices with other health practitioners. Members of the Practitioner Research and Collaboration Initiative practice-based research network identifying as Western Herbalists (WHs) completed a specifically developed, online questionnaire. Western Herbalists regularly treat menstrual problems, perceiving high, though differential, levels of effectiveness. For menstrual problems, WHs predominantly prescribe individualised formulas including core herbs, such as Vitex agnus-castus, and problem-specific herbs. Estimated clients' weekly cost (median = $25.00) and treatment duration (median = 4-6 months) covering this Western herbal medicine treatment appears relatively low. Urban-based women are more likely than those rurally based to have used conventional treatment for their menstrual problems before consulting WHs (p = .001). Only 19% of WHs indicated direct contact by conventional medical practitioners regarding treatment of clients' menstrual problems despite 42% indicating clients' conventional practitioners recommended consultation with WH. Western herbal medicine may be a substantially prevalent, cost-effective treatment option amongst women with menstrual problems. A detailed examination of the behaviour of women with menstrual problems who seek and use Western herbal medicine warrants attention to ensure this healthcare option is safe, effective, and appropriately co-ordinated within women's wider healthcare use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Utilization Pattern and Drug Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Western Medicine, and Integrated Chinese-Western Medicine Treatments for Allergic Rhinitis Under the National Health Insurance Program in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Kang; Lai, Chih-Sung; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Ho, Yu-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Patients in Taiwan with allergic rhinitis seek not only Western medicine treatment but also Traditional Chinese Medicine treatment or integrated Chinese-Western medicine treatment. Various studies have conducted pairwise comparison on Traditional Chinese Medicine, Western medicine, and integrated Chinese-Western medicine treatments. However, none conducted simultaneous analysis of the three treatments. This study analyzed patients with allergic rhinitis receiving the three treatments to identify differences in demographic characteristic and medical use and thereby to determine drug use patterns of different treatments. The National Health Insurance Research Database was the data source, and included patients were those diagnosed with allergic rhinitis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 470-478). Chi-square test and Tukey studentized range (honest significant difference) test were conducted to investigate the differences among the three treatments. Visit frequency for allergic rhinitis treatment was higher in female than male patients, regardless of treatment with Traditional Chinese Medicine, Western medicine, or integrated Chinese-Western medicine. Persons aged 0-19 years ranked the highest in proportion of visits for allergic rhinitis. Traditional Chinese Medicine treatment had more medical items per person-time and daily drug cost per person-time and had the lowest total expenditure per person-time. In contrast, Western medicine had the lowest daily drug cost per person-time and the highest total expenditure per person-time. The total expenditure per person-time, daily drug cost per person-time, and medical items per person-time of integrated Chinese-Western medicine treatment lay between those seen with Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western medicine treatments. Although only 6.82 % of patients with allergic rhinitis chose integrated Chinese-Western medicine treatment, the visit frequency per person-year of

  6. Treatment-seeking behaviour among the Nasioi people of Bougainville: choosing between traditional and western medicine.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Joan Elizabeth; Alpers, Michael P

    2009-04-01

    In Papua New Guinea (PNG) there continues to be considerable interest in developing a health system that incorporates both traditional and western medicine. A policy on traditional medicine has recently been endorsed. Simultaneously, there is limited information about the traditional beliefs and practices that influence treatment-seeking behaviour. A case study among the Nasioi people of Bougainville was conducted to gather information that could help to inform the implementation of the National Policy on Traditional Medicine for PNG. The main objective of the case study was to describe how health knowledge and belief systems influence treatment-seeking behaviour, specifically in relation to the use of traditional and western health care systems. The study also sought to develop an explanatory model for decision-making responses to febrile illnesses and skin conditions. By using a non-experimental, cross-sectional study design and focused ethnographic approach, a sample of 200 Nasioi community members were interviewed by Nasioi-speaking research assistants. The study found that people in the sample group subscribe to both traditional and western medical paradigms. Western medical concepts have been assimilated but have not displaced traditional understanding of illness. There was congruence between beliefs about causes of illness, treatment-seeking responses to illness and stated or hypothetical preferences for traditional or western medicine. Data obtained in each of these domains reflect concepts of illness derived from both medical paradigms and demonstrate participants' confidence in the efficacy of both traditional and western medicine. It is proposed that a health system that incorporates traditional medicine may be better aligned with people's concepts of illness than the current system. Because it is more consistent with Nasioi concepts of illness, an incorporated health system may lead to more appropriate health service utilisation and, ultimately, to

  7. [Clinical observation on treatment of type 2 cardiac and kidney syndrome by combination of traditional Chinese and Western medicines].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Hua; Rong, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Miao-Hai; Zhang, Xiang-Nong

    2017-10-01

    Clinical observation on treatment of type 2 cardiac and kidney syndrome by combination of traditional Chinese and Western medicine. The patients were divided into two groups: the simple Western medicine treatment group (control group) and the traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine treatment group (treatment group). The patients in the two groups were treated with conventional western medicine.The treatment group was given based on Buxin Yishen decoction, a total of three courses of treatment to observe the two groups of patients before and after treatment of total efficacy, cardiac function indicators, changes in renal function indicators. The total efficacy of the treatment group and the control group were 91.80% and 72.41%, respectively. There were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.01). The cardiac function indexes and renal function indexes of the treatment group and the control group before and after treatment (P<0.01). Compared with the two groups, the left ventricular function, Hematuria natriuretic peptide, serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, cystatin-C were improved, and the treatment group (P<0.05~0.01). The results showed that the combination of traditional Chinese and Western medicine treatment can improve the clinical efficacy of type 2 heart and kidney syndrome, significantly improve heart and kidney function, better than conventional Western medicine treatment, and has good safety. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. [Hot issues on the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis by Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine].

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing; Deng, Li-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is recognized as critical refractory disease. The case fatality rate of SAP is as high as 36%-50%. Although significant progress has been achieved on the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) by Integrated Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western Medicine (WM), there still exist some difficulties hindering the further improvement of therapeutic efficacy. The hot issues includes: unconfirmative curative effects and diverse treatment principles, complicated predictive scoring systems and inaccurate markers for the severity stratification, unproved new therapeutic tools and controversial methods waiting more high qualified evidence, unclarified mechanism of Integrated TCM and WM. In order to overcome the difficulties, we aim to launch the clinical pathway of Integrated TCM and WM, to strengthen the unity of multidisciplinary cooperation. We also need to keep the efforts on screening the markers for early evaluation and prediction of disease severity, improving the diagnosis and treatment, exploring the mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine in treating SAP with more high quality basic and clinical research. Based on these efforts, we could provide better treatments and prognosis for SAP patients.

  9. A Literature Study on Usage of and Satisfaction Levels with Combined Treatment Including Oriental and Western Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-Hun; Lim, Sung-Min

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to summarize and analyze the usage of and the satisfaction levels with combined treatment including Oriental and Western medicine. Methods: We searched studies on the usage of and the satisfaction levels with combined treatment including Oriental and Western medicine over the past 10 yrs (2001-2011) from 3 Korean databases (National Assembly Library, Research Information Service System, and National Discovery for Science Leaders). The reviewers also conducted a summarizing analysis by sampling the literature according to the type of study, study period, region, study subjects, sample size, type of sampling, research method, data analysis, study instruments, main results, etc. Results: When the main results of six studies on combined treatment usage and satisfaction levels were considered together, the most important decisive factor in determining the usage of combined treatment was the illness of the patient, followed by the patient’s occupation, sex, age, education, marital status, religion, treatment cost, and treatment results. In addition, the most important factor that determined satisfaction levels with combined treatment was age, followed by education, religion, income, health status, treatment procedures, staff attitude, and cleanliness. Conclusions: Elderly patients with musculoskeletal, cerebrovascular, and circulatory system illnesses are more likely to prefer combined treatment over independent Oriental or Western treatment and are more likely to request specialized, adjusted medical care. PMID:25780642

  10. [Unification of Oriental and Western medicine with study on Oriental and Western medicine].

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Lee, W K; Suh, J S; Song, K E; Lee, J W; Kim, P T; Lee, Y S; Lee, J N; Kang, B J; Kim, D H

    1998-01-01

    In Korea the system of medical management has been bifurcated into two parts since the restoration of nation from Japanese after World War II. One is 'Western Medicine' and the other is 'Oriental Medicine' like Chinese but not like Japanese. The authors attempted to study on the unification of both medicines to prevent the confusion of medicare for people. The major part of medical care is accomplished by Western medicine among people in Korea and China. However, Oriental medicine is still present as well as college of Oriental medicine in small number. There have been long struggles between two parts of medicine because of each assertions for the theories. The ancient medicine has been likely to have its characteristics either in Western or Oriental medicine although in many countries were succeeded by Western medicine except a few Asian countries such as Korea and China. In Japan since the license of Oriental(herb) medicine was ceased about one hundred years ago, the Western medicine has been authorized by law until today and the herb is the secondary medicine as a kind of folk treatment as well as continuous and enormous study for scientification. In only China and Korea this herb medicine has been kept to use as a part of medicine by law though China has developed combined medicine to use both Western and Oriental medicine by one physician since previous prime minister Chou En-Lai around the year 1950 who made a recommendation to the two medical societies, Western and Oriental. This fact has a big sense to establish the unification of two medicines in near future in Korea as well as China. For this accomplishment of medical unification both parts of medicine require sincere and enormous efforts to study the theory and practice of herb medicine even from now on. This unification of two medicines will provide the best medicare in most convenient way to the people in the world creating new world medicine like the third medicine including alternative medicine. The

  11. Optimization model research on efficacy in treatment of chronic urticaria by Chinese and Western medicine based on a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Macheng; Ye, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yuquan; Cai, Xi; Fu, Yanhua; Yang, Xuming

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the potential rules and knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western Medicine (WM) treatment on chronic urticaria (CU) based on data-mining methods. Sixty patients with chronic urticaria, treated with TCM and WM, were selected. Gray correlation analyses were adopted to determine therapeutic efficacy. Association algorithms were utilized to ascertain the correlation between the disease course and treatment results. A genetic algorithm was applied to discover the optimization model in the TCM and WM treatment on CU. The total symptom scores after 4 weeks and 8 weeks of treatment in the TCM spleen-strengthening group correlated highly with the pretreatment total symptom score. The duration of treatment showed the greatest impact on the total symptom score. A quartic equation was established (y = - 1.6403 x 10 - 6 x(4) + 0.00025576x(3) + 0.0012819 x2 - 1.024x + 79.5879, and x = 106.9518, y = 83.0036) using the genetic algorithm. TCM treatment had a better effect in the later stage, whereas WM was better in the early stage. The duration of disease course had an impact on the effects of treatment. If the average total symptom score before treatment was < or = 83.0036, TCM or WM treatment could achieve better efficacy.

  12. [Exploration of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by western medicine].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-jing

    2015-02-01

    "Microcosmic syndrome", "treatment based on syndrome differentiation", and "combination of disease identification and syndrome differentiation" generally refer to a mode: following the syndrome if with no disease identified, following the disease if with no syndrome type differentiated. For example, Chinese medical treatment of hypertension, high blood lipids, increased transaminase, and so on candirectly use Chinese recipes, but no longer with syndrome differentiation. Clinical application of Chinese patent medicine can also obtain favorable clinical. Western doctors need not follow syndrome differentiation. The invention of artemisinin was screened from more than 40 000 kinds of compounds and herbs, but with no reference of any traditional Chinese medical theory. A lot of folk remedy and empirical recipes have obtained effective efficacy but unnecessarily with profound Chinese medical theories. Various evidences showed that disease can also be cured without syndrome differentiation. I held that it might be associated with the same mechanism of Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Any disease can be cured or alleviated by Chinese medicine is a result from its modern pharmacological effect, which is achieved by improving etiologies, and pathogeneses. I was inspired by whether we can directly use traditional Chinese medicine with modern pharmacological effects to treat symptomatic disease. So I raised an idea of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by Western medicine, i.e., we find and use Chinese herbs with relatively effective modern pharmacological effect to treat diseases targeting at patients' clinical symptoms and signs, as well as various positive laboratory results (collectively called as microscopic dialectical indicators). More Western doctors would use it to treat disease due to omission of complicated and mysterious syndrome differentiation. This will promote extensive application and expansion of Chi- nese medicine and pharmacy, enlarge the team of

  13. [Clinical study on manifestation of hepatolenticular degeneration complicated with epilepsy and therapeutic effect of integrative Chinese and Western medicine treatment].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ji-yuan; Wang, Gong-qiang; Cheng, Nan; Wang, Xun; Hong, Mingfan; Han, Yongzhu; Yang, Renmin

    2004-09-01

    To observe the clinical manifestation of 155 patients with hepatolenticular degeneration (HLD) complicated with epilepsy and the therapeutic effect of integrative Chinese and Western medicine treatment on them. Clinical manifestation of patients and its relationship with abnormalities in cranial CT and/or MRI were observed. Patients were treated by combined treatment of copper repellent with sodium dimercaptosulfonate 20 mg/kg per day by intravenous dripping, and modified Gandou Decoction (GDD) by oral intake and antiepileptics as well, after treatment for 8-10 courses, the clinical effect, copper levels in urine and serum were compared between groups. In the 155 HLD patients, 96 were complicated with petit mal and 59 with grand mal. In the CT and/or MRI conducted in 72 patients, all showed abnormal images, besides such frequently met images as bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia focal lesion in 65 case-episode (90.3%) and brain atrophy of various degrees in 61 case-episode (84.7%), the massive lesions in cerebral white matter as principal, with the cortex involved, were also found in 54 patients (74%), which were mostly bilateral and symmetric or located in 2 adjecent lobes of brain, the sites of damage, in sequence of occurrence, were frontal lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe and callosal gyrus. Brain atrophy was found in all the remained patients without above-mentioned lesions. Abnormal EEG was shown in 29 patients (40.2%), which mainly manifested as theta wave of moderate to high potential and/or short paroxysmal spike-slow or sharp-slow complex wave evoked. The urinary copper level in patients after treatment was 34.5 +/- 21.6 micromol/24 hrs, significantly higher than that before treatment, 4.49 +/- 1.93 micromol/24 hrs (P < 0.01). And the serum copper level in patients also lowered significantly (P< 0.01). Epileptic seizure was controlled completely along with the gradually improving of extrapyramidal symptoms. Partial seizure was the most common type of

  14. [Current situation of the study on treatment of bacteria translocation with integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine].

    PubMed

    Geng, Yu-Shan; Wang, Jia-Tai

    2006-03-01

    Bacteria translocation (BT) induced enterogenous infection in multiple organs dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is closely related with the stress pyemia and MODS. For prevention of BT, western medicine stresses to improve the blood and oxygen supply of intestinal tract, mucosa protection, and application of microorganism preparation, while traditional Chinese medicine could also win good effect by using such drugs as rhubarb, red sage root, and compound decoctions.

  15. Ethnopharmacological survey on medicinal plants used in snakebite treatments in Western and Sabaragamuwa provinces in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Dharmadasa, R M; Akalanka, G C; Muthukumarana, P R M; Wijesekara, R G S

    2016-02-17

    Sri Lanka has a great diversity of snake species. In this relation, over 40,000 cases of snakebite accidents are reported annually from different agro-ecological regions of the country. Since more than 95% of victims rely on traditional treatments, there is an urgent necessity to improve the system. Traditional knowledge on snakebite treatments has been passed on from generation to generation within families. Unfortunately, there has been a limited update of information on pertinent issues related to this subject. In the present study we conducted a comprehensive survey on the types of medicinal plant materials, including the specific plant parts that are available for this purpose. In addition, various treatment types, frequency index, heavily used and rare materials, family wise distribution, challenges faced by traditional practitioners and future prospects were also explored. The present survey covered two provinces with a high population of traditional practitioners for snakebites treatment in Sri Lanka.Information was gathered from a total of seventy-four (74) traditional practitioners from the Sabaragamuwa and Western provinces. A questionnaire was prepared and pre-tested by 10-15 respondents prior to the survey. Actual data were gathered through face-to-face interviews. Collected data were tabulated and analyzed. A total of 341 different plant species belonging to 99 families were documented. The highest number of plants was reported from the family Fabaceae (32 species). This was followed by Malvaceae (16 species), Asteraceae (15 species), Rutaceae (13 species Apocyanaceae (14 species), Lamiaceae (11 species), Poaceae, Euphorbaceae and Phyllanthaceae (10 species per each) respectively. Different parts of the plant such as leaves (53.67%), barks (26.10%), entire plant (14.08%), roots (10.26%), bulbs (8.80%), seeds (7.62%), fruits (6.45%), buds (5.87%), flowers (3.23%) stems (2.93%) and latex (2.05%) were used for the preparation of nine different types of

  16. [HIS-based analysis of comorbid characteristics and combined treatment of Chinese and western medicine in patients with depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun-ran; Xie, Yan-ming

    2014-09-01

    To understand the comorbid characteristics and distribution of combined treatment of Chinese and Western medicine in depressive patients. The descriptive statistic method and association rule were used to analyze the data from 19 general hospitals with 3-A level in China. Among the depressive disorder, the most frequent co-morbid physical diseases included hypertension (24.67%), coronary heart disease (16.10%) and cerebral infarction (12.89%), and the proportion of comorbid changes with the increasing age, from 6.51% to 12.55%, 16.33% and 12.47% for hypertension; from 2.79% to 5.69%, 10.17% and 14.22% for coronary heart disease; from 3.72%, 6.27%, 7.70% and 12.25% for cerebral infarction. The use frequency of the antidepressants is 77.18%, and the use frequency of flupentixol & melitracen is 20.95%. The use frequency of Huoxue Huayu Tongluo of traditional Chinese medicine is 59.97%, with that of 27.91% for Ginkgo biloba extract The combined use frequency of Huoxue Huayu Tongluo of TCM and the antidepressants is the highest, especially for the combined use of Shuxuening injection and fluoxetine. The most frequent comorbid diseases of depression include three kinds of diseases, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease and cerebral infarction, and its proportion gradually increased with the growth of age. The single use frequency of flupentixol & melitracen and G. biloba extract is the highest, while the combined use of Shuxuening injection and fluoxetine is the highest.

  17. Prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine, western medicine, and integrated Chinese-Western medicine for allergic rhinitis under the National Health Insurance in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Kang; Ho, Yu-Ling; Chang, Yuan-Shiun

    2015-09-15

    Allergic rhinitis has long been a worldwide health problem with a global growth trend. The use of traditional Chinese medicines alone or integrated Chinese-Western medicines for its treatment is quite common in Taiwan. Respiratory diseases account for the majority of outpatient traditional Chinese medicine treatment, while allergic rhinitis accounts for the majority of respiratory diseases. We hereby conduct a comparative analysis between traditional Chinese medicine treatments and western medicine treatments for allergic rhinitis in Taiwan. The results of the analysis on the prescription difference of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine treatments would be helpful to clinical guide and health policy decision making of ethnopharmacological therapy. Patients diagnosed as allergic rhinitis with diagnostic code 470-478 (ICD-9-CM) were selected as subjects from 2009-2010 National Health Insurance Research Database based on the claim data from the nationwide National Health Insurance in Taiwan. This retrospective study used Chi-Square test to test the effects of gender and age on visit of traditional Chinese medicine, western medicine, and integrated Chinese-Western medicine treatments. A total of 45,804 patients diagnosed as allergic rhinitis with ICD-9-CM 470-478 were identified from 2009-2010 NHIRD. There were 36,874 subjects for western medicine treatment alone, 5829 subjects for traditional Chinese medicine treatment alone, and 3101 subjects for integrated Chinese-Western medicine treatment. Female patients were more than male in three treatments. 0-9 years children had the highest visit frequency in western medicine and integrated Chinese-Western medicine groups, while 10-19 years young-age rank the highest in traditional Chinese medicine group. The Chi-square test of independence showed that the effects of gender and age on visit of three treatments were significant. The prescription drugs of western medicine treatment alone were almost for

  18. Who's talking? Communication between health providers and HIV-infected adults related to herbal medicine for AIDS treatment in western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Kipp, Walter; Rubaale, Tom

    2008-07-01

    Communication between patients and physicians about herbal medicine is valuable, enabling physicians to address issues of potential herb-drug interactions and ensuring appropriate medical care. As seemingly harmless herbal remedies may have detrimental interactions with various HIV antiretroviral drugs, the importance of communication is intensified, but often stifled around the use of herbal medicine in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. In western Uganda, 137 HIV-infected adults attending conventional HIV/AIDS treatment programmes (67 of whom were receiving antiretroviral therapy) shared their experiences and perceptions about traditional herbal medicine and related patient-physician communication issues through interviews and focus group discussions. Although close to 64% of respondents reported using herbal medicine after being diagnosed with HIV, only 16% of these respondents had informed their conventional medical practitioners about using these herbs. Furthermore, only 13% of antiretroviral therapy recipients had inquired about concurrent herb-antiretroviral drug use with their HIV/AIDS treatment providers, largely because they perceived a low acceptance and support for herbal medicine by conventional medical practitioners. Importantly however, almost 68% of HIV-infected adults indicated they would be willing to discuss herbal medicine use if directly asked by a conventional medical practitioner, and the overwhelming majority (91%) said they were amenable to following physician advice about herbal medicine. As such, improved patient-physician communication about herbal medicine is needed, and we recommend that herbal medicine histories be completed when patient histories are taken. Also, HIV/AIDS treatment programmes should be encouraged to develop specific patient-physician communication standards and best practice guidelines to ensure that patients can make informed decisions about herb and pharmaceutical drug co-therapy based on known risks, particularly in the

  19. Parallel subgroup design of a randomized controlled clinical trial-comparing the approaches of Chinese medicine and Western medicine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ji-qian; Liu, Feng-bin; Hou, Zheng-kun

    2010-10-01

    A new method for the comparison of the treatment efficacy for specific diseases or conditions between Chinese medicine and Western medicine, which serve the same medical aim but are based on substantially different theoretical systems, was identified. Abiding by the principle of parallel subgroup design of a randomized controlled trial (PSD-RCT), participants were recruited following identical inclusion and exclusion criteria and were randomly allocated into two groups to receive treatment using the respective approaches of Chinese medicine and Western medicine. The Chinese medicine group was divided into subgroups according to the theory of Chinese medicine and the Western medicine group was also divided into subgroups according to the theory of Western medicine. The treatment for each subgroup was well defined in the protocol, including major formulae and principles for individualized modifications. The primary outcome measure was ascertained to be directly related to the patients' status but independent from both theories of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, while the secondary outcomes were represented by the patient-reported outcomes and some laboratory tests commonly accepted by Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Then, taking functional dyspepsia as an example, the authors explain the framework of the PSD-RCT for efficacy comparisons between Chinese medicine and Western medicine, and recommend that the PSD-RCT can be used to compare treatment efficacy for a specific disease or condition between Chinese medicine and Western medicine, and the comparison among subgroups can provide valuable clues for further studies.

  20. Is there a divide between local medicinal knowledge and Western medicine? a case study among native Amazonians in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Calvet-Mir, Laura; Reyes-García, Victoria; Tanner, Susan

    2008-08-18

    Interest in ethnomedicine has grown in the last decades, with much research focusing on how local medicinal knowledge can contribute to Western medicine. Researchers have emphasized the divide between practices used by local medical practitioners and Western doctors. However, researchers have also suggested that merging concepts and practices from local medicinal knowledge and Western science have the potential to improve public health and support medical independence of local people. In this article we study the relations between local and Western medicinal knowledge within a native Amazonian population, the Tsimane'. We used the following methods: 1) participant observation and semi-structured interviews to gather background information, 2) free-listing and pile-sorting to assess whether Tsimane' integrate local medicinal knowledge and Western medicine at the conceptual level, 3) surveys to assess to what extent Tsimane' combine local medicinal knowledge with Western medicine in actual treatments, and 4) a participatory workshop to assess the willingness of Tsimane' and Western medical specialists to cooperate with each other. We found that when asked about medical treatments, Tsimane' do not include Western treatments in their lists, however on their daily practices, Tsimane' do use Western treatments in combination with ethnomedical treatments. We also found that Tsimane' healers and Western doctors express willingness to cooperate with each other and to promote synergy between local and Western medical systems. Our findings contrast with previous research emphasizing the divide between local medical practitioners and Western doctors and suggests that cooperation between both health systems might be possible.

  1. Traditional Chinese medicine and Western psychopharmacology: building bridges.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Edward; Segesser, Kathryn

    2013-12-01

    This paper demonstrates that in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, there are striking similarities between the mechanisms of psychoactive agents used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and those of western psychopharmacology. While western researchers search for new treatments and novel mechanisms of action, investigators in Asia are analyzing traditional remedies in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for their effectiveness. A review of contemporary pharmacologic studies of agents used in TCM for psychiatric indications reveals that virtually all of the active principles of drug action established in 20th century psychopharmacology were encountered empirically in Chinese herbal medicine over the past 2000 years. Building bridges between these two traditions may thus be of benefit to both cultures. In addition to providing western patients with a wider selection of treatment options, the effort may help Asian clinicians and researchers avoid some of the errors that have troubled their western counterparts. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Treatment of severe fluoroacetamide poisoning in patient with combined multiple organ dysfunction syndrome by evidence-based integrated Chinese and Western medicines: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wanxin; Gao, Hongxia; Kang, Nini; Lu, Aili; Qian, Caiwen; Zhao, Yuanqi

    2017-07-01

    Fluoroacetamide poisoning is the acute and severe disease of human, which leads to nervous, digestive, and cardiovascular system damage or even death in a short period of time. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman with loss of consciousness, nausea, and vomiting who was sent to the hospital by passers-by. She was diagnosed with severe fluoroacetamide poisoning with combined multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. When the diagnosis was unclear, we gave gastric lavage, support and symptomatic treatment, and closely with the vital sign. When the diagnosis was clear, based on the evidence of retrieved, muscle injection of acetamide, calcium gluconate, and vitamin C. Traditional Chinese medicine aspect, oral administration of mung bean soup of glycyrrhizae and Da-Cheng-Qi decoction enema. By setting reasonable treatment for patients, she had no special discomfort and complications after treatment. Besides, through 1-month follow-up, it was confirmed that the treatments were effective. Evidence-based integrated Chinese and Western medicines can effectively improve the therapeutic effects in severe fluoroacetamide-poisoned patients with combined MODS.

  3. Biorheology, Western medicine and acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Copley, A L

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made by the author to show that biorheology and certain of its branches are expected to contribute towards a better understanding of mechanisms concerning beneficial effects known in the practice of acupuncture. Rheology, a branch of physics, founded as an organized science in 1929, is defined as the science of deformation and flow of matter. Biorheology comprises the science of deformation and flow of biological systems or of materials of biological significance. Recently, the author considered biorheology to be the missing link between the life sciences. Hemorheology, at present its most active branch, is concerned with the rheological (deformation and flow) properties of blood, including its cellular and plasmatic components, and of the structures of the vessel wall with which blood and its components come into direct contact. Hemorheology is the study of how the components of blood and of the vessel wall can function and interact rheologically. In 1981, the author defined the entity of the blood and its more or less leaky envelopes, the variety of blood vessels in a variety of tissues and organs, as an organ, named the 'vessel-blood organ'. It is a special organ penetrating all other organs and can be likened to some extent to the nervous system. Hemorheology is thus the rheology of the vessel-blood organ, its constituents and of the processes involved in both its two portions as well as in their interactions. There is an extension of hemorheology, termed recently by the author 'parahemorheology', which deals with processes and flow occurring within the interstitial spaces, across the parenchymal cell membranes, the lymph and the channels or lymphatics, in which it is contained, and its walls. Thus parahemorheology is intertwined with hemorheology. Applications of biorheology to the theory and practice of different fields in medicine is called medical or clinical biorheology. It is expected that clinical hemorheology and clinical parahemorheology

  4. Western medicine in a Chinese cultural setting.

    PubMed

    Ho, Faith Chi Suk

    2009-01-01

    Hong Kong's unique medical heritage stems from its development as a city with a predominantly Chinese population and a long history of exposure to the influence of Western cultural and scientific ideas and practices. This heritage is preserved and displayed in the Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences, where exhibits of both Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western medicine, particularly those aspects with special relevance to Hong Kong, are featured. This paper also describes the significance of the plague outbreak of 1894 in shaping Hong Kong's medical history, and in bringing about the existence of the building which houses the museum, a 100 year-old protected monument originally named the Bacteriological Institute. The museum's role in society, by providing programmes on health and heritage for the public's education and enjoyment, and the need to preserve and identify both tangible and intangible aspects of our cultural heritage is also briefly explored.

  5. The model of Western integrative medicine: the role of Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Gustav; Tao, Iven

    2011-01-01

    The basic concept of integrative medicine (IM) is that by combining mainstream (biomedicine) with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), synergistic therapeutic effects can be attained. When the methods of mind/body medicine (MBM) are added to this combination, as in Western countries, a new concept emerges that drastically changes the approach toward illness.It is interesting to note that the joining of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine in the early days of the Peoples' Republic of China preceded the Western model of IM by almost 50 years. Several elements that make up the key components of IM as practiced today in the West were already present in the Chinese version of IM, and Chinese medicine has played and continues to play an important role in advancing IM. However, one of the major differences between the Chinese and the Western models of IM today, besides MBM and some other treatment options, is that Western integrative medicine (WIM) strictly requires its CAM methods to be supported by scientific evidence.The therapeutic methods of IM and their applications are many and varied. However, they are most frequently employed to treat chronic medical conditions, e.g., bronchial asthma, rheumatic disease, chronic inflammatory bowel disorder and chronic pain. Other fields in which IM may be applied are internal medicine (inflammatory bowel diseases and cardiovascular diseases), musculoskeletal disorders, oncology (chemotherapy-induced side effects), obstetrics and gynecology (dysmenorrhea, endometriosis, infertility and menopausal complaints), pediatrics, geriatrics, neurology (migraine and chronic headache), and psychiatry (anxiety and depression).The concept of WIM is discussed here in detail by reviewing its scope and implications for the practice of medicine and focusing on the role of Chinese medicine in WIM.

  6. Is there a divide between local medicinal knowledge and Western medicine? a case study among native Amazonians in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Calvet-Mir, Laura; Reyes-García, Victoria; Tanner, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Background Interest in ethnomedicine has grown in the last decades, with much research focusing on how local medicinal knowledge can contribute to Western medicine. Researchers have emphasized the divide between practices used by local medical practitioners and Western doctors. However, researchers have also suggested that merging concepts and practices from local medicinal knowledge and Western science have the potential to improve public health and support medical independence of local people. In this article we study the relations between local and Western medicinal knowledge within a native Amazonian population, the Tsimane'. Methods We used the following methods: 1) participant observation and semi-structured interviews to gather background information, 2) free-listing and pile-sorting to assess whether Tsimane' integrate local medicinal knowledge and Western medicine at the conceptual level, 3) surveys to assess to what extent Tsimane' combine local medicinal knowledge with Western medicine in actual treatments, and 4) a participatory workshop to assess the willingness of Tsimane' and Western medical specialists to cooperate with each other. Results We found that when asked about medical treatments, Tsimane' do not include Western treatments in their lists, however on their daily practices, Tsimane' do use Western treatments in combination with ethnomedical treatments. We also found that Tsimane' healers and Western doctors express willingness to cooperate with each other and to promote synergy between local and Western medical systems. Conclusion Our findings contrast with previous research emphasizing the divide between local medical practitioners and Western doctors and suggests that cooperation between both health systems might be possible. PMID:18710524

  7. [Reflection on treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Ni

    2012-02-01

    The current situation of Chinese medicine and Western medicine treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has made the integrative medicine treatment of AIDS an important treatment strategy. Integrative medicine treatment of AIDS has made certain achievements in clinical research, basic research, and other aspects. It has good mass foundation and curative efficacy, as well as insufficiency. I hope integrative medicine can be brought into full play in the treatment of AIDS and make breakthrough progress.

  8. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  9. [The methods of Western medicine in on ancient medicine].

    PubMed

    Ban, Deokjin

    2010-06-30

    The treatise On Ancient Medicine attests that questions of method were being debated both in medicine and in philosophy and is important evidence of cross-discipline methodological controversy. The treatise On Ancient Medicine is the first attempt in the history of Greek thought to provide a detailed account of the development of a science from a starting point in observation and experience. The author of it criticizes philosophical physicians who attempt to systematized medicine by reducing it to the interaction of one or more of the opposites hot, cold, wet, and dry, factors. He regards the theory of his opponents as hypothesis(hypothesis). Medicine has long been in possession of both an archē and a hodos, a principle and a method, which have enabled it to make discoveries over a long period of time. As far as method is concerned, the traditional science of medicine attained the knowledge of the visible by starting from observation and experience, but it recommended the use of reasoning and analogies with familiar objects as a means of learning about the invisible. It also utilized inference from the visible to the visible(epilogismos) and inference from the visible to the invisible(analogismos). The use of analogy as a means of learning about the obscure was also part of the common heritage of early philosophy and medicine. But the author's use of the analogical method distinguishes it from Empedocles' well-known analogy comparisons of the eye to a lantern and the process of respiration to the operations of a clepsydra. According to the author, traditional science of medicine used functional analogy like wine example and cheese example to know the function of humors within the body and utilized structured analogy like a tube example and a cupping instrument example to acknowledge an organ or structure within the body. But the author didn't distinguish between the claim that medicine has a systematic method of making discoveries and very different claim that it

  10. Assessment of the Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Trials on Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease with Traditional Chinese Medicine from the Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fang-fang; Xu, Qin; Sun, Qi; Zhao, Sheng-jun; Wang, Ping; Guo, Xue-rui

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to language limitations, little is known about the reporting quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on the treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine (CJITWM). Objective In this study, we utilized the CONSORT 2010 statement to understand the reporting quality of RCTs on CHD with TCM from the CJITWM. Methods The China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) electronic database was searched for CJITWM RCTs on the treatment of CHD with TCM, published between Janurary 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011. We excluded articles reported as “animal studies,” “topic review,” “diagnostic test,” “editorials,” or “others.” The CONSORT checklist was applied to evaluate the reporting quality of all eligible articles by two independent authors after extensive discussion. Each item was graded as either “yes” or “no” depending on whether the authors had reported it or not. Results We identified 21 articles meeting our inclusion criteria. The percentage of 11 of the 37 items was 4.8∼95.2%, 14 of the 37 items were reported in all included articles, while 12 items were not mentioned at all. The average reporting percentage for the “title and abstract” section was 52.4%, for the “introduction” section 100.0%, for the “methods” section 45.4%, for the “results” section 57.1%, for the “discussion” section 79.4%, and for the “other information” section 17.5%. Conclusion In general, the reviewed RCTs were not consistent with the CONSORT 2010 statement. Authors should adhere to the CONSORT statement in reporting RCTs; editorial departments may consider the CONSORT statement as a guideline and should instruct authors to write manuscripts, and reviewers to judge them according to CONSORT statutes. PMID:24489719

  11. Assessment of the reporting quality of randomized controlled trials on treatment of coronary heart disease with traditional chinese medicine from the chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fang-fang; Xu, Qin; Sun, Qi; Zhao, Sheng-jun; Wang, Ping; Guo, Xue-rui

    2014-01-01

    Due to language limitations, little is known about the reporting quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on the treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine (CJITWM). In this study, we utilized the CONSORT 2010 statement to understand the reporting quality of RCTs on CHD with TCM from the CJITWM. The China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) electronic database was searched for CJITWM RCTs on the treatment of CHD with TCM, published between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011. We excluded articles reported as "animal studies," "topic review," "diagnostic test," "editorials," or "others." The CONSORT checklist was applied to evaluate the reporting quality of all eligible articles by two independent authors after extensive discussion. Each item was graded as either "yes" or "no" depending on whether the authors had reported it or not. We identified 21 articles meeting our inclusion criteria. The percentage of 11 of the 37 items was 4.8 ∼ 95.2%, 14 of the 37 items were reported in all included articles, while 12 items were not mentioned at all. The average reporting percentage for the "title and abstract" section was 52.4%, for the "introduction" section 100.0%, for the "methods" section 45.4%, for the "results" section 57.1%, for the "discussion" section 79.4%, and for the "other information" section 17.5%. In general, the reviewed RCTs were not consistent with the CONSORT 2010 statement. Authors should adhere to the CONSORT statement in reporting RCTs; editorial departments may consider the CONSORT statement as a guideline and should instruct authors to write manuscripts, and reviewers to judge them according to CONSORT statutes.

  12. The Problem of Dualism in Modern Western Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gendle, Mathew H.

    2016-01-01

    Dualism is historically important in that it allowed the medical practice to be divorced from church oversight. The reductionist approaches of modern Western medicine facilitate a dispassionate and mechanistic approach to patient care, and dualist views promoted by complementary and alternative medicine are also problematic. Behavioural disorders are multifactorally realizable and emerge apparently chaotically from interactions between internal physiological systems and the patient's environment and experiential history. Conceptualizations of behavioural disorders that are based on dualism deny the primacy of individual physiology in the generation of pathology and distract from therapies that are most likely to produce positive outcomes. Behavioural health professionals should adopt holistic models of patient care, but these models must be based on methodologies that emphasize radical emergence over the artificial separation of the “physical” and “mental.” This will allow for the humanistic practice of medicine while simultaneously maximizing the likelihood of treatment success. PMID:28031628

  13. The Problem of Dualism in Modern Western Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gendle, Mathew H

    2016-01-01

    Dualism is historically important in that it allowed the medical practice to be divorced from church oversight. The reductionist approaches of modern Western medicine facilitate a dispassionate and mechanistic approach to patient care, and dualist views promoted by complementary and alternative medicine are also problematic. Behavioural disorders are multifactorally realizable and emerge apparently chaotically from interactions between internal physiological systems and the patient's environment and experiential history. Conceptualizations of behavioural disorders that are based on dualism deny the primacy of individual physiology in the generation of pathology and distract from therapies that are most likely to produce positive outcomes. Behavioural health professionals should adopt holistic models of patient care, but these models must be based on methodologies that emphasize radical emergence over the artificial separation of the "physical" and "mental." This will allow for the humanistic practice of medicine while simultaneously maximizing the likelihood of treatment success.

  14. Context Effects in Western Herbal Medicine: Fundamental to Effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Snow, James

    2016-01-01

    Western herbal medicine (WHM) is a complex healthcare system that uses traditional plant-based medicines in patient care. Typical preparations are individualized polyherbal formulae that, unlike herbal pills, retain the odor and taste of whole herbs. Qualitative studies in WHM show patient-practitioner relationships to be collaborative. Health narratives are co-constructed, leading to assessments, and treatments with personal significance for participants. It is hypothesized that the distinct characteristics of traditional herbal preparations and patient-herbalist interactions, in conjunction with the WHM physical healthcare environment, evoke context (placebo) effects that are fundamental to the overall effectiveness of herbal treatment. These context effects may need to be minimized to demonstrate pharmacological efficacy of herbal formulae in randomized, placebo-controlled trials, optimized to demonstrate effectiveness of WHM in pragmatic trials, and consciously harnessed to enhance outcomes in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the traditional treatment of diabetes in Chtouka Ait Baha and Tiznit (Western Anti-Atlas), Morocco.

    PubMed

    Barkaoui, M; Katiri, A; Boubaker, H; Msanda, F

    2017-02-23

    In Morocco, diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem with more than 1.5 million cases in 2014. Medicinal plants are widely used by the Moroccan population to treat the illness. The aim of this work is to make an inventory of plant species used in folk medicine for the management of diabetes in Chtouka Ait Baha and Tiznit provinces. The survey was carried out by means of semi-structured questionnaires. A total of 380 interviews were conducted with traditional health practitioners and knowledgeable villagers. The data were analyzed through use value (UV), fidelity level (FL) and relative frequency of citation (RFC). In total, 48 plant species belonging to 25 families were reported. Lamiaceae, Asteraceae and Apiaceae were reported as the most represented families. Six plants are reported for the first time as used in traditional treatment of diabetes and one plant species was previously unknown for its medicinal use to treat diabetes in Morocco. The most frequently cited plant species are Allium sativum L., Salvia officinalis L., Marrubium vulgare L. and Lavandula dentata L. Leaves were the most cited plant part used, decoction is the preferred mode of preparation. This study showed the importance of folk medicine in the healthcare system for the local people living in the study area. The current study represents a useful documentation, which can contribute to preserving knowledge on the use of medicinal plants in this region and to explore the phytochemical and pharmacological potential of medicinal plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breviscapine Injection Improves the Therapeutic Effect of Western Medicine on Angina Pectoris Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan; Li, Yafeng; Gao, Shoucui; Cheng, Daxin; Zhao, Sihai; Liu, Enqi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of breviscapine injection in combination with Western medicine on the treatment of patients with angina pectoris. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Science Citation Index, EMBASE, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Wanfang Database, the Chongqing VIP Information Database and the China Biomedical Database were searched to identify randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of Western medicine compared to breviscapine injection plus Western medicine on angina pectoris patients. The included studies were analyzed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. The literature search yielded 460 studies, wherein 16 studies matched the selection criteria. The results showed that combined therapy using Breviscapine plus Western medicine was superior to Western medicine alone for improving angina pectoris symptoms (OR =3.77, 95% Cl: 2.76~5.15) and also resulted in increased electrocardiogram (ECG) improvement (OR=2.77, 95% Cl: 2.16~3.53). The current evidence suggests that Breviscapine plus Western medicine achieved a superior therapeutic effect compared to Western medicine alone. PMID:26052709

  17. [Acupuncture combined with western medicine for CP/CPPS:a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Xiang, Juan; Ouyang, Lizhi; Wang, Xuzhe; Zhang, Sainan; Chen, Haijiao; Chen, Junjun; Li, Tielang

    2016-12-12

    To compare the clinical efficacy differences among acupuncture combined with western medicine, acupuncture alone and western medicine alone for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Ninety patients were randomly assigned into a needle-medicine group, an acupuncture group and a western medicine group, 30 patients in each group. The patients in the needle-medicine group were treated with acupuncture combined with western medicine; the scalp points included Shenting (GV 24), Xinhui (GV 22), Qianding (GV 21), Baihui (GV 20), Chengguang (BL 6), Tongtian (BL 7), etc. The body points were Zhongji (CV 3), Guanyuan (CV 4), Pangguangshu (BL 28), Ciliao (BL 32), etc. The acupuncture was given 30 min per treatment, once a day. Besides, oral administration of 0.2g levofloxacin (twice per day) and 0.2 mg tamsulosin (once a day) was applied. The patients in the acupuncture group and western medicine group were treated by acupuncture and western medicine respectively. 12-d treatment was taken as one session, and totally 2 sessions were given. The clinical efficacy of the three groups after treatment was compared as well as the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) total score and pain score, self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and self-rating depression scale (SDS) before and after treatment. During the trial two patients dropped out, as a result, 30 patients in the needle-medicine group, 29 patients in the acupuncture group and 29 patients in the western medicine group were included in the analysis. After treatment, 21 patients were cured, 6 patients were markedly effective, 2 patients were effective and 1 patient failed in the needle-medicine group;12 patients were cured, 10 patients were markedly effective, 5 patients were effective and 2 patients failed in the acupuncture group; 11 patients were cured, 12 patients were markedly effective, 4 patients were effective and 2 patients failed in the medicine group; the efficacy

  18. Current therapeutic role and medicinal potential of Scutellaria barbata in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western research.

    PubMed

    Tao, Geyang; Balunas, Marcy J

    2016-04-22

    Scutellaria barbata is a common herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) most often used to treat cancer. S. barbata has been found to exhibit efficacy both in vitro and in vivo on a variety of cancer types. Similarly encouraging results have been shown in patients with metastatic breast cancer from Phase Ia and Ib clinical trials. This study aims to elucidate the current use of S. barbata by TCM practitioners and in current Western research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen TCM practitioners in Beijing and Nanjing, China to understand their clinical use of S. barbata. Practitioners were also asked to comment on the future development of TCM using Western research methods and the potential for integration of the two types of medicine in clinical therapy. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare use of S. barbata by disease and in conjunction with other herbs. Current Western research related to S. barbata is focused on cancer treatment, which corresponds to the most common use of S. barbata by TCM practitioners. Other common uses that practitioners reported included infection and inflammation, for which Beijing practitioners reported use of S. barbata more often than Nanjing practitioners (p<0.05). Hedyotis diffusa was found to be the most commonly cited herb to pair with S. barbata for cancer treatment (p<0.05). When compared to Western clinical trials of BZL101, an S. barbata extract, TCM practitioners reported using smaller doses of S. barbata in shorter durations, in combination with numerous other herbs with the goal to potentiate therapeutic efficacy and mitigate side effects. In addition, TCM practitioners repeatedly emphasized symptom differentiating as the key to achieving maximum therapeutic potential of S. barbata, a factor typically overlooked in Western research. Similarities and differences in diagnosis and treatment regimens between TCM practitioners and Western research have the potential to shed light on possible new

  19. Different perceptions of narrative medicine between Western and Chinese medicine students.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Da; Liao, Kuo-Chen; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Tseng, Hsu-Min; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Lii, Shu-Chung; Kuo, Han-Pin; Yeh, San-Jou; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2017-05-10

    Western medicine is an evidence-based science, whereas Chinese medicine is more of a healing art. To date, there has been no research that has examined whether students of Western and Chinese medicine differentially engage in, or benefit from, educational activities for narrative medicine. This study fills a gap in current literature with the aim of evaluating and comparing Western and Chinese Medicine students' perceptions of narrative medicine as an approach to learning empathy and professionalism. An initial 10-item questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale was developed to assess fifth-year Western medical (MS) and traditional Chinese medical (TCMS) students' perceptions of a 4-activity narrative medicine program during a 13-week internal medicine clerkship. Exploratory factor analysis was undertaken. The response rate was 88.6% (412/465), including 270 (65.5%) MSs and 142 (34.5%) TCMSs, with a large reliability (Cronbach alpha = 0.934). Three factors were extracted from 9 items: personal attitude, self-development/reflection, and emotional benefit, more favorable in terms of enhancement of self-development/reflection. The perceptions of narrative medicine by scores between the two groups were significantly higher in TCMSs than MSs in all 9-item questionnaire and 3 extracted factors. Given the different learning cultures of medical education in which these student groups engage, this suggests that undertaking a course in Chinese medicine might enhance one's acceptance to, and benefit from, a medical humanities course. Alternatively, Chinese medicine programmes might attract more humanities-focused students.

  20. [Traditional medicine seen from the perspective of Western medicine during the late 19th and early 20th century in Korea].

    PubMed

    Yeo, In-Sok

    2007-12-01

    From the 18th century traditional medicine began to be criticised by some of Korean intellectuals who attained the knowledge of Western medicine through the imported books on Western science. In the early 20th century, Western medical doctors in Korea generally had critical attitude toward traditional medicine. Their critical opinions on traditional medicine are typically recognizable in the debate between two camps that occurred in 1930s. However, some exceptional doctors such as Chang Ki-moo and Bang Hap-shin had special interest in traditional medicine despite their education in Western medicine. It was their clinical experience of the limitation of Western medicine which led them to study traditional medicine. Both of them were particularly attracted by the School of Old Prescriptions, which was a school of Japanese traditional medicine. The medical theory of the school was characterized by the simplification of vague and complicated theory of traditional medicine. The school held the theory that all diseases are caused by one poison. Consequently, treatment of all diseases consists in eliminating the poison. He also put forward a theory of one prescription for one disease, and therefore the same remedy should be applied to a disease with the same cause even though it might manifest various symptoms. Given the fact that their theory of diseases is very similar to that of Western medicine, it is understandable that they were attracted to the School of Old Prescriptions. As the doctors trained in Western medicine, they were possibly more familiar with the doctrine of the School of Old Prescriptions than the traditional medicine based on Yin Yang and Five-Phase theory.

  1. Linking Ayurveda and Western medicine by integrative analysis.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, Fazlin Mohd; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Lowe, Robert; Joshi, Kalpana; Fan, Tai-Ping; Glen, Robert C; Bender, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    In this article, we discuss our recent work in elucidating the mode-of-action of compounds used in traditional medicine including Ayurvedic medicine. Using computational ('in silico') approach, we predict potential targets for Ayurvedic anti-cancer compounds, obtained from the Indian Plant Anticancer Database given its chemical structure. In our analysis, we observed that: (i) the targets predicted can be connected to cancer pathogenesis i.e. steroid-5-alpha reductase 1 and 2 and estrogen receptor-β, and (ii) predominantly hormone-dependent cancer targets were predicted for the anti-cancer compounds. Through the use of our in silico target prediction, we conclude that understanding how traditional medicine such as Ayurveda work through linking with the 'western' understanding of chemistry and protein targets can be a fruitful avenue in addition to bridging the gap between the two different schools of thinking. Given that compounds used in Ayurveda have been tested and used for thousands of years (although not in the same approach as Western medicine), they can potentially be developed into potential new drugs. Hence, to further advance the case of Ayurvedic medicine, we put forward some suggestions namely: (a) employing and integrating novel analytical methods given the advancements of 'omics' and (b) sharing experimental data and clinical results on studies done on Ayurvedic compounds in an easy and accessible way.

  2. Integrative Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine service model for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sit, Regina W S; Wong, Wendy; Law, Sheung Wai; Wu, Justin C Y

    2016-07-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common, costly, and debilitating condition that creates a heavy socioeconomic burden on the global health care systems. In Western Medicine (WM), the treatment goals are to relieve pain, reduce disability, and enhance rehabilitation. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), acupuncture is frequently used to rebalance the vital energy "Qi". Whilst numerous literatures are available from WM and TCM in the management of LBP, the value of an integrative WMTCM therapy remains unknown. This article aims to introduce an integrative WM-TCM service model for LBP, which is now available at the Hong Kong Institute of Integrative Medicine, the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

  3. Opportunities for silvicultural treatment in western Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Colin D. MacLean

    1980-01-01

    A recent Forest Survey inventory of western Oregon has been analyzed to determine the extent of physical opportunities to increase wood production through silvicultural treatment. Results are presented by owner group and by geographic unit.

  4. [Schofield and the first spread of western medicine in Shanxi].

    PubMed

    Zheng, J Y

    2017-05-28

    After the Second Opium War, the signing of the Tientsin Treaty and the Peking Treaty legitimized the missionary activities and authorized the missionary the rights to enter inland China for propagating their religious doctrines. In the late 1870s, the"The extraordinary famine of the Ding Wu year "and the subsequent epidemic provided the opportunity for missionaries to enter Shanxi. Dr. Schofield, sent by the China Inland Mission, arrived in Taiyuan in 1880, set up clinics and practised there. He died of typhus after treating a typhus patient in the summer of 1883. Schofield stayed and practised in Taiyuan for 2 years and 8 months. Later, the China Inland Mission and other missionaries donated to establish a Shanxi's first western medicine Hospital to commemorate Schofield. The medical activities of Dr. Schofield enlightened and promoted the Shanxi people's understanding of western medicine.

  5. Concurrent Study of Eastern and Western Medicine at the National College of Natural Medicine: Dual or Duel?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrea Christine

    2010-01-01

    Students at the National College of Natural Medicine (NCNM) are eligible to concurrently study both Western medicine, as reflected by the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (ND) program, and Eastern medicine, as exhibited by the Master of Science in Oriental Medicine (MSOM) degree program. The dual track is unique in that the dominant Western…

  6. [Changes and establishment of the principle of "Unity of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine"].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian

    2014-11-01

    "Unity of traditional Chinese and western medicine" was one of the three major health work principles at the early founding of the People's Republic of China. It was not only a choice of political strategy in line with the lack of contemporary health-care resources, but also a part of the revolutionary heritage for more than 20 years in the process of the Chinese Communist Party from the preliminary "application of both traditional and western medicine" to the making of the principles of both "cooperation of traditional Chinese and western medicine" and "unity of traditional Chinese and western medicine". All this was closely related to the concrete environment of the Chinese health work of various stages of Yan'an period with strong revolutionary atmosphere and was not the professional demand of the health workers, rather, this principle set up in 1950 was the result of the careful consideration of Mao Zedong and an adjustment guided under the revolutionary framework of Neo-democracy set up under the guidance of the Common Principle which was a bettered adaptation to the contemporary national condition.

  7. Interactions between traditional Chinese medicines and Western therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elena; Tan, Marisela; Xin, Jianni; Sudarsanam, Sucha; Johnson, Dale E

    2010-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a holistic approach to health that attempts to bring the body, mind and spirit into harmony. TCM is an essential part of the healthcare system in several Asian countries, and is considered a complementary or alternative medical system in most Western countries. An integration of the traditional Chinese and Western systems of medicine has begun in multiple medical centers internationally, and there is increasing evidence that several herbs and combinations of herbs used in TCM impart important pharmacological effects. The number of databases and compilations of herbs, herbal formulations, phytochemical constituents and molecular targets is increasing, primarily because of the widespread use of TCM in combination with Western drugs. The continued popularity of herbal remedies worldwide suggests that evidence-based research in this field, as well as information regarding the potential efficacy and safety of phytochemical constituents in herbs and TCM formulations, are essential, particularly when TCM is used in combination with other drugs. Herb-drug interactions are similar to drug-drug interactions in terms of their effects on ADME properties. Improvements in the knowledge of the molecular targets and metabolic pathways, as well as of the synergistic and inhibitory effects associated with important phytochemicals from herbs and herbal formulations, will lead to the development of rational approaches for the safe combination of healthcare systems from different cultures.

  8. Western mental health training for traditional Chinese medicine practitioners.

    PubMed

    Lam, T P; Mak, K Y; Goldberg, D; Lam, K F; Sun, K S

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the impact of a Western mental health training course for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners.   A combined qualitative and quantitative approach was applied to examine the changes in the TCM practitioners' clinical practice characteristics and attitudes. Focus groups and structured questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare their responses before and after the Course. After a 10-week training course conducted by psychiatrists and family physicians, there were significant changes in confidence of the TCM practitioners for diagnosis (33% being confident before the Course vs. 76% after the Course) and management (24% vs. 55%) of common mental health problems. The causal effects of better classifications to recognition of mental health problems were explained by the qualitative responses. Proportion of TCM practitioners being confident of referring mental health patients to other healthcare professionals doubled from 25% to 50% after the Course. Nonetheless, there was no significant change in percentage of these patients being recommended to Western doctors owing to a lack of formal referral channel. Western mental health training for TCM practitioners has positive impact on their clinical practice. However, the practical barriers in making referrals highlight the need of closer collaboration between conventional and traditional medicine. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. The medicinal plants of Chepan Mountain (Western Bulgaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahariev, Dimcho

    2015-12-01

    Bulgaria is one of the European countries with the greatest biodiversity, including biodiversity of medicinal plants. The object of this study is Chepan Mountain. It is located in Western Bulgaria and it is part of Balkan Mountain. On the territory of the Chepan Mountain (only 80 km2) we found 344 species of medicinal plants from 237 genera and 83 families. The floristic analysis indicates, that the most of the families and the genera are represented by a small number of inferior taxa. The hemicryptophytes dominate among the life forms with 49.71%. The biological types are represented mainly by perennial herbaceous plants (60.47%). There are 7 types of floristic elements divided in 27 groups. The largest percentage of species are of the European type (58.43%). Among the medicinal plants, there are two Balkan endemic species and 18 relic species. We described 23 species with protection statute. The anthropophytes among the medicinal plants are 220 species (63.95%).

  10. An ethnobotany of Western Cape Rasta bush medicine.

    PubMed

    Aston Philander, Lisa

    2011-11-18

    This descriptive ethnobiological research is the first documentation of the materials utilized in the pharmacopeia of a novel group of herbalists, Rasta bush doctors, found in the botanically diverse Western Cape of South Africa. This article suggests that medicinal plants used by bush doctors unite the disparate ethnomedicines found in South Africa. Ethnospecies name and parts used were recorded during detailed inventories of 39 bush doctors. Collection of voucher specimens for botanical identification occurred in 15 locations. Herbal remedies were classified into use categories and were compared to historical ethnobotanical literature to ascertain previous cultural affiliations. There were 205 ethnospecies found in the Rastafari ethnobiology, 181 were used medicinally. Ethnospecies belong to 71 plant families and 71% belonged to six plant families: Rutaceae (13), Asteraceae (13), Apiaceae (9), Lamiaceae (8), Fabaceae (8), and Euphorbiaceae (7). The majority of remedies (49%) were foliage. Medicinal plants treated over 30 ailments including: gastrointestinal symptoms (11%), urogential complaints (11%), skin ailments (9%), and cardiovascular diseases (8%). Bush doctors appropriated remedies traditionally important to Zulu, KhoiSan, European and Xhosa healing traditions. Novel plants and plant utilization were noted for 22 plant species. Use of previously undocumented plant materials as medicinals denote distinct local knowledge including novel Rastafarian utilization of herbs for spiritual and ritual purposes. The range of the largely herbaceous pharmacopeia is narrow compared to the region's highly biodiverse materials and historical records of medicinal use. Bush doctors' experimentation with known herbal remedies illustrates a striking level of cross-cultural adaptation. This syncretic pharmacopeia reflects the cultural diversity of Southern Africa, drawing upon recent invasive species, European influence and traditional herbs used by the KhoiSan, Zulu and Xhosa

  11. The use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding: a population-based survey in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Main concerns for lactating women about medications include the safety of their breastfed infants and the potential effects of medication on quantity and quality of breast milk. While medicine treatments include conventional and complementary medicines, most studies to date have focused on evaluating the safety aspect of conventional medicines. Despite increasing popularity of herbal medicines, there are currently limited data available on the pattern of use and safety of these medicines during breastfeeding. This study aimed to identify the pattern of use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding in Perth, Western Australia, and to identify aspects which require further clinical research. Methods This study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire validated through two pilot studies. Participants were 18 years or older, breastfeeding or had breastfed in the past 12 months. Participants were recruited from various community and health centres, and through advertising in newspapers. Simple descriptive statistics were used to summarise the demographic profile and attitudes of respondents, using the SPSS statistical software. Results A total of 304 questionnaires from eligible participants were returned (27.2% response rate) and analysed. Amongst the respondents, 59.9% took at least one herb for medicinal purposes during breastfeeding, whilst 24.3% reported the use of at least one herb to increase breast milk supply. Most commonly used herbs were fenugreek (18.4%), ginger (11.8%), dong quai (7.9%), chamomile (7.2%), garlic (6.6%) and blessed thistle (5.9%). The majority of participants (70.1%) believed that there was a lack of information resources, whilst 43.4% perceived herbal medicines to be safer than conventional medicines. Only 28.6% of users notified their doctor of their decision to use herbal medicine(s) during breastfeeding; 71.6% had previously refused or avoided conventional medicine treatments due to concerns regarding safety of

  12. Meta-analysis of the effectiveness of Chinese and Western integrative medicine on medium and advanced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Cui, Meng; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhao, Ying-Kai; Gao, Yong-Hong; Zhu, Hai-Yan

    2012-11-01

    To summarize the effectiveness of Chinese and Western integrative medicine in treating medium and advanced lung cancer, and to provide guidelines for clinical application. For this metaanalysis, a comparative search of Chinese medicine data in Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (CBM) was undertaken to identify articles related to randomized comparative research of Chinese and Western integrative medicine in treating medium and advanced lung cancer between 1996 to 2006. Quality of life (QOL) was estimated using RevMan 4.2 software for data processing, adopting the odd ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI). Through meta-analysis of 10 qualified articles, the results were as follows: the merging effectiveness of QOL [OR=3.80, 95% CI (2.65, 5.47)]; the rate of survival [OR=3.44, 95% CI (2.04, 5.80)]; the tumor response rate [OR=1.88, 95% CI (1.37, 2.58)]; the tumor developing rate [OR=0.33, 95% CI (0.23, 0.48)]. Significant differences existed between the Chinese and Western integrative medicine treatment group and the Western treatment group (P<0.01). Chinese and Western integrative medicine treatment of medium and advanced lung cancer has shown to improve patients' QOL and survival rate; it also can control tumor development in the short term.

  13. [Analysis of clinical characteristics of traditional Chinese and Western medicine in Professor Jiang Liangduo's theory of "sanjiao meridian stasis"].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Liang-Duo; Ma, Qing; Xu, Dong; Tang, Shi-Huan; Luo, Zeng-Gang

    2017-12-01

    In the clinical practice, Professor Jiang Liangduo, a national senior Chinese medicine doctor, has created the theory of "sanjiao meridian stasis" from the theory of meridian dialectics and from the overall state. In this paper, the traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine clinical characteristics of sanjiao meridian stasis theory which is often used by Professor Jiang Liangduo in the treatment of out-patient syndrome differentiation, were first studied and summarized to investigate its inherent regularity. First, the source of data and research methods were introduced, and then the Traditional Chinese Medicine Inheritance Support System was used with the method of data mining to retrospectively analyze the disease characteristics of Chinese and Western medicine in 279 patients with sanjiao meridian stasis diagnosed by Professor Jiang in 2014. Then the following main conclusions were made after research: sanjiao meridian stasis was more common in women as well as young and middle-aged population. Often manifested by prolonged treatment course, red tongue with yellowishfur, with good correlation between modern Western medicine diagnosis and TCM differentiation syndrome. The symptoms of sanjiao meridian stasis syndrome are mostly of heat syndromes, and middle-aged patients are the most common patients with stasis and stasis of sanjiao. Related information of Western medicine diagnosis can help to diagnose the "sanjiao meridian stasis". Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. Matched-pair study showed higher quality of placebo-controlled trials in Western phytotherapy than conventional medicine.

    PubMed

    Nartey, Linda; Huwiler-Müntener, Karin; Shang, Aijing; Liewald, Katharina; Jüni, Peter; Egger, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    Herbal medicine (phytotherapy) is widely used, but the evidence for its effectiveness is a matter of ongoing debate. We compared the quality and results of trials of Western phytotherapy and conventional medicine. A random sample of placebo-controlled trials of Western phytotherapy was identified in a comprehensive literature search (19 electronic databases). Conventional medicine trials matched for condition and type of outcome were selected from the Cochrane Central Controlled Trials Register (issue 1, 2003). Data were extracted in duplicate. Trials described as double-blind, with adequate generation of allocation sequence and adequate concealment of allocation were assumed to be of higher methodological quality. Eighty-nine herbal medicine and 89 matched conventional medicine trials were analyzed. Studies of Western herbalism were smaller, less likely to be published in English, and less likely to be indexed in MEDLINE than their counterparts from conventional medicine. Nineteen (21%) herbal and four (5%) conventional medicine trials were of higher quality. In both groups, smaller trials showed more beneficial treatment effects than larger trials. Our findings challenge the widely held belief that the quality of the evidence on the effectiveness of herbal medicine is generally inferior to the evidence available for conventional medicine.

