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Sample records for wilhelm konrad roentgen

  1. Konrad Bajer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    These Proceedings are dedicated to our co-editor Konrad Bajer, who carried the lion's share of the work involved until his sudden and untimely death from cancer on 29th August 2014. Konrad was one of the key Organisers of the program "Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences" held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge from July to December 2012. During that time, he was on leave from the University of Warsaw, and held a Visiting Fellow Commonership at Trinity College, Cambridge. He had particular responsibility for the satellite workshop Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, held at ICMS, Edinburgh, in October 2012. Konrad graduated in Physics from the University of Warsaw in 1980, and took his PhD in Fluid Dynamics at DAMTP, Cambridge, 1984-89. He was active in EUROMECH, having been a principal organiser of the European Turbulence Conference (ETC13) in Warsaw 2011, and the meeting Turbulence: the Historical Perspective that followed it. He has been equally active in IUTAM; his distinction was recognised by his very recent election to the Congress Committee of IUTAM. Konrad's research interests were in magnetohydrodynamics and vortex dynamics in classical and quantum systems; also in problems of gasifcation, in which he played a coordinating role at the University of Warsaw. He impressed all with his exceptionally warm and friendly personality, and will be greatly missed in the whole scientifc community.

  2. Roentgen Stereophotogrammetry In Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvik, Goran

    1983-07-01

    A system for roentgen stereophotogrammetry has been used in Lund, Sweden, since August 1972 and by August 1982 ten thousand stereo films have been evaluated using this method. Patient investigations started March 1973 and of the more than 500 patients investigated 300 have been referred by orthopedic surgeons. The skeletal parts investigated had been permanently marked with tantalum balls 0.5 or 0.8 mm in diameter. The causes for the investigation have been bone growth disorders in the Lower extremity (134 patients), spinal fusions (35 patients), high tibial osteotomies for gonarthrosis (21 patients) and endoprosthetic replacement of the knee (68 patients) or hip (42 patients) joint. By the roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA), information on for instance the development of angular deformities and staple loosening in the leg, the healing process of the intended fusion in the spine or at the knee, and on the migration and stability of prosthetic components have been obtained. RSA is of value both for prognostic and followup purposes, and is versatile enough in proper setting to be used as a routine clinical investigation.

  3. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  4. License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

    2003-02-24

    Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

  5. Roentgen signs in diagnostic imaging. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Meschan, I. Farrer-Meschan, R.M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiology of the diaphragm, pleura, thoracic cage, and upper air passages; Radiology of the breasts; Radiology of nodular lesions of the lung parenchyma; Roentgen signs of abnormalities in the lung: and overview; and Special examination of the larynx.

  6. [Konrad Birkhaug and the BCG vaccine].

    PubMed

    Laerum, O D

    2001-03-20

    Konrad Elias Birkhaug (1892-1980) was born in Bergen to Elisa Marie Skorge and Karl Anders Birkhaug, a policeman, as the sixth of their ten children. After a period as a laboratory assistant at Bergen Municipal Hospital, he emigrated to USA in 1911. He graduated from the medical school of Johns Hopkins University in 1924. After residency in bacteriology, he became professor at Rochester University in 1927 and head of its laboratory of bacteriology. From 1932 to 1935 he worked as a senior scientist at the Institute Pasteur in Paris and from 1935 to 1945 as a fellow of the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen. From 1937 he also headed the National Laboratory for production of BCG vaccine. After active involvement in the resistance movement against the Nazis during the Second World War, he returned to the USA in 1946 as head of the BCG laboratory of the State of New York in Albany. He retired in 1953 and settled in Bergen, where he died in 1980. Birkhaug is one of the pioneers in the research on immunity reactions to tuberculosis infection and BCG vaccination. He is also known for producing the first antiserum against erysipelas, which was used from 1927 until sulphonamides were discovered. In addition to his international scientific publications, he wrote two books in Norwegian, his autobiography and a book about the German eradication of a small fishermen's village in Western Norway during the Second World War.

  7. Roentgen stereophotogrammetry for analysis of cranial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Selvik, G.; Alberius, P.; Fahlman, M.

    1986-04-01

    A system of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been developed and its value in studies of cranial growth in both man and the experimental animal (rabbit) has been delineated. This method is based on measurements from metal bone marker images on roentgenograms. Two roentgen tubes simultaneously expose the object, which is placed in one of two types of calibration cages. The object position does not need to be identical from one examination to the next. The cage, holding indicators of predetermined internal positions (in two or four planes), defines a laboratory coordinate system. Two-dimensional image coordinates are obtained by means of a highly accurate cartographic instrument. By computer reconstruction of the x-ray beams through the markers, 3-D object coordinates are calculated. For subsequent analysis of growth processes, extensive software is necessary. To control intrasegmental stability (routinely performed at each examination), a minimum of two markers is required, whereas three markers are needed in each skeletal segment for kinematic analysis using the rigid-body concept. Careful planning of marker placement before implantation minimizes implant loss and instability that otherwise might be a problem. Complications other than bone marker loosening have been nonexistent. The technical accuracy is high. Consequently, roentgen stereophotogrammetry, with the aid of metallic implants, is a superior means to obtain biometric information on cranial growth with relative ease.

  8. ROENTGEN: case-based reasoning and radiation therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Berger, J

    1992-01-01

    ROENTGEN is a design assistant for radiation therapy planning which uses case-based reasoning, an artificial intelligence technique. It learns both from specific problem-solving experiences and from direct instruction from the user. The first sort of learning is the normal case-based method of storing problem solutions so that they can be reused. The second sort is necessary because ROENTGEN does not, initially, have an internal model of the physics of its problem domain. This dependence on explicit user instruction brings to the forefront representational questions regarding indexing, failure definition, failure explanation and repair. This paper presents the techniques used by ROENTGEN in its knowledge acquisition and design activities.

  9. Theoretical reflections on Wilhelm Reich's Character Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, David

    2002-01-01

    The ideas contained in Wilhelm Reich's Character Analysis, while very influential, have not been thoroughly exploited in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. These ideas, aimed particularly at producing genuine change rather than mere intellectual understanding, are reexamined. Further implications of them are discussed.

  10. The Construction of the Konrad Repository - Status and Perspective - 13034

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, V.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the Atomic Energy Act of Germany the Federation is responsible for the construction and operation of installations for the safekeeping and disposal of radioactive waste. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) is assigned with this duty. In 1982 the abandoned iron ore mine Konrad near Salzgitter (Federal State of Lower Saxony) was proposed as a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste with negligible heat generation. After 20 years of plan approval procedure the license was granted by the Ministry for Environment of Lower Saxony in May 2002. This decision was finally confirmed by the Federal Administrative Court in March 2007. The construction has started, but former assumptions about the beginning of waste emplacement tuned out to be too optimistic. In the course of the preparatory work and the implementation planning it turned out that many changes need to be done. As a matter of fact most of the documents and planning originate from the 1990's and need to be revised because from that time on until now no adaptation was appropriate. The necessity to apply the state-of-the-art technology and other legal implications give rise to further changes and new licensing procedures, especially building licenses. Furthermore, the license from 2002 also includes a lot of collateral clauses that need to be fulfilled before radioactive waste can be emplaced. With this in mind, the time frame for the construction of the Konrad repository was revised in 2010. As a result, the completion of the erection before 2019 does not seem to be realistic. (authors)

  11. Historical Connections: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: The Universal Genius.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Wilbert; Reimer, Luetta

    1994-01-01

    Contains biographical facts, contributions, quotations, and anecdotes about mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Presents an activity in which students discover patterns in the sums of the reciprocals of the triangular numbers. Contains reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  12. Wilhelm Weinberg's early contribution to segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-09-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862-1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy-Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg's signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel's segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861-1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=1/4. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878-1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg's article.

  13. Wilhelm Weinberg's early contribution to segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-09-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862-1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy-Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg's signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel's segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861-1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=1/4. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878-1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg's article. PMID:24018765

  14. Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis using computer-based image-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostgaard, S E; Gottlieb, L; Toksvig-Larsen, S; Lebech, A; Talbot, A; Lund, B

    1997-09-01

    The two-dimensional position of markers in radiographs for Roentgen Stereophotogrammetric Analysis (RSA) is usually determined using a measuring table. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and the accuracy of a new RSA system using digitized radiographs and image-processing algorithms to determine the marker position in the radiographs. Four double-RSA examinations of a phantom and 18 RSA examinations from six patients included in different RSA-studies of knee prostheses were used to test the reproducibility and the accuracy of the system. The radiographs were scanned at 600 dpi resolution and 256 gray levels. The center of each of the tantalum-markers in the radiographs was calculated by the computer program from the contour of the marker with the use of an edge-detection software algorithm after the marker was identified on a PC monitor. The study showed that computer-based image analysis can be used in RSA-examinations. The advantages of using image-processing software in RSA are that the marker positions are determined in an objective manner, and that there is no need for a systematic manual identification of all the markers on the radiograph before the actual measurement.

  15. Contributions of Theodor Wilhelm Engelmann on phototaxis, chemotaxis, and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Drews, Gerhart

    2005-01-01

    Theodor Wilhelm Engelmann (1843-1909), who had a creative life in music, muscle physiology, and microbiology, developed a sensitive method for tracing the photosynthetic oxygen production of unicellular plants by means of bacterial aerotaxis (chemotaxis). He discovered the absorption spectrum of bacteriopurpurin (bacteriochlorophyll a) and the scotophobic response, photokinesis, and photosynthesis of purple bacteria.

  16. The Meaning of Disfigurement in Wilhelm Hauff's "Dwarf Nose."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blamires, David

    2002-01-01

    Notes that Wilhelm Hauff's fairy tale "Dwarf Nose" tells of a boy who is turned into a squirrel for seven years, then regains human form as a dwarf with a long nose before finally achieving normal adult proportions. Discusses how the story includes details that suggest a sexual interpretation. (SG)

  17. Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship: The Paradox of a Liberating Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosevelt, Jinx

    1980-01-01

    In analyzing the educational sequences of Goethe's novel, "Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship," the author suggests ways that this literary genre, the bildungsroman, which portrays an individual's development through a series of educational encounters, can provide teacher education students with material for studying the riddlelike quality of the…

  18. Model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetry of orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Valstar, E R; de Jong, F W; Vrooman, H A; Rozing, P M; Reiber, J H

    2001-06-01

    Attaching tantalum markers to prostheses for Roentgen stereophotogrammetry (RSA) may be difficult and is sometimes even impossible. In this study, a model-based RSA method that avoids the attachment of markers to prostheses is presented and validated. This model-based RSA method uses a triangulated surface model of the implant. A projected contour of this model is calculated and this calculated model contour is matched onto the detected contour of the actual implant in the RSA radiograph. The difference between the two contours is minimized by variation of the position and orientation of the model. When a minimal difference between the contours is found, an optimal position and orientation of the model has been obtained. The method was validated by means of a phantom experiment. Three prosthesis components were used in this experiment: the femoral and tibial component of an Interax total knee prosthesis (Stryker Howmedica Osteonics Corp., Rutherfort, USA) and the femoral component of a Profix total knee prosthesis (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, USA). For the prosthesis components used in this study, the accuracy of the model-based method is lower than the accuracy of traditional RSA. For the Interax femoral and tibial components, significant dimensional tolerances were found that were probably caused by the casting process and manual polishing of the components surfaces. The largest standard deviation for any translation was 0.19mm and for any rotation it was 0.52 degrees. For the Profix femoral component that had no large dimensional tolerances, the largest standard deviation for any translation was 0.22mm and for any rotation it was 0.22 degrees. From this study we may conclude that the accuracy of the current model-based RSA method is sensitive to dimensional tolerances of the implant. Research is now being conducted to make model-based RSA less sensitive to dimensional tolerances and thereby improving its accuracy. PMID:11470108

  19. Influence of serotonin on fraction of lesions in DNA induced by ultraviolet light and roentgen irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E.V.; Fraikin, G.Ya.

    1986-02-20

    The influence of serotonin on the yield of thymine dimers and rupture of the N-glycoside bond (the yield of thymine in DNA irradiated with ultraviolet light and roentgen irradiation) was studied by means of two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. It was found that serotonin bound to DNA decreases the formation of UV-induced thymine dimers, but has no effect on the number of breaks in the N-glycoside bond in thymidine residues induced by roentgen irradiation. The data obtained are discussed in terms of the question of the mechanisms of the protective effect of serotonin in the photoprotection of yeast cells against the lethal action of UV- and roentgen radiation.

  20. Waldemar Wilhelm: father of oral and maxillofacial surgery in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Waldemar Wilhelm (1913-1994) was honored by the Asociación Colombiana de Cirugía Oral y Maxilofacial (Colombian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) as the Father of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Colombia. Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, Wilhelm graduated as a dentist from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in 1936. He emigrated shortly thereafter to Colombia, receiving his dental license there in 1943. He completed his oral and maxillofacial surgery training at Nordwestdeutsche Kieferklinic, under the tutelage of Prof. Dr. Dr. Karl Schuchardt in Hamburg. In 1950, he settled in Bogotá, where he joined the Universidad Nacional School of Dentistry, opened Colombia's first oral and maxillofacial surgery department at Hospital San José, and trained the first maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia in 1958.

  1. "My goose child Martina": the multiple uses of geese in the writings of Konrad Lorenz.

    PubMed

    Munz, Tania

    2011-01-01

    In 1935, the graylag goose Martina (1935-?) hatched from an egg in the home of the zoologist Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989). Martina imprinted on Lorenz, slept in his bedroom, mated with the gander Martin, and flew off in 1937. Over the following decades, Konrad Lorenz helped to establish the discipline of ethology, received a share of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and continued to write about his famous goose Martina. This essay examines the different instantiations of the geese in general, and Martina in particular, in Lorenz's writings aimed at readerships that included prewar zoologists, National Socialist psychologists, and popular audiences from the 1930s to 1980s. By developing an animal with her own biography, Lorenz created an individual whose lived and rhetorical agency made her especially well suited to perform widely divergent aspects of his evolving science. While a significant literature in the history of science has explored the standardization and stabilization of animals in science, I show how Lorenz's creation of a highly protean and increasingly public Martina was co-constitutive of the establishment of the science and public persona.

  2. High Resolution Imager (HRI) for the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The design of the high resolution imager (HRI) on HEAO 2 was modified for use in the instrument complement of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT). Mechanical models of the front end assembly, central electronics assembly, and detector assembly were used to accurately represent the HRI envelope for both fit checks and focal plane configuration studies. The mechanical and electrical interfaces were defined and the requirements for electrical ground support equipment were established. A summary description of the ROSAT telescope and mission is included.

  3. Utopianism in psychology: the case of Wilhelm Reich.

    PubMed

    Pietikainen, Petteri

    2002-01-01

    This article examines utopian elements in Wilhelm Reich's writings in his American phase (1939-1957) in order to illustrate utopian sources of dynamic psychology. Although there are scholars who have used the term "psychological utopia" and applied it to individual thinkers (Reich, Marcuse, Fromm) and to specific psychological disciplines (psychoanalysis, behaviorism, cognitive psychology), the term itself has remained elusive and vague. Furthermore, there have been few attempts to systematically examine utopian elements in twentieth-century psychology in general and the basic assumptions of psychological utopianism in particular. While pointing out that Reich's orgonomic theories have no scientific merit, this article argues for the relevancy of his ideas for understanding the nature of utopianism in dynamic psychology.

  4. Knightmare in Armor: reflections on Wilhelm Reich's contributions to psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Grossman, W I

    1976-11-01

    One of the more curious by-products of the political and social unrest of the late 1960s, has been the emergence of and survival of interest in the writings of Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957). In the last few years, new translations of his books have appeared and some of his early work has been translated for the first time. A biography, magazine articles, and various surveys of his work convey the impression that his ideas are timely, or at least that they are historically important. However, I believe that the current enthusiasm for Reich owes more to the problems that interested him than to the light he shed on them. His great appeal for radical youth is based on his advocacy of social and sexual reform, for which he provided ideological support through a Marxist-psychoanalytic synthesis. By the technique of anthropological, economic, and psychological analysis, Reich tried to provide a scientific justification for revolutionary hopes.

  5. Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784-1846) and the Russian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichsanova, Vera N.

    In the first half of the 19th century the foundations of stellar astronomy were established thanks to the German astronomer, geodeticist and mathematician Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel. Internationally estimed and in close relationship with scientists in many countries, especially in Russia, Bessel (although not yet 30 years old) in 1814 became a foreign member of the Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Wilhelm Struve, director of the Dorpat observatory, was in close contact with him. Together they discussed problems of observational procedures and the use of instruments. In 1817 Struve bought the same Reichenbach meridian circle as Bessel used in Königsberg. Both ordered their refractors from the famous Fraunhofer workshop in Munich. %(9-inch for Dorpat). Bessel was also involved in the high precision Russian geodetic survey which started in 1816 and which succeeded in connecting the Russian and western European triangulation networks. Struve tried to measure parallaxes using the bright star Vega (α Lyrae); his results were published in 1837. Also in 1837 Bessel, using his Fraunhofer heliometer and the star 61 Cygni, found a result close to modern values, later acknowledged with the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society. In 1834 Struve was named director of the new Russian observatory in Pulkovo, St. Petersburg. Struve discussed the plans with Bessel and both acquired a Repsold meridian circle. The next aim, begun in the 1840s -- after the first determination of stellar distances -- was the distribution of stars in space (in the Milky Way). For this, catalogues with not only accurate stellar positions but also brightnesses were necessary. Thanks to Bessel's thorough reformation of measuring and reduction methods, making possible high accuracy telescopic observations, Struve was able to produce important results in stellar astronomy.

  6. The father of ethology and the foster mother of ducks: Konrad Lorenz as expert on motherhood.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Marga

    2009-06-01

    Konrad Lorenz's popularity in the United States has to be understood in the context of social concern about the mother-infant dyad after World War II. Child analysts David Levy, René Spitz, Margarethe Ribble, Therese Benedek, and John Bowlby argued that many psychopathologies were caused by a disruption in the mother-infant bond. Lorenz extended his work on imprinting to humans and argued that maternal care was also instinctual. The conjunction of psychoanalysis and ethology helped shore up the view that the mother-child dyad rests on an instinctual basis and is the cradle of personality formation. Amidst the Cold War emphasis on rebuilding an emotionally sound society, these views received widespread attention. Thus Lorenz built on the social relevance of psychoanalysis, while analysts gained legitimacy by drawing on the scientific authority of biology. Lorenz's work was central in a rising discourse that blamed the mother for emotional degeneration and helped him recast his eugenic fears in a socially acceptable way.

  7. The father of ethology and the foster mother of ducks: Konrad Lorenz as expert on motherhood.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Marga

    2009-06-01

    Konrad Lorenz's popularity in the United States has to be understood in the context of social concern about the mother-infant dyad after World War II. Child analysts David Levy, René Spitz, Margarethe Ribble, Therese Benedek, and John Bowlby argued that many psychopathologies were caused by a disruption in the mother-infant bond. Lorenz extended his work on imprinting to humans and argued that maternal care was also instinctual. The conjunction of psychoanalysis and ethology helped shore up the view that the mother-child dyad rests on an instinctual basis and is the cradle of personality formation. Amidst the Cold War emphasis on rebuilding an emotionally sound society, these views received widespread attention. Thus Lorenz built on the social relevance of psychoanalysis, while analysts gained legitimacy by drawing on the scientific authority of biology. Lorenz's work was central in a rising discourse that blamed the mother for emotional degeneration and helped him recast his eugenic fears in a socially acceptable way. PMID:19653490

  8. Oral orthopedics and movement of maxillary segments. A roentgen stereophotogrammetric study.

    PubMed

    Rune, B; Sarnäs, K V; Selvik, G

    1979-10-01

    An infant with a complete unilateral cleft of the lip and palate underwent maxillary expansion treatment using an oral orthopedic appliance. Movement of the maxillary bone segments was studied by means of metallic implants and roentgen stereophotogrammetry, and intra-oral changes were recorded by measuring transverse dimensions on casts. Expansion treatment had almost no influence on the positions of the maxillary segments, and movements of the segments showed little agreement with measures on casts. The findings suggest that the appropriate use of the term oral orthopedics and the evaluation of treatment effects would benefit from evaluating the movement of the segments by methods other than measurements of casts.

  9. Carpal instability in rheumatoid arthritis and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Pathogenesis and roentgen appearance.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, D; Niwayama, G

    1977-01-01

    The roentgen appearance and pathogenesis of carpal instability are described in an evaluation of patients and cadavers with rheumatoid arthritis and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Dorsiflexion (16%) and palmar flexion (8%) instability occurs in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly in patients with moderate to advanced disease. Navicular-lunate dissociation frequently accompanies dorsiflexion instability and results from involvement of the interosseous ligament between the two bones by rheumatoid pannus. Carpal instability and navicular-lunate dissociation also accompany pyrophosphate arthropathy, resulting from calcific deposition and cystic degeneration of ligamentous structures. Images PMID:901029

  10. Automatic model-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) of total knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Syu, Ci-Bin; Lai, Jiing-Yih; Chang, Ren-Yi; Shih, Kao-Shang; Chen, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Conventional radiography is insensitive for early and accurate estimation of the mal-alignment and wear of knee prostheses. The two-staged (rough and fine) registration of the model-based RSA technique has recently been developed to in vivo estimate the prosthetic pose (i.e, location and orientation). In the literature, rough registration often uses template match or manual adjustment of the roentgen images. Additionally, possible error induced by the nonorthogonality of taking two roentgen images neither examined nor calibrated prior to fine registration. This study developed two RSA methods for automate the estimation of the prosthetic pose and decrease the nonorthogonality-induced error. The predicted results were validated by both simulative and experimental tests and compared with reported findings in the literature. The outcome revealed that the feature-recognized method automates pose estimation and significantly increases the execution efficiency up to about 50 times in comparison with the literature counterparts. Although the nonorthogonal images resulted in undesirable errors, the outline-optimized method can effectively compensate for the induced errors prior to fine registration. The superiority in automation, efficiency, and accuracy demonstrated the clinical practicability of the two proposed methods especially for the numerous fluoroscopic images of dynamic motion.

  11. Evaluation of three pose estimation algorithms for model-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, B L; Valstar, E R; Stoel, B C; Rozing, P M; Reiber, J H C

    2004-01-01

    Model-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) uses a three-dimensional surface model of an implant in order to estimate accurately the pose of that implant from a stereo pair of roentgen images. The technique is based on minimization of the difference between the actually projected contour of an implant and the virtually projected contour of a model of that same implant. The advantage of model-based RSA over conventional marker-based RSA is that it is not necessary to attach markers to the implant. In this paper, three pose estimation algorithms for model-based RSA are evaluated. The algorithms were assessed on the basis of their sensitivities to noise in the actual contour, to the amount of drop-outs in the actual contour, to the number of points in the actual contour and to shrinkage or expansion of the actual contour. The algorithms that were studied are the iterative inverse perspective matching (IIPM) algorithm, an algorithm based on minimization of the difference (DIF) between the actual contour and the virtual contour, and an algorithm based on minimization of the non-overlapping area (NOA) between the actual and virtual contour. The results of the simulation and phantom experiments show that the NOA algorithm does not fulfil the high accuracy that is necessary for model-based RSA. The IIPM and DIF algorithms are robust to the different distortions, making model-based RSA a possible replacement for marker-based RSA.

  12. Pattern of growth retardation after Blount stapling: a roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Bylander, B; Hansson, L I; Selvik, G

    1983-02-01

    The roentgen stereophotogrammetric method has been used in 19 children treated by Blount stapling for progressive leg length discrepancy. The growth plates of distal femur and/or proximal tibia were stapled with a total of 31 growth regions stapled. Longitudinal growth rate of 25 intact growth regions of distal femur and proximal tibia was determined and correlated well to growth rates as derived from growth tables of Green and Anderson and Kember and Sissons. In stapled growth regions, a uniform pattern of growth retardation was found and correlated well to skeletal age: the more advanced the skeletal age at time of stapling, the more pronounced and rapid initial growth retardation and the lower basal growth rate. Significant asymmetric growth was registered in 5 of 31 stapled growth regions, especially in three patients who developed loosening of staples. In five patients the staple tip motion was analyzed. Widening of staples and staple tip movements within the bony epiphysis and metaphysis were small. In the skeletally younger cases the widening and tip movement were more pronounced than in the older cases. In summary, the roentgen stereophotogrammetric method was used in order to analyze pre- and postoperative growth pattern and was found valuable in checking growth rates after Blount stapling to detect early complications such as asymmetric growth and loosening of staples. Furthermore, the movements and the deformation of the staples by the growth process could be evaluated with high precision.

  13. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  14. Wilhelm Troll (1897 - 1978): idealistic morphology, physics, and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Rieppel, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Idealistic morphology as articulated by the botanist Wilhelm Troll, the main target of the critique voiced by the early phylogeneticists, was firmly embedded in its contemporary scientific, cultural, and political context. Troll appealed to theoretical developments in contemporary physics in support of his research program. He understood burgeoning quantum mechanics not only to threaten the unity of physics, but also the validity of the principle of causality. Troll used this insight in support of his claim of a dualism in biology, relegating the causal-analytical approach to physiology, while rejuvenating the Goethean paradigm in comparative morphology. This embedded idealistic morphology in the völkisch tradition that characterized German culture during the Weimar Republic and its aftermath. In contrast, the contemporary phylogeneticists anchored their research program in the rise of logical positivism and in Darwin's principle of natural selection. This, in turn, brought phylogenetic systematists of the late 1930s and early 1940s into the orbit of national-socialist racial theory and eugenics. In conclusion, the early debate between idealistic morphologists and phylogenetic systematists was not only ideologically tainted, but also implied a philosophical impasse that is best characterized as a conflict between the Goethean and Newtonian paradigm of natural science.

  15. Wilhelm Troll (1897 - 1978): idealistic morphology, physics, and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Rieppel, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Idealistic morphology as articulated by the botanist Wilhelm Troll, the main target of the critique voiced by the early phylogeneticists, was firmly embedded in its contemporary scientific, cultural, and political context. Troll appealed to theoretical developments in contemporary physics in support of his research program. He understood burgeoning quantum mechanics not only to threaten the unity of physics, but also the validity of the principle of causality. Troll used this insight in support of his claim of a dualism in biology, relegating the causal-analytical approach to physiology, while rejuvenating the Goethean paradigm in comparative morphology. This embedded idealistic morphology in the völkisch tradition that characterized German culture during the Weimar Republic and its aftermath. In contrast, the contemporary phylogeneticists anchored their research program in the rise of logical positivism and in Darwin's principle of natural selection. This, in turn, brought phylogenetic systematists of the late 1930s and early 1940s into the orbit of national-socialist racial theory and eugenics. In conclusion, the early debate between idealistic morphologists and phylogenetic systematists was not only ideologically tainted, but also implied a philosophical impasse that is best characterized as a conflict between the Goethean and Newtonian paradigm of natural science. PMID:22696827

  16. Wilhelm Weinberg’s Early Contribution to Segregation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862–1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy–Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg’s signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel’s segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861–1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=14. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878–1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg’s article. PMID:24018765

  17. A new type of model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis for solving the occluded marker problem.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, B L; Valstar, E R; Stoel, B C; Rozing, P M; Reiber, J H C

    2005-11-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) measures micromotion of an orthopaedic implant with respect to its surrounding bone. A problem in RSA is that the markers are sometimes overprojected by the implant itself. This study describes the so-called Marker Configuration Model-based RSA (MCM-based RSA) that is able to measure the pose of a rigid body in situations where less than three markers could be detected in both images of an RSA radiograph. MCM-based RSA is based on fitting a Marker Configuration model (MC-model) to the projection lines from the marker projection positions in the image to their corresponding Roentgen foci. An MC-model describes the positions of markers relative to each other and is obtained using conventional RSA. We used data from 15 double examinations of a clinical study of total knee prostheses and removed projections of the three tibial component markers, simulating occlusion of markers. The migration of the tibial component with respect to the bone, which should be zero, for the double examination is a measure of the accuracy of algorithm. With the new algorithm, it is possible to estimate the pose of a rigid body of which one or two markers are occluded in one of the images of the RSA radiograph with high accuracy as long as a proper MC-model of the markers in the rigid body is available. The new algorithm makes RSA more robust for occlusion of markers. This improves the results of clinical RSA studies because the number of lost RSA follow-up moments is reduced.

  18. A biplane roentgen videometry system for dynamic /60 per second/ studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, E.; Wood, E. H.; Heintzen, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A roentgen-television digital-computer technique and a display system developed for dynamic circulatory structure studies are described. Details are given for a videoroentgenographic setup which is used for obtaining biplane roentgen silhouettes of a left ventricle. A 60 per sec measurement of the shape and volume of angiographically outlined cardiac chambers can be made by this technique along with simultaneous ECG, pressure, and flow measurements accessible for real-time digital computer processing and analysis.

  19. [Wilhelm Liepmann (1878-1939)--the fate of a gynecologist between the Kaiser Reich and Fascism].

    PubMed

    Schneck, P

    1984-01-01

    The paper gives a bioergographical survey on the German obstetrician and gynaecologist Wilhelm Liepmann. He was Ass. Professor at the Berlin university. Later he became director of the German Women-Institute, which was founded by the Hauptverband der Krankenkassen. In 1933 Liepmann had to emigrate to Turkey, where he got the chair of gynaecology at the university of Istanbul.

  20. Wilhelm von Humboldt and the "Orient": On Edward W. Said's Remarks on Humboldt's Orientalist Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messling, Markus

    2008-01-01

    From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. "Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed."…

  1. Perfecting the Individual: Wilhelm von Humboldt's Concept of Anthropology, "Bildung" and Mimesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    In the works of Wilhelm von Humboldt education took on a new quality, focusing firmly on the importance of the individual. "Bildung" was to become the principal task with a view to preparing the individual for the requirements of future life. In this article, the author investigates two aspects relating to the "Bildung" of the individual. First,…

  2. Image-based RSA: Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis based on 2D-3D image registration.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, P W; Kaptein, B L; Stoel, B C; Reiber, J H C; Rozing, P M; Valstar, E R

    2008-01-01

    Image-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (IBRSA) integrates 2D-3D image registration and conventional RSA. Instead of radiopaque RSA bone markers, IBRSA uses 3D CT data, from which digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are generated. Using 2D-3D image registration, the 3D pose of the CT is iteratively adjusted such that the generated DRRs resemble the 2D RSA images as closely as possible, according to an image matching metric. Effectively, by registering all 2D follow-up moments to the same 3D CT, the CT volume functions as common ground. In two experiments, using RSA and using a micromanipulator as gold standard, IBRSA has been validated on cadaveric and sawbone scapula radiographs, and good matching results have been achieved. The accuracy was: |mu |< 0.083 mm for translations and |mu| < 0.023 degrees for rotations. The precision sigma in x-, y-, and z-direction was 0.090, 0.077, and 0.220 mm for translations and 0.155 degrees , 0.243 degrees , and 0.074 degrees for rotations. Our results show that the accuracy and precision of in vitro IBRSA, performed under ideal laboratory conditions, are lower than in vitro standard RSA but higher than in vivo standard RSA. Because IBRSA does not require radiopaque markers, it adds functionality to the RSA method by opening new directions and possibilities for research, such as dynamic analyses using fluoroscopy on subjects without markers and computer navigation applications.

  3. Professor Bernhard Pollack (1865-1928) of Friedrich Wilhelm University, Berlin: neurohistologist, ophthalmologist, pianist.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the life and work of Bernhard Pollack (1865-1928), a pioneer neurohistologist, ophthalmologist, and world-class pianist. In 1897, Pollack published the first standard manual on staining methods for the nervous system. Born into a Prussian-Jewish family, he received his piano education from the composer Moritz Moszkowski and his pathology education from Carl Weigert. Pollack worked in the Institutes of Wilhelm Waldeyer (anatomy), Emanuel Mendel (neuropsychiatry), the later Nobel laureate Robert Koch (infectious diseases), and the Eye Policlinic of Paul Silex (ophthalmology), becoming a Professor of Ophthalmology at Berlin's Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in 1919. The study also chronicles the founding by Pollack of the Berlin Doctors' Orchestra in 1911. PMID:22572721

  4. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Atkins, Carolyn; Pavlinskiy, Mikhail N.; Tkachenko, Alexey V.; Lapshov, Igor Y.