  15. Differences in the origin of philosophy between Chinese medicine and Western medicine: Exploration of the holistic advantages of Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Da-zhi; Li, Shao-dan; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yin; Mei, Rong; Yang, Ming-hui

    2013-09-01

    To explore advantages of Chinese medicine (CM) by analyzing differences in the origin of philosophy for human health between CM and Western medicine (WM). Methodologically, a distinctive feature of CM is its systems theory, which is also the difference between CM and WM. Since the birth of CM, it has taken the human body as a whole from the key concepts of "qi, blood, yin-yang, viscera (Zang-Fu), and meridian and channel", rather than a single cell or a particular organ. WM evolves from the Western philosophic way of thinking and merely uses natural sciences as the foundation. The development of WM is based on human structures, or anatomy, and therefore, research of WM is also based on the way of thinking of decomposing the whole human body into several independent parts, which is the impetus of promoting the development of WM. The core of CM includes the holistic view and the dialectical view. Chinese herbal medicines contain various components and treat a disease from multiple targets and links. Therefore, Chinese herbal medicines treat a diseased state by regulating and mobilizing the whole body rather than just regulating a single factor, since the diseased state is not only a problem in a local part of the body but a local reflection of imbalance of the whole body.

  16. Alternative Therapies for Diabetes: A Comparison of Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Approaches.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Eric; Luo, Luguang

    2017-05-18

    Across the world, the economic and health costs of diabetes are rising at an alarming rate. Each year in the United States, billions of dollars are spent on T2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatments, but such treatments are not always effective and can lead to adverse events. Many pharmacological treatments exist to control the primary and secondary symptoms of T2DM, but these medications are not always efficacious, do little to treat secondary T2DM symptoms, and often carry adverse side effects. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a form of alternative medicine that is becoming appealing to western healthcare systems because of its comprehensive, holistic approach to managing T2DM patients. Works across TCM printed texts, clinical trial databases, medical association practice guidelines, and the existing literature on TCM and western diabetes treatments (in print and online) are reviewed. Conventional pharmaceutical therapies for T2DM are not efficacious enough to maintain satisfactory blood glucose levels for all patients, and even patients who maintain stable blood glucose levels may still suffer from secondary T2DM symptoms as well as from the side effects of their medications. TCM therapies have demonstrated promising results in T2DM clinical studies without causing the types of side effects associated with standard pharmaceutical treatments. In addition, the economic burden of TCM diabetes treatments on patients and payers is oftentimes less than that of pharmaceutical regimens. TCM approaches can be a viable alternative approach to treatment in the modern U.S. healthcare landscape, but a number of obstacles impede its assimilation into western health systems. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. [Ten-day Periodical of Traditional Chinese Medicine and its concept of confluence of Chinese and western medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S B; Wang, Z W

    2016-09-28

    The Ten - day Periodical of Traditional Chinese Medicine , a TCM Journal founded by the Xiamen Professional School of Traditional Chinese Medicine in July 1934, had published a lot of essays written by many TCM physicians that interpret the concept of traditional Chinese medicine by western medicine, offering the academic way of probing confluence of Chinese and Western Medicine in Xiamen. The aim of the Journal includes "developing TCM academy" and the "confluence of TCM with western medicine" , the exploration of TCM and the penetration of Chinese and western medicine, and getting rid of blind faith on "science" to set up the belief of TCM and to prove the ideas of visceral theory and its gasification by the anatomical knowledge of western medicine. The Journal envisaged the difference between the TCM and WM, avoided blind convergence, representing the academic inheritance and progress of the era. Although the essays published might have made a forced analogy by over-praising TCM, however, its exploration and convergence of TCM and the experiences are helpful to modern scholars to properly manage the relation of TCM and WM to face the future challenge consciously.

  18. Vegetation response to western juniper slash treatments.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Casey; Miller, Rick; Bates, Jonathan D

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to kill trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation recovery following woodland control to develop best management practices. In this study, we compared two fuel reduction treatments and a cut-and-leave (CUT) treatment used to control western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis Hook.) of the northwestern United States. Treatments were; CUT, cut-and-broadcast burn (BURN), and cut-pile-and-burn the pile (PILE). A randomized complete block design was used with five replicates of each treatment located in a curl leaf mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray)/mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle)/Idaho fescue (Festuca idahoensis Elmer) association. In 2010, 4 years after tree control the cover of perennial grasses (PG) [Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa secunda J. Pres) and large bunchgrasses] were about 4 and 5 % less, respectively, in the BURN (7.1 ± 0.6 %) than the PILE (11.4 ± 2.3 %) and CUT (12.4 ± 1.7 %) treatments (P < 0.0015). In 2010, cover of invasive cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was greater in the BURN (6.3 ± 1.0 %) and was 50 and 100 % greater than PILE and CUT treatments, respectively. However, the increase in perennial bunchgrass density and cover, despite cheatgrass in the BURN treatment, mean it unlikely that cheatgrass will persist as a major understory component. In the CUT treatment mahogany cover increased 12.5 % and density increased in from 172 ± 25 to 404 ± 123 trees/ha. Burning, killed most or all of the adult mahogany, and mahogany recovery consisted of 100 and 67 % seedlings in the PILE and BURN treatments, respectively. After treatment, juniper presence from untreated small trees (<1 m tall; PILE and CUT treatments) and seedling emergence (all treatments) represented 25-33 % of

  19. Vegetation Response to Western Juniper Slash Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Casey; Miller, Rick; Bates, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to kill trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation recovery following woodland control to develop best management practices. In this study, we compared two fuel reduction treatments and a cut-and-leave (CUT) treatment used to control western juniper ( Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis Hook.) of the northwestern United States. Treatments were; CUT, cut-and-broadcast burn (BURN), and cut-pile-and-burn the pile (PILE). A randomized complete block design was used with five replicates of each treatment located in a curl leaf mahogany ( Cercocarpus ledifolius Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray)/mountain big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle)/Idaho fescue ( Festuca idahoensis Elmer) association. In 2010, 4 years after tree control the cover of perennial grasses (PG) [Sandberg's bluegrass ( Poa secunda J. Pres) and large bunchgrasses] were about 4 and 5 % less, respectively, in the BURN (7.1 ± 0.6 %) than the PILE (11.4 ± 2.3 %) and CUT (12.4 ± 1.7 %) treatments ( P < 0.0015). In 2010, cover of invasive cheatgrass ( Bromus tectorum L.) was greater in the BURN (6.3 ± 1.0 %) and was 50 and 100 % greater than PILE and CUT treatments, respectively. However, the increase in perennial bunchgrass density and cover, despite cheatgrass in the BURN treatment, mean it unlikely that cheatgrass will persist as a major understory component. In the CUT treatment mahogany cover increased 12.5 % and density increased in from 172 ± 25 to 404 ± 123 trees/ha. Burning, killed most or all of the adult mahogany, and mahogany recovery consisted of 100 and 67 % seedlings in the PILE and BURN treatments, respectively. After treatment, juniper presence from untreated small trees (<1 m tall; PILE and CUT treatments) and seedling emergence (all treatments) represented 25-33 % of pre-treatment tree

  20. Taiwanese Medical Students' Narratives of Intercultural Professionalism Dilemmas: Exploring Tensions between Western Medicine and Taiwanese Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Gosselin, Katherine; Chandratilake, Madawa; Monrouxe, Lynn V.; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2017-01-01

    In an era of globalization, cultural competence is necessary for the provision of quality healthcare. Although this topic has been well explored in non-Western cultures within Western contexts, the authors explore how Taiwanese medical students trained in Western medicine address intercultural professionalism dilemmas related to tensions between…

  1. Complementary medicine in chronic pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Charles A

    2006-05-01

    This chapter looks at therapies that are considered "alternative" to conventional medical approaches. A definition of "complementary and alternative" medicine is considered in the context of the complex and clinically challenging field of pain medicine. A rationale for studying unorthodox treatments of chronic pain is presented. The challenges of an evidence-based approach to incorporating complementary therapies are explored, and a brief survey of several commonly available complementary medicine therapies is provided.

  2. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  3. Use of Western Medicine and Traditional Korean Medicine for Joint Disorders: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis Based on Korean Nationwide Insurance Data

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the usage of Western medicine and traditional Korean medicine for treating joint disorders in Korea. Data of claims from all medical institutions with billing statements filed to HIRA from 2011 to 2014 for the four most frequent joint disorders were used for the analysis. Data from a total of 1,100,018 patients who received medical services from 2011 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics are presented as type of care and hospital type. All statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS for Windows version 21. Of the 1,100,018 patients with joint disorders, 456,642 (41.5%) were males and 643,376 (58.5%) were females. Per diem costs of hospitalization in Western medicine clinics and traditional Korean medicine clinics were approximately 160,000 KRW and 50,000 KRW, respectively. Among costs associated with Western medicine, physiotherapy cost had the largest proportion (28.78%). Among costs associated with traditional Korean medicine, procedural costs and treatment accounted for more than 70%, followed by doctors' fees (21.54%). There were distinct differences in patterns of medical care use and cost of joint disorders at the national level in Korea. This study is expected to contribute to management decisions for musculoskeletal disease involving joint disorders. PMID:29456569

  4. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants in western part of central Taurus Mountains: Aladaglar (Nigde - Turkey).

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Ebru; Alpınar, Kerim

    2015-05-26

    With this study, we aimed to document traditional uses of medicinal plants in the western part of Aladaglar/Nigde. This study was conducted between 2003 and 2005. The research area was in the western part of the Aladaglar mountains. The settlements in Aladaglar (5 towns and 10 villages) were visited during the field work. The plants collected by the help of medicinal plant users. The plants were identified and voucher specimens prepared. These voucher specimens were kept at the Herbarium of Istanbul University Faculty of Pharmacy (ISTE). We collected the information by means of semi-structured interviews with 170 informants (90 men and 80 women). In addition, the relative importance value of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated for the medicinal plants researched in the study. According to the results of the identification, among 126 plants were used by the inhabitants and 110 species belonging to 40 families were used for medicinal purposes. Most of the medicinal plants used in Aladaglar/Nigde belong to the families Lamiaceae (25 species), Asteraceae (16 species), Apiaceae (7 species), Fabaceae (6 species) and Brassicaceae (5 species). The most commonly used plant species were Hypericum perforatumThymus sipyleus var. sipyleus, Rosa canina, Urtica dioica, Malva neglecta, Thymus leucotrichus, Salix alba, Mentha longifolia, Berberis crataegina, Juniperus oxycedrus, Viscum album subsp. abietis, Allium rotundum and Taraxacum stevenii. The most common preparations were infusion and decoction. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (86%), hemorrhoids (79%), urinary diseases (69%), diabetes (68%) and respiratory diseases (61%). The use of traditional medicine was still widespread among the inhabitants of Aladaglar mountains/Nigde region. Due to the lack of medical facilities in the villages of Aladaglar mountains, local people prefer herbal treatment rather than

  5. Reasons given by hypertensive patients for concurrently using traditional and Western medicine at Natalspruit Hospital in the Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mabuza, Langalibalele H.; Okonta, Henry I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2007, a large number of hypertensive patients seen at Natalspruit Hospital had poor adherent to their anti-hypertension treatment which manifested itself through poor blood pressure control. On enquiry, they revealed that they were also taking traditional medicines. Objectives To explore the reasons given by hypertensive patients for concurrently using traditional and Western medicine. Methods A qualitative study was conducted amongst nine purposefully selected participants attending treatment at the hospital. Interviews were conducted in the Southern Sotho and IsiZulu languages and were audio-taped. The exploratory question was: ‘Would you tell us why you are taking traditional medicine together with the antihypertensive medicine your are receiving at this hospital?’ The transcribed and translated transcriptions were analysed using the ‘cut and paste’ method to identify themes. Results Themes that emerged were that traditional medicine was readily accessible; traditional healers displayed knowledge and confidence in their medicine; traditional medicine was perceived to counteract the side-effects of western medicine; the two streams were perceived to complement each other and both streams could lead to a ‘cure’. Patients were disappointed at the perceived bad attitude of the hospital staff. Conclusion The reasons given by hypertensive patients for their concurrent use of traditional and Western medicine centred around patients’ relatively favourable perception of traditional medicine and its practitioners. Western medicine health care practitioners should continue health education on antihypertensive medication in a manner acceptable to patients.

  6. Place of the indigenous and the western systems of medicine in the health services of India.

    PubMed

    Banerji, D

    1979-01-01

    The interrelationships of the indigenous (traditional and western (modern) systems of medicine are a function of the interplay of social, economic, and political forces in the community. In India, western medicine was used as a political weapon by the colonialists to strengthen the oppressing classes and to weaken the oppressed. Not only were the masses denied access to the western system of medicine, but this system contributed to the decay and degeneration of the preexisting indigenous systems. This western and privileged-class orientation of the health services has been actively perpetuated and promoted by the postcolonial leadership of India. The issue in formulating an alternative health care system for India is essentially that of rectifying the distortions which have been brought about by various forces. The basic premise for such an alternative will be to start with the people. Action in this field will lead to a more harmonious mix between the indigenous and western systems of medicine.

  7. Inefficient procurement processes undermine access to medicines in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Magadzire, Bvudzai P; Ward, Kim; Leng, Henry M J; Sanders, David

    2017-06-30

    South Africa (SA) has experienced several stock-outs of life-saving medicines for the treatment of major chronic infectious and non-communicable diseases in the public sector. To identify the causes of stock-outs and to illustrate how they undermine access to medicines (ATM) in the Western Cape Province, SA. This qualitative study was conducted with a sample of over 70 key informants (frontline health workers, sub-structure and provincial health service managers). We employed the critical incident technique to identify significant occurrences in our context, the consequences of which impacted on access to medicines during a defined period. Stock-outs were identified as one such incident, and we explored when, where and why they occurred, in order to inform policy and practice. Medicines procurement is a centralised function in SA. Health service managers unanimously agreed that stock-outs resulted from the following inefficiencies at the central level: (i) delays in awarding of pharmaceutical tenders; (ii) absence of contracts for certain medicines appearing on provincial code lists; and (iii) suppliers' inability to satisfy contractual agreements. The recurrence of stock-outs had implications at multiple levels: (i) health facility operations; (ii) the Chronic Dispensing Unit (CDU), which prepacks medicines for over 300 000 public sector patients; and (iii) community-based medicines distribution systems, which deliver the CDU's prepacked medicines to non-health facilities nearer to patient homes. For instance, stock-outs resulted in omission of certain medicines from CDU parcels that were delivered to health facilities. This increased workload and caused frustration for frontline health workers who were expected to dispense omitted medicines manually. According to frontline health workers, this translated into longer waiting times for patients and associated dissatisfaction. In some instances, patients were asked to return for undispensed medication at a later

  8. [A comparative study on the ethics of Western and traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-xue; Liu, Sheng

    2008-10-01

    The ethics of Western medicine and that of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) developed separately in their own ways. The formation and development of ancient medical ethics of China were extensively and deeply influenced by Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and other religious thought, while the ancient ethic basis of western society was influenced by traditional Judaism, Christianism, Catholicism and other natural philosophical thinking of ancient Greece and Rome. With the progress of medical and life sciences, the medical ethics begins to transfer into the life ethics, thus giving rise to new questions in the ethics of Western medicine and TCM.

  9. Behavioral medicine: treatment and organizational issues.

    PubMed

    McKegney, F P; Schwartz, C E

    1986-09-01

    Behavioral medicine is a newly emerging field dating back to the early 1970s. In this short time, a great deal of controversy and confusion has arisen as to even the definition of the term. Similarly, there are now a variety of different operational applications of this concept in patient care, research, and health care system organizations. It is proposed that the title "behavioral medicine" be used in the most general way, consistent with the definition developed by the Institute of Medicine meeting in 1978. In it, behavioral medicine is a term designating a very large field and is not analogous to a profession, medical specialty, or discipline. This term denotes a body of psychologic and social knowledge and a set of techniques applied to research, prevention, and treatment of medical illness, including psychiatric illness. By this definition, behavioral medicine treatment techniques would include psychotherapy, hypnosis, relaxation, behavior therapy, behavior modification, biofeedback, and pharmacotherapy. One of the cardinal principles of behavioral medicine as a field is that well-defined treatment techniques are used for specific target symptoms or signs of illness. It is proposed that individual behavioral medicine treatment programs be called by the name of either the specific treatment utilized or of the target(s) of the intervention. It is important to ensure collaboration between the variety of treatment and research programs that would fall under this general definition of behavioral medicine, which includes consultation-liaison psychiatry. An organizational model is proposed that would combine all such programs within a multidisciplinary division of a department of psychiatry. This division might be entitled with one or both names, e.g., "consultation-liaison psychiatry and behavioral medicine." Perhaps most importantly, this new field should not promise more than it may be able to provide, particularly in trying to achieve the biopsychosocial model

  10. Primary care quality between Traditional Tibetan Medicine and Western Medicine Hospitals: a pilot assessment in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhua; Shi, Leiyu; Yin, Aitian; Mao, Zongfu; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2015-05-14

    This paper assesses both patients' perspectives on the differences in primary care quality between traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) hospitals and western medicine (WM) hospitals and the efficacy of the government's investment in these two Prefecture-level primary care structures in Tibet. A validated Tibetan version of the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT-T) was used to collect data on 692 patients aged over 18 years old, who reported the sampling site was their regular source of health care. T-tests were performed to compare the separate and total primary care attributes between WM hospitals and TTM hospitals. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of the health care setting with primary care attributes while controlling for socio-demographic, health service use and health status characteristics. Compared to WM hospitals, the results showed that TTM hospitals had patients who were older (15.8 % versus 8.4 % over 60 years); with lower education levels (66.0 % versus 35.8 % with below junior high school ) and income levels (46.9 % versus 26.5 % with annual household income below 30,000RMB); more likely to be married (79.2 % versus 60.5 %); made less frequent health care visits; and had higher self-rated health status. Overall, patients assessed the primary care performance in TTM hospitals significantly higher (80.0) than WM hospitals (74.63). There were no differences in health care assessment by patient gender, age, income, education, marital status and occupation. TTM patients reported better primary care experiences than patients using WM hospitals, which validated the government's investment in traditional Tibetan medicine.

  11. A novel classification method for aid decision of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yufeng; Liu, Bo; He, Liyun; Bai, Wenjing; Yu, Xueyun; Cao, Xinyu; Luo, Lin; Rong, Peijing; Zhao, Yuxue; Li, Guozheng; Liu, Baoyan

    2017-09-01

    Traditional Chinese patent medicines are widely used to treat stroke because it has good efficacy in the clinical environment. However, because of the lack of knowledge on traditional Chinese patent medicines, many Western physicians, who are accountable for the majority of clinical prescriptions for such medicine, are confused with the use of traditional Chinese patent medicines. Therefore, the aid-decision method is critical and necessary to help Western physicians rationally use traditional Chinese patent medicines. In this paper, Manifold Ranking is employed to develop the aid-decision model of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment. First, 115 stroke patients from three hospitals are recruited in the cross-sectional survey. Simultaneously, traditional Chinese physicians determine the traditional Chinese patent medicines appropriate for each patient. Second, particular indicators are explored to characterize the population feature of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment. Moreover, these particular indicators can be easily obtained byWestern physicians and are feasible for widespread clinical application in the future. Third, the aid-decision model of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment is constructed based on Manifold Ranking. Experimental results reveal that traditional Chinese patent medicines can be differentiated. Moreover, the proposed model can obtain high accuracy of aid decision.

  12. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants from the Humla district of western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Timsina, Binu

    2010-08-09

    The present paper documents the uses of plants in traditional herbal medicine for treatment of human and veterinary ailments in four village development committees in the Humla district of western Nepal. It also determines the homogeneity of informant's knowledge on medicinal plants suitable for different ailment categories and the most preferred plant species used to treat each ailment category in the study areas. The ethnobotanical information was collected through semi-structured interviews and key informant discussion. The data were analyzed through informant consensus factor (ICF), fidelity level (FL) and use value (UV). We documented 161 plant species belonging to 61 families and 106 genera used for treating 73 human and 7 veterinary ailments. We also documented culinary uses and additional uses for 67 and 33 species of medicinal plant species respectively. Most medicines were prepared in the form of powder and used orally. Roots were most frequently used plant parts. The uses of 93 medicinal plants were not mentioned in any previous studies. Gastro-intestinal ailments have the highest ICF (0.40) whereas opthalmological uses have the lowest (zero) ICF. Mentha spicata and Rumex hastatus has the highest FL (100% each) both being used for gastro-intestinal ailments and Delphinium himalayai has the lowest (47.4%) for veterinary uses. ICF values indicated that there was high agreement in the use of plants in gastro-intestinal ailment category among the users. FL or UV values indicated the most preferred plant species used in study areas. These preferred plant species could be prioritized for conservation and subjected to further studies related to chemical screening for their authenticity. Most of the medicinal plants of the region are collected in the wild and are often harvested for trade. Sustainable harvesting methods and domestication of the highly traded species is thus needed in the study areas. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Natural medicines for alcoholism treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Xu, B J; Zheng, Y N; Sung, C K

    2005-11-01

    Alcoholism is a serious problem throughout the world. The development of alcoholism remedies have medical, social and economical significance. In view of the pitfalls of psychological dependence and adverse behavioural effects of synthetic drugs, the development of low toxicity and high efficiency medicines derived from natural products exhibits expansive market prospects. Based on these considerations, we summarize briefly folk application of traditional hangover remedies and clinical application of herbal complex and patent medicines for alcoholism treatment. We have reviewed the effects of natural medicines on intake, absorption and metabolism of alcohol, as well as the protective effects on alcohol-induced acute and chronic tissue injury.

  14. Complementary medicine in chronic pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Charles A

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses several issues related to therapies that are considered "complementary" or "alternative" to conventional medicine. A definition of "complementary and alternative medicine" (CAM) is considered in the context of the evolving health care field of complementary medicine. A rationale for pain physicians and clinicians to understand these treatments of chronic pain is presented. The challenges of an evidence-based approach to incorporating CAM therapies are explored. Finally, a brief survey of the evidence that supports several widely available and commonly used complementary therapies for chronic pain is provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethnoveterinary medicine in the Arribes del Duero, western Spain.

    PubMed

    González, José A; García-Barriuso, Mónica; Amich, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Currently, traditional ethnoveterinary practices are rare in Europe and the plants used previously have been replaced by the modern drugs used by national veterinary services. However, in some rural areas of the Mediterranean basin these traditional practices persist. Here we analyze the plant resources still used, or that have been used up until recently, for the treatment of the health and comfort of animals in a region in the central-western part of the Iberian Peninsula, the Arribes del Duero. We document the use of 84 species, belonging to 39 families (with a total of 2243 use-reports), and 62 herbal remedies based on the use of a single plant species (43) and cited by at least three independent informants. The veterinary use of the Ranunculaceae Clematis campaniflora is reported for the first time. We also identify several plants used as bedding or fodder for livestock and discuss the relevance of some toxic plants and some "magical-curative" aspects reported in the territory.

  16. "The medicine from behind": The frequent use of enemas in western African traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    van Andel, Tinde; van Onselen, Sabine; Myren, Britt; Towns, Alexandra; Quiroz, Diana

    2015-11-04

    with young infants, frequent enema use can pose serious risks like direct toxicity caused by harmful ingredients, mechanical injury and infections. In Africa, enemas containing herbal medicine are common methods of administering herbal medicine for a variety of diseases, rather than just medicinal treatments for constipation as previously thought. Health professionals should be aware of the extent of, and motivation behind enema use to develop culturally appropriate education programs, especially targeted at vulnerable groups such as elderly people, parents of young infants and pregnant women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Use of Traditional and Western Medicine among Korean American Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Miyong; Han, Hae-Ra; Kim, Kim B.; Duong, Diep N.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of traditional and western medicine by Korean American elderly people, noting factors associated with their health-seeking behaviors and health service utilization. Interview data indicate that respondents used a broad spectrum of health resources, both traditional and western. Health insurance status and source of health care…

  18. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Obesity: An Overview of Scientific Evidence from 2007 to 2017

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingyue; Yao, Hezhi

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a very common global health problem, and it is known to be linked to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Western medical treatments for obesity have many drawbacks, including effects on monoamine neurotransmitters and the potential for drug abuse and dependency. The safety of these medications requires improvement. Herbal medicine has been used for treatment of disease for more than 2000 years, and it has proven efficacy. Many studies have confirmed that herbal medicine is effective in the treatment of obesity, but the mechanisms are not clear. This article will discuss the possible effects and mechanisms of herbal medicine treatments for obesity that have been reported in the past decade. PMID:29234439

  19. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Obesity: An Overview of Scientific Evidence from 2007 to 2017.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfei; Sun, Mingyue; Yao, Hezhi; Liu, Yue; Gao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a very common global health problem, and it is known to be linked to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Western medical treatments for obesity have many drawbacks, including effects on monoamine neurotransmitters and the potential for drug abuse and dependency. The safety of these medications requires improvement. Herbal medicine has been used for treatment of disease for more than 2000 years, and it has proven efficacy. Many studies have confirmed that herbal medicine is effective in the treatment of obesity, but the mechanisms are not clear. This article will discuss the possible effects and mechanisms of herbal medicine treatments for obesity that have been reported in the past decade.

  20. [Foreign firms and dissemination of western medicine in China before the Opium War].

    PubMed

    He, L P; Wang, L

    2016-11-28

    From the beginning of the 19th century to the Opium War, by taking the advantages of free entering and departing China, and to protect themselves, the foreign firms introduced vaccination technique into China. This is the beginning of the introduction of western medicine to China. After 1807, following the arrival of protestant missionaries, foreign firms became the stronghold for the missionaries to conceal their missionary status so as to propagate the principles of Christianity. With the aid of the business firms employee's legal identity, the missionaries started their activities of delivering western medicines and practices. Later, the business firms gained commercial profits through the subsidizing medical services and infiltration. Although western medicine objectively improved the medical conditions in China and promoted the modernization of Chinese health career, but it cast an important aspect of western aggression against China at the same time.

  1. Limitations of Western Medicine and Models of Integration Between Medical Systems.

    PubMed

    Attena, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    This article analyzes two major limitations of Western medicine: maturity and incompleteness. From this viewpoint, Western medicine is considered an incomplete system for the explanation of living matter. Therefore, through appropriate integration with other medical systems, in particular nonconventional approaches, its knowledge base and interpretations may be widened. This article presents possible models of integration of Western medicine with homeopathy, the latter being viewed as representative of all complementary and alternative medicine. To compare the two, a medical system was classified into three levels through which it is possible to distinguish between different medical systems: epistemological (first level), theoretical (second level), and operational (third level). These levels are based on the characterization of any medical system according to, respectively, a reference paradigm, a theory on the functioning of living matter, and clinical practice. The three levels are consistent and closely consequential in the sense that from epistemology derives theory, and from theory derives clinical practice. Within operational integration, four models were identified: contemporary, alternative, sequential, and opportunistic. Theoretical integration involves an explanation of living systems covering simultaneously the molecular and physical mechanisms of functioning living matter. Epistemological integration provides a more thorough and comprehensive explanation of the epistemic concepts of indeterminism, holism, and vitalism to complement the reductionist approach of Western medicine; concepts much discussed by Western medicine while lacking the epistemologic basis for their emplacement. Epistemologic integration could be reached with or without a true paradigm shift and, in the latter, through a model of fusion or subsumption.

  2. [The trend and prospect of studies on the history of Western medicine in Korea.].

    PubMed

    Kim, Ock Joo

    2010-06-30

    Studies on the history of Western medicine in Korea began to be actively conducted and published since the restart of the Korean Society for the History of Medicine in 1991, which had been originally inaugurated in 1947, and the publication of its official journal, the Korean Journal of Medical History in 1992. In 1970s and 1980s, even before the start of the Journal, articles on a history of Western medicine were published mainly written by physicians in medical journals. This paper aims to provide an overview of the publications on the history of Western medicine in Korea, comparing papers published in the Journal with those published in other journals. Authors of the papers in the Journal are those who majored in history of medicine or history science whose initial educational backgrounds were medicine or science, whereas authors of the papers in other journals majored in Western history, economic history, social history, religious history, or women's history. While a large portion of papers in the Journal deal with medicine in ancient Greek or in modern America with no paper on medieval medicine, the papers in other journals deal with more various periods including ancient, medieval and modern periods and with diverse areas including France, Britain, Germany, Europe etc. Recent trends in 2000s show an increase in the number of researchers who published the history of Western medicine in other journals, total number of their publications, and the topics that they dealt with in their papers. In contrast, however, the number of researchers published in the Journal, the number of the papers and its topics - all decreased in recent years. Only three papers on the history of diseases have been published in the Journal, while eleven published in other journals. In order to stimulate research on the history of Western medicine in Korea, concerted efforts are necessary including academic communication among various disciplines, formulation of a long term plan to enlarge

  3. The ontological status of western science and medicine.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Alex

    2012-07-01

    This paper traces the revolutionary changes that have transformed the ontological status of western physics and biology over the last thirty years, so as to show in detail how they have moved towards the perspective of the Vedic sciences. From this it appears that Ayurveda's more holistic approach is no longer in opposition to the views of physics and biology. In physics, experimental verification of phenomena associated with quantum correlations have forced scientists to accept that the macroscopic world is not strongly objective: traditional western scientific ontology stands rejected. One consequence is that the world is not necessarily reductionist i.e. based solely on the properties of its tiniest constituents. In biology, the 1930's discovery of homeostasis has reached a natural climax: the feedback instabilities, identified by Norbert Wiener as inevitably accompanying control processes, are now recognized to be states of optimal regulation, where organisms centre their function. The non-reductive properties of these states clearly distinguish the theory of control from previous physical theories; they now occupy the centre-stage of life. Possibly against expectation, their non-reductive nature makes their physics holistic: western biology seems to have broken free of reductionist physics. When Ayurveda and bioscience are compared in light of these little appreciated advances in fundamental science, the supposed differences between them are vastly reduced - they practically dissolve. Instead of being poles apart, the ontologies of western science and Ayurveda seem to have become almost identical.

  4. The ontological status of western science and medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces the revolutionary changes that have transformed the ontological status of western physics and biology over the last thirty years, so as to show in detail how they have moved towards the perspective of the Vedic sciences. From this it appears that Ayurveda's more holistic approach is no longer in opposition to the views of physics and biology. In physics, experimental verification of phenomena associated with quantum correlations have forced scientists to accept that the macroscopic world is not strongly objective: traditional western scientific ontology stands rejected. One consequence is that the world is not necessarily reductionist i.e. based solely on the properties of its tiniest constituents. In biology, the 1930's discovery of homeostasis has reached a natural climax: the feedback instabilities, identified by Norbert Wiener as inevitably accompanying control processes, are now recognized to be states of optimal regulation, where organisms centre their function. The non-reductive properties of these states clearly distinguish the theory of control from previous physical theories; they now occupy the centre-stage of life. Possibly against expectation, their non-reductive nature makes their physics holistic: western biology seems to have broken free of reductionist physics. When Ayurveda and bioscience are compared in light of these little appreciated advances in fundamental science, the supposed differences between them are vastly reduced – they practically dissolve. Instead of being poles apart, the ontologies of western science and Ayurveda seem to have become almost identical. PMID:23125507

  5. [Research and analysis to Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Shan; Li, Pu; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xin-Chun; Lin, Li

    2013-05-01

    To investigated Shui nationality folk medicine's awareness to orthopedics & traumatology, the history of orthopedics & traumatology treatment, Shui nationality folk doctors' practicing medicine, heritage, diagnosis and treatment methods and tools, etc, through investigated drug resources category and distribution characteristics of Shui nationality medicine to orthopedics & traumatology treatment, explored and finished Shui nationality medicine orthopedics & traumatology treatment theoretical system. After more than 5 years' exploration and finishing, preliminarily formed the theoretical system framework and medicine application characteristics of Shui nationality medicine treating orthopedics & traumatology. Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology has distinctive national style, and worthy to further exploration and research.

  6. A web-based knowledge management system integrating Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine for relational medical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Hernandez, Maria C; Lai-Yuen, Susana K; Piegl, Les A; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-10-26

    This article presents the design of a web-based knowledge management system as a training and research tool for the exploration of key relationships between Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine, in order to facilitate relational medical diagnosis integrating these mainstream healing modalities. The main goal of this system is to facilitate decision-making processes, while developing skills and creating new medical knowledge. Traditional Chinese Medicine can be considered as an ancient relational knowledge-based approach, focusing on balancing interrelated human functions to reach a healthy state. Western Medicine focuses on specialties and body systems and has achieved advanced methods to evaluate the impact of a health disorder on the body functions. Identifying key relationships between Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine opens new approaches for health care practices and can increase the understanding of human medical conditions. Our knowledge management system was designed from initial datasets of symptoms, known diagnosis and treatments, collected from both medicines. The datasets were subjected to process-oriented analysis, hierarchical knowledge representation and relational database interconnection. Web technology was implemented to develop a user-friendly interface, for easy navigation, training and research. Our system was prototyped with a case study on chronic prostatitis. This trial presented the system's capability for users to learn the correlation approach, connecting knowledge in Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine by querying the database, mapping validated medical information, accessing complementary information from official sites, and creating new knowledge as part of the learning process. By addressing the challenging tasks of data acquisition and modeling, organization, storage and transfer, the proposed web-based knowledge management system is presented as a tool for users in medical training and research to explore, learn and

  7. Systems biology-based diagnostic principles as pillars of the bridge between Chinese and Western medicine.

    PubMed

    van der Greef, Jan; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Schroën, Jan; Wang, Mei; Hankemeier, Thomas; Xu, Guowang

    2010-12-01

    Innovative systems approaches to develop medicine and health care are emerging from the integration of Chinese and Western medicine strategies, philosophies and practices. The two medical systems are highly complementary as the reductionist aspects of Western medicine are favourable in acute disease situations and the holistic aspects of Chinese medicine offer more opportunities in chronic conditions and for prevention. In this article we argue that diagnosis plays a key role in building the bridge between Chinese and Western medicine. Recent advances in the study of health, healing, placebo effects and patient-physician interactions will be discussed pointing out the development of a system-based diagnosis. Especially, a system biology-based diagnosis can be used to capture phenotype information, leading towards a scientific basis for a more refined patient characterization, new diagnostic tools and personalized heath strategies. Subtyping of rheumatoid arthritis patients based on Chinese diagnostic principles is discussed as an example. New insights from this process of integrating Western and Chinese medicine will pave the way for a patient-centred health care ecosystem. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Taiwanese medical students' narratives of intercultural professionalism dilemmas: exploring tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Gosselin, Katherine; Chandratilake, Madawa; Monrouxe, Lynn V; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-05-01

    In an era of globalization, cultural competence is necessary for the provision of quality healthcare. Although this topic has been well explored in non-Western cultures within Western contexts, the authors explore how Taiwanese medical students trained in Western medicine address intercultural professionalism dilemmas related to tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture. A narrative interview method was employed with 64 Taiwanese medical students to collect narratives of professionalism dilemmas. Noting the prominence of culture in students' narratives, we explored this theme further using secondary analysis, identifying tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture and categorizing students' intercultural professionalism dilemmas according to Friedman and Berthoin Antal's 'intercultural competence' framework: involving combinations of advocacy (i.e., championing one's own culture) and inquiry (i.e., exploring one's own and others' cultures). One or more intercultural dilemmas were identified in nearly half of students' professionalism dilemma narratives. Qualitative themes included: family relations, local policy, end-of-life care, traditional medicine, gender relations and Taiwanese language. Of the 62 narratives with sufficient detail for further analysis, the majority demonstrated the 'suboptimal' low advocacy/low inquiry approach (i.e., withdrawal or inaction), while very few demonstrated the 'ideal' high advocacy/high inquiry approach (i.e., generating mutual understanding, so 'intercultural competence'). Though nearly half of students' professionalism narratives concerned intercultural dilemmas, most narratives represented disengagement from intercultural dilemmas, highlighting a possible need for more attention on intercultural competence training in Taiwan. The advocacy/inquiry framework may help educators to address similar disconnects between Western medicine and non-Western cultures in other contexts.

  9. Treatment of Insomnia With Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrinder; Zhao, Kaicun

    2017-01-01

    Insomnia is a condition with sleep problems and many people suffered from it. Chronic insomnia can last for long time and it will severely affect people's health and the quality of life. In conventional medicine, the most commonly used the medicine is benzodiazepine. It is effective but also has significant side effects. Patients try to use some kinds of alternative medicines. Chinese medicinal herbs and formulas have been used in the treatment of insomnia for more than 2000 years in China. In recent decades, Chinese herbal medicine has been widely used in the Western countries. Many clinical studies including randomized controlled clinical trials and research on pharmacological action mechanisms of the herbs for treatment of insomnia have been conducted. It is very important and very helpful to review the published research papers to gather the available information for a critical analysis. This chapter evaluated the data from both of clinical studies and pharmacological researches on the therapeutic formulas and on some key herbs used in the treatment of insomnia. Clinical studies showed a very wide spectrum of herbs that were used in clinical treatment of insomnia. This was due to different syndrome patterns happened with insomnia. This brought complexity and difficulties to identify which are the essential key herbs or formulas. It was found Suanzaoren decoction (Ziziphus spinose decoction ) is the most frequently used formula for the treatment of insomnia. Based on the clinical data, several herbs were identified as most frequently used sedative and hypnotic herbs in Chinese herbal medicine including Suanzaoren (Ziziphus spinose ), Fuling (Poria cocos ), and Gancao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis ). The underlying pharmacological action mechanisms discovered in the studies on some key herbs used in the treatment of insomnia were evaluated. The major pharmacological action mechanisms shared by most of the sedative herbs are to act through the neurotransmitter gamma

  10. Interactions between traditional Chinese medicine and western drugs in Taiwan: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan Chen; Lu, Richard; Iqbal, Usman; Hsu, Ko-Ching; Chen, Bi-Li; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Huang, Chih-Wei; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Jian, Wen-Shan; Tsai, Shin-Han

    2015-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions have long been an active research area in clinical medicine. In Taiwan, however, the widespread use of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) presents additional complexity to the topic. Therefore, it is important to see the interaction between traditional Chinese and western medicine. (1) To create a comprehensive database of multi-herb/western drug interactions indexed according to the ways in which physicians actually practice and (2) to measure this database's impact on the detection of adverse effects between traditional Chinese medicine compounds and western medicines. First, a multi-herb/western medicine drug interactions database was created by separating each TCM compound into its constituent herbs. Each individual herb was then checked against an existing single-herb/western drug interactions database. The data source comes from the National Health Insurance research database, which spans the years 1998-2011. This study estimated the interaction prevalence rate and further separated the rates according to patient characteristics, distribution by county, and hospital accreditation levels. Finally, this new database was integrated into a computer order entry module of the electronic medical records system of a regional teaching hospital. The effects it had were measured for two months. The most commonly interacting Chinese herbs were Ephedrae Herba and Angelicae Sinensis Radix/Angelicae Dahuricae Radix. Ephedrae Herba contains active ingredients similar to in ephedrine. 15 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine compounds contain Ephedrae Herba. Angelicae Sinensis Radix and Angelicae Dahuricae Radix contain ingredients similar to coumarin, a blood thinner. 9 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine compounds contained Angelicae Sinensis Radix/Angelicae Dahuricae Radix. In the period from 1998 to 2011, the prevalence of herb-drug interactions related to Ephedrae Herba was 0.18%. The most commonly prescribed traditional Chinese compounds were

  11. Prospects for Precision Medicine in Glomerulonephritis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yulu Cherry; Chun, Justin

    2018-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) consists of a group of kidney diseases that are categorized based on shared histopathological features. The current classifications for GN make it difficult to distinguish the individual variability in presentation, disease progression, and response to treatment. GN is a significant cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and improved therapies are desperately needed because current immunosuppressive therapies sometimes lack efficacy and can lead to significant toxicities. In recent years, the combination of high-throughput genetic approaches and technological advances has identified important regulators contributing to GN. In this review, we summarize recent findings in podocyte biology and advances in experimental approaches that have opened the possibility of precision medicine in GN treatment. We provide an integrative basic science and clinical overview of new developments in GN research and the discovery of potential candidates for targeted therapies in GN. Advances in podocyte biology have identified many candidates for therapeutic targets and potential biomarkers of glomerular disease. The goal of precision medicine in GN is now being pursued with recent technological improvements in genetics, accessibility of biologic and clinical information with tissue biobanks, high-throughput analysis of large-scale data sets, and new human model systems such as kidney organoids. With advances in data collection, technologies, and experimental model systems, we now have vast tools available to pursue precision medicine in GN. We anticipate a growing number of studies integrating data from high-throughput analysis with the development of diagnostic tools and targeted therapies for GN in the near future.

  12. Attitudes, Knowledge, Use, and Recommendation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Health Professionals in Western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Rios-Gonzalez, Blanca Estela; Lopez-Barragan, Liliana; Saldaña-Cruz, Ana Miriam; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Katya

    2016-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased in many countries, and this has altered the knowledge, attitudes, and treatment recommendations of health professionals in regard to CAM. Considering Mexican health professionals׳ lack of knowledge of CAM, in this report we surveyed 100 biomedical researchers and Ph.D. students and 107 specialized physicians and residents of a medical specialty in Guadalajara, México (Western Mexico) with a questionnaire to address their attitudes, knowledge, use, and recommendation of CAM. We observed that significantly more researchers had ever used CAM than physicians (83% vs. 69.2%, P = .023) and that only 36.4% of physicians had ever recommended CAM. Female researchers tended to have ever used CAM more than male researchers, but CAM use did not differ between genders in the physician group or by age in either group. Homeopathy, herbal medicine, and massage therapy were the most commonly used CAMs in both the groups. Physicians more frequently recommended homeopathy, massage therapy, and yoga to their patients than other forms of CAM, and physicians had the highest perception of safety and had taken the most courses in homeopathy. All CAMs were perceived to have high efficacy (>60%) in both the groups. The attitude questionnaire reported favorable attitudes toward CAM in both the groups. We observed a high rate of Mexican health professionals that had ever used CAM, and they had mainly used homeopathy, massage therapy, and herbal medicine. However, the recommendation rate of CAM by Mexican physicians was significantly lower than that in other countries, which is probably due to the lack of CAM training in most Mexican medical schools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulations of alternative mechanical thinning treatment programs on western timberland

    Treesearch

    Karen L. Abt; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Kenneth E. Skog; R. James Barbour; Miles A, Hemstrom; Robert J. Huggett

    2011-01-01

    We used the Economics of Biomass Removals model to evaluate the required treatment acreages, volumes removed, treatment costs and product revenues from national forest and other ownerships. We used three distinct treatment prescriptions to achieve two hazard reduction goals for treatable timberlands in the Western United States. The two hazard reduction goals were to...

  14. Medicinal Plants: Their Use in Anticancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell, M.; Rahman, P.K.S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Globally cancer is a disease which severely effects the human population. There is a constant demand for new therapies to treat and prevent this life-threatening disease. Scientific and research interest is drawing its attention towards naturally-derived compounds as they are considered to have less toxic side effects compared to current treatments such as chemotherapy. The Plant Kingdom produces naturally occurring secondary metabolites which are being investigated for their anticancer activities leading to the development of new clinical drugs. With the success of these compounds that have been developed into staple drugs for cancer treatment new technologies are emerging to develop the area further. New technologies include nanoparticles for nano-medicines which aim to enhance anticancer activities of plant-derived drugs by controlling the release of the compound and investigating new methods for administration. This review discusses the demand for naturally-derived compounds from medicinal plants and their properties which make them targets for potential anticancer treatments. PMID:26594645

  15. Joint development of evidence-based medical record by doctors and patients through integrated Chinese and Western medicine on digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Gao, Hong-yang; Gao, Rui; Zhao, Ying-pan; Li, Qing-na; Zhao, Yang; Tang, Xu-dong; Shang, Hong-cai

    2016-02-01

    Building the clinical therapeutic evaluation system by combing the evaluation given by doctors and patients can form a more comprehensive and objective evaluation system. A literature search on the practice of evidence-based evaluation was conducted in key biomedical databases, i.e. PubMed, Excerpt Medica Database, China Biology Medicine disc and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. However, no relevant study on the subjects of interest was identified. Therefore, drawing on the principles of narrative medicine and expert opinion from systems of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, we propose to develop and pilot-test a novel evidence-based medical record format that captures the perspectives of both patients and doctors in a clinical trial. Further, we seek to evaluate a strategic therapeutic approach that integrates the wisdom of Chinese medicine with the scientific basis of Western medicine in the treatment of digestive system disorders. Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of remedies under the system of Chinese medicine is an imperative ongoing research. The present study intends to identify a novel approach to assess the synergistic benefits achievable from an integrated therapeutic approach combining Chinese and Western system of medicine to treat digestive system disorders.

  16. [Zhu Lian's cognition on theory and method of acupuncture and moxibustion under background of western medicine].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-yun; Zhang, Li-jian; Liu, Bing

    2014-11-01

    With new acupuncture and moxibustion as the study object, based on the basic composition of acupuncture-moxibustion theory, from 3 aspects of meridian-acupoint theory, acupuncture-moxibustion method theory and acupuncture-moxibustion treatment theory, under the background of western medicine, ZHU Lian's different opinions on theory and method of acupuncture and moxibustion were discussed. It was believed by ZHU Lian that the distribution of 14-meridians was approximately identical to that of nerves, so with modern neuroanatomy knowledge to understand the meaning of acupoint; the acupuncture function could be explained from the angle of neurophysiology. Clinical diagnosis and treatment method could be established by modern classification methods of diseases. ZHU Lian's cognition that was different from traditional theory and method of acupuncture and moxibustion was combined with updated physiology and anatomy knowledge at that time, and was involved with Pavlov's advanced nerve theory, so she firstly put forward the opinion that acupuncture therapy can't work without the involvement of cerebral cortex.

  17. Epistemological challenges in contemporary Western healthcare systems exemplified by people's widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Salamonsen, Anita; Ahlzén, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    Modern Western public healthcare systems offer predominantly publicly subsidized healthcare traditionally based on biomedicine as the most important basis to cure persons who suffer from disorders of somatic or psychiatric nature. To which extent this epistemological position is suitable for this purpose is under scientific debate and challenged by some people's personal understandings of health and illness, their individual illness experiences and their decision-making. Current studies show decreasing levels of patient trust in Western public healthcare and a widespread patient-initiated use of complementary and alternative medicine which is often linked to unmet patient-defined healthcare needs. Patients'/complementary and alternative medicine users' understandings of their afflictions are often based on elements of biomedical knowledge as well as embodied and experience-based knowledge. We believe this points to the need for a phenomenologically and socially based understanding of health and illness. In this article, we analyze challenges in contemporary healthcare systems, exemplified by people's widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine and based on three ways of understanding and relating to unhealth: disease (the biomedical perspective), illness (the phenomenological perspective), and sickness (the social perspective). In public healthcare systems aiming at involving patients in treatment processes, acknowledging the coexistence of differing epistemologies may be of great importance to define and reach goals of treatment and compliance.

  18. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Residents of Wayu Town, Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belachew, Negash; Tadesse, Tarekegne

    2017-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine covers a wide variety of therapies and practices, which vary from country to country and region to region. The study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine among the residents of Wayu town, Western Ethiopia. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 302 residents. A systematic sampling was used to select households. Data were entered in SPSS (version 20; IBM Corp) and descriptive statistics was carried out. Of 302 participants, 51.65% have a good knowledge, 78.6% were aware of complementary and alternative medicine, and 74.22% used it in the past 2 years. A total of 23.83% believe that complementary and alternative medicine is more effective than modern medicine and 28.8% preferred complementary and alternative medicine to modern medicine. This study revealed that in Wayu town, there is relatively high public interest in complementary and alternative medicine practices and a significant number has a good knowledge but generally the attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine is relatively low. PMID:29250965

  19. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Residents of Wayu Town, Western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Belachew, Negash; Tadesse, Tarekegne; Gube, Addisu Alemayehu

    2017-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine covers a wide variety of therapies and practices, which vary from country to country and region to region. The study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine among the residents of Wayu town, Western Ethiopia. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 302 residents. A systematic sampling was used to select households. Data were entered in SPSS (version 20; IBM Corp) and descriptive statistics was carried out. Of 302 participants, 51.65% have a good knowledge, 78.6% were aware of complementary and alternative medicine, and 74.22% used it in the past 2 years. A total of 23.83% believe that complementary and alternative medicine is more effective than modern medicine and 28.8% preferred complementary and alternative medicine to modern medicine. This study revealed that in Wayu town, there is relatively high public interest in complementary and alternative medicine practices and a significant number has a good knowledge but generally the attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine is relatively low.

  20. Prospects for Precision Medicine in Glomerulonephritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yulu Cherry; Chun, Justin

    2018-01-01

    Background: Glomerulonephritis (GN) consists of a group of kidney diseases that are categorized based on shared histopathological features. The current classifications for GN make it difficult to distinguish the individual variability in presentation, disease progression, and response to treatment. GN is a significant cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and improved therapies are desperately needed because current immunosuppressive therapies sometimes lack efficacy and can lead to significant toxicities. In recent years, the combination of high-throughput genetic approaches and technological advances has identified important regulators contributing to GN. Objectives: In this review, we summarize recent findings in podocyte biology and advances in experimental approaches that have opened the possibility of precision medicine in GN treatment. We provide an integrative basic science and clinical overview of new developments in GN research and the discovery of potential candidates for targeted therapies in GN. Findings: Advances in podocyte biology have identified many candidates for therapeutic targets and potential biomarkers of glomerular disease. The goal of precision medicine in GN is now being pursued with recent technological improvements in genetics, accessibility of biologic and clinical information with tissue biobanks, high-throughput analysis of large-scale data sets, and new human model systems such as kidney organoids. Conclusion: With advances in data collection, technologies, and experimental model systems, we now have vast tools available to pursue precision medicine in GN. We anticipate a growing number of studies integrating data from high-throughput analysis with the development of diagnostic tools and targeted therapies for GN in the near future. PMID:29449955

  1. [Advantages and problems of traditional Chinese medicine in treatment of acute pharyngitis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Xie, Yan-Ming; Li, Guang-Xi; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Yuan-Chen; Tang, Jing-Jing; Yao, Xiao-Yan; Li, Meng

    2017-10-01

    This paper systematically studies relevant literatures at home and abroad in recent years. China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI) was used to collect the literatures for acute pharyngitis treated with traditional Chinese medicine from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2016, and the bibliometric method was employed for statistical analysis. A total of 493 papers were preliminarily selected. According to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria, 182 eligible articles were selected. According to the evaluation and analysis of the literatures, the Guidelines for Clinical Research of New Drugs is currently used as the common standards for the diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngitis; Chinese patent medicines are the main traditional Chinese medicine for treating this disease; Decoctions for treatment of this disease include Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, Scutellariae Radix, Platycodonis Radix, Forsythiae Fructus, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, Scrophdlariae Radix, Isatidis Radix, and Ophiopogonis Radix; The bloodletting puncture is the common external therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine have their own characteristics in the treatment of this disease. Western medicine for the treatment of acute pharyngitis are mainly antiviral, antibiotic and glucocorticoid drugs, whose disadvantages are toxicity, side effects, drug resistance and double infections. Traditional Chinese medicine doctors have rich experiences in the treatment of the disease, which is characterized by treatment determination based on syndrome differentiation, safe and reliable medication, significant curative effect, low drug resistance, and wide varieties of traditional Chinese medicine forms, convenient portability and taking, low price, and low toxic and side effects. It is an arduous and significant task to explore traditional Chinese medicine, and study and develop new-type effective drugs. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. Medicinal Plants for Diabetes Treatment During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Debora Cristina; Leal-Silva, Thais; Soares, Thaigra Sousa; Moraes-Souza, Rafaianne Queiroz; Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome of great importance that affects an increasing number of people every day. In particular, diabetes is a common and important disease during pregnancy and is marked by complications, both fetal and maternal, that increase the risks of morbidity and mortality for diabetic pregnant women and their offspring. Drugs such as insulin and hypoglycemic drugs are given to treat diabetes, but regular exercise and adequate diet have also been indicated. Furthermore, coadjutant therapies such as medicinal plants are popularly used to reduce diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, either within or outside the context of pregnancy. However, studies examining plant use for diabetes treatment are necessary to confirm its possible effects and its safety for the mother and fetus. The objective of this literature review was to conduct a survey of plant species that are utilized worldwide and their stated therapeutic uses. A literature search was performed using the terms "diabetes and pregnancy", which resulted in the identification of 31,272 articles. Of these studies, only 12 (0.0038%) were related to medicinal plants, demonstrating that there has been little investigation into this issue. Of the papers analyzed in this review, half evaluated plant leaves, indicating that these scientific studies attempted to reproduce the preparations commonly used by various populations, i.e., in the form of tea. Additionally, more than 90% of studies utilized experimental animals to evaluate the maternal-fetal safety of medicinal plant substances that may potentially be dangerous for humans. Thus, once confidence levels for plant-derived substances are established based on toxicological analyses and safety is confirmed, it is possible that plants will be used to complement conventional diabetes therapies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Trends of increase in western medical services in traditional medicine hospitals in China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jay J; Wang, Ying; Lin, Fang; Lu, Jun; Moseley, Charles B; Sun, Mei; Hao, Mo

    2011-09-06

    Compare changes in types of hospital service revenues between traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals and Western-medicine based general hospitals. 97 TCM hospitals and 103 general hospitals were surveyed in years of 2000 and 2004. Six types of medical service revenue between the two types of hospitals were compared overtime. The national statistics from 1999 to 2008 were also used as complementary evidence. For TCM hospitals, the percentage of service revenue from Western medicine increased from 44.3% to 47.4% while the percentage of service revenue from TCM declined from 26.4% to 18.8% from 1999 to 2004. Percentages of revenue from laboratory tests and surgical procedures for both types of hospitals increased and the discrepancy between the two types of hospitals was narrowed from 1999 to 2004. For TCM hospitals, revenues from laboratory tests increased from 3.64% to 5.06% and revenues from surgical procedures increased from 3.44% to 7.02%. General hospitals' TCM drug revenue in outpatient care declined insignificantly from 5.26% to 3.87%, while the decline for the TCM hospitals was significant from 19.73% to 13.77%. The national statistics from 1999 to 2008 showed similar trends that the percentage of revenue from Western medicine for TCM hospitals increased from 59.6% in 1999 to 62.2% in 2003 and 66.1% in 2008 while the percentage of revenue from TCM for TCM hospitals decreased from 18.0% in 1999, 15.4% in 2003, and 13.7% in 2008. Western medicine has become a vital revenue source for TCM hospitals in the current Chinese health care environment where government subsidies to health care facilities have significantly declined. Policies need to encourage TCM hospitals to identify their own special and effective services, improve public perception, increase demand, strengthen financial sources, and ultimately make contributions to preserving one of the national treasures.

  4. The Intersection of Curandismo and Western Medicine and Their Epidemiological Impact for Aging Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Pamela Anne

    2018-01-01

    The rising costs of health care in the United States continue to stimulate interest in alternative health care options among Americans. Western medicine is also beginning to pay more attention to these alternative practices and their utility for successful treatment of illness. Alternative health care practices have always been used by Hispanics whose mortality and morbidity profiles have stimulated interest from researchers. Though Hispanics occupy some of the lowest socioeconomic positions in the United States, they have higher life expectancy rates and comparable rates of morbidity for many health conditions relative to other racial/ethnic groups. This has been referred to as the "Hispanic health advantage" and the "Hispanic health paradox" [Turra CM, Elo IT. The impact of salmon bias on hispanic mortality advantage: new evidence from social security data. Popul Res Policy Rev. 2008;27:515. Franzini L, Fernandez-Esquer ME. Socioeconomic, cultural, and personal influences on health outcomes in low income Mexican-origin individuals in Texas. Soc Sci Med. 2004;59(8):1629-1646. George M. The Mexican-American health paradox: the collective influence of sociocultural factors on Hispanic health outcomes. 2013;9(2):2-3. Gallo LC, Penedo FJ, Espinosa de los Monteros K, Argueles W. Resiliency in the face of disadvantage: do hispanic cultural characteristics protect health outcomes. J Pers. 2009;77(6):1707-1746. Turra CM, Goldman N. Socioeconomic differences in mortality among U.S. adults: insights into the Hispanic paradox. J Gerontol. 2007;62(3):184-192]. Even when controlling for socioeconomic status and education, life expectancy for Hispanics is greater than that of whites (CDIC, 2015). Debate about the causes of this paradox continues and some data indicates that the paradox is specific to older Hispanics (i.e., middle and older ages). Among Hispanic ethnic groups, this "paradox" has been most salient for Mexican Americans, therefore, this chapter focuses on Mexican

  5. The crisis of the western system of medicine in contemporary capitalism.

    PubMed

    Navarro, V

    1978-01-01

    This article makes a critique of current interpretations of the crises of the western system of medicine and presents alternative explanations for those crises. It indicates that the crises of medicine--reflected in its ubiquitous problems of costs and ineffectiveness--are due to and reflect the crises of legitimation and capital accumulation of contemporary capitalism. The article is divided into six parts: the first two define the characteristics of the crises of western contemporary capitalism and of its system of medicine, with a critique of current theories which try to explain them. Parts three and four contrapose to these theories a Marxist interpretation of the crises, tracing their causes to the needs created by the process of capital accumulation and to the demands expressed by the working population. The needs and demands generated by Capital and Labor are intrinsically in conflict, and are realized in the daily practice of class struggle. The characteristics and consequences of that struggle for health and for the organization, content, and ideology of medicine are analyzed in the fifth part. This class struggle takes place within a political context in which Capital and its social expression, the bouregeoisie or corporate class, have the dominant influence on the organs of the State. The sixth part of the article shows how that dominance determines the nature of the State responses to the crises of medicine. A primary thesis of this paper is that social class, class struggle, capitalism, and imperialism are not passé categories, as most ideologists of capitalism postulate, but rather they are the most important paradigms for understanding the crises of the western system of power and its medicine.

  6. Influence of Prescribed Herbal and Western Medicine on Patients with Abnormal Liver Function Tests: A Retrospective Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ah-Ram; Yim, Je-Min; Kim, Won-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. Methods: We investigated nerve disease patients with abnormal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We compared aspartic aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. Results: AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combination medicine. Conclusions: This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients’, moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests. PMID:25780634

  7. [Medicinal treatment of tricuspid valve regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Lankeit, M; Keller, K; Tschöpe, C; Pieske, B

    2017-11-01

    The vast majority of tricuspid valve regurgitations are of low degree without prognostic relevance in healthy individuals; however, morbidity and mortality increase with the degree of regurgitation, which can be secondary to either primary (structural) or secondary (functional) alterations of the valve. Due to the frequent lack of symptoms, echocardiographic examinations should be annually performed in patients with higher degree (at least moderate) tricuspid valve regurgitation, in particular in the presence of risk factors. Individual therapeutic management strategies should consider the etiology of the tricuspid valve regurgitation, the degree of regurgitation, the valve pathology and the risk-to-benefit ratio of the envisaged therapeutic procedure. Medicinal treatment options for tricuspid valve regurgitation are limited and generalized recommendations cannot be provided due to the lack of conclusive clinical trials. Symptomatic therapeutic measures encompass especially (loop) diuretics for the reduction of preload and afterload of the right ventricle. Pharmaceutical reduction of the heart rate should be avoided in patients with right heart insufficiency. While symptomatic therapeutic measures are often associated with only moderate effects, the most effective therapy of tricuspid valve regurgitation consists in the treatment of underlying illnesses, in most cases pulmonary hypertension due to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), left heart disease or acute pulmonary embolism. Based on a number of published clinical studies and licensing of new drugs, treatment options for patients with PAH and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) have substantially improved during the past years allowing for a differentiated, individualized management.

  8. Conservation of indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants of Western Himalayan region Rawalakot, Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajjad; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mehmood, Ansar; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem

    2017-05-01

    The aim of present was to document indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants traditionally used by inhabitants of Rawalakot Azad Kashmir and to screen selected medicinal plants for their antibacterial potential. Several field surveys were conducted to document indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants through interviews from local inhabitants during 2010-2013. During the study, 58 plant species, belonging to 37 families, were identified and their medicinal uses were recorded. Ethnobotanical data indicates that inhabitants of Rawalakot use medicinal plant mainly for the treatment of stomach, liver and sexual disorders. Usually fresh plant materials were used for medicinal preparations and administrated orally. Among all the species studied, three most frequently used medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Berberis lycium and Zanthoxylum armatum were screened for their antibacterial potential by using disc diffusion method. The crude aqueous, petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts were found to be very active against selected bacterial strains. The present study contributes significantly to the medicinal plant knowledge and shows that medicinal plant knowledge is deteriorating among younger generations. Therefore, further research is needed to document indigenous knowledge, to find conservation status of medicinal plant species and to find antimicrobial compounds for more sophisticated usage of medicinal plants in future.

  9. [The transition of acupuncture and moxibustion in Japan in modern times after western medicine spreading to the East].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Yun

    2014-04-01

    The research methods, such as philology of medicine history and comparison between tradition and modern and so on were adopted in this article to study the acupuncture-moxibustion development after western medicine spreading to the East in Japan and its main transition under the impact of western medicine. The results showed that from Meiji to Showa period, under the influence of western medicine, the transition of Japanese acupuncture-moxibustion mainly embodied in following three aspects, incuinng acupuncture works absorbing western medicine knowledge, applying experiment measures to explore acupuncture principle and launching acupuncture teaching in accordance with Europe and America academy educational pattern. The changes on acupuncture works, teaching materials and methods of researching and teaching have triggered the transition and transformation of Japanese acupuncture-moxibustion from tradition to modern.

  10. Riparian fuel treatments in the western USA: Challenges and considerations

    Treesearch

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Kristen E. Meyer; Gregg Riegel; Timothy Burton

    2016-01-01

    Fuel reduction treatments are being conducted throughout watersheds of the western United States to reduce hazardous fuels in efforts to decrease the risk of high-severity fire. The number of fuel reduction projects that include near-stream environments is increasing, bringing new challenges to riparian management. Riparian areas are protected by administrative...

  11. [Western medicine and alternative medicines: can they be complementary? Conceptual reflections].

    PubMed

    Duarte Gómez, María Beatriz

    2003-01-01

    The present article is part of a series of reflections from an intercultural approach to health systems and corresponding public policies, motivated by findings from a study on two intercultural hospitals in rural Mexico. The frequent utilization of complementary and alternative medicines by the local population and the hegemonic health model that excludes them make the existing health system an unsatisfactory response to people's needs. We present the concept of complementariness as a health system component and propose priorities on this issue, taking different approaches: complementariness as a public policy, as an institutional project, or as an individual decision by the therapist or patient.