    2013-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the Astronomical Roengen Telescope- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC) instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission. ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Each module provides an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. We will present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  5. The Nazi symbiosis: politics and human genetics at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute.

    PubMed

    Berez, Thomas M; Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2004-12-01

    The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA), from its inception in Weimar Republic Germany to its apogee under the rule of the Third Reich, is an example of how politics and human heredity can function as mutually beneficial resources. Whether it was a result of the Nazi bureaucrats' desire to legitimize their racial policy through science, or the KWIA personnel's desire to secure more funding for their research, the symbiotic relationship that developed between human genetics and Nazi politics could help explain why many scientists in the Third Reich undertook research projects that wholly transgressed the boundaries of morally acceptable science.

  6. Wilhelm von Waldeyer-Hartz (1836-1921): an anatomist who left his mark.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Andreas

    2007-04-01

    Wilhelm Waldeyer was anatomist, physiologist, and pathologist during the German Empire (the so-called Second Reich). His scientific career left many traces still noticeable today. Not only is he commemorated in "his" pharyngeal lymphoid ring and other eponyms, but he also coined an impressive range of successful medical terms, including "chromosome" and "neuron." Moreover, Waldeyer left truly physical traces by donating parts of his body to his own Institute of Anatomy in Berlin. His scientific production does, however, also include "pseudoscientific" works, notably his questionable research on African brains.

  7. The Nazi symbiosis: politics and human genetics at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute.

    PubMed

    Berez, Thomas M; Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2004-12-01

    The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA), from its inception in Weimar Republic Germany to its apogee under the rule of the Third Reich, is an example of how politics and human heredity can function as mutually beneficial resources. Whether it was a result of the Nazi bureaucrats' desire to legitimize their racial policy through science, or the KWIA personnel's desire to secure more funding for their research, the symbiotic relationship that developed between human genetics and Nazi politics could help explain why many scientists in the Third Reich undertook research projects that wholly transgressed the boundaries of morally acceptable science. PMID:15571767

  8. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1909: Wilhelm Ostwald

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-02-01

    This, the third of a series of thirteen articles on Nobel Laureates in chemical dynamics, features the work of Wilhelm Ostwald, who won the Nobel Prize in 1909 for his work on catalysis, equilibria, and reaction rates. The first two articles in this series discussed two of Ostwald's students--Jacobus van't Hoff (Nobel 1901) and Svante Arrhenius (Nobel 1903). Ostwald's own studies of catalysis were guided by the work of those two former students. Ostwald's name remains associated with the catalytic process used to manufacture nitric acid from ammonia.

  9. The observatory of the Emperor Wilhelm University: the people behind the documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.

    We give an overview of the personnel of Strasbourg Observatory between 1872 and 1919, by making use of official documents, recollections of Wilhelm Foerster and Hermann Kobold, reports and bibliographies. The careers of almost all scientific workers are briefly described, and supplemented by illustrations. In addition, the major projects carried out at the observatory are outlined, including those which were continued after the first world war, and the experiments which led to the development of a seismological station in Strasbourg. An Appendix includes the bibliography of PhD theses and of annual reports.

  10. Tribute to an Astronomer: The Work of Max Ernst on Wilhelm Tempel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël

    2016-05-01

    In 1964-1974, the German artist Max Ernst created, with the help of two friends, a series of works (books, movie, and paintings) related to the astronomer Wilhelm Tempel. Mixing actual texts by Tempel and artistic features, this series pays homage to the astronomer by recalling his life and discoveries. Moreover, the core of the project, the book Maximiliana or the Illegal Practice of Astronomy, actually depicts the way science works, making this work of art a most original tribute to a scientist.

  11. Les Observatoires astronomiques en Italie. An 1863 Report by Otto Wilhelm Struve.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Simone; Galli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    In the autumn of 1863 Otto Wilhelm Struve, director of the Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory in Russia, visited most of the observatories in Italy. The report that he wrote on this occasion provides an overview on the conditions of astronomical research in Italyjust after the unification of the country. Later Struve sent a French translation of his report to the Italian astronomer Giovan Battista Donati, who used it to promote the construction of the Arcetri Observatory in Florence, which was inaugurated in 1872. We present here a transcription of the French translation of Struve's report and the transcription of a letter written by him in support of Donati's project

  12. [Psychoanalysis during the Nazi era. Contemporary consequences of a historical controversy: the Wilhelm Reich "case"].

    PubMed

    Nitzschke, B

    1999-01-01

    The paper sheds light on the extent of collaboration between the pre-World War II German Psychoanalytic Society (DPG) and the Nazi regime. This is shown by the story of the expulsion of Wilhelm Reich from membership in the DPG, at Freud's own bid. A leading German psychoanalyst, Carl Müller-Braunschweig, published the paper "Psychoanalysis and Weltanschauung" in the fanatically "national" (so-called "völkisch") Nazi propaganda organ Reichswart in 1993 following consultations with officials of the International Psychoanalytic Association (IPA) who endorsed these policies. This paper by Müller-Braunschweig was used both to prevent the possible outlawing of psychoanalysis by the Nazis and to deny official DPG support to Wilhelm Reich and the group of leftist-oriented IPA analysts who joined forces with him in opposing Nazi ideology. The paper concludes with examples from post-1945 historiography showing how the exclusion of Reich and the related DPG/IPA compromise and "appeasement" policy were either ignored or disclaimed.

  13. The timing of Late Pleistocene glaciation at Mount Wilhelm, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephanie; Barrows, Timothy; Hope, Geoff; Pillans, Brad; Fifield, Keith

    2016-04-01

    The highlands of New Guinea were the most extensively glaciated area in the Asian tropical region during the Late Pleistocene. Evidence for glaciation is widespread on most of the mountain peaks above ~3500 m. Glacial landforms include both valley and ice cap forms, but the timing of glaciation remains constrained to only a few local areas. This paper focuses on Mount Wilhelm, which is situated in the central southern region of Papua New Guinea at 5.78°S and is the highest peak (4510 m a.s.l.) We focus on a south easterly valley (Pindaunde Valley) emanating from the peak, where large moraines indicate the maximum ice extent of a valley glacier ~5 km long. Within this extensive moraine complex, recessional moraines document the retreat of the glacier towards the summit region. In order to determine the timing of deglaciation, we collected samples for surface exposure dating using 36Cl and 10Be from diorite boulders positioned on moraine crests. The ages indicate that maximum ice extent was attained during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that ice remained near its maximum extent until after 15 ka but persisted at higher elevations almost until the Holocene. These results are similar to those described from Mt Giluwe to the northwest of Mount Wilhelm, where an ice cap reached its maximum extent at the LGM and remained there for around 3-4,000 years. This indicates that full glacial conditions were only brief in this region of the tropics.

  14. Replication and Pedagogy in the History of Psychology V: The Metronome and Wilhelm Wundt's Search for the Components of Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayala, Christopher; Borawski, Steven; Miller, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920) believed that consciousness was represented by the interconnection of psychical processes comprised of temporal elements and compounds. To explore these processes, Wundt used a metronome to measure the amount of information that passed into consciousness across time. The current project replicated some of his procedures,…

  15. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Ins1rument Aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma (SRG) mission is a Russian-German X-ray astrophysical observatory that carries two co-aligned and complementary X-ray telescope systems. The primary instrument is the German-led extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (eROSITA), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that covers the energy range from 0.2-12 keV. The complementary instrument is the Russian-led Astronomical Roentgen Telescope -- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC or ART), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that provides higher energy coverage, up to 30 keV (with limited sensitivity above 12 keV).

  16. The holist tradition in twentieth century genetics. Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype concept.

    PubMed

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-06-01

    The terms 'genotype', 'phenotype' and 'gene' originally had a different meaning from that in the Modern Synthesis. These terms were coined in the first decade of the twentieth century by the Danish plant physiologist Wilhelm Johannsen. His bean selection experiment and his theoretical analysis of the difference between genotype and phenotype were important inputs to the formation of genetics as a well-defined special discipline. This paper shows how Johannsen's holistic genotype theory provided a platform for criticism of narrowly genocentric versions of the chromosome theory of heredity that came to dominate genetics in the middle decades of the twentieth century. Johannsen came to recognize the epoch-making importance of the work done by the Drosophila group, but he continued to insist on the incompleteness of the chromosome theory. Genes of the kind that they mapped on the chromosomes could only give a partial explanation of biological heredity and evolution. PMID:24882823

  17. [The letters of Ernst Wilhelm Brücke to Rudolf Virchow 1850-1857].

    PubMed

    Andree, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Rudolf Virchow is one of the most prominent German physician of the nineteenth century. Virchow pioneered the modern concept of pathological processes by his application of the cell theory to explain the effects of disease in the organs and tissues of the body. He emphasized that diseases arose, not in organs or tissues in general, but primarily in their individual cells. Moreover, he campaigned vigorously for social reforms and contributed to the development of anthropology as a modern science. Ernst Wilhelm Brücke was an important researcher in most fields of physiology. His works were epoch-making and influential for our knowledge of the nature of cells and his optical works made the basis for the invention of the eye mirror which was later constructed by Helmholtz. He also is also known for his work on the physiology of language. For the first time the correspondence between these scientific celebrities is published.

  18. The holist tradition in twentieth century genetics. Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype concept

    PubMed Central

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The terms ‘genotype’, ‘phenotype’ and ‘gene’ originally had a different meaning from that in the Modern Synthesis. These terms were coined in the first decade of the twentieth century by the Danish plant physiologist Wilhelm Johannsen. His bean selection experiment and his theoretical analysis of the difference between genotype and phenotype were important inputs to the formation of genetics as a well-defined special discipline. This paper shows how Johannsen's holistic genotype theory provided a platform for criticism of narrowly genocentric versions of the chromosome theory of heredity that came to dominate genetics in the middle decades of the twentieth century. Johannsen came to recognize the epoch-making importance of the work done by the Drosophila group, but he continued to insist on the incompleteness of the chromosome theory. Genes of the kind that they mapped on the chromosomes could only give a partial explanation of biological heredity and evolution. PMID:24882823

  19. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.; Atkins, C.; Zavlin, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission. Four of those modules are being fabricated under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) An additional three flight modules and one spare for the ART-XC Instrument are produced under a Cooperative Agreement between NASA and IKI. The instrument will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Each module consists of 28 nested thin Ni/Co shells giving an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of the first four modules is scheduled for November 2013, while the remaining three modules will be delivered to IKI in January 2014. We present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  20. Genetics as a modernization program: biological research at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes and the political economy of the Nazi State.

    PubMed

    Gausemeier, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    During the Third Reich, the biological institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft) underwent a substantial reorganization and modernization. This paper discusses the development of projects in the fields of biochemical genetics, virus research, radiation genetics, and plant genetics that were initiated in those years. These cases exemplify, on the one hand, the political conditions for biological research in the Nazi state. They highlight how leading scientists advanced their projects by building close ties with politicians and science-funding organizations and companies. On the other hand, the study examines how the contents of research were shaped by, and how they contributed to, the aims and needs of the political economy of the Nazi system. This paper therefore aims not only to highlight basic aspects of scientific development under Nazism, but also to provide general insights into the structure of the Third Reich and the dynamics of its war economy.

  1. [The response to Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Schüttmann, W

    1995-01-01

    In early January 1896 Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen sent offprints to several colleagues of his to make them acquainted with his discovery of the X-rays. From January 5, 1896 newspapers started reporting on that discovery worldwide from Vienna. In several cities the news immediately set off corresponding scientific activities among specialists. This paper looks into such activities carried out in Berlin to show how promptly Röntgen's discovery was taken up, with a number of priorities having been set in the capital of the German Reich. The X-ray photographs which Röntgen had forwarded together with his offprints were displayed and discussed at a meeting of the Berlin Physical Society as early as on January 4, 1896, making his discovery known to the public for the first time. On January 6, 1896 the discovery and photographs were presented at a session of the Berlin Association of Internal Medicine and its diagnostic application was discussed in the medical community for the first time. A few days after that, the first photographs shot by other authors after Röntgen, and their diagnostic use, were demonstrated in Berlin. Finally, Röntgen's early visit to Emperor William II on January 12, 1896, which led to the speedy introduction of the X-day technique into German military medicine, is discussed in detail.

  2. Discovering environmental cancer: Wilhelm Hueper, post-World War II epidemiology, and the vanishing clinician's eye.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, C

    1997-01-01

    Today, our understanding of and approach to the exogenous causes of cancer are dominated by epidemiological practices that came into widespread use after World War II. This paper examines the forces, considerations, and controversies that shaped postwar risk factor epidemiology in the United States. It is argued that, for all of the new capabilities it brought, this risk factor epidemiology has left us with less of a clinical eye for unrecognized cancer hazards, especially from limited and localized exposures in the work-place. The focus here is on Wilhelm Hueper, author of the first textbook on occupational cancer (1942). Hueper became the foremost spokesman for earlier identification practices centering on occupational exposures. The new epidemiological methods and associated institutions that arose in the 1940s and 1950s bore an unsettled relation to earlier claims and methods that some, Hueper among them, interpreted as a challenge. Hueper's critique of the new epidemiology identified some of its limitations and potentially debilitating consequences that remain with us today. Images p1825-a p1827-a p1829-a PMID:9366640

  3. Selection within organisms in the nineteenth century: Wilhelm Roux's complex legacy.

    PubMed

    Heams, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Selectionism, or the extension of darwinian chance/selection dynamics beyond the individual level, has a long history in biological thought. It has generated important theories in immunology or neurology, and turns out to be a convincing framework to account for the intrinsic stochastic nature of core events in cellular biology. When looking back at the intellectual origins of selectionism, the essay by the German embryologist Wilhelm Roux, Der Kampf der Theile im Organismus (The Struggle of the Parts in the Organism - 1881) might be one, if not the earliest reference after the darwinian revolution. It describes the individual as a multilevel structure, where each level results from a 'darwinian' struggle of its parts (molecules, cells, tissues, organs). But Roux's theory, far from being a simple extension of natural selection, has complex and even conflictual relationships with darwinism. This essay is worth rediscovering as a subtle historical testimony of the evolutionary and developmental life sciences debates of its time. Moreover, some of its theses may also enrich some current debates among evolutionary biologists over levels of selection, and among cellular and molecular biologists over the status of determinism in biology today.

  4. From Wilhelm von Humboldt to Hitler-are prominent people more prone to have Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Horowski; Horowski; Calne; Calne

    2000-10-01

    We describe Parkinsonism in prominent people, where Wilhelm von Humboldt and Adolf Hitler provide just two spectacular, opposing examples. In both of them, there is little if any evidence that the disease did influence their life ambitions, methods of achieving them or cognitive function in general. Thus, Hitler's Parkinsonism should remain a 'footnote' to history, and historians should acknowledge that in his last years, his trembling, his curbed posture, his slow walking, mask-like face and low voice did not indicate remorse, fear or depression as a consequence of his crimes, but were mere expressions of his disease which, until the end, had no impact on his intellectual skills and methods. The apparently higher incidence of Parkinsonism in prominent people may be just due to their higher visibility, or a consequence of disease-related personality traits (e.g. ambition, perfectionism, rigidity) which may contribute to becoming, e.g., a prominent authoritarian person. Perhaps even some early behaviour pattern (such as repressed emotions or acting in public-which could even increase the risk of some infection) contributes to a greater vulnerability for developing Parkinsonism. Further studying other prominent cases might lead us to better understanding of risk factors and the expression of early Parkinsonism. PMID:10900395

  5. From Wilhelm von Humboldt to Hitler-are prominent people more prone to have Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Horowski; Horowski; Calne; Calne

    2000-10-01

    We describe Parkinsonism in prominent people, where Wilhelm von Humboldt and Adolf Hitler provide just two spectacular, opposing examples. In both of them, there is little if any evidence that the disease did influence their life ambitions, methods of achieving them or cognitive function in general. Thus, Hitler's Parkinsonism should remain a 'footnote' to history, and historians should acknowledge that in his last years, his trembling, his curbed posture, his slow walking, mask-like face and low voice did not indicate remorse, fear or depression as a consequence of his crimes, but were mere expressions of his disease which, until the end, had no impact on his intellectual skills and methods. The apparently higher incidence of Parkinsonism in prominent people may be just due to their higher visibility, or a consequence of disease-related personality traits (e.g. ambition, perfectionism, rigidity) which may contribute to becoming, e.g., a prominent authoritarian person. Perhaps even some early behaviour pattern (such as repressed emotions or acting in public-which could even increase the risk of some infection) contributes to a greater vulnerability for developing Parkinsonism. Further studying other prominent cases might lead us to better understanding of risk factors and the expression of early Parkinsonism.

  6. Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the discoverer of oxygen, and a very productive chemist.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-12-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) has an important place in the history of the discovery of respiratory gases because he was undoubtedly the first person to prepare oxygen and describe some of its properties. Despite this, his contributions have often been overshadowed by those of Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, who also played critical roles in preparing the gas and understanding its nature. Sadly, Scheele was slow to publish his discovery and therefore Priestley is rightly recognized as the first person to report the preparation of oxygen. This being said, the thinking of both Scheele and Priestley was dominated by the phlogiston theory, and it was left to Lavoisier to elucidate the true nature of oxygen. In addition to his work on oxygen, Scheele was enormously productive in other areas of chemistry. Arguably he discovered seven new elements and many other compounds. However, he kept a low profile during his life as a pharmacist, and he did not have strong links with contemporary prestigious institutions such as the Royal Society in England or the French Académie des Sciences. He was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Science but only attended one meeting. Partly as a result, he remains a somewhat nebulous figure despite the critical contribution he made to the history of respiratory gases and his extensive researches in other areas of chemistry. His death at the age of 43 may have been hastened by his habit of tasting the chemicals that he worked on. PMID:25281638

  7. Charles Darwin and other great men in correspondence with Carl Wilhelm von Naegeli.

    PubMed

    Naegeli, W; Wiedemann, H R

    1993-04-15

    The great Swiss-German botanist Carl Wilhelm von Naegeli (1817-1891) was a student of Lorenz Oken, A.P. de Candolle, and Matthias Jacob Schleiden and became a key figure in "genetic" (i.e., evolutionary-developmental) biology in the mid-late 19th century. He was an expert on the hawk-weed, Hieracium and also made important contributions to microbiology. One of his many outstanding students was Carl Correns, one of the 3 rediscoverers of Mendel's work. Naegeli was an early proponent and defender of Darwin. The correspondence preserved in the Naegeli family contains many important letters between Naegeli and his contemporaries. Those from Mendel to Naegeli have passed out of the Naegeli family and were published by Correns earlier in the century. However, exceptionally notable items still in the archives of the Naegeli family include 4 surviving letters from Darwin, 2 letters from Virchow, and 10 from Justus von Liebig. In spite of a lack of appreciation of Mendel's work, we call attention to the importance of those surviving documents from an era in which very few of the greatest naturalists and founders of modern biology--including Goethe, Darwin, Galton, Agassiz, von Humboldt, von Baer--were without "blind spots."

  8. Charles Darwin and other great men in correspondence with Carl Wilhelm von Naegeli.

    PubMed

    Naegeli, W; Wiedemann, H R

    1993-04-15

    The great Swiss-German botanist Carl Wilhelm von Naegeli (1817-1891) was a student of Lorenz Oken, A.P. de Candolle, and Matthias Jacob Schleiden and became a key figure in "genetic" (i.e., evolutionary-developmental) biology in the mid-late 19th century. He was an expert on the hawk-weed, Hieracium and also made important contributions to microbiology. One of his many outstanding students was Carl Correns, one of the 3 rediscoverers of Mendel's work. Naegeli was an early proponent and defender of Darwin. The correspondence preserved in the Naegeli family contains many important letters between Naegeli and his contemporaries. Those from Mendel to Naegeli have passed out of the Naegeli family and were published by Correns earlier in the century. However, exceptionally notable items still in the archives of the Naegeli family include 4 surviving letters from Darwin, 2 letters from Virchow, and 10 from Justus von Liebig. In spite of a lack of appreciation of Mendel's work, we call attention to the importance of those surviving documents from an era in which very few of the greatest naturalists and founders of modern biology--including Goethe, Darwin, Galton, Agassiz, von Humboldt, von Baer--were without "blind spots." PMID:8484417

  9. Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the discoverer of oxygen, and a very productive chemist.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-12-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) has an important place in the history of the discovery of respiratory gases because he was undoubtedly the first person to prepare oxygen and describe some of its properties. Despite this, his contributions have often been overshadowed by those of Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, who also played critical roles in preparing the gas and understanding its nature. Sadly, Scheele was slow to publish his discovery and therefore Priestley is rightly recognized as the first person to report the preparation of oxygen. This being said, the thinking of both Scheele and Priestley was dominated by the phlogiston theory, and it was left to Lavoisier to elucidate the true nature of oxygen. In addition to his work on oxygen, Scheele was enormously productive in other areas of chemistry. Arguably he discovered seven new elements and many other compounds. However, he kept a low profile during his life as a pharmacist, and he did not have strong links with contemporary prestigious institutions such as the Royal Society in England or the French Académie des Sciences. He was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Science but only attended one meeting. Partly as a result, he remains a somewhat nebulous figure despite the critical contribution he made to the history of respiratory gases and his extensive researches in other areas of chemistry. His death at the age of 43 may have been hastened by his habit of tasting the chemicals that he worked on.

  10. Bladder tumors and aromatic amines - historical milestones from Ludwig Rehn to Wilhelm Hueper.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Holger Georg; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We know today that environmental factors must be regarded as a significant cause of the urinary bladder carcinoma. In Germany, the urinary bladder carcinoma is the second most common urological tumor among men and the most common among women and more than 100 occupational bladder cases are recognized and compensated per year. Scientific studies of this problem reach back to the 18th century. However it was only in 1895 that the surgeon Ludwig Rehn firstly described 3 cases of occupational bladder tumors in at most 45 fuchsine workers in Frankfurt / M. This extremely significant discovery was followed by a description of a large number of cases of urinary bladder tumors among workers in the paint industry. Nevertheless, it was impossible to induce bladder cancer in animals by aromatic amines for many years. In the 1930s, the pathologist Wilhelm C. Hueper was the first to induce bladder cancer in animal experiments, applying beta-naphthylamine to dogs. Based on these experiments and corroborated by epidemiologic studies, beta-naphthylamine was banned in Germany and many countries from the 1950s on. This review will highlight work and life of these two pioneering medical researchers.

  11. Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Objectives of NASA's participation in the ROSAT mission are to: a) measure the spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of discrete cosmic sources including normal stars, collapsed stellar objects, and active galactic nuclei; b) perform spectroscopic mapping of extended X-ray sources including supernova remnants, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies; and c) conduct the above observations of cosmic sources with unprecedented sensitivity and spatial resolution over the 0.1 - 2.0 keV energy band.

  12. ROENTGEN RAY INTOXICATION

    PubMed Central

    Warren, S. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1923-01-01

    X-rays which injure intestinal epithelium (and presumably other body or tumor cells) travel in straight lines from the target through the living tissues, forming a cone or beam of rays as controlled by impervious screens. It is probable that secondary radiation is formed, especially deep in the body tissues, but such radiation does no injury to intestinal epithelium outside of the cone or path of radiation. Lesions in the stomach and intestine may be confidently predicted from a knowledge of the size and form of the cone or beam of x-rays given over the abdomen. These lesions even more than skin burns do not heal and may in fact go on after many weeks to perforation. Even in the depths of the abdomen the duodenal lesions are as clean-cut as a peptic ulcer, indicating the lack of dispersion or scattering of the primary or secondary rays in passage through the living tissues. Transition from normal to necrotic mucosa rarely occupies more than 2 to 3 mm. and often can be observed in a single low power microscopic field. PMID:19868824

  13. [Edward Wilhelm Drescher--the founder of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania].

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, J H

    1999-01-01

    Professor Edward Wilhelm Drescher--an eminent Polish pediatric surgeon and pioneer of this specialization in West Pomerania--was born in 1912 in Biłgoraj. His young years he spent in his parents familial town Kalisz, where he attended a very famous college--State Humanistic Grammar-School. In 1937 he graduated from Faculty of Medicine at the Warsaw University. Next year he started his career as a surgeon in the Surgery at Orthopedic Ward of Pediatric Clinic in Warsaw, which was directed by prof. Jan Kossakowski--excellent pediatric surgeon and artist. During the September Campaign he took part in the battle of Bzura and in the defense of Polish capital as the physician in the 25th Regiment of Artillery. In 1940 he joined Polish underground army--AK. In 1944, when the Warsaw Uprising broke out, he was the Commander of the insurgent hospital--Poznańska 11. It was a very well arranged and headed hospital, which admitted about eight hundred wounded soldiers and civilians. After the war for two years he lived in Sopot, where he organized and directed the Surgery Hospital and the Town Outpatients' Department. In 1947 he moved to Szczecin, where he arranged the first ward of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania (in Polish Red Cross hospital). Ten years later he was nominated the head of the Clinic of Pediatric Surgery in the Pomeranian Medical Academy in Szczecin. For many years Prof. Drescher was provincial and regional consultant. He helped to organize a few pediatric surgery wards in Pomerania (Koszalin, Gorzów Wlkp., Słupsk). He died in 1977 in Warsaw. Prof. Drescher published almost 80 scientific papers including two medical books. Traumatology of children and the newborn surgery became his principal area of interest. He was the author of Code of the Ethical and Moral Procedure of the Polish Medical Society. For almost twenty years he was co-author the Annales of Pomeranian Medical Academy. He was a co-founder, next was a president of the Polish Association of

  14. Neuroscience in its context. Neuroscience and psychology in the work of Wilhelm Wundt.

    PubMed

    Ziche, P

    1999-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920), the first to establish an Institute devoted exclusively to psychological research in Germany, started his career as a (neuro)physiologist. He gradually turned into a psychologist in the 1860's and 1870's, at a time when neuroscience had to deal with the problem of giving an adequate physiological interpretation of the data accumulated by neuroanatomy. Neither the functional interpretation of brain morphology, nor the options provided by the reflex model seemed acceptable to Wundt. In his Physiological Psychology, first published in 1874, Wundt adds another aspect to this discussion by showing that psychology may help, and indeed is required, to clarify some of the most controversial problems in brain research. He thus became a key figure in neuroscience's struggle to locate itself within the various research traditions. The following theses will be argued for: 1. Wundt's turn to psychology resulted from his view that the methodological basis of physiological brain research of the time was unsatisfactory. 2. Psychology, in its attempt to solve these problems, implied a new conception of an interaction between experimental and theoretical brain research. 3. Wundt tried to demonstrate the necessity of psychological considerations for experimental brain research. These points are discussed with reference to Wundt's treatment of the localization of functions in the brain. According to Wundt, psychology can show, by analyzing the complex structure of intellect and will, that mental phenomena can be realized in the brain only in the form of complex interations of the elements of the brain. The results of the psychological considerations imply that a strict localizations cannot be correct; but they are also turned against the conception of a complete functional equivalence of the various parts of the cortext. For Wundt, a reconstruction of brain processes cannot start with neurones, but only with patterns of a functional organization of brain

  15. Wilhelm Winkler (1842-1910) - a Thuringian private astronomer and maecenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Wilfried; Dorschner, Johann; Schielicke, Reinhardt E.

    Wilhelm Winkler was born in 1842 in Eisenberg, Thuringia, as the son of a lawyer. After attending the trading high school in Gera, Winkler worked as a merchant in Eisenberg, following in the footsteps of his grandfather. In 1875 he gave up this trade and devoted his time entirely to astronomy. Advised by Carl Bruhns, director of the Leipzig University Observatory, he established an observatory on his estate in Gohlis near Leipzig. From 1878 Winkler regularly observed sunspots; other fields of his observational interests were comets, occultations of stars by the Moon, and Jupiter's satellites. In 1887 he went to Jena, where he contacted Ernst Abbe, who was the head of the Jena observatory, too. For some years, Winkler's instruments were used in the new observatory erected by Abbe, which replaced the old Ducal Observatory of the Goethe era. Winkler donated the precision pendulum clock and some other instruments to this observatory. He also offered his observational assistance whenever it was wanted. In 1893 Winkler built up his own observatory in Jena and published annual reports on his work in the Vierteljahrsschrift of the Astronomische Gesellschaft. His observational results mainly appeared in the journal Astronomische Nachrichten. In 1902 he was awarded an honorary doctor's degree by the Philosophical Faculty of Jena University. However, at that time his physical constitution began gradually to fade. He lost his left eye due to a sarcoma, and finally he died at the age of 68. In his will, he left 100 000 Mark in form of securities to Jena University (Winkler Foundation). The University Observatory got his 4.5 m dome, the transport of which from his residence to the final site was also paid for by him, several instruments, and a lot of books. In 1936 Winkler's dome was closed by the University. The observatory was transferred from the University to the Zeiss works in exchange for the observatory in the Jena Forst. Zeiss sponsored the reconstruction of the old dome

  16. [Edward Wilhelm Drescher--the founder of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania].

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, J H

    1999-01-01

    Professor Edward Wilhelm Drescher--an eminent Polish pediatric surgeon and pioneer of this specialization in West Pomerania--was born in 1912 in Biłgoraj. His young years he spent in his parents familial town Kalisz, where he attended a very famous college--State Humanistic Grammar-School. In 1937 he graduated from Faculty of Medicine at the Warsaw University. Next year he started his career as a surgeon in the Surgery at Orthopedic Ward of Pediatric Clinic in Warsaw, which was directed by prof. Jan Kossakowski--excellent pediatric surgeon and artist. During the September Campaign he took part in the battle of Bzura and in the defense of Polish capital as the physician in the 25th Regiment of Artillery. In 1940 he joined Polish underground army--AK. In 1944, when the Warsaw Uprising broke out, he was the Commander of the insurgent hospital--Poznańska 11. It was a very well arranged and headed hospital, which admitted about eight hundred wounded soldiers and civilians. After the war for two years he lived in Sopot, where he organized and directed the Surgery Hospital and the Town Outpatients' Department. In 1947 he moved to Szczecin, where he arranged the first ward of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania (in Polish Red Cross hospital). Ten years later he was nominated the head of the Clinic of Pediatric Surgery in the Pomeranian Medical Academy in Szczecin. For many years Prof. Drescher was provincial and regional consultant. He helped to organize a few pediatric surgery wards in Pomerania (Koszalin, Gorzów Wlkp., Słupsk). He died in 1977 in Warsaw. Prof. Drescher published almost 80 scientific papers including two medical books. Traumatology of children and the newborn surgery became his principal area of interest. He was the author of Code of the Ethical and Moral Procedure of the Polish Medical Society. For almost twenty years he was co-author the Annales of Pomeranian Medical Academy. He was a co-founder, next was a president of the Polish Association of

  17. Improvement in the clinical practicability of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA): free from the use of the dual X-ray equipment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Lee, Chian-Her; Syu, Ci-Bin; Lai, Jiing-Yih; Chen, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2012-10-01

    After total knee replacement, the monitoring of the prosthetic performance is often done by roentgenographic examination. However, the two-dimensional (2D) roentgen images only provide information about the projection onto the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) planes. Historically, the model-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) technique has been developed to predict the spatial relationship between prostheses by iteratively comparing the projective data for the prosthetic models and the roentgen images. During examination, the prosthetic poses should be stationary. This should be ensured, either by the use of dual synchronized X-ray equipment or by the use of a specific posture. In practice, these methods are uncommon or technically inconvenient during follow-up examination. This study aims to develop a rotation platform to improve the clinical applicability of the model-based RSA technique. The rotation platform allows the patient to assume a weight-bearing posture, while being steadily rotated so that both AP and ML knee images can be obtained. This study uses X-ray equipment with a single source and flat panel detectors (FPDs). Four tests are conducted to evaluate the quality of the FPD images, steadiness of the rotation platform, and accuracy of the RSA results. The results show that the distortion-induced error of the FPD image is quite minor, and the prosthetic size can be cautiously calibrated by means of the scale ball(s). The rotation platform should be placed closer to the FPD and orthogonal to the projection axis of the X-ray source. Image overlap of the prostheses can be avoided by adjusting both X-ray source and knee posture. The device-induced problems associated with the rotation platform include the steadiness of the platform operation and the balance of the rotated subject. Sawbone tests demonstrate that the outline error, due to the platform, is of the order of the image resolution (= 0.145 mm). In conclusion, the rotation

  18. Comparison Between Monteiro DA Rocha and Wilhelm Olbers' Methods for the Determination of the Orbits of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Fernando B.; Fernandes, João

    2006-08-01

    In 1797, under von Zach sponsoring, Wilhelm Olbers published his work on the determination of the parabolic orbits of the comets - "Abhandlung tiber die leichteste und bequemste Methode, die Bahn eines Cometen aus einigen Beobachtungen zu berechnen von Wilhelm Olbers". Over the next century, this method would become the main tool to determine comets' parabolic orbits. Two years later, in 1799, an article of Monteiro da Rocha entitled "Determinação das Orbitas dos Cometas" is published in Memórias da Academia Real das Ciências de Lisboa. This study publishes a method to solve the problem of the determination of comets' orbits very similar with the one proposed by Olbers. In the current article we intend to provide some information about the method of Monteiro da Rocha, which in fact was formerly formulated circa 16-17 years in advance to Olbers method, and to present the results of the quantitative side-by-side comparison of methods.

  19. A roentgen stereophotogrammetric study of implant stability and movement of segments in the maxilla of infants with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Rune, B; Jacobsson, S; Sarnäs, K V; Selvik, G

    1979-07-01

    Three implants (tantalum pins 1.5 x 0.5 mm) were inserted in each lateral segment of the cleft maxilla of ten infants aged three to 33 months. To check the stability of the implants in the bone the distances between the three implants within each segment were measured by means of roentgen stereophotogrammetry (accuracy 0.05 mm) at intervals of 7, 35, 63, 147, and 287 days after initial examination and at varying intervals thereafter (maximal observation time 833 days). No implants were lost and 18 of 60 measured distances were stable (final changes less than 0.2 mm). The three implants were regarded as a rigid-body model which represented the segment in the calculations of motion. In all infants with complete clefts, transverse narrowing occurred immediately after primary closure of the lip, or primary palate repair, while subsequent movement followed individual patterns.

  20. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  1. Biplane roentgen videometric system for dynamic, 60/sec, studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    An operator interactive video system for the measurement of roentgen angiographically outlined structures is described. Left ventricular volume and three-dimensional shapes are calculated from up to 200 pairs of diameters measured from ventriculograms at the rate of 60 pairs of biplane images per second. The accuracy and reproducibility of volumes calculated by the system were established by analysis of roentgenograms of inanimate objects of known volume and by comparison of left ventricular stroke volumes calculated by the system with the stroke volumes calculated by an indicator-dilution technique and an aortic root electromagnetic flowmeter. Computer-generated display of the large amounts of data obtained by the videometry system is described.

  2. "A talented young man" - The short life of Friedrich Wilhelm Tönnies, 1796-1817; (German Title: "Ein talentvoller junger Mann" - Das kurze Leben des Friedrich Wilhelm Tönnies, 1796-1817)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemin, Friedhelm

    Friedrich Wilhelm Tönnies' name is hardly found in the major histories of astronomy. This is not surprising since he died before the age of twenty-one. Nevertheless, and perhaps because he knew at heart that not much time was granted to him, he left an astonishingly prolific oeuvre which indicates his rich talents. His contemporaries also testify that this son af a wealthy textile merchant had a great talent. But it is idle to speculate whether he would have become a second Bessel, or just an inconspicuous high school teacher in some remote Prussian province. He experienced a decisive career advancement by the Berlin astronomer J.E. Bode, obtained his Ph.D. already at the age of nineteen, published, among other things, about the large solar eclipse of November 19, 1816, and corresponded with several professional astronomers, before he succumbed to a pulmonary disease.

  3. Wilhelm Reich's self-censorship after his arrest as an enemy alien: the chilling effect of an illegal imprisonment.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Philip W

    2014-04-01

    After discussing Wilhelm Reich's place in psychoanalysis, the article explores his arrest as an 'enemy alien' in December 1941. Reich's emotional responses to his imprisonment (which was illegal and which lasted nearly a month) are explored. A number of scholars have suggested that many European radical psychoanalysts refrained from sharing their former political ideas once they emigrated to the United States. Following a brief discussion of this pattern of 'silencing,' it is argued that Reich's withholding certain documents from publication was due to a self-imposed censorship, motivated in part by the fear of further governmental interference with his life and work. This fear, however, did not extend to his discussion of his newly developed theory of orgone energy.

  4. Wilhelm Reich's self-censorship after his arrest as an enemy alien: the chilling effect of an illegal imprisonment.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Philip W

    2014-04-01

    After discussing Wilhelm Reich's place in psychoanalysis, the article explores his arrest as an 'enemy alien' in December 1941. Reich's emotional responses to his imprisonment (which was illegal and which lasted nearly a month) are explored. A number of scholars have suggested that many European radical psychoanalysts refrained from sharing their former political ideas once they emigrated to the United States. Following a brief discussion of this pattern of 'silencing,' it is argued that Reich's withholding certain documents from publication was due to a self-imposed censorship, motivated in part by the fear of further governmental interference with his life and work. This fear, however, did not extend to his discussion of his newly developed theory of orgone energy. PMID:24628260

  5. Measurement of migration of soft tissue by modified Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA): validation of a new technique to monitor rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Cashman, P M M; Baring, T; Reilly, P; Emery, R J H; Amis, A A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to use Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) to measure migration of soft-tissue structures after rotator cuff repair. RSA stereo films were obtained; images were analysed using a semi-automatic software program allowing 3D viewing of results. RSA imaging experiments were performed to validate the technique, using a glass phantom with implanted RSA beads and an animal model with steel sutures as RSA markers which were moved known distances. Repeated measurements allowed assessment of inter- and intra-observer variability at a maximum of 1.06 mm. RSA analysis of the phantom showed a variation up to 0.22 mm for static and 0.28 mm for dynamic studies. The ovine tissue specimen demonstrated that using steel sutures as RSA markers in soft tissue is feasible, although less accurate than when measuring bone motion. This novel application of RSA to measure soft tissue migration is practicable and can be extended to in vivo studies.

  6. [Wilhelm Troll (1897-1978). The tradition of idealistic morphology in the German botanical sciences of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Meister, Kay

    2005-01-01

    During the first half of the 19th century, idealistic morphology developed into an influential research program in the German biosciences. This program was based on the concept of an ideal connection existing between various living beings. The growth of Darwinian thought and its new paradigm of historical explanation supplanted the idealistic morphology. Yet in the first half of the 20th century the principles of idealistic morphology experienced a powerful revival. Wilhelm Troll (1897-1978) was one of the most significant figures in this renaissance. Guided by the ideas of J.W. von Goethe, Troll established a research program rejecting causal, functional, and phylogenetic explanations as well as the idea of evolutionary adaptation. Instead, he attempted to create a 'pure' morphology based on the descriptions of various plant species. Governed by some explicitly metaphysical presumptions, Troll based his theory on the description of the organismal Gestalt. In consequence, his theory was actually a return to the proper idealistic morphology as it was known in the early 19th century. It lead German botanical morphology to a period of methodological and epistemological return. PMID:16602487

  7. A variation on forced migration: Wilhelm Peters (Prussia via Britain to Turkey) and Muzafer Sherif (Turkey to the United States).

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül

    2016-01-01

    In 1933 the Turkish Republic formally offered university positions to 30 German-speaking academics who were dismissed with the coming to power of the National Socialist Government. That initial number went up to 56 with the inclusion of the technical assistants. By 1948 the estimated total had increased to 199. Given renewable five-year contracts with salaries substantially higher than their Turkish counterparts, the foreign émigrés were to implement the westernization program of higher education. The ten year-old secular Turkish Republic's extensive social reforms had encompassed the adoption of the Latin alphabet, and equal rights for women, removing gender bias in hiring. Such a high concentration of émigré academics in one institution, "the highest anywhere in the world," provides a unique opportunity to study a subject which has been neglected. In this article two cases in psychology will be examined: Wilhelm Peters (1880-1963), who came, via Britain, to Istanbul in 1936 from the University of Jena in Germany, and Muzafer Sherif (1906-1988) who went to the United States from Ankara University in 1945. The purpose of the comparative analysis is to identify the features that are specific to the German experience, and those that are shared and underlie translocation in science within the multifaceted complexity of the process of forced migration. PMID:27388256

  8. A variation on forced migration: Wilhelm Peters (Prussia via Britain to Turkey) and Muzafer Sherif (Turkey to the United States).

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül

    2016-01-01

    In 1933 the Turkish Republic formally offered university positions to 30 German-speaking academics who were dismissed with the coming to power of the National Socialist Government. That initial number went up to 56 with the inclusion of the technical assistants. By 1948 the estimated total had increased to 199. Given renewable five-year contracts with salaries substantially higher than their Turkish counterparts, the foreign émigrés were to implement the westernization program of higher education. The ten year-old secular Turkish Republic's extensive social reforms had encompassed the adoption of the Latin alphabet, and equal rights for women, removing gender bias in hiring. Such a high concentration of émigré academics in one institution, "the highest anywhere in the world," provides a unique opportunity to study a subject which has been neglected. In this article two cases in psychology will be examined: Wilhelm Peters (1880-1963), who came, via Britain, to Istanbul in 1936 from the University of Jena in Germany, and Muzafer Sherif (1906-1988) who went to the United States from Ankara University in 1945. The purpose of the comparative analysis is to identify the features that are specific to the German experience, and those that are shared and underlie translocation in science within the multifaceted complexity of the process of forced migration.

  9. Treating Epiphora in Adults With the Wilhelm Plastic Nasolacrimal Stent: Mid-Term Results of a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ciampi, Juan J. Lanciego, Carlos; Navarro, Sofia; Cuena, Rafael; Velasco, Javier; Perea, Miguel; Garcia-Garcia, Lorenzo

    2011-02-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate, in a prospective, single-center study, the effectiveness of the Wilhelm-type stent used in interventional radiology for the management of epiphora. Patients (n = 104; mean age 64 [range 25-88]; 33 male and 71 female) with severe epiphora had the stents inserted (135 stents in 115 eyes) to treat obstruction of the nasolacrimal system. The etiology of the obstruction was idiopathic in 83 cases, chronic dacryocystitis in 31, cases and postsurgical status in 1 case. The overall technical success rate of stent placement was near 94%. Resolution of epiphora was complete in 105 cases and partial in 3 cases. During a mean 13-month follow-up (range 1 week to 28 months), the median duration of primary patency was 11 months, and the percentage of patency at 6 months was 60.8%, at 1 year was 39.6%, and at 2 years was 25%. Stents malfunctioned in 54 cases, and all were easily withdrawn except in 1 case. Of these 27 cases, patency recovered spontaneously in 9 and by way of a second stent in 18. Secondary patency was 50%. Factors presdisposing to lower primary patency are inflammatory etiology and location of the obstruction. The benefit of stent deployment is clear with respect to the resolution of epiphora in candidate patients for percutaneous treatment. Technical and/or design improvements would be welcomed.

  10. Predicting 3D pose in partially overlapped X-ray images of knee prostheses using model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA).

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chi-Pin; Lin, Shang-Chih; Shih, Kao-Shang; Huang, Chang-Hung; Lee, Chian-Her

    2014-12-01

    After total knee replacement, the model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) technique has been used to monitor the status of prosthetic wear, misalignment, and even failure. However, the overlap of the prosthetic outlines inevitably increases errors in the estimation of prosthetic poses due to the limited amount of available outlines. In the literature, quite a few studies have investigated the problems induced by the overlapped outlines, and manual adjustment is still the mainstream. This study proposes two methods to automate the image processing of overlapped outlines prior to the pose registration of prosthetic models. The outline-separated method defines the intersected points and segments the overlapped outlines. The feature-recognized method uses the point and line features of the remaining outlines to initiate registration. Overlap percentage is defined as the ratio of overlapped to non-overlapped outlines. The simulated images with five overlapping percentages are used to evaluate the robustness and accuracy of the proposed methods. Compared with non-overlapped images, overlapped images reduce the number of outlines available for model-based RSA calculation. The maximum and root mean square errors for a prosthetic outline are 0.35 and 0.04 mm, respectively. The mean translation and rotation errors are 0.11 mm and 0.18°, respectively. The errors of the model-based RSA results are increased when the overlap percentage is beyond about 9%. In conclusion, both outline-separated and feature-recognized methods can be seamlessly integrated to automate the calculation of rough registration. This can significantly increase the clinical practicability of the model-based RSA technique.

  11. ["The future must look to the past"* : Prof. Dr. Abraham Aaron Buschke (1868-1943) and Wilhelm Ludwig Löwenstein (1895-1959)].

    PubMed

    Dräger, D L; Protzel, C; Hakenberg, O W

    2015-11-01

    Like many other areas of medicine, dermatology with its comparatively high proportion of Jewish physicians was also not spared from the National Socialist appointment policy with dismissals, laws on "appreciation of the people", research influenced by National Socialist policies, and persecution of Jewish physicians. Prof. Abraham Aaron Buschke and Dr. Wilhelm Ludwig Lowenstein, who were the first to describe the Buschke-Lowenstein tumor, also suffered this destiny. In March 1933, Professor Buschke was dismissed from the position of directing physician at the Virchow Hospital in Berlin and in 1934 his teaching license was revoked. Despite affidavits of his "loyalty to the regime", Dr. Lowenstein fared the same treatment.

  12. ["The future must look to the past"* : Prof. Dr. Abraham Aaron Buschke (1868-1943) and Wilhelm Ludwig Löwenstein (1895-1959)].

    PubMed

    Dräger, D L; Protzel, C; Hakenberg, O W

    2015-11-01

    Like many other areas of medicine, dermatology with its comparatively high proportion of Jewish physicians was also not spared from the National Socialist appointment policy with dismissals, laws on "appreciation of the people", research influenced by National Socialist policies, and persecution of Jewish physicians. Prof. Abraham Aaron Buschke and Dr. Wilhelm Ludwig Lowenstein, who were the first to describe the Buschke-Lowenstein tumor, also suffered this destiny. In March 1933, Professor Buschke was dismissed from the position of directing physician at the Virchow Hospital in Berlin and in 1934 his teaching license was revoked. Despite affidavits of his "loyalty to the regime", Dr. Lowenstein fared the same treatment. PMID:26450094

  13. The Wilhelm Wundt Center and the first graduate program for the history and philosophy of psychology in Brazil: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas; Caropreso, Fátima Siqueira; Simanke, Richard Theisen; Castañon, Gustavo Arja

    2013-08-01

    The expansion of Brazilian universities since 2009 has promoted a general growth and incentive of scientific activities throughout the country, not only in the so-called hard sciences, but also in the human sciences. In this brief report, we announce the creation of two new institutional spaces dedicated to the history and philosophy of psychology at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) in Brazil: the Wilhelm Wundt Center for the History and Philosophy of Psychology (NUHFIP) and the Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23977953

  14. [Biomechanical properties of interference screw implantation in replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament with patellar and hamstring transplants. An experimental study using roentgen stereometry analysis (RSA)].

    PubMed

    Adam, F; Pape, D; Steimer, O; Kohn, D; Rupp, S

    2001-09-01

    This experimental roentgen stereometric analysis (RSA) study was performed to measure micromotions between the graft and tunnel under submaximal load in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim was to evaluate the maximum load at failure, linear stiffness, and slippage of bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts fixed with interference screws compared to quadrupled hamstring grafts fixed with interference screws. We used 15 porcine tibia specimens for the study. In the BPTB group, the 10 x 25-mm bone plugs were fixed in a tunnel with 10 mm in diameter using a 7 x 25-mm titanium interference screw (n = 5) or a biodegradable screw (n = 5). The five hamstring transplants were folded to a four-stranded graft and armed with a baseball stitch suture. The sutured side was fixed with a 7 x 25-mm biodegradable polylactide screw in an 8-mm tunnel. The tibial bones, tendon grafts, and interference screws were marked with tantalum beads. The grafts were mounted to a custom made load frame and loaded parallel to the axis under RSA control increasing the force in steps of 50 N. Micromotions between bone plug, screw, and tibia were measured with RSA. Accuracy of RSA for the in vitro study was evaluated as 0.05 mm. Hamstring grafts failed at significantly lower maximum loads (492 +/- 30 N) than BPTB grafts (658 +/- 98 N). Linear stiffness of the hamstring graft fixations was eight times lower compared to the BPTB grafts (403 +/- 141 N/mm vs 3500 +/- 1300 N/mm). There was no significant difference between the biodegradable and titanium screws in the BPTB group. Slippage of the graft started at 82 +/- 35 N load in the hamstring group and at 428 +/- 135 N in the BPTB group. Slippage of the graft at 75% of the maximum pull-out strength was measured as 0.36 +/- 0.25 mm in the BPTB and 2.58 +/- 1.08 mm in the hamstring group. The interference screw fixation of a quadrupled hamstring graft showed a lower linear stiffness and an earlier slippage compared to a patellar

  15. Nomenclatural studies toward a world catalog of Diptera genus-group names. III. Christian Rudolph Wilhelm Wiedemann.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pont, Adrian C

    2013-01-01

    The Diptera genus-group names of Christian Rudolph Wilhelm Wiedemann are reviewed and annotated. A total of 50 available genus-group names in 25 families of Diptera are listed alphabetically for each name giving author, year and page of original publication, originally included species, type species and method of fixation, current status of the name, family placement, and a list of any emendations of it that have been found in the literature. Remarks are given to clarify nomenclatural or taxonomic information. A biography of Wiedemann is given with discussion of his works and his relationships with contemporaries. In addition, an index is given to all the species-group names of Diptera proposed by Wiedemann (1,775 of which 1,698 are available) with bibliographic reference to each original citation. An appendix gives a complete bibliography of all the known writings by Wiedemann, non-zoological as well as zoological.The following type species is designated herein: Eristalis chrysopygus Wiedemann, 1819 for Pachycephalus Wiedemann, 1830, by present designation [Syrphidae].Corrected or clarified type-species and methods of typification are given for: Colax Wiedemann, 1824 [Nemestrinidae]; Cyphomyia Wiedemann, 1819 [Stratiomyidae]; Philoliche Wiedemann, 1821 [Tabanidae]; Ropalomera Wiedemann, 1820 [Ropalomeridae]; Timia Wiedemann, 1824 [Ulidiidae].Acting as First Reviser, the following correct original spelling for multiple original spellings is selected: Maekistocera Wiedemann, 1820 [Tipulidae]. A previous First Reviser action for multiple original spellings missed by other workers is given for the following: Rhaphiorhynchus Wiedemann, 1821 [Pantophthalmidae].The following nominal genera enter into new synonymies: Ceratophyia Osten Sacken, 1858 of Ceratophya Wiedemann, 1824, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Epopter Wiedemann, 1830 of Sphecomyia Le Peletier & Serville, 1825, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Melophaga Wiedemann, 1830 of Melophagus Latreille, 1802, n. syn. [Hippoboscidae]; Midas

  16. On the bifurcation of blood vessels--Wilhelm Roux's doctoral thesis (Jena 1878)--a seminal work for biophysical modelling in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Kurz, H; Sandau, K; Christ, B

    1997-02-01

    Wilhelm Roux's doctoral thesis described the relationship between the angle and diameter of bifurcating blood vessels. We have re-read this work in the light of biophysics and developmental biology and found two remarkable aspects hidden among a multitude of observations, rules and exceptions to these rules. First, the author identified the major determinants involved in vascular development; genetics, cybernetics, and mechanics; moreover, he knew that he could not deal with the genetic and regulatory aspects, and could hardly treat the mechanical part adequately. Second, he was deeply convinced that the laws of physics determine the design of organisms, and that a necessity for optimality was inherent in development. We combined the analysis of diameter relationships with the requirement for optimality in a stochastic biophysical model, and concluded that a constant wall-stress condition could define a minimum wall-tissue optimum during arterial development. Hence, almost 120 years after Wilhelm Roux's pioneering work, our model indicates one possible way in which physical laws have determined the evolution of regulatory and structural properties in vessel wall development. PMID:9059737

  17. [The history of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society during the Third Reich. Interim reports of the president's commission of the Max Planck Society].

    PubMed

    Weber, M M

    2002-11-01

    In 1997 the Max Planck Society set up a presidential commission to do research on the historical development of its precursor organization, the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG), during the Third Reich. This paper presents some of the important results given in the interim reports of this commission that are relevant to psychiatry. It focuses on brain research, anthropology, psychiatric genetics, and the role of the well-known biochemist Adolf Butenandt. In general, the interim reports reflect the numerous links between the biomedical research of the KWG and the institutions of the National Socialist (Nazi) state. However, they do not yet allow a final historical assessment as to the complex situation of this field of research during National Socialism.

  18. The historical development of modern virus research in Germany, especially in the Kaiser-Wilhelm-/Max-Planck-Society, 1936--1954.

    PubMed

    Butenandt, A

    1977-01-01

    This is lecture on the historical development of modern virus research in Germany to introduce a symposium dedicated to Prof. Werner Schäfer, Tübingen, on the occasion of his 65th birthday. The author was set the task of relating from his memories the beginning of modern virus research in Germany. This research has, since 1936, essentially taken place in the Kaiser-Wilhelm/Max-Planck-Society and in 1954 led to the founding of the Max-Planck-Institute for Virus Research in Tübingen, an institute which to the present day owes its scientific reputation in considerable part to the activity of Werner Schäfer. Since the author personally experienced and participated in the Institute's development from 1936-1954, his remarks are predominantly influenced by personal recollections, which have been sharpended by a renewed study of old records in the 'Library and Archive of the History of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft', Berlin-Dahlem.

  19. ["A decision meaning a new foundation...": from the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics to the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics].

    PubMed

    Sachse, Carola

    2011-01-01

    The Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) in Berlin-Dahlem dates its establishment to 1964. Its homepage makes no mention of its predecessor institutes, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics (KWIA) and the subsequent MPI for Comparative Genetics and Hereditary Pathology (MPIVEE). This article traces the two critical phases of transition regarding the constellations of academic staff, institutional and epistemic ruptures and continuities specific to the era. Only one of the five department heads from the final war years, Hans Nachtsheim, remained a researcher within the Max Planck Society (MPG); he nevertheless continued to advocate the pre-war and wartime eugenic agenda in the life sciences and social policy. The generational change of 1959/60 became a massive struggle within the institute, in which microbial genetics (with Fritz Kaudewitz) was pitted against human genetics (with Friedrich Vogel) and managed to establish itself after a fresh change in personnel in 1964/65. For the Dahlem institute, this involved a far-reaching reorientation of its research, but for the genetically oriented life sciences in the Max Planck Society as a whole it only meant that molecular biology, which was already being pursued in the West German institutes, gained an additional facility. With this realignment of research traditions, the Society was able to draw a line under the Nazi past without having to address it head-on.

  20. Human genetics and politics as mutually beneficial resources: The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics during the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2006-01-01

    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do we explain why the vast majority of German human geneticists and eugenicists were willing to work for the National Socialist state and, at the very least, legitimized its exterminationist racial policy; and (2) what accounts for at least some of Germany's most renowned medically trained professionals' involvement in forms of morally compromised science that wholly transcend the bounds of normal scientific practice? Although a complete answer to this question must await an examination of other German biological research centers, the present study suggests that during the Nazi period the symbiotic relationship between human genetics and politics served to radicalize both. The dynamic between the science of human heredity and Nazi politics changed the research practice of some of the biomedical sciences housed at the KWIA. It also simultaneously made it easier for the Nazi state to carry out its barbaric racial program leading, finally, to the extermination of millions of so-called racial undesirables.

  1. [The alphabet of nature and the alphabet of culture in the eighteenth century. botany, diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner : Botany, Diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner].

    PubMed

    Gierl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture. PMID:20665241

  2. [The alphabet of nature and the alphabet of culture in the eighteenth century. botany, diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner : Botany, Diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner].

    PubMed

    Gierl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture.

  3. [The search for "od." Karl Ludwig Freiheer von Reichenbach (1788-1869) and Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer (1806-1853), two joined against Justus von Liebig].

    PubMed

    Habacher, M

    1980-05-01

    The author describes the controversy between Justus von Liebig on one side and Reichenbach and Mayrhofer on the other side. It is a controversy about problems of science and medicine which are characteristic for the late 18th and the first half of the 19th century, when Mesmerism and similar ideas of occultic and comparative phenomenona were discussed and often refused as being "not scientific". Justus von Liebig and Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach were both chemists, both interested in scientific progress and working in this field. They were friends in the years 1830 to 1848. But later on this friendship ended when Reichenbach--who in the mean time moved to Vienna--became more and more interested in phenomenons seen by sensitive persons concerning effects of light. Although Reichenbach himself was not able to recognize the phenomenons he was sure that other persons had this ability. He had the impression that there is a special force floating through the universe, and this force he called "od". Liebig, who was not able to follow this theory and rejected it has speculation, turned against Reichenbach in 1852-3. So the controversy began and their old friendship came to an end. Reichenbach's theory of the "od", characteristic for the time of the romanticism and leading back to Mesmerism was accepted and supported by the Austrian physician Dr. Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer who had aroused his interest by describing similar phenomenos some of this patients had. The letters of both men, the chemist and the doctor, which are well preserved (Technical Museum of Vienna) and discussed here, give a good impression of Reichenbach's ideas concerning his theory of the "od" and his philosophical ideas. As Reichenbach tried to find a philosophy corresponding to his theory and as he meant to have found this in the philosophy of Friedrich Eduard Beneke his remarks in those letters give a good information about Beneke's discussion of Reichenbach's theory. Mayrhofer, on the other hand

  4. [The search for "od." Karl Ludwig Freiheer von Reichenbach (1788-1869) and Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer (1806-1853), two joined against Justus von Liebig].

    PubMed

    Habacher, M

    1980-05-01

    The author describes the controversy between Justus von Liebig on one side and Reichenbach and Mayrhofer on the other side. It is a controversy about problems of science and medicine which are characteristic for the late 18th and the first half of the 19th century, when Mesmerism and similar ideas of occultic and comparative phenomenona were discussed and often refused as being "not scientific". Justus von Liebig and Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach were both chemists, both interested in scientific progress and working in this field. They were friends in the years 1830 to 1848. But later on this friendship ended when Reichenbach--who in the mean time moved to Vienna--became more and more interested in phenomenons seen by sensitive persons concerning effects of light. Although Reichenbach himself was not able to recognize the phenomenons he was sure that other persons had this ability. He had the impression that there is a special force floating through the universe, and this force he called "od". Liebig, who was not able to follow this theory and rejected it has speculation, turned against Reichenbach in 1852-3. So the controversy began and their old friendship came to an end. Reichenbach's theory of the "od", characteristic for the time of the romanticism and leading back to Mesmerism was accepted and supported by the Austrian physician Dr. Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer who had aroused his interest by describing similar phenomenos some of this patients had. The letters of both men, the chemist and the doctor, which are well preserved (Technical Museum of Vienna) and discussed here, give a good impression of Reichenbach's ideas concerning his theory of the "od" and his philosophical ideas. As Reichenbach tried to find a philosophy corresponding to his theory and as he meant to have found this in the philosophy of Friedrich Eduard Beneke his remarks in those letters give a good information about Beneke's discussion of Reichenbach's theory. Mayrhofer, on the other hand

  5. Wer war Heinrich Wilhelm Dove? [Who was Heinrich Wilhelm Dove?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    Heinrich W. Dove was born in Liegnitz (Legnica) in 1803 and died in 1879 in Berlin. In the early 1820s, he studied in Breslau (Wroclaw) and Berlin. He also studied with the famous philosopher G. W. F. Hegel. In 1845, Dove became full professor of physics in Berlin. Dove was one of the founders of meteorology and weather forecast. The present article presents a summary of his life and his works.

  6. Validation of a new method for finding the rotational axes of the knee using both marker-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis and 3D video-based motion analysis for kinematic measurements.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2011-05-01

    In a previous paper, we reported the virtual axis finder, which is a new method for finding the rotational axes of the knee. The virtual axis finder was validated through simulations that were subject to limitations. Hence, the objective of the present study was to perform a mechanical validation with two measurement modalities: 3D video-based motion analysis and marker-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). A two rotational axis mechanism was developed, which simulated internal-external (or longitudinal) and flexion-extension (FE) rotations. The actual axes of rotation were known with respect to motion analysis and RSA markers within ± 0.0006 deg and ± 0.036 mm and ± 0.0001 deg and ± 0.016 mm, respectively. The orientation and position root mean squared errors for identifying the longitudinal rotation (LR) and FE axes with video-based motion analysis (0.26 deg, 0.28 m, 0.36 deg, and 0.25 mm, respectively) were smaller than with RSA (1.04 deg, 0.84 mm, 0.82 deg, and 0.32 mm, respectively). The random error or precision in the orientation and position was significantly better (p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively) in identifying the LR axis with video-based motion analysis (0.23 deg and 0.24 mm) than with RSA (0.95 deg and 0.76 mm). There was no significant difference in the bias errors between measurement modalities. In comparing the mechanical validations to virtual validations, the virtual validations produced comparable errors to those of the mechanical validation. The only significant difference between the errors of the mechanical and virtual validations was the precision in the position of the LR axis while simulating video-based motion analysis (0.24 mm and 0.78 mm, p=0.019). These results indicate that video-based motion analysis with the equipment used in this study is the superior measurement modality for use with the virtual axis finder but both measurement modalities produce satisfactory results. The lack of significant differences between

  7. [Friedrich Wilhelm I and porphyria].

    PubMed

    Pierach, C A; Jennewein, E

    1999-01-01

    Historical evidence has been collected attempting to diagnose members of royal houses, perhaps most publicized by Macalpine and Hunter (1969) for George III and his assumed porphyria, claiming that his insanity was a classic case of thereof. This rare metabolic disease presents with a variety of signs and symptoms: skin disease, abdominal pain, tachycardia, and neuro-psychiatric findings. The porphyrias are hereditary and since George III and Frederick William I share ancestors it seemed reasonable to investigate if the latter may also have suffered from porphyria. The pathography of both kings is meticulous, showing for both that abdominal pain, erratic behavior, restlessness, and discolored urine were frequently observed and complete recovery interictally was common. Intercurrent illnesses, fasting, alcohol and even tobacco smoking have been shown to be inducers of attacks and these risk factors are well documented in royal history.--The diagnosis of porphyria was not recognized then and other names were used, such as Cachexia hypochondriaca, Asthma spasmodico flatulentum, dolores arthritici.--We propose that Frederick William I suffered from an inducible porphyria.

  8. Neuropathological research at the "Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Psychiatrie" (German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute). Scientific utilization of children's organs from the "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Children's Special Departments) at Bavarian State Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Steger, Florian

    2006-09-01

    During National Socialism, the politically motivated interest in psychiatric genetic research lead to the founding of research departments specialized in pathological-anatomical brain research, the two Kaiser Wilhelm-Institutes (KWI) in Berlin and Munich. The latter was indirectly provided with brain material by Bavarian State Hospitals, to three of which "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Special Pediatric Units) were affiliated. As children became victims of the systematically conducted child "euthanasia" in these Special Pediatric Units, this paper will address the question whether and to which extent the organs from victims of child "euthanasia" were used for (neuro-) pathological research at the KWI in Munich. By means of case studies and medical histories (with focus on the situation in Kaufbeuren-Irsee), I will argue that pediatric departments on a regular base delivered slide preparations, that the child "euthanasia" conduced in these departments systematically contributed to neuropathological research and that slide preparations from victims of child "euthanasia" were used in scientific publications after 1945.