  12. Behaviors of providers of traditional korean medicine therapy and complementary and alternative medicine therapy for the treatment of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-Sang; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Ki-Kyong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Min-Young

    2015-03-01

    In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide background knowledge for establishing a new policy with the management and quality control of CAM. Structured and well organized questionnaires were made, and 350 persons were surveyed concerning the providers of CAM or Korean oriental medicine. The questionnaires were collected and analyzed. The questionnaires (182) were collected. The questionnaires identified a total of 73 known providers, such as medicinal professionals or other providers of CAM suppliers, 35.6% of whom had had experience with treating cancer patients (52.6% vs. 29.6%). The treatment methods were a little different: alternative therapy and nutritional therapy being preferred by medicinal professionals and mind body modulation therapy and alternative therapy being preferred by other CAM providers. Four patients (7.4%) experienced side effects, and 6 patients (12.5%) experienced legal problems. As the method for managing the therapy, CAM providers, medicinal professionals, and other CAM providers had different viewpoints. For example, some CAM providers stated that both legislation and an official education on CAM or a national examination were needed as a first step to establish the provider's qualifications and that as a second step, a license test was needed for quality control. To the contrary, medicinal professionals stated that a license test was needed before legislation. Adequate management and quality control of CAM providers is thought to involve both education and legislation.

  13. [Advantages and evidences research on Chinese medicine for treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Luo, Song-Ping; Li, Min; Zhang, Hui-Xian; Xu, Li-Mian; Zhao, Rui-Hua; Wei, Shao-Bin

    2017-04-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infectious disease. At present, Western medicine is mainly treated with antibiotics. However, the situation of antibiotics abuse is so grim that the potential risks such as the imbalance of bacteria, the resistance of bacteria, the production of super bacteria and the increase of adverse reactions are becoming more and more serious. Therefore, it is urgent to find a way to supplement or substitute antibiotics for the treatment of this disease. Traditional Chinese medicine treatment of the disease is effective and has its unique advantages. This paper mainly discusses the advantages and evidences of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease, to further prove the effectiveness and safety of TCM treatment and to provide medical evidence of reducing antibiotics use. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. Treatment of early gastric cancer in the Western World.

    PubMed

    Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Berlth, Felix; Baltin, Christoph; Mönig, Stefan; Hölscher, Arnulf H

    2014-05-21

    The incidence rate of gastric cancer is much higher in Asia than in the Western industrial nations. According to the different screening programs in Japan and Korea about fifty percent of treated patients had an early tumor stage. In contrast, European and American patients with gastric cancer had an advanced tumor stage. Therefore, the experience for the various therapeutic options for gastric cancer may be different between these regions. In this review we tried to point out the treatment modalities in Western industrial countries for early gastric cancer.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments and Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Joseph M.; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments outside their indications, particularly to lose weight. Some of the herbal remedies and dietary supplements that may of relevance for psychopharmacological practice are discussed with respect to CAM treatments.

  16. The role of integrative medicine and Kampo treatment in an aging society: experience with Kampo treatment during a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Shin; Numata, Takehiro; Iwasaki, Koh; Kuroda, Hitoshi; Kagaya, Yutaka; Ishii, Tadashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake, elderly individuals, who are particularly vulnerable during natural disasters, experienced difficulty while evacuating the area. This report discusses the Kampo treatments provided to elderly individuals in the disaster areas, and the role of integrative medicine and Kampo treatment. The changes in symptoms and Kampo treatment contents were summarized using the medical records of treatments provided in the evacuation centers until 10 weeks after the earthquake. Infectious diseases, the common cold and hypothermia were frequently observed in most patients for first two weeks after the disaster. Allergies increased two weeks later, and mental distress was commonly observed six weeks later. We prescribed several Kampo formulas to treat the individual symptoms. Many elderly individuals were treated using Western medications, but the symptoms persisted; however, after Kampo formulas were included in the treatment, the symptoms of many patients improved. Unlike Western medications, Kampo formulas warmed the bodies of elderly individuals who often had a reduced basal metabolism and low body temperatures due to exposure to the cold tsunami waters. Therefore, the Kampo formulas may have improved the immunity of those who were under psychological and physical stress because they had spent several days in the evacuation centers. Many studies have reported the effectiveness of Kampo formulas. Therefore, the combined usage of both Western and Kampo medicine may be used in a mutually complementary manner, and these combination treatments may play an important role in preserving the victims overall health after natural disasters.

  17. Medicine and psychiatry in Western culture: Ancient Greek myths and modern prejudices

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Clementi, Nicoletta; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2009-01-01

    The origins of Western culture extensively relate to Ancient Greek culture. While many ancient cultures have contributed to our current knowledge about medicine and the origins of psychiatry, the Ancient Greeks were among the best observers of feelings and moods patients expressed towards medicine and toward what today is referred to as 'psychopathology'. Myths and religious references were used to explain what was otherwise impossible to understand or be easily communicated. Most ancient myths focus on ambiguous feelings patients may have had towards drugs, especially psychotropic ones. Interestingly, such prejudices are common even today. Recalling ancient findings and descriptions made using myths could represent a valuable knowledge base for modern physicians, especially for psychiatrists and their patients, with the aim of better understanding each other and therefore achieving a better clinical outcome. This paper explores many human aspects and feelings towards doctors and their cures, referring to ancient myths and focusing on the perception of mental illness. PMID:19811642

  18. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anant Gopal; Kumar, Akhilesh; Tewari, Divya Darshan

    2012-05-16

    Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal. Study was conducted during 2010-2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informants. Voucher specimens were collected with the help of informants, processed into herbarium following standard methods, identified with the help of pertinent floras and taxonomic experts, and submitted in Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal for future references. During the present study 66 medicinal plant species belonging to 37 families and 60 genera has been documented. These plants were used to treat various diseases and ailments grouped under 11 disease categories, with the highest number of species (41) being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by dermatological disorders (34). In the study area the informants' consensus about usages of medicinal plants ranges from 0.93 to 0.97 with an average value of 0.94. Herbs (53%) were the primary source of medicine, followed by trees (23%). Curcuma longa (84%) and Azadirachta indica (76%) are the most frequently and popularly used medicinal plant species in the study area. Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use. The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost. The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government

  19. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal. Methods Study was conducted during 2010–2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informants. Voucher specimens were collected with the help of informants, processed into herbarium following standard methods, identified with the help of pertinent floras and taxonomic experts, and submitted in Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal for future references. Results During the present study 66 medicinal plant species belonging to 37 families and 60 genera has been documented. These plants were used to treat various diseases and ailments grouped under 11 disease categories, with the highest number of species (41) being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by dermatological disorders (34). In the study area the informants’ consensus about usages of medicinal plants ranges from 0.93 to 0.97 with an average value of 0.94. Herbs (53%) were the primary source of medicine, followed by trees (23%). Curcuma longa (84%) and Azadirachta indica (76%) are the most frequently and popularly used medicinal plant species in the study area. Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use. Conclusions The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost. The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that

  20. Chaos in Western Medicine: How Issues of Social-Professional Status are Undermining Our Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, N. W.

    2012-01-01

    From the period immediately following the second world war, western (orthodox) medicine – both as a philosophy of medicine and as a professional guild of medical professionals actively practicing medicine – has made progress in leaps and bounds, especially considering the advances in technology and associated enterprises. Over the last thirty years, however, the practice of orthodox medicine has taken a turn for the worst despite progressive philosophies and tenets of basic practice as offered by the professional bodies that regulate how medicine is operated and implemented. Current healthcare environments are in a chaotic state of affairs, most notably due to issues involving affordability of medical professionals. It is argued that the social-professional status of medical doctors allow exorbitant and unreachable demands on governments for increased salaries. The title-based supremacy of doctors within the occupations domain is not supported by what they are offering society at large, and it compromises the ability of medical institutions and governments to provide better and more affordable healthcare. From a sociological point of view, this paper examines the social-religious history of such social class-based occupational power and dominance, and paves the way toward an overhaul of current medical education frameworks that proactively will ensure greater occupational equity in healthcare settings, across all healthcare disciplines tasked with patient care and improvement of healthcare services. In essence, doctoral titles should only be awarded after successful completion of postgraduate doctoral studies, and a new breed of medical professionals must emerge, able to contribute more meaningfully to the advancement of medicine as a profession, as well as toward increased standards of healthcare and improved health services delivery. PMID:23121737

  1. Substitutes or complements? Diagnosis and treatment with non-conventional and conventional medicine.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-04-01

    Portugal has a strong tradition of conventional western healthcare. So it provides a natural case study for the relationship between Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Western Medicine (WM). This work aims to test the relationship between CAM and WM users in the diagnosis and treatment stages and to estimate the determinants of CAM choice. The forth Portuguese National Health Survey is employed to estimate two single probit models and obtain the correlation between the consumption of CAM and WM medicines in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Firstly, both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage, CAM and WM are seen to be complementary choices for individuals. Secondly, self-medication also shows complementarity with the choice of CAM treatment. Thirdly, education has a non-linear relationship with the choice of CAM. Finally, working status, age, smoking and chronic disease are determinant factors in the decision to use CAM. The results of this work are relevant to health policy-makers and for insurance companies. Patients need freedom of choice and, for the sake of safety and efficacy of treatment, WM and CAM healthcare ought to be provided in a joint and integrated health system.

  2. Substitutes or complements? Diagnosis and treatment with non-conventional and conventional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portugal has a strong tradition of conventional western healthcare. So it provides a natural case study for the relationship between Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Western Medicine (WM). This work aims to test the relationship between CAM and WM users in the diagnosis and treatment stages and to estimate the determinants of CAM choice. Methods: The forth Portuguese National Health Survey is employed to estimate two single probit models and obtain the correlation between the consumption of CAM and WM medicines in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Results: Firstly, both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage, CAM and WM are seen to be complementary choices for individuals. Secondly, self-medication also shows complementarity with the choice of CAM treatment. Thirdly, education has a non-linear relationship with the choice of CAM. Finally, working status, age, smoking and chronic disease are determinant factors in the decision to use CAM. Conclusion: The results of this work are relevant to health policy-makers and for insurance companies. Patients need freedom of choice and, for the sake of safety and efficacy of treatment, WM and CAM healthcare ought to be provided in a joint and integrated health system. PMID:25844385

  3. Comparative effects of traditional Chinese and Western migraine medicines in an animal model of nociceptive trigeminovascular activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonglie; Martins-Oliveira, Margarida; Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling disorder of the brain with limited therapeutic options, particularly for preventive treatment. There is a need to identify novel targets and test their potential efficacy in relevant preclinical migraine models. Traditional Chinese medicines have been used for millennia and may offer avenues for exploration. Methods We evaluated two traditional Chinese medicines, gastrodin and ligustrazine, and compared them to two Western approaches with propranolol and levetiracetam, one effective and one ineffective, in an established in vivo rodent model of nociceptive durovascular trigeminal activation. Results Intravenous gastrodin (30 and 100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the trigeminocervical complex. Ligustrazine (10 mg/kg) and propranolol (3 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited dural-evoked trigeminocervical complex responses, although the timing of responses of ligustrazine does not match its pharmacokinetic profile. Levetiracetam had no effects on trigeminovascular responses. Conclusion Our data suggest gastrodin has potential as an anti-migraine treatment, whereas ligustrazine seems less promising. Interestingly, in line with clinical trial data, propranolol was effective and levetiracetam not. Exploration of the mechanisms and modelling effects of Chinese traditional therapies offers novel route for drug discovery in migraine.

  4. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants commonly used by Kani tribals in Tirunelveli hills of Western Ghats, India.

    PubMed

    Ayyanar, Muniappan; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2011-04-12

    For thousands of years, medicinal plants have played an important role throughout the world in treating and preventing a variety of diseases. Kani tribal people in Tirunelveli hills still depend on medicinal plants and most of them have a general knowledge of medicinal plants which are used for first aid remedies, to treat cough, cold, fever, headache, poisonous bites and some simple ailments. The present study was initiated with an aim to identify traditional healers who are practicing herbal medicine among the Kani tribals in Tirunelveli hills of Western Ghats, India and quantitatively document their indigenous knowledge on the utilization of medicinal plants particularly most common ethnomedicinal plants. Field study was carried out over a period of 4 years in Tirunelveli hills. The ethnomedicinal information was collected through interviews among the Kani traditional healers. The collected data were analyzed through use value (UV), informant consensus factor (F(ic)), fidelity level (FL) and relative importance (RI). A total of 90 species of plants distributed in 83 genera belonging to 52 families were identified as commonly used ethnomedicinal plants by the Kani traditional healers in Tirunelveli hills for the treatment of 65 types of ailments. These ailments were categorized into 15 ailment categories based on the body systems treated. Leaves were the most frequently used plant parts and most of the medicines were prepared in the form of paste and administered orally. F(ic) values of the present study indicated that there was a high agreement in the use of plants in the treatment of jaundice and diabetes among the users. Dermatological infections/diseases and gastro-intestinal disorders had highest use-reports and 29 species of plants had the highest fidelity level of 100%. The most important species according to their use value were Gymneme sylvestre (2.00), Melia azedarach, Murraya koenigii, Syzygium cumini and Terminalia chebula (1.83). As a result of the

  5. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by ethnic people in Parbat district of western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Malla, Birendra; Gauchan, Dhurva P; Chhetri, Ran B

    2015-05-13

    Nepal, a mountainous country having diversified topographic and climatic conditions, gives rise to a wide range of flora and fauna. In villages ethnic people, including Magar and Majhi highly depend on medicinal plants for their primary healthcare. Due to overexploitation, encroachment in forest for arable land and destruction of natural habitat, potentially useful medicinal plants are going to be threatened in their natural environment. There is a strong need to enlist highly valuable medicinal plants and use traditional knowledge to protect, utilize and manage them in ex-situ and in-situ conservation. The present research investigates and documents traditional knowledge on medicinal plants utilization as natural medicine by two ethnic communities Magar and Majhi of Parbat district in Western Nepal. Ethnomedicinal data was collected during 2012-2013 by the following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of herbs, shrubs and trees were collected using semi-structured questionnaire, field observation, personal interview and group discussion with 334 (130 men and 204 women) pre-identified local informants, among which 13 male and 2 female were local healers. Statistical tool, informant consensus factors (F(IC)) and fidelity level (FL) values were used to analyze the importance of ethnomedicinal plants. A total of 132 ethnomedicinal plant species belonging to 99 genera and 67 families have been documented. These plants are used to treat various diseases and disorders grouped under 12 disease categories, with the highest number of species (61) being used for gastro-intestinal, parasitic and hepatobiliary disorders (FIC=0.78%), followed by blood and lymphatic system (F(IC)=0.76%) category. The highest fidelity level (FL) values recorded in Paris polyphylla (FL=96.0%) followed by Bergenia ciliata (FL=95.0%) confirms that these plants are the best plant species with medicinal properties. The two ethnic communities, Magar and Majhi, in Parbat district

  7. [Effect of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy on progression of acute renal failure in patients with chronic renal insufficiency: a short-term clinical study].

    PubMed

    Fu, Peng; Yu, Guang; Huang, Xue-Qiang; Xu, Jing; Mei, Xiao-Bin; Wu, Hao; Yuan, Wei-Jie

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy on the progression of acute renal failure in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Thirty-two patients with chronic renal insufficiency developed acute renal failure recently were treated with Chinese herbs and western drugs intravenously and clysterizing of Chinese herbs liquid for 30 minutes, and the treatment course was 14 days. Assessment of liver and renal function, blood routine, electrolytes and endogenous creatinine clearance rate (Ccr) was performed before and 2 weeks after the treatment. The levels of hemoglobin (HB), white blood cell count (WBC) and serum electrolytes showed no significant changes after the treatment. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) decreased, while the level of Ccr increased significantly (P<0.05) after the treatment. The total effective rate was 65.6%. The integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy can effectively delay the deterioration of renal function in patients with chronic renal insufficiency accompanied by acute renal failure.

  8. [Non-medicinal treatments of spasticity in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mailhan, L; Papeix, C

    2012-04-01

    Non-medicinal treatments of spasticity may be proposed in patients with multiple sclerosis as either an adjunct to pharmacological treatments or the first line of treatment. Assessment of non-medicinal treatments, whether manual, surgical or with instrumentation, shows it to be beneficial for limb spasticity. Studies also reveal that, contrary to expectations, physical exercise does not increase spasticity. This means that physical exercise may be prioritized and that sports practice should not be forbidden, provided that the patient has an adequate neurological status and takes sufficient breaks to avoid fatigue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Medicinal flora and ethnoecological knowledge in the Naran Valley, Western Himalaya, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mountain ecosystems all over the world support a high biological diversity and provide home and services to some 12% of the global human population, who use their traditional ecological knowledge to utilise local natural resources. The Himalayas are the world's youngest, highest and largest mountain range and support a high plant biodiversity. In this remote mountainous region of the Himalaya, people depend upon local plant resources to supply a range of goods and services, including grazing for livestock and medicinal supplies for themselves. Due to their remote location, harsh climate, rough terrain and topography, many areas within this region still remain poorly known for its floristic diversity, plant species distribution and vegetation ecosystem service. Methods The Naran valley in the north-western Pakistan is among such valleys and occupies a distinctive geographical location on the edge of the Western Himalaya range, close to the Hindu Kush range to the west and the Karakorum Mountains to the north. It is also located on climatic and geological divides, which further add to its botanical interest. In the present project 120 informants were interviewed at 12 main localities along the 60 km long valley. This paper focuses on assessment of medicinal plant species valued by local communities using their traditional knowledge. Results Results revealed that 101 species belonging to 52 families (51.5% of the total plants) were used for 97 prominent therapeutic purposes. The largest number of ailments cured with medicinal plants were associated with the digestive system (32.76% responses) followed by those associated with the respiratory and urinary systems (13.72% and 9.13% respectively). The ailments associated with the blood circulatory and reproductive systems and the skin were 7.37%, 7.04% and 7.03%, respectively. The results also indicate that whole plants were used in 54% of recipes followed by rhizomes (21%), fruits (9.5%) and roots (5

  10. Medicinal flora and ethnoecological knowledge in the Naran Valley, Western Himalaya, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shujaul M; Page, Sue; Ahmad, Habib; Shaheen, Hamayun; Ullah, Zahid; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Harper, David M

    2013-01-10

    Mountain ecosystems all over the world support a high biological diversity and provide home and services to some 12% of the global human population, who use their traditional ecological knowledge to utilise local natural resources. The Himalayas are the world's youngest, highest and largest mountain range and support a high plant biodiversity. In this remote mountainous region of the Himalaya, people depend upon local plant resources to supply a range of goods and services, including grazing for livestock and medicinal supplies for themselves. Due to their remote location, harsh climate, rough terrain and topography, many areas within this region still remain poorly known for its floristic diversity, plant species distribution and vegetation ecosystem service. The Naran valley in the north-western Pakistan is among such valleys and occupies a distinctive geographical location on the edge of the Western Himalaya range, close to the Hindu Kush range to the west and the Karakorum Mountains to the north. It is also located on climatic and geological divides, which further add to its botanical interest. In the present project 120 informants were interviewed at 12 main localities along the 60 km long valley. This paper focuses on assessment of medicinal plant species valued by local communities using their traditional knowledge. Results revealed that 101 species belonging to 52 families (51.5% of the total plants) were used for 97 prominent therapeutic purposes. The largest number of ailments cured with medicinal plants were associated with the digestive system (32.76% responses) followed by those associated with the respiratory and urinary systems (13.72% and 9.13% respectively). The ailments associated with the blood circulatory and reproductive systems and the skin were 7.37%, 7.04% and 7.03%, respectively. The results also indicate that whole plants were used in 54% of recipes followed by rhizomes (21%), fruits (9.5%) and roots (5.5%). Our findings demonstrate the

  11. Homeopathic treatment in emergency medicine: a case series.

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, M; Schreiber, R; Rosenthal, C; Itzchaki, M

    2003-01-01

    Following a multiple-casualty construction disaster in Israel, members of The Center of Integrated Complementary Medicine joined in the emergency activity of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center. They administered homeopathic treatment to injured patients to supplement conventional orthopaedic treatment. This was to our knowledge the first time that complementary medicine had been used officially in conjunction with conventional medicine in an emergency situation. Our objective is to report and summarize the rationale, procedures and outcome of the complementary medicine intervention. Fifteen orthopaedic patients were included. They were treated by homeopathy in two phases starting 24 h post-trauma. All patients initially received Arnica montana 200CH in a single dose. Anxiety was treated with Aconite 200CH in nine patients, Opium 200CH in three, Ignatia 200CH in two and Arsenicum album 200CH in one according to type of anxiety. One day later, most patients reported a lessening of pain, 58% felt improvement, 89% had reduced anxiety, and overall, 61% felt that homeopathic treatment was helpful. In the second phase, 48 h post-trauma, specific complaints were addressed with classical homeopathy. At discharge patients rated the homeopathic treatment successful in 67% of the specific complaints. Several issues relating to the use of homeopathy in emergency medicine and its relation to conventional treatment are discussed. These include compliance, the conduct of rounds, shortage of time and staff, and the procurement of medicines.

  12. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 3: plants used in traditional medicine in Kikuku village, Muleba District

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practice. Traditional medicines are the mainstay of healthcare in this region and are known to support the management of many illnesses such as malaria, bacterial infections, epilepsy, gynecological problems and others. However, most of the plants being used have either not been documented or evaluated for safety and efficacy or both. This study, the sixth of an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plants that are used at Kikuku village, Muleba District. Methodology A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information on the common/local names of the plants, parts of the plants used, diseases treated, methods of preparing the herbal remedies, dosage of the remedies administered, frequency and duration of treatment and toxicity of the medicines. A literature review was carried out for information on the ethnomedical uses of the reported plants. Results A total of 49 plant species belonging to 47 genera and 24 plant families were documented. The family Euphorbiaceae and Asteraceae had the highest representation. The plants are used for the treatment of skin conditions (10 plants; 20%), bacterial infections and wounds (14 plants; 28.6%), malaria (14 plants; 28.6%), gastrointestinal disorders (11 plants; 22.4%), gynecological problems including infertility (8 plants; 16.3%), hypertension (5 plants; 10.2%), viral infections (7 plants; 14.3%), chest problems (5 plants; 10.2%), diabetes (3 plants; 6.1%), cancer (2 plants; 4.1%), inflammatory conditions (arthritis, rheumatism), HIV and AIDS, and hernia each treated by 1 plant (3 plants in total; 6.1%). Information obtained from the literature indicate that 25 (51.0%) of the therapeutic claims are supported by laboratory results or have similar claims of ethnomedical use from other countries. Conclusion Herbal remedies comprise an important and effective component of the healthcare system in Kikuku

  13. [Clinical application evaluation of Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Internal Diseases in Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Jie; Liu, Meng-Yu; Lian, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Nan-Nan; Zhao, Jun

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the applicability and clinical applications of Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Internal Diseases in Traditional Chinese Medicine, so as to provide the basis for the revision of the guidelines. This study was completed by the research and promotion base for traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) standard. The methods of applicability evaluation and application evaluation were used in the study. The questionnaires were filled out to evaluate applicability of the guideline, including doctor's familiarity with the guideline,the quality of the guideline, applicable conditions and clinical applications. The prospective case study analysis method was used to evaluate application of the guideline, including evaluation of clinical application compliance and application results(such as clinical effects, safety and economy). There were two parts in the guideline, which were TCM guideline and Western medicine guideline. The results of applicability evaluation showed that there were no obvious differences between TCM guideline and Western medicine guideline in doctor's familiarity with guideline(85.43%, 84.57%) and the use of the guideline(52.10%, 54.47%); the guidelines with good quality, and higher scores in the scope of application and the use of the term rationality(91.94%, 93.35%); the rationality scores of relevant contents in syndrome differentiation and treatment were more than 75%; the applicable conditions were better, and the safety score was the the highest. The comprehensive applicability evaluation showed that the proportion of the application of TCM guideline and Western medicine guideline were 77.73%, 75.46%, respectively. The results of application evaluation showed that there was high degree coincidence between the guideline with its clinical application; except for "other treatment" and "recuperation and prevention" in TCM, other items got high scores which were more than 90%; in the evaluation of application effects, safety of the guideline

  14. Traditional Chinese and western medicine for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis after lower extremity orthopedic surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shibai; Song, Yi; Chen, Xi; Qian, Wenwei

    2018-04-10

    Chinese herbal medicine has traditionally been considered to promote blood circulation to remove obstruction in the channels and clear pathogenic heat to drain dampness effects. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate its benefits for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) after lower extremity orthopedic surgery. Relevant, published studies were identified using the following keywords: lower extremity orthopedic surgery, arthroplasty, joint replacement, fracture, traditional Chinese and western medicine, Chinese herbal medicine, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and Venous thromboembolism (VTE). The following databases were used to identify the literature consisting of RCTs with a date of search of 31 May 2017: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of knowledge, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, the Chongqing VIP Database, the Chinese Biomedical Database, and the Wanfang Database (including three English and four Chinese databases). All relevant data were collected from studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The outcome variables were the incidence rate of DVT, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and D-dimer; subcutaneous hematoma; and other reported outcomes. RevMan5.2. software was adopted for the meta-analysis. A total of 20 published studies (1862 cases) met the inclusion criteria. The experimental group, 910 patients (48.87%), received the Chinese herbal medicine or traditional Chinese and western medicine for prevention of DVT; the control group, 952 patients (51.13%), received the standard western treatment. The meta-analysis showed that traditional Chinese and western medicine therapy reduced the incidence rates of DVT significantly when compared with controls (risk ratio [RR] = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.54; P < 0.00001), and the D-dimer was lower in the experimental group (P = 0.01). Besides, the incidence rate of subcutaneous hematoma was lower in the experimental group (P < 0

  15. [Curative effect of combined traditional Chinese medicine with Western medicine therapy on chronic nephritis and its correlation with hemorheology and microcirculation].

    PubMed

    Sun, G X

    1993-02-01

    Patients were divided into two groups, 89 cases treated by combined traditional Chinese and Western medicine (TCM-WM) therapy, the other 36 served as control. Each of two groups was further subdivided into 4 clinical types and 5 Syndromes of TCM. Hemorheology and microcirculation were tested before and after treatment, the clinical curative effects of both groups were compared and correlation analysis between clinical curative effect and improvement of hemorheology and microcirculation was made. The results showed that the remission rate and total effective rate were 79.8% and 92.1% respectively in testing group, significantly higher than those (25% and 50%) of control (P < 0.05-0.01). The curative effect on each clinical type and Syndrome of TCM was better than that on corresponding type and Syndrome of control (P < 0.05-0.01). The improvement of hemorheology and microcirculation was more significant in testing group than that in control. It was very significant in complete and partial remission of both group (P < 0.05-0.01) but not marked in the cases of improved and ineffective cases (P > 0.05). Therefore clinical curative effect was closely related with them. So any treatment which could improve hemorheology and microcirculation would be useful in treating chronic nephritis.

  16. Tibetan medicine “RNSP” in treatment of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing-Ming; He, Xue; Lian, Hui-Juan; Yuan, Dong-Ya; Hu, Qun-Ying; Sun, Zheng-Qi; Li, Yan-Song; Zeng, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (Alzheimer Disease, AD) is one of the most common type in senile dementia. Its main pathological features were that a large number of senile plaques gathered in brain extracellular and tangles fibrosis appeared in nerve cells. Currently, the pathogenesis of AD is still uncertain, and scale investigation and combined brain CT, MRI data were analyzed mainly for clinical diagnosis. Mitigation and improvement of the nervous system activity to interfere with the subsequent behavior of the patients are the main methods for treatment. In clinical no drug can really prevent and cure AD. From the view point of Tibetan medicine studies, Tibetan medicine RNSP has effect on improving memory and repairing the neurons in the brain. In this study, we combined the characteristics of AD pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment methods to explore the feasibility of Tibetan medicine RNSP for the treatment of AD to provide new ideas for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. PMID:26884898

  17. Tibetan medicine "RNSP" in treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing-Ming; He, Xue; Lian, Hui-Juan; Yuan, Dong-Ya; Hu, Qun-Ying; Sun, Zheng-Qi; Li, Yan-Song; Zeng, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (Alzheimer Disease, AD) is one of the most common type in senile dementia. Its main pathological features were that a large number of senile plaques gathered in brain extracellular and tangles fibrosis appeared in nerve cells. Currently, the pathogenesis of AD is still uncertain, and scale investigation and combined brain CT, MRI data were analyzed mainly for clinical diagnosis. Mitigation and improvement of the nervous system activity to interfere with the subsequent behavior of the patients are the main methods for treatment. In clinical no drug can really prevent and cure AD. From the view point of Tibetan medicine studies, Tibetan medicine RNSP has effect on improving memory and repairing the neurons in the brain. In this study, we combined the characteristics of AD pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment methods to explore the feasibility of Tibetan medicine RNSP for the treatment of AD to provide new ideas for the diagnosis and treatment of AD.

  18. Literature Review: Herbal Medicine Treatment after Large-Scale Disasters.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Shin; Kaneko, Soichiro; Numata, Takehiro; Kamiya, Tetsuharu; Arita, Ryutaro; Saito, Natsumi; Kikuchi, Akiko; Ohsawa, Minoru; Kohayagawa, Yoshitaka; Ishii, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and typhoons, occur worldwide. After the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami, our medical support operation's experiences suggested that traditional medicine might be useful for treating the various symptoms of the survivors. However, little information is available regarding herbal medicine treatment in such situations. Considering that further disasters will occur, we performed a literature review and summarized the traditional medicine approaches for treatment after large-scale disasters. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library for articles written in English, and Ichushi for those written in Japanese. Articles published before 31 March 2016 were included. Keywords "disaster" and "herbal medicine" were used in our search. Among studies involving herbal medicine after a disaster, we found two randomized controlled trials investigating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), three retrospective investigations of trauma or common diseases, and seven case series or case reports of dizziness, pain, and psychosomatic symptoms. In conclusion, herbal medicine has been used to treat trauma, PTSD, and other symptoms after disasters. However, few articles have been published, likely due to the difficulty in designing high quality studies in such situations. Further study will be needed to clarify the usefulness of herbal medicine after disasters.

  19. [Factors determining the selection of treatment options of complementary and alternative medicine].

    PubMed

    Zörgő, Szilvia; Purebl, György; Zana, Ágnes

    2016-04-10

    Complementary and alternative medicine have undoubtedly been gaining ground on the healthcare market, thus the vital question arises why patients choose these treatments, oftentimes at the cost of discontinuing the Western medical therapy. The aim of the authors was to investigate and scrutinize factors leading to the utilization of various alternative medical services. The basis of this qualitative research was medical anthropological fieldwork conducted at a clinic of Traditional Chinese Medicine including participant observation (355 hours), unstructured interviews with patients (n = 93) and in-depth interviews (n = 14). Patients of alternative medical systems often do not receive a diagnosis, explanation or cure for their illness from Western medicine, or they do not agree with what they are offered. In other instances, patients choose alternative medicine because it exhibits a philosophical congruence with their already existing explanatory model, that is, previous concepts of world, man or illness. A particular therapy is always part of a cultural system and it is embedded in a specific psycho-social context, hence choice of therapy must be interpreted in accordance with this perspective.

  20. [Assurance and assessment of quality education in occupational medicine in selected countries of western Europe and in the United States. 1. Western Europe].

    PubMed

    Boczkowski, A

    2000-01-01

    The author discusses the studies undertaken with the general aim to provide education in occupational medicine and assure and assess its quality in some countries of Western Europe advanced more than Poland in this area. It becomes quite evident that despite a widespread interest in quality of education, there is a lack of basic systemic solutions. A gap between basic theoretical and methodological guidelines and a large number of dispersed reports on concrete analytical and evaluation studies can be still observed. In addition to the presentation of an inside view of research activities carried out in some countries of Western Europe and the United States, based on selected professional publications, the author formulates general conclusions on how the assurance and quality assessment of education in occupational medicine function in those countries.

  1. Land-Use and Socioeconomic Change, Medicinal Plant Selection and Biodiversity Resilience in Far Western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Ripu M; Baral, Kedar; Paudel, Prashant; Acharya, Ram P; Thapa-Magar, Khum B; Cameron, Mary; Bussmann, Rainer W

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous plant use-systems have evolved under, and constantly adapted to human and non-human impacts. In the last decades however, increasing socioeconomic and cultural transformations, including land-use change, outmigration, globalized markets, the introduction of new species, and climate change have led to a decreasing availability of indigenous resources, and are ultimately leading to a reduction of local use-knowledge. Participant observations, discussions, walks-in-the-woods, semi-structured interviews and informal meetings were carried out in 12 villages of far western Nepal between 2011 and 2015 to assess how sociocultural changes have affected the sustenance of indigenous systems and local biodiversity, when compared to studies carried out in the previous decades. Our findings show that there were no statistically significant differences in subject variable means, but differences were relatively important to plant parts-use and plant growth-forms (p = 0.183 and 0.088 respectively). Cissampelos pareira, Acorus calamus, Calotropis gigantea were found to have the greatest relative importance, whereas Ageratina adenophora, Melia azedarach, Carum carvi were most important based on use values. Among them, C. pareira and A. adenophora were introduced. The spatial distribution of species collected for medicine showed that all habitats were important for collection however, habitats close to villages were more favored. The use of non-indigenous and easily available species and more accessible habitats is becoming more prevalent as primary forests become increasingly overexploited, indigenous species become limited, and sociocultural cause of land use change expand. The utilization of indigenous and non-indigenous species and nearby habitats, although possibly affecting the quality of medicinal species, nonetheless reveals the dynamism of indigenous medicines as an adaptive asset mitigating human and non-human environmental changes.

  2. Land-Use and Socioeconomic Change, Medicinal Plant Selection and Biodiversity Resilience in Far Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Kedar; Paudel, Prashant; Acharya, Ram P.; Thapa-Magar, Khum B.; Cameron, Mary; Bussmann, Rainer W.

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous plant use-systems have evolved under, and constantly adapted to human and non-human impacts. In the last decades however, increasing socioeconomic and cultural transformations, including land-use change, outmigration, globalized markets, the introduction of new species, and climate change have led to a decreasing availability of indigenous resources, and are ultimately leading to a reduction of local use-knowledge. Participant observations, discussions, walks-in-the-woods, semi-structured interviews and informal meetings were carried out in 12 villages of far western Nepal between 2011 and 2015 to assess how sociocultural changes have affected the sustenance of indigenous systems and local biodiversity, when compared to studies carried out in the previous decades. Our findings show that there were no statistically significant differences in subject variable means, but differences were relatively important to plant parts-use and plant growth-forms (p = 0.183 and 0.088 respectively). Cissampelos pareira, Acorus calamus, Calotropis gigantea were found to have the greatest relative importance, whereas Ageratina adenophora, Melia azedarach, Carum carvi were most important based on use values. Among them, C. pareira and A. adenophora were introduced. The spatial distribution of species collected for medicine showed that all habitats were important for collection however, habitats close to villages were more favored. The use of non-indigenous and easily available species and more accessible habitats is becoming more prevalent as primary forests become increasingly overexploited, indigenous species become limited, and sociocultural cause of land use change expand. The utilization of indigenous and non-indigenous species and nearby habitats, although possibly affecting the quality of medicinal species, nonetheless reveals the dynamism of indigenous medicines as an adaptive asset mitigating human and non-human environmental changes. PMID:27936247

  3. Referral to and attitude towards traditional Chinese medicine amongst western medical doctors in postcolonial Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chung, Vincent C H; Hillier, Sheila; Lau, Chun Hong; Wong, Samuel Y S; Yeoh, Eng Kiong; Griffiths, Sian M

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the international trend for patients to choose both allopathic western medicine (WM) and traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM), the World Health Organization has called for stronger collaboration between WM doctors (WMD) and TCAM practitioners. This resonates with the situation in Hong Kong where the dominant modality of patient care is primarily based on WM practice while traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is often used as a complement. The roots of this utilization pattern lie in colonial history when TCM was marginalised during the British administration. However since 1997 when China regained sovereignty, policies to regulate and professionalize TCM practices have been formally introduced. Despite both its popularity and this policy shift, progress on implementing collaboration between WM and TCM clinicians has been slow. This study, the first since 1997, explores current attitudes and referral behaviours of WMD towards use of TCM. We hypothesised that WMD would have positive attitudes towards TCM, due to regulation and cultural affinity, but that few actual TCM referrals would be made given the lack of a formal collaboration policy between elements within the healthcare system. Our results support these hypotheses, and this pattern possibly rooted from structural inhibitions originating from the historical dominance of WM and failure of services to respond to espoused policy. These have shaped Hong Kong's TCAM policy process to be closer with situations in the West, and have clearly differentiated it from integration experiences in other East Asian health systems where recent colonial history is absent. In addition, our results revealed that self use and formal education of TCM, rather than use of evidence in decision making, played a stronger role in determining referral. This implies that effective TCAM policies within WM dominated health systems like Hong Kong would require structural and educational solutions that foster

  4. Pruritus Treatment in Viewpoints of Traditional Persian Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jazani, Arezoo Moini; Azgomi, Ramin Nasimi Doost; Shirbeigi, Leila

    2016-05-01

    Pruritus is an unpleasant feeling that can cause the desire of scratching in a person and can be the symptoms of systemic, infectious, and neurological diseases. Pruritus is the most common clinical manifestation of skin diseases. Pruritus prevalence is 8-38% in the general population. Causes and treatments of pruritus have been described by traditional Persian medicine scientists. The aim of this study was to derive general principles of the proposed treatment to reduce or relieve pruritus. This descriptive study, review traditional medicine books including Al canon fil tibb, Al-Hawi, Makhzan ul-adviyyah, Al-Abniyah an-Haghyegh el-adviyah, Tuhfat ul-Momineen and Exir-e-Azam. The above-mentioned documents were derived and classified by keywords such as pruritus, hakka, jarab and sherry. In traditional Persian medicine, there are different causes for pruritus such as accumulation of vapors or acute humors in subcutaneous tissue or weakness of expulsive (Dafi'a) faculty and its treatment is based on removing the causes. Proper nutrition, bathing, and removing pathogenic humors are involved in the treatment. According to this study, some plants such as Cassia fistula, Purslane, Violets, Fumaria, Barley, Coriander, Rose and Terminalia chebula are anti-itching. Proper nutrition is the most important point in health and treatment of humors production with appropriate quality and quantity. Pruritus can be treated by lifestyle modification and using medicinal plants. It could be concluded that traditional Persian medicine therapies can be effective in the treatment of pruritus with mild side effects. By further investigation and research, we can reach more effective treatment methods in the field of traditional Persian medicine along with other new medical therapies.

  5. A Survey of Chinese Medicinal Herbal Treatment for Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Hamme, Gesa; Beckmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Janine; Efferth, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Schröder, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the common side effects of chemotherapy treatment with potentially severe implications. Despite several treatment approaches by conventional and complementary western medicine, the therapeutic outcome is often not satisfactory. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) offers empirical herbal formulas for the treatment of oral ulceration which are used in adaptation to chemotherapy-induced mucositis. While standard concepts for TCM treatment do not exist and acceptance by conventional oncologists is still low, we conducted a review to examine the evidence of Chinese herbal treatment in oral mucositis. Eighteen relevant studies on 4 single herbs, 2 combinations of 2 herbs, and 11 multiherbal prescriptions involving 3 or more compounds were included. Corresponding molecular mechanisms were investigated. The knowledge about detailed herbal mechanisms, especially in multi-herbal prescriptions is still limited. The quality of clinical trials needs further improvement. Meta-analysis on the existent database is not possible but molecular findings on Chinese medicinal herbs indicate that further research is still promising for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. PMID:24285975

  6. Endermologie New Aproach in the Medicine Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezencevová, Viktória; Torok, Jozef; Czánová, Tatiana; Zajac, Ján

    2017-10-01

    Using the effect of mechanical forces affecting cellular response in the treatment of post-traumatic, postoperative, post-imlantation conditions through the application of Endermologie®- mechanotransduction represents a revolutionary solution in tissue-rehabilitation and positive target tissue influencing, with faster regeneration (1). Endermologie® is a noninvasive, painless, natural method of treatments of all connective tissue transformations, muscle and circulation pathologies. The aim of our study is investigation and explanation the mechanism of action by observing the physiological effects of Endermologie® based on human studies. The paper is focused on monitoring of possitive effect tissue regeneration using endermologie as a tools mechanostimulation improvements of systems integridy and health improvement.

  7. Comparison of conventional medicine, TCM treatment, and combination of both conventional medicine and TCM treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study protocol of a randomized comparative effectiveness research trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Sheng; Xie, Yang; Li, Su-Yun; Yu, Xue-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects millions worldwide. Although many therapies exist and are being developed to relieve symptoms and reduce mortality, few data are available to understand which of the therapeutic alternatives is the most cost-effective for COPD patients in everyday clinical practice, especially for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Comparative effectiveness research can help patients, clinicians, and decision-makers make best informed treatment decisions where such evidence was previously lacking. This study aims to compare the effectiveness and economic evaluation of three treatments: (1) conventional Western medicine; (2) TCM treatments, which have been evaluated and have certain effect; and (3) a combination of both conventional Western medicine and TCM treatments, and then determine which treatment is the most suitable for COPD patients. A multicenter, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial is adopted. A total of 360 patients will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of the three treatments group, with 120 in each group. Patients in the conventional Western medicine group will be given Salbutamol, Formoterol, Salmeterol/fluticasone, respectively, according to the guidelines. For the TCM group, patients will be given Bufei granule, Bu-Fei Jian-Pi granule, Bu-Fei Yi-Shen granule, and Yi-Qi Zi-Shen granule based on their corresponding TCM syndrome patterns, respectively. For the combination of conventional medicine and TCM treatments group, patients will be given a combination of conventional Western medicine and TCM granules. Treatments in each group are recognized as a whole comprehensive intervention. After the 26-week treatment, another 26 weeks will be followed up. The outcome measures including the frequency and duration of acute exacerbations, lung function, dyspnea, exercise capacity, quality of life, and economic evaluation will be assessed. It is hypothesized that each of the three treatments will have

  8. Identifying Knowledge Sharing Barriers in the Collaboration of Traditional and Western Medicine Professionals in Chinese Hospitals: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Lihong; Nunes, Miguel Baptista

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project that aims at identifying knowledge sharing (KS) barriers between traditional and western medicine practitioners co-existing and complementing each other in Chinese healthcare organisations. The study focuses on the tacit aspects of patient knowledge, rather than the traditional technical information shared…

  9. MEDICINE SELLERS AND MALARIA TREATMENT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

    PubMed Central

    GOODMAN, CATHERINE; BRIEGER, WILLIAM; UNWIN, ALASDAIR; MILLS, ANNE; MEEK, SYLVIA; GREER, GEORGE

    2009-01-01

    Medicine sellers are widely used for fever and malaria treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, but concerns surround the appropriateness of drugs and information provided. There is increasing interest in improving their services, so we reviewed the literature on their characteristics, and interventions to improve their malaria-related practices. Sixteen interventions were identified, involving a mix of training/capacity building, demand generation, quality assurance and creating an enabling environment. Although evidence is insufficient to prove which approaches are superior, tentative conclusions were possible. Interventions increased rates of appropriate treatment, and medicine sellers were willing to participate. Features of successful interventions included a comprehensive situation analysis of the legal and market environment; “buy-in” from medicine sellers, community members and government; use of a combination of approaches; and maintenance of training and supervision. Interventions must be adapted to include artemisinin-based combination therapies, and their sustainability and potential to operate at national level should be further explored. PMID:18165494

  10. Five-year outcomes of western mental health training for Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tai Pong; Mak, Ki Yan; Lam, Kwok Fai; Chan, Hoi Yan; Sun, Kai Sing

    2016-10-26

    There are increasing expectations for primary care practitioners to deal with mental health problems. In Hong Kong, 15 % of the general public consult Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners regularly for their primary health care needs. This study investigated the 5-year outcomes of a western mental health training course for TCM practitioners in Hong Kong. Structured questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare the TCM practitioners' confidence and engagement in mental health care before and after the Course. The data collected during 2011-2015 were analyzed. A total of 151 TCM practitioners returned both pre- and post-Course questionnaires, with a response rate of 95.6 %. After the course, there were significant increases in the proportions of participants being confident of recognizing patients with psychological problems (62.9 % before the course vs 89.4 % after), diagnosing common mental health problems (47.7 % vs 77.5 %), and managing them (31.2 % vs 64.3 %). Overall, 66.9 % of the participants reported some increase in their confidence in recognizing patients with psychological problems, diagnosing or/and managing patients with common mental health problems. Qualitative responses illustrated the major improvements were increased awareness of mental symptoms, better understanding of classification of mental disorders and management approaches. On the other hand, barriers included difficulties in understanding medical terms in English, consultation time constraints, and a lack of formal referral system to psychiatrists. The Course has positive impact on TCM practitioners in handling mental health patients. The findings are useful for designing similar trainings on complementary and alternative medicine practitioners in other countries.

  11. Homeopathic medicines for adverse effects of cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Sosie; Cummings, Mike; Berkovitz, Saul; van Haselen, Robbert; Fisher, Peter

    2009-04-15

    Homeopathic medicines are used by patients with cancer, often alongside conventional treatment. Cancer treatments can cause considerable morbidity and one of the reasons patients use homeopathic medicines is to help with adverse effects. Evaluate effectiveness and safety of homeopathic medicines used to prevent or treat adverse effects of cancer treatments. The following were searched up to November 2008: Cochrane PaPaS Trials Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; BNI; CancerLIT; AMED; CISCOM; Hom-Inform; SIGLE; National Research Register; Zetoc; www.controlled-trials.com; http://clinicaltrials.gov; Liga Medicorum Homeopathica Internationalis (LMHI, Liga) conference proceedings; reference lists of relevant studies were checked; and homeopathic manufacturers, leading researchers and practitioners were contacted. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of homeopathic medicines in participants with a clinical or histological diagnosis of cancer where the intervention was aimed at preventing or treating symptoms associated with cancer treatments. All age groups, and all stages of disease were included. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and two review authors extracted data. Three review authors independently assessed trial quality using the Delphi List and the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Where available, data were extracted for analysis. Eight controlled trials (seven placebo controlled and one trial against an active treatment) with a total of 664 participants met the inclusion criteria. Three studied adverse effects of radiotherapy, three studied adverse effects of chemotherapy and two studied menopausal symptoms associated with breast cancer treatment.Two studies with low risk of bias demonstrated benefit: one with 254 participants demonstrated superiority of topical calendula over trolamine (a topical agent not

  12. Liuwei dihuang pills enhance the effect of Western medicine in treating type 2 diabetes: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Pu, Run; Geng, Xiang-nan; Yu, Fei; Liang, Hui-gang; Shi, Lu-wen

    2013-10-01

    To perform meta-analyses evaluating the efficacy of adding Liuwei Dihuang Pills (, LDP) to Western medicine in improving treatment outcomes for type 2 diabetes. Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Chinese databases, including the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched to identify eligible studies; i.e., if the study involved a randomized clinical trial in which the experimental group combined LDP with Western drugs and the control group used the corresponding Western drugs alone to treat type 2 diabetes. Outcomes were measured in terms of fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial blood glucose (2hPG) and HbA1c level. Efficacy was also measured by using control and response rates. The combined odds ratio (OR), mean difference (MD), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Studies included in the analysis were less adequate than expected in terms of methodological quality. A total of 1,609 patients from 18 studies were included. We found that adding LDP can lower patients' FBG (MD=0.54 mmol/L, 95% CI [0.15, 0.93], P=0.007), 2hPG (MD=1.05 mmol/L, 95% CI [0.29, 1.81], P<0.01) and HbA1c (MD=0.23, 95% CI [0.02, 0.45], P=0.008). There were also improvements in treatment response rates (OR=3.41, 95% CI [2.38, 4.90], P<0.01) and control rates (OR=2.47, 95% CI [1.91, 3.20], P<0.01). Adding LDP to Western medicine might improve treatment outcomes of diabetes, including FBG, 2hPG, response rates and control rates.

  13. Medical Treatment and Medicinal Charms Mentioned in the Atharvanic Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The ancient Vedic texts Provides us with valuable information and guide lines on various multi-faced aspects of human life. The present discussion is limited to the medical treatment and medicinal charms mentioned in the Atharvanic literature with specific consideration to Kausikasutra for better understanding of the rites and actions mentioned in Atharvanaveda. PMID:22556455

  14. Factors affecting the career path choices of graduates at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Campbell, John R; Naylor, Jonathan M; Lawson, Karen L; Derkzen, Dena

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the demographics of the Class of 2006, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, and to determine which factors influenced the graduates' career path choices. Data were collected via an on-line survey and the response rate was 95.7% (67/70). The majority (57%) of graduates were starting their veterinary career in a food animal-related (FAR) job. Two factors were significantly associated with this choice: 1) those raised in, or near, a small center (population < 10 000) were 3.4 times (P = 0.03) more likely to accept a FAR position than were those raised in a large center (> 10 000), and 2) graduates with a bachelor of science in agriculture (BSc Ag) were 4.5 times (P = 0.04) more likely to begin their career as a FAR practitioner than were those without such a degree. However, 9 of the 16 graduates having a BSc Ag had an urban upbringing.

  15. Utilization of Medicines Available at Home by General Population of Rural and Urban Set Up of Western India

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In India, medicines are procured with prescription or without prescription by patients, which are kept at home and often are utilized in inappropriate manner. It may remain unused, get expired or may be repeated in the way of self medication. So there remains an increase chance of self-medication compared to prescribed drugs. Aim This study was aimed to explore the utilization pattern of medicines available at home with special attention to the types of medicine (with or without prescription) and their appropriate utilization (dosage compliance) and intended self-medication. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Anand district of Gujarat, India during the year 2012- 2014 after Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) approval. Data were collected from 800 houses, 400 each from urban and rural areas and then analysed for the details of medicines available in the house as: (i) number of homes having medicines; (ii) number of formulations with and without prescriptions; (iii) number of formulations with package inserts & expired formulations; (iv) Dosage forms of medicines; (v) pharmacological class wise distribution of medicines; (vi) status of the medicine use whether for current use, future use or leftover; and (vii) Appropriateness of medicines with and without prescription in relation to dose and duration of treatment. Results Medicines were available in 93.75% houses. More medicine formulations (16.76%) were found without prescription in urban area than in rural (11.82%). Highest number of dosage forms found, were that of tablets (62%). Among the prescribed medicines, majority of medicines were from cardiovascular disease (19.88%) and from without prescription medicines, Non-Steroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) were the major group available at houses (35.13%). The leftover medicines with prescription were 20.39% and without prescription medicines were 13.37%. Appropriate dose and duration of medicines were followed more

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Treatment of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Min

    2018-02-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is increasing. Food allergy can be life threatening and there is no approved treatment available. Allergen avoidance and rescue medication remain the sole management tools. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common in the United States. However, research into safety and efficacy for food allergy is limited. Continued scientific research into food allergy herbal formula 2 (FAHF-2), refined methods of formulation, purified compounds, and other modalities are needed. Traditional Chinese medicine is the main component of CAM in the United States. Conventional doctors, CAM practitioners, and patients' families must collaborate to comanage these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chinese Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weili; Zhang, Yinan; Huang, Yingjie; Lu, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This chapter summarizes recent developments in preclinical and clinical research on Chinese herbal medicines and their neurochemical mechanism of action for the treatment of drug addiction. We searched Chinese and English scientific literature and selected several kinds of Chinese herbal medicines that have beneficial effects on drug addiction. Ginseng (Renshen) may be clinically useful for the prevention of opioid abuse and dependence. Rhizoma Corydalis (Yanhusuo) may be used to prevent relapse to chronic drug dependence. Alkaloids of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Gouteng) appear to have positive effects on methamphetamine and ketamine addiction. Both Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen) and Radix Pueraiae (Gegen) have beneficial inhibitory effects on alcohol intake. Sinomenine has been shown to have preventive and curative effects on opioid dependence. l-Stepholidine, an alkaloid extract of the Chinese herb Stephania intermedia (Rulan), attenuated the acquisition, maintenance, and reacquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference and antagonized the heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. Traditional Chinese herbal medicines may be used to complement current treatments for drug addiction, including withdrawal and relapse. As the molecular mechanisms of action of traditional Chinese herbal medicines are elucidated, further advances in their use for the treatment of drug addiction are promising. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Narrative medicine and the personalisation of treatment for elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Cenci, C

    2016-07-01

    Healthcare organisations, medical knowledge and clinical practice are among the contexts that have most strongly felt the impact of the over 75 population. This is a population of multimorbidity and polypharmacy patients. They are often seen as a conglomeration of juxtaposed guidelines resulting in the intake of more than 10 drugs a day, with absolutely no certainty of their efficacy. The scientific community is increasingly calling into question the current disease-focused approach. Narrative medicine can provide the tools for a treatment plan which is instead more patient-centred. Narrative medicine can promote the development of a systemic, integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to elderly patients. The stories of patients and caregivers, their representations, perceptions, experiences and preferences can reduce the risk of inappropriate tests and treatments. They can promote deprescribing procedures based on a careful analysis of a specific patient's needs. Narration time is treatment time which does not necessarily create a burden on organisations and caregivers. Quite the contrary since by facilitating adherence and team work, it can significantly reduce time and costs. Given their training and the importance of their relationship with elderly patients, internists, together with geriatricians, can play a key role in promoting and coordinating a narrative medicine approach. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective Medicinal Plant in Cancer Treatment, Part 2: Review Study.

    PubMed

    Kooti, Wesam; Servatyari, Karo; Behzadifar, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Nouri, Bijan; Zare Marzouni, Hadi

    2017-10-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases. With due attention to rapid progress in the phytochemical study of plants, they are becoming popular because of their anticancer effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effective medicinal plants in the treatment of cancer and study their mechanism of action. In order to gather information the keywords "traditional medicine," "plant compounds," "medicinal plant," "medicinal herb," "toxicity," "anticancer effect," "cell line," and "treatment" were searched in international databases such as ScienceDirect, PubMed, and Scopus and national databases such as Magiran, Sid, and Iranmedex, and a total of 228 articles were collected. In this phase, 49 nonrelevant articles were excluded. Enhancement P53 protein expression, reducing the expression of proteins P27, P21, NFκB expression and induction of apoptosis, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway, and reduction of the level of acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation are the most effective mechanisms of herbal plants that can inhibit cell cycle and proliferation. Common treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy can cause some complications. According to results of this study, herbal extracts have antioxidant compounds that can induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation by the investigated mechanisms.

  20. Treatment of understory hemlock in the western white pine type

    Treesearch

    I. T. Haig

    1933-01-01

    Silvicultural practice for the national forests in the mixed western white pine stands of northern Idaho has long been complicated by the economic problems arising from the presence of aggressive, tolerant, low-value species, such as western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and lowland white fir (Abies grandis), in association with the less tolerant, faster-growing, high-...

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine approaches in the treatment of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Gary H

    2015-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is a diverse set of practices and treatments that has seen a significant increase among Americans over the past decade. These approaches have been applied to a myriad of medical and mental health disorders with varying levels of efficacy. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine to address the growing numbers of individuals suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related disorders. These approaches include pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities. This article will review some of the most widely used non-pharmacologic complementary and alternative medicine practices used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder such as recreational therapy, animal-assisted therapy, yoga, and acupuncture as well as alternative delivery methods for psychotherapy.

  2. Medicinal plants used in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Skin is an organ providing contact with the environment and protecting the human body from unfavourable external factors. Skin inflammation, reflected adversely in its functioning and appearance, also unfavourably affects the psyche, the condition of which is important during treatment of chronic skin diseases. The use of plants in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases results from their influence on different stages of inflammation. The paper presents results of the study regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of the plant raw material related to its influence on skin. The mechanism of action, therapeutic indications and side effects of medicinal plants used for treatment of inflammatory diseases of the skin are described. PMID:24278070

  3. Effective Medicinal Plant in Cancer Treatment, Part 2: Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Kooti, Wesam; Servatyari, Karo; Behzadifar, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Nouri, Bijan; Zare Marzouni, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases. With due attention to rapid progress in the phytochemical study of plants, they are becoming popular because of their anticancer effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effective medicinal plants in the treatment of cancer and study their mechanism of action. In order to gather information the keywords “traditional medicine,” “plant compounds,” “medicinal plant,” “medicinal herb,” “toxicity,” “anticancer effect,” “cell line,” and “treatment” were searched in international databases such as ScienceDirect, PubMed, and Scopus and national databases such as Magiran, Sid, and Iranmedex, and a total of 228 articles were collected. In this phase, 49 nonrelevant articles were excluded. Enhancement P53 protein expression, reducing the expression of proteins P27, P21, NFκB expression and induction of apoptosis, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway, and reduction of the level of acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation are the most effective mechanisms of herbal plants that can inhibit cell cycle and proliferation. Common treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy can cause some complications. According to results of this study, herbal extracts have antioxidant compounds that can induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation by the investigated mechanisms. PMID:28359161

  4. [Combination of acupuncture, cupping and medicine for treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: a multi-central randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Jang, Zhen-Ya; Li, Chang-Du; Qiu, Ling; Guo, Jun-Hua; He, Ling-Na; Yue, Yang; Li, Fang-Ze; Qin, Wen-Yi

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of combination of acupuncture, cupping and medicine for treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome. By using multi-central randomized controlled method, 186 cases were randomly divided into an acupuncture combined with cupping and western medicine group (group A), an acupuncture combined with cupping group (group B) and a western medicine group (group C) and treated continuously for 4 weeks. The treatment of acupuncture combined with cupping was produced by acupuncture at five mental points and moving cupping on the Hechelu of the back, once evrey other day, thrice each week, and the western medicine therapy by oral administration of Amitriptyline, once each day. The scores of McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), the amount of tenderness point and the time of producing effect were compared and the therapeutic effects were assessed with the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD). The cured and markedly effective rate was 65.0% (39/60) in the group A, which was superior to 15.9% (10/63) in the group B and 16.1% (9/56) in the group C (both P < 0.001). After treatment, the scores of MPQ and HAMD and the amount of tenderness point all decreased in the three groups, group A being significantly better than group B and group C, and the time of producing effect in the group A was more earlier than those in the group B and the group C. The therapeutic effect of combination of acupuncture, cupping and medicine on fibromyalgia syndrome is superior to that of the simple acupuncture combined with cupping or the simple medicine.

  5. [Experience of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine in first case of imported Zika virus disease in China].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yichu; Zeng, Liping; Bao, Wen; Xu, Pinghua; Zhong, Gongrong

    2016-02-01

    Zika virus disease is an acute infectious disease caused by Zika virus transmitted through Aedes mosquitoes. To explore the therapeutic effect of integrated traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Zika virus disease, the treatment process of the first imported case in China was reviewed. The first imported Zika virus disease in China was admitted to Ganxian People's Hospital in Jiangxi Province on February 6th, 2016, and the patient received isolation treatment for 9 days and cured later. The effect of antiviral treatments including Xiyanping injection was evaluated based on clinical diagnosis and treatment process of the patient. A 34-year old male patient was admitted with chief complaint of fever for 9 days, orbital pain and itching rash for 4 days on February 6th, 2016. (1) Epidemiological characteristics: the patient was bitted by mosquitoes during his business trip in Venezuela since January 1st, where Zika virus disease was spreading. On January 20th he had dizziness without fever, and the symptom disappeared after taking medicines without details. Paroxysmal dizziness, chills and mild fever without myalgia was experienced on January 28th. On February 3rd small red rash appeared in the neck, spreading to anterior part of chest, limbs and trunk, and the fever, fatigue, nausea was continued, and a new symptom of paroxysmal pain in back of ears and orbits appeared, during which he had not go to hospital. The symptoms relieved on February 4th. He returned to Ganxian County on February 5th, he had yellow stool 3 times with normal temperature, without abdominal pain, and red rash still appeared in the neck. He went to Ganxian People's Hospital on February 6th, 2016. (2) Clinical manifestation: the vital signs showed a temperature of 36.8?centigrade, a pulse rate of 80 bpm, a respiratory rate of 20 bpm, and a blood pressure of 110/70 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa). It was showed by physical examination that red rash appeared in the neck, and no superficial enlarged

  6. Provisional biopharmaceutical classification of some common herbs used in Western medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Sarah; Almukainzi, May; Bou-Chacra, Nadia Araci; Amidon, Gordon L; Lee, Beom-Jin; Feng, Jianfang; Kanfer, Isadore; Zuo, Joan Zhong; Wei, Hai; Bolger, Michael B; Löbenberg, Raimar

    2012-04-02

    The aim of this study was to classify some markers of common herbs used in Western medicine according to the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS). The BCS is a scientific approach to classify drug substances based upon their intestinal permeability and their solubility, at the highest single dose used, within the physiologically relevant pH ranges. Known marker components of twelve herbs were chosen from the USP Dietary Supplement Compendium Monographs. Different BCS parameters such as intestinal permeability (P(eff)) and solubility (C(s)) were predicted using the ADMET Predictor, which is a software program to estimate biopharmaceutical relevant molecular descriptors. The dose number (D₀) was calculated when information from the literature was available to identify an upper dose for individual markers. In these cases the herbs were classified according to the traditional BCS parameters using P(eff) and D₀. When no upper dose could be determined, then the amount of a marker that is just soluble in 250 mL of water was calculated. This value, M(x), defines when a marker is changing from highly soluble to poorly soluble according to BCS criteria. This biopharmaceutically relevant value can be a useful tool for marker selection. The present study showed that a provisional BCS classification of herbs is possible but some special considerations need to be included into the classification strategy. The BCS classification can be used to choose appropriate quality control tests for products containing these markers. A provisional BCS classification of twelve common herbs and their 35 marker compounds is presented.

  7. Ethnobotanical study of nutri-medicinal plants used for the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic ailments among the local communities of western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Asiimwe, Savina; Kamatenesi-Mugisha, Maud; Namutebi, Agnes; Borg-Karlsson, Anna-Karin; Musiimenta, Peace

    2013-11-25

    Herbal remedies are a source of therapeutics for nearly 80% of the population in Uganda. Poor health facilities and limited access to antiretroviral drugs have perpetuated and increased the use of traditional medicine especially in rural areas for the treatment of opportunistic ailments of HIV/AIDS. To document the traditional uses of nutri-medicinal plants in the management of immunocompromised ailments associated with HIV/AIDS. To document the parts and growth forms of plants used, methods of preparation and administration of the herbal remedies. The study was conducted in Mbarara and Isingiro districts of western Uganda between December 2010 and May 2011. Ethnobotanical information was collected from 64 respondents who were sampled based on recommendations of local elders and administrators. Ethnobotanical data on the use of nutri-medicinal plants for traditional treatment of HIV/AIDS opportunistic ailments were collected by employing semi-structured interviews with selected respondents, house hold visits and field observations as described by (Martin, 1995a). The respondents were mainly traditional medical practitioners who treat patients who are already receiving antiretroviral drugs. Fidelity levels of plant species and informant consensus factor were determined to show the percentage of informants claiming the use of certain plant species for the same major purpose and to analyse people's knowledge of plant use. The study revealed 81 plant species most of which were herbs (49%). Leaves (71%) were the most frequently used parts in remedy preparations which were mainly administered orally (85%). The majority of plants (54%) were harvested from wild populations. Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Plumeria obtusa L., and Abutilon guineense (Shumach.) Baker. F and Exell were the nutri-medicinal plants that scored the highest Fidelity level values. The informant's consensus about usages of plants ranged from 0.75 to 0.80. Plants that are presumed to be effective in treating

  8. Complementary medicine use in cancer patients receiving intravenous antineoplastic treatment.

    PubMed

    Juanbeltz Zurbano, Regina; Pérez-Fernández, Mª Dolores; Tirapu Nicolás, Bianka; Vera García, Ruth; De la Cruz Sánchez, Susana; Sarobe Carricas, María Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has grown considerably, although there is little research on the topic in Spain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of complementary medicine use in adult cancer patients at the same time as they were receiving conventional treatment in a Spanish referral cancer centre. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the Ambulatory Treatment Unit during 2 consecutive weeks in March 2015. Adult patients who were receiving intravenous chemotherapy were included. Study variables were obtained from a questionnaire and medical records. 316 patients were included. 32.3% of the patients reported complementary medicine use during this period and 89% were ingesting products by mouth, herbs and natural products being the most commonly used. 81% of patients started to use complementary medicine after diagnosis, and family/friends were the main source of information. 65% of the patients reported improvements, especially in their physical and psychological well-being. Significant predictors of CAM use were female gender (P=0.028), younger age (P<0.001), and secondary education (P=0.009). A large proportion of cancer patients receiving intravenous chemotherapy also use complementary medicine, which they mainly take by mouth. Due to the risk of chemotherapy-CAM interactions, it is important for health-professionals to keep abreast of research on this issue, in order to provide advice on its potential benefit and risks. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-Freckles Herbal Treatment in Iranian Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zakerin, Sara; Fahimi, Shirin; Rezghi, Maedeh

    2016-05-01

    Freckles are numerous pigmented spots of the skin, mainly confined to the face, even arms and back. Although freckles are light-brown macules, most frequently observed in individuals with red or blond hair, they are common to Asian people too. Freckles increase in number, size, and depth of pigmentation during the summer months. Histologically, freckles show increased production of melanin pigment by a normal number of melanocytes. Freckles commonly stop spreading before adolescence and last for life, but could sometimes be subtle in adulthood. Treatments are often requested for cosmetic purposes. Before the advent of lasers, treatment modalities for pigmentary disorders included surgical excision, dermabrasion, chemical bleaching, and peeling. These treatments may lead to unwanted side effects of potential scarring or undesired pigmentation changes. In Iranian traditional medicine (ITM), freckles have been known as well. "Namash" was the term used by ITM scholars to indicate freckles. There is a wide range of plants, which were prescribed by Iranian physicians for the treatment of freckles. The purpose of this study is to find the most frequent useful herbs for freckles as mentioned in ITM references. Seven ITM references were studied for anti-freckles medicines. The references were Canon of Medicine (Avicenna), Alhavi (Razes) Tuhfat ul-Momineen (Momen tonekaboni), Makhzan-ul-Adwiah (Aghili), Ikhtiyarat Badi'i (Ansari), Al-abnia An-Haghyegh el-advia (Heravi), and al-jāmi li-mufradāt al-adwiyawa al-aghdhiya (Ibn al-Baitar). Moreover, plants were ordered according to their repetition in the references. Afterwards, traditional names of the selected plants were matched with the scientific names using botanical text references. This study demonstrated that Myristica fragrans Houtt, Cicer arietema L., Eruca sativa Lam., Lilium candidium L., Amygdalus communis L., Arum italicum L. were the most frequent herbs mentioned in ITM references for the treatment of freckles

  10. The role of traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) in the practice of psychosomatic medicine: the usefulness of Kampo in the treatment of the stress-related symptoms of women, especially those with peri-menopausal disorder.

    PubMed

    Ushiroyama, Takahisa

    2013-10-22

    A serious problem currently plaguing the medical field is the widening gap between academic medicine, which studies the features and causes of illness, and the medical care that patients desire. An example of this gap can be observed in the practice of psychotherapy, which is effective only for certain patients. Kampo medicine that combines the advantages of Western medicine with those of traditional Japanese medicine is currently undergoing a revival in the healthcare sector. The therapeutic policies underlying Kampo medicine are based on the physical constitution and current symptoms of each patient. For this reason, Kampo medicine is referred to as "tailor-made medicine" and has properties similar to "mind and body" or psychosomatic medicine. Some women exhibit multiple undefined stress-related symptoms during the peri-menopausal period. In order to accurately diagnose and provide patient-specific treatment, physicians should not only investigate the various stress factors in patients' lives but should also provide a Sho, or a Kampo diagnosis. The therapeutic approach in Kampo medicine is aimed at harmonizing the mind, body, and spirit; this practice involves the use of narrative and holistic medication that treats the entire being of the patient, resulting in an increased number of specialized treatment plans.There are many Kampo prescriptions tailored to treat women who exhibit various stress-related symptoms. Both Kampo and psychosomatic medicine are based on the principles of narrative-based medicine, and by integrating these two medical systems, an ideal system can be devised to better cope with the various needs of patients. This new medical system established by integrating and harmonizing Western and Eastern medicine can be used for the treatment of women with stress-related symptoms.

  11. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Asthma: A Traditional Persian Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Behjat; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    To search major Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM) textbooks for medicinal plants used to treat asthma. The conformity of the TPM findings on the anti-asthmatic efficacy of plants with the findings of pharmacological studies was also explored. Major TPM textbooks were hand searched to find medicinal plants used for the treatment of asthma. Scientific names of TPM-suggested plants were determined using botanical databases and were used for a multidatabase electronic search in PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect and Google Scholar databases. Then, the antiasthmatic effectiveness of TPM-recommended plants was verified in view of the findings from modern pharmacological investigations. According to the main TPM texts, Adianthum capillus-veneris, Boswellia oleogumresin, Crocus sativus, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Hyssopus officinalis and Ruta graveolens were the most efficacious medicinal plants for the treatment of asthma. This finding was confirmed by pharmacological studies which showed counterbalancing effects of the above-mentioned plants on inflammation, oxidative stress, allergic response, tracheal smooth muscle cell constriction and airway remodeling. The strong ethnobotanical background of plants used in TPM could be a valuable tool to find new anti-asthmatic medications. In this review, TPM-suggested anti-asthmatic plants were found to possess several mechanisms relevant to the treatment of respiratory diseases according to the information retrieved from modern pharmacological studies. This high degree of conformity suggested further proof-of-concept trials to ascertain the role of these plants in the routine management of asthmatic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Review of Herbal Traditional Chinese Medicine for the Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guang-dong; Li, Chao-yuan; Cui, Wen-peng; Guo, Qiao-yan; Dong, Chang-qing; Zou, Hong-bin; Liu, Shu-jun; Dong, Wen-peng; Miao, Li-ning

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most serious chronic complications of diabetes; 20–40% of diabetic patients develop into end stage renal disease (ESRD). However, exact pathogenesis of DN is not fully clear and we have great difficulties in curing DN; poor treatment of DN led to high chances of mortality worldwide. A lot of western medicines such as ACEI and ARB have been demonstrated to protect renal function of DN but are not enough to delay or retard the progression of DN; therefore, exploring exact and feasible drug is current research hotspot in medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely used to treat and control diabetes and its complications such as DN in a lot of scientific researches, which will give insights into the mechanism of DN, but they are not enough to reveal all the details. In this paper, we summarize the applications of herbal TCM preparations, single herbal TCM, and/or monomers from herbal TCM in the treatment of DN in the recent 10 years, depicting the renal protective effects and the corresponding mechanism, through which we shed light on the renal protective roles of TCM in DN with a particular focus on the molecular basis of the effect and provide a beneficial supplement to the drug therapy for DN. PMID:26649322

  13. The use of herbal medicine in cancer-related anorexia/ cachexia treatment around the world.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Chun; Li, Ying-Xiao; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-related cachexia, a condition in which the body is consumed by deranged carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism that is induced by inflammatory cytokines. Cachexia is associated with poor treatment outcome, fatigue and poor quality of life. Pharmacological intervention in the treatment and/or prevention of cachexia has been mainly aimed at the use of appetite enhancers to increase oral nutritional intake so far. Herbal remedies are part of traditional and folk healing methods with long histories of use. In this report, we have assessed which herbal approaches have had associated cancer cachexia case reports. Commonly used herbal medicines in western countries include essiac, iscador, pau d'arco tea, cannabinoids and so on. Some Kampo herbs and formulations are commonly used by cancer patients reduce the side effects and complications during the antitumor therapy. The relevant herbal medicines include ginseng, C. rhizome and radix astragali, and the related herbal remedies, such as TJ-48, TJ-41, PHY906 and Rikkunshito. However, there still have some adverse effects caused or amplified by herb and drug interactions that are difficult to separate. However, randomized effectiveness of herbal medicines shall be further identified in controlled clinical trials involving cancer patients with cachexia.

  14. Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian-Attari, Mohammad Mahdi; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Dargahi, Leila; Shirzad, Meysam; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence in recent years. Dramatic growth in AD prevalence has increased the importance of more researches on AD treatment. History has shown that traditional medicine can be a source of inspiration to find new therapies. Objectives: This study tried to codify the recommendations of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) by studying the main medical manuscripts. The second purpose was to compare these findings with new medical information. Materials and Methods: Cardinal traditional medical and pharmacological texts from 10th to 18th century were searched for traditional terms of dementia (Nesyan, Fisad-uz-Zekr, Faramooshkari) focused on treatment methods. The findings were classified into three groups: lifestyle recommendations, dietary approaches, and drug therapies. These findings were compared with new medical findings. Results: ITM has dietary recommendations for dementia such as increasing consumption of nuts, poultry and eggs, milk, and grape products (like raisin and currant). These compounds are full of unsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and polyphenolic compounds. New findings suggest that these substances can help in prevention and treatment of AD. ITM has some lifestyle considerations like increasing physical and mental activities, listening to music, attending musical feasts, and smelling specific perfumes. New medical findings confirm nearly all of these recommendations. Along with the aforementioned items, treatment with natural medicines is in the first line of traditional treatment of dementia. New investigations show that many of these herbs have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory factors and acetylcholine esterase inhibitory effects. A few of them also have N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) blocking activity. When these herbs are put together in traditional formulations, they can comprehensively fight against the disease. Conclusions: More ethnopharmacological

  15. Globalizing the Science Curriculum: An Undergraduate Course on Traditional Chinese Medicine as a Complementary Approach to Western Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Robert; Lin, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A course has been created to examine the ways in which China and the West have approached human health and medicine. Though fundamentally different, these two systems are complementary in a number of ways. This course is a model for a global science course in an educational initiative that incorporates Asian themes into science and engineering…

  16. The Merging of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine in China: Old Ideas Cross Culturally Communicated through New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, James A.

    Cross-cultural communication between China and the West, instigated in 1979 by the establishment of an open-door policy in China, has led to the merging of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with the medical practices of the West. The result of these medical exchanges is a blending of medical practices that proves to be more effective in the…

  17. Treatment of Diarrhoea in Rural African Communities: An Overview of Measures to Maximise the Medicinal Potentials of Indigenous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Njume, Collise; Goduka, Nomalungelo I.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rural communities in Africa, particularly in children under the age of five. This calls for the development of cost effective alternative strategies such as the use of herbal drugs in the treatment of diarrhoea in these communities. Expenses associated with the use of orthodox medicines have generated renewed interest and reliance on indigenous medicinal plants in the treatment and management of diarrhoeal infections in rural communities. The properties of many phenolic constituents of medicinal plants such as their ability to inhibit enteropooling and delay gastrointestinal transit are very useful in the control of diarrhoea, but problems such as scarcity of valuable medicinal plants, lack of standardization of methods of preparation, poor storage conditions and incertitude in some traditional health practitioners are issues that affect the efficacy and the practice of traditional medicine in rural African communities. This review appraises the current strategies used in the treatment of diarrhoea according to the Western orthodox and indigenous African health-care systems and points out major areas that could be targeted by health-promotion efforts as a means to improve management and alleviate suffering associated with diarrhoea in rural areas of the developing world. Community education and research with indigenous knowledge holders on ways to maximise the medicinal potentials in indigenous plants could improve diarrhoea management in African rural communities. PMID:23202823

  18. Treatment of anxiety and depression: medicinal plants in retrospect.

    PubMed

    Fajemiroye, James O; da Silva, Dayane M; de Oliveira, Danillo R; Costa, Elson A

    2016-06-01

    Anxiety and depression are complex heterogeneous psychiatric disorders and leading causes of disability worldwide. This review summarizes reports on the fundamentals, prevalence, diagnosis, neurobiology, advancement in treatment of these diseases and preclinical assessment of botanicals. This review was conducted through bibliographic investigation of scientific journals, books, electronic sources, unpublished theses and electronic medium such as ScienceDirect and PubMed. A number of the first-line drugs (benzodiazepine, azapirone, antidepressant tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors, noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, etc.) for the treatment of these psychiatric disorders are products of serendipitous discoveries. Inspite of the numerous classes of drugs that are available for the treatment of anxiety and depression, full remission has remained elusive. The emerging clinical cases have shown increasing interests among health practitioners and patients in phytomedicine. The development of anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs of plant origin takes advantage of multidisciplinary approach including but not limited to ethnopharmacological survey (careful investigation of folkloric application of medicinal plant), phytochemical and pharmacological studies. The selection of a suitable plant for a pharmacological study is a basic and very important step. Relevant clues to achieving this step include traditional use, chemical composition, toxicity, randomized selection or a combination of several criteria. Medicinal plants have been and continue to be a rich source of biomolecule with therapeutic values for the treatment of anxiety and depression. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  19. Timber markets and fuel treatments in the western US

    Treesearch

    Karen L. Abt; Jeffrey P. Prestemon

    2006-01-01

    We developed a model of interrelated timber markets in the U.S. West to assess the impacts of large-scale fuel reduction programs on these markets, and concomitant effects of the market on the fuel reduction programs. The linear programming spatial equilibrium model allows interstate and international trade with western Canada and the rest of the world, while...

  20. Streptomycete endophytes from anti-diabetic medicinal plants of the Western Ghats inhibit alpha-amylase and promote glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Akshatha, V J; Nalini, M S; D'Souza, C; Prakash, H S

    2014-05-01

    α-amylase inhibitor retards the liberation of glucose from dietary complex carbohydrates and delays the absorption of glucose. The purpose of the study was to isolate and select α-amylase inhibitor-producing endophytic actinomycetes from the leaves and stems of Leucas ciliata and Rauwolfia densiflora, two of the well-known medicinal plants used in the treatment for diabetes. Sterilized plant samples were inoculated on the actinomycete isolation agar medium containing 50 ppm cycloheximide and incubated for 4-8 weeks at room temperature. The actinomycetes were isolated on agar medium and identified on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences, the isolates exhibiting >99% similarities were submitted to NCBI, and gene accession numbers were obtained. They were inoculated to International Streptomyces Project 1 medium (ISP 1) for fermentation. The extracts obtained were tested for the anti-diabetic potential by the inhibition of alpha-amylase by colorimetric assay and glucose uptake in the porcine hemidiaphragm. Streptomyces longisporoflavus (JX965948) isolated from the stem fragments of L. ciliata exhibited alpha-amylase inhibitory activity (IC50 values = 162.3 ± 1.05 μg ml⁻¹) in comparison with the standard Acarbose™ (IC50 value = 73.1 ± 1.12 μg ml⁻¹). Extract of Streptomyces sp. (JQ926174) from R. densiflora indicated glucose uptake in the porcine hemidiaphragm. Results indicate for the first time the potential of endophytic streptomycete extracts with anti-diabetic activity. Endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from two medicinal species of the Western Ghats, a biodiversity 'hotspot' in southern India and screened for the anti-diabetic potential for inhibition of α-amylase and improved glucose uptake in the porcine hemidiaphragm. Results indicate the inhibition of α-amylase by Streptomyces longisporoflavus extract with IC50 values of 162.3 ± 1.05 μg ml⁻¹ in comparison with the standard inhibitor Acarbose™ with IC50 value 73.1 ± 1.12 μg ml

  1. Herbal and food folk medicines of the Russlanddeutschen living in Künzelsau/Taläcker, South-Western Germany.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Andrea; Gray, Charlotte

    2008-07-01

    An urban ethnobotanical study was carried out among a community of Russlanddeutschen (Germans from Russia) who in recent years have moved from Russia and Central Asia to Künzelsau, a small town located in Württemberg, in South-Western Germany. Thirty-six in-depth interviews were conducted with the women in this community, and 62 homemade medicinal preparations derived from 46 botanical species were recorded. As well as common medicinal plant uses that are well known in modern evidence-based German and Western European phytotherapy, we were able to record traces of the community's Russian and Central Asian (Turkic) heritage through the very popular use of sorrel as a depurative or for preventing and treating colds and flu; the use of dill as a digestive; watermelon as a diuretic; birch to relieve rheumatism and arthritis; buckwheat as a tonic; rye-based fermented beverages as a stimulant and as a depurative, diverse berries to prevent colds and flu; coriander as a digestive, and other medicinal foods. Traces of archaic German preparations were also recorded, which were probably Swabian in origin. Nearly half of the overall quoted items represented folk functional foods. The researchers believe that the findings in this study could stimulate public health policies aimed at improving both the phyto-pharmacovigilance of lesser-known herbal drugs, and the health and well-being of migrants by promoting a better understanding of emic health beliefs and newcomers' healing strategies.

  2. Zika virus infection and biological treatment for reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Song, Jeehey; Kim, Michael Woo-Il; Gilman-Sachs, Alice

    2017-02-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic is particularly challenging in the field of reproductive medicine as various biological tissues and byproducts, such as intravenous immunoglobulin G or cells are utilized during reproductive cycles, and an infected mother has an increased risk of having babies with fetal microcephaly and other congenital brain anomalies. In this review, current guidelines for prevention of sexual transmission of ZIKV, ZIKV testing, and tissue and blood product usages are summarized for physicians caring for those planning pregnancy or going through infertility treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Real world clinical research of common complications and characteristics of traditional Chinese and western treatment in gastric malignant tumor inpatients].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Yang, Wei; Xie, Yan-Ming; Sun, Yong; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-09-01

    To Understand the characteristics of the common complications in the gastric malignant tumor inpatients in our country, the related traditional Chinese and western medicine combined usage. By using the method of frequency analysis and correlation, analysis the diagnostic and Prescribing information in HIS database of 20 national first-class ternary general hospital inpatients. The most common coexistent disease are malignant tumor in other parts, benign tumor. The most common complications are serous cavity effusion, lung infection, abnormal liver function. In other parts malignant tumor, more than 50% with advanced gastric malignancy; in other parts benign tumor, 86.00% located in the digestive and Urinary system, in the complications, digestive system diseases accounted for 23.80%; further according to the association rules of data mining, and calculate the combination scheme of the most commonly used for acid suppression drugs in combination with the centralizer and eliminate pathogenic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In the real world, most of the gastric malignant tumor disorder crowd is in the advanced stage, with lymph nodes and other parts of the transfer; and at the same time to incorporate the spleen and kidney disease in TCM zang-fu organs dialectical, should notice the reach mark early intervention, achieve the purpose of cure not ill; acid suppression hemostatic drugs combined the centralizer and eliminate pathogenic the three medicine combined treatment of Chinese traditional medicine is relevant.

  4. Deciphering "integrated Chinese and Western medicine" in the rural Lijiang basin: state policy and local practice(s) in socialist China.

    PubMed

    White, S D

    1999-11-01

    Based on ethnographic research during an eighteen-month period in 1989-90, this article explores the rural practice of "integrated Chinese and Western medicine" (integrated medicine) in southwest China's Lijiang basin. Integrated medicine is a consciously formulated hybrid medical practice that was introduced by Chairman Mao during the Cultural Revolution as the cornerstone of national health policy. It was originally envisioned as the epistemological handmaiden of the "cooperative health care" system (of "barefoot doctor" fame). The relationship between the respective People's Republic of China (PRC) practices of "Chinese medicine" and "Western medicine" embedded in integrated medicine is explored here on two levels. Integrated medicine is analyzed both as a state policy and as an everyday practice engaged in by village practitioners and lay villagers alike. During the Maoist period, integrated medicine in the rural Lijiang basin was particularly receptive to local interpretation and experimentation by "the masses." This local license in interpreting state policy represented a point of contrast between integrated medicine and other state-sanctioned medical practices. During the ensuing first decade of the post-Mao period, a popular cultural influence on integrated medicine persisted. Integrated medicine is thus examined here both in terms of how state/urban/elite agencies have enacted processes of "syncretism from above" as well as how local/rural/peasant agencies have enacted processes of "syncretism from below" in shaping it as a therapeutic practice. Rural Lijiang basin explanatory models reveal a pattern whereby afflictions are classified according to either "medicine of systematic correspondence" criteria or "stigmatized affliction" criteria. Both types of criteria reflect distinctive interpretations and appropriations of theories rooted in Chinese therapeutic practices and "Western medicine," respectively. The rural basin practice of integrated medicine thus

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi-Hao A.; Nahas, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE (from January 1966), EMBASE (from January 1980), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched until March 2008, combining the terms irritable bowel syndrome or irritable colon with complementary therapies, alternative medicine, acupuncture, fiber, peppermint oil, herbal, traditional, yoga, massage, meditation, mind, relaxation, probiotic, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, or behavior therapy. Results were screened to include only clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Level I evidence was available for most interventions. MAIN MESSAGE Soluble fibre improves constipation and global IBS symptoms. Peppermint oil alleviates IBS symptoms, including abdominal pain. Probiotic trials show overall benefit for IBS but there is little evidence supporting the use of any specific strain. Hypnotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy are also effective therapeutic options for appropriate patients. Certain herbal formulas are supported by limited evidence, but safety is a potential concern. All interventions are supported by systematic reviews or meta-analyses. CONCLUSION Several complementary and alternative therapies can be recommended as part of an evidence-based approach to the treatment of IBS; these might provide patients with satisfactory relief and improve the therapeutic alliance. PMID:19221071

  6. Treatment adherence and beliefs about medicines among Egyptian vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa A Sayed; Abou-Taleb, Doaa A E; Mohamed, Refaat Ragheb

    2016-11-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disorder of depigmentation that has different treatment modalities, but patients' nonadherence is common. This study aimed to assess the influence of patients' medication beliefs on patients' adherence to topical, oral medications, and phototherapy in vitiligo. Between September 2015 and February 2016, 260 patients with vitiligo were asked to fill in the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) to assess their beliefs about therapy for vitiligo. Their adherence to the therapy was examined using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). The MMAS-8 scale and BMQ had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.78 and 0.66, respectively). Using Morisky's recommended cutoff point, 71% of patients were categorized as low or nonadherent to the scheduled therapy. Patients who perceived specific necessity of dermatological medicines significantly adhered to their therapy (OR 1.23; 95% CI 1.09, 1.38; p = 0.001) whereas patients who had specific concerns about the adverse effects exhibited significant low adherence (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.56, 0.76; p < 0.001). Positive beliefs about the necessity of medications in vitiligo do not necessarily reflect high adherence. Patients' adherence behavior is a multidimensional and dynamic process. The prolonged course of treatment, its cost, and unsatisfactory outcomes influenced the patients' adherence. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Medicinal wild plant knowledge and gathering patterns in a Mapuche community from North-western Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Estomba, Diego; Ladio, Ana; Lozada, Mariana

    2006-01-03

    Medicinal plant use has persisted as a long standing tradition in the Mapuche communities of Southern Argentina and Chile. An ethnobotanical survey was conducted in the rural Curruhuinca community located near the mountain city of San Martin de los Andes, Argentina. Semi-structured interviews were carried out on 22 families in order to examine the present use of medicinal plants and their reputed therapeutic effects. Ecological variables, such as distance to the gathering site and biogeographical origin were also analyzed. Our results showed that the Curruhuinca dwellers cited 89 plant species for medicinal purposes, both of native and exotic origin. They know about 47 native plants, of which they use 40, and they know of 42 exotic medicinal plants of which they use 34. A differential pattern was observed given that only native species, relevant for the traditional Mapuche medicine, were collected at more distant gathering sites. The interviewees mentioned 268 plant usages. Those most frequently reported had therapeutic value for treating digestive ailments (33%), as analgesic/anti-inflammatory (25%) and antitusive (13%). Native species were mainly cited as analgesics, and for gynecological, urinary and "cultural syndrome" effects, whereas exotic species were mainly cited for digestive ailments. The total number of medicinal plants known and used by the interviewees was positively correlated with people's age, indicating that this ancient knowledge tends to disappear in the younger generations.

  8. [Effect of integrative Chinese and Western medicine in treating chronic urticaria and its impact on interleukin-10 and interleukin-8 in peripheral blood].

    PubMed

    Jin, Cai-Yun; Wang, Dong-Lian; Fang, Zhi-De

    2008-04-01

    To study the clinical effects of integrative Chinese and Western medicine in treating chronic urticaria and its impact on peripheral blood content of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-8. Patients were assigned to the treatment group and the control group according to their sequence of visiting. They were treated orally with levocetirizine hydrochloride 5 mg once a day, but additional Kangqian Decoction (a self-formulated Chinese herbal preparation consisted of thorowax root 15 g, divaricate saposhnikovia root 9 g, licorice root 15 g, moutan bark 15 g, red sage root 15 g, milkvetch root 30 g, and schisandra fruit 12 g, etc. ) was given to the treatment group one dose per day, for 2 weeks as one therapeutic course. The efficacy was evaluated after two courses of medication, and patients' IL-10 and IL-8 levels in the peripheral blood were determined before and after treatment. The total effective rate in the treatment group and control group was 93.75% and 56.66% respectively with significance difference between them (P <0.01). After treatment, the level of serum IL-10 was significantly lower while that of IL-8 was significantly higher in the treatment group (2.96 +/- 1.66, 50.17 +/- 32.35) than that in the control group (4.77 +/- 2.99, 29.44 +/- 17.62) respectively (P < 0.01). Chronic urticaria was related to the immune unbalance of body. Integrative medicine could adjust immune function to display a quick, potent anti-inflammatory and anti-anaphylactic actions in treating chronic urticaria with less adverse reaction and low recurrent rate.

  9. Medicinal treatments of cholesterol gallstones: old, current and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, Agostino; Wang, Helen H; Moschetta, Antonio; Wang, David Q-H

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol cholelithiasis is one of the most common and costly digestive diseases. Although gallstones are usually asymptomatic and no treatment is generally required, it is imperative to treat symptomatic gallstones with or without complicated conditions. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is first-line therapy for symptomatic gallstones. By contrast, a cautious study on the natural history of the disease and costs of therapy, indicates that non-surgical treatment of gallstones is currently restricted to a subgroup of patients with mild symptoms or with small radiolucent cholesterol gallstones in a functioning gallbladder. Appropriate selection of patients suitable for medical therapy is therefore of key importance. Oral litholysis with the hydrophilic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid induces cholesterol desaturation of bile and may lead to gallstone dissolution in patients with small, radiolucent, cholesterol-enriched stones in a functioning gallbladder with a patent cystic duct. Recent studies from experimental animal models and preliminary findings in humans also suggest that blocking intestinal absorption of cholesterol with the powerful, specific, and effective NPC1L1 inhibitor ezetimibe, may offer a novel and exciting strategy for the treatment of cholesterol gallstones. A similar possibility might arise from manipulation of specific nuclear receptors involved in cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis. Current views and perspectives on medicinal treatment of cholesterol gallstone disease are discussed here.

  10. Traditional medicine in the treatment of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Liu, Yanli; Zhu, Weili; Shi, Jie; Liu, Yu; Ling, Walter; Kosten, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate clinical trials and neurochemical mechanisms of the action of traditional herbal remedies and acupuncture for treating drug addiction. We used computerized literature searches in English and Chinese and examined texts written before these computerized databases existed. We used search terms of treatment and neurobiology of herbal medicines, and acupuncture for drug abuse and dependence. Acupuncture showed evidence for clinical efficacy and relevant neurobiological mechanisms in opiate withdrawal, but it showed poor efficacy for alcohol and nicotine withdrawal or relapse prevention, and no large studies supported its efficacy for cocaine in well-designed clinical trials. Clinical trials were rare for herbal remedies. Radix Puerariae showed the most promising efficacy for alcoholism by acting through daidzin, which inhibits mitocochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and leads to disulfiram-like alcohol reactions. Peyote also has some evidence for alcoholism treatment among Native Americans. Ginseng and Kava lack efficacy data in addictions, and Kava can be hepatotoxic. Thunbergia laurifolia can protect against alcoholic liver toxicity. Withania somnifera and Salvia miltiorrhiza have no efficacy data, but can reduce morphine tolerance and alcohol intake, respectively, in animal models. Traditional herbal treatments can compliment pharmacotherapies for drug withdrawal and possibly relapse prevention with less expense and perhaps fewer side effects with notable exceptions. Both acupuncture and herbal treatments need testing as adjuncts to reduce doses and durations of standard pharmacotherapies.

  11. [Analysis of citations referenced in articles published in Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine from 2001 to 2004].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-hai; Liang, Li

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the referential rule and the informative absorbing capacity of the Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine (CJITWM), and analyze the characteristics of literature requirement of scientists working in integrated Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM) field offering suggestions on literary utilization. Citation analysis was used to analyze the references cited in 1825 articles published in CJIM from 2001 to 2004 according to their time sequence of publishing. The citation rate was 53.64%, and 9.51% citations per article. Most of the citations were mainly cited from journals (85.38%) and books (13.4%). The Price Index was 49.22%, and the self-citation rate for author and periodical were 3.63% and 7.77% respectively. CJITWM is a highly authorized and representative professional academic periodical in the field of ICWM. The citations are mainly cited from periodicals written in Chinese or English, they are of good novelty and quality, but the citation rate should be further improved.

  12. Alternative ponderosa pine restoration treatments in the western United States

    Treesearch

    James McIver; Phillip Weatherspoon; Carl Edminster

    2001-01-01

    Compared to presettlement times, many ponderosa pine forests of the United States are now more dense and have greater quantities of fuels. Widespread treatments are needed in these forests to restore ecological integrity and to reduce the risk of uncharacteristically severe fires. Among possible restorative treatments, however, the appropriate balance among cuttings,...

  13. Use of herbal medicine among pregnant women on antenatal care at nekemte hospital, Western ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bayisa, Bodena; Tatiparthi, Ramanjireddy; Mulisa, Eshetu

    2014-11-01

    Investigations across the world confirm dramatic increment in the use of complementary and alternative medicine in pregnant women. The most important aspect is lack of awareness of pregnant women about potential effects of using traditional medicine on fetus; some herbal products may be teratogenic in human and animal models. In this area, so far, no research has been conducted in Ethiopia to assess traditional medicine use in pregnant women. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and use of herbal drugs among pregnant women attending Nekemte Hospital to provide baseline information for future studies. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted by quantitative and qualitative approaches to identify the prevalence of using herbal medicines among pregnant women. About 50.4% of study participants used herbal drugs during their pregnancy. The proportion of herbal drug usage was gradually decreased along with the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The most and least commonly used herbs were ginger (44.36%) and tenaadam (9.15 %), respectively. The common indications of herbal remedies use during pregnancy were nausea (23.90%) and morning sickness (21.05%). The result of the present study confirmed wide use of herbal drugs use during pregnancy that need to report the safety concerns of these drugs during pregnancy. To achieve the requirements of pregnant women, it is vital for health care workers to be familiar with the effect of herbal medicine in pregnancy.

  14. General public knowledge, preferred dosage forms, and beliefs toward medicines in western Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Mahmoud S; Abdallah, Qasem M; Alshakhsheer, Sami M; Alosaimi, Salman B; Althmali, Ahmed R; Alahmari, Solaiman A

    2014-06-01

    To measure general public knowledge, source of knowledge, preferred dosage forms, and beliefs toward medicines. A cross-sectional study design using convenience-sampling technique was used. A pre-validated questionnaire was designed and distributed to the general public through face-to-face interviews. All data were analyzed, and p-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. The study took place in the Clinical Pharmacy Department, Taif University, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between August 2012 and February 2013 RESULTS: Nine hundred participants successfully responded to this study. Males represented two-thirds of the respondents (66.8%). In addition, 52% of respondents were of high education level. Modern (74.2%) and alternative medicines (88.7%) were understood by most respondents. Tablets (69.6%) and capsules (37.6%) represented the highest preferred dosage forms. In addition, physicians (66.6%) and pharmacists (46.2%) were the main sources of information regarding medicines. In terms of beliefs, respondents showed wrong beliefs in many statements used in this study. There is a need to improve public knowledge and beliefs toward medicines as well as utilizing public preferred dosage forms. In addition, pharmacists should play a major role in these programs since they are experts on medicines and play a more active role in patient education and counseling.

  15. Use of Herbal Medicine Among Pregnant Women on Antenatal Care at Nekemte Hospital, Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bayisa, Bodena; Tatiparthi, Ramanjireddy; Mulisa, Eshetu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Investigations across the world confirm dramatic increment in the use of complementary and alternative medicine in pregnant women. The most important aspect is lack of awareness of pregnant women about potential effects of using traditional medicine on fetus; some herbal products may be teratogenic in human and animal models. In this area, so far, no research has been conducted in Ethiopia to assess traditional medicine use in pregnant women. Objectives: Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and use of herbal drugs among pregnant women attending Nekemte Hospital to provide baseline information for future studies. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted by quantitative and qualitative approaches to identify the prevalence of using herbal medicines among pregnant women. About 50.4% of study participants used herbal drugs during their pregnancy. The proportion of herbal drug usage was gradually decreased along with the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The most and least commonly used herbs were ginger (44.36%) and tenaadam (9.15 %), respectively. The common indications of herbal remedies use during pregnancy were nausea (23.90%) and morning sickness (21.05%). Results: The result of the present study confirmed wide use of herbal drugs use during pregnancy that need to report the safety concerns of these drugs during pregnancy. Conclusions: To achieve the requirements of pregnant women, it is vital for health care workers to be familiar with the effect of herbal medicine in pregnancy. PMID:25625049

  16. Systematic review on traditional medicinal plants used for the treatment of malaria in Ethiopia: trends and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alebie, Getachew; Urga, Befikadu; Worku, Amha

    2017-08-01

    Ethiopia is endowed with abundant medicinal plant resources and traditional medicinal practices. However, available research evidence on indigenous anti-malarial plants is highly fragmented in the country. The present systematic review attempted to explore, synthesize and compile ethno-medicinal research evidence on anti-malarial medicinal plants in Ethiopia. A systematic web search analysis and review was conducted on research literature pertaining to medicinal plants used for traditional malaria treatment in Ethiopia. Data were collected from a total of 82 Ethiopian studies meeting specific inclusion criteria including published research articles and unpublished thesis reports. SPSS Version 16 was used to summarize relevant ethno-botanical/medicinal information using descriptive statistics, frequency, percentage, tables, and bar graphs. A total of 200 different plant species (from 71 families) used for traditional malaria treatment were identified in different parts of Ethiopia. Distribution and usage pattern of anti-malarial plants showed substantial variability across different geographic settings. A higher diversity of anti-malarial plants was reported from western and southwestern parts of the country. Analysis of ethno-medicinal recipes indicated that mainly fresh leaves were used for preparation of remedies. Decoction, concoction and eating/chewing were found to be the most frequently employed herbal remedy preparation methods. Notably, anti-malarial herbal remedies were administered by oral route. Information on potential side effects of anti-malarial herbal preparations was patchy. However, some anti-malarial plants were reported to have potentially serious side effects using different local antidotes and some specific contra-indications. The study highlighted a rich diversity of indigenous anti-malarial medicinal plants with equally divergent herbal remedy preparation and use pattern in Ethiopia. Baseline information gaps were observed in key geographic

  17. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. Methods: 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days’ treatment. Results: after 30 days’ treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: patients with coronary heart disease, treated by pulsed magnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function. PMID:26309664

  18. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days' treatment. after 30 days' treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (P<0.05). patients with coronary heart disease, treated by pulsed magnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function.

  19. The temple and the plane tree: rationality and cult at the beginnings of western medicine.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, M H

    2001-10-01

    There are multiple interrelationships between science, medicine and visual arts. This article discusses aspects of architecture associated with the Greek healing cult of Asklepios, the case in point being the Asklepios temple on the island of Kos in the Aegean. Further, the cult is contrasted with the beginnings of the observation-based medicine practised by Hippocrates (460-c.370 BC). Finally, it is suggested that including elements of visual arts in medical education is consistent with the aims of the new medical curricula.

  20. Black Contributions to the Early History of Western Medicine: Lack of Recognition as a Cause of Black Under-Representation in US Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Frederick

    1979-01-01

    During several millenia, blacks in ancient Egypt made numerous contributions to medicine and were acknowledged as the inventors of the art of medicine. They produced the earliest physicians, medical knowledge, and medical literature. They contributed to the development of medicine in ancient Greece. Ancient writers, including Herodotus, Isocrates, and Diodorus, affirm this. Modern presentations of ancient medicine, however, deprive blacks of the knowledge of their early contributions to medicine by ignoring or subtly misrepresenting the black identity of the ancient Egyptians. Blacks are currently under-represented in US medical schools. It is proposed that the recognition of the contributions of blacks to the early history of Western medicine would inspire black students to study medicine. PMID:423296

  1. Management of genetic epilepsies: From empirical treatment to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Striano, Pasquale; Vari, Maria Stella; Mazzocchetti, Chiara; Verrotti, Alberto; Zara, Federico

    2016-05-01

    Despite the over 20 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) now licensed for epilepsy treatment, seizures can be effectively controlled in about ∼70% of patients. Thus, epilepsy treatment is still challenging in about one third of patients and this may lead to a severe medically, physically, and socially disabling condition. However, there is clear evidence of heterogeneity of response to existing AEDs and a significant unmet need for effective intervention. A number of studies have shown that polymorphisms may influence the poor or inadequate therapeutic response as well as the occurrence of adverse effects. In addition, the new frontier of genomic technologies, including chromosome microarrays and next-generation sequencing, improved our understanding of the genetic architecture of epilepsies. Recent findings in some genetic epilepsy syndromes provide insights into mechanisms of epileptogenesis, unrevealing the role of a number of genes with different functions, such as ion channels, proteins associated to the vesical synaptic cycle or involved in energy metabolism. The rapid progress of high-throughput genomic sequencing and corresponding analysis tools in molecular diagnosis are revolutionizing the practice and it is a fact that for some monogenic epilepsies the molecular confirmation may influence the choice of the treatment. Moreover, the novel genetic methods, that are able to analyze all known genes at a reasonable price, are of paramount importance to discover novel therapeutic avenues and individualized (or precision) medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vijayshree; Shinto, Lynne; Bourdette, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disabling disease of the CNS that affects people during early adulthood. Despite several US FDA-approved medications, the treatment options in MS are limited. Many people with MS explore complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments to help control their MS and treat their symptoms. Surveys suggest that up to 70% of people with MS have tried one or more CAM treatment for their MS. People with MS using CAM generally report deriving some benefit from the therapies. The CAM therapies most frequently used include diet, omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants. There is very limited research evaluating the safety and effectiveness of CAM in MS. The most promising among CAM therapies that warrant further investigation are a low-fat diet, omega-3 fatty acids, lipoic acid and vitamin D supplementation as potential anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents in both relapsing and progressive forms of MS. There is very limited research evaluating the safety and effectiveness of CAM in MS. However, in recent years, the NIH and the National MS Society have been actively supporting the research in this very important area. PMID:20441425

  3. Local indigenous knowledge about some medicinal plants in and around Kakamega forest in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Otieno, Nickson Erick; Analo, Caleb

    2012-01-01

    Kakamega forest is Kenya's only rainforest and is distinguishably rich in biodiversity but threatened by agricultural encroachment and other forms of human activity. It is also one of Kenya's Important Bird Areas and a significant source of natural products to neighboring rural communities, such as medicinal plants, food, wood and other fibers. By using structured questionnaires for direct interviews, local indigenous knowledge was tapped through involvement of a focal group of elderly key informants in three blocks of the forest. Forty key species of medicinal plants used by local people were identified and recorded. Fifty-five percent of these were shrubs, thirty-two percent trees, seven-and-a-half percent lower plants such as herbs or forbs while five percent were climbers. About seventy percent of the medicinal plants occurred inside the forest itself and thirty percent around the edge and the immediate surroundings outside the forest. Thirty-eight (95%) of the plants were indigenous to Kenya and two (5%) exotic. Such extensive indigenous knowledge of the medicinal uses of the plants, including their distribution trends in the forest, may be tapped for decision support in rural health service planning, policy formulation for conserving the forest, tracking and mitigation of climate change impacts.

  4. A technique for identifying treatment opportunities from western Oregon and Washington forest survey plots.

    Treesearch

    Colin D. MacLean

    1980-01-01

    Identification of opportunities for silvicultural treatment from inventory data is an important objective of Renewable Resources Evaluation in the Pacific Northwest. This paper describes the field plot design and data analysis procedure used by what used to be known as Forest Survey to determine the treatment opportunity associated with each inventory plot in western...

  5. Comparison of the knowledge, attitudes and practice with antibiotic use between traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine usual attenders in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wun, Yuk Tsan; Lam, Tai Pong; Lam, Kwok Fai; Sun, Kai Sing

    2014-02-01

    Patients who usually attend Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) need to go to western medicine (WM) doctors for antibiotics in Hong Kong. They might have different knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) with antibiotics from the WM-attenders. This study compares TCM attenders with the WM-attenders in Hong Kong about their KAP with antibiotics. The comparison could help future campaigns/education on appropriate antibiotic use. A questionnaire on KAP with antibiotics was designed after eight focus groups of purposively selected participants. A territory-wide telephone survey then interviewed randomly selected residents who were aged 18 years or above and spoke the local dialect. Of 2471 respondents, 270 and 2092 usually attended TCM and WM, respectively. Majority of both the TCM- and WM-attenders preferred doctors who were judicious in prescribing antibiotics and seldom asked for them. The TCM-attenders were significantly more likely to be female and with lower household income. They were also more likely to agree that antibiotics were not useful for upper respiratory tract infections and that antibiotic resistance was a serious local problem. They were less likely to accept or be treated with antibiotics. The TCM-attenders were also more concerned about the side-effects of antibiotics. However, they were also less likely than the WM-attenders to always finish a full course of antibiotic. Apart from non-compliance, the TCM-attenders' KAP with antibiotics favour the appropriate use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polydrug abuse among opioid maintenance treatment patients is related to inadequate dose of maintenance treatment medicine.

    PubMed

    Heikman, Pertti Kalevi; Muhonen, Leea Hellevi; Ojanperä, Ilkka Antero

    2017-07-06

    Polydrug abuse is a known problem among opioid-dependent patients receiving opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). However, improved laboratory diagnostics is required to reveal polydrug abuse in its current scope. Furthermore, there are few studies focusing on the relationship between polydrug abuse and adequacy of the dose of OMT medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the polydrug abuse among opioid-dependent patients receiving OMT with inadequate (Group IA) and adequate (Group A) doses of OMT medicine as experienced by the patients. Craving for opioids and withdrawal symptoms were evaluated as indicators of the adequacy rating. This is a retrospective register-based study of 60 OMT patients on either methadone or sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone medication, whose polydrug abuse was studied from urine samples by means of a comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry method. Inadequate doses of the OMT medicines were associated with higher subjective withdrawal scores and craving for opioids. Six groups of abused substances (benzodiazepines, amphetamines, opioids, cannabis, new psychoactive substances, and non-prescribed psychotropic medicines) were found among OMT patients. Group IA patients showed significantly more abuse of benzodiazepines and amphetamines than the Group A patients. All the new psychoactive substances and most of the non-prescribed psychotropic medicines were detected from the Group IA patients. There was no difference in the doses of the OMT medicine between Groups IA and A patients. Polydrug abuse, detected by definitive laboratory methods, was widespread and more common among Group IA than Group A patients, emphasizing the requirement for individual OMT medicine dose adjustment.

  7. Availability and affordability of essential medicines for children in the Western part of Ethiopia: implication for access.

    PubMed

    Sado, Edao; Sufa, Alemu

    2016-03-15

    Essential medicines (EMs) are those medicines which satisfy the priority health care needs of the population. Although it is a fundamental human right, access to essential medicines has been a big challenge in developing countries particularly for children. WHO recommends assessing the current situations on availability and affordability of EMs as the first step towards enhancing access to them. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess access to EMs for children based on availability, affordability, and price. We adapted the WHO and Health Action International tools to measure availability, affordability, and prices of EMs. We collected data on 22 EMs for children from 15 public to 40 private sectors' drug outlets in east Wollega zone. Availability was expressed as percentage of drug outlets per sector that stocked surveyed medicines on the day of data collection, and prices were expressed as median price ratio. Affordability was measured as the number of daily wages required for the lowest-paid government unskilled worker (1.04 US $per day) to purchase one standard treatment of an acute condition or treatment for a chronic condition for a month. The average availability of essential medicines was 43 % at public and 42.8 % at private sectors. Lowest priced medicines were sold at median of 1.18 and 1.54 times their international reference prices (IRP) in the public and private sectors, respectively. Half of these medicines were priced at 0.90 to 1.3 in the public sector and 1.23 to 2.07 in the private sector times their respective IRP. Patient prices were 36 % times higher in the private sector than in the public sector. Medicines were unaffordable for treatment of common conditions prevalent in the zone at both public and private sectors as they cost a day or more days' wages for the lowest paid government unskilled worker. Access to EMs to children is hampered by low availability and high price which is unaffordable. Thus, further study on larger scale is

  8. Medicine and psychiatry in Western culture: among Ancient Greek myths and modern prejudices.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Michele; Clementi, Nicoletta; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2009-01-01

    While many ancient cultures contributed to our current knowledge about medicine and psychiatry origins, Ancient Greeks were among the best observers of feelings and moods patients could express toward medicine and toward what today referred as "psychopathology". Myths and religious references were used to explain what elsewhere impossible to understand or easily communicated. Most of ancient myths focus on ambiguous feelings patients could have towards drugs, especially psychotropic ones. Interestingly, such prejudices are common yet today. Recalling ancient findings and descriptions made using myths, should represent a valuable knowledge for modern physicians, especially for psychiatrists, and their patients, with the aim of better understanding each other and therefore achieving a better clinical outcome. The paper explores many human aspects and feelings toward doctors and their cures, referring to ancient myths, focusing on the perception of mental illness.

  9. New treatment paradigms for ADPKD: moving towards precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Lanktree, Matthew B; Chapman, Arlene B

    2017-12-01

    The natural history of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by a variable rate of cyst development and increase in total kidney volume (TKV), variable kidney function decline and age of onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and variable presentation of renal and extrarenal manifestations. Precision medicine is proposed to improve patient outcomes by tailoring therapy to the specific genetic background, pathophysiology, disease burden, prognosis and status of each individual. This approach to the management of patients with ADPKD is nearing clinical implementation owing to advances in genetics, imaging, biomarker development and therapeutics. In this Review, we discuss pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for the treatment of hypertension and proteinuria, and for slowing the rate of cyst growth in patients with ADPKD before the development of ESRD. We provide recommendations for the management of renal complications, including cyst infection, nephrolithiasis, haematuria and chronic pain. The early treatment of patients with ADPKD who are largely asymptomatic is associated with a therapeutic burden but slows cyst growth and delays subsequent loss of kidney function, which ultimately delays the need for renal replacement therapy and has a positive effect on the quality of life of patients.

  10. Chinese Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Feng, Bo; Yang, Xiaochen; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Xingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the current clinical evidence of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for prehypertension. Search Strategy. Electronic databases were searched until May, 2013. Inclusion Criteria. We included randomized clinical trials testing CHM against life style intervention and no treatment, or combined with life style intervention against life style intervention. Data Extraction and Analyses. Study selection, data extraction, quality assessment, and data analyses were conducted according to Cochrane standards. Results. Five trials were included. Methodological quality of the trials was evaluated as generally low. Only 1 trial reported allocation sequence. No trial reported the allocation concealment, double blinding, placebo control, presample size estimation, intention to treat analysis, and drop-out. All the included trials were not multicenter and large scale. Although meta-analysis showed that CHM is superior to either life style intervention group or no treatment group in decreasing blood pressure, we are unable to draw a definite conclusion on the effect of CHM due to the poor research methods used in the reviewed trials. The safety of CHM is still uncertain. Conclusions. There is no evidence to show that CHM is effective and safe for prehypertension due to serious methodological flaw of the reviewed trials. Rigorously designed trials are warranted to confirm these results. PMID:23878599

  11. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome using complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Full-Young; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2009-06-01

    The therapeutic objectives for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients are to improve their functioning in society. Accordingly, recommended management is to develop a logical strategy including a positive diagnosis, consideration of the patient's agenda and emotional state, critical appraisal of the efficacies of various drugs and a graded therapeutic response. Unfortunately, none of the currently available drugs (e.g. antispasmodics, antidiarrheals, osmotics, cathartics, bulking agents, tranquilizers, sedatives) are globally effective in treating all IBS symptoms, and the advanced receptor-targeted drugs are not always successfully and safely marketed. Consequently, more than half of patients may seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to treat the annoying bowel symptoms. Physicians have considered these CAM measures to have an "enhanced placebo effect". For example, many herbal medicine and plant products are globally used to treat IBS, whereas their efficacies are often inconclusive because of small sample sizes, inadequate data analyses and lack of standardized preparations. Meta-analyses do not establish their true efficacy. Acupuncture has long been employed by patients themselves to treat functional gastrointestinal disorders with satisfactory response, but its effect on IBS does not seem to be promising. Peppermint oil, melatonin and clay-like materials are effective in treating some IBS symptoms, while their true pharmacology remains enigmatic. In conclusion, IBS treatment is usually tailored to the individual's manifestations, ranging from reassurance to psychotherapy. Apart from conventional medications, CAM may be considered individually as a supplement or alternative to treat IBS patients that is at least equal in effect to placebo if patients do not exhibit any intolerable or serious side effects.

  12. [French Society of Vascular Medicine good medical practice guidelines on safety and environment in vascular medicine: Treatment of varicose veins].

    PubMed

    Giordana, P; Miserey, G

    2014-12-01

    These guidelines proposed by the French Society of Vascular Medicine define the optimal environment for vascular medicine practice: outpatient clinic; equipment, layout and maintenance of the care center; infection risk prevention (hand hygiene, individual protective measures, exposure to blood, ultrasound apparatus, etc.); common interventions and techniques (liquid and foam sclerotherapy, endovenous thermal treatments). These guidelines do not include phlebectomy and use of ultrasound contrast agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A strategic assessment of forest biomass and fuel reduction treatments in western states

    Treesearch

    Bob Rummer; Jeff Prestemon; Dennis May; Pat Miles; John Vissage; Ron McRoberts; Greg Liknes; Wayne D. Shepperd; Dennis Ferguson; William Elliot; Sue Miller; Steve Reutebuch; Jamie Barbour; Jeremy Fried; Bryce Stokes; Edward Bilek; Ken Skog

    2003-01-01

    In the 15 western states there are at least 28 million acres of forest that could benefit from some type of mechanical treatment to reduce hazardous fuel loading. It is estimated that about 60 percent of this area could be operationally accessible for treatment with a total biomass treatment volume of 345 million bone dry tons (bdt). Two-thirds of this forest area is...

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal morphology and dark septate fungal associations in medicinal and aromatic plants of Western Ghats, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, T; Senthilkumar, M; Rajangam, M; Udaiyan, K

    2006-12-01

    We investigated roots of 107 medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) in the Western Ghats region of Southern India for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) associations. Of the 107 MAPs belonging to 98 genera in 52 families examined, 79 were AM and 38 harbored a DSE association. Typical Arum- and Paris-type mycorrhizas are first reported in the presumed nonmycorrhizal family Amaranthaceae. Similarly, DSE associations are recorded for the first time in nine plant families and 37 plant species. Thirty MAPs had both AM and DSE associations. The number of MAPs having Arum-type mycorrhiza was greater than those having Paris-type. This was more prominent among herbaceous plants than in trees where the Paris-type was predominant. Similarly, the Arum-type was more prevalent in annuals than in perennials. DSE associations were more frequent in herbs and perennials compared to other MAPs.

  15. Kampo medicines as alternatives for treatment of migraine: six case studies.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuyuki; Sato, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Kampo is a well-recognized form of traditional medicine in Japan. This paper reports upon six cases of successful use of Kampo medicines, herbal medicine preparations, for the treatment of migraine. Most of the patients had been treated with conventional medicines, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or triptans, but were not satisfied with the outcomes of these conventional treatments with regard to their effectiveness or feelings of discomfort after administration. We administered two Kampo medicines, goshuyuto for prevention of migraine and senkyuchachosan as a painkiller. Both Kampo medicines worked successfully in the treatment of migraine and the patients were satisfied with their effects. Kampo medicine seems a favorable candidate for alternative therapy of migraine.

  16. [Individualized clinical treatment from the prospective of hepatotoxicity of non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Chen, Juan; Hou, Xue-Feng; Song, Jie; Feng, Liang; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2017-04-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine has a long history in clinical application, and been proved to be safe and effective. In recent years, the toxicity and side-effects caused by the western medicine have been attracted much attention. As a result, increasing people have shifted their attention to traditional Chinese medicine. Nonetheless, due to the natural origin of traditional Chinese medicine and the lack of basic knowledge about them, many people mistakenly consider the absolute safety of traditional Chinese medicine, except for well-known toxic ones, such as arsenic. However, according to the clinical practices and recent studies, great importance shall be attached to the toxicity of non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine, in particular the hepatotoxicity. Relevant studies indicated that the toxicity of non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine is closely correlated with individual gene polymorphism and constitution. By discussing the causes and mechanisms of the hepatotoxicity induced by non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine in clinical practices, we wrote this article with the aim to provide new ideas for individualized clinical therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and give guidance for rational and safe use of traditional Chinese medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of stingless bee (Trigona sp.) propolis used in the folk medicine of Western Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Milind K; Punekar, Sachin A; Ranade, Ramchandra V; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2012-05-07

    Stingless bee (Trigona sp.) propolis is widely used in the folk medicine of Western Maharashtra, India to treat a variety of ailments. To determine the chemical composition and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Indian stingless bee propolis. Chemical composition of the ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) was determined by GC-MS analysis. A range of bacteria including multidrug resistant (MDR) cultures as well as a yeast strain was tested for antimicrobial activity using EEP. MIC, MBC, MFC, Kill curves and post agent effect (PAE) of the EEP were assessed using standard microbiological methods. GC-MS analysis revealed that propolis contained 24 compounds (9 known and 15 newly reported). Many of these were known bioactive compounds, including antimicrobials. The MICs of EEP were in the range of 1.21-9.75μg/mL while the MBCs/MFC were between 2.43 and 19.5μg/mL. The time required to achieve 90% (1 log(10)) reduction in culture growth ranged between 1.06 and 3.53h at their respective MIC values. PAE for all the cultures was >24h. Indian stingless bee propolis has a complex nature with 24 chemical compounds. It has a potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The latter finding, in conjunction with other bioactive properties, could provide a scientific basis to its popular use in the Indian folk medicine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Perceived quality of communication amongst outpatients in western and traditional Chinese medicine clinics in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Chung, Vincent Chi Ho; Lau, Chun Hong; Wong, Eric Ming Chung; Yeoh, Eng Kiong; Griffiths, Sian Meryl

    2009-04-01

    This study investigates differences in perceived communication by patients of the quality of outpatient episodes in an urban Chinese population. A representative, population based survey was conducted in Hong Kong, China. A random sample of respondents aged >15 years who had received outpatient care the 30 days previous to enumeration were invited to evaluate communication with their doctors and the overall quality of their latest consultation. The majority thought that their clinicians were listening carefully (93.5%), explaining clearly (93.1%), expressing appropriate respect (93.8%), and were allocating sufficient time for consultation (89.5%). 97.6% gave 5-10 points out of 10 for overall healthcare quality. Compared to users of private western medicine (WM) services, multivariate analysis showed that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) patients were more likely to rate their clinicians highly for listening skills but low for respect. Users of WM public services were more likely to be dissatisfied with all evaluated aspects. Favourable ratings were more likely to be expressed by those who are older, less educated, and those who paid by indemnity insurance. We have highlighted three unique observations: first, patients' perception of clinician-patient communication in out patients differs between WM and TCM. Second, patients who used public WM services rate the quality of their visits lower than those in the private WM sector. Lastly, we have observed a negative association between higher education background and satisfaction level. Further researches are warranted.

  19. Evolutionary medicine: A meaningful connection between omics, disease, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Abu-Asab, Mones; Chaouchi, Mohamed; Amri, Hakima

    2008-02-01

    The evolutionary nature of diseases requires that their omics be analyzed by evolution-compatible analytical tools such as parsimony phylogenetics in order to reveal common mutations and pathways' modifications. Since the heterogeneity of the omics data renders some analytical tools such as phenetic clustering and Bayesian likelihood inefficient, a parsimony phylogenetic paradigm seems to connect between the omics and medicine. It offers a seamless, dynamic, predictive, and multidimensional analytical approach that reveals biological classes, and disease ontogenies; its analysis can be translated into practice for early detection, diagnosis, biomarker identification, prognosis, and assessment of treatment. Parsimony phylogenetics identifies classes of specimens, the clades, by their shared derived expressions, the synapomorphies, which are also the potential biomarkers for the classes that they delimit. Synapomorphies are determined through polarity assessment (ancestral vs. derived) of m/z or gene-expression values and parsimony analysis; this process also permits intra and interplatform comparability and produces higher concordance between platforms. Furthermore, major trends in the data are also interpreted from the graphical representation of the data as a tree diagram termed cladogram; it depicts directionality of change, identifies the transitional patterns from healthy to diseased, and can be developed into a predictive tool for early detection.

  20. Traditional Chinese medicine versus western medicine as used in China in the management of rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized, single-blind, 24-week study.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ting; Ou, Ai-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Wei; Fu, Li-Yuan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Yan, Xiao-Ping; Feng, Xing-Hua; Su, Li; Song, Yue-Jin; Zeng, Sheng-Ping; Liu, Wei; Qian, Xian; Zhu, Wan-Hua; Lao, Ying-Rong; Xu, Wei-Hua; Wen, Ze-Huai; He, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Bao-Juan; Chen, Geng-Xin; Xue, Su-Qin

    2014-12-01

    This study is designed to compare the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with western medicine (WM) in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a 24-week, randomized, multicenter, single-blind study comparing TCM with WM (as used in China) carried out between June 2002 and December 2004 in nine research centers in China, involving 489 patients. Patients were randomized to receive TCM (n = 247), MTX and SSZ (n = 242). MTX was started at a dose of 5 mg to a final dose of 7.5-15 mg weekly. The maintenance dose was 2.5-7.5 mg weekly. The starting dose of SSZ was 0.25 g bid, increasing by 0.25 g a day once a week to a final dose of 0.5-1 g qid. The maintenance dose was 0.5 g tid to qid. Primary end point was the proportion of patients with response according to the American College of Rheumatology 20 % improvement criteria (ACR20) at weeks 24. At 24 weeks, ACR20 responses were 53.0 % in TCM group and 66.5 % in WM group, (P < 0.001) at 24 weeks. ACR 50 responses were 31.6 % of TCM group and 42.6 % in WM group, (P = 0.01). ACR70 responses were 12.6 % in TCM group and 17.4 % in WM group, (P = 0.14). Side effects were observed more frequently in WM group. In this study, ACR20, ACR50 responses at 24 weeks were significantly better in the WM treated group, by intention to treat (ITT) and per protocol analysis. The ACR 70 response showed no significant difference between the two groups. TCM, while effective in treating RA, appears to be less effective than WM in controlling symptoms, but TCM is associated with fewer side effects.

  1. Attitudes, skill and use of evidence-based practice among US Western herbal medicine providers: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Snow, James E; Leach, Matthew J; Clare, Bevin A

    2017-03-01

    Background Evidence-based practice (EBP) has been the focus of increasing attention in the teaching and delivery of both complementary and conventional healthcare. Western herbal medicine (WHM) is a system of complementary healthcare rooted in tradition. How WHM practitioners perceive, are prepared for, and use EBP, has to date been largely ignored. We therefore examined the use, opinion, skills, and training in EBP, and barriers and facilitators of EBP uptake, among herbal practitioners in the United States (US). Methods The study utilized a cross-sectional, descriptive survey design. A sample of US clinical herbalists was invited to complete a validated online questionnaire, the Evidence-Based practice Attitude and utilization SurvEy (EBASE). Results Seventy-four US herbal practitioners completed the survey (response rate=35 %). Participants demonstrated a generally positive attitude toward EBP (median attitude subscore 31 [possible range=8-40]), a moderate to high level of self-assessed skill in EBP (median skill subscore 46 [13-65]) and a moderate level of EBP uptake (median use subscore 12 [0-24]). Apart from a lack of clinical evidence in herbal medicine, there were few perceived barriers to EBP uptake among herbal practitioners. Access to the Internet, online databases and full-text journal articles were considered most useful in facilitating the uptake of EBP in WHM practice. Conclusions Respondents' attitudes, skill level, and uptake of EBP were generally consistent with other complementary and alternative medicine providers. Educational initiatives, including those focused on the appraisal and application of evidence, may help to optimize the use of EBP among WHM practitioners.

  2. The Protestant medical missions to China: the introduction of Western medicine with vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Louis

    2013-05-01

    Modern medicine in China began with the arrival of Anglo-American Protestant missionaries in the early 19th century. Conditions were vastly different from the times of the Jesuits in Peking during the 17th and 18th centuries, when the priests enjoyed the endorsement of the Court and high officials. Faced with hostile and xenophobic officialdom and populace, surgeons of the British East India Company in collaboration with missionaries took the initiative. In 1805 Dr Alexander Pearson (1780-1874) introduced smallpox vaccination in Macao and Canton. Reverend Dr Robert Morrison (1782-1834) of the London Missionary Society with another East India Company Surgeon, Dr John Livingstone (1829) opened a dispensary for the poor in Macao in 1820. These pioneers paved the way for later Anglo-American medical missionaries who revolutionized medical practice in China.

  3. Psychopharmacological Treatment Options for Global Child and Adolescent Mental Health: The WHO Essential Medicines Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutcher, Stan; Murphy, Andrea; Gardner, David

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines (EML) and suggests modification for appropriate psychopharmacological treatment of child- and adolescent-onset mental disorders. The EML enlists few of the psychotropic medicines that are useful for the treatment of young people thereby limiting the…

  4. Stand development following precommercial thinning and fertilization treatments in a western redcedar (Thuja plicata) dominated forest

    Treesearch

    Constance A. Harrington; Warren D. Devine

    2011-01-01

    Western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don.) is an important North American tree species, but little information is available on its long-term responses to silvicultural treatments. Stand responses (mortality, ingrowth, basal area and volume growth, and distributions of trees by diameter and height classes) were followed for 25 years after...