  9. Investigation relative to the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.; Primini, Francis A.; Fabbiano, Guiseppina; Harris, Daniel E.; Jones-Foreman, Christine; Trinchieri, Ginevra; Golub, Leon; Bookbinder, Jay; Seward, Frederick D.; Zombeck, Martin V.

    1994-01-01

    Reports include: High Resolution Observations of the Central Region of M31; The X-ray Emission of Low-X-ray-Luminosity Early-Type Galaxies: Gas Versus Compact Sources; Interaction Between Cluster Gas and Radio Features of Cygnus A; Hot Gas and Dark Halos in Early-Type Galaxies; A Gravitational Lens in X-rays - 0957+461; How Massive are Early-Type Galaxies?; Three Crab-Like SNR in the Large Magellanic Cloud; and Soft X-ray Emission from Boundary Layers in Cataclysmic Variables. Papers submitted to the Astrophysical Journal are attached.

  10. [Voiding urethrosonography. An alternative to roentgen urethrography].

    PubMed

    Dörnberger, V; Dörnberger, G; Flüchter, S H

    1988-12-01

    X-ray contrast imaging of the urethra, retrograde as urethrogram (UG) or antegrade as part of the miction cystourethrogram (MCU), has proved successful as a standard examination in urological diagnosis. The article presents a sonography technique enabling three-dimensional morphological and functional imaging the entire male urethra by real-time sonography. Advantages over x-ray film methods are the repeatability at any time, low invasiveness, absence of exposure to x-rays, and lesions of the urethral mucosa by catheters, as well as the avoidance of iodine-induced contrast medium reactions. Miction urethrosonography (MUS) is suitable for screening diagnosis of urethral stricture in miction difficulties, for excluding an iatrogenic of congenital urethral diverticulum, and for control after urethral surgery (internal urethrotomy, urethroplasty).

  11. ["... that progress in anatomy is most likely to occur when its problems include the study of growth and function, as well as of structure". about the anatomy and physiology of Ernst Heinrich Weber (794-1878 and Wilhelm His (1831-1904) his successor in the department of anatomy at the University of Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Reinhard

    2005-11-01

    The Leipzig anatomist and physiologist Ernst Heinrich Weber had introduced physiological thinking in anatomy and exact methods of mathematical physics to the study of the functioning of the body making him the founder of a physically orientated physiology. But he would not have been that excellent physiologist without being a nonetheless distinguished anatomist since he solved his physiological problems usually following function in close relation to structure. Together with his brother Wilhelm Eduard Weber (1804-1891), who later was to become a famous physicist, in their theory of waves he laid the basis for an exact analysis of the movements of fluids in elastic tubes und was the first to apply the basic laws of hydrodynamics to the circulation of the blood. In collaboration with his youngest brother Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Weber (1806-1871), who worked as a prosector at his institute and together with Wilhelm Weber had studied the mechanics of the walking apparatus, he demonstrated the inhibiting effect of the vagus nerve on the action of the heart. Ernst Heinrich Weber's approach to consider an organ as a whole not neglecting the study of its function set him apart from most of his contemporaries and has characterized the work of the Leipzig anatomists and physiologists since his time. Among those was Wilhelm His from Basle who succeeded him in the chair of anatomy in 1872. On the basis of a systematic analysis of human embryos by means of serial sections and plastic reconstruction His completely reformed the field of embryology and was the first to present a comprehensive treatise on human embryology. The making of modern human embryology was, above all, his achievement. He did not confine himself to mere description but wanted to gain deeper insight into the causal events by developmental-mechanical conceptions. With his detection of the neuroblasts and that they give rise to an axon and later to dendrites His provided the developmental foundations for the

  12. The Alphabet of Nature and the Alphabet of Culture in the Eighteenth Century. Botany, Diplomatics, and Ethno-Linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture. PMID:20665241

  13. Human heredity and politics: A comparative institutional study of the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor (United States), the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity, and Eugenics (Germany), and the Maxim Gorky Medical Genetics Institute (USSR).

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark B; Allen, Garland E; Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2005-01-01

    Despite the fact that much has been written in recent years about the science of heredity under the Third Reich, there is as yet no satisfying analysis of two central questions: What, if anything, was peculiarly "Nazi" about human genetics under National Socialism? How, under whatever set of causes, did at least some of Germany's most well-known and leading biomedical practioners become engaged in entgrenzte Wissenschaft (science without moral boundaries)? This paper attempts to provide some answers to these two questions comparing three institutes that studied eugenics and human heredity in the 1920s and 1930s: the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor, New York, directed by Charles B. Davenport; the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics, in Berlin, directed by Eugen Fischer; and the Maxim Gorky Medical Genetics Institute in Moscow, directed by Solomon G. Levit. The institutes are compared on the basis of the kind and quality of their research in eugenics and medical genetics, organizational structure, leadership, patronage (private or state), and the economic-social-political context in which they functioned.

  14. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  15. Crystallography: To Infinity and Beyond…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles

    2014-01-01

    William Henry Bragg moved from Cambridge in Britain to South Australia to take up a professorship at the University of Adelaide in 1885. He brought with him a broad interest in many areas of physics, but when Wilhelm Roentgen discovered X-rays in the 1890s, Bragg's interest was stimulated. William's Australian-born son, Lawrence (WL…

  16. Olbers, Heinrich Wilhelm (1758-1840)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Doctor, astronomer, born in Arbergen, Germany, enthusiast for astronomy. He discovered several comets. In 1800 he joined the team of 24 `celestial police', organized by FRANZ VON ZACH, who were to patrol a share of the zodiac looking for the planet missing (according to BODE's law) between Mars and Jupiter. On New Year's Day 1801 PIAZZI discovered Ceres, and, in March 1802, Olbers discovered Pall...

  17. Argelander, Friedrich Wilhelm August (1799-1875)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Memel, East Prussia. Director of the Bonn Observatory, where he organized a survey of the position of all 324 198 stars of the northern hemisphere above the ninth magnitude, published as the star charts and catalogs of the Bonner Durchmusterung (BD). His assistant, Eduard Schönfeld (1828-91), made the extension (BDE) into the southern sky. It is staggering to think about this ...

  18. [Combined ultrasound and roentgen localization in ESWL. Initial clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Gschwend, J; Miller, K; Hautmann, R

    1993-03-01

    Interdisciplinary use of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy with sonographic or fluoroscopic guidance has become a routine procedure in clinical practice, for both urolithiasis and cholecystolithiasis. Therefore, newly developed systems with combined locating devices are gaining in importance. A primary sonographically guided lithotripter was extended by a mobile X-ray system. The results were compared with those obtained with a first-generation lithotripter. The results show that sufficient disintegration of stones throughout the urinary tract is possible with both systems. The retreatment rate with both lithotripters was 30% when stone size was comparable. No essential differences in treatment time, shockwave energy and pain were found. The easy localisation of radiolucent stones, convenient positioning of the patient and successful localisation of ureteral stones near to the spine are advantages of the MPL 9000 X. On the other hand, the technically simpler fluoroscopy system and greater ease of electrode changing are advantages of the HM3 Lithotripter. Altogether, differences in the application of the two systems are slight and insignificant except in special cases.

  19. Roentgen Examination of Soft Tissues of the Pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Charles D.

    1964-01-01

    With meticulous preparation of the patient and with careful technique, the soft tissues of the pelvis are identifiable in most cases. Search should be made for the traces of abnormal pelvic structures on plain-film studies. Once the normal is recognized, any variations are easily identified. The fundamental differences between various radiologic densities—air, fat, fluid, muscle, calcium, bone and metal—should be observed. Special procedures can be used to enhance the contrasts after adequate evaluation of the simplest and, on many occasions, the invaluable, plain-film study of the soft tissues of the pelvis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:14232160

  20. Atlas of normal developmental roentgen anatomy, 2/e

    SciTech Connect

    Keats, T.E.; Smith, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is the revision of the radiographic atlas that provides normal standards for relative size, proportion, density, and configuration of the developing anatomy at various ages and for both sexes. This second edition features a new introductory chapter on maturation standards and an introductory page of text for each age group, describing key radiographic and anatomic changes. The authors have also replaced some radiographs from the first edition with new, higher quality films.

  1. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  2. Hermann Wilhelm Abich im Kaukasus: Zum zweihundertsten Geburtstag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, Ilse; Seibold, Eugen

    2006-11-01

    Hermann Abich was born in 1806 in Berlin and died in 1886 in Graz. He grew up in a wealthy family which had friendly relations with famous scientists like Alexander von Humboldt, Leopold von Buch or Carl Ritter. After his studies in Heidelberg and Berlin he turned to extended fieldwork at the volcanoes of Italy. In 1833 1834 he published excellent petrological/chemical results and got soon a good scientific reputation. Thus he was nominated as Professor for Geology and Mineralogy of the prestigious Russian University in Dorpat (now Tartu, Esthonia) in 1842. In 1844 he was sent to Armenia by the Russian authorities. For the next three decades his fieldwork with about 190 publications was concentrated on the Great and Lesser Caucasus. This was a period of Russian expansion to the South with long-lasting regional fights. But he enjoyed the support of powerful governors. He was an indefatigable and enthusiastic explorer and a precise observer and designer. His interests covered many fields: morphology, glaciology, structural geology, volcanology with Thermal Springs, mineral resources from hydrocarbons, coal, salt to ores, stratigraphy and paleontology as a base for geological maps. But he also gave advice for practical problems, and he was active in meteorology, botany and archaeology. Alltogether he became “the Father of Caucasus Geology”. The following sketch stresses only on three aspects of his activities. He was one of the first pioneers in hydrocarbon exploration, especially around the anticlines with the mud volcanoes near Baku. In many respects, however, his fundamental ideas were erronous. He explained the structure of the Great Caucasus by the traditional theories of Leopold von Buch and Elie de Beaumont. The Caucasus anticline “was elevated by forces acting from beneath”. Following them he tried to discover regularities in the strike of mountain chains. Similarily he treated volcanism like Alexander von Humboldt and Leopold von Buch with their two groups of phenomena: voluminous, mostly basaltic “elevation craters” versus isolated, mostly trachytic and relatively small cones of “true volcanoes”. In spite of the isolation of the Caucasus region he had cultivated continuously contacts with leading geologists in Europe and was honoured by many institutions. He left Russia in 1876 for Vienna planning to write there the final monograph volumes about his investigations but he died before he could complete them.

  3. Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel - the astronomer as a poet; (German Title: Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel - der Astronom als Poet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Dietmar

    This contribution illuminates a hitherto unknown side of the famous astronomer Bessel: his delight in occasionally writing poetry. These poems were thought to be of private use only, in particular as rhymed answers to his intimate correspondent Heinrich Christian Schumacher.

  4. [The Roentgen's discovery -first press releases, research articles and textbooks in Kraków].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The author presents Kraków's publications from the pioneering years of radiology. She also emphasises the great role of the publications in the development of this field in Kraków's medical environment

  5. From Roentgen to magnetic resonance imaging: the history of medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Scatliff, James H; Morris, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging has advanced in remarkable ways since the discovery of x-rays 120 years ago. Today's radiologists can image the human body in intricate detail using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, ultrasound, and various other modalities. Such technology allows for improved screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease, but it also comes with risks. Many imaging modalities expose patients to ionizing radiation, which potentially increases their risk of developing cancer in the future, and imaging may also be associated with possible allergic reactions or risks related to the use of intravenous contrast agents. In addition, the financial costs of imaging are taxing our health care system, and incidental findings can trigger anxiety and further testing. This issue of the NCMJ addresses the pros and cons of medical imaging and discusses in detail the following uses of medical imaging: screening for breast cancer with mammography, screening for osteoporosis and monitoring of bone mineral density with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, screening for congenital hip dysplasia in infants with ultrasound, and evaluation of various heart conditions with cardiac imaging. Together, these articles show the challenges that must be met as we seek to harness the power of today's imaging technologies, as well as the potential benefits that can be achieved when these hurdles are overcome. PMID:24663131

  6. Total hip replacement with a zirconium oxide ceramic femoral head: a randomised roentgen stereophotogrammetric study.

    PubMed

    von Schewelov, T; Sanzén, L; Onsten, I; Carlsson, A; Besjakov, J

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the wear characteristics and clinical performance of four different total hip joint articulations in 114 patients. Wear and migration was measured by roentgenstereophotogrammetric analysis at five years or at the last follow-up. The mean annual wear was 0.11 mm for a stainless steel/Enduron articulation, 0.34 mm for stainless steel/Hylamer cup, 0.17 mm for zirconium oxide ceramic/Enduron and 0.40 mm for zirconium oxide ceramic/Hylamer. The difference between the groups was significant (p < 0.008) except for stainless steel/Hylamer vs zirconium oxide ceramic/Hylamer (p = 0.26). At present, 12 patients have undergone a revision procedure, four at five years and eight thereafter. No patient who received a stainless steel/Enduron articulation at their primary replacement required revision. Conflicting results have been reported about the performance of the zirconium oxide ceramic femoral head, but our findings suggest that it should not be used with a polymethylmethacrylate acetabular component. Hylamer has already been withdrawn from the market.

  7. [Changes in the thoracic roentgen image in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pölzleitner, D; Herold, C; Tscholakoff, D; Imhof, H

    1990-01-19

    Since the earliest reports of what was later termed the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) appeared in 1980/81, with the recognition of opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men and i.v. drug abusers, more than 60% of AIDS patients develop pulmonary manifestations at some time in the course of their disease. Radiographic evaluation of the chest plays an important role in diagnosis. In fact, radiological changes are unspecific and either bacteriological proof or histological verification needs to be confirmed.

  8. The Teaching of Roentgen Anatomy to Medical Students: A Self-Instructional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegtmeyer, Charles J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This multidisciplinary approach necessitates the involvement of radiology that is suited for inclusion in an anatomy course since it is an ideal instrument for teaching anatomic principles. (Author/PG)

  9. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  10. [Roentgen morphology of extramural masses in double-contrast images of the digestive system].

    PubMed

    Wittich, G; Czembirek, H; Jantsch, H; Lechner, G; Salomonowitz, E

    1983-07-01

    A model for analysis, adapted to double contrast technique, is presented which helps to detect extrinsic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. During retrospective evaluation of double contrast examinations of 73 patients this scheme enabled the correct diagnosis in 96%.

  11. The Progress of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Arthur

    2015-10-01

    Introduction; 1. Scope of lectures. State of physics in 1875. Science of energy. Theory of gases. Elastic solid theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electricity. Training of students. Maxwell's view. Accurate measurement and discovery of Argon. German methods. Kirchhoff's laboratory. Wilhelm Weber's laboratory. The two laboratories of Berlin. Laboratory instruction at Manchester. Position of physics in mathematical tripos at Cambridge. Todhunter's views. The Cavendish laboratory. Spectrum analysis. The radiometer. Theory of vortex atom; 2. Action at a distance. Elastic solid of theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electrical action. Electro-magnetic theory. Verification of electromagnetic theory by Hertz. Electro-magnetic waves. Wireless telegraphy. First suggestion of molecular structure of electricity. Early experiments in the electric discharge through gases. Kathode rays. Works of Goldstein and Crookes. Hittorf's investigations. Own work on the discharge through gases. Ionization of gases. Magnetic deflexion of kathode rays. J. J. Thomson's experiments. Measurement of atomic charge; 3. Roentgen's discovery. Theories of Roentgen rays. Ionizing power of Roentgen rays. Conduction of electricity through ionized gases. Discovery of radio-activity. Discovery of radium. Magnetic deflexion of rays emitted by radio-active bodies. Discovery of emanations. Theory of radio-active change. Decay of the atom. Connexion between helium and the a ray. Helium produced by radium. Strutt's researches on helium accumulated in rocks. Electric inertia. Constitution of atom. J. J. Thomson's theory of Roentgen radiation. The Michelson-Morley experiment. Principle of relativity. The Zeeman effect. Other consequences of electron theory. Contrast between old and modern school of physics; 4. Observational sciences. Judgment affected by scale. Terrestrial magnetism. Existence of potential. Separation of internal and external causes. Diurnal variation. Magnetic storms. Their causes. Solar

  12. Travelogue of Konrad Keilhack (1858-1944), Geologist from Berlin, attending the International Geological Congress 1897 in St. Petersburg (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2015-09-01

    Keilhack reported his impressions from his participation at the International Geological Congress in Russia in 1897 in several consecutive articles. In the more than 100 years since that time, a lot has changed. Apart from the totally different style of scientific presentations, with almost no illustrations, except maps, being shown during a talk, field trips were also a very special event, involving huge amounts of logistics. More than 200 people were transported to very remote areas of the European part of Russia. As well as organizing transportation by coaches and horses, places to stay overnight had to be found in large numbers and special regulations had to be issued by the government to allow access to various outcrops. Keilhacks visit of the oil-producing sites around Baku are of special interest, since they belonged obviously to the most productive ones on the globe at that time.

  13. Radiation and health*

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, B.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation has been a source of fascination and concern ever since Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen discovered X-rays on 8 November 1895. Over the years, health workers as well as the public have been concerned about medical uses of X-rays, the presence of radon in buildings, radioactive waste from nuclear power stations, fallout from nuclear test explosions, radioactive consumer products, microwave ovens, and many other sources of radiation. Most recently, the tragic accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the USSR, and the subsequent contamination over most of Europe, has again wakened interest and concern and also reminded us about a number of misconceptions about radiation. This article describes the essentials about radiation (especially ionizing radiation) and its health effects. PMID:3496982

  14. A triboelectric closed loop band system for the generation of x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Lucas, B.; Ganlieli, Z.; Wong, E. W.; Cortes, P.; Mehta, N.; Cuadra, D.; Fong, J.; Hansen, S.; Kotowski, A.; Camara, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    X-ray have been commercially produced using the same basic design since their discovery by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, for which he was awarded the first Nobel prize in physics. This technology requires high voltage elements, ultra high vacuum tubes, and high voltage electronics. The vacuum and high voltage drive up the price of x-ray technology and in order to bring down the cost, a brand new way to produce x-rays is needed. In 2008 Carlos Camara, Juan Escobar, Jonathan R. Hird, and Seth Putterman1 discovered that by pealing scotch tape in a vacuum you could create enough x-rays to take an x-ray radiograph of a finger. This lead to the formation of Tribogenics and the development of the rod and band x-ray architecture.

  15. [Wilhelm Reich--Arthur Janov--a comparison of their work].

    PubMed

    Sprengler, M

    1984-01-01

    Although he does not always mention it, A. Janov agrees with many of W. Reich's opinions on theoretical-philosophical foundations and the theory of neurosis and other illnesses; from their criticism of society both of them develop the demand for prophylaxis of neurosis as a prerequisit for their common utopia of a selfregulated society. Primal therapy and Orgon therapy are two different forms of the "New Body Therapies" group. The authors disagree with their views of the physiological nature of Pain (A. Janov) and blokked orgon, the "function of the orgasm" and "orgastic potency", concepts that were considered by Reich to be his most important. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are given.

  16. Wilhelm Julius Foerster und die "Vereinigung von Freunden der Astronomie und kosmischen Physik" (1891 bis 1914).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, K.-H.

    Am 19. Mai 1891 wurde ins Leben gerufen die "Vereinigung von Freunden der Astronomie und der kosmischen Physik (nachfolg.: V.A.P.) - eine der beiden institutionellen Vorläufer der sich 1953 konstituierenden "Vereinigung der Sternfreunde".

  17. [The medical arrangements of the Westphalian Wilhelms-University in Münster (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weber, F W

    1977-12-01

    The buildings of the clinics and institutions of the medical faculty in Münster which were planned in 1914 and completed in 1925 were enlarged considerably with numerous new buildings in the 1950's because of increasing specialisation in medicine. The university eye clinic built in 1925 was enlarged in 1970 by the addition of a bed wing and in 1975 by the new construction of the out patients department. In 1969 the foundation stone for the new central clinic with the four bed towers was laid. The eye clinic will not move into the new central clinic, because the old part of the present eye clinic was also completely renovated, besides the construction of both the additions. This description is complemented by conclusive data on the number and bed-use of the single clinics and on the cost of the new wing and the number of students. PMID:342807

  18. [Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen and the discovery of X-rays].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M

    1996-01-01

    W.C. Röntgen reported the discovery of X-rays in December 1895 after seven weeks of assiduous work during which he had studied the properties of this new type of radiation able to go through screens of notable thickness. He named them X-rays to underline the fact that their nature was unknown. The news of this discovery immediately aroused an immense interest in the public and also initiated intense research in several directions. Physicians and physicists began as early as January 1896 to use X-rays on patients to investigate the skeleton and subsequently the lung and other organs. This was the birth or radiology. Rapidly they observed skin erythema, which led to the idea of using X-rays against a variety of lesions. In June 1896 the first patient was treated by radiotherapy. J.J. Thomson (Cambridge, U.K.) showed that X-rays were able to ionize gaz and the study of this phenomenon led to the discovery of electrons in 1897. In order to understand the emission of X-rays, H. Becquerel (Paris) investigated the role of the phosphorescence of the glass of the tube and while doing so discovered radioactivity in March 1896. X-rays and radioactivity were at the origin of the scientific revolution at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Research on radioactive materials demonstrated the existence of atoms which had been till then only a convenient hypothesis for explaining chemical reactions, but whose reality was considered as dubious by most physicists. Moreover, interaction of particles emitted by radionuclides and atoms enabled first the study of the structure of the atom and subsequently its nucleus. Matter, elements which were thought to be immutable were found to be transmutable, and eventually to disintegrate. The origin of the energy transferred to the radiation which was emitted appeared as a mystery and in order to explain it the physicist had to accept that matter could convert energy. In 1903 Einstein established the equivalence between matter and energy. Matter, energy, electricity, light which were formerly considered as continuous quantities were found to be discrete: there are particles of matter (elementary particles), energy (quanta, Planck 1905), electricity (electron), light (photons). Radioactive decay, particle interactions imposed a probabilistic physics which progressively replaced classic deterministic physics. Radioactivity can be used as a clock to measure time in the universe. Datations were made for fossils, art masterpieces and also for the earth, the solar system and universe. X-rays diffraction proved to be a powerful tool for studying crystals and molecules, in particular protein, and in 1953 enabled to demonstrate the DNA double helix. Hence X-rays and radioactivity originated a revolution in physics and science and in the vision of nature. The imperceptible and yet so powerful rays demonstrated the deficiencies of our senses. Mathematical entities and instrumentation must complement our sensations. The huge increment in our knowledge is accompanied by a divorce between the scientist and the layman who now often has great difficulties understanding new concepts not only in physics but also in biology.

  19. [Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen and the discovery of X-rays].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M

    1996-01-01

    W.C. Röntgen reported the discovery of X-rays in December 1895 after seven weeks of assiduous work during which he had studied the properties of this new type of radiation able to go through screens of notable thickness. He named them X-rays to underline the fact that their nature was unknown. The news of this discovery immediately aroused an immense interest in the public and also initiated intense research in several directions. Physicians and physicists began as early as January 1896 to use X-rays on patients to investigate the skeleton and subsequently the lung and other organs. This was the birth or radiology. Rapidly they observed skin erythema, which led to the idea of using X-rays against a variety of lesions. In June 1896 the first patient was treated by radiotherapy. J.J. Thomson (Cambridge, U.K.) showed that X-rays were able to ionize gaz and the study of this phenomenon led to the discovery of electrons in 1897. In order to understand the emission of X-rays, H. Becquerel (Paris) investigated the role of the phosphorescence of the glass of the tube and while doing so discovered radioactivity in March 1896. X-rays and radioactivity were at the origin of the scientific revolution at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Research on radioactive materials demonstrated the existence of atoms which had been till then only a convenient hypothesis for explaining chemical reactions, but whose reality was considered as dubious by most physicists. Moreover, interaction of particles emitted by radionuclides and atoms enabled first the study of the structure of the atom and subsequently its nucleus. Matter, elements which were thought to be immutable were found to be transmutable, and eventually to disintegrate. The origin of the energy transferred to the radiation which was emitted appeared as a mystery and in order to explain it the physicist had to accept that matter could convert energy. In 1903 Einstein established the equivalence between matter and energy. Matter, energy, electricity, light which were formerly considered as continuous quantities were found to be discrete: there are particles of matter (elementary particles), energy (quanta, Planck 1905), electricity (electron), light (photons). Radioactive decay, particle interactions imposed a probabilistic physics which progressively replaced classic deterministic physics. Radioactivity can be used as a clock to measure time in the universe. Datations were made for fossils, art masterpieces and also for the earth, the solar system and universe. X-rays diffraction proved to be a powerful tool for studying crystals and molecules, in particular protein, and in 1953 enabled to demonstrate the DNA double helix. Hence X-rays and radioactivity originated a revolution in physics and science and in the vision of nature. The imperceptible and yet so powerful rays demonstrated the deficiencies of our senses. Mathematical entities and instrumentation must complement our sensations. The huge increment in our knowledge is accompanied by a divorce between the scientist and the layman who now often has great difficulties understanding new concepts not only in physics but also in biology. PMID:8696882

  20. [Site of discovery in the bath tub. Evaluation of a fatality after four years using postmortem roentgen diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lasczkowski, G; Riepert, T; Rittner, C

    1992-01-01

    On the one hand the following case demonstrates the problems of finding a dead body in the bathroom and on the other hand the importance of postmortem x-ray examinations. The corpse of an 65-year-old woman was discovered in her bath tub. At the body's feet there was a hair dryer. Investigations concerning murder were negative, circumstances appeared to be unsuspicious. That was why a postmortem examination was not performed. -4 years later murder had to be considered. After manual strangling the deceased and the hair dryer were layed into the bath tub. The corpse was exhumed and taken to a forensic autopsy. It was found that the hyoid bone and the superior horn of the thyroid cartilage were both fractured on the right. Damages caused by the preparation itself were excluded by using serial roentgenographs. These observations in combination with histological findings and the results of further investigations convincingly supported the suspicion of strangling by hand.

  1. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2013-01-01

    MSFC is developing eight x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the SRG Mission. The Engineering Unit tests are successful. MSFC is on schedule to deliver flight units in the November of 2013 and January 2014.

  2. [Measuring device for rapid determination of tube peak voltage and the switch-on time of roentgen equipment].

    PubMed

    Bronder, T; Eickelkamp, U; Jakschik, J

    1982-11-01

    A prototype of a measuring device is described, which reads the tube peak voltage and the switch-on time of x-ray units by means of two radiation detectors with different energy dependences due to detector materials (Caesium Iodine and Silicon). With a storage oscilloscope the curves of the tube voltage and the relative absorbed dose rate of intensifying screens can be displayed. The measuring range of the tube peak voltage is 60 kV to 150 kV. It is possible to measure exposure times of radiography equipment above 2 ms wit sufficiently low uncertainty. The tube peak voltage has been read with a relative uncertainty below 5% for almost all dose rates, which arise in practical application of medical x-ray units, and its calibration is made by means of x-ray apparatus with tube voltage reading, which has been compared to a Ge(Li) spectrometer. The stability of tube voltage reading of the measuring device is only effected by radiation damage of the detectors after a long time of utilization. The small diameter of the probe permits the accommodation of other probes, ionization chambers, phantoms, etc. in the radiation field at the same time. PMID:6217132

  3. [Flow rates of roentgen contrast media of different viscosity in 4.1 Charrière coronary catheters].

    PubMed

    Jung, F; Schmitt, R M; Scheller, B; Bach, R; Heidmann, D; Spitzer, S; Schieffer, H

    1996-08-01

    The studies presented here investigated the obtainable flows of different contrast media (Iopromide 370 mg iodine/ml, ZK 119 095 370 mg iodine/ml, ZK 139 129 370 mg iodine/ml, Iopamidol 370 mg iodine/ml, Iopromide 300 mg iodine/ml, ZK 119 095 300 mg iodine/ml, ZK 139 129 300 mg iodine/ml, Iopamidol 300 mg iodine/ml, aqua dest.) in 4.1 Charrière coronary catheters. The measurements of the flow achieved by a standardised power of 100 N show that the highest values are reached with the substance ZK 119 095 (both for 300 mg iodine/ml and 370 mg iodine/ml). On comparison of the catheter types there are no differences in the delivery rate. The x-ray contrast-media, however, are significantly different: the lowest iodine delivery rate is found for iopromide 370 with 384.5 mg iodine/s; the highest rate for the test substance ZK 119 095 with 648.9 mg iodine/s. Although contrast media with low viscosity contain considerably less iodine/ml it is possible to achieve an iodine density in coronary vessels by about 86% higher than that achieved by contrast media with 370 mg iodine/ml. Therefore, the possibility to choose a viscosity-adapted x-ray contrast-medium allows the use of very thin cardiac catheter systems without leading to a worsening of picture quality.

  4. [Therapeutic percutaneous puncture and drainage of postoperative space-occupying lesions using permanent ultrasound and roentgen control].

    PubMed

    Gerstner, G J; Schramek, P

    1987-02-01

    Ultrasonically guided, percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy allows final histological and/or cytological diagnosis in patients with benign or malignant space-occupying growths even of small size. Therapeutic puncture and drainage of postoperative abdominal or retroperitoneal growths (haematoma, seroma, lymph cyst, abscess) however, requires 1.) dilatation of the percutaneously established puncture channel and 2.) continuous vacuum aspiration over a period of several days or weeks. We report on three therapeutic punctures in two patients with retroperitoneal lymph cysts following abdominal radical hysterectomy with lymphonodectomy and one patient with abscess formation following nephrectomy. The technique employed was as used in percutaneous nephrostomy. Under local anaesthesia and permanent ultrasound guidance the lesion is punctured with a 1.3 mm hollow puncture needle of three parts (Angiomed) and after aspiration of fluid a 0.9 mm wire guide with a curved, soft tap was inserted through the puncture needle in the lesion. The puncture channel is then dilated under x-ray visualisation with a Teflon-coated fasciadilatator (Cook) to Charr. 16 (20). Finally either a polyvinyl catheter with two lateral apertures (Cook) or a double-barrelled Shirley Drain is inserted and fixed to the skin with a stitch. For diversion a closed system is used. Over a period of one to two weeks 50 to 200 millilitres of secretion are drained off per day in decreasing quantity. The patients returned to normal temperature and recovered entirely. The advantage of our method is the avoidance of dangerous and difficult secondary surgery.

  5. [New developments in parameter-oriented roentgen densitometry perfusion analysis within the scope of heart catheter studies].

    PubMed

    Haude, M; Caspari, G; Baumgart, D; Spiller, P; Heusch, G; Erbel, R

    1997-04-01

    X-ray densitometric evaluation of digital subtraction coronary arteriograms allows a qualitative and quantitative detection of contrast medium propagation through the epicardial coronary arteries, the capillary system and the coronary venous system. So-called "time-density-curves" (TDCs) can be generated following Lambert-Beer's law similar to indicator dilution curves by using contrast medium as the indicator. Several time and density parameters can be derived from these TDCs, which are related to local myocardial perfusion. Different animal validation studies have shown the applicability of this concept for in-vivo evaluation of coronary blood flow and myocardial perfusion. Nevertheless, absolute measurement of volumetric coronary blood flow or myocardial perfusion failed. Therefore, relative changes in coronary blood flow or myocardial perfusion in response to pharmacologically induced maximum hyperemia were measured and coronary or myocardial perfusion reserve was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic flow or perfusion divided by baseline values. Despite theoretical attractions for an application during routine cardiac catheterization, this densitometric approach did not get a wide acceptance. Primary reason for this limited use in specialized centers was the time consuming process of densitometric evaluation of the subtraction coronary arteriograms, which require digital cine angiography and necessitates enormous computer hard ware. This main limitation has been overcome since more powerful computer hard ware (processor speed, hard disk space, digitization boards) has become rapidly available during the last years at more moderate pricing and digital techniques today are state of the art in cardiac catheterization laboratories. In addition, soft ware program packages allowed an automatization of the digitization and densitometric evaluation process. These programs include ECG triggered cine image digitization with improved temporal resolution, semiautomatic definition of regions-of-interest including definition of reference regions-of-interest for the detection of background density changes and quality-controlled densitometric parameter analysis. This progress made an application during routine cardiac catheterization feasible. In animal validation studies this improved X-ray densitometric approach for evaluation of local myocardial perfusion was validated versus colour-coded microsphere techniques. The time parameter "rise time", defined as the time from the start of local contrast medium induced density change to its maximum revealed a close correlation (r2 = 0.965) to the results of the microsphere technique over a wide range of perfusion. We have applied this technique before and after coronary interventions such as balloon angioplasty and stenting. Results documented an improvement of poststenotic myocardial perfusion reserve immediately after coronary balloon angioplasty and an additional improvement after adjunct coronary stenting. Only after stenting but usually not after coronary balloon angioplasty alone poststenotic myocardial perfusion reserve gained the intraindividual reference level, measured in a perfusion bed supplied by an epicardial coronary artery without stenoses. These results documented the functional benefit of coronary stenting on poststenotic myocardial perfusion in addition to the well known morphologic benefit with the creation of a larger and more circular conduit. PMID:9206707

  6. Investing in nursing education: some evidence of immediate private monetary benefits.

    PubMed

    Siedenberg, J M

    1989-05-01

    Sir Alexander Fleming's discovery of penicillin and Wilhelm Roentgen's detection of X rays are two of the more famous illustrations of research findings coming about accidentally. Fleming and Roentgen each was working in the general field of his major breakthrough when a significant disclosure occurred quite fortuitously. Results presented in this article also came about somewhat unintentionally. While studying the benefits of investment in cooperative education, positive outcomes in completing a baccalaureate degree with a specialization in nursing, turned up. A study of Lehman College alumni (1980-1985) revealed that nursing students fared better in the labor market upon graduation than did their nonnursing counterparts. This article examines several of the employment variables, such as wage rate and search costs, in light of factors including background differences of graduates, and market conditions such as the nursing shortage. Evidence suggests that the relative advantage enjoyed by the nursing group is associated with the additional human capital obtained through pursuing an academic concentration in nursing.

  7. Deep mantle mineralogy and novel materials synthesis using multianvil high-pressure technology (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetsuo, Irifune

    2016-04-01

    Phase relations in mantle and slab materials have been studied using Kawai-type multianvil apparatus (KMA) under pressure and temperature conditions of the mantle transition region and the uppermost lower mantle of the Earth. The associated density and sound velocity changes of these materials have also been determined using the KMA technology combined with synchrotron in situ X-ray and ultrasonic interferometry measurements. The results show that the mantle transition region is made of a pyrolitic composition, while the presence of a harzburgite-rich layer is suggested in the lower parts of this region. Use of sintered diamond anvils for KMA has allowed expansion of these measurements toward deeper region of the lower mantle. Our preliminary results of such measurements indicate that at least upper part of the lower mantle is made of the pyrolitic composition contrary to a recent study based on Brillouin scattering measurements in diamond anvil cell, which concluded a more Si-rich lower mantle. On the other hand, we have been applying KMA technology to synthesis of novel functional materials utilizing its capability of producing very high static pressures and homogeneous temperatures in relatively large sample volumes. These include ultrahard nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) directly converted from graphite, which is now being used for applications to abrasive and cutting tools as well as for some scientific applications such as anvils for some high-pressure devices. Another example of such a novel material is hard and tough nano-polycrystalline stishovite (NPS), which is also potentially important for some industrial applications. Moreover, we recently succeeded in making highly transparent nano-polycrystalline garnet (NPG), which is ideal for the measurements of sound velocities by various methods, such as Brillouin scattering and GHz ultrasonic interferometry. Thus, the KMA technology opens the door to the synthesis of transparent nano-polycrystalline ceramics, in addition to its use for the studies in deep Earth mineralogy.

  8. [Considerations concerning the award of the first Nobel Prize in Physics to Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen].

    PubMed

    Luberti, R F; Bagur, D B; Ponticelli, R; Brezina, A J

    1998-11-01

    By the end of the 19th century, the quantity of scientists of great value was so big that selecting one for the top prize was not easy at all. Opinions were divided, giving rise to the personal controversy depicted in this article.

  9. Wilhelm August Gottlieb Manniske, MD (1769-1835): microscope use during removal of buried corneal body in 1792.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, J Fraser

    2013-02-01

    In 1792, a priest in Germany consulted a young doctor about a buried corneal foreign body hidden in a small, hard mass that partly covered the pupil. During removal of the foreign body, the doctor inspected the corneal incision with a microscope to confirm the suspected presence of the foreign body. This may be the first use of a microscope in eye surgery. PMID:23411892

  10. [The coding of roentgen diagnostic findings of studies based on morphologic structural changes. A computer assisted archive system for scientific purposes].

    PubMed

    Fritschy, P

    1986-09-01

    For the last three years our Institute has been using a system based on a microcomputer for archiving scientifically interesting findings. This computer processes data obtained via computed tomography, sonography and angiography. Besides the coding of examination findings the system also enables compilation of efficiency statistics data. The system can be extended with comparatively little effort for processing MR data as well. Coding is not effected, as in most of the generally used systems, according to diagnosis, but according to the pathological change that can be detected via x-ray film. This prevents erroneous coding due to erroneous evaluation of the finding in question. The examinations can be stored immediately without waiting for verification. Search for defined findings is effected via screen where a search profile is set up interactively. Due to the hierarchic structure of code allocation it is possible to call for more or less detailed findings from the stored data. PMID:3533392

  11. Struve family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Struve, Friedrich Georg Wilhelm (1793-1864); Struve, Otto Wilhelm (1819-1905), son of Friedrich; Struve, Karl Hermann (1854-1920), elder son of Otto Wilhelm, brother of Gustav; Struve, Gustav Wilhelm Ludwig (1858-1920), younger son of Otto Wilhelm, brother of Karl; Struve, Otto (1897-1963) [Otto Struve II], son of Gustav....

  12. Fritz Reiche and German Refugee Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Fritz Reiche (1883-1969) was a distinguished theoretical physicist, a student and colleague of Wilhelm Roentgen, Max Planck, Fritz Haber, Rudolf Ladenburg, James Franck, Max Born, Max von Laue and other early luminaries. He was coauthor of the famous Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, and author of the seminal book The Quantum Theory, first published in 1920. He was one of the last Jewish physicists to leave Germany during the Nazi period, in 1941. In his book "Heisenberg's War" Thomas Powers relates that Reiche bore news of German work on nuclear fission, in a message from Friedrich Houtermans to Wigner and others in Princeton, where Reiche lived in Einstein's home during the summer of 1941. Reiche's son Hans later claimed that this incident played a significant role in convincing Einstein to write that letter to President Roosevelt. In this talk I will relate the difficulties Reiche experienced, first in leaving Germany and then in reestablishing his physics career in the US. He finally obtained an adjunct position at NYU where he served until his retirement. The role played by the renowned Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced Foreign Scholars will be discussed. The particular role played by Ladenburg, who was instrumental in obtaining a small grant for Reiche permitting him to obtain a US visa, in helping many physicists leave Nazi Germany and occupied countries, will also be described.

  13. Evolution of Medical Imaging and Computational Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Stanley R.

    2000-11-01

    The first medical images produced using x-rays appeared less than a year after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895. For over a century x-ray projection radiography has been and continues to be the most widely used diagnostic imaging modality. For over seventy years mathematics and computational methods were used in a general way for image processing and analysis. The really challenging mathematical and computational problems did not emerge until the 1970s with the beginning of computed tomography (CT) to produce images popularly known as CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scans. This was followed rapidly by positron-emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) emerged in the 1980s and is in many ways the most informative medical imaging methodology. Computer-based mathematical methods are fundamental to the success of these imaging modalities, and are increasingly important in several other novel imaging techniques. The technologies involved in each modality are competely different, have varying diagnostic value, and are described by different fundamental equations. The common underlying theme is that of the reconstruction of important characteristics of medical interest from indirect measurements. Several of these methodologies for visualizing internal body anatomy and function will be discussed and related to the evolution of computational capabilities. This brings out aspects of these biomedical imaging technologies where a deeper understanding is needed, and to frontiers where future advances are likely to come from continued research in physics jointly with the mathematical sciences.

  14. The state of the art of medical imaging technology: from creation to archive and back.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations. PMID:21915232

  15. 76 FR 53705 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: “Seductive Luxury and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ...: The Furniture of Abraham and David Roentgen'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following... ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation: The Furniture of Abraham and David Roentgen,'' imported from abroad...

  16. [From anamnesis to the art of interpretation, or: What is a "genuine" psychoanalyst? Wolfgang Warda, Ludwig Binswanger, Wilhelm Strohmayer and the origins of psychoanalysis in Thuringia].

    PubMed

    May, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Warda and Strohmayer from Thuringia were among the first German physicians who developed an interest in Freuds theory and therapeutic method around 1900. Their contributions reflect the influence of Otto Binswanger, professor of psychiatry in Jena, a representative of the "psychological direction" in psychiatry which in the beginning was relatively receptive to Freud. The paper discusses their rapprochement to, and detachment from, the Freudian school, including also the work of a third young physician: Ludwig Binswanger, Otto's nephew, who was active in Jena at the same time. It points to certain factors contributing to the increasing rejection Freud met in academic circles which have been underrated to date: (1) the transformation of psychoanalysis into an art of interpretation; (2) the introduction of transference. Both factors which were elaborated by Freud as essentials of his theoretical and practical approach around 1900 and published in 1904/05, undermined the claim of academic medicine to objectivity. The paper describes how psychoanalysis officially abandoned the scientific standards of contemporary medicine at the Weimar congress in 1911, at the same time as Warda and Strohmayer left the Freudian group. PMID:27281983

  17. A Brazilian in the Reich of Wilhelm II: Henrique da Rocha Lima, Brazil-Germany relations and the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, 1901-1909.

    PubMed

    Silva, André Felipe Cândido da

    2013-03-01

    This article follows the career of the Brazilian physician Henrique da Rocha Lima, one of the first to join the group of young researchers working at the Instituto Soroterápico de Manguinhos (Instituto Oswaldo Cruz). It describes his first voyage to Germany where he specialized in microbiology and pathological anatomy, training that shaped his subsequent professional identity. The tensions and dilemmas experienced by Rocha Lima provide an insight into what it meant to dedicate oneself to a scientific career in Brazil at the start of the twentieth century. They also reveal the importance of the relations with the German-speaking world for the experimental medicine that became established under the leadership of Oswaldo Cruz.

  18. [From anamnesis to the art of interpretation, or: What is a "genuine" psychoanalyst? Wolfgang Warda, Ludwig Binswanger, Wilhelm Strohmayer and the origins of psychoanalysis in Thuringia].

    PubMed

    May, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Warda and Strohmayer from Thuringia were among the first German physicians who developed an interest in Freuds theory and therapeutic method around 1900. Their contributions reflect the influence of Otto Binswanger, professor of psychiatry in Jena, a representative of the "psychological direction" in psychiatry which in the beginning was relatively receptive to Freud. The paper discusses their rapprochement to, and detachment from, the Freudian school, including also the work of a third young physician: Ludwig Binswanger, Otto's nephew, who was active in Jena at the same time. It points to certain factors contributing to the increasing rejection Freud met in academic circles which have been underrated to date: (1) the transformation of psychoanalysis into an art of interpretation; (2) the introduction of transference. Both factors which were elaborated by Freud as essentials of his theoretical and practical approach around 1900 and published in 1904/05, undermined the claim of academic medicine to objectivity. The paper describes how psychoanalysis officially abandoned the scientific standards of contemporary medicine at the Weimar congress in 1911, at the same time as Warda and Strohmayer left the Freudian group.

  19. German-American Cultural Interaction in the Jacksonian Era: Six Unpublished Letters by Francis Lieber and John Pickering to Wilhelm von Humboldt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller-Vollmer, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    Letters by German-American writer and political scientist Francis Lieber and American lawyer and linguist John Pickering to Wilhem von Humboldt in Berlin, published here for the first time, give insight into the cultural interaction between Germany and the United States during the Jacksonian era, and may open new perspectives for German-American…

  20. How Wilhelm Dilthey Influenced Popular Science Writing: Kurd Laßwitz's "Homchen. Ein Tiermärchen aus der oberen Kreide"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouni, Safia

    In the second half of the nineteenth century, popularization of science appeared to be a necessity of the time. Scientists and politicians discussed the pros and cons of making scientific knowledge accessible to the public. The question of how and by whom popularization should be done was a common topic in newspapers and magazines of the time. Even though museums as well as zoological and botanical gardens played an important role in disseminating knowledge, it can be said that the popularization of science basically was (and probably still is) a "language-based event".1

  1. Comment on 'Historical review of a long-overlooked paper by R. A. Daly concerning the origin and the early history of the moon' by Ralph B. Baldwin and Don Wilhelms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, F. J.; Stark, L. E.

    1993-02-01

    R. A. Daly made mention of the possibility of an impact theory for the origin of the moon prior to his 1946 paper on the subject. In the revised edition of his book 'Igneous Rocks and the Depths of the Earth' (1933), Daly suggested that the lunar mass may have separated from the earth as the result of a collision between the earth and a planetoid. This, and not the 1946 paper, was the first publication of this theory for the origin of the moon.

  2. 77 FR 51606 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Extravagant Inventions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Furniture of the Roentgens,'' Formerly Titled ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation: The Furniture of Abraham... State pertaining to the exhibition ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation: The Furniture of Abraham and David Roentgen.'' The referenced notice is corrected here to change the exhibition name to...

  3. Overview of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (originally called the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - AXAF) is the X-Ray component of NASA's "Great Observatory" Program. Chandra is a NASA facility that provides scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to scientific proposals for its use. The Observatory is the product of the efforts of many organizations in the United States and Europe. The Great Observatories also include the Hubble Space Telescope for space-based observations of astronomical objects primarily in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the now defunct Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory that was designed to observe gamma-ray emission from astronomical objects, and the soon-to-be-launched Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (hereafter CXO) is sensitive to X-rays in the energy range from below 0.1 to above 10.0 keV corresponding to wavelengths from 12 to 0.12 nanometers. The relationship among the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, sorted by characteristic temperature and the corresponding wavelength, is illustrated. The German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered what he thought was a new form of radiation in 1895. He called it X-radiation to summarize its properties. The radiation had the ability to pass through many materials that easily absorb visible light and to free electrons from atoms. We now know that X-rays are nothing more than light (electromagnetic radiation) but at high energies. Light has been given many names: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray and gamma radiation are all different forms. Radio waves are composed of low energy particles of light (photons). Optical photons - the only photons perceived by the human eye - are a million times more energetic than the typical radio photon, whereas the energies of X-ray photons range from hundreds to thousands of times higher than that of optical photons. Very low temperature systems

  4. Calibration of the ART-XC/SRG X-ray Mirror Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Elsner, R.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    Seven x-ray mirror modules are being fabricated at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument to be launched on board of the Spektrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. As they are completed, the modules are tested and calibrated at the MSFC's 104-m Stray Flight Facility. The results of these calibration measurements and comparisons with theoretical models will be presented.

  5. Our Compulsory Goals: Effective Teaching and Meaningful Learning through Powerful Cultural Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Wilhelm asks, "But are new literacies just fun?" Then he immediately answers, "Absolutely not--if we as teachers provide the right context and conditions of their use." Offering research-based advice on incorporating technology to increase motivation and deepen learning, Wilhelm boils it down to this bottom line: it's engaged, substantive,…

  6. Teaching Literacy for Love and Wisdom: Being the Book and Being the Change. Language and Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.; Novak, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This powerful book lays out an inspiring new vision for the teaching of English, building on themes central to Wilhelm's influential "You Gotta BE The Book." With this new work, Wilhelm and Novak challenge business as usual in the language arts. They call for nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the aims and methods of the English…

  7. Nature, Human Nature, and Solutions to Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    This paper promotes an undergraduate course that would discuss the great ideas of Plato, St. Paul, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Paul Sartre, B. F. Skinner, and Konrad Lorenz. This course would help students understand human values and behaviors while focusing on historical, world, and national problems. Tentative solutions would then be…

  8. Some Issues Concerning Aggression and Violence in Human Beings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponton, Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    Examines aggression and violence from an interdisciplinary perspective. Humanistic psychologist Rollo May sees violence as the end product of power deprivation. Anthropologists Konrad Lorenz and Robert Ardrey regard aggression as an innate biological drive. Anthropologist Richard Leakey views it as a learned, culturally determined response.…

  9. Caveat Lector: Reviewing Popular Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Vivian Scott

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems with reviews and criticisms of popular social science books: the quality and background of reviewers, the difficulty of distinguishing between fact and opinion, and the scarcity of competent reviewers. Analyzes reviews of Robert Ardrey's "African Genesis" and "The Territorial Imperative," Konrad Lorenz's "On Aggression," and…

  10. Up-to-Date and with a Past: The "Duden" and Its History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Gerhard

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the origins and history of Konrad Duden's "Vollstandiges Orthographisches Worterbuch," the standard reference work on correct German spelling since the 1880s, which since the early 20th century has been referred to simply as "Duden." Also emphasized are the historical and cultural impact of "Duden" spelling guides in the 20th century. (24…

  11. 75 FR 45200 - Commercial Driver's License (CDL) Standards; Rotel North American Tours, LLC; Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... for public comment (75 FR 33661). No comments were received in the public docket by the close of the... Erbersdobler, Wilhelm Fuchs, Ludwig Gerlsberger, Christian Hafner, Peter Hess, Michael Huber, Gerhard...

  12. Planetary Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Batson, Raymond M.

    2007-02-01

    Preface; List of contributors; 1. Introduction R. Greeley and R. M. Batson; 2. History of planetary cartography R. M. Batson, E. A. Whitaker and D. E. Wilhelms; 3. Cartography R. M. Batson; 4. Planetary nomenclature M. E. Strobell and H. Masursky; 5. Geodetic control M. E. Davies; 6. Topographic mapping S. S. C. Wu and F. J. Doyle; 7. Geologic mapping D. E. Wilhelms; Appendices R. M. Batson and J. L. Inge; Index.

  13. Physicists and Physics in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Jürgen; Eckert, Michael; Wolff, Stefan

    We give a tour of Munich and some outlying sites that focuses on the lives and work of the most prominent physicists who lived in the city, Count Rumford, Joseph Fraunhofer, Georg Simon Ohm, Max Planck, Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein, Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, Wilhelm Wien, Arnold Sommerfeld, Max von Laue, and Werner Heisenberg. We close with a self-guided tour that describes how to reach these sites in Munich.

  14. Roentgenstructural analysis of Cristalline Cobalt II with 1,10- fenatrolin and tiosemicarbazid acetic acid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Aviv Yu.

    The author has reported his long years research in the area of structure and Roentgen analysis of Cristalls. The talk concerns Roentgen analysis, Its first steps in Kishinev during the finish of 40-th and the beginning of 50-th. Some concerns was given to prof. T.I. Malinovskij,a graduated from the Yassy University one of the first Assistants Proff. at the Kishinev State Pedagogical Institute and later a leading scientist in the area of cristalls research in the Soviet Moldavia. Particularly, the actual talk was dedicated to interaction of acids with cristals of 1,10 fenatrolin.

  15. ART-XC/SRG: Status of the X-ray Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Elsner, R. F.; ODell, S.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has approximately 65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  16. ART-XC/SRG: Status of the X-ray Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Elsner, R.; O'Dell, S.; Kolodziejczak, J.; McCracken, J.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinskiy, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard-x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has approx. 65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  17. ART-XC/SRG: Status of the X-ray Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Elsner, R.; O'Dell, S.; Kolodziejczak, J.; McCracken, J.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinskiy, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard-x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has approximately 65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  18. Flight programs and X-ray optics development at MSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Swartz, D.; Gaskin, J.; Weisskopf, M.

    The X-ray astronomy group at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing electroformed nickel/cobalt x-ray optics for suborbital and orbital experiments. Suborbital instruments include the Focusing X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) and Micro-X sounding rocket experiments and the HEROES balloon payload. Our current orbital program is the fabrication of mirror modules for the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) to be launched on board the Russian-German Spectrum Roentgen Gamma Mission (SRG). A second component of our work is the development of fabrication techniques and optical metrology to improve the angular resolution of thin-shell optics to the arcsecond-level.

  19. Development and Calibration of the ART-XC Mirror Modules for the Spectrum Rontgen Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B.; Gubarev, M.; Elsner, R.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Odell, S.; Swartz, D.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2013-01-01

    The Spectrum-Röntgen-Gamma (SRG) mission is a Russian-lead X-ray astrophysical observatory that carries two co-aligned X-ray telescope systems. The primary instrument is the German-led extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (eROSITA), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that covers the energy range from 0.2-12 keV. The complementary instrument is the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope -- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC or ART), a 7-module Xray telescope system that provides higher energy coverage, up to 30 keV.

  20. [Possibilities of x-ray computed tomography in the diagnosis and treatment of suppurative complications of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Briskin, B S; Rybakov, G S; Khalidov, O Kh; Tereshchenko, G V

    2002-01-01

    The authors have analyzed results of the roentgen computed examination of 73 patients with acute pancreatitis and its complications. The potentialities of roentgen computed tomography (RCT) in diagnosing are shown as well as computed semiotics of acute pancreatitis and its complications. The authors consider that RCT makes the diagnosis substantially more exact and enables the complications to be detected much earlier. Systematization of the signs detected by RCT in acute pancreatitis in combination with the clinical symptoms gives the information necessary for correct strategy of surgical treatment.

  1. [Digital radiography in tomography of the facial bones].

    PubMed

    Ibing, H P; Vogel, H; Biebesheimer, V

    1988-09-01

    In 14 patients the x-ray findings of dental, mandibular and maxillary roentgen diagnosis were compared with conventional tomography and tomography by digital radiography. All details important for diagnosis were shown by both techniques. Tomography by digital radiography offered a more convenient approach and pictures easier to be interpreted than pictures by conventional tomography. PMID:3175474

  2. Atomic Pioneers, Book 2, From the Mid-19th to the Early 20th Century. A World of the Atom Series Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Ray; Hiebert, Roselyn

    This booklet is concerned with the last half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century when a great surge of knowledge vital to atomic science took place, as illustrated by work by Faraday, Mendeleev, Roentgen, Becquerel and the Curies. Each succeeding discovery brought atomic science closer to the great breakthrough that marked the close…

  3. Rosenman's "Serendipity and Scientific Discovery" Revisited: Toward Defining Types of Chance Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz de Chumaceiro, Cora L.; Yaber O., Guillermo E.

    1994-01-01

    The role of serendipity or "chance in all its forms" in scientific discovery is considered. The need to differentiate between purely accidental events and Rothenberg's "articulations of error" when discussing scientific discoveries is stressed. Examples of articulations of errors are noted, including Fleming (penicillin), Roentgen (X-ray effect),…

  4. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  5. Tinea corporis overlying the thyroid gland after radioiodine (131I) treatment of Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Yedinak, M.A.; Crooks, L.A.; Fox, B.J.

    1986-04-01

    A case of tinea corporis involving the skin overlying the thyroid gland is described in a 36-year-old man who had received radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease. The dermatophytosis mimicked a delayed roentgen erythema. Radiation to the dermis may have locally altered the cell-mediated immunity and predisposed this patient to the dermatophytosis.

  6. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  7. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  8. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  9. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  10. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  11. The scientific bridge: fifty years of Germany-Israel diplomatic relations.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Helmut; Willner, Itamar; Marek, Ilan

    2015-10-12

    "…︁ Fifty years ago, out of the ashes of the Second World War, the German Chancellor, Konrad Adenauer, and the Israeli Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion, initiated the establishment of diplomatic relations between Germany and Israel. This special issue commemorates the fruitful and mutually enriching long-term collaborations between Israeli and German scientists …︁ Read more in the Editorial by Helmut Schwarz, Itamar Willner, and Ilan Marek.

  12. In Memoriam Werner Callebaut.

    PubMed

    Boniolo, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    The article contains some recollections on Werner Callebaut highlighting his personal character and his role in the community of historians, philosophers and sociologists of the life sciences. Werner Callebaut (1952-2014) was a real European philosopher. He was the Scientific Director of the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI, Klosterneuburg, Austria) and the President of the International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology.

  13. Study of a Solar X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The highly structured nature of the outer solar atmosphere seems to be intimately linked to the presence, at the solar surface, of magnetic fields that have been generated inside the Sun and have emerged to the surface. The corona is brightest (and also hottest) at just those locations where the magnetic field has emerged from inside the Sun. Dynamo theory predicts that strong magnetic fields will be generated deep in the solar interior and that bundles or 'ropes' of magnetic flux will float to the surface. When this happens, a magnetically bipolar region will become visible, extending above the surface in a three-dimensional structure. The field lines penetrate through the surface, showing two magnetic poles, and also exhibit a three-dimensional structure above the surface. The structure created by the field emergence is rooted in the (relatively) cool photosphere and extends through the chromosphere and transition region to the corona. Thus, the magnetic field creates a region, called an active region, which contains portions at temperatures from less than 10(exp 4) K to greater than 10(exp 6) K, and is therefore visible at wavelengths from the infrared through x-rays. The locations where the magnetic field leaves and reenters the visible surface are called the 'footpoints' of the coronal structures associated with the magnetic field. The magnetic fields themselves are not directly visible. However, the hot coronal plasma is, for the most part, constrained to follow the direction of the magnetic field lines in the atmosphere. Now, 100 years after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1896, we can routinely make observations of the solar corona from outside the Earth's atmosphere in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As shown by comparing x-ray images with magnetograms, the bright corona over these bipolar magnetic regions consists of closed structures that seem to follow the orientation of the magnetic field. Although we can see down to the

  14. Prospects for AGN Science using the ART-XC on the SRG Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    The enhanced hard X-ray sensitivity provided by the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope to the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission facilitates the detection of heavily obscured and other hard-spectrum cosmic X-ray sources. The SRG all-sky survey will obtain large, statistically-well-defined samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) including a significant population of local heavily-obscured AGN. In anticipation of the SRG all-sky survey, we investigate the prospects for refining the bright end of the AGN luminosity function and determination of the local black hole mass function and comparing the spatial distribution of AGN with large-scale structure defined by galaxy clusters and groups. Particular emphasis is placed on studies of the deep survey Ecliptic Pole regions.

  15. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  16. Preparation of PbSeO3 as a new material, sensitive to the electromagnetic radiation in UV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaev, V. V.; Smolyaninov, V. D.; Stoyanova, T. V.; Egorov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The new technology of the formation of photoresistive structures sensitive in ultraviolet range of electromagnetic spectrum based on lead selenide and lead selenite composite is discussed. Studies of photosensitivity were carried out using a set of LEDs in the visible and ultraviolet spectral range. Obtained structures show considerable sensitivity in ultraviolet and blue range of radiation, meanwhile that in red and yellow region of light turned to be small. The structures were formed by oxidation of PbSe crystals. Diffusion of the oxygen through the surface layer of PbSe was suggested to be a key mechanism of oxidation. Oxidation kinetics were studied by means of roentgen lines chemical shift and roentgen diffraction.

  17. Tibial bone mineral distribution as influenced by calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D feeding levels in the growing turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrell, F. A.; Brenes, J.; Waibel, P.

    1974-01-01

    Roentgen signs, subperiosteal, endosteal, and trabecular bone growth are evaluated in turkeys fed phosphorus at the 0.5, 0.56, 0.68, 0.90, and 2.70 percent levels. Calcium levels of 0.30, 0.40, 0.60, 1.2, and 3.60 percent were also tested. Vitamin D levels of 0, 100, 300, 900 and 27,000 I.U. per day were likewise evaluated. Roentgen signs, bone mineral as measured by T-125 gamma ray absorption, and bone mineral growth patterns as shown by radiograph area projection are correlated with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D feeding levels. Differences in bone growth at the various feeding levels were observed which were not reflected by differences in other studied parameters.

  18. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  19. Electrodynamics of a compound system with relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2007-08-15

    The electromagnetic interaction of a moving compound charged system with leading relativistic corrections is studied. An effective Hamiltonian is obtained by using a set of canonical transformations, and it is demonstrated that the coupling of the total motion to internal degrees of freedom is uniquely determined by Lorentz covariance. Several known results such as the Roentgen term and the interaction of the spin with the electric field are recovered, and new results for various relativistic and recoil corrections are obtained.

  20. Nils Gustav Dalén, the Unknown Nobel Prize Winner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Hanging on the wall of my museum is a large "Map of Physics" published by the Central Scientific Company in 1938. On it is a list of the Nobel Prizes in physics, starting with Roentgen in 1901 and ending with Fermi in 1938. I can recognize every name except the one for 1912: Nils Gustav Dalén. Perhaps you have had the same experience when looking through the updated list.

  1. [The "recommendations of 1928" and its background].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Y

    1993-01-01

    In the "recommendations of the International X-ray Units Committee" published in 1928, the first international unit "Roentgen" was given without any specific definition of the physical quantity represented by the unit. This introduced confusion into the subsequent history of radiation units. The "recommendations" had another distinctive feature, i.e., more than half of the recommendations were concerned with the problems of X-ray measurement. Around 1925, almost all Roentgen societies and physics societies in the world regarded the ionization of air by X-ray as a basic phenomenon for the establishment of the unit. Many devices were proposed for counting the number of ions. O. Glasser and his joint research workers examined the accuracy of each apparatus to choose the best one. The results of their study were adopted in the "recommendations of 1928". In the meantime, owing to the Compton effect discovered in 1923, it had become difficult to relate the X-ray dose unconditionally with air ionization quantity. Consequently, the physical quantity represented by the unit "Roentgen" became difficult to specify, and much time was needed to resolve these problemss. Various sicknesses and lesions had been caused by the misuse of X-ray. To avoid the damage and to reproduce the conditions of treatment, physicians took it as a matter of urgency to standardize the international units. They thought that practical convenience should be given priority over the pursuit of physical precision in the standardization of units and measurements. These factors led to the vagueness of the physical quantity represented by "Roentgen" in the "recommendations of 1928". PMID:11639745

  2. [The and beginnings of Chilean endocrinology in the 1920s].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Delgado, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Rejuvenation was a chapter of critical importance for the worldwide development of endocrinology in the 1920s. This work explores the acceptance of these techniques in Chile. Starting in the late 19th century, the Chilean Medical Journal (Revista Médica de Chile) incorporated references to experiments with endocrine gland preparations that were being conducted in Europe at the time. An appropriation of the experiments by the Austrian Eugen Steinach began in 1920, with prominent figures such as the Italian professor Juan Noe Crevani and the young Chilean student Ottmar Wilhelm. Between 1922 and 1924, Wilhelm developed a series of experiments on dogs, bulls, pigs, rats and Welfare Board patients through the so-called Steinach operation, which consisted of the sectioning of the efferent channel in one of the testicles. Professor Noe's scientific patronage policy and Wilhelm's strategy of succession in the field led the latter to hold a chair in the new School of Medicine of Universidad de Concepci6n at the age of 25. From this position, the. figure of Wilhelm was fundamental for the development of a line of endocrinological research that was able to position Universidad de Concepci6n as a scientific development centre, which was strengthened by the arrival of another disciple of Steinach in Chile, the Latvian professor Alejandro Lipschütz. PMID:27363250

  3. What Teachers Need to Know about Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff; Smith, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    Motivation is key to engaging students in meaningful and productive work. Identifying individual students' interests would be ideal, but in the real world, we need to create and sustain "situational interest." Smith and Wilhelm reference their own research as well as other research that is contextually very different to show how the same…

  4. A Poetic Journey: The Transfer and Transformation of German Strategies for Moral Education in Late Eighteenth-Century Dutch Poetry for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlevliet, Sanne; Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular Dutch educational enlightenment authors was Hieronymus van Alphen. His three volumes of "Little Poems for Children" published in 1778 and 1782 were extremely successful, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Inspired by the German poets Christian Felix Weisse and Gottlob Wilhelm Burmann, Van Alphen brought about an…

  5. Sisyphus at Work: The Leibniz Edition, The Kaiserreich and Divided Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poser, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Despite several attempts, the prolific writings of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz have not yet been brought together in a single edition. Efforts have been hampered by the sheer volume and diversity of the Leibniz estate, and also by changing political circumstances. This paper traces the history of the Leibniz edition as a long-term project of the…

  6. The Doubling Moment: Resurrecting Edgar Allan Poe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnick, J. Bradley; Mergil, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article expands upon Jeffrey Wilhelm's and Brian Edmiston's (1998) concept of a doubling of viewpoints by encouraging middle level students to use dramatization to take on multiple perspectives, to pose interpretive questions, and to enhance critical inquiry from inside and outside of texts. The doubling moment is both the activation of…

  7. The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggett, Blaine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Traces the convoluted alliances and diplomatic blundering that resulted in World War I. Places a large degree of the blame on Kaiser Wilhelm II who almost singlehandedly dismantled or ruptured the alliances and treaties of imperial chancellor Otto von Bismarck. Includes photos, paintings, and diary entries. (MJP)

  8. ["... why is it that I see everything so differently ..?" A letter to Theodor Reik about psychoanalytic technique (Berlin, February 7th, 1933)].