  5. Site treatments influence development of a young mixed-species western larch stand

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. Cole; Wyman C. Schmidt

    1986-01-01

    Four treatments, all combinations of leaving or removing residual trees and shrubs or scarifying or not scarifying seedbeds, were evaluated for species differences in growth, vigor, and expression of dominance. Western larch was the dominant species in regeneration and growth but had begun to lose some of its advantage by age 25, particularly on scarified areas where...

  6. Maya Healers' Conception of Cancer as Revealed by Comparison With Western Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gharzouzi, Eduardo; Renner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cultural diversity in clinical encounters is common, yet mental constructions regarding cancer that influence expected treatment are poorly studied for indigenous people. We explored Maya healers' conceptions, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer to remedy this problem. Methods In-depth structured interviews with 67 traditional Maya healers in Guatemala across Kaqchikel, Kiche', Mam, Mopan, and Q'eqchi' ethnolinguistic groups were conducted by using a transdisciplinary format. Analysis of qualitative data in categorized matrixes allowed for statistical examination of tendencies and the results were complemented by validation workshops with Maya representatives. Results Maya classification of diseases has broad categories of malignant diseases including cancer. Specific Maya terms might equate to particular cancer types, which would open new avenues for research. Notions of malignancy and metastasis were expressed by healers as core characteristics of cancer, a disease believed to be both material and spiritual. Resolution of and/or treatment for cancer is based on restoring physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual equilibrium of the patient and extending that equilibrium to his larger social circle. Conclusion Maya conceptions of cancer determine how traditional diagnostic tools are used and dictate treatment options that include the patient's social-spiritual support system. Official health care providers' understanding of these principles can improve implementation of culturally appropriate protocols that increase indigenous patients' compliance and reduce rates of treatment abandonment. PMID:28717684

  7. Efficacy of Iranian Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi Fard, Mehri; Shojaii, Asie

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder which affects about 50 million people worldwide. Ineffectiveness of the drugs in some cases and the serious side effects and chronic toxicity of the antiepileptic drugs lead to use of herbal medicine as a form of complementary and alternative medicine. In this review modern evidences for the efficacy of antiepileptic medicinal plants in Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM) will be discussed. For this purpose electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, and Google Scholar were searched for each of the antiepileptic plants during 1970-February 2013.Anticonvulsant effect of some of the medicinal plants mentioned in TIM like Anacyclus pyrethrum, Pimpinella anisum, Nigella sativa, and Ferula gummosa was studied with different models of seizure. Also for some of these plants like Nigella sativa or Piper longum the active constituent responsible for antiepileptic effect was isolated and studied. For some of the herbal medicine used in TIM such as Pistacia lentiscus gum (Mastaki), Bryonia alba (Fashra), Ferula persica (Sakbinaj), Ecballium elaterium (Ghesa-al Hemar), and Alpinia officinarum (Kholanjan) there is no or not enough studies to confirm their effectiveness in epilepsy. It is suggested that an evaluation of the effects of these plants on different epileptic models should be performed. PMID:23936834

  8. Natural Medicines Used in the Traditional Tibetan Medical System for the Treatment of Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Li, Hai-Jiao; Xu, Tong; Du, Huan; Huan Gang, Chen-Lei; Fan, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Liver disease is one of the most risk factors threatening human health. It is of great significance to find drugs that can treat liver diseases, especially for acute and chronic hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and liver cancer. The search for drugs with good efficacy from traditional natural medicines has attracted more and more attention. Tibetan medicine, one of the China's traditional medical systems, has been widely used by the Tibetan people for the prevention and treatment of liver diseases for hundreds of years. The present paper summarized the natural Tibetan medicines that have been used in Tibetan traditional system of medicine to treat liver diseases by bibliographic investigation of 22 Tibetan medicine monographs and drug standards. One hundred and ninety three species including 181 plants, 7 animals, and 5 minerals were found to treat liver diseases in traditional Tibetan medicine system. The most frequently used species are Carthamus tinctorius, Brag-zhun, Swertia chirayita, Swertia mussotii, Halenia elliptica, Herpetospermum pedunculosum, and Phyllanthus emblica. Their names, families, medicinal parts, traditional uses, phytochemicals information, and pharmacological activities were described in detail. These natural medicines might be a valuable gift from the old Tibetan medicine to the world, and would be potential drug candidates for the treatment of liver diseases. Further studies are needed to prove their medicinal values in liver diseases treatment, identify bioactive compounds, elucidate the underlying mechanism of action, and clarify their side effects or toxicity with the help of modern phytochemical, pharmacological, metabonomics, and/or clinical trial methods. PMID:29441019

  9. Natural Medicines Used in the Traditional Tibetan Medical System for the Treatment of Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Li, Hai-Jiao; Xu, Tong; Du, Huan; Huan Gang, Chen-Lei; Fan, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Liver disease is one of the most risk factors threatening human health. It is of great significance to find drugs that can treat liver diseases, especially for acute and chronic hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and liver cancer. The search for drugs with good efficacy from traditional natural medicines has attracted more and more attention. Tibetan medicine, one of the China's traditional medical systems, has been widely used by the Tibetan people for the prevention and treatment of liver diseases for hundreds of years. The present paper summarized the natural Tibetan medicines that have been used in Tibetan traditional system of medicine to treat liver diseases by bibliographic investigation of 22 Tibetan medicine monographs and drug standards. One hundred and ninety three species including 181 plants, 7 animals, and 5 minerals were found to treat liver diseases in traditional Tibetan medicine system. The most frequently used species are Carthamus tinctorius , Brag-zhun, Swertia chirayita, Swertia mussotii, Halenia elliptica, Herpetospermum pedunculosum , and Phyllanthus emblica . Their names, families, medicinal parts, traditional uses, phytochemicals information, and pharmacological activities were described in detail. These natural medicines might be a valuable gift from the old Tibetan medicine to the world, and would be potential drug candidates for the treatment of liver diseases. Further studies are needed to prove their medicinal values in liver diseases treatment, identify bioactive compounds, elucidate the underlying mechanism of action, and clarify their side effects or toxicity with the help of modern phytochemical, pharmacological, metabonomics, and/or clinical trial methods.

  10. Nurse prescribing of medicines in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A growing number of countries are introducing some form of nurse prescribing. However, international reviews concerning nurse prescribing are scarce and lack a systematic and theoretical approach. The aim of this review was twofold: firstly, to gain insight into the scientific and professional literature describing the extent to and the ways in which nurse prescribing has been realised or is being introduced in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries; secondly, to identify possible mechanisms underlying the introduction and organisation of nurse prescribing on the basis of Abbott's theory on the division of professional labor. Methods A comprehensive search of six literature databases and seven websites was performed without any limitation as to date of publication, language or country. Additionally, experts in the field of nurse prescribing were consulted. A three stage inclusion process, consisting of initial sifting, more detailed selection and checking full-text publications, was performed independently by pairs of reviewers. Data were synthesized using narrative and tabular methods. Results One hundred and twenty-four publications met the inclusion criteria. So far, seven Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries have implemented nurse prescribing of medicines, viz., Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden, the UK and the USA. The Netherlands and Spain are in the process of introducing nurse prescribing. A diversity of external and internal forces has led to the introduction of nurse prescribing internationally. The legal, educational and organizational conditions under which nurses prescribe medicines vary considerably between countries; from situations where nurses prescribe independently to situations in which prescribing by nurses is only allowed under strict conditions and supervision of physicians. Conclusions Differences between countries are reflected in the jurisdictional settlements between the nursing and medical professions

  11. Nurse prescribing of medicines in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P; Francke, Anneke L

    2011-05-27

    A growing number of countries are introducing some form of nurse prescribing. However, international reviews concerning nurse prescribing are scarce and lack a systematic and theoretical approach. The aim of this review was twofold: firstly, to gain insight into the scientific and professional literature describing the extent to and the ways in which nurse prescribing has been realised or is being introduced in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries; secondly, to identify possible mechanisms underlying the introduction and organisation of nurse prescribing on the basis of Abbott's theory on the division of professional labor. A comprehensive search of six literature databases and seven websites was performed without any limitation as to date of publication, language or country. Additionally, experts in the field of nurse prescribing were consulted. A three stage inclusion process, consisting of initial sifting, more detailed selection and checking full-text publications, was performed independently by pairs of reviewers. Data were synthesized using narrative and tabular methods. One hundred and twenty-four publications met the inclusion criteria. So far, seven Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries have implemented nurse prescribing of medicines, viz., Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden, the UK and the USA. The Netherlands and Spain are in the process of introducing nurse prescribing. A diversity of external and internal forces has led to the introduction of nurse prescribing internationally. The legal, educational and organizational conditions under which nurses prescribe medicines vary considerably between countries; from situations where nurses prescribe independently to situations in which prescribing by nurses is only allowed under strict conditions and supervision of physicians. Differences between countries are reflected in the jurisdictional settlements between the nursing and medical professions concerning prescribing. In some

  12. Effects of leptin treatment and Western diet on wheel running in selectively bred high runner mice.

    PubMed

    Meek, Thomas H; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2012-05-15

    The role of leptin in regulating physical activity is varied. The behavioral effects of leptin signaling depend on the type of activity and the animal's physiological state. We used mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running to further study how leptin regulates volitional exercise. Mice from four replicate high runner (HR) lines typically run ~3-fold more revolutions per day than those from four non-selected control (C) lines. HR mice have altered dopamine function and differences from C in brain regions known to be important in leptin-mediated behavior. Furthermore, male HR mice have been found to dramatically increase running when administered Western diet, an effect possibly mediated through leptin signaling. Male mice from generation 61 (representing three HR lines and one C line) were allowed wheel access at 24 days of age and given either Western diet (high in fat and with added sucrose) or standard chow. After four weeks, Western diet significantly increased circulating leptin, insulin, C-peptide, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, and inflammatory hormone resistin concentrations in HR mice (C mice not measured). Western diet increased running in HR mice, but did not significantly affect running in C mice. During the fifth week, all mice received two days of intra-peritoneal sham injections (physiological saline) followed by three days of murine recombinant leptin injections, and then another six days of sham injections. Leptin treatment significantly decreased caloric intake (adjusted for body mass) and body mass in all groups. Wheel running significantly increased with leptin injections in HR mice (fed Western or standard diet), but was unaffected in C mice. Whether Western diet and leptin treatment stimulate wheel running in HR mice through the same physiological pathways awaits future study. These results have implications for understanding the neural and endocrine systems that control locomotor activity, food consumption, and body

  13. Protocol for a prospective observational study of conventional treatment and traditional Korean medicine combination treatment for children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Yun, Young-Ju; Shin, Yong-Beom; Kim, Nam-Kwen; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Shin, Myung-Jun; Yu, Sun-Ae

    2016-06-08

    Cerebral palsy leads to many complications as well as delayed motor development, and early intensive rehabilitation in infancy, which is based on the theory of brain plasticity, is emphasized. In addition to conventional treatment, including physical, occupational, or speech-language therapies, children also have a demand for traditional Korean medicine interventions such as acupuncture or herbal medicine; however, a lack of evidence has made traditional Korean medicine difficult to implement in practice. We planned a multicentre, prospective, observational study to assess the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of conventional treatment and traditional Korean medicine combination treatment for children with cerebral palsy. Three hundred children with cerebral palsy aged 6 to 78 months will be recruited from six institutions. Data from each child are collected every month for a one-year period, during which time treatment might be changed or discontinued. A qualified investigator visits the sites to measure effectiveness variables, including Gross Motor Function Measure and Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory. Adverse events and cost-effectiveness variables are collected using surveys conducted at baseline, mid-study, and end of study, as well as monthly tracking surveys. In the analyses, participants will be classified into two groups: group A children will be the conventional treatment group with physical, occupational, speech-language or other conventional rehabilitation therapies, whereas group B children will be the combination treatment group with traditional Korean medicine interventions, that is, herbal medicine, chuna, moxibustion and acupuncture, in addition to conventional treatment. Only a few clinical case reports have evaluated the effectiveness and safety of traditional Korean medicine; therefore, more data are required to provide optimal information to children with cerebral palsy and their guardians. We hypothesized that

  14. [Medical treatment and folk medicine recorded in "Mimibukuro"].

    PubMed

    Hamada, T

    1993-06-01

    "Mimibukuro" is a book written by Moriyasu Negishi in the Edo-period. M. Negishi (1737-1815) was a magistrate in the city of Edo. He was very much interested in listening to and recording many kinds of the stories, which were told by various kinds of people, such as public officers, samurais, merchants, doctors, etc. Among the stories of this book, there are found some stories concerning folk medicine, medicinal substances and charms. In this report, I studied such kinds of the stories. As the results of my studies, I have shown that some medicinal stories originated in the old Chinese medical books. Other stories were supposed to have been popular among the people of Edo.

  15. Impact of Community-Based Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine Metabolic Syndrome Intervention Technology in Rural Residents in Southern Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqing; Xie, Bo; Tao, Yanghong; Ma, Yonghua; Zhang, Kaijin

    2015-07-26

    To explore the feasibility and efficiency of community-based integrated traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine metabolic syndrome (MS) intervention in rural residents. The MS intervention was administered to 598 rural community residents aged 45 years and older in Zhoushi from 2011 to 2013. Subjects completed a health examination and health behavior questionnaire before and after the intervention. In the intervention, we designed a "healthy life self-help program" using TCM appropriate technologies for the subjects. After 2 years of intervention by means of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine, 57.0% (341 persons) of the subjects no longer suffered from MS. The recovery rate of BMI, blood pressure, FBG, TG, and HDL-C were 22.1%, 40.5%, 37.9%, 32.8%, and 62.4%, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in exercise, smoking, and alcohol drinking between baseline and 2 years later. The integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine MS intervention was effective in deceasing most of the parameters of MS, especially blood pressure, and helping people to do more exercise. The program would be useful to implement in other similar populations.

  16. Chinese Medicines in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: From Formulas to Extracts and Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueni; Fang, Gang; Pang, Yuzhou

    2018-02-28

    In order to fully understand the progresses and achievements in Chinese medicines for the treatment of prostate cancer, we summarize all the available reports on formulas, extracts, and compounds of Chinese medicines against prostate cancer. A number of clinical trials verified that traditional Chinese formulas had some unique advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer. Many Chinese medicine extracts could protect against prostate cancer, and many compounds isolated from Chinese traditional medicines showed a clear anti-prostate cancer effect. However, Chinese medicines are facing many problems regarding their multicomponent nature, complicated mechanisms of action, and high doses required for therapy. Herein, we review the functions of Chinese medicines in prostate cancer and focus on their mechanisms. The review will deepen the understanding of Chinese medicines potential in the anti-prostate cancer field. In addition, we put forward a question concerning the current research on Chinese medicines: in order to better illustrate that Chinese medicines can be used in the clinical treatment of prostate cancer, should our research focus on formulas, extracts, or compounds?

  17. Chinese Medicines in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: From Formulas to Extracts and Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueni; Fang, Gang; Pang, Yuzhou

    2018-01-01

    In order to fully understand the progresses and achievements in Chinese medicines for the treatment of prostate cancer, we summarize all the available reports on formulas, extracts, and compounds of Chinese medicines against prostate cancer. A number of clinical trials verified that traditional Chinese formulas had some unique advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer. Many Chinese medicine extracts could protect against prostate cancer, and many compounds isolated from Chinese traditional medicines showed a clear anti-prostate cancer effect. However, Chinese medicines are facing many problems regarding their multicomponent nature, complicated mechanisms of action, and high doses required for therapy. Herein, we review the functions of Chinese medicines in prostate cancer and focus on their mechanisms. The review will deepen the understanding of Chinese medicines potential in the anti-prostate cancer field. In addition, we put forward a question concerning the current research on Chinese medicines: in order to better illustrate that Chinese medicines can be used in the clinical treatment of prostate cancer, should our research focus on formulas, extracts, or compounds? PMID:29495626

  18. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  19. 'Prisoners of their own feebleness': women, nerves and Western medicine--a historical overview.

    PubMed

    Cayleff, S E

    1988-01-01

    The medical conceptualization, diagnosis and treatment of nervous disorders has been greatly affected by gender ideologies. A survey of recent scholarship reveals that gender ideologies still largely inform the illness-labeling, medical diagnosis and management of woman's physiology and, in particular, her nerves. Historically the names of the specific 'diseases' have evolved from demonic possession, tarantism, hysteralgia, hystero-epilepsy, neurasthenia, hypochondriasis and nervousness to neurosis, but several key features remain static. The overriding common features of these ailments are the gender of their sufferers and the behavioral symptoms they exhibit. The etiologies first emphasized uterine causation then gradually shifted emphasis to focus on psychological factors. Both of these etiological explanations contributed to perceptions of women as more physiologically and emotionally vulnerable and unpredictable and justified advocating a gender-specific course of medical management and social sphere of influence. Historically and contemporarily, medical illness-labeling and therapeutics pertaining to women's nerves reflect the interplay between changing scientific information and culturally constructed gender relations. Claims and 'proofs' of women's predisposed susceptibility to nervous debility transcended medical and scientific knowledge to include assertions that reflected and perpetuated deeply-held beliefs about female and male physiology, their consequent natures, and the acceptable parameters of women's behavior and influence. Thus the metaphor of the prison can be employed to describe not only the debility produced among women from psycho-organic malaise, but also the limitations placed on women's life choices and acceptable modes of expression.

  20. A Review of On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems in Western Australia from 1997 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gunady, Maria; Shishkina, Natalia; Tan, Henry; Rodriguez, Clemencia

    2015-01-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used in Western Australia (WA) to treat and dispose of household wastewater in areas where centralized sewerage systems are unavailable. Septic tanks, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), and composting toilets with greywater systems are among the most well established and commonly used OWTS. However, there are concerns that some OWTS installed in WA are either performing below expected standards or failing. Poorly performing OWTS are often attributed to inadequate installation, inadequate maintenance, poor public awareness, insufficient local authority resources, ongoing wastewater management issues, or inadequate adoption of standards, procedures, and guidelines. This paper is to review the installations and failures of OWTS in WA. Recommendations to the Department of Health Western Australia (DOHWA) and Local Government (LG) in regard to management strategies and institutional arrangements of OWTS are also highlighted. PMID:25960745

  1. Burnout Syndrome: Global Medicine Volunteering as a Possible Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Iserson, Kenneth V

    2018-02-19

    In the last few decades, "burnout syndrome" has become more common among clinicians, or at least more frequently recognized. Methods to prevent and treat burnout have had inconsistent results. Simultaneously, clinicians' interest in global medicine has increased dramatically, offering a possible intervention strategy for burnout while providing help to underserved areas. Caused by a variety of stressors, burnout syndrome ultimately results in physicians feeling that their work no longer embodies why they entered the medical field. This attitude harms clinicians, their patients and colleagues, and society. Few consistently successful interventions exist. At the same time, clinicians' interest in global medicine has risen exponentially. This paper reviews the basics of both phenomena and posits that global medicine experiences, although greatly assisting target populations, also may offer a strategy for combating burnout by reconnecting physicians with their love of the profession. Because studies have shown that regular volunteering improves mental health, short-term global medicine experiences may reinvigorate and reengage clinicians on the verge of, or suffering from, persistent burnout syndrome. Fortuitously, this intervention often will greatly benefit medically underserved populations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Randomized controlled trials on treatment by homeopaths and self-treatment with homeopathic medicines: design and protocol.

    PubMed

    Steinsbekk, Aslak; Bentzen, Niels; Fønnebø, Vinjar; Lewith, George T

    2004-12-01

    This study investigates (1) whether treatment by homeopaths is more efficacious than self-selected conventional health care and (2) whether self-treatment with self-selected homeopathic medicines is more efficacious than placebo in preventing childhood upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). A four-arm randomized controlled trial involving two independent investigations, one open and pragmatic (evaluating the effect of treatment by homeopaths including homeopathic medicines) and one double-blinded (evaluating the effect of self-treatment with homeopathic medicine). The planned sample size is 420 children below the age of 10, recruited by a postal invitation to all children diagnosed with URTIs when attending a casualty department in Trondheim, Norway. The children are randomly assigned to receive either (1) self-selected homeopathic medicine or placebo (270 patients), (2) treatment by one of four different homeopaths who could prescribe any homeopathic medicine (75 patients), or (3) waiting list control using self-selected conventional health care (75 patients). Total URTI symptom scores from patients' diary over 12 weeks. PLAN: The results of these two studies (available at the end of 2004) have the potential to provide information about the efficacy of treatment by homeopaths independently from the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in children with URTIs.

  3. Medicinal plants in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Maliheh; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a small, spiral, Gram-negative bacillus that plays a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases ranging from asymptomatic gastritis to gastric cancer. Schedule compliance, antibiotic drug resistance, and side-effects of triple or quadruple therapy have led to research for novel candidates from plants. The purpose of this paper is to review the most potent medicinal plants of recently published literature with anti-H. pylori activity. For centuries, herbals have been used by traditional healers around the world to treat various gastrointestinal tract disorders such as dyspepsia, gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease. The mechanism of action by which these botanicals exert their therapeutic properties has not been completely and clearly elucidated. Anti-H. pylori properties may be one of the possible mechanisms by which gastroprotective herbs treat gastrointestinal tract disorders. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Google scholar, EBSCO, and local databases were explored for medicinal plants with anti-H. pylori properties between 1984 and 2013 using key words "medicinal plants" and "Helicobacter pylori" or "anti-Helicobacter pylori". A total of 43 medicinal plant species belonging to 27 families including Amaryllidaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae, Asteraceae, Bignoniaceae, Clusiaceae, Chancapiedra, Combretaceae, Cyperaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Geraniaceae, Lamiaceae, Lauraceae, Lythraceae, Menispermaceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae, Papaveraceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, and Theaceae were studied as herbs with potent anti-H. pylori effects. Traditional folk medicinal use of some of these plants to treat gastric infections is substantiated by the antibacterial activity of their extracts against H. pylori.

  4. Chinese integrative medicine: inclusion of a Chinese medicine programme in a conventional medical institute.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Yong; Feng, Yibin; Lao, Lixing

    2014-05-01

    To meet community demands with optimal Chinese and conventional medical treatment, the University of Hong Kong is promoting integrative medicine by developing Chinese medicine programmes that train students of both Western and Chinese medicine. The programmes emphasize multi-disciplinary training and interaction between the two therapeutic approaches, enabling students to establish reliable, consistent, and respectful mutual cooperation in their future careers.

  5. [Natural science vs. natural philosophy: Friedrich Theodor von Frerichs and the emergence of modern western medicine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Werner

    2016-12-01

    The beginnings of modern western medicine reach to about 1800 when under the liberating influence of French Revolution observation of diseases was started to follow more scientifically justified criteria. At that time speculative doctrines prevailed, e. g. those set up natural philosopher Schelling. In this context Internist Friedrich Theodor von Frerichs at Berlin Charité University Hospital gained great merits because of his struggle for a scientifically-based experimental clinical medicine. This is demonstrated nicely in a recently found autograph document. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. [Clinical application of electroacupuncture plus chinese medicine in treatment of peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-sheng; Ouyang, Ying-yi; Yin, Yong

    2006-04-01

    To probe into the role of electroacupuncture in treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. Eighty-six cases were divided into a treatment group (n=45) treated with electroacupuncture plus Chinese medicine, and a control group (n=41) treated with acupuncture plus Chinese medicine. Taiyang (EX-HN 5), Yangbai (GB 14) and other points on the affected side were selected and Chinese medicine modified Qianzheng powder was administrated. Their clinical therapeutic effects were analyzed and evaluated. The effective rate was 97. 8% in the treatment group and 82.9% in the control group with a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). the treatment group being higher than the control group. Chinese medicine plus acupuncture combined with electroacupuncture has a better therapeutic effect on peripheral facial paralysis.

  7. Clinical phenotype network: the underlying mechanism for personalized diagnosis and treatment of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Yubing; Peng, Yonghong; Hu, Jingqing; Zhang, Runshun; He, Liyun; Wang, Yinghui; Jiang, Lijie; Yan, Shiyan; Li, Peng; Xie, Qi; Liu, Baoyan

    2014-09-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) investigates the clinical diagnosis and treatment regularities in a typical schema of personalized medicine, which means that individualized patients with same diseases would obtain distinct diagnosis and optimal treatment from different TCM physicians. This principle has been recognized and adhered by TCM clinical practitioners for thousands of years. However, the underlying mechanisms of TCM personalized medicine are not fully investigated so far and remained unknown. This paper discusses framework of TCM personalized medicine in classic literatures and in real-world clinical settings, and investigates the underlying mechanisms of TCM personalized medicine from the perspectives of network medicine. Based on 246 well-designed outpatient records on insomnia, by evaluating the personal biases of manifestation observation and preferences of herb prescriptions, we noted significant similarities between each herb prescriptions and symptom similarities between each encounters. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of TCM personalized medicine, we constructed a clinical phenotype network (CPN), in which the clinical phenotype entities like symptoms and diagnoses are presented as nodes and the correlation between these entities as links. This CPN is used to investigate the promiscuous boundary of syndromes and the co-occurrence of symptoms. The small-world topological characteristics are noted in the CPN with high clustering structures, which provide insight on the rationality of TCM personalized diagnosis and treatment. The investigation on this network would help us to gain understanding on the underlying mechanism of TCM personalized medicine and would propose a new perspective for the refinement of the TCM individualized clinical skills.

  8. Herbal Medicine Treatment for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsu Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To summarize and evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines used for the treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. Methods Thirteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to November 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy of herbal medicines alone or in combination with other Traditional Chinese Medicine treatments for ASD in children were included. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used and other data analyses were performed using RevMan (Version 5.3). Results Ten RCTs involving 567 patients with ASD were included for qualitative synthesis. In conjunction with conventional therapy, herbal medicines significantly improved the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) score, but the results of effects on total effective rate (TER) were different between the included studies. The use of herbal medicines with integrative therapy improved the CARS score and TER. In the studies that documented adverse events, no serious events were associated with herbal medicines. Conclusions The efficacy of herbal medicines for the treatment of ASD appears to be encouraging but was inconclusive owing to low methodological quality, herbal medicine diversity, and small sample size of the examined studies. PMID:28592982

  9. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christon, Lillian M.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may elect to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments with their children in place of, or in addition to, conventional treatments. CAM treatments are controversial and understudied and, for most, the efficacy has not been established. The current study (n = 248) examined…

  10. [Assurance and assessment of education quality in occupational medicine of selected countries of Western Europe and the United States. II. USA].

    PubMed

    Boczkowski, A

    2000-01-01

    The author discusses the studies undertaken with the general aim to provide education in occupational medicine and assure its quality assessment in some countries of Western Europe advanced more than Poland in this area. It becomes quite evident that despite a widespread interest in quality of education, there is a lack of basic systemic solutions, and a gap between basic theoretical and methodological guidelines and a large number of dispersed reports on concrete analytical and evaluation studies can be still observed. In addition to the presentation of an inside view of research activities carried out in some countries of Western Europe and the United States, based on selected professional publications, the author formulates general conclusions on how the assurance and quality assessment of education in occupational medicine function in those countries.

  11. The effect of nuclear medicine telediagnosis on diagnostic pathways and management in rural and remote regions of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Tually, P; Walker, J; Cowell, S

    2001-01-01

    Limited accessibility to certain medical imaging services in regional and rural centres has led to the use of alternative modalities, which may not be best practice or which require patients to travel considerable distances for diagnosis. Data collected over three years were examined to determine the clinical effect of nuclear medicine teleradiology (NMT) and its effect on diagnostic patterns for the investigation of cardiovascular disease, radio-occult musculoskeletal injury and oncology. In comparison with two other rural, non-NMT areas of similar demographic profile, there was a significant shift in the delivery of care in terms of diagnostic work-up. NMT input led to the detection of disease and a change to therapeutic management in 122 cases and eliminated the need to transfer patients to another facility for unnecessary and expensive examinations in 38 cases. While NMT is more costly than conventional nuclear medicine services, it permits faster access to specialist consultation, provides for better management and is likely to reduce overall health costs by reducing the volume of inappropriate tests and treatment practice.

  12. Chinese herbal medicine for atopic dermatitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hsiewe Ying; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Chen, DaCan; Xue, Charlie Changli; Lenon, George Binh

    2013-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, itching skin disease, and conventional therapies offer inadequate symptom management. Patients with AD are increasingly turning to Chinese medicine. We systematically evaluated the clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety of oral Chinese herbal medicine for AD. Searches were conducted on major electronic databases using the following key words: "randomized controlled trials," "atopic dermatitis," "traditional Chinese medicine," "traditional East Asian medicine," "herbal medicine," "Chinese herbal drugs," "medicinal plants," "phytotherapy," "Kampo medicine," and "Korean traditional medicine." The results were screened to include English/Chinese randomized controlled trials. A metaanalysis was conducted on suitable outcome measures. Seven randomized controlled trials were included (1 comparing Chinese herbal medicine and Western medicine with Western medicine alone; 6 comparing Chinese herbal medicine with placebo). Combined Chinese herbal medicine with Western medicine was superior to Western medicine alone. Three placebo controlled trials showed significant treatment efficacy and 2 showed significantly reduced concurrent therapy with Chinese herbal medicine. No abnormalities in safety profile or severe adverse events were reported. A metaanalysis of all included studies could not be conducted because of study heterogeneity. Chinese herbal medicine significantly improved symptom severity of AD and was reported as well tolerated. However, the poor quality of studies did not allow for valid conclusions to support its tolerability and routine use. Additional studies addressing the methodologic issues are warranted to determine the therapeutic benefit of Chinese herbal medicine for AD. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Naturalness as an ethical stance: idea(l)s and practices of care in western herbal medicine in the UK.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    An association of non-biomedical healthcare with appeals to nature and naturalness, and an invocation of a rhetoric of gentleness, goodness, purity and moral power has been noted previously, and some scholars argue that nature has taken on a meaning broadly opposed to the rational scientific order of modernity. Drawing on an ethnographic study of women's practice and use of western herbal medicine (WHM) in the UK, the intertwining of the perceived naturalness of WHM with distinct care practices points to a further avenue for exploration. To examine patients' and herbalists' discourses of the naturalness of WHM and associated idea(l)s and practices of care, understandings of nature and a feminist ethics of care are utilized as analytical frameworks. The analysis presented suggests that, through WHM, patients and herbalists become embedded in a complex spatio-temporal wholeness and web of care that intertwines past, present and future, self and others, and local and global concerns. In the emerging 'ordinary ethics of care', naturalness constitutes a sign of goodness and of a shared humanity within the organic world, while care, underpinned by idea(l)s of natural and holistic care practices, links human and non-human others. Thus, the naturalness of WHM, as perceived by some patients and herbalists, engages and blends with a continually unfolding field of relationships in the lifeworld(s), where care practices, caring relations and collective wellbeing may constitute an ethical stance that raises deeper questions about the significance of relationality, the values of care/caring and the mutual involvement of nature and human being(s).

  14. Paleolithic diets as a model for prevention and treatment of Western disease.

    PubMed

    Lindeberg, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    To explore the possibility that a paleolithic-like diet can be used in the prevention of age-related degenerative Western disease. Literature review of African Paleolithic foods in relation to recent evidence of healthy nutrition. Available evidence lends weak support in favor and little against the notion that lean meat, fish, vegetables, tubers, and fruit can be effective in the prevention and treatment of common Western diseases. There are no obvious risks with avoiding dairy products, margarine, oils, refined sugar, and cereal grains, which provide 70% or more of the dietary intake in northern European populations. If stroke, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer are preventable by dietary changes, an ancestral-like diet may provide an appropriate template. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Coprescription of Chinese herbal medicine and Western medication among female patients with breast cancer in Taiwan: analysis of national insurance claims

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bih-Ru; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Jing Chong; Wu, Min-Shan; Chou, Chia-Lin; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background Many female breast cancer (FBC) patients take Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) and Western medication (WM) concurrently in Taiwan. Despite the possibility of interactions between the CHM and WM mentioned in previous studies, the pattern of these coprescriptions in FBC patients remains unclear. Hence, the aim of the present study is to investigate the utilization of coprescriptions of CHM and WM among the FBC patients in Taiwan. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey using the sampled cohort in 2009 obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. There were 3,507 FBC patients identified from the registry for catastrophic illness patients. Ambulatory visit records, corresponding prescriptions, and the data of beneficiaries belonging to the FBC patients were further extracted. A total of 1,086 FBC patients used CHM at least once. CHM and WM prescribed within any overlapping duration were defined as coprescriptions. Results There were 868 (80.0%) patients simultaneously receiving CHM and WM. A total of 4,927 CHM prescriptions and 6,358 WM prescriptions were prescribed concurrently. Among these coprescriptions, the most frequently used CHM was jia-wei-xiao-yao-san (21.2%), and the most frequently coprescribed WM was acetaminophen (38.9%), followed by tamoxifen (25.5%). There were 346 patients using systemic adjuvant therapy and CHM concurrently. The most commonly coprescribed CHM with chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and trastuzumab was xiang-sha-liu-jun-zi-tang, jia-wei-xiao-yao-san, and zhi-gan-cao-tang, respectively. Conclusion The combined use of CHM with WM is prevalent. The main purpose of combining CHM with systemic cancer treatment is to alleviate the treatment-related adverse effects. However, the combination may result in the potential risk of drug–herb interactions. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the CHM and WM coprescriptions for FBC patients. PMID:24855343

  16. Tibetan medicine: a unique heritage of person-centered medicine.

    PubMed

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Ottaviani, Luigi; Mella, Joey

    2011-12-01

    With a history going back approximately 2,500 years, the Tibetan medicine, known as Sowa Rigpa in the Tibetan language, is one of the world's oldest known traditional medicine. It originally developed during the pre-Buddhist era in the kingdom known as Shang Shung. As a traditional medicine, the future development of Tibetan medicine in Western countries is linked to being recognized as a popular and viable healthcare option providing an alternative clinical reality. Its inherent ability to incorparate predictive diagnostics, targeted prevention, and the creation of individualized medical treatment give Tibetan medicine great potential for assessing and treating patients.

  17. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  18. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts.

  19. [New challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: thinking and practice from evidence-based medicine to precision medicine].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    With the development of tumor molecular diagnosis and the administration of targeted drugs, cancer treatment has gradually entered a new era of precision medicine. The diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a full embodiment of the concept of precision medicine, but there are still many problems needed to be solved in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of GIST (such as the correlation between the gene mutation and prognosis, the treatment strategy of wild type GIST and the drug resistance phenomenon).

  20. A Pilot Whole Systems Clinical Trial of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Naturopathic Medicine for the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Calabrese, Carlo; Mist, Scott; Aickin, Mikel; Sutherland, Elizabeth; Leben, Joseph; DeBAR, Lynn; Elder, Charles; Dworkin, Samuel F.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To assess the feasibility and acceptability of studying whole systems of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Naturopathic medicine (NM) in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and to determine whether there is indication to support further research. Design A pilot study using a randomized controlled clinical trial design of whole system TCM and NM versus state-of-the-art specialty care (SC). Setting/location Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW), and practitioner offices in Portland, Oregon. Subjects One hundred and sixty (160) women 25–55 years of age attending a KPNW TMD specialty clinic. Interventions Whole system TCM and NM, and KPNW TMD clinic SC; the intervention protocols were designed to model the individually tailored type of community care offered in alternative medicine practices in Portland and in the KPNW TMD clinic, using protocols that enhanced similarities among practitioners within each system and permitted full descriptions of the treatments provided. Outcome measures TMD was ascertained using the Research Diagnostic Criteria/TMD; outcomes were self-reported worst and average facial pain and interference with activities (scaled 0–10 where 10 is worst). Results Of 948 consecutive eligible patients, 160 were randomized to one of three arms; 128 provided endpoint data. TCM and NM demonstrated significantly greater in-treatment reductions for worst facial pain compared to SC (adjusted regression analysis; higher negative values indicate greater improvement, = −1.11 ± 0.43, p = 0.010 and −1.02 ± 0.45, p = 0.025 for TCM and NM, respectively, compared to SC) and at 3 months post-treatment (−1.07 ± 0.51, p = 0.037 and −1.27 ± 0.54, p = 0.019 for TCM and NM versus SC, respectively). Additionally, TCM provided significantly greater decreases in average pain than SC; NM provided significantly greater decreases than SC or TCM in TMD-related psychosocial interference

  1. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Clinical Trials Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments Taking insulin or other diabetes ... Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you ...

  2. Treatment of eating disorders among ethnic minorities in western settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sarmila; Warfa, Nasir

    2013-09-01

    This systematic review looked at the utilisation of treatment, access to treatment and referral of ethnic minorities for treatment of eating disorders in western settings. It also aimed to explore the barriers in access and utilisation of treatment including the role of acculturation. The review included both qualitative and quantitative studies. The search identified a total of 2786 articles. Out of the 2786 articles, 12 articles (1 qualitative and 11 quantitative) were selected for the purpose of the research. The review showed that ethnic minority communities in UK and USA were far less likely to seek and receive treatment for their eating disorders and also less likely to be diagnosed and referred to eating disorder services or clinics for treatment of their eating disorders. Referral bias of ethnic minority participants to specialist eating disorder services were found in three quantitative studies (Waller et al. 2009, Becker et al. 2003, Abbas et al. 2010). The review also found that more accultured ethnic minority participants were more likely to seek treatment for their eating disorders. The above study has shown that ethnic minorities are less likely to have access to treatment for Eating Disorders.

  3. The influence of social context on the treatment outcomes of complementary and alternative medicine: the case of acupuncture and herbal medicine in Japan and the U.S.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Mahn

    2015-04-25

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as acupuncture and herbal medicine, is popular in many countries. Yet, treatment outcomes of CAM are found to vary significantly between medical trials in different social environments. This paper addresses how the social organization of medicine affects medical treatment outcomes. In particular, it examines the extent to which two popular complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions (acupuncture and herbal medicine) are coordinated with biomedicine and how coordination characteristics are related to the treatment outcomes of the two CAM interventions. This paper conducts an archival analysis of the institutional settings of the CAM interventions in Japan and the U.S. It also conducts a systematic content analysis of the treatment outcomes in 246 acupuncture reports and 528 herbal medicine reports that are conducted in Japan or the U.S. and registered in the Cochrane Library's Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and 716 acupuncture reports and 3,485 herbal medicine reports that are from Japan or the U.S. and listed in MEDLINE. It examines the association between the treatment outcomes of the two interventions and the geographical location of the reports; it also explores how the institutional settings of the interventions are related to the treatment outcomes. Japanese herbal medicine is integrated into the national medical system the most and American herbal medicine the least; American acupuncture and Japanese acupuncture fall in the middle. Treatment outcomes are the most favorable for Japanese herbal medicine and the least favorable for American herbal medicine. The outcomes of American acupuncture and Japanese acupuncture fall in the middle. The co-utilization of CAM with biomedicine can produce difficulties due to tensions between CAM and biomedicine. These difficulties and subsequent CAM treatment outcomes vary, depending on how CAM is institutionalized in relation to biomedicine

  4. Individualized medicine, health medicine, and constitutional theory in Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi

    2012-03-01

    The patterns of modern science and changes in the medical model can result in the transformation of the current state of individualized and health medicines into being the primary trend in medical development. Chinese and Western medical systems are dissimilar in terms of value orientations, thinking style, and research directions because of their different historical and cultural backgrounds. Individualized treatment in modern medicine is mainly established based on individual genome information and the differences in mononucleotide polymorphisms. However, such treatment method is expensive, creates an uncertain genetic marker, and leads to different result interpretations, among other problems. The Chinese constitutional theory developed in the 1970s expresses the principle behind Chinese health medicine and individual treatment and provides the corresponding methods. The Chinese constitutional theory divides the constitution of the Chinese population into nine categories based on established classification criteria. It promotes the study of the relationship of each constitution to diseases and Chinese medicine preparation toward adjusting the constitution and preventing diseases. The theory also provides methods and tools for individualized treatment. Constitution identification shows the direction and provides the core technology for the evaluation of the health status. By combining the developments in modern biotechnology, new diagnostic techniques and treatment models of constitution-differentiation, disease-differentiation, and syndrome-differentiation can be established for the development of individualized Chinese medicine treatment and health medicine for the international medical community.

  5. Changing global essential medicines norms to improve access to AIDS treatment: Lessons from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, A.; Fonseca, E. Da; Gruskin, S.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil's large-scale, successful HIV/AIDS treatment programme is considered by many to be a model for other developing countries aiming to improve access to AIDS treatment. Far less is known about Brazil's important role in changing global norms related to international pharmaceutical policy, particularly international human rights, health and trade policies governing access to essential medicines. Prompted by Brazil's interest in preserving its national AIDS treatment policies during World Trade Organisation trade disputes with the USA, these efforts to change global essential medicines norms have had important implications for other countries, particularly those scaling up AIDS treatment. This paper analyses Brazil's contributions to global essential medicines policy and explains the relevance of Brazil's contributions to global health policy today. PMID:19333805

  6. Changing global essential medicines norms to improve access to AIDS treatment: lessons from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunn, A; Fonseca, E Da; Gruskin, S

    2009-01-01

    Brazil's large-scale, successful HIV/AIDS treatment programme is considered by many to be a model for other developing countries aiming to improve access to AIDS treatment. Far less is known about Brazil's important role in changing global norms related to international pharmaceutical policy, particularly international human rights, health and trade policies governing access to essential medicines. Prompted by Brazil's interest in preserving its national AIDS treatment policies during World Trade Organisation trade disputes with the USA, these efforts to change global essential medicines norms have had important implications for other countries, particularly those scaling up AIDS treatment. This paper analyses Brazil's contributions to global essential medicines policy and explains the relevance of Brazil's contributions to global health policy today.

  7. Chinese Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Depression: Applications, Efficacies and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Menglin; Liang, Yan; Yang, Yiting; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Keyu; Chen, Zijie; Zhai, Shuangqing

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a common psychiatric disorder and a leading cause of disability worldwide. Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the commonly used complementary and alternative medicine therapies for depression. Clinical trials have been carried out to assess the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine currently. The exploration of herbal mechanisms of action used for the treatment of depression has also received great attention. This study is performed to summarize the frequently used formulae, patent drugs and single herbs in treating depression, review the literatures of clinical trials in treating depressive disorders, and to list the possible mechanisms involved during the treatment. Besides, we will analyze the limitations of present studies and the obstacles in the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Herbal Medicines for the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Current Scenario and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Devkar, Ranjitsinh V.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a multifactorial disease and has close correlations with other metabolic disorders. This makes its treatment difficult using a single pharmacological drug. Use of plant extract/decoction or polyherbal formulation to treat various liver diseases is very well mentioned in various traditional systems of medicine (Ayurveda, Japanese or traditional Chinese Medicine, and Kampo medicine). Medicinal herbs are known for their multifaceted implications and thus can form an effective treatment schedule against NASH. Till date, several plant extracts, polyherbal formulations, and phytochemicals have been evaluated for their possible therapeutic potential in preventing onset and progression of NASH in experimental models, but clinical studies using the same are sparse. Herbal extracts with antioxidants, antidiabetic, and antihyperlipidemic properties have been shown to ameliorate symptoms of NASH. This review article is a meticulous compilation of our current knowledge on the role of natural products in alleviating NASH and possible lacunae in research that needs to be addressed. PMID:24987431

  9. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants administered for the treatment of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand-Ahmadi, Babak; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Tajeddini, Pegah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Naghdi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is very high in human societies and their prevention and treatment are the most important priority in many countries. Hypertension makes an important contribution to the development of CVDs. Objectives: This study aimed to collect the ethno-medicinal knowledge of the traditional healers of Shiraz on medicinal plants used in the treatment of hypertension. Materials and Methods: Ethno-medicinal data were collected from September 2012 to July 2013 through direct interview. Twenty-five healers were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires and their traditional ethno-medicinal knowledge was recorded. Questionnaires were included apothecary personal information, plant local name, plant parts used, method of preparation, season of harvest and traditional use. Data collected from surveys and interviews were transferred to Microsoft Excel 2007 and analyzed. Results: Analysis of data showed that, 27 medicinal plants from 22 families are used for the treatment of hypertension. The families with most antihypertensive species were Apiaceae (8%), Rosaceae (8%) and Papaveraceae (8%). The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (36%) followed by fruits (30%), aerial part (17%) and branches (7%). The most frequently used preparation method was decoction (95%). Borago officinalis (51.85%), Berberis vulgaris (51.58%) had the highest frequency of mention. Conclusion: The ethno-medicinal survey of medicinal plants recommended by traditional healers for the treatment of hypertension provides new areas of research on the antihypertensive effect of medicinal plants. In the case of safety and effectiveness, they can be refined and processed to produce natural drugs. PMID:27689107

  10. Use of generic and essential medicines for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gama, Helena; Torre, Carla; Guerreiro, José Pedro; Azevedo, Ana; Costa, Suzete; Lunet, Nuno

    2017-06-29

    The successful control of cardiovascular diseases at the lowest possible cost requires the use of the most effective and affordable medicines. We aimed to describe the trends in the ambulatory use of medicines for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases [Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification system (ATC): C and B01A] in Portugal, between 2004 and 2012, and to estimate the potential for expenditure reduction through changes in patterns of use. We analysed sell-out data, expressed as defined daily doses (DDD) and pharmacy retail price (€), from a nationwide database. We estimated potential reduction in expenditures through the increase, up to 90% of the volume of DDD, in the use of generic and essential medicines; the latter were defined according to guidelines from Portugal and another European country. Overall consumption increased by approximately 50% from 2004 to 2012, reaching nearly 2400 million DDD, whereas expenditure decreased to 753 million € (-31.3% since 2006). Use of generics and essential medicines increased, representing 43.6 and 39.9% of DDD consumption in 2012, respectively. The 40 most used groups of medicines in 2012 accounted for just over 80% of overall consumption; among these, increase in use of generics and essential medicines would have contributed to a saving of 275 million €. Changes in patterns of consumption of medicines towards a more frequent use of generics, a preferential use of essential medicines and a more rational use of fixed-dose combinations may contribute to a more efficient use of health resources.

  11. Erectile dysfunction treatment and traditional medicine—can East and West medicine coexist?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joe K. C.; Tan, Ronny B. W.

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common sexual problem affecting many men irrespective of cultures, beliefs and nationalities. While medical therapy for ED has been revolutionized by the advent of oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and intracavernosal injection of vasoactive agents, recent technological advances such stem cell therapy, low intensity shock wave and newer generation of penile prosthesis implant offer hope to men who do not respond to conventional medical therapy. In contrast, traditional and complementary medicine (TCM) focuses on the restoration and better overall bodily regulation with the use of various herbal and animal products as well as exercises to invigorate qi (energy) in vital organs. Western medicine involves an analysis of ED symptom and underlying causes that contribute to ED, while TCM emphases the concept of holism and harmonization of body organs to achieve natural sexual life. The following article reviews our current understanding regarding the philosophical approach, and evaluates the evidence surrounding various ED therapies between mainstream Western Medicine and TCM. PMID:28217454

  12. Herbal medicine as inducers of apoptosis in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Safarzadeh, Elham; Sandoghchian Shotorbani, Siamak; Baradaran, Behzad

    2014-10-01

    Cancer is uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body. Nowadays, cancer is considered as a human tragedy and one of the most prevalent diseases in the wide, and its mortality resulting from cancer is being increased. It seems necessary to identify new strategies to prevent and treat such a deadly disease. Control survival and death of cancerous cell are important strategies in the management and therapy of cancer. Anticancer agents should kill the cancerous cell with the minimal side effect on normal cells that is possible through the induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis is known as programmed cell death in both normal and damaged tissues. This process includes some morphologically changes in cells such as rapid condensation and budding of the cell, formation of membrane-enclosed apoptotic bodies with well-preserved organelles. Induction of apoptosis is one of the most important markers of cytotoxic antitumor agents. Some natural compounds including plants induce apoptotic pathways that are blocked in cancer cells through various mechanisms in cancer cells. Multiple surveys reported that people with cancer commonly use herbs or herbal products. Vinca Alkaloids, Texans, podo phyllotoxin, Camptothecins have been clinically used as Plant derived anticancer agents. The present review summarizes the literature published so far regarding herbal medicine used as inducers of apoptosis in cancer.

  13. Pharmacokinetic interactions of herbal medicines for the treatment of chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Lin, Wan-Ling; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-04-01

    Chronic liver disease is a serious global health problem, and an increasing number of patients are seeking alternative medicines or complementary treatment. Herbal medicines account for 16.8% of patients with chronic liver disease who use complementary and alternative therapies. A survey of the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan reported that Long-Dan-Xie-Gan-Tang, Jia-Wei-Xia-Yao-San, and Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang (Sho-saiko-to) were the most frequent formula prescriptions for chronic hepatitis used by traditional Chinese medicine physicians. Bioanalytical methods of herbal medicines for the treatment of chronic hepatitis were developed to investigate pharmacokinetics properties, but multicomponent herbal formulas have been seldom discussed. The pharmacokinetics of herbal formulas is closely related to efficacy, efficiency, and patient safety of traditional herbal medicines. Potential herbal formula-drug interactions are another essential issue during herbal formula administration in chronic hepatitis patients. In a survey with the PubMed database, this review article evaluates the existing evidence-based data associated with the documented pharmacokinetics profiles and potential herbal-drug interactions of herbal formulas for the treatment of chronic hepatitis. In addition, the existing pharmacokinetic profiles were further linked with clinical practice to provide insight for the safety and specific use of traditional herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. [Construction and analysis of questionnaires on AIDS cough in traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis and treatment procedures].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Xue, Liu-Hua; Chen, Yu-Xia; Huang, Shi-Jing; Pan, Ju-Hua; Wang, Jie

    2013-08-01

    To norm the behavior of AIDS cough in traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis and treatment and improve the clinical level of cough treatment for HIV/AIDS, and build AIDS cough diagnosis and treatment procedures in traditional Chinese medicine. Combined with clinical practice,to formulate questionnaire on AIDS cough in traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis and treatment by both English and Chinese literature research to expertise consultation and verify the results of the questionnaires on the statistics using the Delphi method. Questionnaire contents consist of overview, pathogeny, diagnosis standard, dialectical medication (phlegm heat resistance pulmonary lung and kidney Yin deficiency lung spleen-deficiency), treating spleen-deficiency (lung), moxibustion treatment and aftercare care and diet and mental, average (2.93-3.00), full mark rate (93.10%-100%) ranks average (9.91-10.67) and (287.50-309.50) of which are the most high value, and the variation coefficient is 0.00, the Kendall coefficient (Kendalls W) is 0.049 which is statistical significance, the questionnaire reliability value of alpha was 0.788. Preliminary standarded concept, etiology and pathogenesis, diagnosis and syndrome differentiation treatment of AIDS cough, basically recognised by the experts in this field, and laid the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis and treatment on develop the AIDS cough specifications.

  15. Genetic Structure, Diversity and Long Term Viability of a Medicinal Plant, Nothapodytes nimmoniana Graham. (Icacinaceae), in Protected and Non-Protected Areas in the Western Ghats Biodiversity Hotspot.

    PubMed

    Shivaprakash, K Nagaraju; Ramesha, B Thimmappa; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Dayanandan, Selvadurai; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani

    2014-01-01

    The harvesting of medicinal plants from wild sources is escalating in many parts of the world, compromising the long-term survival of natural populations of medicinally important plants and sustainability of sources of raw material to meet pharmaceutical industry needs. Although protected areas are considered to play a central role in conservation of plant genetic resources, the effectiveness of protected areas for maintaining medicinal plant populations subject to intense harvesting pressure remain largely unknown. We conducted genetic and demographic studies of Nothapodytes nimmoniana Graham, one of the extensively harvested medicinal plant species in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India to assess the effectiveness of protected areas in long-term maintenance of economically important plant species. The analysis of adults and seedlings of N. nimmoniana in four protected and four non-protected areas using 7 nuclear microsatellite loci revealed that populations that are distributed within protected areas are subject to lower levels of harvesting and maintain higher genetic diversity (He = 0.816, Ho = 0.607, A = 18.857) than populations in adjoining non-protected areas (He = 0.781, Ho = 0.511, A = 15.571). Furthermore, seedlings in protected areas had significantly higher observed heterozygosity (Ho = 0.630) and private alleles as compared to seedlings in adjoining non-protected areas (Ho = 0.426). Most populations revealed signatures of recent genetic bottleneck. The prediction of long-term maintenance of genetic diversity using BOTTLESIM indicated that current population sizes of the species are not sufficient to maintain 90% of present genetic diversity for next 100 years. Overall, these results highlight the need for establishing more protected areas encompassing a large number of adult plants in the Western Ghats to conserve genetic diversity of economically and medicinally important plant species.

  16. Genetic Structure, Diversity and Long Term Viability of a Medicinal Plant, Nothapodytes nimmoniana Graham. (Icacinaceae), in Protected and Non-Protected Areas in the Western Ghats Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprakash, K. Nagaraju; Ramesha, B. Thimmappa; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Dayanandan, Selvadurai; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani

    2014-01-01

    Background and Question The harvesting of medicinal plants from wild sources is escalating in many parts of the world, compromising the long-term survival of natural populations of medicinally important plants and sustainability of sources of raw material to meet pharmaceutical industry needs. Although protected areas are considered to play a central role in conservation of plant genetic resources, the effectiveness of protected areas for maintaining medicinal plant populations subject to intense harvesting pressure remain largely unknown. We conducted genetic and demographic studies of Nothapodytes nimmoniana Graham, one of the extensively harvested medicinal plant species in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India to assess the effectiveness of protected areas in long-term maintenance of economically important plant species. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis of adults and seedlings of N. nimmoniana in four protected and four non-protected areas using 7 nuclear microsatellite loci revealed that populations that are distributed within protected areas are subject to lower levels of harvesting and maintain higher genetic diversity (He = 0.816, Ho = 0.607, A = 18.857) than populations in adjoining non-protected areas (He = 0.781, Ho = 0.511, A = 15.571). Furthermore, seedlings in protected areas had significantly higher observed heterozygosity (Ho = 0.630) and private alleles as compared to seedlings in adjoining non-protected areas (Ho = 0.426). Most populations revealed signatures of recent genetic bottleneck. The prediction of long-term maintenance of genetic diversity using BOTTLESIM indicated that current population sizes of the species are not sufficient to maintain 90% of present genetic diversity for next 100 years. Conclusions/Significance Overall, these results highlight the need for establishing more protected areas encompassing a large number of adult plants in the Western Ghats to conserve genetic diversity

  17. Outcome of tuberculosis patients under directly observed short course treatment in western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ejeta, Eyasu; Chala, Muda; Arega, Gebeyaw; Ayalsew, Kassahu; Tesfaye, Lensa; Birhanu, Tadesse; Disassa, Haimanot

    2015-07-30

    Treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs, as suggested by the World Health Organization. However, this has not been well documented in the study area. This work contributes to a better understanding this issue. A five-year (2009-2013) retrospective cohort study was conducted between April and May 2014, in six randomly selected health institutions providing tuberculosis treatment in western Ethiopia. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between treatment outcomes and predictor variables. A total of 1,175 tuberculosis patients with a mean (standard deviation) age of 29.91 (13.99) were involved in the study. The majority of the study participants had smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (39.7%) and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (39.7%). Of all the study participants, 14.5% were cured, 56.3% completed treatment, 0.2% had treatment failure, 8.1% died during follow-up, 7.1% were reported as defaulters, and 13.8% were transferred out to another health institution. The overall treatment success rate was 70.8% and show progressive increases over the course of the study. The associated predictors were enrollment years, HIV co-infection, and sputum smear follow-up in the second, fifth, and seven months. The treatment success rate was unsatisfactory in spite of improvement seen over the study period. Thus, continued follow-up of patients, with frequent supportive supervision during the course of treatment, and provision of early detection and follow-up for HIV infection need to be strengthened to achieve an effective treatment outcome.

  18. Swiss ethnoveterinary knowledge on medicinal plants - a within-country comparison of Italian speaking regions with north-western German speaking regions.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Maria; Zbinden, Mirjam; Vogl, Christan R; Ivemeyer, Silvia; Meier, Beat; Amorena, Michele; Maeschli, Ariane; Hamburger, Matthias; Walkenhorst, Michael

    2017-01-03

    Ethnoveterinary knowledge in Europe may play an important role as a basis for sustainable treatment options for livestock. Aims of our study were (a) to compare the ethnoveterinary practices of two culturally and sociodemographically different regions of Switzerland, (b) to compare results with earlier ethnoveterinary studies conducted in Switzerland and in adjacent Italian regions and, (c) to evaluate possible reasons for regional differences in European ethnoveterinary medicine. 25 interviews were conducted in 2014 in all Italian speaking regions (ItR) of Switzerland, and 31 interviews were held in five north-western German speaking Cantons (GeC). Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect detailed information regarding plant species, mode of preparation, dosage, route of administration, category of use, origin of knowledge, frequency of use, and satisfaction with outcomes of the treatments. A total of 162 homemade remedies in ItR and 219 in GeC were reported, out of which 125 and 145, respectively, were reported to contain only one plant species (homemade single species herbal remedy report, HSHR). 44 ItR and 43 GeC plant species were reported to treat livestock, of which only a half were used in both regions. For each HSHR, we classified the treatment intention of all use reports (UR), leading to a total of 205 and 219 UR in ItR and GeC respectively. While cattle were the most often treated livestock species in both study regions, in ItR 40% of UR were administered to small ruminants. Main indications in both regions were gastrointestinal diseases and skin afflictions, but in ItR a high number of URs were reported as antiparasitics. URs were mainly handed down from the past generation, but in GeC the source of knowledge for 20% of URs were from courses. Regarding the used plant species, ItR showed a higher concordance with Swiss than Italian studies, but with some differences to all regions. A total of 22 (14 ItR; 8 GeC) plant species in this study

  19. Perspectives of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Erin; Sevigny, Marika; Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Phillips, Karen P

    2014-10-14

    Infertility patients are increasingly using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to supplement or replace conventional fertility treatments. The objective of this study was to determine the roles of CAM practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted in Ottawa, Canada in 2011 with CAM practitioners who specialized in naturopathy, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, hypnotherapy and integrated medicine. CAM practitioners played an active role in both treatment and support of infertility, using a holistic, interdisciplinary and individualized approach. CAM practitioners recognized biological but also environmental and psychosomatic determinants of infertility. Participants were receptive to working with physicians, however little collaboration was described. Integrated infertility patient care through both collaboration with CAM practitioners and incorporation of CAM's holistic, individualized and interdisciplinary approaches would greatly benefit infertility patients.

  20. Beneficial effects of traditional Chinese medicine on the treatment of osteoporosis on ovariectomised rat models.

    PubMed

    Rufus, Pamela; Mohamed, Norazlina; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2013-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disorder that affects both men and women worldwide. It causes low bone mass and therefore increases bone susceptibility to fracture when bone undergoes a minor trauma. Lack of estrogen is the principal cause of osteoporosis. Estrogen, calcium, calcitonin, vitamin D and several antioxidants help in the prevention of osteoporosis. In order to effectively treat osteoporosis, there has been an extended research on the biological activities of traditional medicines since synthetic medicines possess several side effects that reduce their efficacy. Therefore, there is a need to develop new treatment alternatives for osteoporosis. This review centres on the scientific researches carried out on the evaluation of Chinese traditional medicines in the treatment of osteoporosis. Various plants like Achyranthes bidentata, Davallia formosana, polygonatum sibiricum, Cibotium barometz, Er-Zhi-Wan, Curculigo orchioides and a combined treatment of Hachimi-jio-gan (Ba-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan) with alendronate proved active in preventing post-menopausal osteoporosis.

  1. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy". Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Validating a hospital medicines formulary survey in the Western Pacific Region--a global hospital pharmacy initiative based on the Basel Statements.

    PubMed

    Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Basel Statements were developed to reflect the future of hospital pharmacy worldwide. Included were a key set of statements regarding the expanding role of hospital pharmacists' influence on prescribing from the management of medicines formularies to being an active member of the therapeutic decision-making process. This study aimed to validate a survey to measure Basel Statement 26 regarding the role of medicines formularies and the factors that affect its use in the Western Pacific Region (WPR). The survey was developed in consultation with a WPR advisory group and current literature. The survey was translated using the forward-backward method into Chinese (simplified) and Vietnamese. The instrument was pilot tested in a stratified random sample of 260 hospital pharmacy directors in the WPR. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the data to assess construct validity of the Medicines Formulary Scale that assessed responders' perceptions of their formulary and impact on utilization. The Medicines Formulary Survey was completed by 107 hospital pharmacy directors or equivalent. The survey contained the Medicines Formulary Scale in addition to questions regarding the content and review process of the hospital's formulary as well as demographic questions. Application of the PCA procedures resulted in a parsimonious 2-factor solution in which 33.8% of the variance was explained. The Cronbach alpha for the 17-item scale was found to be 0.70. The Cronbach alpha values for the first and second factor/subscales were 0.76 and 0.68, respectively. The Medicines Formulary Survey appears reliable and valid for assessing hospital pharmacy directors' perceptions of hospital medicine formularies in the WPR. Further development of validated instruments to assess other areas of hospital pharmacy practice will help track the progression of hospital pharmacy and aid in globalization of the profession. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Comparative research into the process of forming the theory of constitution in ancient western medicine and that of four trigrams constitution in Korean medicine and contents of two theories of constitution].

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hong

    2009-06-01

    After conducting comparative research into the process of forming the Theory of Constitution in Ancient Western Medicine and that of Four Trigrams Constitution(Sasang Constitution) in Korean Medicine and contents of two Theories of Constitution in terms of medical history, both theories were found to be formed by an interaction between philosophy and medicine, followed by a combination of the two, on a philosophical basis. The Theory of Constitution in Ancient Western Medicine began with the Theory of Four Elements presented by Empedocles, followed by the Theory of Four Humors presented by Hippocrates and the Theory of Four Temperaments by Galenos, forming and developing the Theory of Constitution. After the Middle Ages, there was no significant advance in the Theory of Constitution by modern times ; however, it developed into the theory of constitution type of Kretschmer and others after the 19th century and into the scientific theory of constitution based on genetics presented by Garrod and others early in the 20th century. The Theory of Four Trigrams Constitution began with the Theory of Constitution in Huangdi Neijing, followed by developments and influences of existing medicine called beginning, restoration, and revival periods and DongeuisoosebowonSaSangChoBonGwon based on the original philosophy of Four Trigrams presented by Lee Je-ma, which is found in GyeokChiGo, DongMuYuGo and so on, ultimately forming and developing into the Theory of Four Trigrams Constitution in Dongeuisoosebowon. Recently, a lot of research is being conducted into making it objective in order to achieve reproducibility in diagnosis and so forth of Four Trigrams Constitution.