    PubMed

    Heimann, Paula

    2005-01-01

    A letter by Paula Heimann to her training analyst Th. Reik, written shortly before her emigration to London, sheds light on some controversies, centering in particular around Wilhelm Reich, which shaped continental psychoanalytic clinical discourse in the early 1930's as well as on Heimann's own future development as a clinician.

  9. [A note on the technical debate between Reich/Fenichel and Theodor Reik (1932-1936)].

    PubMed

    Schröter, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Wilhelm Reich's technical emphasis on the "systematic analysis of defenses" was controversial even before 1933. His main opponent in this field was Reik who expressed his criticism several times from 1932 to 1935. For Reik, the analytical process was essentially open, dependent on surprise. Fenichel, Reich's ally, defended a "scientific" approach, as opposed to "intuition", but later adopted a mediatory position.

  10. [Denaturalized psychoanalysts].

    PubMed

    Peglau, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents hitherto unknown material from the German Foreign Office referring to the denaturalization of Therese Benedek, Bruno Bettelheim, Adolf Storfer and Wilhelm Reich by Nazi Germany. It corroborates the finding that nobody was persecuted by the Nazis solely on the basis of psychoanalytic activities or membership in a psychoanalytic organization.

  11. Hard-luck Scheele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Bruce C.

    2015-11-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele had a hand in the discovery of at least six elements and contributed to the early development of chemistry in numerous other ways. Bruce Gibb looks into Scheele's story and considers why he doesn't get the credit that he deserves.

  12. Proactivity vs Reactivity: Preparing Students for Success with CCSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Wilhelm has studied the Common Core State Standards and come away with a generally positive opinion. His concern is that now that the Standards are written, we let professional teachers mold them into the best possible practices for teaching their students. With specific advice for working with students--developing background knowledge, making…

  13. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  14. Centennial of Röntgen's discovery of x-rays.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, R I

    1996-01-01

    November 8, 1995, marked the 100th anniversary of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery of x-rays. This remarkable scientific achievement has had an effect on medicine and science that has been matched by few other advances. I will briefly review the events leading up to Röntgen's discovery and the subsequent development of radiology as a discipline. PMID:8764624

  15. Reading Motivation: Exploring the Elementary Gender Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinak, Barbara A.; Gambrell, Linda B.

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to more clearly understand the erosion of motivation in some readers, a number of researchers (Mohr, 2006; Smith & Wilhelm, 2002) and organizations (The Education Alliance, 2007) have called for the investigation of gender differences in all readers, including young children. Consequently, this study focused on younger, average…

  16. How Principals Cultivate Shared Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Do teacher leaders in your school mainly fill the traditional roles of department chair or grade-level representative? Or do they lead their peers in collaborative teams whose primary focus is improving student learning? Terry Wilhelm, director of the School Leadership Center for Riverside County Office of Education in California, says that…

  17. Zum Ausgleich von generativer und energetischer Sprachbetrachtung (A Comparison of the "Generative" and "Energetic" Views of Language)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, Leo

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of two basic conceptions: Wilhelm von Humboldt's idea of language as energeia'' existing within and without man, and Noam Chomsky's idea of language generated by the speaker according to an innate apparatus. Revised version of lectures presented at the University of Bonn, West Germany in August 1971. (RS)

  18. Technology in Our Schools: A Call for a Cost/Benefit Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm is a vocal advocate for the substantive integration of technology into language arts classes in ways that support the "critical" use of technologies and the learning of new concepts and procedures for reading and composing. He makes the case that no one can be considered fully literate without a familiarity with and appreciation for our…

  19. "The Lengthened Shadow of One Man": The Public Intellectual and the Founding of Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, John

    1998-01-01

    Identifies five intellectuals who made distinctive contributions to the founding of new universities in England, Germany, and the United States. Institutional and individual biographies profile: Thomas Jefferson (University of Virginia); Wilhelm von Humboldt (University of Berlin); Lord Brougham (University College, University of London); A.D.…

  20. The Origin of the Mole Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    German Chemist, August Wilhelm Hofmann first introduced the term "molar" (from the Latin moles, meaning "a large mass") into chemistry, around 1865. The particular use of the term molar gained currency in the physics literature, where it was in common use at least through the 1940s.

  1. Development and Self-Identity: Hegel's Concept of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, A. W.; George, Michael

    1982-01-01

    This essay draws together various ideas on education that appear in the works of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and demonstrates how these ideas relate to Hegel's total philosophy. Education, by retracing the path of the mind's self-realization, raises the individual's subjective consciousness to recognition of the rationality underlying social…

  2. Meeting the Challenge: Creating Engaging and Powerful Contexts for Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the conditions of "flow" experience from two studies into the literate lives of young men (Smith and Wilhelm 2002; 2006) that were explanatory, when present, of motivation and engagement in various activities including literacy, and when absent, of a lack of motivation and engagement in various activities including literacy.…

  3. Next Steps in the Journey: Learning to Listen to Student Voices: Teaching with Our Mouths Shut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    According to Wilhelm, a teacher's power lies in learning to work "with" students, starting with listening. He recommends setting up conditions and mechanisms that help you learn from your students what they are learning, what challenges they are facing, and how best to teach them. Through inquiry, the classroom can become a vital and engaging…

  4. Attitude as Predictor of Success in Online Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereijo, Maria Victoria Perez

    2006-01-01

    This is the second article in a series of articles published with findings on student perceptions of asynchronous web-based courses (Perez Cereijo, Young, & Wilhelm, 2001). This portion of the study examines the independent relationships between various student characteristics and student's perceived advantages and disadvantages of the…

  5. Using Irony in Teaching the History of Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines historical ironies and stories with surprise endings about Rene Descartes and Wilhelm Wundt that can enliven history of psychology lectures and make certain concepts more memorable. Explains that this approach does not trivialize psychology's history but adds humor to a subject that students sometimes find dull. (CMK)

  6. Drifting from Slow to "D'oh!": Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive Control Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Suss, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects' WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates during…

  7. The Rhetoric in Mathematics: Newton, Leibniz, the Calculus, and the Rhetorical Force of the Infinitesimal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, G. Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    This essay investigates the rhetoric surrounding the appearance of the concept of the infinitesimal in the seventeenth-century Calculus of Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Although historians often have positioned rhetoric as a supplemental discipline, this essay shows that rhetoric is the "material" out of which a new and powerful…

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western Regional Home Management-Family Economics Educators (25th, Scottsdale, Arizona, November 6-8, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ruth E., Ed.

    These proceedings consist of 12 presentations, most of which are followed by responses or comments. The papers include: "Integrating Family Economics and Family Counseling" (Hogan; discussants Schnittgrund, Wilhelm); "A Test of the Deacon-Firebaugh Management Model" (Gage, Schmid); "Perceived Income Adequacy and Selected Financial Management…

  9. Next Steps in the Journey: Teaching with "Urgency:" A Call for Immediate Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    With a staggering number of students dropping out of school, widespread below-grade reading proficiency, and PISA results showing a demoralizing lag internationally in math, science, and general problem solving, teachers need to exercise all the control available to them to engage students in meaningful learning. Wilhelm suggests six steps…

  10. Speaking Personally--With Borje Holmberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Borje Holmberg is Swedish and has been active in distance education as a theorist and practitioner for more than fifty years. He is the former president of the Wilhelm-Buchner Hochschule, a distance teaching university in Germany. Here, Holmberg is interviewed by William C. Diehl, the Interviews Editor for "The American Journal of Distance…

  11. Literacy and Neuroplasticity: Transforming Our Perspectives and Ourselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm applies two of his core beliefs--that anyone can learn the next appropriate concept or process if they are provided with a meaningful situation and proper assistance, and that literacy and the kinds of texts we call literature provide a unique and powerful way of knowing and of transforming the self--to a look at how recent research on the…

  12. Integrating Fiction and Nonfiction Reading into the Business Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Judy; Pedersen, Erin

    2013-01-01

    One goal of high school teachers is to help students appreciate that reading does not end when they leave the classroom. When students find reading meaningful, they are more likely to see themselves as readers and choose to read long after they leave the classroom setting (Hinchman, Alvermann, Boyd, Brozo, & Vacca, 2003-2004; Wilhelm, 2001).…

  13. Literary Origins of the Term "School Psychologist" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on the literary origins of the term "school psychologist" is revisited, and conclusions are revised in light of new evidence. It appears that the origin of the term in the American literature occurred as early as 1898 in an article by Hugo Munsterberg, predating the usage by Wilhelm Stern in 1911. The early references to the…

  14. History of experimental psychology from an Estonian perspective.

    PubMed

    Allik, Jüri

    2007-11-01

    A short review of the development of experimental psychology from an Estonian perspective is presented. The first rector after the reopening of the University of Dorpat (Tartu) in 1802, Georg Friedrich Parrot (1767-1852) was interested in optical phenomena which he attempted to explain by introducing the concept of unconscious inferences, anticipating a similar theory proposed by Herman von Helmholtz 20 years later. One of the next rectors, Alfred Wilhelm Volkmann (1800-1878) was regarded by Edwin Boring as one of the founding fathers of the experimental psychology. Georg Wilhelm Struve (1793-1864) played an essential part in solving the problem of personal equations. Arthur Joachim von Oettingen (1836-1920) developed a theory of music harmony, which stimulated his student Wilhelm Friedrich Ostwald (1853-1932) to study colour harmony. Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926), the founder of modern psychiatry, is by far the most important experimental psychologist who has worked in Estonia. His successor Wladimir von Tchisch (1855-1922), another student of Wilhelm Wundt, continued Kraepelin's work in experimental psychology. The lives of Wolfgang Köhler (1887-1967), who was born in Reval (Tallinn), and Oswald Külpe (1862-1915), who graduated from the University of Dorpat, extended the link between the history of experimental psychology and Estonia. Karl Gustav Girgensohn (1875-1925), the founder of the Dorpat School of the psychology of religion, stretched the use of experimental methods to the study of religious experience.

  15. Bildung und bildungstheoretische Ueberlegungen zur Grundung der Republik (Education and the Republic--Educational Theorists Reflections on the Foundation of the Republic).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellekamps, Stephanie

    1996-01-01

    Draws on Wilhelm von Humboldt's typology of the active human being to debate the questions whether and how individuals can produce their social and political world. Discusses, with reference to Marie Condorcet and Immanuel Kant, procedures of the public that are necessary prerequisites for actions aimed at forming the world. (DSK)

  16. Three famous autopsies.

    PubMed

    Haddad, F S

    1999-02-01

    George II, the King of England, died from dissecting aneurism of the aorta. Napoleon died from a carcinoma of the stomach. Frederick III, Emperor of Germany, died of a laryngeal cancer; his untimely death, and the succession of his son, Wilhelm II, was largely responsible for the great catastrophe of 1914. An autopsy was performed on each of these three famous and historical figures.

  17. Notes on Joseph Fraunhofer's honorary Ph.D. degree from Erlangen, 1822 (German Title: Bemerkungen zur Ehrenpromotion Joseph Fraunhofers 1822 in Erlangen )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventzke, Karl

    In 1822, Joseph Fraunhofer received a honorary Ph.D. degree from Erlangen University. Presumably, this distinction was based on suggestions by Johann Wilhelm Pfaff. Since 1822, Pfaff gave lectures with the inclusion of instruments, which he obtained directly from Fraunhofer, and presumably also included problems of spectral investigation. This contribution analyzes informations which were collected in this regard.

  18. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  19. Adult Education in the Federal Republic of Germany: Scholarly Approaches and Professional Practice. Monographs on Comparative and Area Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Wilhelm, Ed.

    This monograph offers insight into the development of the conceptual basis, scholarly inquiry, and professional practice of adult education in West Germany from the end of World War II to the German reunification. Introductory materials are an "Introduction" (Wilhelm Mader) and "Translator's Note and Acknowledgements" (Martin Haindorff). Three…

  20. Academic Freedom: In Justification of a Universal Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karran, Terence

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the justification for, and benefits of, academic freedom to academics, students, universities and the world at large. It surveys the development of the concept of academic freedom within Europe, more especially the impact of the reforms at the University of Berlin instigated by Wilhelm von Humboldt. Following from this, the…

  1. Bildung as a Powerful Tool in Modern University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesen, Mogens Noergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how powerful "Bildung" is as a tool in modern university teaching. The concept of "Bildung" was originally introduced by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (Kant 1787, 1798, 1804) and the Prussian lawyer and politician Wilhelm von Humboldt (Humboldt 1792, Bohlin 2008). From 1810 "Bildung" was a key concept in…

  2. "Bildung" and Intercultural Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "Bildung", sometimes translated as self-cultivation, is located at the core of an influential tradition of educational thought. A key question concerns the relationship between "Bildung" and interculturality. Drawing on Wilhelm von Humboldt and Hans-Georg Gadamer, and on the so-called transformative learning…

  3. Alphabet Soup: ERP, CT, and ACT for OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolin, David F.

    2009-01-01

    The present article comments on the case conference presented in this issue, namely, Himle and Franklin's (Himle & Franklin, 2009) exposure and response prevention (ERP); Chosak and colleagues' (Chosak, Marques, Fama, Renaud, & Wilhelm, 2009) cognitive therapy (CT); and (Twohig, 2009) Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Two questions are…

  4. Martin Bartels als Lehrer von Carl Friedrich Gauß.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, W. R.

    The role of the young Martin Bartels (1769 - 1836), later professor of mathematics at Kazan and Dorpat, as a teacher of C. F. Gauß is discussed on the basis of his autobiographic notes and of reminiscences by the astronomer Otto Struve, the son of Bartel's son-in-law Wilhelm Struve.

  5. The International Relations of the Struves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, W. R.

    At least 10 astronomers in 5 generations belonged to the Struve dynasty, a family having its origin in Holstein and living in Germany, Russia, the USA and other countries. The best known astronomers among them were Wilhelm (1793-1864), Otto Wilhelm (1819-1905), Hermann (1854-1920), Ludwig (1858-1920), Georg (1886-1933) and Otto Ludwig Struve (1897-1963). After a short account of the family's history, its international relations will be regarded, with emphasis on the following aspects: Nationality/citizenship, places of living and work, personal relations to other astronomers including correspondence and cooperation, travels, languages of publications. Although a comparison of the different members of the family is possible only to a certain degree due to their different role and importance in astronomy, some changes which developed over 150 years can be traced: E.g., Wilhelm Struve published in German, Latin, French, Russian and English, whereas his grandsons and great-grandsons wrote their papers mainly in one language -- German or English. Wilhelm had relatively close relations with French astronomers, whereas his great-grandson Georg was the author of verbal assaults on French scientists. Georg published also heavy criticism of the International Astronomical Union, whereas his cousin Otto Luwig later became IAU's President.

  6. The Genealogy of Judgement: Towards a Deep History of Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The classical conception of academic freedom associated with Wilhelm von Humboldt and the rise of the modern university has a quite specific cultural foundation that centres on the controversial mental faculty of "judgement". This article traces the roots of "judgement" back to the Protestant Reformation, through its heyday as the signature…

  7. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  8. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, Keith; Kephart, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    This online volume contains a selection of papers arising from two workshops organised within the six-month programme Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, from July to December 2012. The first of these was a 'satellite workshop' held at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS), Edinburgh, 15-19 October 2012, under the title Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, and with Scientific Organising Committee: Konrad Bajer (Warsaw), Mitchell Berger (Exeter), Steve Cowley (Culham Centre for Fusion Energy), Andrew Gilbert (Exeter), Gunnar Hornig (Dundee), and Clare Parnell (St Andrews). The second was the workshop Quantised Flux in Tightly Knotted and Linked Systems held at the Newton Institute, 3- 7 December 2012, with Scientific Organising Committee: Natalia Berloff (DAMTP, Cambridge), Anne-Christine Davis (DAMTP, Cambridge), Jason Cantarella (University of Georgia), Thomas Kephart (Vanderbilt University), Paul Sutcliffe (Durham University), and Tanmay Vachaspati (Arizona State University). Videos of the lectures given at this second workshop can be viewed at http://www.newton.ac.uk/webseminars. The papers published here follow a natural progression through the following topics: helicity and related invariants of magnetic fields in ideal MHD; relaxation under topological constraints; lower bounds on magnetic energy; current and vortex filaments; applications in the solar corona, tokamak plasmas, and cyclone dynamics; higher-order invariants; topology of curves and surfaces, and energy measures; tight knots; applications to Bose-Einstein condensates, QCD, and cosmic superstring theory. Some of the papers span more than one of these areas. We owe a great debt of gratitude to Konrad Bajer, who was one of the guiding spirits behind the whole Newton Institute program, and who took particular responsibility for the Satellite Workshop at ICMS

  9. 50 years of membership in AGU recognized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recently, 14 AGU members who joined the Union in 1937 received their recognition pins for 50 years of membership in the Union. They join the distinguished ranks of the 50- year AGU members, who are listed below by the year that they joined:1937 A.B. Bryan, Leonard B. Corwin, Tate Dalrymple, Richard H. Fleming, Harry L. Frauenthal, Konrad B. Krauskopf, J. Stuart Meyers, Brian O'Brien, Joseph F. Poland, Edward J. Rutter, Noel H. Stearn, John P. Tully, Victor Vacquier, G.H. Westby, and Harvey O. Westby.

  10. Einleitung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther-Klaus, Ellen

    Deutschland hat sich in den letzten Jahrzehnten den internationalen Ruf erworben, auf dem Gebiet der Technologie führend zu sein. Große, weitreichende Erfindungen sind in Deutschland gemacht worden. Viele Nobelpreise gehen nach Deutschland: Robert Bosch, Nikolaus Otto und Konrad Zuse gehören genauso zu den großen Erfindern, wie Melitta Bentz und Emmy Noether. 85 % aller Nobelpreise, die seit 1901 nach Deutschland gingen, sind in den Kategorien Chemie, Physik und Medizin vergeben worden. Allein im Jahr 2007 wurden in Deutschland fast 50.000 Patente angemeldet.

  11. Clinical imprinting: the impact of early clinical learning on career long professional development in nursing.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    The literature recognises a relationship between clinical experience and a successful undergraduate experience in nursing; however what constitutes an effective approach remains the subject of debate, particularly in relation to first year of learning. There is evidence from a biological standpoint that early experience impacts on the behavioural development of animals, described by Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989) as 'imprinting'. The concept of imprinting has resonance for nursing. In this article the importance of 'getting it right at the beginning' is explored and what, if anything, Lorenz's theory tells us about the impact of early clinical learning on subsequent professional development.

  12. The role of tone sensation and musical stimuli in early experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the role of music in early experimental psychology is examined. Initially, the research of Wilhelm Wundt is considered, as tone sensation and musical elements appear as dominant factors in much of his work. It is hypothesized that this approach was motivated by an understanding of psychology that dates back to Christian Wolff 's focus on sensation in his empirical psychology of 1732. Wolff, however, had built his systematization of psychology on Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, who combined perception with mathematics,and referred to music as the area in which sensation is united with numerical exactitude. Immanuel Kant refused to accept empirical psychology as a science, whereas Johann Friedrich Herbart reintroduced the scientific basis of empirical psychology by, among other things, referring to music.

  13. A note on the history of the Norwegian Psychoanalytic Society from 1933 to 1945.

    PubMed

    Anthi, Per; Haugsgjerd, Svein

    2013-08-01

    The Norwegian analysts, who were trained in Berlin before 1933, were drawn into a struggle against fascism, informed by politically leftist analysts who worked at the Berlin Institute. The Norwegian group, including the analysts Wilhelm Reich and Otto Fenichel, were committed to Marxist or social democratic ideologies in order to fight down fascism and Nazism. They were a source of inspiration but also of conflict. After the war the leadership of the IPA was sceptical about the Norwegian group because of its former connections with Die Linke, as well as its relations with Wilhelm Reich. This paper in part considers the courageous efforts of Nic Waal, whom Ernest Jones used as a delegate and courier to solve problems for the IPA and who was unjustly treated after the war.

  14. The Politics of Memory: Otto Hahn and the Third Reich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2006-03-01

    As President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and its successor, the Max Planck Society, from 1946 until 1960, Otto Hahn (1879 1968) sought to portray science under the Third Reich as a purely intellectual endeavor untainted by National Socialism. I outline Hahn’s activities from 1933 into the postwar years, focusing on the contrast between his personal stance during the National Socialist period, when he distinguished himself as an upright non-Nazi, and his postwar attitude, which was characterized by suppression and denial of Germany’s recent past. Particular examples include Hahn’s efforts to help Jewish friends; his testimony for colleagues involved in denazification and on trial in Nuremberg; his postwar relationships with émigré colleagues, including Lise Meitner; and his misrepresentation of his wartime work in the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry.

  15. Otto Hahn: Responsibility and Repression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark

    2006-05-01

    The role that Otto Hahn (1879 1968) played in the discovery of nuclear fission and whether Lise Meitner (1878 1968) should have shared the Nobel Prize for that discovery have been subjects of earlier studies, but there is more to the story. I examine what Hahn and the scientists in his Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry in Berlin-Dahlem did during the Third Reich, in particular, the significant contributions they made to the German uranium project during the Second World War. I then use this as a basis for judging Hahn’s postwar apologia as the last president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and first president of its successor, the Max Planck Society.

  16. A 'German world' shared among doctors: a history of the relationship between Japanese and German psychiatry before World War II.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akira

    2013-06-01

    This article deals with the critical history of German and Japanese psychiatrists who dreamed of a 'German world' that would cross borders. It analyses their discourse, not only by looking at their biographical backgrounds, but also by examining them in a wider context linked to German academic predominance and cultural propaganda before World War II. By focusing on Wilhelm Stieda, Wilhelm Weygandt and Kure Shuzo, the article shows that the positive evaluation of Japanese psychiatry by the two Germans encouraged Kure, who was eager to modernize the treatment of and institutions for the mentally ill in Japan. Their statements on Japanese psychiatry reflect their ideological and historical framework, with reference to national/ethnic identity, academic position, and the relationship between Germany and Japan. PMID:24573258

  17. Hufeland's interest in plant movements.

    PubMed

    Aschoff, J

    1991-01-01

    Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland (1762-1836) was one of the eminent physicians at the time of Goethe. When only 21 years old, he followed his father as a medical practitioner in Weimar. In 1793 he became Professor of Medicine at the University of Jena, from where he moved, in 1801, to Berlin as the physician in ordinary to king Friedrich Wilhelm III, council of state, and Professor at the leading hospital, the Charité. Hufeland pioneered in what today would be called public hygiene. Many of his lectures and publications were addressed to the educated laymen. In his most read book, the 'Makrobiotik', he emphasizes the importance of the 24-h periodicity as a basic unit of biological chronometry. In view of this, Hufeland has become a kind of 'patron saint' to modern chronobiologists. PMID:1760962

  18. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 9; (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions deal with astronomical events of the past 1000 years. We elucidate the person of the single European observer of the supernova of 1006, and the views of Christoph Scheiner and Otto von Guericke on the structure and substance of the cosmos. A study of the development of the Copernican and the cosmological principles conclude this group of themes. Biographical investigations were carried out on the clockmaker Nikolaus Lilienfeld, the astronomers Johann Wurzelbau, Friedrich Wilhelm Toennies and Boris Karpov as well as the “panbabylonist” Alfred Jeremias. Astronomers can be active also in poetry and fiction. This is shown in the studies of Johann Leonard Rost and Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel. Finally, Johannes Hevelius' Observatory in Danzig/Gdansk, destroyed by a fire in 1679, is reconstructed by means of printed sources, old maps and photographs. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  19. Hufeland's interest in plant movements.

    PubMed

    Aschoff, J

    1991-01-01

    Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland (1762-1836) was one of the eminent physicians at the time of Goethe. When only 21 years old, he followed his father as a medical practitioner in Weimar. In 1793 he became Professor of Medicine at the University of Jena, from where he moved, in 1801, to Berlin as the physician in ordinary to king Friedrich Wilhelm III, council of state, and Professor at the leading hospital, the Charité. Hufeland pioneered in what today would be called public hygiene. Many of his lectures and publications were addressed to the educated laymen. In his most read book, the 'Makrobiotik', he emphasizes the importance of the 24-h periodicity as a basic unit of biological chronometry. In view of this, Hufeland has become a kind of 'patron saint' to modern chronobiologists.

  20. A 'German world' shared among doctors: a history of the relationship between Japanese and German psychiatry before World War II.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akira

    2013-06-01

    This article deals with the critical history of German and Japanese psychiatrists who dreamed of a 'German world' that would cross borders. It analyses their discourse, not only by looking at their biographical backgrounds, but also by examining them in a wider context linked to German academic predominance and cultural propaganda before World War II. By focusing on Wilhelm Stieda, Wilhelm Weygandt and Kure Shuzo, the article shows that the positive evaluation of Japanese psychiatry by the two Germans encouraged Kure, who was eager to modernize the treatment of and institutions for the mentally ill in Japan. Their statements on Japanese psychiatry reflect their ideological and historical framework, with reference to national/ethnic identity, academic position, and the relationship between Germany and Japan.

  1. The role of tone sensation and musical stimuli in early experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the role of music in early experimental psychology is examined. Initially, the research of Wilhelm Wundt is considered, as tone sensation and musical elements appear as dominant factors in much of his work. It is hypothesized that this approach was motivated by an understanding of psychology that dates back to Christian Wolff 's focus on sensation in his empirical psychology of 1732. Wolff, however, had built his systematization of psychology on Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, who combined perception with mathematics,and referred to music as the area in which sensation is united with numerical exactitude. Immanuel Kant refused to accept empirical psychology as a science, whereas Johann Friedrich Herbart reintroduced the scientific basis of empirical psychology by, among other things, referring to music. PMID:21462196

  2. [Historical development of anthropology in Basel].

    PubMed

    Bay, R

    1986-12-01

    The author reports on the history of physical anthropology in Basel (Switzerland). The anthropological research activities of Carl Gustav Jung (1794-1864), Wilhelm His-Vischer (1831-1904), Ludwig Rütimeyer (1825-1895), Julius Kollmann (1834-1918), Paul and Fritz Sarasin (P.: 1856-1924; F.: 1859-1942), Felix Speiser (1880-1949) and the author himself (b. 1909) are described in detail. PMID:3548583

  3. [THE HANOVERIAN SCHOLAR AND THE DOCTOR OF THE PEASANTS].

    PubMed

    Giampietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Bernardino Ramazzini met in Modena in autumn 1689, and made friends. Rereading their correspondence and finding other coeval documents, the author reconstructs a scientific relation forgotten by historians. They not only discussed on air pollution, artesian wells and barometric forecast, but - more generally - favored the foundation of social medicine on epidemiology. Hence the Leibnizian contribution to the European fortune of Third Hippocrates.

  4. Rebuttal to the comment by Malhotra and Strom on "Constraints on the source of lunar cataclysm impactors"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćuk, Matija; Gladman, Brett J.; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2011-11-01

    Ćuk et al. (Ćuk, M. Gladman, B.J., Stewart, S.T. [2010]. Icarus 207 590-594) concluded that the the lunar cataclysm (late heavy bombardment) was recorded in lunar Imbrian era craters, and that their size distribution is different from that of main belt asteroids (which may have been the dominant pre-Imbrian impactors). This result would likely preclude the asteroid belt as the direct source of lunar cataclysm impactors. Malhotra and Strom (Malhotra, R., Strom, R.G. [2011]. Icarus) maintain that the lunar impactor population in the Imbrian era was the same as in Nectarian and pre-Nectarian periods, and this population had a size distribution identical to that of main belt asteroids. In support of this claim, they present an Imbrian size distribution made from two data sets published by Wilhelms et al. (Wilhelms, D.E., Oberbeck, V.R., Aggarwal, H.R. [1978]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 9, 3735-3762). However, these two data sets cannot be simply combined as they represent areas of different ages and therefore crater densities. Malhotra and Strom (Malhotra, R., Strom, R.G. [2011]. Icarus) differ with the main conclusion of Wilhelms et al. (Wilhelms, D.E., Oberbeck, V.R., Aggarwal, H.R. [1978]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 9, 3735-3762) that the Nectarian and Imbrian crater size distributions were different. We conclude that the available data indicate that the lunar Imbrian-era impactors had a different size distribution from the older ones, with the Imbrian impactor distribution being significantly richer in small impactors than that of older lunar impactors or current main-belt asteroids.

  5. [History and personalities at the Department of Urology, University of Magdeburg. From medical academy to university].

    PubMed

    Klatte, T; Klatte, D

    2006-10-01

    The Medical Academy of Magdeburg was founded in 1954, but at that time the university did not have its own urological department. It was founded in 1957. Chiefs of the department were Hartwig Eggers (through 1958), Gerhard Wilhelm Heise (1958-1976), Gerd-Wolfgang Mueller (1976-1994), and Ernst Peter Allhoff (since 1994). The department has an interesting history. Numerous famous urologists were trained here.

  6. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota.

  7. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota. PMID:22916408

  8. [THE HANOVERIAN SCHOLAR AND THE DOCTOR OF THE PEASANTS].

    PubMed

    Giampietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Bernardino Ramazzini met in Modena in autumn 1689, and made friends. Rereading their correspondence and finding other coeval documents, the author reconstructs a scientific relation forgotten by historians. They not only discussed on air pollution, artesian wells and barometric forecast, but - more generally - favored the foundation of social medicine on epidemiology. Hence the Leibnizian contribution to the European fortune of Third Hippocrates. PMID:26946810

  9. The Statistical Interpretation of Entropy: An Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmberlake, Todd

    2010-11-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, which states that the entropy of an isolated macroscopic system can increase but will not decrease, is a cornerstone of modern physics. Ludwig Boltzmann argued that the second law arises from the motion of the atoms that compose the system. Boltzmann's statistical mechanics provides deep insight into the functioning of the second law and also provided evidence for the existence of atoms at a time when many scientists (like Ernst Mach and Wilhelm Ostwald) were skeptical.

  10. The type specimen of Anoura geoffroyi lasiopyga (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Gardner, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1868, Wilhelm Peters described Glossonycteris lasiopyga, based on a specimen provided by Henri de Saussure and collected in Mexico. The type specimen was presumed to be among those housed in the collections of the Zoologisches Museum of the Humboldt Universitat in Berlin, Germany. Our study of one of Saussure?s specimens from Mexico, discovered in the collections of the Museum d?Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland, demonstrates that it and not one of the Berlin specimens is the holotype.

  11. [A Polish physician's impressions from the Viennese Clinic of Winternitz].