  4. The clinical study of the optimalization of surgical treatment and the traditional Chinese medicine intervention on palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Yan, Zhikun; Fu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Liwen; Xu, Linhai; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Genmiao

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the efficacy of different surgical methods in treating palmar hyperhidrosis and the compensatory hyperhidrosis after surgery and to observe the efficacy of "Energy-boosting and Yin-nourishing anti-perspirant formula" on postsurgical hyperhidrosis patients. Two-hundred patients were randomly assigned to groups A (Chinese and Western medicine, T4 transection plus "Energy-boosting and Yin-nourishing anti-perspirant formula") and B (Western medicine, T4 transection). The surgical efficiency, recurrence rate, compensatory hyperhidrosis, and the long-term life quality were compared. Another 100 cases (group C, T2 transection) were analyzed as a control group. After surgery, the palmar hyperhidrosis and armpit sweating were relieved in all the three group patients and in 34 % of patients combined with plantar hyperhidrosis, the symptoms were relieved. Transient palmar hyperhidrosis was found in three cases at day 2 to day 5 postoperatively. One case of Horner's syndrome and one case recurrence were found in group C patients. The compensatory sweating of various degrees occurred in all the three groups. There were 25, 24, and 43 cases in groups A, B, and C, respectively. There is a significant difference between groups C, A, and B. The compensatory sweating in 13 cases of group A and four cases of group B had different degrees of improvement in the follow-up 6 months after surgery. There is a significant difference. Thoracoscopic bilateral T4 sympathetic chain and the Kuntz resection are the optimized surgical treatments for the palmar hyperhidrosis. "Energy-boosting and Yin-nourishing anti-perspirant formula" is effective in treating the postoperative compensatory sweating.

  5. Epidemiology of self-medication with modern medicines among health care professionals in Nekemte town, western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sado, Edao; Kassahun, Endashaw; Bayisa, Getu; Gebre, Mohammed; Tadesse, Ayana; Mosisa, Balisa

    2017-10-30

    Self-medication is defined as use of medicines to treat self-recognized illnesses. It is widely used in Ethiopia. However, its extent of use is unknown among health professionals. This study aimed to assess prevalence and reasons of self-medication with modern medicines among health professionals. A cross-sectional study was conducted on the health professionals, working in the public health facilities. Data were collected from March to May, 2016 using semi-structured questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using statistical package for the social sciences. A chi square test was used as test of significance at 95% of confidence interval. A total of 154 health professionals were enrolled, with 53% were being females. The finding revealed that prevalence of self-medication with modern medicines was 67.5%. Financial constraints (32.5%) and familiarity with medicines (24%) were the major reasons of self-medication. It also showed that self-medication with modern medicines was significantly associated with marital status (χ 2  = 19.57, P = 0.00). Analgesics (53%) and antibiotics (36%) were the most commonly used categories of medicines. Self-medication with modern medicines was highly practiced among health professionals. Financial constraints and familiarity with medicines were the two major reasons of practicing.

  6. Can a digital medicine system improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment?

    PubMed

    Papola, D; Gastaldon, C; Ostuzzi, G

    2018-06-01

    A substantial proportion of people with mental health conditions do not adhere to prescribed pharmacological treatments. Poor adherence is probably one of the most critical elements contributing to relapse in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders. In order to tackle this global issue, in November 2017 the Food and Drug Administration approved a tablet formulation of the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole embedded with a novel digital adherence-assessment device. In this commentary, we critically appraised the potential beneficial and harmful consequences of this new digital formulation of aripiprazole, and we highlighted expected implications for clinical practice.

  7. Prevention and Treatment of Flatulence From a Traditional Persian Medicine Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Larijani, Bagher; Esfahani, Mohammad Medhi; Moghimi, Maryam; Shams Ardakani, Mohammad Reza; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Nazem, Esmaiel; Hasani Ranjbar, Shirin; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Zargaran, Arman

    2016-01-01

    Context The feeling of abdominal fullness, bloating, and movement of gas in the abdomen is a very uncomfortable sensation termed flatulence. Since flatulence is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms that is bothersome to patients, it is important to identify effective methods to resolve this issue. In modern medicine, management of flatulence is often not satisfactory. On the other hand, traditional systems of medicine can be considered good potential sources to find new approaches for preventing and treating flatulence. The aim of this study is to review flatulence treatments from a traditional Persian medicine (TPM) viewpoint. Evidence Acquisition In this study, the reasons for flatulence and methods for its prevention and treatment are reviewed in traditional Persian medicine (TPM) texts and then related with evidence from modern medicine by searching in databases, including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and IranMedex. Results From a traditional Persian scholar viewpoint, one of the most important causes of flatulence is an incorrect manner of eating; valuable advice to correct bad eating habits will be illustrated. In addition, traditional practitioners describe some herbs and vegetables as well as herbal compounds that are effective food additives to relieve flatulence. The anti-flatulent effect of most of these herbs has been experimentally verified using modern medicine. Conclusions Attention to TPM can lead to the identification of new preventive and curative approaches to avoid and treat flatulence. In addition, Persian viewpoints from the medieval era regarding flatulence are historically important. PMID:27275398

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Flatulence From a Traditional Persian Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Larijani, Bagher; Esfahani, Mohammad Medhi; Moghimi, Maryam; Shams Ardakani, Mohammad Reza; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Nazem, Esmaiel; Hasani Ranjbar, Shirin; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Zargaran, Arman

    2016-04-01

    The feeling of abdominal fullness, bloating, and movement of gas in the abdomen is a very uncomfortable sensation termed flatulence. Since flatulence is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms that is bothersome to patients, it is important to identify effective methods to resolve this issue. In modern medicine, management of flatulence is often not satisfactory. On the other hand, traditional systems of medicine can be considered good potential sources to find new approaches for preventing and treating flatulence. The aim of this study is to review flatulence treatments from a traditional Persian medicine (TPM) viewpoint. In this study, the reasons for flatulence and methods for its prevention and treatment are reviewed in traditional Persian medicine (TPM) texts and then related with evidence from modern medicine by searching in databases, including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and IranMedex. From a traditional Persian scholar viewpoint, one of the most important causes of flatulence is an incorrect manner of eating; valuable advice to correct bad eating habits will be illustrated. In addition, traditional practitioners describe some herbs and vegetables as well as herbal compounds that are effective food additives to relieve flatulence. The anti-flatulent effect of most of these herbs has been experimentally verified using modern medicine. Attention to TPM can lead to the identification of new preventive and curative approaches to avoid and treat flatulence. In addition, Persian viewpoints from the medieval era regarding flatulence are historically important.

  9. Assessment of the reporting quality of randomized controlled trials on the treatment of diabetes mellitus with traditional chinese medicine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Xu, Qin; Sun, Qi; Fan, Fang-Fang; Guo, Xue-Rui; Guo, Fei

    2013-01-01

    After the publication of the CONSORT 2010 statement, few studies have been conducted to assess the reporting quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on treatment of diabetes mellitus with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) published in Chinese journals. To investigate the current situation of the reporting quality of RCTs in leading medical journals in China with the CONSORT 2010 statement as criteria. The China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) electronic database was searched for RCTs on the treatment of diabetes mellitus with TCM published in the Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional & Western Medicine, and the China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica from January to December 2011. We excluded trials reported as "animal studies", "in vitro studies", "case studies", or "systematic reviews". The CONSORT checklist was applied by two independent raters to evaluate the reporting quality of all eligible trials after discussing and comprehending the items thoroughly. Each item in the checklist was graded as either "yes" or "no" depending on whether it had been reported by the authors. We identified 27 RCTs. According to the 37 items in the CONSORT checklist, the average reporting percentage was 45.0%, in which the average reporting percentage for the "title and abstract", the "introduction", the "methods", the "results", the "discussion" and the "other information" was 33.3%, 88.9%, 36.4%, 54.4%, 71.6% and 14.8%, respectively. In the Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional & Western Medicine, and the China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica the average reporting percentage was 42.2%, 56.8%, and 46.0%, respectively. The reporting quality of RCTs in these three journals was insufficient to allow readers to assess the validity of the trials. We recommend that editors require authors to use the CONSORT statement when reporting their trial results as a condition of publication.

  10. Listeriosis Phytotherapy: A Review Study on the Effectiveness of Iranian Medicinal Plants in Treatment of Listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Saki, Kourosh; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-12-17

    Listeria monocytogenes can be found in many processed foods, raw milk, dairy products, meat and meat products such as sausages, beef and fish products, seafoods, eggs, fruits, and vegetables such as radish and cabbage. This article is a review study on the Iranian medicinal plants applied for treatment of listeriosis. Information of this review article was obtained by searching various key words such as Listeria monocytogenes, medicinal plants, plant extracts and essential oils among scientific articles published in databases of Google scholar, ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus, SID and Magiran. Thyme, German chamomile, great chamomile, yarrow, onion, oregano, nutmeg, sage, sagebrush, hyssop, rosemary, St John's wort, safflower, ajowan, cumin, peppermint, shallot, anise, and parsnip are known antilisteriosis medicinal plants. Bioactive phytochemicals, antioxidants and monoterpenes, sesquiterpene, coumarin, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, alkaloids, and terpenoids are the main ingredients of antilisteriosis medicinal plants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic treatments. However, none of these methods is free of side effects and their exact role in therapy is not clear. In this paper apart from presenting the possible causes of acne vulgaris and its available drugs, recently published papers about medicinal plants used in the treatment of acne vulgaris were reviewed. Results: Consumption of alternative and complementary medicine, including medicinal plants, is increasing and is common amongst patients affected by acne and infectious skin diseases. Medicinal plants have a long history of use and have been shown to possess low side effects. These plants are a reliable source for preparation of new drugs. Conclusions: Many plants seem to have inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria, fungi and viruses in vitro. However, there are a few clinical evidences about the effectiveness and safety of these plants in the treatment of acne and other skin infections. PMID:26862380

  12. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-11-01

    Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic treatments. However, none of these methods is free of side effects and their exact role in therapy is not clear. In this paper apart from presenting the possible causes of acne vulgaris and its available drugs, recently published papers about medicinal plants used in the treatment of acne vulgaris were reviewed. Consumption of alternative and complementary medicine, including medicinal plants, is increasing and is common amongst patients affected by acne and infectious skin diseases. Medicinal plants have a long history of use and have been shown to possess low side effects. These plants are a reliable source for preparation of new drugs. Many plants seem to have inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria, fungi and viruses in vitro. However, there are a few clinical evidences about the effectiveness and safety of these plants in the treatment of acne and other skin infections.

  13. Indigenous plant medicines for health care: treatment of Diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nisha H; Parikh, Palak K; Kothari, Charmy

    2014-05-01

    Medicinal plants have played an important role in treating and preventing a variety of diseases throughout the world. Metabolic syndrome had become a global epidemic, defined as a cluster of three of five criteria: insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low high-density cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. The current review focuses on Indian medicinal plant drugs and plants used in the treatment of diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Though there are various approaches to reduce the ill-effects of diabetes and hyperlipidemia and its secondary complications, plant-based drugs are preferred due to lesser side effects and low cost. The current review focuses on twenty-three medicinal plants used in the treatment of Diabetes mellitus and nine medicinal plants used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. The wealth of knowledge on medicinal plants points to a great potential for research and the discovery of new drugs to fight diseases, including diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Traditional Chinese medicine valuably augments therapeutic options in the treatment of climacteric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Climacteric syndrome refers to recurring symptoms such as hot flashes, chills, headache, irritability and depression. This is usually experienced by menopausal women and can be related to a hormonal reorganization in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, originating 1000s of years ago, above-mentioned symptoms can be interpreted on the basis of the philosophic diagnostic concepts, such as the imbalance of Yin and Yang, the Zang-Fu and Basic substances (e.g. Qi, Blood and Essence). These concepts postulate balance and harmonization as the principle aim of a treatment. In this context, it is not astounding that one of the most prominent ancient textbooks dating back to 500-200 BC, Huang di Neijing: The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine gives already first instructions for diagnosis and therapy of climacteric symptoms. For therapy, traditional Chinese medicine comprises five treatment principles: Chinese herbal medicine, TuiNa (a Chinese form of manual therapy), nutrition, activity (e.g. QiGong) and acupuncture (being the most widespread form of treatment used in Europe). This review provides an easy access to the concepts of traditional Chinese medicine particularly regarding to climacteric syndrome and also focuses on current scientific evidence.

  15. Effects of treatment on free radicals in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in South Western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adebimpe, Wasiu Olalekan; Faremi, Ayodeji Oluwaseun; Nassar, Sulaiman Adebayo

    2015-12-01

    Formation of Malondialdehyde (MDA), a free radical, in Tuberculosis patients does occur when Tubercule bacilli induces reactive oxygen species as a result of phagocytic respiratory burst. This study evaluated the effect of treatment on plasma level of Malondialdehyde among patients infected with Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in Osogbo South Western Nigeria. Descriptive cross sectional study among 110 patients, grouped into four categories (three TB patient categories and controls). All patients were screened for presence or absence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in their sputum and HIV 1 & 2 in their blood using standard techniques. The level of free radical (Malondialdehyde, MDA) was determined by Thiobabituric acid reacting method. Data was analyzed using the SPSS software version 17.0. Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly lower in TB patients on drugs (TBD) compared with the new cases on treatment (NCT). (0.17+0.88mol/L Vs 0.27+0.08mol/L, p<0.05). Varying degrees of correlations were also found between free radicals and electrolytes. Reduced serum MDA levels in TBD suggested a reduction in the levels of free radical injury once treatment was commenced. Therefore serum free radical may be an index of monitoring response to treatment in tuberculosis management.

  16. Guide to fuel treatments in dry forests of the Western United States: assessing forest structure and fire hazard.

    Treesearch

    Morris C. Johnson; David L. Peterson; Crystal L. Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Guide to Fuel Treatments analyzes a range of fuel treatments for representative dry forest stands in the Western United States with overstories dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and pinyon pine (Pinus edulis). Six silvicultural options (no thinning; thinning...

  17. Combined heat and controlled atmosphere quarantine treatments for control of western cherry fruit fly in sweet cherries.

    PubMed

    Neven, Lisa G; Rehfield-Ray, Linda

    2006-06-01

    Nonchemical quarantine treatments, using a combination of short duration high temperatures under low oxygen, elevated carbon dioxide atmospheric environment were developed to control western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, in sweet cherries, Prunus avium (L.). The two treatments developed use a chamber temperature of 45 degrees C for 45 min and a chamber temperature of 47 degreesd C for 25 min, both under a 1% oxygen, 15% carbon dioxide, -2 degrees C dew point environment. Both these treatments have been shown to provide control of all life stages of western cherry fruit fly while preserving commodity market quality. There was no definitive egg or larval stage, which was demonstrated to be the most tolerant to either controlled atmosphere temperature treatment system treatment. Efficacy tests for both treatments resulted in 100% mortality of >5000 western cherry fruit flies in each treatment. These treatments may provide, with further study, quarantine security in exported sweet cherries where western cherry fruit fly is a quarantine concern and fumigation with methyl bromide is not desired.

  18. Using Landscape-Based Decision Rules to Prioritize Locations of Fuel Treatments in the Boreal Mixedwood of Western Canada

    Treesearch

    Marc-André Parisien; Dave R. Junor; Victor G. Kafka

    2006-01-01

    This study used a rule-based approach to prioritize locations of fuel treatments in the boreal mixedwood forest of western Canada. The burn probability (BP) in and around Prince Albert National Park in Saskatchewan was mapped using the Burn-P3 (Probability, Prediction, and Planning) model. Fuel treatment locations were determined according to three scenarios and five...

  19. Effects of insecticide treatments on subsequent defoliation by western spruce budworm in Oregon and Washington: 1982-92.

    Treesearch

    Katharine A. Sheehan

    1996-01-01

    Effects of insecticide treatments conducted in Oregon and Washington from 1982 through 1992 on subsequent defoliation by western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) were evaluated by using aerial sketchmaps and a geographic information system. For each treatment, the extent and severity of defoliation was calculated for the treated...

  20. Semi-commercial ultralow oxygen treatment for control of western flower thrips, frankliniella occidentalis (thysanoptera: thripidae), on harvested iceberg lettuce.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pallet scale two day ultralow oxygen (ULO) treatment with 30 ppm oxygen at 10°C ambient temperature was conducted on seven cultivars of vacuum cooled iceberg lettuce which had been stored for 1, 3, 4, and 6 days to develop a safe and effective treatment for control of western flower thrips, Franklin...

  1. Traditional perceptions and treatment of mental disorders in western Ethiopia before the 1974 revolution.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, L; Merdasa, F

    1991-11-01

    This article describes the traditional concepts and treatment of mental disorders in the Oromo areas in western Ethiopia before the revolution in 1974. There are three traditional cultural influences operating: traditional Oromo thinking, the Coptic church and the Islamic culture. One important element in traditional Oromo thinking is that each person is believed to possess an ayana, which is a special divine agent that can descend upon people, but also means a person's character and personality. In the traditional Oromo society, the Kallu is the religious leader who, through an ecstatic ritual technique, can investigate the causes of the disorder and advise what to do. Mental disorders are generally explained as resulting from disturbances in the relationship between people and divinity. The second important cultural element in western Ethiopia is the orthodox Coptic church, which usually looks upon mental disorders as possession by evil spirits, which are thus treated by specially gifted priests and monks by praying and giving holy water or eventually exhortation. According to Islamic teaching in the area, mental disorders are caused by evil spirits sent by God to punish the unfaithful people. Some Muslim sheiks treat mental cases with prayers, but herbal remedies are also used. There is a great intermingling of these different cultural and religious elements and people attend different healers and religious leaders more depending on the reputation of the person than on cultural and religious affiliation.

  2. Prescription of Chinese Herbal Medicine in Pattern-Based Traditional Chinese Medicine Treatment for Depression: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ka-Yan; Yu, Yee-Man; Ng, Bacon Fung-Leung; Ziea, Eric Tat-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatments are often prescribed based on individuals' pattern diagnoses. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials in Chinese and English literatures on TCM pattern-based treatment for depression has therefore been conducted. A total of 61 studies, 2504 subjects, and 27 TCM patterns were included. Due to the large variation of TCM pattern among participants, we only analyzed the top four commonly studied TCM patterns: liver qi depression, liver depression and spleen deficiency, dual deficiency of the heart, and spleen and liver depression and qi stagnation. We found that Xiaoyao decoction was the most frequently used herbal formula for the treatment of liver qi depression and liver depression with spleen deficiency, while Chaihu Shugan decoction was often used for liver depression and qi stagnation. Bai Shao (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) and Chai Hu (Bupleurum chinense DC.) were commonly used across different TCM patterns regardless of the prescribed Chinese herbal formulas. The rationale underlying herb selection was seldom provided. Due to the limited number of studies on TCM pattern-based treatment of depression and their low methodological quality, we are unable to draw any conclusion regarding which herbal formulas have higher efficacy and which TCM patterns respond better to CHM. PMID:26180532

  3. Medicinal plants used for hypertension treatment by folk healers in Songkhla province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Neamsuvan, Oratai; Komonhiran, Panadda; Boonming, Kamonvadee

    2018-03-25

    Hypertension is the most dominant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular, kidney, and eye diseases. In Thailand, illness and hospitalisation in the modern public health system due to high blood pressure is increasing. However, some Thai people have turned their attention to the use of herbal medicines for healthcare. Therefore, this study aimed (1) to study the folk knowledge of hypertension treatment and (2) to study plant utilisation in the treatment of high blood pressure by Songkhla folk healers. Field surveys and semi-structured interviews about theories of disease, principles of healing, and herbal usage (plant species, parts used, preparation, and application methods) were gathered. The data were analysed by descriptive statistics. The literatures regarding medicinal plants used in any traditional medicine, antihypertension activity, and toxicity was reviewed. Most healers believed that hypertension was caused by the disorder of fire and wind elements in the body. The medicinal plants containing hot and mild tastes, which had the potential for treating problems in the wind element, were applied. A total of 62 species were used for hypertension treatment. Most plants were in the Asteraceae, Piperaceae, Rutaceae, or Zingiberaceae family (4 species each). Herbal medicines were preferred to be prepared by boiling (78%) and consumed by drinking 1 teacup before 3 meals each day (26%). Piper retrofractum and Cleome viscosa had the greatest Frequency of Citation (FC = 6, n = 14). Thirty-seven species have been reported for use in traditional medicine. Twenty-four and 46 species have already been investigated for antihypertension activity and toxicity, respectively. Identifying medicinal plants that have been tested by experienced folk doctors would provide an opportunity for people to choose and consume local herbs that are easy to access in their local area. However, the remaining plants that have not been studied for antihypertension activity and

  4. Traditional/Alternative Medicine: An Investigation into Identification, Knowledge and Consumption Practices of Herbal Medicine among Students with Hearing Impairment in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeniyi, Samuel O.; Olufemi-Adeniyi, Olubukola A.; Erinoso, Sakiru M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of traditional medicine as alternative or complimentary therapy is gaining prominence in primary health care worldwide. This is because of the efficacy in the management of mild, chronic seemingly incurable ailments/diseases. Though the publicity is on the increase from country to country in the world, however, one cannot conclude that the…

  5. Is Europe still heading to a common price level for on-patent medicines? An exploratory study among 15 Western European countries.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Christine; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje Katja; Vogler, Sabine; de Joncheere, Kees; Laing, Richard Ogilvie; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that medicines prices in Europe converge over time as a result of policy measures such as external price referencing. To explore whether ex-factory prices of on-patented medicines in Western European countries have converged over a recent period of time. Prices of ten on-patent medicines in five years (2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012) of 15 European countries were analyzed. The unit of analysis was the ex-factory price in Euro per defined daily dose (exchange rate indexed to 2007). A score (deviation from the average price) per country as well as the ranges were calculated for all medicines. The prices between countries and selected products varied to a great extent from as low as an average price of € 1.3/DDD for sitagliptin in 2010-2012 to an average of € 221.5/DDD for alemtuzumab in 2011. Between 2008 and 2012, a price divergence was seen which was fully driven by two countries, Germany (up to 27% more expensive than the average) and Greece (up to 32% cheaper than the average). All other countries had stable prices and centered around the country average. Prices of less expensive as well as expensive medicines remained relatively stable or decreased over time, while only the price of sirolimus relatively increased. Our study period included the time of the recession and several pricing policy measures may have affected the prices of medicines. Instead of the expected price convergence we observed a price divergence driven by price changes in only two of the 15 countries. All other European countries remained stable around the country average. Further research is needed to expand the study to a bigger sample size, and include prescribing data and Eastern European countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrated community case management by drug sellers influences appropriate treatment of paediatric febrile illness in South Western Uganda: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kitutu, Freddy Eric; Kalyango, Joan Nakayaga; Mayora, Chrispus; Selling, Katarina Ekholm; Peterson, Stefan; Wamani, Henry

    2017-10-23

    Fever case management is a major challenge for improved child health globally, despite existence of cheap and effective child survival health technologies. The integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) intervention of paediatric febrile illnesses though adopted by Uganda's Ministry of Health to be implemented by community health workers, has not addressed the inaccess to life-saving medicines and diagnostics. Therefore, the iCCM intervention was implemented in private drug shops and evaluated for its effect on appropriate treatment of paediatric fever in a low malaria transmission setting in South Western Uganda. From June 2013 to September 2015, the effect of the iCCM intervention on drug seller paediatric fever management and adherence to iCCM guidelines was assessed in a quasi-experimental study in South Western Uganda. A total of 212 care-seeker exit interviews were done before and 285 after in the intervention arm as compared to 216 before and 268 care-seeker interviews at the end of the study period in the comparison arm. The intervention effect was assessed by difference-in-difference analysis of drug seller treatment practices against national treatment recommendations between the intervention and comparison arms. Observed proportions among care-seeker interviews were compared with corresponding proportions from 5795 child visits recorded in patient registries and 49 direct observations of drug seller-care-seeker encounters in intervention drug shops. The iCCM intervention increased the appropriate treatment of uncomplicated malaria, pneumonia symptoms and non-bloody diarrhoea by 80.2% (95% CI 53.2-107.2), 65.5% (95% CI 51.6-79.4) and 31.4% (95% CI 1.6-61.2), respectively. Within the intervention arm, drug seller scores on appropriate treatment for pneumonia symptoms and diagnostic test use were the same among care-seeker exit interviews and direct observation. A linear trend (negative slope, - 0.009 p value < 0.001) was observed for proportions of

  7. Ethnopharmacological Survey of Plants Used in the Traditional Treatment of Gastrointestinal Pain, Inflammation and Diarrhea in Africa: Future Perspectives for Integration into Modern Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timo D.; Mtui, Dorah J.; Balemba, Onesmo B.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary This review provides an inventory of numerous plant species used as traditional remedies for pain and diarrhea in Africa. Africa can emulate advances in traditional Chinese medicine through research, commercialization, teaching traditional medicine in medical schools, and incorporating botanical products in treating veterinary and human patients. Prioritized research of plant species with proven folklore in treating pain and diarrhea using high throughput screening to identify and test bioactive compounds to verify their effectiveness, mechanisms of action and safety and translational research are needed to facilitate these advances and the integration of traditional African botanical preparations for treating pain and gastrointestinal disorders into western medicine. Abstract There is a growing need to find the most appropriate and effective treatment options for a variety of painful syndromes, including conditions affecting the gastrointestinal tract, for treating both veterinary and human patients. The most successful regimen may come through integrated therapies including combining current and novel western drugs with acupuncture and botanical therapies or their derivatives. There is an extensive history and use of plants in African traditional medicine. In this review, we have highlighted botanical remedies used for treatment of pain, diarrheas and inflammation in traditional veterinary and human health care in Africa. These preparations are promising sources of new compounds comprised of flavonoids, bioflavanones, xanthones, terpenoids, sterols and glycosides as well as compound formulas and supplements for future use in multimodal treatment approaches to chronic pain, gastrointestinal disorders and inflammation. The advancement of plant therapies and their derivative compounds will require the identification and validation of compounds having specific anti-nociceptive neuromodulatory and/or anti-inflammatory effects. In particular, there is

  8. Herbal medicines for urinary stone treatment. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Monti, Elena; Trinchieri, Alberto; Magri, Vittorio; Cleves, Anne; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2016-03-31

    To analyze the clinical evidence on the efficacy of phytotherapy in the treatment of calculi in the urinary tract. To be eligible, full-length articles should include the results of randomized controlled trials enrolling patients affected by urolithiasis, reporting any comparison between an experimental herbal agent versus placebo or any active comparator, aimed at preventing the formation or facilitating the dissolution of calculi in any portion of the urinary tract. Fifteen databases were searched for relevant references. The primary outcomes investigated were (i) the reduction of stone size and/or number and (ii) the urinary excretion rates of calcium, urate, or oxalate. The secondary outcome of the review was the adverse effects (AE) of treatment. Risk of bias (ROB) and quality of the evidence were assessed according to Cochrane and GRADE guidelines. We performed a random-effect meta-analysis. 541 articles were retrieved and 16 studies were finally confirmed as eligible. Multiple Cochrane ROB tool items were rated as having high risk of bias in each analyzed trial report. Pooled analysis of continuous data could be performed for three different comparisons: (i) phytotherapy versus citrate as single agent (ii) phytotherapy versus placebo, (iii) preparation of Didymocarpus pedicellata (DP)--combined with other herbal agents--versus placebo. Results showed that citrate is superior to phytotherapy in significantly decreasing both the size of urinary stones (mean difference: phytotherapy, 0.42 mm higher; 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.6; Z = 4.42, P < 0.0001; I2 = 30%) and the urinary excretion rate of urate (mean difference: 42.32 mg/24h higher, 95% CI: 19.44 to 65.19; Z = 3.63, P = 0.0003; I2 = 96%), assessed after 3 months on-therapy. No significant differences in the excretion rates of urinary calcium or oxalate were found. The DP preparation was superior to placebo in inducing total clearance (risk ratio: 6.19, 95% CI: 2.60 to 14.74; Z = 4.12, P < 0.0001; I2 = 0%) and size

  9. New horizon in the treatment of sepsis: a systematic review of alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Sarah; Ghannadi, Alireza; Meidani, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    BackgroundDespite great advancement in treatment of sepsis, mortality of sepsis remains unacceptably high, even with the modern antibiotic and intensive care technologies. Considering the key role of immune dysfunction in sepsis pathophysiology, different treatments were evaluated, but failed to improve survival of patients. Natural remedies have been tested in various studies to overcome sepsis. In this study, we aim to review some of the evidence from clinical, in vitro and in vivo studies about the effect of alternative medicine on sepsis management. MethodsThe following databases were searched up to March 2014: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid and Google Scholar using combination of Mesh term. All in vitro and in vivo studies, also clinical trials, published in English, which evaluated alternative medicine in management of sepsis were included. Results Out of 95 relevant studies, the inclusion criteria were met for 79 cases. Among them, 18 studies were performed on humans. The most herbal medicine, including Xubijing (n=10) and then Rhubarb (n=3). Most of the reviewed botanical medicines modulate the immune system. Reduction of mortality was also reported in studies. ConclusionsModulation of immune system, anti-inflammatory activities and improvement of survival were the action of herbal medicine. A monovalent approach is not enough for treatment of sepsis, we recommend further studies to identify active component of herbal and use them in combination. Also an animal model of sepsis does not exactly mimic human sepsis, so more clinical studies should be performed. With no new drug on the horizon, herbal medicine will be promising for treatment of sepsis.

  10. The role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of eating disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Sarah; Smith, Caroline A; Hay, Phillipa

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review critically appraises the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder. Sixteen studies were included in the review. The results of this review show that the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder is unclear and further studies should be conducted. A potential role was found for massage and bright light therapy for depression in those with Bulimia Nervosa and a potential role for acupuncture and relaxation therapy, in the treatment of State Anxiety, for those with an eating disorder. The role of these complementary therapies in treating eating disorders should only be provided as an adjunctive treatment only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of triple-negative breast cancer with Chinese herbal medicine: A prospective cohort study protocol.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hui; Peng, Nan; Yu, Mingwei; Sun, Xu; Ma, Yunfei; Yang, Guowang; Wang, Xiaomin

    2017-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is featured with the biological properties of strong aggressive behaviors, rapid disease progression, high risk of recurrence and metastasis, and low disease free survival. Patients with this tumor are insensitive to the endocrine therapy and target treatment for HER-2; therefore, chemotherapy is often used as routine treatment in clinical. Because of the fact that a considerable number of patients seek for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) treatment after operation and chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy, it is thus need to evaluate the correlation between Chinese herbal medicine treatment and prognosis. This is a multicenter, prospective cohort study started in March 2016 in Beijing. A simple of 220 participants diagnosed with TNBC were recruited from nine hospitals and are followed up every 3 to 6 months till March 2020. Detailed information of participants includes personal information, history of cancer, quality of life, symptoms of traditional Chinese medicine and fatigue status is taken face-to-face at baseline. The study has received ethical approval from the Research Ethical Committee of Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Capital Medical University (No.2016BL-014-01). Articles summarizing the primary results and ancillary analyses will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-OOC-16008246.

  12. [Control of craving for methamphetamine: development of scales for dependence and search for medicines for treatment].

    PubMed

    Ogai, Yasukazu; Haraguchi, Ayako; Kondo, Ayumi; Takamatsu, Yukio; Yamamoto, Hideko; Sendoo, Eiichi; Ikeda, Katzutaka

    2005-10-01

    Methamphetamine dependence presents a serious problem not only for patients but also for society. Medical treatment has mainly targeted psychotic symptoms such as hallucination and delusion, and ignored the symptoms of craving, which are the major cause of dependence. Therefore, the risk of lapse into methamphetamine reuse remains very high. Although development of both medicines and programs for treatment of craving is needed, progress has been hampered by the lack of appropriate scales for assessing the severity of dependence and craving. On the other hand, recent breakthroughs in genomic sciences and molecular medicine have made it possible to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying craving in animals. This paper reviews studies on the development of scales for assessing the severity of methamphetamine dependence and craving, together with recent data on candidate medicines for craving treatment in animals. The reliability and validity of the revised Addiction Severity Index -Japanese version (ASI-J) was confirmed after its administration to 100 drug abuse patients. The Craving Index was also newly developed, and its validity for prediction of relapse was confirmed. In animal experiments, fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was recognized as a candidate medicine for treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

  13. Successful Integrative Medicine Assessment and Treatment of Chronic Pain Associated With Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Myung Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Presented is the first reported case series of chronic neck and back pain associated with breast scars from breast surgery and successfully treated with an integrative medicine assessment and treatment approach, which included the assessment technique of autonomic response testing and the scar therapy technique of neural therapy. Implications for nursing practice are discussed. PMID:27782920

  14. Use of traditional herbal medicine as an alternative in dental treatment in Mexican dentistry: a review.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, Cindy; Diaz Gómez, Martha; Oh, Myung Sook

    2017-12-01

    Herbal therapies are used worldwide to treat health conditions. In Mexico, generations have used them to treat gingivitis, periodontitis, mouth infections, and discoloured teeth. However, few studies have collected scientific evidence on their effects. This study aimed at searching and compiling scientific evidence of alternative oral and dental treatments using medicinal herbs from Mexico. We collected various Mexican medicinal plants used in the dental treatment from the database of the Institute of Biology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. To correlate with existing scientific evidence, we used the PubMed database with the key term '(scientific name) and (oral or dental)'. Mexico has various medical herbs with antibacterial and antimicrobial properties, according to ancestral medicinal books and healers. Despite a paucity of experimental research demonstrating the antibacterial, antimicrobial, and antiplaque effects of these Mexican plants, they could still be useful as an alternative treatment of several periodontal diseases or as anticariogenic agents. However, the number of studies supporting their uses and effects remains insufficient. It is important for the health of consumers to scientifically demonstrate the real effects of natural medicine, as well as clarify and establish their possible therapeutic applications. Through this bibliographical revision, we found papers that testify or refute their ancestral uses, and conclude that the use of plants to treat oral conditions or to add to the dental pharmacological arsenal should be based on experimental studies verifying their suitability for dental treatments.

  15. [Recognizing prevention and treatment of burn sepsis with the concept of holistic integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Huan, J N

    2017-04-20

    Sepsis remains a major cause of death in severe burns. The effect of sepsis management is influenced by its complicated pathophysiologic changes. In order to improve the outcome of burn sepsis, the predisposing factor of sepsis after burn analyzed by advanced technology, the early prevention, antibiotics therapy, and combined treatment in severe burns with sepsis are discussed using the concept of holistic integrative medicine.

  16. [Clinical study of integrative medicine in treatment of nephropathy: strategy and innovation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping

    2008-05-01

    The author analyzed the main issues in current clinical study of integrative medicine in treatment of renal diseases, and proposed the target-oriented strategy for clinical study of different renal diseases, emphasizing the importance of method improvement for academic innovation.

  17. The effectiveness and safety of Iranian herbal medicines for treatment of premenstrual syndrome: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-Saghooni, Nahid; Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Behboodi Moghadam, Zahra; Mirzaii Najmabadi, Khadigeh

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is one of the most common problems among women of reproductive age. The popularity of complementary/alternative therapies has grown in recent years, and these treatments have been more commonly used by women (48.9%) than men (37.8%). The aim of this systematic review was to assess effectiveness and safety of Iranian herbal medicines for treatment of premenstrual syndrome. Methods: PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, and Google Scholar were searched along with SID, Magiran and Irandoc up to Dec 2017. Inclusion criteria consist of Iranian, published, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using Iranian herbal medicine for treatment of reproductive age women with PMS. Eventually Eighteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Results: Overall, studies have shown that Vitex agnuscastus, Hypericum perforatum, Matricaria chamomilla, saffron, Curcumin, Melissa officinalis, Zataria multiflora, Wheat Germ Extract, Echinophora platyloba, Foeniculum vulgare, Valerian root extract, Citrus sinensis, Zingiber officinale and Flax seed might alleviate symptoms of PMS. Conclusion: This research demonstrated efficacy and safety of Iranian herbal medicines in alleviating PMS. Therefore, herbal medicine can be regarded as an alternative treatment for women suffering from PMS. PMID:29632841

  18. [Treatment and prevention of alcohol-related problems and evidence based medicine].

    PubMed

    Nespor, K; Csémy, L

    2006-01-01

    Some principles of evidence based medicine are mentioned. Effective strategies of prevention and treatment of alcohol related problems include among others higher taxation of alcohol, prevention of driving while intoxicated, the training of relevant social skills in school children, brief intervention, the use of naltrexone and acamprosate, participation in Alcoholics Anonymous and family therapy.

  19. Herbal medicines in the treatment of psychiatric disorders: 10-year updated review.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome

    2018-03-25

    This paper provides a 10-year update of the 2007 systematic review of herbal medicines studied in a broad range of psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, seasonal affective, bipolar, psychotic, phobic, somatoform, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders. Ovid Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library were searched for herbal medicines with both pharmacological and clinical evidence of psychotropic activity. This updated review now covers clinical trial evidence for 24 herbal medicines in 11 psychiatric disorders. High-quality evidence was found to exist for the use of Piper methysticum (Kava), Passiflora spp. (passionflower) and Galphimia glauca (galphimia) for anxiety disorders; and Hypericum perforatum (St John's wort) and Crocus sativus (saffron) for major depressive disorder. Other encouraging herbal medicines with preliminary evidence include Curcuma longa (turmeric) in depression, Withania somnifera (ashwagandha) in affective disorders, and Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo) as an adjunctive treatment in Schizophrenia. Although depression and anxiety are commonly researched, many other mental disorders still require further prospective investigation. Although the previous review suggested increasing the adjunctive study of select herbal medicines with pharmaceuticals, this was still only found to sparingly occur in research designs. Aside from this, future focus should involve the incorporation of more biomarker analysis, in particular pharmacogenomics, to determine genetic factors moderating response to herbal medicines. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. [Effectiveness of conventional diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine in the treatment of pain from bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Mallardo, Vania; Vaccaro, Andrea; Santagata, Mario; Raucci, Antonio; D'Agosto, Gianfranco; Fontanarosa, Antonio; Schillirò, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastasis sites from solid tumors. Bone pain due to metastatic neoplastic growth is due to tumor infiltration and expansion of bone membranes. Treatment of acute and chronic pain represents one of the greatest problems in clinical oncology, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. This review focuses on the effectiveness of conventional diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine for the detection, management and treatment of pain from bone metastasis.

  1. Potential of Central, Eastern and Western Africa Medicinal Plants for Cancer Therapy: Spotlight on Resistant Cells and Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Mbaveng, Armelle T.; Kuete, Victor; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health hurdle worldwide and has moved from the third leading cause of death in the year 1990 to second place after cardiovascular disease since 2013. Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used treatment modes; however, its efficiency is limited due to the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. The present overview deals with the potential of the flora of Central, Eastern and Western African (CEWA) regions as resource for anticancer drug discovery. It also reviews the molecular targets of phytochemicals of these plants such as ABC transporters, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multi drug-resistance-related proteins (MRPs), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) as well as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB-1/HER1), human tumor suppressor protein p53, caspases, mitochondria, angiogenesis, and components of MAP kinase signaling pathways. Plants with the ability to preferentially kills resistant cancer cells were also reported. Data compiled in the present document were retrieved from scientific websites such as PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, Web-of-Science, and Scholar Google. In summary, plant extracts from CEWA and isolated compounds thereof exert cytotoxic effects by several modes of action including caspases activation, alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells and inhibition of angiogenesis. Ten strongest cytotoxic plants from CEWA recorded following in vitro screening assays are: Beilschmiedia acuta Kosterm, Echinops giganteus var. lelyi (C. D. Adams) A. Rich., Erythrina sigmoidea Hua (Fabaceae), Imperata cylindrical Beauv. var. koenigii Durand et Schinz, Nauclea pobeguinii (Pobég. ex Pellegr.) Merr. ex E.M.A., Piper capense L.f., Polyscias fulva (Hiern) Harms., Uapaca togoensis Pax., Vepris soyauxii Engl. and Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich. Prominent antiproliferative compounds include: isoquinoline alkaloid isotetrandrine (51), two

  2. Toward the use of precision medicine for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wang; Xiao, Yandi; Wei, Zihao; Yuan, Yao; Qiu, Min; Sun, Chongkui; Zeng, Xin; Liang, Xinhua; Feng, Mingye; Chen, Qianming

    2017-01-10

    Precision medicine is a new strategy that aims at preventing and treating human diseases by focusing on individual variations in people's genes, environment and lifestyle. Precision medicine has been used for cancer diagnosis and treatment and shows evident clinical efficacy. Rapid developments in molecular biology, genetics and sequencing technologies, as well as computational technology, has enabled the establishment of "big data", such as the Human Genome Project, which provides a basis for precision medicine. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive cancer with a high incidence rate and low survival rate. Current therapies are often aggressive and carry considerable side effects. Much research now indicates that precision medicine can be used for HNSCC and may achieve improved results. From this perspective, we present an overview of the current status, potential strategies, and challenges of precision medicine in HNSCC. We focus on targeted therapy based on cell the surface signaling receptors epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT3 and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK cellular signaling pathways. Gene therapy for the treatment of HNSCC is also discussed.

  3. Toward the use of precision medicine for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wang; Xiao, Yandi; Wei, Zihao; Yuan, Yao; Qiu, Min; Sun, Chongkui; Zeng, Xin; Liang, Xinhua; Feng, Mingye; Chen, Qianming

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine is a new strategy that aims at preventing and treating human diseases by focusing on individual variations in people's genes, environment and lifestyle. Precision medicine has been used for cancer diagnosis and treatment and shows evident clinical efficacy. Rapid developments in molecular biology, genetics and sequencing technologies, as well as computational technology, has enabled the establishment of “big data”, such as the Human Genome Project, which provides a basis for precision medicine. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive cancer with a high incidence rate and low survival rate. Current therapies are often aggressive and carry considerable side effects. Much research now indicates that precision medicine can be used for HNSCC and may achieve improved results. From this perspective, we present an overview of the current status, potential strategies, and challenges of precision medicine in HNSCC. We focus on targeted therapy based on cell the surface signaling receptors epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT3 and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK cellular signaling pathways. Gene therapy for the treatment of HNSCC is also discussed. PMID:27924064

  4. Community-based treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: early experience and results from Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Park, P.; Gardner, A.; Kisang, G.; Diero, L.; Sitienei, J.; Carter, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the light of the 2010 World Health Organization estimation of 650 000 cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) globally, the need to develop, implement and scale up MDR-TB treatment programs is clear. The need is greatest and urgent in resource-poor countries, such as Kenya, with a high TB burden and an anticipated rise in reported cases of MDR-TB with increasing access to drug susceptibility testing. Objectives: To describe the set-up of a community-based program, early clinical outcomes, challenges and possible solutions. Setting: The Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (Moi Hospital) catchment areas: Western and North Rift Provinces, Kenya. Design: Program description and retrospective chart review. Results: An MDR-TB team established a community-based program with either home-based DOT or local facility-based DOT. Following referral, the team instituted a home visit, identified and hired a DOT worker, trained family and local health care professionals in MDR-TB care and initiated community-based MDR-TB treatment. In the first 24 months, 14 patients were referred, 5 died prior to initiation of treatment and one had extensively drug-resistant TB. Among eight patients who initiated community-based DOT, 87% underwent culture conversion by 6 months, and 75% were cured with no relapse after a median follow-up of 15.5 months. Multiple challenges were experienced, including system delays, stigma and limited funding. Conclusion: Despite multiple challenges, our model of an MDR-TB team that establishes a community-based treatment system encircling diagnosed cases of MDR-TB is feasible, with acceptable treatment outcomes. PMID:26392946

  5. Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of primary hypertension: a methodology overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Xinke, Zhao; Yingdong, Li; Mingxia, Feng; Kai, Liu; Kaibing, Chen; Yuqing, Lu; Shaobo, Sun; Peng, Song; Bin, Liu

    2016-10-20

    Chinese herbal medicine has been used to treat hypertension in China and East Asia since centuries. In this study, we conduct an overview of systematic reviews of Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of primary hypertension to 1) summarize the conclusions of these reviews, 2) evaluate the methodological quality of these reviews, and 3) rate the confidence in the effect on each outcome. We comprehensively searched six databases to retrieve systematic reviews of Chinese herbal medicine for primary hypertension from inception to December 31, 2015. We used AMSTAR to evaluate the methodological quality of included reviews, and we classified the quality of evidence for each outcome in included reviews using the GRADE approach. A total of 12 systematic reviews with 31 outcomes were included, among which 11 systematic reviews focus on the therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicine combined with conventional medicine or simple Chinese herbal medicine versus simple conventional medicine. Among the 11 items of AMSTAR, the lowest quality was "providing a priori design" item, none review conformed to this item, the next was "stating the conflict of interest" item, only three reviews conformed to this item. Five reviews scored less than seven in AMSTAR, which means that the overall methodological quality was fairly poor. For GRADE, of the 31 outcomes, the quality of evidence was high in none (0 %), moderate in three (10 %), low in 19 (61 %), and very low in nine (29 %). Of the five downgrading factors, risk of bias (100 %) was the most common downgrading factor in the included reviews, followed by imprecision (42 %), inconsistency (39 %), publication bias (39 %), and indirectness (0 %). The methodological quality of systematic reviews about Chinese herbal medicine for primary hypertension is fairly poor, and the quality of evidence level is low. Physicians should be cautious when applying the interventions in these reviews for primary hypertension patients in

  6. [Personalized molecular medicine: new paradigms in the treatment of cochlear implant and cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Zenner, H P; Pfister, M; Friese, N; Zrenner, E; Röcken, M

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate present options for the indication of cochlear implants (CI) and new forms of treatment for head and neck cancer, melanomas and basal cell carcinomas, with emphasis on future perspectives. A literature search was performed in the PubMed database. Search parameters were "personalized medicine", "individualized medicine" and "molecular medicine". Personalized medicine based on molecular-genetic evaluation of functional proteins such as otoferlin, connexin 26 and KCNQ4 or the Usher gene is becoming increasingly important for the indication of CI in the context of infant deafness. Determination of HER2/EGFR mutations in the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene may be an important prognostic parameter for therapeutic decisions in head and neck cancer patients. In basal cell carcinoma therapy, mutations in the Hedgehog (PCTH1) and Smoothened (SMO) pathways strongly influence the indication of therapeutic Hedgehog inhibition, e.g. using small molecules. Analyses of c-Kit receptor, BRAF-600E and NRAS mutations are required for specific molecular therapy of metastasizing melanomas. The significant advances in the field of specific molecular therapy are best illustrated by the availability of the first gene therapeutic procedures for treatment of RPE65-induced infantile retinal degradation. The aim of personalized molecular medicine is to identify patients who will respond particularly positively or negatively (e.g. in terms of adverse side effects) to a therapy using the methods of molecular medicine. This should allow a specific therapy to be successfully applied or preclude its indication in order to avoid serious adverse side effects. This approach serves to stratify patients for adequate treatment.

  7. Traditional medicine practitioners' knowledge and views on treatment of pregnant women in three regions of Mali.

    PubMed

    Nordeng, Hedvig; Al-Zayadi, Waled; Diallo, Drissa; Ballo, Ngolo; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2013-09-17

    Despite the widespread use of medicinal plants in Mali, knowledge about how traditional practitioners (TPs) treat pregnant and lactating women is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate how traditional practitioners in Mali treat common diseases and ailments during pregnancy. Data was collected through structured interviews of traditional practitioners in one urban (Bamako) and two rural areas (Siby and Dioila) in Mali. The TPs were interviewed about how they treat common diseases and ailments during pregnancy. They were also asked to name harmful plants in pregnancy and plants that could affect breast milk production. In addition, we asked about nine specific medicinal plants commonly used in Mali; Opilia amentacea (syn. Opilia celtidifolia), Ximenia americana, Cola cordifolia, Combretum glutinosum, Parkia biglobosa, Trichilia emetica, Combretum micranthum, Lippia chevalieri and Vepris heterophylla. A total of 72 traditional practitioners (64% women, age: 34 to 90 years) were interviewed during an eight week period October 2011 to December 2011. They treated between 1 and 30 pregnant women with medicinal plants per months. We found a relatively high consensus for treatment of pregnant women with common diseases and ailments like nausea and dermatitis. The highest informer consensus was found for the treatment of malaria during pregnancy. TPs generally recommended pregnant women to avoid medicinal plants with bitter tastes like stem and root bark of Khaya senegalensis and Opilia amentacea (syn. Opilia celtidifolia). TPs distinguished between oral (potentially unsafe) and dermal use (safe) of Opilia amentacea (syn. Opilia celtidifolia). Cola cordifolia was used to facilitate labor. Experience and knowledge about treatment of pregnant women with medicinal plants was broad among the traditional practitioners in the three investigated regions in Mali. Collaborating with traditional practitioners on the safe use of medicinal plants in pregnancy may promote

  8. Medicinal Plants Used for Neuropsychiatric Disorders Treatment in the Hauts Bassins Region of Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Kinda, Prosper T.; Zerbo, Patrice; Guenné, Samson; Compaoré, Moussa; Ciobica, Alin; Kiendrebeogo, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background: In Burkina Faso, phytotherapy is the main medical alternative used by populations to manage various diseases that affect the nervous system. The aim of the present study was to report medicinal plants with psychoactive properties used to treat neuropsychiatric disorders in the Hauts Bassins region, in the western zone of Burkina Faso. Methods: Through an ethnobotanical survey using structured questionnaire, 53 traditional healers (TH) were interviewed about neuropsychiatric disorders, medicinal plants and medical practices used to treat them. The survey was carried out over a period of three months. Results: The results report 66 plant species used to treat neuropsychiatric pathologies. Roots (36.2%) and leaves (29%) were the main plant parts used. Alone or associated, these parts were used to prepare drugs using mainly the decoction and the trituration methods. Remedies were administered via drink, fumigation and external applications. Conclusions: It appears from this study a real knowledge of neuropsychiatric disorders in the traditional medicine of Hauts Bassins area. The therapeutic remedies suggested in this work are a real interest in the fight against psychiatric and neurological diseases. In the future, identified plants could be used for searching antipsychotic or neuroprotective compounds. PMID:28930246

  9. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Free access to medicines for the treatment of chronic diseases in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the free access to medicines for the treatment of chronic diseases in the Brazilian population, according to demographic and socioeconomic factors. We also analyzed the most used pharmacological groups, according to funding source: free-of-charge or out-of-pocket paid. METHODS Analysis of data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), a population-based household survey, of cross-sectional design, based on probabilistic sample of the Brazilian population. We analyzed as outcome the prevalence of free access (free-of-charge) to all medicines for treatment of the reported chronic diseases, in the last 30 days. We studied the following independent variables: sex, age group, education in complete years of school, economic class, health plan, and geographical region of residence. We estimated the prevalences and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) and applied the Pearson’s Chi-squared test to assess the differences between the groups, considering a 5% significance level. RESULTS About half of adults and older adults who have had full access to the treatment of chronic diseases in Brazil obtained all needed medicines for free (47.5%; 95%CI 45.1–50.0). The prevalences of free access were higher among men (51.4%; 95%CI 48.1–54.8), age group of 40-59 years (51.1%; 95%CI 48.1–54.2), and in the poorest social classes (53.9%; 95%CI 50.2–57.7). The majority of medicines that act on the cardiovascular system, such as diuretics (C03) (78.0%; 95%CI 75.2–80.5), beta-blockers (C07) (62.7%; 95%CI 59.4–65.8), and the agents that work in the renin-angiotensin system (C09) (73.4%; 95%CI 70.8–75.8), were obtained for free. Medicines that act on the respiratory system, such as agents against obstructive airway diseases (R03) (60.0%; 95%CI 52.7–66.9) were mostly paid with own resources. CONCLUSIONS Free

  11. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used to manage High Blood Pressure and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Bitterfontein, Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Davids, Denver; Gibson, Diana; Johnson, Quinton

    2016-12-24

    The aim of this study was to identify and document medicinal plants used to manage High Blood Pressure and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Bitterfontein, Western Cape Province, South Africa. One hundred and twelve (112) respondents were interviewed between August 2014 and September 2015 through semi-structured surveys to gather data on the percentage of people who had been diagnosed with High Blood Pressure and/or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and to determine the frequency of medicinal plant and allopathic medicine use. Twelve (12) key respondents were subsequently selected, using a non-probability snowball sampling method. They were interviewed in-depth concerning their plant practices and assisted with plant collection. Twenty-four plant (24) species belonging to 15 families were identified for the management of High Blood Pressure and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The most frequently reported families were Asteraceae (20.8%), Lamiaceae (16.67%), Crassulaceae (8.33%) and Aizoaceae (8.33%). The remaining (45.54%) were evenly split over eleven families- Fabaceae, Amaryllidaceae, Anacardiaceae, Capparaceae, Geraniaceae, Apiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, Rutaceae, Asphodelaceae and Thymelaeaceae. The most commonly used plant species overall was Lessertia frutescens (96.55%). The most frequently used plant parts included leaves (57.63%) roots/bulbs (15.25%) and stems (11.86%), mostly prepared as infusions or decoctions for oral administration. Medicinal plants are widely used by High Blood Pressure and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus sufferers. They employ diverse plant species to manage both conditions. In addition, some sufferers often use prescribed allopathic medication, as well as medicinal plants, but at different intervals. Despite high usage the plants identified are not currently threatened (Red Data list status: least concern). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. TREATMENT OF PROGRESSION OF DIFFUSE ASTROCYTOMA BY HERBAL MEDICINE: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Trogrlić, Ivo; Trogrlić, Dragan; Trogrlić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the use of phytotherapy in a 33-year-old woman who, after finishing the oncological treatment of diffuse astrocytoma, had tumour progression. Phytotherapy was introduced after the tumour had progressed. It consisted of 4 types of herbal medicine which the subject was taking in form of tea once a day at regular intervals. The patient started phytotherapy along with temozolomide, which was the only oncological treatment she was under after the tumour had progressed. Following the finished chemotherapy, the patient continued the treatment with herbal medicine only. She regularly took phytotherapy without interruption and to the fullest extent for 30 months, and the results of treatment were monitored by periodic scanning using nuclear magnetic resonance technique. The control scanning that was conducted after the end of combined treatment with temozolomide and phytotherapy showed tumour regression. The patient continued with phytotherapy after finishing chemotherapy and, during the following 24 months, it was the sole treatment option. In that period, the regression of the tumour continued, until a control examination 30 months after the introduction of phytotherapy showed no clinical and radiological signs of tumour. The results presented in this research paper clearly indicate the potential of phytotherapy in the treatment of some types of brain tumours. A complete regression of tumour following the treatment with nothing but herbal medicine offers support for such claim. Future research should demonstrate the effectiveness of phytotherapy, as a supplementary form of brain tumour treatment, and the results of this research should be compared with the existing information on the effectiveness of the protocols currently used in the treatment of these types of tumour.

  13. Treatment of Diabetes and/or Hypertension Using Medicinal Plants in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Yedjou, CG; Tsambang, LWD; Tchinda, AT; Donfagsiteli, N; Agbor, GA; Tchounwou, PBB; Nkongmeneck, BA

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants have served as valuable starting materials for drug development in both developing and developed countries. Today, more than 80% of the people living in Africa were depended on medicinal plants based medicines to satisfy their healthcare needs. The main goal of the present study was to collect and document information on herbal remedies traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension in Cameroon. To reach this objective, data were collected from 328 patients who have been diagnosed at least once by a physician as diabetics and/or hypertension patients. One hundred and eighty two (182) among them took for a period of 10 days different varieties of medicinal plants which were prepared in form of decoction, maceration and infusion and administered orally twice or three times daily. As result, 70% of patients who used plants were relieved at the end of the treatment. Thirty-three plants have been recorded and documented for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension. The results of this study can stimulate a sustainable development by providing the basis for drugs discovery and by documenting biodiversity for long time exploitation. PMID:26550547

  14. An Evidence-based Review of Medicinal Herbs for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Long, Chunlin; Pasalar, Mehdi

    2017-10-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common diseases in society, affecting up to 40% of the population. It has major impact on the quality of life and a high burden on medical expenditure. In this work, herbs used by ancient Iranians to treat GERD have been introduced. Different well-known Persian textbooks and recent electronic databases were searched to explore the treatment of GERD and the pharmacological mechanisms of the identified medicinal plants. GERD has been known for many centuries, and many herbal remedies for its treatment have been elucidated in traditional medical literature. We found 25 medicinal herbs in Persian medicine books and searched for evidence to support them in the current literature. Although their active components or the mechanism of action were not known by the ancient Persians at that time, their persistent use during different centuries might indicate their effectiveness. Owing to their potential, medicinal herbs are a viable option for the treatment of diseases like GERD even today. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Treatment of menopausal symptoms in family medicine settings following the Women's Health Initiative findings.

    PubMed

    Burg, Mary Ann; Fraser, Kathryn; Gui, Serena; Grant, Kathryn; Kosch, Shae Graham; Nierenberg, Barry; Oyama, Oliver; Pomm, Heidi; Sibille, Kimberly; Spruill, Timothy; Swartz, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    This study explores trends in treatment of menopausal symptoms and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in family medicine settings subsequent to the release of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) findings. Anonymous self-administered questionnaires were distributed to family medicine residents and faculty from 8 participating family medicine residency programs in the state of Florida. The survey asked physicians how they typically treated common menopausal symptoms in otherwise healthy menopausal women, and how their practice patterns had changed since the release of the WHI findings. We analyzed survey responses from 62 faculty and 148 residents (66% of eligible respondents). HRT is still prominent for treating irregular menses, vaginal dryness, vasomotor symptoms, and decreased libido. Faculty physicians were significantly more likely than residents to use HRT for menopausal symptoms. Female physicians were more likely than male physicians to say their treatment patterns had changed as a result of the WHI. After weighing the evidence of potential risks of HRT from the WHI study, family medicine physicians altered and broadened their strategies for treating common menopausal symptoms. Although HRT remains a prominent treatment approach, there is now more physician-patient discussion of individual risks and benefits than occurred before the WHI's release of findings.

  16. Scientific evaluation of medicinal plants used for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding by Avicenna.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Masumeh; Qaraaty, Marzieh; Amin, Gholamreza; Haririan, Ismaeil; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is one of the prevalent gynecological disorders that cause considerable morbidity and management of that plays an important role in protecting women's health. This review focuses on medicinal plants mentioned by Avicenna, a great Iranian philosopher and physician (A.D. 980-1037), in his book Canon for treatment of AUB. Medicinal plants mentioned in Canon for treatment of AUB were elicited and searched in electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and Cochrane library to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Data were collected for the years 1980-2014. The findings included 23 plants belonging to 18 families. Scientific findings have revealed that these plants control AUB through four mechanisms of action including inhibition of inflammatory process, inhibition of prostaglandins production, antiproliferative activity on human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), and estrogenic activity. All of the plants exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Cuscuta chinensis and Portulaca oleracea exhibited estrogenic activity. Boswellia carteri, Lens culinaris, Myrtus communis, Polygonum aviculare, Pistacia lentiscus, and Punica granatum have revealed inhibitory activity on biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Some of the mentioned plants including: Ceratonia siliqua, Cuscuta chinensis, Cuscuta epithymum, Cydonia oblonga, Paeonia sp., Portulaca oleracea, Solanum nigrum, Rumex acetosa and Onopordum acanthium have shown antiproliferative activity on HeLa cells. Investigation of traditional Iranian medicine literatures can lead to the identification of effective natural medicines for the management of AUB; however, conclusive confirmation of the efficacy and safety of these treatments needs more evaluations.

  17. A Review of Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Earache and Tinnitus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian-Sani, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Luther, Tahra

    2017-06-01

    Despite numerous trials, there has not yet been any definite strategy to reduce replicable long-term tinnitus and earache. Complementary and alternative medical approaches have been used to decrease the symptoms of tinnitus and earache. This study was conducted to report medicinal plants that are used to treat ear disorders, especially earache and tinnitus in different regions of Iran. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, LISTA (EBSCO), Embase, and Web of Science were searched using relevant search terms to retrieve eligible publications. Twenty-three species from sixteen families were used for the treatment of earache and tinnitus in Iran. Plants from families Asteraceae and Lamiaceae were the most commonly used plants for the treatment of earache. Ginkgo biloba was frequently reported for the treatment of tinnitus. This study shows the important role of medicinal plants in the treatment of earache and tinnitus in some regions of Iran. The medicinal plants reported in this review can be considered in treatments for earache and tinnitus if examined more extensively in clinical trials.

  18. Effect of treatment on strength and stiffness of Western Red Cedar utility poles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, G.S.; Chetwynd, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Based on a survey of North American utilities, research organizations and manufacturers, the effect of preservative methods on strength and stiffness of new wood utility poles was found to be inconclusive. This is primarily due to the fact that no direct comparisons were made between the mechanical properties of the same poles before and after the treatment. Hence a systematic research program was carried out on thirty, forty-five foot long Western Red Cedar poles having different sizes. Two newly developed Nondestructive Evaluation instruments, based on ultrasonic principles, were used to grade and assure the quality of these poles, individually, atmore » the green stage. Penetration resistances were quantified using an instrumented drill. The stiffness of the untreated poles were measured from full scale deflection tests. After these measurements, the poles were treated with chromate copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservatives. Change in strength, stiffness and penetration resistance due to the treatment was quantified for each pole using the above methods. This paper will summarize the results obtained from this research program.« less

  19. Efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Jiang, Manjun; Zhao, Xiaofang; Liang, Jian

    2014-02-01

    To systematically review the efficacy and safety of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) interventions, compared with control interventions (placebo or conventional Western medical therapy), in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Electronic databases including PubMed, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang Data were searched to identify relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published as of May 2012. Studies were selected according to the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria and then subjected to methodological quality assessment, data extraction, and meta-analysis according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Twelve RCTs involving 881 patients with AIDS were included. Methodological quality assessment showed that two were high-quality, two were moderate-quality, and eight were low-quality. Meta-analysis showed that TCM interventions were associated with significantly reduced plasma viral load compared with placebo [odds ratio OR = 2.46, 95% confidence interval CI (1.02, 5.94); P = 0.04]. However, the reductions in plasma viral load significantly favored conventional Western medical therapy alone over integrated traditional Chinese and Western medical therapy [OR = 0.16, 95% CI (0.05, 0.55); P = 0.004]. Patients receiving TCM interventions had significantly higher CD4+ T lymphocyte counts compared with those on placebo [OR = 2.54, 95% CI (1.40, 4.60); P = 0.002]. In addition, TCM interventions were significantly more likely to have improved clinical symptoms [OR = 2.82, 95% CI (1.85, 4.31); P < 0.00001]. TCM interventions conferred a similar risk of adverse events (AEs) compared with control interventions [OR = 1.87, 95% CI (0.58, 6.01); P = 0.29]. Current evidence suggests that TCM interventions are significantly more effective than placebo in reducing plasma viral load and increasing CD4+ T lymphocyte count in patients with AIDS. When compared with

  20. Case reports describing treatments in the emergency medicine literature: missing and misleading information.

    PubMed

    Richason, Tiffany P; Paulson, Stephen M; Lowenstein, Steven R; Heard, Kennon J

    2009-06-15

    Although randomized trials and systematic reviews provide the "best evidence" for guiding medical practice, many emergency medicine journals still publish case reports (CRs). The quality of the reporting in these publications has not been assessed. In this study we sought to determine the proportion of treatment-related case reports that adequately reported information about the patient, disease, interventions, co-interventions, outcomes and other critical information. We identified CRs published in 4 emergency medicine journals in 2000-2005 and categorized them according to their purpose (disease description, overdose or adverse drug reactioin, diagnostic test or treatment effect). Treatment-related CRs were reviewed for the presence or absence of 11 reporting elements. All told, 1,316 CRs were identified; of these, 85 (6.5%; 95CI = 66, 84) were about medical or surgical treatments. Most contained adequate descriptions of the patient (99%; 95CI = 95, 100), the stage and severity of the patient's disease (88%; 95CI = 79, 93), the intervention (80%; 95CI = 70, 87) and the outcomes of treatment (90%; 95CI = 82, 95). Fewer CRs reported the patient's co-morbidities (45%; 95CI = 35, 56), concurrent medications (30%; 95CI = 21, 40) or co-interventions (57%; 95CI = 46, 67) or mentioned any possible treatment side-effects (33%; 95CI = 24, 44). Only 37% (95CI = 19, 38) discussed alternative explanations for favorable outcomes. Generalizability of treatment effects to other patients was mentioned in only 29% (95CI = 20, 39). Just 2 CRs (2.3%; 95CI = 1, 8) reported a 'denominator" (number of patients subjected to the same intervention, whether or not successful. Treatment-related CRs in emergency medicine journals often omit critical details about treatments, co-interventions, outcomes, generalizability, causality and denominators. As a result, the information may be misleading to providers, and the clinical applications may be detrimental to patient care.