    PubMed

    Kierzek, A

    1999-01-01

    The achievements of Vincenz Priestnitz, Sebastian Kneipp and Wilhelm Winternitz for the development of hydrotherapy are presented at the beginning. The professional and scientific activities of Winternitz are strongly pointed out. Eugeniusz Piasecki (1872-1947), the Polish physician and theorist of physical education impressions from Vieneese Clinic of Winternitz are depicted widely. The role of Winternitz in formation of modern hydrotherapy in Polish territories is presented finally. PMID:10695389

  12. Hind, John R (1823-1895)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    English astronomer, discovered in 1852 a small nebula in Taurus which, in 1861, was found by HEINRICH D'ARREST to have disappeared. By the end of the year, D'Arrest and OTTO WILHELM STRUVE had recovered it. Hind's variable nebula, as it came to be called, demonstrated that at least some nebulae were small, as nothing larger than a light year in dimension can disappear in a year. The nebula is a ...

  13. A simulation environment for estimation of the performance of RSA cages.

    PubMed

    Gammuto, M; Martelli, S; Trozzi, C; Bragonzoni, L; Russo, A

    2008-09-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) is an important technique for in vivo evaluation of joint kinematics and surgical outcome. However, its accuracy is highly affected by the experimental set-up. In this paper we present a new software environment for assessing the impact of calibration cage design on the accuracy of the reconstruction of 3D points, which can be easily used for preliminary evaluations also by non-expert users. The paper presents methods of the simulator and preliminary results in a clinical standard and custom environment. The software was realized using MATLAB and developed for the PC/Windows operating system. It is freeware under request to authors.

  14. Medical physics: some recollections in diagnostic X-ray imaging and therapeutic radiology.

    PubMed

    Gray, J E; Orton, C G

    2000-12-01

    Medical physics has changed dramatically since 1895. There was a period of slow evolutionary change during the first 70 years after Roentgen's discovery of x rays. With the advent of the computer, however, both diagnostic and therapeutic radiology have undergone rapid growth and changes. Technologic advances such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostic imaging and three-dimensional treatment planning systems, stereotactic radiosurgery, and intensity modulated radiation therapy in radiation oncology have resulted in substantial changes in medical physics. These advances have improved diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy while expanding the need for better educated and experienced medical physics staff.

  15. /sup 57/Co-bleomycin scintigraphy for the staging of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nieweg, O.E.; Piers, D.A.; Beekhuis, H.; Sluiter, H.J.; van der Wal, A.M.; Woldring, M.G.

    1989-03-15

    The value of Cobalt-57 bleomycin (/sup 57/Co-BLM) scintigraphy in the detection of lymph node metastases in the hilum and mediastinum was investigated in 132 patients with peripherally located lung cancer. In one half of the patients with metastases, these were visualized. Specificity was 98%. These results were better than those obtained with chest radiography and conventional roentgen tomography. /sup 57/Co-BLM scintigraphy is routinely used in the staging of patients with lung cancer, obviating the need for mediastinoscopy.

  16. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  17. Chisinau 1983-1986. Recollections about Chisinau Politechinc Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2010-10-01

    %B The recollections include a journal of the events and people from 1983 till 1986 at the Department of Physics of the Chisinau Technical University in the Republic of Moldova (former USSR). The main scientific areas were semiconductors,low temperature physics, cristalophysics and roentgen rays, but astrophysics and gravity were also represented at the Department. The teaching of physics at the University is overviewed briefly also. The recollections are written in a literary form without formula.Other scientific, cultural and political events during 1983-1988 are mentioned.

  18. [Cerebral metastasis as the form of presentation of a basaloid carcinoma of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, I R; Lima, R M; Serafim, A; Lemos, M M; Cristas, J; Machado, J; Oliveira, H

    1995-09-01

    A case of oesophageal basaloid carcinoma is reported. The disease was revealed as a brain metastasis and was found ad initium to be in an advanced stage, with evidence of brain, lung and liver metastasis. The treatment performed was palliative subtotal oesophagectomy followed by roentgen therapy. A year and a half later, the patient is still alive and in home care follow up. The authors end stressing this uncommon presentation for an oesophageal neoplasm and the rarity of its histologic type. They also stress the role of surgery, although palliative, in long survival, very unlike the rapid evolution of the few published cases.

  19. PROS Support for PSPCs on the SRG mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornstrup, A.; Westergaard, N. J.; Conroy, M. A.; Orszak, J. S.

    In 1995, the Russian Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) satellite will be launched. The satellite contains several Xray telescopes, among which are the SODART telescope, developed by the Danish Space Research Institute, IKI Moscow, and NASA among others. DSRI provides 4 Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC) detectors (called HEPC and LEPC) in the focal plane of the SODART mirror module. PROS, the Xray analysis package under IRAF, developed by SAO initially to reduce ROSAT and Einstein data, has now been extended to support reduction of data from the HEPC/LEPC detectors on-board SRG. The poster presents the results of the reduction of simulated HEPC/LEPC data.

  20. Irradiation of small structures through the intact skull.

    PubMed

    Larsson, B; Lidén, K; Sarby, B

    1974-12-01

    The physical conditions for producing minute disc-shaped lesions for functional radiation surgery by means of narrow beam irradiation are discussed. The intention was a treatment procedure for routine clinical use and with high physical and mechanical reproducibility. The possibilities of using high energy electrons, supervoltage roentgen radiation, gamma emitting nuclides or fast neutrons in a technique for routine clinical use were investigated. The radiation of choice taking physical properties, radiation biologic factors and practical circumstances into account was considered to be 60-Co gamma radiation. A treatment apparatus containing 179 60-Co sources within a spherical sector of 70 degrees latitude and 160 degrees longitude was constructed. PMID:4219255

  1. Basic physics and biology of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Crocker, I R; Popowski, Y

    1997-06-01

    The therapeutic use of ionizing radiation followed shortly after the discovery of X-rays by Roentgen in 1895. The radiobiological principles that underlie the clinical use of ionizing radiation have been ablated slowly over the past century. Ionizing radiation, which is used therapeutically for benign and malignant conditions, is characterized by the localized release of large amounts of energy. These radiations may be electromagnetic (X- or gamma rays) or particulate (electrons, protons, alpha particles, neutrons, etc.). In this paper we will review some basic radiation physics and radiation biology principles which might be unfamiliar to the interventional cardiologist interested in this evolving application of radiation to prevent restenosis. PMID:9546997

  2. [The therapy of acute radiogenic epitheliolysis with a dressing of hydrocolloids and polymers (Biofilm). A report on clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Pape, H; Schnabel, T; Kölzer, K; Schmitt, G; Jung, U

    1990-11-01

    Acute skin lesions following radiotherapy are uncomfortable and unacceptable side effects. They are observed predominantly after high surface doses as in conventional roentgen or electron beam therapy. To accelerate the wound healing we tested a bandage consisting of hydrocolloids and polymers, which is permeable for gas and water. Handling, compatibility and effectiveness of this plaster were tested in this study. According to the RTOG scoring system 19 irradiated fields with grade II to IV lesions were treated. Densitometric measurements of verification films with and without Biofilm showed no energy absorption. The bandage was comfortable for the patients and easy to handle.

  3. [Value of contrast arthrography in the diagnosis of hemophilic arthropathy].

    PubMed

    Andreev, Iu N; Vishnevskaia, E S; Kagan, I E

    1990-10-01

    X-ray semiotics of changes in the roentgen-negative components of the knee joint at different stages of hemophilic arthropathy has been described basing on the study of 46 contrast arthrography ++ of the joint, and their correlation with the results of macroscopic and histological investigations of the tissues removed during surgery. Identification of the character of the damage in the soft-tissue and cartilage components of the joint is particularly important at the early stages of arthropathy, as it enables determining the optimum therapeutic tactics when the data of routine roentgenography give insufficient information, and changes in the bones are limited and, as a rule, reversible.

  4. The eROSITA All-Sky Survey and its spectroscopic follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, Mara

    2015-08-01

    eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) is the core instrument on the Russian/German Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) mission which is current scheduled for launch in 2016. In the soft band (0.5-2 keV), the deep All-sky survey will be 30 times more sensitive than the previous ROSAT All-sky survey, while the first ever true all-sky survey will be mapped in the hard band (2-8 keV).The design driving science is the detection of large samples of galaxy clusters to redshifts z > 1, in order to study the large scale structure in the Universe and test cosmological models including Dark Energy. In addition, eROSITA is expected to yield a sample of around 3 million active galactic nuclei, which is bound to revolutionize our view of the evolution of supermassive black holes and their impact on the process of structure formation in the Universe.I will review the main characteristics of eROSITA All-sky survey, with an eye also on the planned spectroscopic follow-up of the sources with SDSS-IV/SPIDERS and ESO/4MOST.

  5. eROSITA: Status and Scientific Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Werner; eROSITA Team

    2016-06-01

    eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) is the core instrument on the Russian Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) mission which is currently scheduled for launch in 2017. eROSITA will perform a deep survey of the entire X-ray sky. In the soft band (0.5-2 keV), it will be about 30 times more sensitive than ROSAT, while in the hard band (2-8 keV) it will provide the first ever true imaging survey of the sky. The design driving science is the detection of large samples of galaxy clusters to redshifts z > 1 in order to study thelarge scale structure in the Universe and test cosmological models including Dark Energy. In addition, eROSITA is expected to yield a sample of a few million AGN, including obscured objects, revolutionizing our view of the evolution of supermassive black holes. The survey will also provide new insights into a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including neutron stars and pulsars, X-ray binaries, activestars and diffuse emission from supernova remnants. The talk reports on the status of eROSITA and its scientific prospects.

  6. Intravenous Angiocardiography Using Digital Image Processing: Experience With Axial Projections In Normal Pigs And In Pigs With Experimentally Generated Left-To-Right Shunts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, Hugo G.; Bursch, Joachim H.; Brennecke, Rudiger; Heintzen, Paul H.

    1981-11-01

    Computerized digitization and processing of roentgen video images recorded at a rate of 50 per second was tested in intravenous angiocardiography in normal pigs weighing 15 to 20 kg. Roentgen video images were recorded in the 4-chamber view obtained by 30-35 degrees caudocranial angulation of the x-ray tube and 50-60 degrees LAO obliquity in the pig. Significant contrast enhancement was obtained through ECG-gated background subtraction and rescaling after integration of multiple background as well as contrast images. Occasionally, histogram equalization was used to further enhance contrast. To study temporal changes in cardiac motion, time parameter extraction or functional imaging was applied as well. The left and right heart were well visualized after intravenous injection of 1/3-1 cc. 76% Urografin per kg. bodyweight. Special purpose processing like subtraction of the end systolic phase from the end diastolic in the left and right ventricles as well as subtraction of the right ventricular phase from the left ventricular phase was also performed. If the left ventricular end systolic phase was subtracted from the end diastolic, most of the left atrium was also subtracted whereby the left ventricle was seen without continuity or superimposition of the left atrium. Experimentally generated ventricular and atrial septal defects as well as patent ductus arteriosus could be detected using the described technique. The results of the animal experiments became the basis for subsequent applications in children with congenital heart disease.

  7. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    PubMed

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and

  8. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    PubMed

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and

  9. Darwin as a student of behavior.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    In The Expression of the Emotions, Charles Darwin documents evolutionary continuity between animals and humans, emphasizing the universality of expressions in man. Most of the book addresses human behavior, and its influence on the study of animal behavior has been weak. The issue of natural selection is remarkably absent from this book, which relies on the inheritance of acquired characters rather than on a genuine Darwinian logic. Yet Konrad Lorenz considered Darwin to be a forerunner of behavioral biology. The reason was to be found in The Descent of Man and chapter VIII of The Origin of Species, where Darwin provides an explanation of behavior through selection, stating that the same mechanisms explaining morphological changes also account for gradual improvements in instincts. He assessed the accuracy of his evolutionary theory by directly studying animal behavior, hence laying the foundations of behavioral research for the next century. PMID:20338536

  10. Alois Alzheimer: A Hundred Years after the Discovery of the Eponymous Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tagarelli, Antonio; Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    The familiar term “Alzheimer’s disease” was coined by Emil Kraepelin to honour his pupil, Alois Alzheimer. However, little is known about the life of the man after whom this important and well-known disease was termed. On the centennial of the discovery of Alzheimer’s disease, it is appropriate to report some aspects of the life and scientific work of Alois Alzheimer. The authors contacted all the libraries of the Universities where Alzheimer studied and/or worked to receive any original material regarding Alois Alzheimer. This review is based for a most part on an original biography written by Konrad and Urlike Maurer after the interviews to Alzheimer’s nieces, Hildegard Koeppen, Ilse Lieblein, Bärbel Lippert, Karin Weiβ, and his nephew, Rupert Finsterwalder. The authors obtained this biography from the Central Library of Medicine in Koeln. PMID:23674983

  11. [I. P. Pavlov and K. Lorenz].

    PubMed

    Gorokhovskaia, E A

    2000-01-01

    In the thirtieth, the founder of ethology Austrian zoologist Konrad Lorenz put forward the new theory of behavior, which was met with considerable resistance of the dominant views on the mechanisms of behavior, including Pavlov's concept. From his first theoretical works and later on Lorenz debated with Pavlov. However, these debates were not reduced to a disagreement. He appreciated greatly the scientific contribution of Pavlov, and the ideas of the Russian physiologist were often the starting point of his own speculations. His polemics with Pavlov differed very much from his uncompromising controversies with behaviorists. When Lorenz compared Pavlov's views with behaviorism, he often preferred Pavlov's ideas. Lorenz also draw some parallels between the Pavlov's understanding of behavior and the ethological approach. Lorenz's discussion with Pavlov about the nature of conditioned reflex is of particular interest, since it stimulated Lorenz to develop the theory of this phenomenon. PMID:10750201

  12. [Clinical dermatology at the Central Hospital Sankt-Jürgen-Strasse in Bremen.. A 110-year history].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A

    2001-08-01

    The history of clinical dermatology in Bremen began in 1891 with a dermatology unit founded in the main building of the then so-called "Big Hospital", nowadays Central Hospital Sankt-Juergen-Street. Friedrich B. Hahn became the first director and served in this position for more than four decades. In 1913, the dermatology wards moved to a new building, still home to the Dermatologic Clinic today. In 1933, the son of F.B. Hahn, Carl F. Hahn, became director until 1938, when the state officials named Konrad Burchardi as head of the department. Immediately after World War II, Friedrich Fölsch replaced K. Burchardi. He served as director until his retirement in 1964, when Joachim J. Herzberg became his successor until 1979. Wolfgang P. Herrmann then directed the clinic until 1994, when the author of this article was elected.

  13. Heritage Gallery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) building 4200 hosts a new spaceflight history museum referred to as the Heritage Gallery, allowing employees and visitors alike to have the opportunity to experience history first hand. On display are many models of launch vehicles and spacecraft that have made the center famous. It features a full-scale mockup of the lunar roving vehicle, three built-in multimedia displays, a large theater screen, and two glass cases that house memorabilia such as personal items belonging to Wernher von Braun, MSFC's first Center Director. The new Heritage Gallery features the accomplishments of several past and present members of the Marshall team. Attending the ribbon cutting ceremony are: (left to right) Gerhard Reisig; Cort Durocher, executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Ernst Stuhlinger; Konrad Darnenburg; Werner Dahm; Walter Jacobi; and host of event, Center Director Art Stephenson.

  14. Evolution and symmetry of multipartite entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gour, Gilad

    2010-11-01

    We discover a simple factorization law describing how multipartite entanglement of a composite quantum system evolves when one of the subsystems undergoes an arbitrary physical process. This multipartite entanglement decay is determined uniquely by a single factor we call the entanglement resilience factor. Since the entanglement resilience factor is a function of the quantum channel alone, we find that multipartite entanglement evolves in exactly the same way as bipartite (two qudits) entanglement. For the two qubits case, our factorization law reduces to the main result of [T. Konrad, Nature Phys. 4, 99 (2008)10.1038/nphys885]. In addition, for a permutation P, we provide an operational definition of P asymmetry of entanglement, and find the conditions when a permuted version of a state can be achieved by local means. PMID:21231157

  15. Evolution and Symmetry of Multipartite Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gour, Gilad

    2010-11-01

    We discover a simple factorization law describing how multipartite entanglement of a composite quantum system evolves when one of the subsystems undergoes an arbitrary physical process. This multipartite entanglement decay is determined uniquely by a single factor we call the entanglement resilience factor. Since the entanglement resilience factor is a function of the quantum channel alone, we find that multipartite entanglement evolves in exactly the same way as bipartite (two qudits) entanglement. For the two qubits case, our factorization law reduces to the main result of [T. Konrad, Nature Phys. 4, 99 (2008)NPAHAX1745-247310.1038/nphys885]. In addition, for a permutation P, we provide an operational definition of P asymmetry of entanglement, and find the conditions when a permuted version of a state can be achieved by local means.

  16. Public and political issues in radioactive waste management in the Federal Republic of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Neis, A.

    1993-12-31

    The Federal Government`s radioactive waste management concept and regulations governing formal public participation in licensing procedures for radioactive waste management facilities are presented. The paper focuses on public and political issues arising from widely diverging views in different social groups on nuclear energy and on radioactive waste management. The resulting conflict between Federal and Laender (Federal constituent states) authorities and the actual course of public participation in a licensing procedure are illustrated with the example of planned final disposal of radioactive waste in the Konrad mine. Major national efforts to overcome the unsatisfying present situation are presented and the role of international consensus is briefly touched. Concluding remarks will particularly justify admissibility and emphasize the need to discuss and eventually decide on radioactive waste management issues regardless of diverging views on nuclear energy.

  17. Alois Alzheimer: a hundred years after the discovery of the eponymous disorder.

    PubMed

    Tagarelli, Antonio; Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2006-06-01

    The familiar term "Alzheimer's disease" was coined by Emil Kraepelin to honour his pupil, Alois Alzheimer. However, little is known about the life of the man after whom this important and well-known disease was termed. On the centennial of the discovery of Alzheimer's disease, it is appropriate to report some aspects of the life and scientific work of Alois Alzheimer. The authors contacted all the libraries of the Universities where Alzheimer studied and/or worked to receive any original material regarding Alois Alzheimer. This review is based for a most part on an original biography written by Konrad and Urlike Maurer after the interviews to Alzheimer's nieces, Hildegard Koeppen, Ilse Lieblein, Bärbel Lippert, Karin Weiβ, and his nephew, Rupert Finsterwalder. The authors obtained this biography from the Central Library of Medicine in Koeln.

  18. The evolution of Harry Harlow: from the nature to the nurture of love.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Marga

    2010-06-01

    Harlow deserves a place in the early history of evolutionary psychiatry but not, as he is commonly presented, because of his belief in the instinctual nature of the mother-infant dyad. Harlow's work on the significance of peer relationships led him to appreciate the evolutionary significance of separate affectional systems. Over time, Harlow distanced himself from the ideas of John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth as well as from Konrad Lorenz's views about imprinting and instincts. Harlow's work did not lend support to Bowlby's belief in an innate need for mother love and his thesis that the mother was the child's psychic organizer. Nor did Harlow agree with Lorenz's view of instincts as biological, unmodifiable innate needs, unaffected by learning.

  19. Darwin as a student of behavior.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    In The Expression of the Emotions, Charles Darwin documents evolutionary continuity between animals and humans, emphasizing the universality of expressions in man. Most of the book addresses human behavior, and its influence on the study of animal behavior has been weak. The issue of natural selection is remarkably absent from this book, which relies on the inheritance of acquired characters rather than on a genuine Darwinian logic. Yet Konrad Lorenz considered Darwin to be a forerunner of behavioral biology. The reason was to be found in The Descent of Man and chapter VIII of The Origin of Species, where Darwin provides an explanation of behavior through selection, stating that the same mechanisms explaining morphological changes also account for gradual improvements in instincts. He assessed the accuracy of his evolutionary theory by directly studying animal behavior, hence laying the foundations of behavioral research for the next century.

  20. The photographers of the Venus transit of 1874 (German Title: Die Photographen des Venusdurchgangs von 1874)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    Apart from the photo-pioneer Hermann Krone from Dresden, little is known about the photographers who took part in the German expeditions for the observation of the Venus transit of 1874. We give a short overview of the photographic methods and instruments employed at that time, present biographic details about O. Eschke, G. Fritsch, C. Kardaetz. F. Stolze, Th. Studer and G. Wolfram, give some details on the expeditions and their final destinations, and show a few rare photographic documents. We also give a transcription of the letters of G. Fritsch written to Wilhelm Foerster in the course of the Persian expedition.

  1. Vienna University Observatory and Bruno Thüring (German Title: Die Wiener Universitätssternwarte und Bruno Thüring )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, Franz; Posch, Thomas; Lackner, Karin

    We investigate Bruno Thüring's political attitude during the time of National Socialism, based on material from the Vienna Observatory archive, and on statements by his contemporaries. The contribution focuses on the filling of astronomy positions in Vienna, and also on the expulsion of Kasimir Graff. A central role is played by Wilhelm Führer, Obersturmführer der Waffen-SS (Senior Storm Leader of the Armed Protection Squad) and chief civil servant in the Reich science ministry. The transcription of an original letter of 1939 by Führer, addressed to Thüring, is given.

  2. The onset of labour: an alternative theory.

    PubMed

    Jones, P

    1996-02-01

    This article, based mainly on the theories and discoveries of Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957), puts forward the bio-energetic theory of the onset of labour, which assumes it to be one of many examples of bio-energetic pulsation in the organism. It suggests that chronic muscular tension ('armouring') interferes with this spontaneous pulsation and may account for many of the difficulties experienced by women in labour. A form of psychotherapy ('orgone-therapy') based on these theories may prove helpful in childbirth education, in the non-intrusive induction of labour, and in labour itself. A research project to test this hypothesis is suggested.

  3. The bias of "music-infected consciousness": the aesthetics of listening in the laboratory and on the city streets of Fin-de-Siècle Berlin and Vienna.

    PubMed

    Hui, Alexandra E

    2012-01-01

    Shifts in the psychophysical study of sound sensation reinforced the changing status of musical expertise in the nineteenth century. The Carl Stumpf-Wilhelm Wundt debate about tone-differentiation experimentation narrowed the conception of hearing. For Stumpf, "music consciousness" (Musikbewusstsein) granted the experimental subjects exceptional insight into sound sensation. This belief reflected a cultural reevaluation of listening, exemplified in music critic Eduard Hanslick decrying the scourge of the city: the piano playing of the neighbors. Stumpf and Hanslick's defenses of subjective musical expertise both inside the laboratory and on the city streets reveal the increasingly divergent conceptions of hearing and listening.

  4. On the early history of Dorpat Observatory and its instrumental equipment (German Title: Zur frühen Geschichte der Dorpater Sternwarte und ihrer instrumentellen Ausstattung )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestmann, Günther

    Dorpat Observatory became famous in the first place through the scientific work of Wilhelm Struve, but this article deals with its little-known early history. The first astronomer appointed at Dorpat University, founded in 1802, was J.W.A. Pfaff, who had to make his first astronomical observations from an attic. From 1807 onward he could use an interim building. The instruments acquired before completion of the observatory in 1810 will he discussed, among them a reflecting telescope built by J.G.F. Schrader, which was never completed, however.

  5. Geologic Map of Part of the Western Hellas Planitia, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Wilhelms, Don E.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Rock units were deposited on Mars by meteorite impact, volcanism, wind, flowing water, standing water, and ice, acting separately or in concert. Hellas Planitia, the deepest tract on Mars, is a broad depression lying within the high-rimmed, approximately 2,300-km-wide Hellas impact basin. The basin and the planitia are centered about 250 km east of the southeast corner of the map area. Like other stratigraphy-based planetary mapping (Wilhelms, 1990), we suggest the most likely origins for age relations and morphologies visible in the map area.

  6. Helmholtz and Zoellner: nineteenth-century empiricism, spiritism, and the theory of space perception.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, W H

    1989-10-01

    J. K. F. Zoellner began writing on "experimental proofs" of a fourth spatial dimension, and of the existence of spirits, in 1878. His arguments caused strong controversy, with rebuttal essays by Wilhelm Wundt and others. The author argues that Zoellner's case that these matters are experimental questions rested on arguments which Hermann von Helmholtz, inveighing against rationalist views of space and space perception, had recently published. Zoellner's use of Helmholtz's arguments to advance and defend his spiritist views occasioned strong criticism of Helmholtz, affected careers and reputations of scholars in Berlin and Leipzig, and caused enduring controversy over the credibility of Helmholtz's empiricist theory of space perception.

  7. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Granada, Miguel A; Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We report on a newly discovered letter by Christoph Rothmann, dated July 1st 1584, and addressed to Johann Ernst of Anhalt. The letter supports the earlier assumption that Johann Ernst recommended Rothmann to Landgrave Wilhelm of Hesse, as Rothmann asks for Johann Ernst's help on the matter in this new source. More importantly Rothmann refers to his attempts to make Copernicus' calculations compatible with the Ptolomean model, which demonstrates that already at this stage of his career he was working on such a compromise, and not only after being influenced by Raimarus Ursus or Tycho Brahe, as has been argued by some authors. PMID:25942771

  8. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Granada, Miguel A; Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We report on a newly discovered letter by Christoph Rothmann, dated July 1st 1584, and addressed to Johann Ernst of Anhalt. The letter supports the earlier assumption that Johann Ernst recommended Rothmann to Landgrave Wilhelm of Hesse, as Rothmann asks for Johann Ernst's help on the matter in this new source. More importantly Rothmann refers to his attempts to make Copernicus' calculations compatible with the Ptolomean model, which demonstrates that already at this stage of his career he was working on such a compromise, and not only after being influenced by Raimarus Ursus or Tycho Brahe, as has been argued by some authors.

  9. LSWAVE 2000: Lasers and short-wavelength applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, W.

    2001-07-01

    LSWAVE 2000 was organized as a Satellite Workshop to the Seventh International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI 2000. It was held on Saturday, August 26, 2000, at the Technische Universität Berlin, and was jointly organized by the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) and the Technical University Berlin (TUB). The organizing committee consisted of Wilhelm Raith (chairman), Wolfgang Sandner, Ingolf Hertel, Manfred Wick, Bernd Winter, Tatjana Gießel, Holger Stiel, Ingo Will, Ursula Bayr (secretary) and Silvia Szlapka (secretary). Continuing information on the Workshop and its proceedings may be found under http://www.mbi-berlin.de/lswave2000/.

  10. Position-specific behaviors and their impact on crew performance: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, J. Randolph

    1993-01-01

    The present study was motivated by results from a preliminary report documenting the impact of specific crewmembers on overall crew performance (Wilhelm & Law, 1992), and a cross-airline cross-fleet project investigating human factors behaviors of commercial aviation flightcrews (Helmreich, Butler, Whilhelm, & Lofaro, 1992). The purpose of the current investigation is to study how position-specific behaviors impact flightcrew performance, and how these position-specific behaviors differ between two airlines and two flying environments. Implications for training will also be addressed.

  11. On first looking into auriculo-ventricular asynchrony.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S; Moynihan, John B

    2010-05-01

    Walter Gaskell's demonstration in 1882 that it was possible to block the passage of contraction from auricle to ventricle in the frog heart by means of a clamp spurred Joseph Erlanger (1906) to prevent, by similar means, impulse conduction through the bundle of (Wilhelm) His jun. (1893) in the mammalian heart. With a miniaturized polygraph to record the jugular and arterial pulsation, James Mackenzie (1902) displayed various grades of heart block in the human heart. His results were confirmed by Thomas Lewis using Willem Einthoven's (1903) ECG in 1911. But without instrumental help, Robert Spittal (1804-1852) recounted a case of reversible auriculo-ventricular block in 1830. PMID:20180919

  12. [Habitus, capital and fields: the search for an acting head of the Hamburg Asylum Friedrichsberg in 1897].

    PubMed

    Sammet, Kai

    2005-01-01

    In 1897 Hamburg was in search of an Oberarzt for the asylum Friedrichsberg who should function as the acting head of the head Wilhelm Reye (1833-1912). This search was part of the intended reformation of the outmoded psychiatric care in Hamburg. During this application procedure the Hamburg Physikus John Wahncau examined all possible candidates and applicants. The article explores the election process by using some sociological categories developed by Pierre Bourdieu (habitus, capital, field). The author argues that not only meritocratic attributes led to the choice of one candidate, but also his functional "fitting" into the field in Hamburg.

  13. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: a cultural-historical science of consciousness in three acts.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michel; Robinson, David K; Yasnitsky, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural foil to an overemphasis on the biological basis of consciousness, sometimes associated with biological determinism.

  14. A Special Sort of Forgetting: Negation in Freud and Augustine.

    PubMed

    Rosengart, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The development from a positive, dualistic theory of memory and forgetting to a concept of memory that includes forgetting as a variety of remembering is traced in two thinkers. Freud's concept of repression is discussed as a complex negation of both remembering and forgetting, and the development of this construct is shown in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess. A close reading of Augustine of Hippo's Confessions shows a similar concept of a special sort of forgetting, in which what is forgotten is remembered nonetheless. Finally, the limits of the comparison are discussed, and a reading of Freud's "Negation" reveals ways in which the unconscious is fundamentally unlike Augustine's interiority.

  15. The science of unitary human beings and interpretive human science.

    PubMed

    Reeder, F

    1993-01-01

    Natural science and human science are identified as the bases of most nursing theories and research programs. Natural science has been disclaimed by Martha Rogers as the philosophy of science that undergirds her work. The question remains, is the science of unitary human beings an interpretive human science? The author explores the works of Rogers through a dialectic with two human scientists' works. Wilhelm Dilthey's works represent the founding or traditional view, and Jurgen Habermas' works represent a contemporary, reconstructionist view. The ways Rogerian thought contributes to human studies but is distinct from traditional and reconstructionist human sciences are illuminated.

  16. Exploring the brain, looking for thoughts: on Asimov's second Fantastic Voyage.

    PubMed

    Cassou-Noguès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate various concerns which appear in Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain. I will disregard his first voyage inside a human body in Fantastic Voyage I, which the author disavows as not being his own work. In contrast, the second voyage is intricate, suggesting problems drawn from a variety of sources. In a nutshell, Asimov's explorers enter the body of a comatose man in order to read his thoughts. The story can be related both to philosophical thought-experiments, such as those of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and of Herbert Feigl, as well as to personal anxieties peculiar to Asimov.

  17. [The I.G. Farben laboratory at the Günzburg mental hospital. Epilepsy research during the NS-regime and the postwar period].

    PubMed

    Söhner, Felicitas; Winckelmann, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the activities of the I.G. Farben laboratory at the former "Heil- und Pflegeanstalt" Günzburg. This laboratory was established to test the newly developed epilepsy drug "Citrullamon" and its derivatives. Specifically, the type and manner of the various experiments were examined to determine whether the suspicions of unethical human experimentation could be identified. The commercial and medical activities between I.G. Farben and the Heil- und Pflegeanstalt, including the specific roles of the senior physician Wilhelm Leinisch and the I.G. Farben chemist Arno Grosse, are reviewed. PMID:26536788

  18. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: a cultural-historical science of consciousness in three acts.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michel; Robinson, David K; Yasnitsky, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural foil to an overemphasis on the biological basis of consciousness, sometimes associated with biological determinism. PMID:21033206

  19. Astro-Dynasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkora, Leila

    2001-05-01

    Four generations of Struves directed eight observatories over two centuries. The first, Wilhelm Struve moved to Estonia from northern Germany to escape Napoleon's military conscription. He pursued university studies and ended up running an observatory for 20 years. Raising his family at the observatory in isolated conditions encouraged his offspring to follow his career path. The last, Otto Struve, was the first director of McDonald Observatory. The Struves were winners of several Gold Medals from Britain's Royal Astronomical Society for their research.

  20. Recognition of distinctive patterns of gallium-67 distribution in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sulavik, S.B.; Spencer, R.P.; Weed, D.A.; Shapiro, H.R.; Shiue, S.T.; Castriotta, R.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Assessment of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga) uptake in the salivary and lacrimal glands and intrathoracic lymph nodes was made in 605 consecutive patients including 65 with sarcoidosis. A distinctive intrathoracic lymph node {sup 67}Ga uptake pattern, resembling the Greek letter lambda, was observed only in sarcoidosis (72%). Symmetrical lacrimal gland and parotid gland {sup 67}Ga uptake (panda appearance) was noted in 79% of sarcoidosis patients. A simultaneous lambda and panda pattern (62%) or a panda appearance with radiographic bilateral, symmetrical, hilar lymphadenopathy (6%) was present only in sarcoidosis patients. The presence of either of these patterns was particularly prevalent in roentgen Stages I (80%) or II (74%). We conclude that simultaneous (a) lambda and panda images, or (b) a panda image with bilateral symmetrical hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray represent distinctive patterns which are highly specific for sarcoidosis, and may obviate the need for invasive diagnostic procedures.