  1. Traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of alcoholism: from ancient to modern.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Lawrence, Andrew J; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol has long been used as a daily beverage in China and around the world. It is a medicinal substance with various biological activities. In fact, alcohol has played an important role in the development of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), within which it is considered as the earliest exhilarant and anaesthetic. Yet, as a substance with great potency of misuse and addiction, the consumption of alcohol can lead to serious damage to individual health and the society. Over the past 20 years, alcohol abuse or alcoholism has become an increasing social problem in China along with the rapid economic development. China, the country of origin for TCM, has accumulated abundant clinical experience in the treatment of alcoholism with its ancient medicine. In the present research, we have summarized clinical and primary studies concerning various remedies of TCM for alcohol abuse, including herbal components (such as Kudzu/Pueraria Lobata, Pediculus melo, Hypericumpperforatum L.), decoctions and acupuncture.

  2. Traditional medicinal plants of cold desert Ladakh--used in treatment of cold, cough and fever.

    PubMed

    Ballabh, Basant; Chaurasia, O P

    2007-06-13

    This research paper presents the findings of an investigation on traditional remedies of cold, cough and fever among Boto (the Buddhists) tribal community of Leh-Ladakh region of India. Ladakh is one of the least populated regions of our country where major population lives in far-flung villages and higher elevations. Health care of tribal population is mainly dependent on traditional system of medicine which is popularly known as Amchi system of medicine. The Amchi system is principally based on Tibetan system of medicine. Fifty-six valuable species belonging to 21 families were identified with relevant information and documented in this paper with regard to their botanical name, family, collection number, local name, parts used and utilization by 'Amchis' (herbal practitioners) in treatment of cold, cough and fever.

  3. A survey on illegal and counterfeit medicines for the treatment of erectile dysfunctions in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Manna, Livia; Rodomonte, Andrea Luca; Bartolomei, Monica; Bertocchi, Paola; Gallinella, Bruno; Antoniella, Eleonora; Muleri, Nadia; Civitelli, Gabriele; Alimonti, Stefano; Romanini, Laura; Rufini, Leandro; Valvo, Luisa

    2012-08-01

    In developed countries the phenomenon of pharmaceutical counterfeiting is steadily increasing through the illegal and the Internet market. Medicines for the treatment of erectile dysfunctions containing phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5) are especially prone to falsification. To obtain evidence of the health risks for patients taking these products and to provide useful information to general practitioners and specialists in sexual medicine. First the samples were visually inspected and then analyzed to get information about their identity and quality. A survey on the PDE5 medicines analyzed by the Italian official medicines control laboratory between 2005 and 2011 was performed. All the analyzed medicines were gathered from the Italian illegal market (seizures by police forces) or were bought from illegal online pharmacies. Results.  The study revealed that 24% of the analyzed samples were counterfeit and 54% were illegal medicines. In 12% of the cases an intermediate classification (illegal/counterfeit) was assigned. Only 7% of the samples were original. Moreover, the examination of the packaging evidenced potential risks: outer and immediate packaging missing; inconsistency between the carton box and the blister as regards the expiry date and/or the batch number; expiry date or manufacturer's name or country missing. In 19% of the samples a potential health risk for patients was identified due to either the presence in the sample of more than one undeclared PDE5(s) or an amount of the active ingredient higher than that declared (up to 190% of the maximum dose) or to the presence of potentially dangerous excipients of non-pharmaceutical origin or quality (e.g., gypsum or non-purified talc). © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Medicinal plants used in the treatment of diabetes in karo ethnic, north sumatra, indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja Nasution, Barita; Alief Aththorick, T.; Rahayu, Suci

    2018-03-01

    Medicinal plants derived from traditional medicines have played an important role in managing a variety of healthcare and diseases in Karo ethnic in North Sumatra, Indonesia. The study aimed to document the ethnobotanical information on medicinal plants used by traditional healers of Karo ethnic in the treatment of diabetes and to assess the crude extract of phytochemical constituents qualitatively from medicinal plant organ. The study was conducted on two Karo sub-ethnic living at the highland (Karo Gugung) in Karo Regency and the lowland (Karo Jahe) in Langkat Regency with the length of the study was eight months of observation. The survey was conducted using open-ended interviews among four traditional healers those who were selected by snowball sampling method; quantitative analysis of ethnobotanical data was performed by calculating the familiarity index (Fi). Fresh plant samples which were used for phytochemical analysis were collected using participatory method. The results showed that 15 plants were used to treat diabetes by Karo traditional healers. The plants are Blumea balsamifera, Nypa fruticans, Bischofia javanica, Eleutherine americana, Allium cepa, A. sativum, Eugenia polyantha, Piper betle, P. nigrum, Citrus aurantiifolia, Boesenbergia pandurata, Curcuma longa, Kaempferia galanga, Zingiber montanum, and Z. officinale. Familiarity index (Fi) value of each plant was 25 which explained that each of medicinal plant was used by only one traditional healer. The phytochemical screening showed that the crude plant extracts contained phenolic, terpenoid, steroid, and saponin.

  5. Evaluation of florfenicol for the treatment of undifferentiated fever in feedlot calves in western Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Booker, C W; Jim, G K; Guichon, P T; Schunicht, O C; Thorlakson, B E; Lockwood, P W

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted in western Canada to evaluate the efficacy of florfenicol for the treatment of undifferentiated fever (UF) in feedlot calves. One hundred and twenty-five recently weaned, auction market derived, crossbred, beef steer calves suffering from UF were allocated to 1 of 2 experimental groups as follows: florfenicol, which was intramuscular florfenicol administered at the rate of 20 mg/kg body weight at the time of allocation (day 0) and again 48 h later; or control, which was intramuscular saline administered at the same volume as florfenicol at the time of allocation and again 48 h later. Eighty-four calves were allocated to the florfenicol group and 41 calves were allocated to the control group. Outcome measures describing animal health, body weight, and rectal temperature parameters were used to determine the efficacy of florfenicol for the treatment of UF. The 1st relapse of UF, 2nd relapse of UF, overall mortality, bovine respiratory disease mortality, and haemophilosis mortality rates were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the florfenicol group than in the control group. Animals in the florfenicol group were significantly (P < 0.05) heavier at day 15 and day 45 than animals in the control group. The rectal temperature on days 1, 2, 3, and 4 of animals in the florfenicol group was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than in the control group. In addition, the change in rectal temperature from day 0 to day 4 was significantly (P < 0.05) different between the experimental groups. The results of this study demonstrate that florfenicol is an efficacious antimicrobial for the treatment of UF. PMID:9285135

  6. Psychological Treatment Trials for Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: A Sexual Medicine Critique and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pyke, Robert E; Clayton, Anita H

    2015-12-01

    Publications claim efficacy for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in women with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and mindfulness meditation training (MMT). However, no review has evaluated the evidence for these therapies from the rigorous perspective of sexual medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the published controlled trials of CBT and MMT for disorders of sexual desire from the perspective of sexual medicine standards of control paradigms, risk/benefit ratios, and clinical significance. MEDLINE was reviewed from the last 10 years. Evaluated study quality via 10 metrics and efficacy as mean change, and proportion of responders and remitters. Three controlled trials support CBT and two controlled trials support MMT. The reports of the trials each lacked several scientific requirements: a hierarchy of endpoints with a planned primary endpoint, sufficient information on the intervention to reproduce it, randomization, adequate control, accepted measures of benefits and harms, compliance data, and/or outcomes of clinical relevance. Psychological treatments for HSDD are not yet supported by adequate clinical trials. The current scientific and regulatory standards for drug treatment trials should also be applicable to psychological treatment trials. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. A cross-sectional study of the availability and price of anti-malarial medicines and malaria rapid diagnostic tests in private sector retail drug outlets in rural Western Kenya, 2013.

    PubMed

    Kioko, Urbanus; Riley, Christina; Dellicour, Stephanie; Were, Vincent; Ouma, Peter; Gutman, Julie; Kariuki, Simon; Omar, Ahmeddin; Desai, Meghna; Buff, Ann M

    2016-07-12

    Although anti-malarial medicines are free in Kenyan public health facilities, patients often seek treatment from private sector retail drug outlets. In mid-2010, the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria (AMFm) was introduced to make quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) accessible and affordable in private and public sectors. Private sector retail drug outlets stocking anti-malarial medications within a surveillance area of approximately 220,000 people in a malaria perennial high-transmission area in rural western Kenya were identified via a census in September 2013. A cross-sectional study was conducted in September-October 2013 to determine availability and price of anti-malarial medicines and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in drug outlets. A standardized questionnaire was administered to collect drug outlet and personnel characteristics and availability and price of anti-malarials and RDTs. Of 181 drug outlets identified, 179 (99 %) participated in the survey. Thirteen percent were registered pharmacies, 25 % informal drug shops, 46 % general shops, 13 % homesteads and 2 % other. One hundred sixty-five (92 %) had at least one ACT type: 162 (91 %) had recommended first-line artemether-lumefantrine (AL), 22 (12 %) had recommended second-line dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), 85 (48 %) had sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), 60 (34 %) had any quinine (QN) formulation, and 14 (8 %) had amodiaquine (AQ) monotherapy. The mean price (range) of an adult treatment course for AL was $1.01 ($0.35-4.71); DHA-PPQ was $4.39 ($0.71-7.06); QN tablets were $2.24 ($0.12-4.71); SP was $0.62 ($0.24-2.35); AQ monotherapy was $0.42 ($0.24-1.06). The mean AL price with or without the AMFm logo did not differ significantly ($1.01 and 1.07, respectively; p = 0.45). Only 17 (10 %) drug outlets had RDTs; 149 (84 %) never stocked RDTs. The mean RDT price was $0.92 ($0.24-2.35). Most outlets never stocked RDTs; therefore, testing prior to

  8. The Medicinal Cannabis Treatment Agreement: Providing Information to Chronic Pain Patients Through a Written Document.

    PubMed

    Wilsey, Barth; Atkinson, J Hampton; Marcotte, Thomas D; Grant, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Pain practitioners would seem to have an obligation to understand and inform their patients on key issues of the evidence base on cannabinoid therapeutics. One way to fulfill this obligation might be to borrow from concepts developed in the prescription of opioids: the use of a written agreement to describe and minimize risks. Regrettably, the widespread adoption of opioids was undertaken while harmful effects were minimized; obviously, no one wants to repeat this misstep. This article describes a method of educating patients in a manner analogous to other treatment agreements. Surveys have demonstrated that pain is the most common indication for medical use of cannabis. As more individuals gain access to this botanical product through state ballot initiatives and legislative mandate, the pain specialist is likely to be confronted by patients either seeking such treatment where permitted, or otherwise inquiring about its potential benefits and harms, and alternative pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids. PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: cannabis guidelines, harmful effects of cannabis, medical marijuana, medicinal cannabis, opioid cannabis interaction, cannabis dependence and cannabis abuse : The authors selected individual tenets a medicinal cannabis patient would be asked to review and acknowledge via signature. Undoubtedly, the knowledge base concerning risks will be an iterative process as we learn more about the long-term use of medicinal cannabis. But we should start the process now so that patients may be instructed about our current conception of what the use of medicinal cannabis entails.

  9. The role of medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kooti, Wesam; Farokhipour, Maryam; Asadzadeh, Zahra; Ashtary-Larky, Damoon; Asadi-Samani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is a serious metabolic disorder and plenty of medical plants are used in traditional medicines to treat diabetes. These plants have no side effects and many existing medicines are derived from the plants. The purpose of this systematic review is to study diabetes and to summarize the available treatments for this disease, focusing especially on herbal medicine. Methods Required papers about diabetes and effective plants were searched from the databases, including Science direct, PubMed, Wiley, Scopus, and Springer. Keywords in this study are ”medicinal plants”, “diabetes”, “symptom”, “herbal”, and “treatment”. Out of the 490 collected articles (published in the period between 1995 and 2015), 450 were excluded due to non-relevance or lack of access to the original article. Results Diabetes is mainly due to oxidative stress and an increase in reactive oxygen species that can have major effects. Many plants contain different natural antioxidants, in particular tannins, flavonoids, C and E vitamins that have the ability to maintain β-cells performance and decrease glucose levels in the blood. Conclusion According to published results, it can be said that medical plants are more affordable and have less side effects compared synthetic drugs, and are more effective in treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26955456

  10. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the treatment of animal diarrhoea in Plateau State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of medicinal plants in the treatment of diseases has generated renewed interest in recent times, as herbal preparations are increasingly being used in both human and animal healthcare systems. Diarrhoea is one of the common clinical signs of gastrointestinal disorders caused by both infectious and non-infectious agents and an important livestock debilitating condition. Plateau State is rich in savannah and forest vegetations and home to a vast collection of plants upheld in folklore as having useful medicinal applications. There is however scarcity of documented information on the medicinal plants used in the treatment of animal diarrhoea in the state, thus the need for this survey. Ten (10) out of 17 Local Government Areas (LGAs), spread across the three senatorial zones were selected. Farmers were interviewed using well structured, open-ended questionnaire and guided dialogue techniques between October and December 2010. Medicinal plants reported to be effective in diarrhoea management were collected using the guided field-walk method for identification and authentication. Results A total of 248 questionnaires were completed, out of which 207 respondents (83.47%) acknowledged the use of herbs in diarrhoea management, while 41 (16.53%) do not use herbs or apply other traditional methods in the treatment of diarrhoea in their animals. Medicinal plants cited as beneficial in the treatment of animal diarrhoea numbered 132, from which 57(43.18%) were scientifically identified and classified into 25 plant families with the families Fabaceae (21%) and Combretaceae (14.04%) having the highest occurrence. The plant parts mostly used in antidiarrhoeal herbal preparations are the leaves (43.86%) followed by the stem bark (29.82%). The herbal preparations are usually administered orally. Conclusion Rural communities in Plateau State are a rich source of information on medicinal plants as revealed in this survey. There is need to scientifically ascertain

  11. Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cysts and Primary Infertility by Iranian Traditional Medicine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Mehdi; Setayesh, Mohammad; Mokaberinejad, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a medical and psychosocial problem with a high prevalence. There are different treatments for this problem in Iranian traditional medicine. A 28-year-old woman presented with the complaints of 4 emergency operations of the left ovarian cyst during 4 years and infertility. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed an ovarian cyst, adhesion, and endometriosis. Hysteroscopy was unremarkable. After 2 months of letrozole administration, the ovarian cyst ruptured again. Considering the failure of conventional treatments, Iranian traditional medicine products were administered to the patient. After 3 months, the patient conceived and delivered a healthy boy through normal vaginal delivery. These compounds may help with pregnancy as a uterine tonic, vitalizer, and aphrodisiac with brain and cardiac tonic properties. PMID:27932523

  12. [Complementary medicine in cancer patients under treatment in Marrakech, Morocco: a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Tazi, I; Nafil, H; Mahmal, L; Harif, M; Khouchani, M; Saadi, Z; Belbaraka, R; Elomrani, A; Tahri, A

    2013-10-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is very frequent in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to analyze the frequency, the reasons of use of CAM in patients with a cancer treated in a Moroccan oncology department. We included in this study 400 patients. An anonymous questionnaire was proposed to patients during treatment. Over 384 analyzable questionnaires, 71% of patients were using CAM. The most frequent method was religious therapy (60%). The second one was herbal medicine (36%). The main reason for using CAM was reducing psychic pain in 53%, and boosting the immune system in 32%. Adverse effects were reported in 2% of cases. Only 5% of patients discussed CAM with their doctors. The cost of CAM was less than 100 Euros in 88% of cases. To optimize the patient-physician relationship and to avoid a propensity to unproved treatments, accurate and adequate communication is necessary.

  13. The Chinese approach to complementary and alternative medicine treatment for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) remains a challenge due to poor understanding on its etiology. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as an optional treatment, has been widely used, because no definitive conventional therapy is available. The different domain of CAM provides miscellaneous treatments for IC/BPS, which mainly include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, biofeedback, yoga, massage, physical therapy, Qigong, traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Clinical evidence has shown that each therapy can certainly benefit a portion of IC/BPS patients. However, the target patient group of each therapy has not been well studied and randomized, controlled trials are needed to further confirm the efficacy and reliability of CAM on managing IC/BPS. Despite these limitations, CAM therapeutic characteristics including non-invasive and effectiveness for specific patients allow clinicians and patients to realize multimodal and individualized therapy for IC/BPS. PMID:26816867

  14. The Chinese approach to complementary and alternative medicine treatment for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ran; Ali, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) remains a challenge due to poor understanding on its etiology. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as an optional treatment, has been widely used, because no definitive conventional therapy is available. The different domain of CAM provides miscellaneous treatments for IC/BPS, which mainly include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, biofeedback, yoga, massage, physical therapy, Qigong, traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Clinical evidence has shown that each therapy can certainly benefit a portion of IC/BPS patients. However, the target patient group of each therapy has not been well studied and randomized, controlled trials are needed to further confirm the efficacy and reliability of CAM on managing IC/BPS. Despite these limitations, CAM therapeutic characteristics including non-invasive and effectiveness for specific patients allow clinicians and patients to realize multimodal and individualized therapy for IC/BPS.

  15. [Establishment of diagnosis and treatment patterns of holistic integrated medicine for neuro-ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanling

    2014-12-01

    Neuro-ophthalmology, as an interdisciplinary, covers at least three disciplines- ophthalmology, neurology and neurosurgery. With limited knowledge in each discipline, doctors often make misdiagnoses for neuro-ophthalmology diseases. Therefore, it is imperative to abandon the distinction between disciplines and combine all the knowledge to diagnose and treat patients in patterns of holistic integrated medicine in order to effectively improve the diagnosis and treatment of neuro-ophthalmology.

  16. [Social network analysis of traditional Chinese medicine on treatment of constipation].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Dong; Tian, Jin-Hui; Wu, Guo-Tai; Niu, Ting-Hui; Chen, Zhen-He; Ren, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The methods of literature metrology and data mining were used to study the research topics and social network analysis of traditional Chinese medicine for constipation. The major Chinese databases were searched to include the research studies of traditional Chinese medicine for constipation. BICOMS analysis software was used to extract and collect the main information and produce co-occurrence Matrix; gCLUTO software was used for cluster analysis. Data analysis was conducted by using SPSS 19.0 software. The results showed that the number of studies on traditional Chinese medicine for constipation was constantly increased, with two literature volume peaks respectively in 2003 and 2006. Related studies have been published in 31 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities have published, but the studies in developed areas were more than those in developing areas. There was little cooperation between research institutions and the authors, especially the cooperation between different areas. At present, the research field of Chinese medicine for constipation is divided into five research topics. In terms of specific traditional Chinese medicine, angelica sinensis is in the core position. The results showed regional imbalance in the number of studies on Chinese medicine treatment for constipation, as well as little cooperation between researchers and research institutions. The research topics mainly focused on the evaluation of clinical efficacy, but the research on optimizing the prescriptions was still not enough, so the future researchers shall pay more attention to the studies of constipation prescriptions with Angelica sinensis as the core herb. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. [Regularity analysis on clinical treatment in primary liver cancer by traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoni; Li, Ning

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate clinical treatment regularity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on primary liver cancer and provide inspiration for the clinical use. Traditional Chinese medicine database on primary liver cancer was established to analysis the classification, frequency, dosage of TCM in clinical treatment. Tonic medicine is the most common medication, herbs for heat-clearing, promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis, eliminating dampness and diuresis and regulating flow of Qi are more common medication, herbs for relieving exterior disorder and digesting are common medication; the first frequency of single herb is Atractglodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma, Poria, Codonopsis Radix. Popular classical prescriptions are Sijunzi Tang, Xiaochaihu Tang, YiguanJian, Xiangsha Liujunzi Tang, Xiaoyao Wan and Gexia Zhuyu Tang, Liuwei Dihuang Tang and Yinchenhao Tang et al. Gallic Gigerii Endothelium Corneum and Ophiopogonis Radix are most commonly drug for poor appetite. Astragali Radix is most commonly drug for fatigue. Corydalis Rhizoma, Toosendan Fructus are most common for liver pain; Pericarpium Arecae, Polyporus, Poria are most common herbs for ascites; Artemisiae Scopariae Herba is common drug for jaundice. Replenishing qi to invigorate the spleen, sparsing liver to regulate the flow of vital energy, clearing heat and promoting diuresis, promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis, nourishing yin and detoxification are the main principles for treating primary liver cancer. Improving clinical symptoms, signs and quality of life of patients with TCM is the key to clinical treatment.

  18. [Case-control study on spinal leveraging manipulation and medicine for the treatment of degenerative scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Tian, Gang; Shen, Mao-rong; Jiang, Wei-guo; Xie, Fu-rong; Wei, Wen-wu

    2015-06-01

    To compare clinical effects of spinal leveraging manipulation and medicine for the treatment of degenerative scoliosis in pain and function. From July 2010 to June 2013, 38 patients with degenerative scoliosis were randomly divided into spinal leveraging manipulation group and medicine group by coin tossing. In manipulation group, there were 9 males and 11 females aged from 58 to 74 years old with an average of (66.63±7.73), the courses of diseases ranged from 3 to 8 months with an average of (5.65±2.58), spinal leveraging manipulation(following meridian to straighten tendon,relieving spasm, osteopathy and massage, clearing and activating the channels and collaterals) were performed for 30 min, once a day, 4 days for a period treatment, totally 9 courses. In medicine group, there were 8 males and 10 females aged from 57 to 70 years old with an average of (63.51±6.61) the courses of diseases ranged from 3 to 5 months with an average of (4.82±1.43), celecoxib with eperisone hydrochloride were orally taken, 4 days for a period treatment, totally 9 courses. VAS score, Cobb angle and ODI score were measured. After treatment, VAS score in manipulation group was (5.38±0.99), (6.36±1.31) in medicine group,and had significant meaning (t=2.618, P<0.05); there was significant differences in Cobb angle between manipulation group (16.51±4.89)° and medicine group (19.85±5.03) °(t=2.074,P<0.05); and had obviously meaning in ODI score between manipulation group (20.20±2.93) and medicine group (26.01±3.11) (t=5.592, P<0.05). Spinal leveraging manipulation for degenerative scoliosis could regulate muscle balance on both side of spine, correct coronal imbalances in spine, recover normal sequence of spine, reduce and remove opperssion and stimulation of nerve root, relieve pain in leg and waist and further improve quality of life.

  19. Understanding cancer and its treatment in Thai traditional medicine: An ethnopharmacological-anthropological investigation.

    PubMed

    Lumlerdkij, Natchagorn; Tantiwongse, Jaturapat; Booranasubkajorn, Suksalin; Boonrak, Ranida; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Laohapand, Tawee; Heinrich, Michael

    2018-04-24

    Thai traditional medicine (TTM) is widely practiced in Thailand and continues to gain importance in cancer management, but little is known about the TTM practitioners' emic concepts and practice. With this study we firstly aim to document the practice of cancer treatment and prevention by TTM practitioners and, secondly, to evaluate how such traditional concepts and practices are correlated with biomedical ones. This in turn can form the basis for developing novel strategies for designing pharmacological experiments and longer term strategies to develop TTM practice. Semi-structured interviews with 33 TTM practitioners were performed in five provinces in different regions of Thailand. The following information were recorded; basic information of informants, descriptions of cancer (mareng in Thai), causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Plants used in the treatment and prevention of mareng were also collected. Using an in depth ethnographic approach four representative case studies to assist in a better understanding of the characteristics of mareng, its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are reported here. Five characteristics of mareng - waste accumulation (khong sia), chronic illnesses (krasai), inflammation (kan aksep), bad blood (luead) and lymph (namlueang), and the imbalance of four basic elements (dhātu si) - have been identified. Explanatory models of cancer in TTM were linked with biomedical concepts and relevant pharmacological actions. Traditional uses and available scientific evidence of medicinal plants mentioned in the case studies for the treatment or prevention of mareng are presented and discussed. Here for the first time five main characteristics of cancer based on Thai traditional medical concepts are analysed. Our findings are relevant not only for the planning of clinical studies or pharmacological experiment in the search for novel compounds for cancer treatment and prevention, but also for the integration of Thai traditional

  20. [Antoine Barthélémy Clot-Bey, a physician from Marseille founder of Western medicine in Egypt].

    PubMed

    Ruf, Henri

    2011-01-01

    Born in Grenoble in 1793 Clot was first a doctor in Marseilles with great success and honour. But for unclear reasons he had to resign, and then decided to be recruited in Egypt, where he was soon called "Clot-Bey" (Bey = officer)": he contributed greatly to modernizing Egyptian medical system: he founded the School of medicine, that of pharmacy, and that of obstetrics, and promoted hygiens and variolisation. After Mehmet Ali abdicated he lost most of his influence, and left Egypt for ever in 1858.

  1. PRECISION MEDICINE - The Golden Gate for Detection, Treatment and Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, H.; O’Bryant, S.E.; Castrillo, J.I.; Ritchie, C.; Rojkova, K.; Broich, K.; Benda, N.; Nisticò, R.; Frank, R.A.; Dubois, B.; Escott-Price, V.; Lista, S.

    2016-01-01

    societal consequences of early detection at asymptomatic stages. In this scenario, the integrated roles of genome sequencing, investigations of comprehensive fluid-based biomarkers and multimodal neuroimaging will be of key importance for the identification of distinct molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in subsets of asymptomatic people at greatest risk for progression to clinical milestones due to those specific pathways. The precision medicine strategy facilitates a paradigm shift in Neuroscience and AD research and development away from the classical “one-size-fits-all” approach in drug discovery towards biomarker guided “molecularly” tailored therapy for truly effective treatment and prevention options. After the long and winding decade of failed therapy trials progress towards the holistic systems-based strategy of precision medicine may finally turn into the new age of scientific and medical success curbing the global AD epidemic. PMID:28344933

  2. PRECISION MEDICINE - The Golden Gate for Detection, Treatment and Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hampel, H; O'Bryant, S E; Castrillo, J I; Ritchie, C; Rojkova, K; Broich, K; Benda, N; Nisticò, R; Frank, R A; Dubois, B; Escott-Price, V; Lista, S

    2016-12-01

    societal consequences of early detection at asymptomatic stages. In this scenario, the integrated roles of genome sequencing, investigations of comprehensive fluid-based biomarkers and multimodal neuroimaging will be of key importance for the identification of distinct molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in subsets of asymptomatic people at greatest risk for progression to clinical milestones due to those specific pathways. The precision medicine strategy facilitates a paradigm shift in Neuroscience and AD research and development away from the classical "one-size-fits-all" approach in drug discovery towards biomarker guided "molecularly" tailored therapy for truly effective treatment and prevention options. After the long and winding decade of failed therapy trials progress towards the holistic systems-based strategy of precision medicine may finally turn into the new age of scientific and medical success curbing the global AD epidemic.

  3. Identification of medicinal plants for the treatment of kidney and urinary stones

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Baharvand-Ahmadi, Babak; Tajeddini, Pegah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Naghdi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney stones are the third most common urinary tract problems after urinary tract infections and prostate pathology. Kidney stones may cause extreme pain and blockage of urine flow. They are usually treated with medications that may cause a number of side-effects. Medicinal herbs are used in different cultures as a reliable source of natural remedies. Objectives: This study aimed to determine native medicinal plants used by traditional healers of Shiraz for the treatment of kidney stones. Materials and Methods: The ethno-medicinal data were collected between July and September 2012 through face-to-face interview with local herbalist. Results: A total of 18 species belonging to 19 botanical families were recorded in study area. Species with the highest frequency of mentions were Alhagi maurorum (51.58%), Tribulus terrestris (51.58%), and Nigella sativa (48.14). The most frequently used plant parts were aerial parts (38%), leaf (33%) and fruits (17%). Decoction (68%) was the most frequently prescribed method of preparation. Most of the medicinal plants recommended by Shirazian herbalists have not been investigated in animal and humane models of renal stone which provides a new area of research. Conclusion: In the case of safety and effectiveness, they can be refined and processed to produce natural drugs. PMID:27689108

  4. Herbal Medicine as an Alternative Treatment in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, Francielly Mourao; Liveror, Francislaine Aparecida; Tolouei Menegati, Sara Emilia Lima; Junior, Arquimedes Gasparotto

    2017-12-27

    This review focuses on the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in the management of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in humans and animals. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases were searched up to October 30, 2016. The key terms used were "ASD", "Asperger", "autism", "healing plants", "herbal medicine", and "medicinal plants". In each database, the searches consisted of each of the three key terms describing the disorder and subtypes plus each of the terms describing the therapy. All human and animal studies on the effects of herbs with the key outcome of change in autism symptoms were included. In vitro studies were excluded. From the publications perused in the initial database, 3157 results were identified, reviewed and a total of 23 studies were included. Preclinical studies using critically validated models were conducted, with some promising preliminary results. Data availability on controlled clinical studies is currently very limited. The use of different methodologies and the very small number of patients raise doubts about the effects of these preparations. Available data do not yet allow us to suggest the effectiveness of herbal medicines as an add-on in the treatment of ASD symptoms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. In-vitro evaluation of selected Egyptian traditional herbal medicines for treatment of alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Egyptians recognized the healing power of herbs and used them in their medicinal formulations. Nowadays, “Attarin” drug shops and the public use mainly the Unani medicinal system for treatment of their health problems including improvement of memory and old age related diseases. Numerous medicinal plants have been described in old literature of Arabic traditional medicine for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (or to strengthen memory). Methods In this study, some of these plants were evaluated against three different preliminary bioassays related to AD to explore the possible way of their bio-interaction. Twenty three selected plants were extracted with methanol and screened in vitro against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and cycloxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzymes. In addition, anti-oxidant activity using DPPH was determined. Results Of the tested plant extracts; Adhatoda vasica and Peganum harmala showed inhibitory effect on AChE at IC50 294 μg/ml and 68 μg/ml respectively. Moreover, A. vasica interacted reversibly with the enzyme while P. harmala showed irreversible inhibition. Ferula assafoetida (IC50 3.2 μg/ml), Syzygium aromaticum (34.9 μg/ml) and Zingiber officinalis (33.6 μg/ml) showed activity against COX-1 enzyme. Potent radical scavenging activity was demonstrated by three plant extracts Terminalia chebula (EC50 2.2 μg/ml), T. arjuna (3.1 μg/ml) and Emblica officinalis (6.3 μg/ml). Conclusion Interestingly, differential results have been obtained which indicate the variability of the mode of actions for the selected plants. Additionally, the reversible interaction of A. vasica against AChE and the potent activity of F. assafoetida against COX-1 make them effective, new and promising agents for treatment of AD in the future, either as total extracts or their single bioactive constituents. PMID:23721591

  6. In-vitro evaluation of selected Egyptian traditional herbal medicines for treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shereen K; Hamed, Ahmed R; Soltan, Maha M; Hegazy, Usama M; Elgorashi, Esameldin E; El-Garf, Ibrahim A; Hussein, Ahmed A

    2013-05-30

    Egyptians recognized the healing power of herbs and used them in their medicinal formulations. Nowadays, "Attarin" drug shops and the public use mainly the Unani medicinal system for treatment of their health problems including improvement of memory and old age related diseases. Numerous medicinal plants have been described in old literature of Arabic traditional medicine for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (or to strengthen memory). In this study, some of these plants were evaluated against three different preliminary bioassays related to AD to explore the possible way of their bio-interaction. Twenty three selected plants were extracted with methanol and screened in vitro against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and cycloxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzymes. In addition, anti-oxidant activity using DPPH was determined. Of the tested plant extracts; Adhatoda vasica and Peganum harmala showed inhibitory effect on AChE at IC50 294 μg/ml and 68 μg/ml respectively. Moreover, A. vasica interacted reversibly with the enzyme while P. harmala showed irreversible inhibition. Ferula assafoetida (IC50 3.2 μg/ml), Syzygium aromaticum (34.9 μg/ml) and Zingiber officinalis (33.6 μg/ml) showed activity against COX-1 enzyme. Potent radical scavenging activity was demonstrated by three plant extracts Terminalia chebula (EC50 2.2 μg/ml), T. arjuna (3.1 μg/ml) and Emblica officinalis (6.3 μg/ml). Interestingly, differential results have been obtained which indicate the variability of the mode of actions for the selected plants. Additionally, the reversible interaction of A. vasica against AChE and the potent activity of F. assafoetida against COX-1 make them effective, new and promising agents for treatment of AD in the future, either as total extracts or their single bioactive constituents.

  7. Medicinal plants as alternative treatments for female sexual dysfunction: utopian vision or possible treatment in climacteric women?

    PubMed

    Mazaro-Costa, Renata; Andersen, Monica L; Hachul, Helena; Tufik, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a complex and multifactorial condition. An increased incidence of FSD is especially associated with the decline of estrogen. Thus, menopause is a critical phase for FSD complaints. In this context, medicinal plants may be a therapeutic option. To identify and describe the popular and clinical uses of medicinal plants for FSD treatment in climacteric women. We highlighted the majority of the plants commonly involved with the female reproductive system including: Angelica sinensis, Cimicifuga racemosa, Ferula hermonis, Ginkgo biloba, Humulus lupulus, Lepidium meyenii, Tribulus terrestris, Trifolium pratense, and Vitex agnus-castus. This study is a narrative review of studies of plants that are possible alternative treatments for FSD. The species described have clinical and popular uses in different cultures as well as medical indications for female reproductive disturbances, mainly in climacteric women. We have also analyzed the evidence level of clinical studies. The main outcome assessed is the efficacy of plants in improving the symptoms of FSD. There is little evidence from the literature to recommend the use of medicinal plants when treating FSD. The majority of studies with a strong level of evidence are associated with the treatment of the vasomotor symptoms of menopause. Ferula hermonis, Angelica sinensis, and Gingko biloba may be suggested for arousal disorder studies. Cimicifuga racemosa, Trifolium pratense, and Vitex agnus-castus may be recommended for several FSD. Humulus lupulus and Tribulus terrestris may help with desire disorder studies. Lepidium meyenii should be studied further. Studies of these plants indicate that they may be useful as a possible alternative and/or complementary approach for studies aimed at the treatment of FSD. At this time, however, this review cannot recommend a plant that has a strong enough level of evidence for treatment of FSD. Thus, there is a need for clinical (double-blinded and

  8. Traditional Chinese medicine herbal preparations in restless legs syndrome (RLS) treatment: a review and probable first description of RLS in 1529.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xue; Wang, Wei-Dong; Walters, Arthur S; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yan-Jiao; Chu, Fu-Yong

    2012-12-01

    Occidental medicine has a given definition for restless legs syndrome (RLS) and knowledge of RLS pathophysiology has led to the development of its therapeutic management. RLS has no cure. Many methods have been used for its treatment, among which traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been considered as a new approach. However, description and management of the disease symptoms can be found in Chinese ancient medical systems. The first mention of RLS may have been as early as the third century BC described as "leg uncomfortable". Nonetheless, the lack of a complete description encompassing all four modern cardinal features of RLS makes this uncertain. On the other hand, the first description of RLS encompassing three of the four major modern criteria occurs in the ancient book of Neike Zhaiyao (Internal summary), 1529 AD just about a century and a half prior to the description of RLS by Sir Thomas Willis in England. Here, we introduce the philosophical concepts of traditional Chinese medicine and the description, classification and understanding of RLS symptoms in traditional Chinese medicine. We have conducted an in-depth review of the literature reporting one part of TCM, Chinese herbal treatment efficacy for RLS, through both English and Chinese search engines. Eighty-five studies were included in the review and more than 40 formulas (including 176 different ingredients) were found in the literature. According to the literature, Chinese herbs have been demonstrated to be safe and hold great potential to be an effective treatment modality for RLS, but the evidence is limited by the quality of these studies. Of the eighty-five studies, only nine were clinical trials with a control group and only three of them were randomized. In cases where herbal preparations were compared to Western medications for RLS, the herbal preparations appear to be superior. However, uncertainty as to whether the diagnosis of RLS was made in accord with Western norms and the use of

  9. Use of traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes in Eastern Uganda: a qualitative exploration of reasons for choice.

    PubMed

    Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Lubega, Muhamadi; Katureebe, Sheila K; Oundo, Abanga; Kiweewa, Francis; Mukanga, David

    2013-01-02

    While there are biomedical drugs for managing diabetes mellitus, some patients with diabetes use traditional medicine. The aim of the study was to explore why patients with diabetes use traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes. The study was conducted in Iganga and Bugiri districts in Eastern Uganda using four focus group discussions (FGDs) with patients with diabetes; two with female patients and two with male patients, thirteen key informant interviews (KIIs); nine with health workers working with patients with diabetes and four with herbalists. FGDs and KIIs focused on what respondents perceived as reasons for patients with diabetes taking traditional medicine. Analysis was done using content analysis. Reasons for taking traditional medicine included finding difficulties accessing hospitals, diabetic drugs being out of stock, traditional medicine being acceptable and available within community, as well as being supplied in big quantities. Others were traditional medicine being cheaper than biomedical treatment and payment for it being done in installments. Traditional medicine was also more convenient to take and was marketed aggressively by the herbalists. Influence of family and friends as well as traditional healers contributed to use of traditional medicine. Possibilities of putting diabetic drugs at facilities closer to patients need to be considered and health facilities should have a constant supply of diabetic drugs. Community members need to be sensitized on the proper treatment for diabetes mellitus and on the dangers of taking traditional medicine.

  10. Use of traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes in Eastern Uganda: a qualitative exploration of reasons for choice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While there are biomedical drugs for managing diabetes mellitus, some patients with diabetes use traditional medicine. The aim of the study was to explore why patients with diabetes use traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes. Methods The study was conducted in Iganga and Bugiri districts in Eastern Uganda using four focus group discussions (FGDs) with patients with diabetes; two with female patients and two with male patients, thirteen key informant interviews (KIIs); nine with health workers working with patients with diabetes and four with herbalists. FGDs and KIIs focused on what respondents perceived as reasons for patients with diabetes taking traditional medicine. Analysis was done using content analysis. Results Reasons for taking traditional medicine included finding difficulties accessing hospitals, diabetic drugs being out of stock, traditional medicine being acceptable and available within community, as well as being supplied in big quantities. Others were traditional medicine being cheaper than biomedical treatment and payment for it being done in installments. Traditional medicine was also more convenient to take and was marketed aggressively by the herbalists. Influence of family and friends as well as traditional healers contributed to use of traditional medicine. Conclusions Possibilities of putting diabetic drugs at facilities closer to patients need to be considered and health facilities should have a constant supply of diabetic drugs. Community members need to be sensitized on the proper treatment for diabetes mellitus and on the dangers of taking traditional medicine. PMID:23282020

  11. Application of Multimodality Imaging Fusion Technology in Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant Tumors under the Precision Medicine Plan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Yi; Chen, Xian-Xia; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2016-12-20

    The arrival of precision medicine plan brings new opportunities and challenges for patients undergoing precision diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors. With the development of medical imaging, information on different modality imaging can be integrated and comprehensively analyzed by imaging fusion system. This review aimed to update the application of multimodality imaging fusion technology in the precise diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors under the precision medicine plan. We introduced several multimodality imaging fusion technologies and their application to the diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors in clinical practice. The data cited in this review were obtained mainly from the PubMed database from 1996 to 2016, using the keywords of "precision medicine", "fusion imaging", "multimodality", and "tumor diagnosis and treatment". Original articles, clinical practice, reviews, and other relevant literatures published in English were reviewed. Papers focusing on precision medicine, fusion imaging, multimodality, and tumor diagnosis and treatment were selected. Duplicated papers were excluded. Multimodality imaging fusion technology plays an important role in tumor diagnosis and treatment under the precision medicine plan, such as accurate location, qualitative diagnosis, tumor staging, treatment plan design, and real-time intraoperative monitoring. Multimodality imaging fusion systems could provide more imaging information of tumors from different dimensions and angles, thereby offing strong technical support for the implementation of precision oncology. Under the precision medicine plan, personalized treatment of tumors is a distinct possibility. We believe that multimodality imaging fusion technology will find an increasingly wide application in clinical practice.

  12. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Treatment Program at a Veterans Health Administration Residential Mental Health Facility.

    PubMed

    Gaddy, Melinda A

    2017-10-12

    A 4-week interdisciplinary integrative medicine program was recently added to the core treatment offerings for veterans participating in the Mental Health Residential Rehabilitation Program at the Dwight D. Eisenhower Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The new integrative medicine program teaches veterans about using meditative practices, nutrition, creative expression, tai chi, hatha yoga, sensory and breathing techniques, and lifestyle changes to enhance well-being. The groups are run by professionals from a variety of disciplines including recreation therapy, art therapy, occupational therapy, psychology, and nutrition. For the first 42 veterans to complete the program, the Short Form 12-item Health Survey was administered before and after participation in the integrative medicine program to assess the potential effectiveness of the program in enhancing physical and psychological well-being. In addition, a brief semistructured interview was used to assess veteran opinions about the program. Results suggest that the program was well received and that both physical and mental health scores improved from before to after treatment in this sample of veterans with complex behavioral health concerns. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Brief intervention to improve diagnosis and treatment knowledge of skin disorders by family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ahiarah, Ahunna; Fox, Chester; Servoss, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Family medicine residents encounter and treat a significant number of skin diseases. It is important for them to make correct diagnostic and treatment decisions for these diseases. Our study was done to assess residents' competence in diagnosing and treating skin disorders before and after a brief educational intervention. A questionnaire containing photographs of 40 skin conditions was administered to 45 family medicine residents, who were asked to identify the conditions shown in the photos. The subsequent intervention consisted of a lecture by a senior resident and a photographic quick reference guide, which was given to each resident. A posttest was administered 8 months later to again assess residents' ability to identify skin conditions. For comparisons of pretest and posttest performance, t tests were used. Participants showed significant improvement in both diagnosing (from 22.3% correct to 54.9% correct) and providing treatment recommendations (from 15.4% correct to 48.5% correct) for skin disorders. A peer-prepared lecture combined with a take-home photographic quick reference guide is an effective way to improve a family medicine resident's knowledge of skin disorders.

  14. Leech therapy- a holistic approach of treatment in unani (greeko-arab) medicine.

    PubMed

    Lone, Azad Hussain; Ahmad, Tanzeel; Anwar, Mohd; Habib, Shahida; Sofi, Gh; Imam, Hashmat

    2011-07-01

    The Unani System of Medicine also known as Greeko-Arab medicine, founded by Hippocrates is based on the concept of equilibrium and balance of natural body humours (blood, bile, black bile and phlegm). The imbalance in the quality and quantity of these humours leads to diseases whereas restoration of this balance maintains health of a person. The treatment methodology of diseases is based on four therapeutic modalities viz. Regimental therapy, Dieto-therapy, Pharmacotherapy and surgery. Irsale Alaq (Leech or Hirudo therapy) is one of the most important and widely practised methods of regimental therapy used for local evacuation of morbid humours. It is a procedure of treatment with the use of medicinal leeches. It has been suggested and successfully practised by Greeko-Arab physicians in the management of musculoskeletal diseases, gynaecological disorders, chronic skin diseases, thromboembolic diseases, varicose veins, ENT disorders etc since long. According to Unani doctrine, the efficacy of leech therapy is attributed to the analgesic and resolvent activities of leeches. However, from modern perspective, the saliva of leech contains about 100 pharmacologically active biological substances like Hirudin, hyaluronidase, vasodilators, anesthetics, antibacterial, fibrinases, collagenase etc. These substances are injected into human body while sucking of the blood and are responsible for the analgesic, anti inflammatory and anesthetic effects of leech therapy.

  15. Treatment of Sleep Disturbance in Alcohol Recovery: A National Survey of Addiction Medicine Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Herman, Debra S.; Freedman, Shelby; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Ramsey, Susan; Stein, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common among patients in recovery from alcoholism and can precipitate relapse. Though sleep complaints are commonly managed with medication, little is known about their management among recovering alcoholic patients. We performed a postal survey of a self-weighted, random systematic sample of 503 members of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) to examine addiction medicine physicians’ medical management of sleep disturbance among patients in early recovery from alcoholism. After 3 mailings, 311 (62%) responded. Of responents, 64% have offered pharmacological treatment to an insomniac, alcoholic patient in the first 3 months after detoxification, but only 22% offered medication to more than half of such patients. Trazodone was the preferred therapy, chosen first by 38% of respondents, followed by other sedating antidepressants (12%), and antihistamines (12%). The mean duration of therapy for trazodone and other sedating antidepressants exceeded one month. Experts in addiction medicine appear reluctant to prescribe medication to sleep-disturbed patients in early recovery from alcoholism. When they do prescribe, trazodone, other sedating antidepressants and antihistamines are favored, despite limited evidence for or against this indication. Although the treatment of disordered sleep among alcoholic patients in early recovery may have merit to prevent relapse, controlled studies of these sleep agents are needed. PMID:12703672

  16. Case Western Reserve University — Treatment of Glioblastoma Using Chain-Like Nanoparticles

    Cancer.gov

    To overcome the limitations of current drugs to treat brain tumors, Case Western University seeks to integrate the unique features of a chain-like nanoparticle with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs.

  17. Herbal medicines for the treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Japanese herbal medicines, called Kampo, have beneficial effects on cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects. Rikkunshito ameliorates cisplatin-induced anorexia through an antagonistic effect on the 5-HT receptors and by increasing the serum ghrelin levels. Hangeshashinto improves irinotecan-induced diarrhea and chemotherapy-induced mucositis by inhibiting the activity of β-glucuronidase as well as the synthesis of prostaglandin E2. Goshajinkigan prevents oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, possibly through suppressing functional alterations of the transient receptor potential channels. In this review, we will summarize the currently available literature regarding the clinical efficacy and potential mechanisms of Kampo medicines in the treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects.

  18. Peripheral nerve disorders and treatment strategies according to Avicenna in his medical treatise, Canon of medicine.

    PubMed

    Aciduman, Ahmet; Er, Uygur; Belen, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    The written transmission of knowledge has played a great part in the advancement of medicine, and historical documents hold the key to a full exploration of the history of medicine. Some fields, including disciplines that deal with peripheral nerve disorders, have received little benefit from such valuable material. In particular, peripheral nerve surgery lacks perspectives from historical data. For many years, physicians have obtained positive results in the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve diseases. Relevant documents reveal that the first author who described the surgical repair of damaged peripheral nerves was Avicenna, a leading figure of the medieval era who lived in the Middle East. In his primary medical work, the Canon, he provides a description, albeit sketchy, of a suture procedure for peripheral nerve transection. This treatise influenced physicians for several centuries. In this presentation, we analyze excerpts from the Canon that concern peripheral nerve disorders and strategies for their management.

  19. Intra-articular treatment of knee osteoarthritis: from anti-inflammatories to products of regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Richards, Masters M; Maxwell, Joshua Shane; Weng, Lihui; Angelos, Mathew G; Golzarian, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating condition that may ultimately require total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Non-operative treatments are bracing, oral analgesics, physical therapy, and intra-articular knee injection (IAKI). The objective of this paper is to provide a systematic literature review regarding intra-articular treatment of knee OA and insight into promising new products of regenerative medicine that may eventually have a substantial effect on treatment. A literature search was executed using Medline, Cochrane, and Embase with keywords "knee osteoarthritis" and "injection." Specifically, 45 articles that discussed intra-articular knee injection using corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid, analgesics, local anesthetics, and newer products of regenerative medicine, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), were analyzed. Of these, eleven were level 1, three were level 2, twelve were level 3, two were level 4, and seventeen were level 5 evidence. Papers included animal models. Local anesthetics have potential side effects and may only be effective for a few hours. Morphine and ketorolac may provide significant pain relief for 24 hours. Corticosteroids may give patients weeks to months of effective analgesia, but complications may occur, such as systemic hyperglycemia, septic arthritis, and joint degradation . Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of synovial fluid, but efficacy with respect to analgesia is controversial. Platelet-rich plasma formulations, autologous conditioned serum, autologous protein solution, and mesenchymal stem cell injections contain anti-inflammatory molecules and have been proposed to attenuate joint destruction or potentially remodel the joint. Currently, knee OA treatment does not address the progressively inflammatory environment of the joint. More investigation is needed regarding products of regenerative medicine, but they may ultimately have profound implications in the way knee OA is managed.

  20. Intra-articular Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: from Anti-inflammatories to Products of Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Masters M.; Maxwell, Joshua Shane; Weng, Lihui; Angelos, Mathew G.; Golzarian, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Knee osteoarthritis (OA)1 is a debilitating condition that may ultimately require total knee arthroplasty (TKA)2. Non-operative treatments are bracing, oral analgesics, physical therapy, and intra-articular knee injection (IAKI)3. The objective of this paper is to provide a systematic literature review regarding intra-articular treatment of knee OA and insight into promising new products of regenerative medicine that may eventually have a substantial effect on treatment. Methods A literature search was executed using Medline, Cochrane, and Embase with keywords ”knee osteoarthritis” and “injection.” Specifically, articles discussing intra-articular knee injection using corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid, analgesics, local anesthetics, and newer products of regenerative medicine, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP)4 and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)5, were analyzed. Results Forty-five publications were scrutinized. Of these, eleven were level 1, three were level 2, twelve were level 3, two were level 4, and seventeen were level 5. Papers included animal models. Local anesthetics have potential side effects and may only be effective for four hours. Morphine and ketorolac may provide significant pain relief for 24 hours. Corticosteroids may give patients weeks to one months of effective analgesia, but complications may occur, such as systemic hyperglycemia, septic arthritis, and joint degradation. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of synovial fluid, but efficacy with respect to analgesia is controversial. Platelet-rich plasma formulations, autologous conditioned serum, autologous protein solution, and mesenchymal stem cell injections contain anti-inflammatory molecules and have been proposed to attenuate joint destruction or potentially remodel the joint. Conclusions Currently, knee OA treatment does not address the progressively inflammatory environment of the joint. More investigation is needed regarding products of regenerative medicine, but they

  1. Prospects of Developing Medicinal Therapeutic Strategies and Pharmaceutical Design for Effective Gluten Intolerance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Savvateeva, Lyudmila V; Zamyatnin, Andrey A

    2016-01-01

    Gluten intolerance is an umbrella term for gluten-related disorders manifested in health decline as a result of the gluten ingestion. The spectrum of gluten-related disorders includes three major groups: autoimmune (mainly, Celiac Disease, CD, also known as Celiac Sprue, dermatitis herpetiformis, or gluten-sensitive ataxia), allergic (wheat allergy, WA), and non-autoimmune non-allergic (non-celiac gluten sensitivity, NCGS, or gluten sensitivity, GS). Pathogenesis and diagnostics of CD and WA are well established in contrast to NCGS, pathogenicity of which is still poorly understood and its symptoms are frequently misdiagnosed since most of the NCGS cases are currently identified via the process of CD and WA exclusion. By now, the only one proven effective way for CD treatment is gluten-free diet (GFD). However, such an increasingly gaining popularity diet is apparently unsuitable for NCGS treatment because in this case gluten does not always arise as the major or exclusive culprit of gastrointestinal disorder. Furthermore, it is some physicians' opinion that GFD can be deficient in fiber and in other vitamins and minerals. In many cases, GFD is commercially inaccessible for the most needy, whereas strict adherence to the diet is complicated by the presence of small amounts of the gluten components in some foods and even medicines. In this regard, a number of research groups and pharmaceutical companies are extensively developing alternative medicinal approaches to GFD for effective gluten intolerance treatment. This review summarizes our understanding of gluten-related disorders, possible mechanisms of gluten intolerance activation and advantages of gluten intolerance medicinal treatment using novel drug candidates obtained with a proper pharmaceutical design.

  2. Effect of Weekend Admissions on the Treatment Process and Outcomes of Internal Medicine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Che; Huang, Yu-Tung; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many studies address the effect of weekend admission on patient outcomes. This population-based study aimed to evaluate the relationship between weekend admission and the treatment process and outcomes of general internal medicine patients in Taiwan. A total of 82,340 patients (16,657 weekend and 65,683 weekday admissions) aged ≥20 years and admitted to the internal medicine departments of 17 medical centers between 2007 and 2009 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis was used to compare patients admitted on weekends and those admitted on weekdays. Patients who were admitted on weekends were more likely to undergo intubation (odds ratio [OR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16–1.39; P < 0.001) and/or mechanical ventilation (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.15–1.35; P < 0.001), cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (OR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05–2.01; P = 0.026), and be transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) (OR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.03–1.30; P = 0.015) compared with those admitted on weekdays. Weekend-admitted patients also had higher odds of in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.09–1.30; P < 0.001) and hospital treatment cost (OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06; P = 0.008) than weekday-admitted patients. General internal medicine patients who were admitted on weekends experienced more intensive care procedures and higher ICU admission, in-hospital mortality, and treatment cost. Intensive care utilization may serve as early indicator of poorer outcomes and a potential entry point to offer preventive intervention before proceeding to intensive treatment. PMID:26871788

  3. An evidence-based approach to medicinal plants for the treatment of sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine.

    PubMed

    Tahvilzadeh, M; Hajimahmoodi, M; Toliyat, T; Karimi, M; Rahimi, R

    2016-10-01

    Infertility is defined as inability of a sexually active couple to conceive after 1 year of regular intercourse without contraception. Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility. The aim of this study was to review medicinal plants that proposed to improve sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine. For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus, GoogleScholar and Cochrane library were explored for medicinal plants used in traditional Persian medicine for sperm abnormalities to obtain studies giving any evidence for their efficacy and pharmacological mechanisms related to male infertility. Data were collected for the years 1966 to March 2015. For some of them, including Chlorophytum borivilianum, Crocus sativus, Nigella sativa, Sesamum indicum, Tribulus terrestris, Mucuna pruriens and Withania somnifera, more reliable evidence was found. The mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of medicinal plants in sperm abnormalities are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and venotonic activity as well as containing precursors for sperm production and increasing blood testosterone level. Various phytochemical categories including saponins, phytosterols, carotenoids, oxygenated volatile compounds, phenolic compounds and alkaloids seem to be responsible for these beneficial effects. Further studies are recommended for obtaining more conclusive results about the efficacy and safety of the mentioned medicinal plants. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in China: opportunity, advancement and challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Hui-Juan; Jin, Yan-Tao; Guo, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Zhen; Xu, Li-Ran

    2013-08-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) has been used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for 30 years and the demonstrated therapeutic effects of CM, such as reducing plasma HIV viral load, increasing CD4(+)T cell counts, promoting immunity reconstitution, ameliorating symptoms and signs, improving the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and counteracting against the effects of anti-retroviral drugs, were summarized and reviewed in this article. The authors point out that it had been a good opportunity to use CM for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS in the past and also there are huge challenges ahead for CM research and clinicians to discover more effective CM and its underlying mechanisms for treatment of AIDS.

  5. Assessment of the Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Trials on the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus with Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Xu, Qin; Sun, Qi; Fan, Fang-fang; Guo, Xue-rui; Guo, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Background After the publication of the CONSORT 2010 statement, few studies have been conducted to assess the reporting quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on treatment of diabetes mellitus with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) published in Chinese journals. Objective To investigate the current situation of the reporting quality of RCTs in leading medical journals in China with the CONSORT 2010 statement as criteria. Methods The China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) electronic database was searched for RCTs on the treatment of diabetes mellitus with TCM published in the Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional & Western Medicine, and the China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica from January to December 2011. We excluded trials reported as “animal studies”, “in vitro studies”, “case studies”, or “systematic reviews”. The CONSORT checklist was applied by two independent raters to evaluate the reporting quality of all eligible trials after discussing and comprehending the items thoroughly. Each item in the checklist was graded as either “yes” or “no” depending on whether it had been reported by the authors. Results We identified 27 RCTs. According to the 37 items in the CONSORT checklist, the average reporting percentage was 45.0%, in which the average reporting percentage for the “title and abstract”, the “introduction”, the “methods”, the “results”, the “discussion” and the “other information” was 33.3%, 88.9%, 36.4%, 54.4%, 71.6% and 14.8%, respectively. In the Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional & Western Medicine, and the China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica the average reporting percentage was 42.2%, 56.8%, and 46.0%, respectively. Conclusions The reporting quality of RCTs in these three journals was insufficient to allow readers to assess the validity of the trials. We recommend that editors require

  6. Over-the-counter and prescription medicine misuse in Cape Town--findings from specialist treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Myers, Bronwyn; Siegfried, Nandi; Parry, Charles D H

    2003-05-01

    To provide community-level public health surveillance information on over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medicine misuse. A retrospective study of OTC and prescription medicine misuse among 9,063 patients from 23 specialist substance abuse treatment centres in Cape Town, South Africa, between 1998 and 2000. OTC and prescription medicine misuse places a burden on health and social services in South Africa. This is evidenced through the constant demand for treatment for OTC/prescription medicine misuse. Benzodiazepines are the class of medicines for which users most often receive treatment, followed by analgesics. Analgesic misuse is most often accounted for by the use of codeine-containing medicines, many of which are available over the counter. Patients using OTC/prescription medicines as their primary drug of abuse are significantly more likely to be female, and aged over 40 years. In contrast, patients using OTC/prescription medicine as an additional drug of abuse tend to be male and over 40 years of age. This study points to the need to develop primary health care protocols for detection, management and referral of patients misusing OTC/prescription drugs and the need to debate the re-scheduling of codeine as a prescription-only substance. The study also points to the need for further community-based research on the nature and extent of OTC/prescription drug misuse among the general population.

  7. Treatment of malaria and related symptoms using traditional herbal medicine in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Sultan; Beyene Tufa, Takele; Kebebe, Dereje; Belew, Sileshi; Mekonnen, Yimer; Gashe, Fanta; Mussa, Seid; Wynendaele, Evelien; Duchateau, Luc; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2018-03-01

    Medicinal plants have always been an integral part of different cultures in Ethiopia in the treatment of different illnesses including malaria and related symptoms. However, due to lack of proper documentation, urbanization, drought, acculturation and deforestation, there is an increased risk of losing this traditional knowledge. Hence, the use of the indigenous knowledge should be well documented and validated for potential future use. To gather and document information on medicinal plants which are used in the traditional treatment of malaria and related symptoms in Ethiopia. First, an ethnomedicinal survey of plants was conducted in 17 districts of Jimma zone, the Oromia national regional state of Ethiopia. Jimma zone is malarious and rich in natural flora. A total of 115 traditional healers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire containing personal data of the respondents, and information on medicinal plants used to treat malaria and related symptoms. In addition, a literature search using Medline/PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and HINARI was conducted on the indigenous use, in-vitro/in-vivo anti-malarial activity reports, and the chemical characterization of medicinal plants of Ethiopia used against malaria. From ethnomedicinal survey, a total of 28 species of plants used in the traditional treatment of malaria and related symptoms in Jimma Zone were collected, identified and documented. In addition, the literature search revealed that 124 medicinal plant species were reported to be traditionally used in the treatment of malaria in Ethiopia. From both ethnomedicinal survey and the literature search, Asteraceae and Fabaceae were the most represented families and Allium sativum L., Carica papaya L., Vernonia amygdalina Del., Lepidium sativum L. and Croton macrostachyus Del. were the most frequently reported plant species for their anti-malarial use. The dominant plant parts used in the preparation of remedies were leaves. About 54% of the

  8. Parents' Views and Experiences about Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Their Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senel, Hatice Gunayer

    2010-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been increasing for children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). In this study, 38 Turkish parents of children with ASD were surveyed related with their use of CAM treatments, experiences, and views for each treatment. They mentioned "Vitamins and minerals",…

  9. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Keith T.; Chau, Cindy H.; Price, Douglas K.; Figg, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (e.g. HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to a FDA approved targeted therapy (e.g. trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters (e.g. TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers have been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (e.g. Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of Next-Generation Sequencing to detect many potential “actionable” cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the one gene-one drug paradigm towards a more comprehensive, multi-gene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (e.g. NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics, while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials like the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. PMID:27197880

  10. ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE PRODUCTS AS A NOVEL TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Lindsey N.; Zhou, Yuning; Qiu, Suimin; Wang, Qingding; Evers, B. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects the mucosal lining of the gastrointestinal tract; the etiology is unknown and treatment is directed at systemic immunosuppression. Natural products, including medicinal herbs, have provided approximately half of the drugs developed for clinical use over the past 20 years. The purpose of our current study was to determine the effects of a novel combination of herbal extracts on intestinal inflammation using a murine model of IBD. Female Swiss-Webster mice were randomized to receive normal water or 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were treated with either a novel combination of herbal aqueous extracts or vehicle control per os (po) or per rectum (pr) every 24h for 7-8d. Disease activity index score (DAI) was determined daily; mice were sacrificed and colons analyzed by H&E staining, MPO assay, and cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6) ELISAs. Mice treated with the combination of herbal extracts, either po or pr, had significantly less rectal bleeding and lower DAI scores when compared to the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, colonic ulceration, leukocytic infiltration, and cytokine levels (TNF-α and IL-6) were decreased in the colons of herbal-treated mice, reflected by H&E staining, MPO assay, and cytokine ELISA. Treatment with the combination of medicinal herbs decreases leukocyte infiltration and mucosal ulceration, ameliorating the course of acute colonic inflammation. This herbal remedy may prove to be a novel and safe therapeutic alternative in the treatment of IBD. PMID:19051360

  11. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. The "Prince of Medicine": Yūhannā ibn Māsawayh and the foundations of the western pharmaceutical tradition.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Paula

    2013-12-01

    This essay examines three medieval pharmaceutical treatises purportedly authored by Yūhannā ibn Māsawayh (anglicized to John Mesue) and traces their immense influence on the development of pharmacy in early modem Europe and the Hispanic world. Despite the importance of these works throughout the early modern period, Mesue is relatively unknown in the history of pharmacy and medicine, and his exact identity remains unclear. This essay argues that "Mesue" was most likely a pseudonym used by an unknown author of the Latin West and that the three works were crafted to meet the demands of the developing "medical marketplace" of late thirteenth-century Europe, where the manuscripts first appeared. At the same time, however, as the Arabic reference of the pseudonym suggests, these treatises were clearly products of the medieval Islamic world, including many innovations that would provide the basis for the theory and practice of pharmacy for centuries and arguably formed part of the artisanal epistemological influence on the Scientific Revolution.

  13. Research advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease with polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Wang, Shun-Chun; Ding, Kan

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of patients' memory and their cognitive abilities and the mechanism is not completely clear. Although a variety of drugs have been approved for the AD treatment, substances which can prevent and cure AD are still in great need. The effect of polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on anti-AD has gained great progress and attained more and more attention in recent years. In this review, research advances in TCM-polysaccharides on AD made in this decade are summarized. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Medicinal plant treatments for fleas and ear problems of cats and dogs in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya

    2008-09-01

    Research conducted in 2003/2004 documented and validated (in a non-experimental way) ethnoveterinary medicines used by small-scale, organic livestock farmers in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Interviews were conducted with 60 participants who were organic farmers or holistic medicinal/veterinary practitioners. A workshop was held with selected participants to discuss the plant-based treatments. This paper reports on the medicinal plants used for fleas in cats and dogs. Fleas and flies are treated with Artemisia vulgaris L. (Asteraceae), Citrus x limon (L.), Juniperus communis L. var. depressa Pursh. (Cupressaceae), Lavandula officinalis L. (Labiatae), Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae), and Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don (Cupressaceae). All of the plants used have insecticidal activity. Ear problems are treated with Achillea millefolium L., Calendula officinalis L., and Helichrysum angustifolium (Roth.) G. Don. (Asteraceae), Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae), Berberis aquifolium Pursh./Mahonia aquifolium (Berberidaceae), Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Fabaceae), Lobelia inflata L. (Campanulaceae), Matricaria recutita L., Melaleuca alternifolia L. (Myrtaceae), Origanum vulgare L. (Labiatae), Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae), Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry (Myrtaceae), Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae), and Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae).

  15. Costs and cost-effectiveness of delivering intermittent preventive treatment through schools in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Temperley, Matilda; Mueller, Dirk H; Njagi, J Kiambo; Akhwale, Willis; Clarke, Siân E; Jukes, Matthew C H; Estambale, Benson B A; Brooker, Simon

    2008-09-30

    Awareness of the potential impact of malaria among school-age children has stimulated investigation into malaria interventions that can be delivered through schools. However, little evidence is available on the costs and cost-effectiveness of intervention options. This paper evaluates the costs and cost-effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) as delivered by teachers in schools in western Kenya. Information on actual drug and non-drug associated costs were collected from expenditure and salary records, government budgets and interviews with key district and national officials. Effectiveness data were derived from a cluster-randomised-controlled trial of IPT where a single dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and three daily doses of amodiaquine were provided three times in year (once termly). Both financial and economic costs were estimated from a provider perspective, and effectiveness was estimated in terms of anaemia cases averted. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the impact of key assumptions on estimated cost-effectiveness. The delivery of IPT by teachers was estimated to cost US$ 1.88 per child treated per year, with drug and teacher training costs constituting the largest cost components. Set-up costs accounted for 13.2% of overall costs (equivalent to US$ 0.25 per child) whilst recurrent costs accounted for 86.8% (US$ 1.63 per child per year). The estimated cost per anaemia case averted was US$ 29.84 and the cost per case of Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia averted was US$ 5.36, respectively. The cost per case of anaemia averted ranged between US$ 24.60 and 40.32 when the prices of antimalarial drugs and delivery costs were varied. Cost-effectiveness was most influenced by effectiveness of IPT and the background prevalence of anaemia. In settings where 30% and 50% of schoolchildren were anaemic, cost-effectiveness ratios were US$ 12.53 and 7.52, respectively. This study provides the first evidence that IPT administered by

  16. [Clinical features of acute myocardial infarction inpatients in 26 level three class A Chinese medicine hospitals in China and the investigation of treatment].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing-Feng; Li, Jun-De; Lei, Yan

    2012-03-01

    To study the therapeutic state of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) inpatients in 26 level three class A Chinese medicine (CM) hospitals in China. The case report form (CRF) was designed and used in this study. Totally 1 094 AMI patients were recruited from 26 level three class A CM hospitals from January 2006 to December 2006. The onset, the heart function, complications, previous history, and CM syndrome types were observed in AMI patients. Treatment by Western medicine (WM), CM intravenous preparation, CM decoction, and Chinese patent medicine were also observed in AMI patients. Blood stasis syndrome (854 cases, 78.06%) and stagnant phlegm syndrome (470 cases, 42.96%) were dominated in the CM sthenia syndrome. Qi deficiency syndrome (683 cases, 62.43%) and Xin-yin deficiency syndrome (231 cases, 21.12%) were dominated in the CM asthenia syndrome. Totally 355 patients (32.45%) received reperfusion. Of them, 224 (20.48%) received percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The top 5 often used Western drugs covered aspirin (1001 cases, 91.50%), low molecular heparin (917 cases, 83.82%), blood lipids regulators (833 cases, 76.14%), ACEI/ARB (822 cases, 75.14%), and nitrates (773 cases, 70.66%). Totally 946 patients (86.47%) used CM intravenous preparations. The CM intravenous preparations with the use frequency more than 5% were sequenced as Shenmai Injection (520 times, 54.97%), Salvia miltiorrhizae preparations (305 times, 32.24%), sanchi preparations (185 times, 19.56%), Shenfu Injection (68 times, 7.19%), Scutellarin Injection (64 times, 6.77%), and Acanthopanax Injection (29 times, 3.07%). Totally 575 patients (52.56%) used CM decoction. The main therapeutic methods covered activating blood circulation therapy (477 cases), qi benefiting therapy (332 cases), and phlegm resolving therapy (303 cases). Commonly used recipes covered Shengmai Powder, Taohong Siwu Decoction, Gualou Xiebai Baijiu Decoction, Erchen Decoction, and Sijunzi Decoction. Totally 394 patients

  17. TREATMENT OF DIARRHOEA USING TRADITIONAL MEDICINES: CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH IN SOUTH AFRICA AND ZIMBABWE

    PubMed Central

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal disorders, diarrhoea in particular remain a major concern in South Africa and Zimbabwe resulting in high mortality rates when left untreated. This investigation was aimed at documenting herbal medicines used in the treatment of diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Materials and Methods: A review of literature on plant species used as remedies for diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe was undertaken by the use of different electronic databases such as Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scopus as well as library searches at the University of Fort Hare, South Africa and the National Herbarium of Zimbabwe (SRGH) in Harare, Zimbabwe. Results: This study reported ten plant species most widely used to treat diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Of the lot, Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hochst. was the most popular medicinal plant used as antidiarrhoeal remedy (11 literature citations) in South Africa and Zimbabwe, followed by Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels and Schotia brachypetala Sond. with eight literature citations each. The roots (47.4%) are the most frequently used plant parts, followed by bark (26.3%), leaves (21.1%) and rhizomes (5.3%). Conclusion: The documented antidiarrhoeal activities of this repository of selected plant species against diarrhoea causing agents such as rotavirus, Escherichia coli, Shigella, Campylobacter, Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica, Salmonella, Yersinia and Vibrio cholerae calls for further investigation aimed at isolating phytochemical compounds responsible for antidiarrhoeal activities, their mode of action, and also establish their safety and efficacy. This cross-cultural acceptance of antidiarrhoeal herbal medicines and the use of the same plant species in different geographical zones serve as an indication of the importance of herbal medicines in primary healthcare of local communities. PMID:28480353

  18. TREATMENT OF DIARRHOEA USING TRADITIONAL MEDICINES: CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH IN SOUTH AFRICA AND ZIMBABWE.

    PubMed

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders, diarrhoea in particular remain a major concern in South Africa and Zimbabwe resulting in high mortality rates when left untreated. This investigation was aimed at documenting herbal medicines used in the treatment of diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe. A review of literature on plant species used as remedies for diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe was undertaken by the use of different electronic databases such as Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scopus as well as library searches at the University of Fort Hare, South Africa and the National Herbarium of Zimbabwe (SRGH) in Harare, Zimbabwe. This study reported ten plant species most widely used to treat diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Of the lot, Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hochst. was the most popular medicinal plant used as antidiarrhoeal remedy (11 literature citations) in South Africa and Zimbabwe, followed by Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels and Schotia brachypetala Sond. with eight literature citations each. The roots (47.4%) are the most frequently used plant parts, followed by bark (26.3%), leaves (21.1%) and rhizomes (5.3%). The documented antidiarrhoeal activities of this repository of selected plant species against diarrhoea causing agents such as rotavirus, Escherichia coli , Shigella , Campylobacter , Giardia , Entamoeba histolytica , Salmonella , Yersinia and Vibrio cholerae calls for further investigation aimed at isolating phytochemical compounds responsible for antidiarrhoeal activities, their mode of action, and also establish their safety and efficacy. This cross-cultural acceptance of antidiarrhoeal herbal medicines and the use of the same plant species in different geographical zones serve as an indication of the importance of herbal medicines in primary healthcare of local communities.

  19. Chinese herbal medicine network and core treatments for allergic skin diseases: Implications from a nationwide database.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Jen-Wu; Chen, Yu-Chun

    2015-06-20

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is commonly used to treat skin diseases, but CHM prescription patterns are difficult to understand due to their complexity and inter-connections. This study aimed to demonstrate CHM core treatments and network for treatment of allergic skin diseases by analyzing a nationwide prescription database. All CHM prescriptions made for atopic dermatitis (with age limitation ≤ 12 years) and urticaria for the entire year of 2011 were included. Association rule mining (ARM) combined with social network analysis (SNA) were used to analyze CHM prescriptions and explore the CHM prescription pattern and network. A total of 27,350 and 97,188 prescriptions for atopic dermatitis and urticaria, respectively, were analyzed. Xiao-Feng-San (XFS) was the most commonly used CHM (32% of prescriptions for atopic dermatitis and 47.4% for urticaria) and was the core treatment for both diseases. Moreover, 42 and 82 important CHM-CHM combinations were identified to establish the CHM network, and XFS with Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz was the most prevalent (6.4% for atopic dermatitis and 9.1% for urticaria). Traditional Chinese Medicine heat syndrome was most prevalent cause. Extensive anti-inflammation, anti-allergy, anti-oxidation, and anti-bacterial effects were also found among the CHMs. Network analysis on CHM prescriptions provides graphic and comprehensive illustrations regarding CHM treatment for atopic dermatitis and urticaria. The CHM network analysis of prescriptions is essential to realize the CHM treatments and to select suitable candidates for clinical use or further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical research on post-stroke hemiplegia treated with the optimized rehabilitation program of integrated Chinese and western medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Li; Qi, Rui; Yan, Jun-Tao

    2013-12-01

    To explore the optimized rehabilitation program in the treatment of post-stroke hemiplegia at the recovery stage. Based on the randomized controlled principle, 60 patients were randomized into an rehabilita tion + massage group (group A) and an rehabilitation + acupuncture group (group B), 30 cases in each one. Bobath sport therapy and functional training were adopted in the two groups. In the group A, the massage therapy was added. The rolling method and palm-rubbing method were used on the affected side, the pressing, kneading and plucking methods were applied to Jianliao (LI 15), Jianzhen (SI 9), Quchi (LI 11), Huantiao (GB 30), Weizhong (BL 40), Chengshan (BL 57), Zusanli (ST 36) and the other acu points; and the nipping method was adopted at the twelve Jing-well points. In the group B, acupuncture was applied to Baihui (BL 20), Jianliao (LI 15), Quchi (LI 11), Shousanli (LI 10), Huantiao (GB 30), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Jiexi (ST 41) and the other acupoints. The treatment was given once a day, 5 treatments a week in the two groups. The efficacy was evaluated in 3 weeks. Fugl-Meyer scale, Barthel index (BI) score, modified Rankin scale and stroke-specific quality of life (SS-QOL) were used to assess the limb motor function, the activity of daily life (ADL), independent activity of life and the quality of life of the patients in the two groups before and after treatment. Based on the total cost and benefit, the health economics evaluation was conducted in the patients of the two groups. The treatments all improved the limb motor function (group A: 26.00 (22) vs 37.00 (33); group B: 30.50 (21) vs 39.50 (36)), the independent activity of life, ADL (group A: 43.50 +/- 22.25 vs 57.50 +/- 22.25; group B: 52.83 +/- 16.59 vs 66.67 +/- 12.82) and the quality of life (group A: 122.23 +/- 30.00 vs 145.50 +/- 28.14; group B: 132.43 +/- 23.87 vs 151.47 +/- 22.37) in the patients of the two groups. The differences in all the indices were significant statistically before and

  1. Efficacy and safety of Chinese patent medicines in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peiru; Mao, Qinghua; Hua, Hong; Liu, Xiaosong; Yan, Zhimin

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common chronic oral mucosal condition of the oral cavity. Investigators in clinical trials have evaluated the effectiveness of Chinese patent medicines in the treatment of RAS. However, the results are conflicting rather than conclusive. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Chinese patent medicines for the treatment of RAS, the authors conducted a systematic review. The authors searched 9 electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or potential clinical controlled trials (CCTs), published in any language, in which the investigators compared Chinese patent medicines with vitamin tablets or placebos for the treatment of RAS. The authors included 11 RCTs and 1 CCT in the review. Results showed that Chinese patent medicines were beneficial for patients with RAS in relieving ulcer pain and reducing the duration and frequency of attacks. The reported adverse effects of Chinese patent medicines included stomachache, abdominal distention, diarrhea, mild nausea, and gastrointestinal discomfort, which were either self-limiting or could be relieved by treatment cessation. Chinese patent medicines may be effective for treatment of RAS by means of relieving pain and reducing ulcer size and episode duration and frequency. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementation of National Fire Plan treatments near the wildland-urban interface in the western United States.

    PubMed

    Schoennagel, Tania; Nelson, Cara R; Theobald, David M; Carnwath, Gunnar C; Chapman, Teresa B

    2009-06-30

    Because of increasing concern about the effects of catastrophic wildland fires throughout the western United States, federal land managers have been engaged in efforts to restore historical fire behavior and mitigate wildfire risk. During the last 5 years (2004-2008), 44,000 fuels treatments were implemented across the western United States under the National Fire Plan (NFP). We assessed the extent to which these treatments were conducted in and near the wildland-urban interface (WUI), where they would have the greatest potential to reduce fire risk in neighboring homes and communities. Although federal policies stipulate that significant resources should be invested in the WUI, we found that only 3% of the area treated was within the WUI, and another 8% was in an additional 2.5-km buffer around the WUI, totaling 11%. Only 17% of this buffered WUI is under federal ownership, which significantly limits the ability of federal agencies to implement fire-risk reduction treatments near communities. Although treatments far from the WUI may have some fire mitigation benefits, our findings suggest that greater priority must be given to locating treatments in and near the WUI, rather than in more remote settings, to satisfy NFP goals of reducing fire risk to communities. However, this may require shifting management and policy emphasis from public to private lands.

  3. Prevalence and modes of complementary and alternative medicine use among peasant farmers with musculoskeletal pain in a rural community in South-Western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Mbada, Chidozie Emmanuel; Adeyemi, Tijani Lukman; Adedoyin, Rufus Adesoji; Badmus, Hakeem David; Awotidebe, Taofeek Oluwole; Arije, Olujide Olusesan; Omotosho, Olorunfemi Sunday

    2015-06-06

    Anecdotally, use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for Musculoskeletal Pain (MSP) is common in Nigeria; however, there seems to be a dearth of empirical data on its prevalence and mode of use. This study investigated the prevalence and modes of use of CAM for MSP among farmers in a rural community in South-western Nigeria. This cross-sectional survey employed multistage sampling technique guidelines for conducting community survey by the World Health Organization among rural community farmers in Gudugbu village, Oyo State, Nigeria. A questionnaire developed from previous studies and validated by expert reviews was used to assess prevalence and modes of CAM use. Data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Alpha level was set at p < 0.05. A total of 230 consenting rural farmers volunteered for this study with a valid response rate of 93.9 % (n = 216). The lifetime, 12-month and point prevalence of CAM for MSP was 96.8 % respectively. Herbal therapy and massage were the predominant types of CAM therapies among previous (83.8 and 80.1 %) and current CAM users (37.5 and 37.5 %). CAM was largely used as sole therapy for MSP (75.5 %) and also in combination with orthodox medicine (23.6 %), and it is consumed on daily basis (21.8 %). CAM was perceived to be very good in maintaining a healthy life (87.1 %) and has less side effects (74 %) and more healthy than taking doctors' prescriptions (63.4 %). There is a high prevalence of CAM among Nigerian rural farmers. The most commonly employed CAM for MSP were herbal remedies and massage which are attributable to beliefs on their perceived efficacy.

  4. Evaluation of silvicultural treatments and biomass use for reducing fire hazard in western states

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Skog; R. James Barbour; Karen L. Abt; E.M. (Ted) Bilek; Frank Burch; Roger D. Fight; Robert J. Hugget; Patrick D. Miles; Elizabeth D. Reinhardt; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2006-01-01

    Several analyses have shown that fire hazard is a concern for substantial areas of forestland, shrubland, grassland, and range in the western United States. In response, broadscale management strategies, such as the National Fire Plan, established actions to reduce the threat of undesirable fire. Available budgets are insufficient to pay for vegetative management on...

  5. Measuring effectiveness of three postfire hillslope erosion barrier treatments, western Montana, USA

    Treesearch

    Peter R. Robichaud; Frederick B. Pierson; Robert E. Brown; Joseph W. Wagenbrenner

    2008-01-01

    After the Valley Complex Fire burned 86 000 ha in western Montana in 2000, two studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of contour-felled log, straw wattle, and hand-dug contour trench erosion barriers in mitigating postfire runoff and erosion. Sixteen plots were located across a steep, severely burned slope, with a single barrier installed in 12 plots (...

  6. A strategic assessment of forest biomass and fuel reduction treatments in Western States

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service; Bob Rummer; Jeff Prestemon; Dennis May; Pat Miles; John Vissage; Ron McRoberts; Greg Liknes; Wayne D. Shepperd; Dennis Ferguson; William Elliot; Sue Miller; Steve Reutebuch; Jamie Barbour; Jeremy Fried; Bryce Stokes; Edward Bilek; Ken Skog

    2005-01-01

    This assessment characterizes, at a regional scale, forest biomass that can potentially be removed to implement the fuel reduction and ecosystem restoration objectives of the National Fire Plan for the Western United States. The assessment area covers forests on both public and private ownerships in the region and describes all standing tree volume including stems,...

  7. Plants used in the traditional medicine of Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) and the Caribbean for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Domínguez, Fabiola; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Carranza-Álvarez, Candy

    2015-12-04

    Obesity is a worldwide medical concern. New ethnobotanical information regarding the antiobesity effect of medicinal plants has been obtained in the last 30 years in response to socio-demographic changes and high-fat diets became common. This review provides a summary of medicinal plants used in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for the empirical treatment of obesity in terms of ethnobotany, toxicity, pharmacology, conservation status, trade and chemistry. Bibliographic investigation was performed by analyzing recognized books, undergraduate and postgraduate theses and peer-reviewed scientific articles, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last four decades. Medicinal plants used for the treatment of obesity were classified in two categories: (1) plants with pharmacological evidence and (2) plants without pharmacological evidence. A total of 139 plant species, belonging to 61 families, native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean that are used for the empirical treatment of obesity were recorded. From these plants, 33 were investigated in scientific studies, and 106 plants lacked scientific investigation. Medicinal plants were experimentally studied in vitro (21 plants) and in vivo (16 plants). A total of 4 compounds isolated from medicinal plants used for the empirical treatment of obesity have been tested in vitro (2 compounds) and in vivo (4 compounds) studies. No clinical trials on obese subjects (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) have been performed using the medicinal plants cited in this review. There are no herbal-based products approved in Mexico for the treatment of obesity. There are a limited number of scientific studies published on medicinal plants from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean used for the treatment of obesity. This review highlights the need to perform pharmacological, phytochemical, toxicological and ethnobotanical studies with medicinal flora to obtain new antiobesity agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland

  8. How are we measuring clinically important outcome for operative treatments in sports medicine?

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Runyon, R Scott; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Gausden, Elizabeth B; Schairer, William W; Allen, Answorth A

    2017-05-01

    Minimal clinically important difference (MCID) and other measures of minimum clinical importance are increasingly recognized as important clinical considerations for evaluating the efficacy of an intervention. As our interpretation of clinical outcome evolves beyond statistical significance, psychometric properties such as MCID will be increasingly important to various stakeholders in the orthopaedic community. The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe the state of clinically important outcome reporting and 2) describe the methods used to derive these psychometric values for sports medicine patients undergoing operative treatments. A review of the MEDLINE database was performed. Studies primarily deriving and reporting clinically important outcome measures for operative interventions in sports medicine were included. Demographic, methodological and psychometric properties of included studies were extracted. Level of Evidence and the Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS) were used to assess study quality. Statistical analysis was primarily descriptive. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria; 10 of the 15 studies were Level II evidence and mean NOS score was 5.3/9. Minimal detectable change (MDC) was the most commonly derived measure of clinical importance, calculated in 53.3% of studies, followed by MCID, calculated in 40.0% of studies. A combination of distribution and anchor-based methods was the most commonly used method to determine clinical importance (N = 7, 46.7%) followed by distribution only (N = 5, 33.3%). Predictors of clinically important change were reported in four studies and were most commonly related to pre-operative functional score. MDC and the MCID are the most commonly reported measures of clinically important outcome after operative treatment in sports medicine. A combination of both distribution and anchor-based methods is commonly used to derive these values. More attention should be paid to reporting outcomes that are clinically important and

  9. [Clinical trials and licensing of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines for cancer treatment in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silva, Cecilia Ferreira da; Silva, Miriam Ventura da; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the pathway of clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines for cancer treatment involving Brazilian institutions from 2003 to 2012. Method This retrospective, descriptive study was based on review of two clinical trial registries, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Brazilian registry ReBEC. Phase II or III studies with participation from Brazilian institutions listed in at least one of the registries were included. Following selection of the trials, the pathway of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines was investigated from the research stage until licensing by the Brazilian Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (Anvisa), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Results Nine trials (eight phase III and one phase II) were selected. All had a randomized, controlled design. Two trials were double-blind and seven were open-label, and all recruited adults (≥ 18 years of age) of both sexes. The mean number of patients recruited per trial was 985.2. Seven trials had been completed and two had been terminated early. All trials were sponsored by non-Brazilian pharmaceutical companies and focused on renal, colorectal, gastric, and lung (non-small cell) cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and melanoma, and involved the use of cetuximab, figitumumab, ipilimumab, rituximab, bevacizumab and interferon alfa-2a. The FDA was the first agency to license the drugs, followed by EMA, except in the case of interferon alfa-2a, which was not approved by EMA. We were unable to determine the year of drug licensing by Anvisa in Brazil. Conclusions The participation of Brazil in clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies and biological medications for cancer treatment is insufficient. The quality of the available information on trials, history of licensing, and other relevant elements is a major weakness of the sources reviewed.

  10. [Complementary and alternative medicine treatment in children with cancer. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Duleba, Karolina; Wysocki, Mariusz; Styczyński, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A growing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is observed in treatment of patients with cancer. The use of CAM often leads to delay or resignation from anticancer treatment. Estimation of the extent of application of CAM methods among children and adolescents treated for cancer, as well as analysis of factors contributing to this decision. A survey based on a questionnaire was performed among 100 patients treated for cancer, including 47 girls and 53 boys, aged 5 months to 25 years (median 9.4 years). The questionnaire was filled-in by patients aged over 16, or by parents. It was found that at least 43% children with cancer were treated with at least one CAM method. The most often used methods were: spiritualism, herbal medicine, bioenergotherapy or diet (46.5%, 42%, 37% and 28% of CAM users, respectively). Odds ratio of the use of CAM methods was 23-fold higher (p<0.0001) in families with earlier own experience. The use of CAM was independent of place of residence, parents' education, social status or the number of children. Although the phase of therapy had no impact, there was a trend towards less frequent use of CAM during maintenance therapy. The most frequent source of information on CAM methods for parents were friends (69%) and mass-media. Most of CAM user parents believed in its effectiveness. The use of CAM methods by families of children with cancer is common. The most popular methods of CAM are herbal medicine and preparations. There is a need for research on safety and an educational programme for patients on the problems of inefficacy of CAM methods.

  11. Integrative medicine in allergy and immunology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2013-06-01

    Integrative medicine is a relatively new discipline which attempts to combine allopathic medicine with alternative or complementary medicine, to reap the benefits of both forms of medicine in optimizing the care of patients. Integrative medicine concentrates on treating the patient as a whole, both in body and mind. While the scientific method and "evidence-based" clinical research drives the management and treatment of diseases in conventional Western medicine, alternative or complementary medicine is based on unproven yet potentially beneficial techniques that have been developed throughout history, dating back to the ancient cultures in the Middle East, Africa, and China. In spite of the lack of evidence of most alternative medicine techniques, these methodologies have been practiced for centuries with great acceptance in many countries. It is in the Western world, where "modern" medicine is dictated by the scientific method, that the most controversy in the use of these alternative modes of therapy exists. Since the science behind alternative medicine is incomplete or non-existent, it is difficult for those trained in Western medicine to accept or adopt this approach. But perhaps it is the failure of Western medicine to adequately guarantee our well being and good health that have led to the ongoing debate between the medical profession and the general public as to the benefits of these alternative treatments. In one sense, integrative medicine may be a futile attempt to coin a new term in the hope of legitimizing alternative medicine. On the other hand, there is a wealth of historical experience in the use of the techniques. Studies to evaluate the scientific basis behind ancient medical techniques are ongoing, and it is to be expected that the results will neither be uniformly positive nor negative. Of particular interest is the effect of traditional medicine, herbal formulations, and manipulative techniques on the immune system, and its application in the

  12. Treatment failure of pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine and induction of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytaemia in children in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bousema, J T; Gouagna, L C; Meutstege, A M; Okech, B E; Akim, N I J; Githure, J I; Beier, J C; Sauerwein, R W

    2003-05-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa faces increasing levels of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to the first-line drug pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine (SP). Successful treatment with SP is reported to induce gametocytes and drug resistance may further increase gametocytaemia after treatment. Treatment success, gametocyte prevalence and gametocyte density were determined in 224 asymptomatic children in western Kenya on day 7 after treatment with SP. Treatment failure (R2 or R3 resistance) was observed in 22% of the children. The relative risk to show gametocytes on day 7 after treatment in children with treatment failure was 4.1 (95% CI 1.4-11.6) times higher compared to children with a sensitive infection, after adjustment for age and trophozoite density at the start of treatment. In addition, the gametocyte density was also higher upon SP treatment failure. These findings are reason for concern, as the increased gametocyte prevalence and density after SP treatment failure may increase the spread of SP-resistant strains in the population.

  13. Eurycoma longifolia: Medicinal Plant in the Prevention and Treatment of Male Osteoporosis due to Androgen Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Effendy, Nadia; Mohamed, Norazlina; Muhammad, Norliza; Naina Mohamad, Isa; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in elderly men is now becoming an alarming health issue due to its relation with a higher mortality rate compared to osteoporosis in women. Androgen deficiency (hypogonadism) is one of the major factors of male osteoporosis and it can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). However, one medicinal plant, Eurycoma longifolia Jack (EL), can be used as an alternative treatment to prevent and treat male osteoporosis without causing the side effects associated with TRT. EL exerts proandrogenic effects that enhance testosterone level, as well as stimulate osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast apoptosis. This will maintain bone remodelling activity and reduce bone loss. Phytochemical components of EL may also prevent osteoporosis via its antioxidative property. Hence, EL has the potential as a complementary treatment for male osteoporosis. PMID:22844328

  14. Racial and ethnic differences in response to medicines: towards individualized pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Valentine J.; Maxey, Randall W.; Levy, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    It is now well documented that substantial disparities exist in the quality and quantity of medical care received by minority Americans, especially those of African, Asian and Hispanic heritage. In addition, the special needs and responses to pharmaceutical treatment of these groups have been undervalued or ignored. This article reviews the genetic factors that underlie varying responses to medicines observed among different ethnic and racial groups. Pharmacogenetic research in the past few decades has uncovered significant differences among racial and ethnic groups in the metabolism, clinical effectiveness, and side-effect profiles of many clinically important drugs. These differences must be taken into account in the design of cost management policies such as formulary implementation, therapeutic substitution and step-care protocols. These programs should be broad and flexible enough to enable rational choices and individualized treatment for all patients, regardless of race or ethnic origin. Images Figure 3 PMID:12401060

  15. Updated review of complementary and alternative medicine treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Greco, Carol M; Nakajima, Claire; Manzi, Susan

    2013-11-01

    It is estimated that over 50 % of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have utilized complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments to reduce symptoms and manage their health. However, there are relatively few randomized controlled trials of CAM for SLE. This review describes recent studies of vitamins and supplements, acupuncture, and mind-body interventions in SLE patients. The recent trials of CAM treatments for SLE indicate that supplements such as vitamin D, omega 3 fatty acids, N-acetyl cysteine and turmeric show some promise for reducing SLE disease activity. In addition, mind-body methods such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and other counseling interventions may improve mood and quality of life in SLE.

  16. Complementary/alternative medicine in dermatology: evidence-assessed efficacy of two diseases and two treatments.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard; Pittler, Max H; Stevinson, Clare

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a brief, but critical, overview of the evidence related to complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) use, and to offer valid and useful information for dermatologists in clinical practice. Systematic literature searches were conducted on these databases: Medline, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CISCOM and AMED (until October 2000). Where appropriate, the evaluation of the published literature was based on systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. After scanning the literature it was decided to focus on a selection of two conditions (atopic dermatitis and chronic venous insufficiency) and two treatment modalities (aloe vera gel and tea tree oil). Data for the life-time prevalence of CAM use by patients with dermatological disease ranges between 35 to 69%. The most popular modalities include herablism and (other) dietary supplements, while atopic dermatitis is one of the conditions most frequently treated with CAM. For patients with atopic dermatitis the evidence relates to autogenic training, hypnotherapy, diet, herbal medicine, and dietary supplements. Compelling evidence of effectiveness exists for none of these therapies. However, some promising data have been reported for those with a psychological component: autogenic training, biofeedback and hypnotherapy. For chronic venous insufficiency there is relatively convincing evidence for the effectiveness of oral horse chestnut seed extract. The data for aloe vera gel and tea tree oil indicate that for neither is there compelling evidence of effectiveness. The use of CAM treatments is not free of risk; direct and indirect risks associated with CAM must be considered.

  17. [Systematic evaluation on clinical literature related with treatment of Parkinson's disease with traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-min; Tang, Xiang-jiang; Lao, Ying-rong

    2005-07-01

    To analyze the quality of scientific research design of clinical literature related with treatment of Parkinson's disease with traditional Chinese medicine, so as to objectively evaluate the therapeutic effect of TCM. According to principles of evidence-based medicine, clinical epidemiology/design measurement evaluation (DME), the "Table of Systematic Evaluation of Quality and Information Collection for TCM Clinical Research Literature" were established and used to evaluate clinical control trial literature related with treatment of Parkinson's disease with TCM published during 1979 to 2000. The method of randomization was not described in 66.7% of the literature. Although randomized design was declared in 33.3 %, problems or mistakes of randomized allocation still existed in them. No record about the state of dropped out or absconded cases in follow-up study and without any record of samples screening presented in all literature. There were some problems of key links concerning samples' homogeneity, outcome indexes selection, conclusion deduction and so on, which could also influence the quality and reliability of randomized controlled trials. Methodological design of clinical research of TCM on Parkinson's disease should be strengthened.

  18. Neurogenic Traditional Chinese Medicine as a Promising Strategy for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasmurthy, Sravan Gopalkrishnashetty; Liu, Jing-Yi; Song, Ju-Xian; Yang, Chuan-Bin; Malampati, Sandeep; Wang, Zi-Ying; Huang, Ying-Yu; Li, Min

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis plays a critical role in the formation of new neurons during learning and memory development. Attenuation of neurogenesis in the brain is one of the primary causes of dementia in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and, conversely, modulating the process of hippocampal neurogenesis benefit patients with AD. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), particularly herbal medicine, has been in use for thousands of years in Asia and many regions of the world for the treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize the role of neurotrophic factors, signal transducing factors, epigenetic modulators and neurotransmitters in neurogenesis, and we also discuss the functions of several Chinese herbs and their active molecules in activating multiple pathways involved in neurogenesis. TCM herbs target pathways such as Notch, Wnt, Sonic Hedgehog and receptor tyrosine kinase pathway, leading to activation of a signaling cascade that ultimately enhances the transcription of several important genes necessary for neurogenesis. Given these pathway activating effects, the use of TCM herbs could be an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. PMID:28134846

  19. The Medicinal Cannabis Treatment Agreement: Providing Information to Chronic Pain Patients via a Written Document

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Over 20 states now approve medical marijuana for a long list of "indications," and more states may well offer access in the near future. Surveys have demonstrated that pain is the most common indication for medical use of cannabis. As more individuals gain access to this botanical product through state ballot initiatives and legislative mandate, the pain specialist is likely to be confronted by patients either seeking such treatment where permitted, or otherwise inquiring about its potential benefits and harms, and alternative pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids. Whether or not they are in the position to prescribe medical cannabis, pain physicians would seem to have an obligation to understand and inform their patients on key issues of the evidence base on cannabinoid therapeutics. One way to fulfill this obligation might be to borrow from concepts developed in the prescription of opioids: the use of a written agreement to describe and minimize risks. Regrettably, the widespread adoption of opioids was undertaken while harmful effects were minimized; obviously, no one wants to repeat this misstep. This article describes a method of educating patients in a manner analogous to other treatment agreements. Undoubtedly, the knowledge base concerning risks will be an iterative process as we learn more about the long-term use of medicinal cannabis. But we should start the process now so that patients may be instructed about our current conception of what the use of medicinal cannabis entails. PMID:25370134

  20. Knowledge and demand for medicinal plants used in the treatment and management of diabetes in Nyeri County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kamau, Loice N; Mbaabu, Mathiu P; Mbaria, James M; Karuri, Gathumbi P; Kiama, Stephen G

    2016-08-02

    Non communicable diseases are currently a major health challenge facing humanity. Nyeri County has one of the highest diabetes prevalence in Kenya (12.6%), compared to the country's prevalence of 5.6%. The purpose of the study was to document; diabetes knowledge, medicinal plants and demand for the services of traditional medicine practitioners, in the management and treatment of diabetes. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the six constituencies in Nyeri, using pre-tested semi-structured questionnaires. Thirty practicing traditional medicine practitioners were purposively selected for the study. Field observation and identification was carried out on all plants that were cited during the interview. Plant samples were collected and voucher specimen deposited in the University of Nairobi Herbarium in the - School of Biological Sciences. The study revealed 30 plant species in 28 genera and 23 families that are used by the traditional medicine practitioners to treat and manage diabetes. Demand for traditional medicine practitioners' services in the treatment of diabetes is low and often occurs when conventional drugs fail. Interaction with the TMPs unveiled significant diversity of potential anti diabetic medicinal plants and in-depth ethnobotanical knowledge that they possessed. Preference for traditional herbal medicine was low despite wide ethnobotanical knowledge in the face of high prevalence of diabetes in the locality. The findings form the basis of pharmacological studies for standardization of the documented ethnomedicine used in the treatment and management of diabetes in the study area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sex Offenders Seeking Treatment for Sexual Dysfunction--Ethics, Medicine, and the Law.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth A; Rajender, Archana; Douglas, Thomas; Brandon, Ashley F; Munarriz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of sexual dysfunction in patients with prior sexual offenses poses ethical and legal dilemmas. Sex offenders are not obligated by law to disclose this history to medical professionals. Over 20% of sex offenders experience sexual dysfunction; however, the number of sex offenders seeking evaluation for sexual dysfunction is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence and characteristics of sex offenders seeking treatment in our clinic; and to review data regarding sex offender recidivism and ethics pertaining to the issue as it relates to treating physicians. Sex offenders were identified via three methods: new patient screening in a dedicated sexual medicine clinic, chart review of those on intracavernosal injection (ICI) therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED), and review of patient's status-post placement of penile prosthesis. Charts were cross-referenced with the U.S. Department of Justice National Sex Offender Public Website. Patient characteristics and details of offenses were collected. The main outcome measures used were a self-reported sexual offense and national registry data. Eighteen male sex offenders were identified: 13 via new patient screening; 3 by review of ICI patients; 1 by review of penile prosthesis data; and 1 prior to penile prosthesis placement. All were primarily referred for ED. Of those with known offenses, 64% were level 3 offenders (most likely to re-offend). The same number had committed crimes against children. All those with complete data had multiple counts of misconduct (average 3.6). Ninety-four percent (17/18) had publicly funded health care. Twelve (67%) were previously treated for sexual dysfunction. Registered sex offenders are seeking and receiving treatment for sexual dysfunction. It is unknown whether treatment of sexual dysfunction increases the risk of recidivism of sexual offenses. Physicians currently face a difficult choice in deciding whether to treat sexual dysfunction in sex

  2. Novel Strategies on Personalized Medicine for Breast Cancer Treatment: An Update.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carmen W H; Law, Bernard M H; So, Winnie K W; Chow, Ka Ming; Waye, Mary M Y

    2017-11-15

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women worldwide. With breast cancer patients and survivors being reported to experience a repertoire of symptoms that are detrimental to their quality of life, the development of breast cancer treatment strategies that are effective with minimal side effects is therefore required. Personalized medicine, the treatment process that is tailored to the individual needs of each patient, is recently gaining increasing attention for its prospect in the development of effective cancer treatment regimens. Indeed, recent studies have identified a number of genes and molecules that may be used as biomarkers for predicting drug response and severity of common cancer-associated symptoms. These would provide useful clues not only for the determination of the optimal drug choice/dosage to be used in personalized treatment, but also for the identification of gene or molecular targets for the development of novel symptom management strategies, which ultimately would lead to the development of more personalized therapies for effective cancer treatment. In this article, recent studies that would provide potential new options for personalized therapies for breast cancer patients and survivors are reviewed. We suggest novel strategies, including the optimization of drug choice/dosage and the identification of genetic changes that are associated with cancer symptom occurrence and severity, which may help in enhancing the effectiveness and acceptability of the currently available cancer therapies.

  3. Factors associated with low adherence to medicine treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze factors associated with low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil. METHODS Analysis of data from Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM - Brazilian Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), a population-based cross-sectional household survey, based on a probabilistic sample of the Brazilian population. We analyzed the association between low adherence to drug treatment measured by the Brief Medication Questionnaire and demographic, socioeconomic, health, care and prescription factors. We used Poisson regression model to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, their respective 95% confidence interval (95%CI) and p-value (Wald test). RESULTS The prevalence of low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases was 30.8% (95%CI 28.8-33.0). The highest prevalence of low adherence was associated with individuals: young adults; no education; resident in the Northeast and Midwest Regions of Brazil; paying part of the treatment; poor self-perceived health; three or more diseases; reported limitations caused by a chronic disease; using five drugs or more. CONCLUSIONS Low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil is relevant, and regional and demographic differences and those related to patients’ health care and therapy regime require coordinated action between health professionals, researchers, managers and policy makers. PMID:27982378

  4. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Shristi; Kolasinski, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, which originated over 5,000 years ago. Parts of this alternative medical system have become increasingly popular worldwide as patients seek approaches to medical care that they perceive as more holistic and less toxic than those offered by conventional Western medicine. Despite the advent of highly effective pharmacologic therapy, most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) continue to use alternative therapy at some point in the treatment of their disease. This report discusses some of the in-vitro data that suggest potential mechanisms through which Ayurvedic herbal medicines might have beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis, and the available clinical data evaluating the use of Ayurvedic medicine for RA.

  5. Combination of flying needle with Chinese Herbal Medicine in the treatment of Atopic dermatitis: A clinical trial.

    PubMed

    X Quan, Xiaohong; Cheng, Shenrong; Ma, Hong; Huang, Hengxuan; Wang, Bin; Chen, Xiuhua

    2014-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (Atopic dermatitis, AD) is a kind of chronic recurrent dermatitis. So far, no curative treatment has been found yet. Acupuncture, as a kind of alternative medicine, Flying Needle is a kind of acupuncture, which has a unique curative effectiveness in improving the skin lesion and itch. A single-center, prospective, randomized clinical design was conducted. The curative effect of the combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture for the treatment of Atopic dermatitis was assessed. Thirty (30) patients were treated with Flying Needle and Chinese herbal medicine. Because of personal reasons, one (1) dropped out. The patients accepted Flying Needle treatment 3 times a week and the internal medicine 3 times daily for in all 12 weeks. Before treatment, and after treat 4,8 and 12 weeks, assessments were performed. After treat 12 weeks, all patients of SCORAD score were dropped, with the mean SCORAD score declining to 19.58 ± 12.21. The recovery and removal rate comparison (*δx² = 5.28, P= 0.03<0.05). There are no side effects. The results hint that combine Flying Needle with Chinese herbal medicine are benefit on patients with atopic dermatitis and the effectiveness may better than oral medicine alone.

  6. Medicinal plants used in Lesotho for treatment of reproductive and post reproductive problems.

    PubMed

    Moteetee, A; Seleteng Kose, L

    2016-12-24

    Reproductive healthcare has been highlighted as a major challenge in Lesotho mainly due to the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections. As a result other reproductive ailments have not received much attention, particularly because healthcare facilities are already limited and many of them are inaccessible. For these reasons, medicinal plants play a major role in primary healthcare system in the country, in addition the plants are easily accessible, more affordable, and their use forms part of the cultural heritage. However, documentation of medicinal plants used for reproductive ailments is scattered, more importantly the biological and pharmacological properties, as well as toxicity of many of these plants are not yet known. To document the plants used by both male and female Basotho (residing in Lesotho) for the treatment of reproductive ailments, to explore their recorded biological and pharmacological effects as well as their toxicity, and to establish if these plants are used for similar purposes in other southern African cultures. The results stem from published findings of recent interviews of traditional medicinal practitioners in the Maseru District of Lesotho, first author's own experiences and observations from the Qacha's Nek District as well as comprehensive literature survey including numerous books and unpublished data. Electronic databases such as Google, Google Scholar, PubMed, and ScienceDirect were also used to search for the chemical compounds, pharmacological activity, and toxicity of the plants. A total of 87 plant species are reported to be used for the treatment of several reproductive problems such as infertility, complications associated with pregnancy (twelve plants are used to treat conditions such as colic, heartburn, nausea, and constipation), cleansing and/ or toning of the uterus (with a purpose either to induce pregnancy or to get rid of the placenta, for example Withania somnifera and Zantedeschia

  7. Efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of influenza A (H1N1): A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Hong; Wang, Re-Qin; Guo, Wen-Jie; Li, Juan-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    In March 2009, the first reported case infected with influenza A (H1N1) virus was identified in Mexico. The World Health Organization officially declared the outbreak to be a pandemic on June 11, 2009. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of influenza A (H1N1) infection. We electronically and manually searched electronic databases, reference lists, and conference compilations to identify randomized clinical trials that compared the treatment of influenza A (H1N1) using TCM with a control group receiving oseltamivir or antivirus therapy. The Jadad score was used to assess trial quality. Duration of viral shedding, time to defervescence, and effective rate were taken as outcome measurements; additionally, heterogeneity analysis and meta-analysis were performed. A total of 30 studies were included in our investigation, and these studies together included 3444 cases. Based on the Jadad score, each of these studies were divided as follows: high-quality studies (n = 3), medium-quality studies (n = 2), and low quality studies (n = 25). A meta analysis was performed, which indicated that the time to defervescence between the TCM treatment group and the control group was statistically significant, the duration of viral [Influenza A (H1N1)] shedding in the integrated Chinese and Western medicine subgroups was statistically significant, but it was not statistically significant between the two groups, the effective rate between the two groups was not statistically significant. A total of 18 studies described adverse drug reactions. The results of our study indicated that the mean time to defervescence in the TCM treatment group was less than noted in the control group, and that the duration of viral [Influenza A (H1N1)] shedding in the integrated Chinese and Western medicine subgroups was less than that noted in the control group. However, the available evidence does not consider the fact

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of bronchiolitis in infants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Bronchiolitis is a common cause of hospitalization among infants. The limited effectiveness of conventional medication has prompted the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as alternative or adjunctive therapy for the management of bronchiolitis. Aims To determine the effectiveness and safety of CAM for the treatment of bronchiolitis in infants aged less than 2 years. Methods A systematic electronic search was performed in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from their respective inception to June 30, 2016 for studies evaluating CAM as an intervention to treat bronchiolitis in infants (1 month to 2 years of age). The CAM could be any form of treatment defined by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) and was utilized either as a single agent or adjunctive therapy. The predefined primary outcome was length of hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were time to resolution of bronchiolitis symptoms, adverse events, and all other clinical outcomes reported by the included studies. Results The review identified 11 studies (8 randomized controlled trials and 3 cohort studies) examining four herbal preparations and four supplements used either as adjunctive or alternative therapy for bronchiolitis in 904 infants. Most studies were of moderate quality. Among six studies reporting on length of stay, a significant benefit was found for Chinese herbal medicine compared to ribavirin in one cohort study (n = 66) and vitamin D compared to placebo in one randomized controlled trial (n = 89). Studies of Chinese herbal medicine (4 studies, n = 365), vitamin D (1 study, n = 89), N-acetylcysteine (1 study, n = 100), and magnesium (2 studies, n = 176) showed some benefits with respect to clinical severity scores, oxygen saturation, and other symptoms, although data were sparse for any single intervention and the outcomes assessed and reported varied across studies. Only five

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of bronchiolitis in infants: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kua, Kok Pim; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is a common cause of hospitalization among infants. The limited effectiveness of conventional medication has prompted the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as alternative or adjunctive therapy for the management of bronchiolitis. To determine the effectiveness and safety of CAM for the treatment of bronchiolitis in infants aged less than 2 years. A systematic electronic search was performed in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from their respective inception to June 30, 2016 for studies evaluating CAM as an intervention to treat bronchiolitis in infants (1 month to 2 years of age). The CAM could be any form of treatment defined by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) and was utilized either as a single agent or adjunctive therapy. The predefined primary outcome was length of hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were time to resolution of bronchiolitis symptoms, adverse events, and all other clinical outcomes reported by the included studies. The review identified 11 studies (8 randomized controlled trials and 3 cohort studies) examining four herbal preparations and four supplements used either as adjunctive or alternative therapy for bronchiolitis in 904 infants. Most studies were of moderate quality. Among six studies reporting on length of stay, a significant benefit was found for Chinese herbal medicine compared to ribavirin in one cohort study (n = 66) and vitamin D compared to placebo in one randomized controlled trial (n = 89). Studies of Chinese herbal medicine (4 studies, n = 365), vitamin D (1 study, n = 89), N-acetylcysteine (1 study, n = 100), and magnesium (2 studies, n = 176) showed some benefits with respect to clinical severity scores, oxygen saturation, and other symptoms, although data were sparse for any single intervention and the outcomes assessed and reported varied across studies. Only five studies reported on adverse events

  10. Medicinal plants used in treatment and management of cancer in Kakamega County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ochwang'i, Dominic O; Kimwele, Charles N; Oduma, Jemimah A; Gathumbi, Peter K; Mbaria, James M; Kiama, Stephen G

    2014-02-12

    Traditional medicine plays a critical role in treatment of chronic debilitating and life threatening conditions and diseases. Cancer is one such condition whose therapeutic intervention is commonly through inexpensive traditional herbal remedies. Increasingly industrialised societies are developing drugs and chemotherapeutics from these traditional herbal plants. Plant biogeography determines the abundance and availability of medicinal plants which in turn determine their use by local communities. The present study was carried out in Kakamega County of Kenya to identify and document medicinal plants used for treatment and management of cancer states by communities living adjacent to Kakamega Tropical rainforest of Kakamega County, Kenya. An ethnobotanical survey was done using semi-structured questionnaires administered to 32 randomly selected herbalists from Kakamega County. Sixty five (65) plants of 59 genera and 32 families were identified as candidates in therapeutic intervention against cancer states. Most commonly cited plant species were Spathodea campanulata P. Beauv. ssp. nilotica (Seem), Microglossa pyrifolia (Lam.) Kuntze, Harungana madagascariensis Lam. ex poir, Prunus africana (Hook. f.) kalkman, Cyphostemma serpens (A. Rich), Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don and Aloe volkensii Engl. The following were documented for the first time; Aeschynomene abyssinica (A. Rich.) Vatke, Synsepalum cerasiferum (welw.) T. D penn., Albizia coriaria Welw. ex Oliv., Aloe volkensii Engl. Bridelia micrantha (Hochst.) Baill, Croton macrostachyus Delile, Cyphostemma serpens (A. Rich), Dicliptera laxata C.B. Clarke, Ekebergia capensis Sparrm., Gardenia volkensii K. schum. ssp. volkensii, Glycine wightii (wight & Arn.), Ocimum gratissimum Suave, Olea hotcsh spp. hochstetteri, Pavetta abyssinica Fresen., Phyllanthus fischeri Pax, Psydrax schimperiana (A. Rich), Rhus vulgaris Meikle, Senna didymobotyra (Fresen.) Irwin and Barneby, Solanecio nandensis (S. Moore) C. Jeffrey

  11. [Establishing the idea of holistic integrative medicine, optimizing the quality of health care service in prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-guo

    2015-07-01

    Under background of reductionism in the modern science, physiology and medicine are stepwise refined into system, organ, disease, cell and gene etc. Although clinical medicine, only service in whole human object, obviously brought tremendous progress, it also appeared obvious defects and limits at the same time. Professionalized and specialized medicine not only needs to be integrated from basics to clinical fields, but also from prevention, health management, clinical treatment and functional rehabilitation medicine. People are indivisible organic whole. Professionalization, translation and integration must be combined. In order to provide the best quality and optimized medical service for the Chinese people and to lead in the world, we have to strengthen professional and technical knowledge, and have to establish the holistic integrative medical philosophy for physiology and medicine too.

  12. The treatment of Uygur medicine Dracocephalum moldavica L on chronic mountain sickness rat model

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyiming, Dilinuer; Hu, Guangmei; Aikemu, Ainiwaer; Hui, Shi Wen; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Dracocephalum moldavica L, a traditional Uygur medicine, possesses some key cardiac activities. However, till date, no reports are available on the use of D. moldavica against chronic mountain sickness (CMS), which is a medical condition that affects the residents of high altitude. The present study was designed to explore the treatment efficacy of D. moldavica on CMS. Materials and Methods: 80 of the 100 Sprague Dawley rats enrolled were bred in simulated high altitude environment and the remaining 20 rats were kept in the plains. Water and alcohol extracts of D. moldavica were prepared. CMS rat model was prepared, and the rat hearts were removed for histopathological analysis. Blood samples were taken for hematological and biochemical analyses. Rat pulmonary artery pressure was determined to study the treatment efficacy. Results: In the CMS model group, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were found to be significantly higher than the control group; while the concentrations of SOD and GSH-Px decreased. D. moldavica could improve these levels, decrease pulmonary artery pressure, and improve the cardiac pathological state. Conclusions: The study results show that IL-6, CRP, MDA, SOD and GSH-Px participate and mediate the formation of CMS and D. moldavica is found to possess noticeable effects on CMS. The present study explored the basics of high altitude sickness and laid the foundation for further progress of Uygur medicines on the treatment of altitude sickness. Further preclinical and clinical studies with more sample size are recommended. PMID:25422549

  13. Personalized Medicine: New Perspectives for the Diagnosis and the Treatment of Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Olszewski, Robert; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-06-10

    The prevalence of renal diseases is rising and reaching 5-15% of the adult population. Renal damage is associated with disturbances of body homeostasis and the loss of equilibrium between exogenous and endogenous elements including drugs and metabolites. Studies indicate that renal diseases are influenced not only by environmental but also by genetic factors. In some cases the disease is caused by mutation in a single gene and at that time severity depends on the presence of one or two mutated alleles. In other cases, renal disease is associated with the presence of alteration within a gene or genes, but environmental factors are also necessary for the development of disease. Therefore, it seems that the analysis of genetic aspects should be a natural component of clinical and experimental studies. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine the right drug, for the right patient, at the right time. Whole-genome examinations may help to change the approach to the disease and the patient resulting in the creation of "personalized medicine" with new diagnostic and treatment strategies designed on the basis of genetic background of each individual. The identification of high-risk patients in pharmacogenomics analyses will help to avoid many unwarranted side effects while optimizing treatment efficacy for individual patients. Personalized therapies for kidney diseases are still at the preliminary stage mainly due to high costs of such analyses and the complex nature of human genome. This review will focus on several areas of interest: renal disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rate of progression and the prediction of prognosis.

  14. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments by Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Amit; Narayanan, Sujata; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Knudsen, Kayla; Sood, Richa; Loehrer, Laura L.; Hanson, Andrew C.; Kuzniar, Tomasz J.; Olson, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the proportion of patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) reporting previous or current use and interest in future use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Design: Cross-sectional, point-of-care, anonymous survey. Setting: Sleep disorders center at a Midwest tertiary care center. Participants: Six hundred forty-six consecutive patients undergoing polysomnography. Measurements: The survey instrument comprised 45 items specifically related to CAM therapies, in addition to obtaining baseline data. Results: Response rate was 81% (522/646). A total of 406/522 (78%) patients were diagnosed with OSAHS. Mean age ± SD was 57 ± 14 years, and 267 participants (66%) were men. Overall, 237 (58%) participants reported ever using CAM. Ever and current CAM use specifically for improving sleep was reported by 20% and 7% of the participants, respectively. Twenty-six percent of participants reported ever using biologic products, and 52% reported ever using nonbiologic CAM treatments. A high proportion (58%) of the participants showed interest in future CAM use for improving sleep. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients with OSAHS report previous or current use, and interest in future use, of CAM treatments. This underscores the need to conduct further research in this field. Citation: Sood A; Narayanan S; Wahner-Roedler DL; Knudsen K; Sood R; Loehrer LL; Hanson AC; Kuzniar TJ; Olson EJ. Use of complementary and alternative medicine treatments by patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(6):575-579. PMID:17993037

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine for prevention and treatment of the common cold.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Richard; Balla, Agneta

    2011-01-01

    To review the evidence supporting complementary and alternative medicine approaches to treatment and prevention of the common cold in adults. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from January 1966 to September 2009 combining the key words common cold or influenza with echinacea, garlic, ginseng, probiotics, vitamin C, and zinc. Clinical trials and prospective studies were included. For prevention, vitamin C demonstrated benefit in a large meta-analysis, with possibly increased benefit in patients subjected to cold stress. There is inconsistent evidence for Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) and North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius). Allicin was highly effective in 1 small trial. For treatment, Echinacea purpurea is the most consistently useful variety; it was effective in 5 of 6 trials. Zinc lozenges were effective in 5 of 9 trials, likely owing to dose and formulation issues. Overall, the evidence suggests no benefit from probiotics for prevention or treatment of the common cold. Vitamin C can be recommended to Canadian patients for prevention of the common cold. There is moderate evidence supporting the use of Echinacea purpurea and zinc lozenges for treatment. Ginseng and allicin warrant further research.

  16. Resiniferatoxin for Pain Treatment: An Interventional Approach to Personalized Pain Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Iadarola, Michael J.; Gonnella, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    This review examines existing preclinical and clinical studies related to resiniferatoxin (RTX) and its potential uses in pain treatment. Like capsaicin, RTX is a vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) agonist, only more potent. This increased potency confers both quantitative and qualitative advantages in terms of drug action on the TRPV1 containing nerve terminal, which result in an increased efficacy and a long duration of action. RTX can be delivered by a central route of administration through injection into the subarachnoid space around the lumbosacral spinal cord. It can also be administered peripherally into a region of skin or deep tissue where primary afferents nerves terminate, or directly into a nerve trunk or a dorsal root ganglion. The central route is currently being evaluated as a treatment for intractable pain in patients with advanced cancer. Peripheral administration offers the possibility to treat a wide diversity of pain problems because of the ability to bring the treatment to the site of the pain (the peripheral generator). While not all pain disorders are appropriate for RTX, tailoring treatment to an individual patient's needs via a selective and local intervention that chemically targets a specific population of nerve terminals provides a new capability for pain therapy and a simplified and effective approach to personalized pain medicine. PMID:26779292

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine for prevention and treatment of the common cold

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Richard; Balla, Agneta

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the evidence supporting complementary and alternative medicine approaches to treatment and prevention of the common cold in adults. Quality of Evidence MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from January 1966 to September 2009 combining the key words common cold or influenza with echinacea, garlic, ginseng, probiotics, vitamin C, and zinc. Clinical trials and prospective studies were included. Main Message For prevention, vitamin C demonstrated benefit in a large meta-analysis, with possibly increased benefit in patients subjected to cold stress. There is inconsistent evidence for Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) and North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius). Allicin was highly effective in 1 small trial. For treatment, Echinacea purpurea is the most consistently useful variety; it was effective in 5 of 6 trials. Zinc lozenges were effective in 5 of 9 trials, likely owing to dose and formulation issues. Overall, the evidence suggests no benefit from probiotics for prevention or treatment of the common cold. Conclusion Vitamin C can be recommended to Canadian patients for prevention of the common cold. There is moderate evidence supporting the use of Echinacea purpurea and zinc lozenges for treatment. Ginseng and allicin warrant further research. PMID:21322286

  18. Non-thermal plasma treatment of Radix aconiti wastewater generated by traditional Chinese medicine processing.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yiyong; Yi, Jianping; Zhao, Shen; Jiang, Song; Chi, Yuming; Liu, Kefu

    2016-06-01

    The wastewater effluent from Radix aconiti processing, an important step in the production processes of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is a type of toxic wastewater and difficult to treat. Plasma oxidation methods have emerged as feasible techniques for effective decomposition of toxic organic pollutants. This study examined the performance of a plasma reactor operated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) to degrade the effluent from R. aconiti processing. The effects of treatment time, discharge voltage, initial pH value and the feeding gas for the reactor on the degradation of this TCM wastewater were investigated. A bacterium bioluminescence assay was adopted in this study to test the toxicity of the TCM wastewater after non-thermal plasma treatment. The degradation ratio of the main toxic component was 87.77% after 60min treatment with oxygen used as feed gas and it was 99.59% when the initial pH value was 8.0. High discharge voltage and alkaline solution environment were beneficial for improving the degradation ratio. The treatment process was found to be capable of reducing the toxicity of the wastewater to a low level or even render it non-toxic. These experimental results suggested that the DBD plasma method may be a competitive technology for primary decomposition of biologically undegradable toxic organic pollutants in TCM wastewater. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Ethnobotanical study of indigenous knowledge on medicinal and nutritious plants used to manage opportunistic infections associated with HIV/AIDS in western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mugisha, Maud Kamatenesi; Asiimwe, Savina; Namutebi, Agnes; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Kakudidi, Esezah Kyomugisha

    2014-08-08

    Traditional medicine plays an important role in the daily lives of the people of Uganda to treat a wide range of health problems. Our study presents results of an ethnobotanical inventory conducted to identify and document medicinal and nutritional plants used in the management of opportunistic infections associated with human immunodeficiency virus / acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), the plant parts used, preparation and administration methods of herbal remedies. We performed semi-structured interviews with 79 respondents (women 78%, men 22%), who included specialists in medicinal plants (such as traditional birth attendants and herbalists) and non specialists with general knowledge of plant use. Respondents answered a semi-structured questionnaire regarding their knowledge of plants and general treatment practices including management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections. The reported plants were collected and identified. Data were analyzed using factor informant consensus and fidelity level to determine homogeneity of informants׳ knowledge on medicinal and nutritional plants suitable for different ailment categories and the most preferred plant species used to treat each ailment category in the study areas. The study revealed 148 plant species belonging to 54 families, most of which were herbs (50.7%). Leaves (61.6%) were the most frequently used parts in remedy preparations which were mainly administered orally (72%). The majority of plants (62%) were harvested from wild habitats. The most important species according to fidelity values are Hibiscus sabdariffa L. for anaemia, Mangifera indica L. for cough, Zehneria scabra (L. F.) Sond. for skin infections, Rhus natalensis Bernh.ex.Krauss for diarrhoea and Tarenna pavettoides (Harv.) Sim for appetite boosting. The factor informant consensus highlighted the agreement in the use of plants and showed that the respiratory infections category had the greatest agreement (0.60). Family Asteraceae accounted

  20. [Advances on study of treatment of lumbar disk herniation by Chinese medicinal herbs].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue-juan; Chen, Chao-yang

    2007-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniation (LDH) is a common orthopaedic disorder. Many clinical and basic science researches have been conducted recently on using Chinese medicinal herbs to treat LDH. Literature review reveals that the common basic formulas include Duhuo Jisheng decoction (DHJST), Buyang Huanwu decoction (HYBWT), Shentong Zhuyu decoction (STZYT), Taohong Siwu decoction (THSWT), Yanghe decoction (YHT) and Tongdu Huoxue decoction (TDHXT). A basic formula can be modified by adding more herbs or removing some herbs from the formula according to clinical symptoms and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome differentiation. Literatures show that herbal treatment have better clinical effects, the medicinal herbs make low-back pain, sciatica and low limb numbness disappeared or alleviated; and restore normal low limb sensation, muscle strength and daily activity. These formulas have also been used to treat LDH postoperative remaining pain, postoperative discitis, postoperative recurrent LDH, and to prevent epidural scar formation and dura mata adhesion. Herbs in these formulas include 5 categories of drugs classified by TCM. They are blood circulation promoting herbs for relieving pain; liver and kidney nourishing and tendons and bones strengthening herbs; blood circulation promoting herbs for unblocking collaterals; pathogenic wind and dampness expelling herbs; and qi invigorating herbs. These herbs have actions of analgesia, anti-inflammation, immunomodulation, phagocytosis of macrophages enhancement, blood circulation improvement, nerve protection, collagen synthesis enhancement. Future research needs to focus on the effects of herbs on four aspects: to enhance collagen synthesis in the disks and inhibit disk degeneration; to promote the resorption of herniated nucleus pulposus and epidural hemorrhage; to prevent nerve cell apoptosis and promote nerve cell regeneration, and to inhibit nociception in the nerve system.