  1. Biomedical technology transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ongoing projects described address: (1) intracranial pressure monitoring; (2) versatile portable speech prosthesis; (3) cardiovascular magnetic measurements; (4) improved EMG biotelemetry for pediatrics; (5) ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration; (6) pediatric roentgen densitometry; (7) X-ray spatial frequency multiplexing; (8) mechanical impedance determination of bone strength; (9) visual-to-tactile mobility aid for the blind; (10) Purkinje image eyetracker and stabilized photocoalqulator; (11) neurological applications of NASA-SRI eyetracker; (12) ICU synthesized speech alarm; (13) NANOPHOR: microelectrophoresis instrument; (14) WRISTCOM: tactile communication system for the deaf-blind; (15) medical applications of NASA liquid-circulating garments; and (16) hip prosthesis with biotelemetry. Potential transfer projects include a person-portable versatile speech prosthesis, a critical care transport sytem, a clinical information system for cardiology, a programmable biofeedback orthosis for scoliosis a pediatric long-bone reconstruction, and spinal immobilization apparatus.

  2. Russian Virtual Observatory: data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O.; Dluzhnevskaya, O.; Bakanas, E.; Kilpio, E.; Kniazev, A.; Kovaleva, D.; Mironov, A.; Pakhomov, Yu.; Ryabchikova, T.; Rykhlova, L.; Sachkov, M.; Sazonov, S.; Zhukov, A.

    The purpose of this review is to analyze main directions of creation and functioning of major data sources developed by Russian astronomers or with their participation and to compare them with the worldwide trends in these fields. We discuss astronomical space missions of the past, present, and future (Astron, INTEGRAL, WSO-UV, Spectrum Roentgen Gamma, Lyra-B), high-quality photometric atlases and catalogues, and spectroscopic data sources, primarily VALD and the global VAMDC framework for the maintenance and distribution of atomic and molecular data. We describe collection, analysis, and dissemination of astronomical data on minor bodies of the Solar System and on variable stars. Also described is the project joining data for all observational types of binary and multiple stars, Binary star DataBase (BDB).

  3. Improved RSA accuracy with DLT and balanced calibration marker distributions with an assessment of initial-calibration.

    PubMed

    Choo, Anthony M T; Oxland, Thomas R

    2003-02-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been used for over 25 years for accurate micromotion measurement in a wide variety of orthopaedic applications. This study investigated two possible improvements to the method. First, direct linear transformation (DLT) was compared to the traditional RSA reconstruction algorithm. The two methods were considered with respect to standard extrapolation and interpolation calibration cages. Matlab simulations showed that reconstruction accuracy was greatly improved (>60%) by combining DLT with an even distribution of enclosing calibration markers. Second, a benchtop study using phantoms translated at 0.0254-mm intervals showed initial-calibration, followed by removal of the interpolation cage for subsequent exposures, was potentially twice as accurate as self-calibration with an extrapolation cage. These results showed optimizations for the application of RSA when unobstructed space is required.

  4. A comparison of the 3D kinematic measurements obtained by single-plane 2D-3D image registration and RSA.

    PubMed

    Muhit, Abdullah A; Pickering, Mark R; Ward, Tom; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2010-01-01

    3D computed tomography (CT) to single-plane 2D fluoroscopy registration is an emerging technology for many clinical applications such as kinematic analysis of human joints and image-guided surgery. However, previous registration approaches have suffered from the inaccuracy of determining precise motion parameters for out-of-plane movements. In this paper we compare kinematic measurements obtained by a new 2D-3D registration algorithm with measurements provided by the gold standard Roentgen Stereo Analysis (RSA). In particular, we are interested in the out-of-plane translation and rotations which are difficult to measure precisely using a single plane approach. Our experimental results show that the standard deviation of the error for out-of-plane translation is 0.42 mm which compares favourably to RSA. It is also evident that our approach produces very similar flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and external knee rotation angles when compared to RSA.

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the project Rio Blanco and surrounding area

    SciTech Connect

    Singman, L.V.

    1994-11-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, conducted an aerial radiation survey of the area surrounding ground zero of Project Rio Blanco in the northwestern section of Colorado in June 1993. The object of the survey was to determine if there were man-made radioisotopes on or near the surface resulting from a nuclear explosion in 1972. No indications of surface contamination were found. A search for the cesium-137 radioisotope was negative. The Minimum Detectable Activity for cesium-137 is presented for several detection probabilities. The natural terrestrial exposure rates in units of Roentgens per hour were mapped and are presented in the form of a contour map over-laid on an aerial photograph. A second team made independent ground-based measurements in four places within the survey area. The average agreement of the ground-based with aerial measurements was six percent.

  6. Research of nanocomposite structure of boron nitride at proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Y. V.; Ermolaev, D. S.; Pak, V.; Zhang, K.

    2016-02-01

    Using roentgen diffraction and electron microscopy, the influence of nanosecond irradiation by ion beams of high energy on forming of self-organized nanoblocks in near surface's layers of boron nitride (BN) has been studied. It was shown that low temperature transitions from hexagonal to wrutz boron nitrides is associated with changes of shape and sizes of self-organized particles consisting the nanoblocks. We have calculated the parameters of nanoblocks using the meanings of interplane distances and properties of subreflexes orders. The collective shifting deformations of layers in nanoblocks provides phase transition under the screen and forming the set of nanotubes with escaping of five order axes of symmetry. It has been realized that pentagons and stars arranged in points of entrance of five order axis of symmetry are associated with peculiarity of self-organization of the spiral-cyclic structures.

  7. Nuclear hostages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    Classical physics since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays led quickly to work on atomic structure and the Nuclear Age. The author traces the history of decisions to pursue nuclear fission, the organization of the Manhattan Project, the compromises of the 1963 test ban treaty, and the dilemma of nuclear weapons development and deployment that now hold mankind hostage. He reviews the rationale for limited nuclear war, first strike, massive retaliation, non-proliferation, and the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) treaties. He argues that the concepts of mobile MX weapons, fratricide, and population dispersal for civil defense are unworkable, suggesting a program of unilaterally withdrawing tactical nuclear weapons from Europe and strengthening intelligence and law-enforcement powers to withstand terrorist activity. Economic cooperation and political reconciliation may take a generation to achieve, but should be our national goal.

  8. The Nature of the Unidentified EUV Sources: Accreting Isolated Neutron Stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madau, Piero

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this project were: (1) to investigate the nature of the EUVE (Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite) 'NOID' sources, objects detected in the EUV bandpass but with no previous identification at optical or other energies; (2) to study the possible association of NOID sources with nearby, isolated neutron stars among the 1e9 predicted to exist in the Galaxy. These dead radio pulsars have not been detected so far in large numbers, but accretion from the interstellar medium can make them bright at EUV wavelengths; and (3) to use the EUVE data to set constraints on neutron star evolution, accretion physics and population properties. The original objectives of our program remain relevant. Indeed, the level of research in this area has increased substantially since our proposal was submitted as a result of new data from the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite).

  9. New horizons for study of the cardiopulmonary and circulatory systems. [image reconstruction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of computer-controlled three-dimensional reconstruction techniques designed to determine the dynamic changes in the true shape and dimensions of the epi- and endocardial surfaces of the heart, along with variable time base (stop-action to real-time) displays of the transmural distribution of the coronary microcirculation and the three-dimensional anatomy of the macrovasculature in all regions of the body throughout individual cardiac and/or respiratory cycles. A technique for reconstructing a cross section of the heart from multiplanar videoroentgenograms is outlined. The capability of high spatial and high temporal resolution scanning videodensitometry makes possible measurement of the appearance, mean transit and clearance of roentgen opaque substances in three-dimensional space through the myocardium with a degree of simultaneous anatomic and temporal resolution not obtainable by current isotope techniques. The distribution of a variety of selected chemical elements or biologic materials within a body portion can also be determined.

  10. [Morphofunctional changes of coccyx area in posttraumatic coccygodynia].

    PubMed

    Brusko, A T; Nosov, A T; Shevchuk, A V

    2004-01-01

    For definition of a pathogenesis ofposttraumatic coccygodynia, a study of morpho-functional changes of the structures of coccyx's area was organized. The preparations of coccyx, removed during operative intervention from 23 different-aged patients with manifestations of disease were analyzed by roentgen, histological technique and a submicroscopy. In a cartilaginous tissue from patients with posttraumatic coccygodynia, dystrophic changes of chondrocytes down to their atrophy, a destruction of the basic material with partial replacement of a fibrillar cartilaginous tissue with a hyaline cartilage were observed with a different degree of manifestation. Vessels and sacrococcygeal nervous plexus were subjected to pathological changes. Increased post-traumatic mobility, alterations in the process of ossification, deceleration of physiological joining of coccyx vertebras and sacrococcygeal joint alter biomechanical properties of coccyx at sitting. These alterations lead to the long-lasting traumatization with degenerative - dystrophic changes, reinforcement of pain syndrome and manifestation of dysfunctions of organs of pelvis.

  11. The evolution of the quasar continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have in hand a large data base of Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), optical, and IR complementary data. We are in the process of obtaining a large amount of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data for the same quasar sample. For our complementary sample at high redshifts, where the UV was redshifted into the optical, we have just had approved large amounts of observing time to cover the quasar continuum in the near-IR using the new Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) array spectrographs. Ten micron, optical, and VLA radio, data also have approved time. An ISO US key program was approved to extend this work into the far-IR, and the launch of ASTRO-D (early in 1993) promises to extend it to higher energy X-rays.

  12. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART -XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module provides an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. We will present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  13. [Mineral changes occurring with age in the intervertebral disks of L4-L5 vertebrae].

    PubMed

    Niedźwiedzki, T; Pawlikowski, M; Brudnicki, J

    1992-01-01

    The results of mineralogical examination of 26 L4-L5 intervertebral discs taken from cadavers has been presented. Radiology did not reveal marked osteoarthritic changes at this level. The age of the individuals at the fatal accident ranged from 4 to 87 years (mean 41.2). -- Scanning microscopy, atom absorbtion spectroscopy and roentgen microscopy was used in the examination. Two age related phenomena were discovered; demineralisation of the nucleus pulposus and mineralisation of the anulus fibrosus. Two types of mineralisation were found; the microscopic one visible as granules of different shape and size consisting of crystalline hydroxyapatite aggregates and the one detectable exclusively by sensitive chemical methods as an increase of Ca and P content and disturbance of the remaining elements content in biological structures.

  14. Double trouble: a tale of two radio-treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Ebere Sunny; Peev, Nikolay; Nagaraja, Sanjoy; Dardis, Ronan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of patients are treated with radiation. In the early era of radiotherapy, which began soon after X-rays were discovered by Roentgen in 1895, tumours were irradiated with high doses of X-rays in a single fraction. The major initial setback was the damage caused to normal tissues; however, in recent times the use of stereotactic radiosurgery, which delivers high doses of radiation precisely to abnormal tissue targets while sparing the surrounding normal brain tissue, and particularly for surgically inaccessible tumours, has taken centre stage. Prophylactic whole brain radiation (in conjunction with aggressive chemotherapy) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has been shown to improve patient survival, however, this is associated with complications in survivors. We report an interesting case of one of the longest survivors who has had double complications from radiotherapy-based interventions. PMID:25239997

  15. Somatic mutational transients: models of response to acute and distributed doses of radiation applied to growing plants.

    PubMed

    Sand, S A

    1972-08-01

    After limited exposures of whole plants to gamma radiation, the induced-mutation frequency, measured in somatic tissue of successively blooming flowers, is a transient function of time. Quantitative interpretation of the data is aided by construction of a cell-generation model. Seven theoretical models are designed to represent interaction between the cell-generation model and seven different modes of application of the radiation treatment. The models provide a structure for integration of the mutational contributions from different floral primordia. These different contributions are distributed over the array of mature flowers by the quantitative relationships of each model. A mathematical expression for the average response of a model can be equated to the average observed response and solved for the implied mutation rate per cell per roentgen.

  16. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of cell proliferation is studied in the lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose-rate of 10 roentgens per day for 105 days. Autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine were utilized. It was found that at least four compensatory mechanisms maintained a near-steady state of cellular growth: (1) an increase in the proportion of PAS-positive cells which stimulate mitotic activity, (2) maturation arrest of proliferating and differentiating cells which tend to replenish the cells damaged or destroyed by irradiation, (3) an increase in the proportion of cells proliferating, and (4) an increase in the proportion of precursor cells. The results are compared to previous findings observed in the thymus.

  17. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  18. Microstructure and magnetic properties of Fe72.5 Si14.2 B8.7 Nb2 Mo1.5 Cu1.1 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalitsyna, E. A.; Kataev, V. A.; Larrañaga, A.; Lepalovskij, V. N.; Turygin, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    This paper surveys structure and magnetic properties of the thin films with thicknesses of 30, 70, 100 and 200 nm, prepared by high-frequency ion-plasma sputtering of Fe72.5 Si14.2 B8.7 Nb2 Mo1.5 Cu1.1 target onto monocrystalline Si substrates. As-deposited films exhibited the roentgen-amorphous state and in-plane induced magnetic anisotropy. Their crystallization and drastic growth of the grains up to 40 nm at 460 °C were revealed and examined by X-ray diffraction methods. Among the measured magnetic properties of the films, the magnetic anisotropy and coercivity were stressed. Their changes with the annealing temperature and film thickness were discussed. The influence of the surface roughness on the coercivity was also investigated with atomic force microscopy.

  19. Research and technology, 1990: Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Goddard celebrates 1990 as a banner year in space based astronomy. From above the Earth's obscuring atmosphere, four major orbiting observatories examined the heavens at wavelengths that spanned the electromagnetic spectrum. In the infrared and microwave, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), measured the spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic background radiation to extraordinary precision. In the optical and UV, the Hubble Space Telescope has returned spectacular high resolution images and spectra of a wealth of astronomical objects. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph has resolved dozens of UV spectral lines which are as yet unidentified because they have never before been seen in any astronomical spectrum. In x rays, the Roentgen Satellite has begun returning equally spectacular images of high energy objects within our own and other galaxies.

  20. An intelligent ground operator support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goerlach, Thomas; Ohlendorf, Gerhard; Plassmeier, Frank; Bruege, Uwe

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents first results of the project 'Technologien fuer die intelligente Kontrolle von Raumfahrzeugen' (TIKON). The TIKON objective was the demonstration of feasibility and profit of the application of artificial intelligence in the space business. For that purpose a prototype system has been developed and implemented for the operation support of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), a scientific spacecraft designed to perform the first all-sky survey with a high-resolution X-ray telescope and to investigate the emission of specific celestial sources. The prototype integrates a scheduler and a diagnosis tool both based on artificial intelligence techniques. The user interface is menu driven and provides synoptic displays for the visualization of the system status. The prototype has been used and tested in parallel to an already existing operational system.

  1. Taste aversions conditioned with partial body radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R.; Spector, A.C. . Dept. of Psychology)

    1981-11-01

    Radiation-induced taste aversion was compared in rats which received partial body exposure to the head or abdomen with rats receiving whole body irradiation. Exposure levels ranged from 25 to 300 roentgens (R). In additional groups, saccharin aversion to partial body gamma ray exposures of the abdomen were conditioned in animals which had prior experience with the saccharin solution. Aversion was measured with a single-bottle short-term test, a 23-hour preference test and by the number of days taken to recover from the aversion. Whole-body exposure was most effective in conditioning the aversion, and exposure of the abdominal area was more effective than exposure to the head. Also, the higher the exposure, the stronger the aversion. Rats receiving prior experience with the saccharin did not condition as well as control rats with no prior saccharin experience. The possible role of radiation-induced taste aversion in human radiotherapy patients was discussed.

  2. Relevant signs of stable and unstable thoracolumbar vertebral column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Gehweiler, J.A.; Daffner, R.H.; Osborne, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    One-hundred and seventeen patients with acute thoracolumbar vertebral column fracture or fracture-dislocations were analyzed and classified into stable (36%) and unstable (64%). Eight helpful roentgen signs were observed that may serve to direct attention to serious underlying, often occult, fractures and dislocations. The changes fall into four principal groups: abnormal soft tissues, abnormal vertebral alignment, abnormal joints, and widened vertebral canal. All stable and unstable lesions showed abnormal soft tissues, while 70% demonstrated kyphosis and/or scoliosis, and an abnormal adjacent intervertebral disk space. All unstable lesions showed one or more of the following signs: displaced vertebra, widened interspinous space, abnormal apophyseal joint(s), and widened vertebral canal.

  3. What can be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    Solar wind charge exchange produces diffuse X-ray emission with a variable surface brightness comparable to that of the cosmic background. While the temporal variation of the charge exchange emission allows some separation of the components, there remains a great deal of uncertainty as to the zero level of both. Because the production mechanisms of the two components are considerably different, their spectra would provide critical diagnostics to the understanding of both. However, current X-ray observatories are very limited in both spectral resolution and sensitivity in the critical soft X-ray (less than 1.0 keV) energy range. Non-dispersive high-resolution spectrometers, such as the calorimeter proposed for the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, will be extremely useful in distinguishing the cascade emission of charge exchange from the spectra of thermal bremsstrahlung cosmic plasmas.

  4. Head and cervical spine postures in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Salonen, M A; Raustia, A M; Huggare, J

    1993-01-01

    Signs and symptoms in the stomatognathic system and head and cervical spine postures were evaluated in 10 edentulous patients prior to renewal of their dentures, as well as immediately and six months after insertion of new dentures. Natural head posture was recorded using the fluid-level method and measured from the roentgen cephalograms. It was shown that the variables duration of edentulousness and free-way space displayed positive correlations with the dysfunction symptoms. In addition, the patients who needed oral rehabilitation the most, who received the greatest reduction in their free-way space, were seen to have raised their heads more than average. There was also an inverse correlation between the reduction of clinical dysfunction index score and cervical spine postures.

  5. eROSITA on SRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predehl, P.

    2016-06-01

    eROSITA is the primary telescope on the Russian-German X-ray mission Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma. The instrument is near its completion: All parts are in place, all seven cameras and seven mirrors plus spares are calibrated, the integration is almost done. All subsystems behave as planned, the performance is as expected. Now we are in the process of doing the final tests before eROSITA will be shipped to Russia for integration into the spacecraft. The launch is now planned for end of September 2017. In parallel to the instrument development, the preparation of the mission is also on its way: The data analysis software is operating, and we are working together with our Russian partners on details of the mission planning. More than 100 German scientists organised in 12 working groups contribute to the mission with simulations, analyses and scientific proposals.

  6. Cluster science from ROSAT to eROSITA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, G.; Böhringer, H.

    2013-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are one of the important cosmological probes to test the consistency of the observable structure and evolution of our Universe with the predictions of specific cosmological models. We use results from our analysis of the X-ray flux-limited REFLEX cluster sample from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to illustrate the constraints on cosmological parameters that can be achieved with this approach. The upcoming eROSITA project of the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission will increase these capabilities by two orders of magnitude and importantly also increase the redshift range of such studies. We use the projected instrument performance to make predictions on the scope of the eROSITA survey and the potential of its exploitation.

  7. FORMATION BY IRRADIATION OF AN EXPANDED, CELLULAR, POLYMERIC BODY

    DOEpatents

    Charlesby, A.; Ross, M.

    1958-12-01

    The treatment of polymeric esters of methacrylic acid having a softening polnt above 40 icient laborato C to form an expanded cellular mass with a smooth skin is discussed. The disclosed method comprises the steps of subjecting the body at a temperature below the softenpoint to a dose of at least 5 x lO/sup 6/ roentgen of gamma radiation from cobalt-60 source until its average molecular weight is reduced to a value within the range of 3 x lO/sup 5/ to 10/sup 4/, and heating at a temperature within the range of 0 to lO icient laborato C above its softening point to effect expansion.

  8. Radiation Sensitivity of New Zealand Black Mice and the Development of Autoimmune Disease and Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Jane I.; Siegel, Benjamin V.

    1971-01-01

    Young New Zealand Black (NZB) mice manifested extremely high resistance to the lethal effects of acute exposures to ionizing radiation, with a dose necessary to kill 50% of the animals within 30 days, LD50(30), of 964 roentgens (R) at 30 days of age and of 856 R for 90-day-old mice. In contrast, Coombs' positive 9-month-old NZB mice (with low primary immune response) were highly susceptible (LD50(30) = 543 R), possibly because of anemia-stimulated erythropoiesis leading to a depletion of stem cells. The radiation resistance of young NZB mice, combined with previous observations of their immunologic hyper-responsiveness, support the concept that NZB mice possess an unusually large pool of hematopoietic stem cells, an abnormality which may predispose them to the development of autoimmune disease and neoplasia. PMID:5276282

  9. Food Irradiation Is Done in Grays, not Rads

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2002-07-01

    One federal agency has chosen to use exclusively modern SI units of radiation dose in its regulations: the FDA. While not exactly hot news, this bold move by a U.S. government agency on November 26, 1997, should be noted by those who wish to encourage the switch from curies, working level months, rads, rems, and roentgens to becquerels, joule hours per cubic meter, grays, sieverts, and coulombs per kilogram. The regulation is 21 CFR 179, Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Food. Specifically, 21 CFR 179.26 (b) 8. permits meat irradiation up to 4.5 kGy for refrigerated meat and 7.0 kGy for frozen meat. Prior to the 1997 addition, radiation doses had been quoted in grays (kGy) with rad (Mrad) values in parentheses. In the 1997 addition, the Mrads disappeared.

  10. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis. PMID:26197687

  11. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Development of the focal plane PNCCD camera system for the X-ray space telescope eROSITA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Andritschke, Robert; Ebermayer, Stefanie; Elbs, Johannes; Hälker, Olaf; Hartmann, Robert; Herrmann, Sven; Kimmel, Nils; Schächner, Gabriele; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Strüder, Lothar; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2010-12-01

    A so-called PNCCD, a special type of CCD, was developed twenty years ago as focal plane detector for the XMM-Newton X-ray astronomy mission of the European Space Agency ESA. Based on this detector concept and taking into account the experience of almost ten years of operation in space, a new X-ray CCD type was designed by the ‘MPI semiconductor laboratory’ for an upcoming X-ray space telescope, called eROSITA (extended Roentgen survey with an imaging telescope array). This space telescope will be equipped with seven X-ray mirror systems of Wolter-I type and seven CCD cameras, placed in their foci. The instrumentation permits the exploration of the X-ray universe in the energy band from 0.3 up to 10 keV by spectroscopic measurements with a time resolution of 50 ms for a full image comprising 384×384 pixels. Main scientific goals are an all-sky survey and investigation of the mysterious ‘Dark Energy’. The eROSITA space telescope, which is developed under the responsibility of the ‘Max-Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial physics’, is a scientific payload on the new Russian satellite ‘Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma’ (SRG). The mission is already approved by the responsible Russian and German space agencies. After launch in 2012 the destination of the satellite is Lagrange point L2. The planned observational program takes about seven years. We describe the design of the eROSITA camera system and present important test results achieved recently with the eROSITA prototype PNCCD detector. This includes a comparison of the eROSITA detector with the XMM-Newton detector.

  13. Understanding and Explanation in France: From Maine de Biran's Méthode Psychologique to Durkheim's Les Formes Élémentaires de la vie Religieuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaus, Warren

    My task here is to compare the ways in which the relations between the human and the natural sciences were conceived in late nineteenth and early twentieth century France and Germany. Historical generalization may be a mug's game. But if I had to generalize, I would say that the French distinguished the human or cultural sciences from the natural sciences only in terms of their subject matters, while the Germans were more likely to try to distinguish them in terms of their goals, methods, foundations, and normative content as well. Although we may be able to find many philosophical positions among the French that resemble certain aspects of the thought of Wilhelm Dilthey, Wilhelm Windelband, or Heinrich Rickert, no one in France held exactly the same combination of philosophical views concerning the human sciences as that held by any of these German thinkers. In particular, no one in France tried to distinguish the human from the natural sciences in terms of understanding versus explanation in the way that Dilthey did. Thus, although there were other disputes in France in regard to the human sciences, such as that between Émile Durkheim and Gabriel Tarde over the role of psychology in sociological explanation, or that between sociologists and philosophers over the methods of ethics, there was no controversy analogous to the conflict among Dilthey, Windelband, and Rickert over the best way to distinguish the human from the natural sciences.

  14. The place of the 17th century in Jung's encounter with China.

    PubMed

    Cambray, Joe

    2005-04-01

    After recounting several dreams and related alchemical interests of Jung's tied to the 17(th) century, a contextualizing look at select scientific and philosophical developments of that century is presented. Several precursors of the contemporary debates on the mind/body relation are noted, with special reference to the work of Antonio Damasio. This in turn leads to a reconsideration of the work of the 17(th) century polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, which Jung read as a major precursor to his formulation of synchronicity (via Leibniz's concept of 'pre-established harmony'). Leibniz was the first philosopher to articulate the mind/body relationship in terms of supervenience, sharing an accord with those contemporary philosophers and scientists who see the mind as being an emergent property of the body-brain. Similarly, these ideas are also consistent with a reformulation of synchronicity in terms of emergence. Tracing Leibniz's interest in China reveals another set of links to Jung and to emergentism. Jung's use of Taoist concepts in developing the synchronicity principle is well known. According to scholars, Leibniz was the first major Western intellect to study the I-Ching, through the assistance of a Jesuit missionary in Beijing, Fr. Joachim Bouvet. Some details of the Leibniz-Bouvet correspondence are discussed here. Despite Helmut Wilhelm's presenting aspects of this correspondence at an Eranos conference, Jung does not appear to have integrated it into his writing on synchronicity--a possible reason for this omission is suggested.

  15. NMR Measures of Heterogeneity Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Hans W.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced solid state NMR spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about structure and dynamics of complex systems. On a local scale, multidimensional solid state NMR has elucidated the geometry and the time scale of segmental motions at the glass transition. The higher order correlation functions which are provided by this technique led to the notion of dynamic heterogeneities, which have been characterized in detail with respect to their rate memory and length scale. In polymeric and low molar mass glass formers of different fragility, length scales in the range 2 to 4 nm are observed. In polymeric systems, incompatibility of backbone and side groups as in polyalkylmethacrylates leads to heteogeneities on the nm scale, which manifest themselves in unusual chain dynamics at the glass transition involving extended chain conformations. References: K. Schmidt-Rohr and H.W. Spiess, Multidimensional Solid-State NMR and Polymers,Academic Press, London (1994). U. Tracht, M. Wilhelm, A. Heuer, H. Feng, K. Schmidt-Rohr, H.W. Spiess, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2727 (1998). S.A. Reinsberg, X.H. Qiu, M. Wilhelm, M.D. Ediger, H.W. Spiess, J.Chem.Phys. 114, 7299 (2001). S.A. Reinsberg, A. Heuer, B. Doliwa, H. Zimmermann, H.W. Spiess, J. Non-Crystal. Solids, in press (2002)

  16. Dilemmas of 19th-century Liberalism among German Academic Chemists: Shaping a National Science Policy from Hofmann to Fischer, 1865-1919.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2015-04-01

    This paper's primary goal is to compare the personalities, values, and influence of August Wilhelm Hofmann and Emil Fischer as exemplars and acknowledged leaders of successive generations of the German chemical profession and as scientists sharing a 19th-century liberal, internationalist outlook from the German wars of unification in the 1860s to Fischer's death in 1919 in the aftermath of German defeat in World War I. The paper will consider the influence of Hofmann and Fischer on the shaping of national scientific institutions in Germany, from founding of the German Chemical Society in 1867 to the first institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society founded in 1911, their academic leadership in other areas including the shaping of a successful academic-industrial symbiosis in organic chemistry, and finally their response to war as a force disruptive of scientific internationalism. All of these developments posed serious dilemmas, exacerbated by emerging strains of nationalism and anti-Semitism in German society. Whereas Hofmann's lifework came to a relatively successful end in 1892, Fischer was not so fortunate, as the war brought him heavy responsibilities and terrible personal losses, but with no German victory and no peace of reconciliation--a bleak end for Fischer and the 19th-century liberal ideals that had inspired him. PMID:26104166

  17. A Diversity of Divisions: Tracing the History of the Demarcation between the Sciences and the Humanities.

    PubMed

    Bouterse, Jeroen; Karstens, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Throughout history, divides between the sciences and the humanities have been drawn in many different ways. This essay shows that the notion of a divide became more urgent and pronounced in the second half of the nineteenth century. While this shift has several causes, the essay focuses on the rise of the social sciences, which is interpreted as posing a profound challenge to the established disciplines of the study of humankind. This is demonstrated by zooming in on linguistics, one of the key traditional disciplines of the humanities. Through the assumption of a correspondence between mental and linguistic categories, psychology became of central importance in the various conceptions of linguistics that emerged in the nineteenth century. Both linguistics and psychology were very much engaged in a process of discipline formation, and opinions about the proper directions of the fields varied considerably. Debates on these issues catalyzed the construction of more radical divisions between the sciences and the humanities. Both Wilhelm Dilthey's dichotomy between understanding and explanation and Wilhelm Windelband's dichotomy between nomothetic and idiographic sciences respond to these debates. While their constructions are often lumped together, the essay shows that they actually meant very different things and have to be treated accordingly.

  18. Dilemmas of 19th-century Liberalism among German Academic Chemists: Shaping a National Science Policy from Hofmann to Fischer, 1865-1919.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2015-04-01

    This paper's primary goal is to compare the personalities, values, and influence of August Wilhelm Hofmann and Emil Fischer as exemplars and acknowledged leaders of successive generations of the German chemical profession and as scientists sharing a 19th-century liberal, internationalist outlook from the German wars of unification in the 1860s to Fischer's death in 1919 in the aftermath of German defeat in World War I. The paper will consider the influence of Hofmann and Fischer on the shaping of national scientific institutions in Germany, from founding of the German Chemical Society in 1867 to the first institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society founded in 1911, their academic leadership in other areas including the shaping of a successful academic-industrial symbiosis in organic chemistry, and finally their response to war as a force disruptive of scientific internationalism. All of these developments posed serious dilemmas, exacerbated by emerging strains of nationalism and anti-Semitism in German society. Whereas Hofmann's lifework came to a relatively successful end in 1892, Fischer was not so fortunate, as the war brought him heavy responsibilities and terrible personal losses, but with no German victory and no peace of reconciliation--a bleak end for Fischer and the 19th-century liberal ideals that had inspired him.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  20. A Diversity of Divisions: Tracing the History of the Demarcation between the Sciences and the Humanities.

    PubMed

    Bouterse, Jeroen; Karstens, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Throughout history, divides between the sciences and the humanities have been drawn in many different ways. This essay shows that the notion of a divide became more urgent and pronounced in the second half of the nineteenth century. While this shift has several causes, the essay focuses on the rise of the social sciences, which is interpreted as posing a profound challenge to the established disciplines of the study of humankind. This is demonstrated by zooming in on linguistics, one of the key traditional disciplines of the humanities. Through the assumption of a correspondence between mental and linguistic categories, psychology became of central importance in the various conceptions of linguistics that emerged in the nineteenth century. Both linguistics and psychology were very much engaged in a process of discipline formation, and opinions about the proper directions of the fields varied considerably. Debates on these issues catalyzed the construction of more radical divisions between the sciences and the humanities. Both Wilhelm Dilthey's dichotomy between understanding and explanation and Wilhelm Windelband's dichotomy between nomothetic and idiographic sciences respond to these debates. While their constructions are often lumped together, the essay shows that they actually meant very different things and have to be treated accordingly. PMID:26353439

  1. Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Hannes; Sasgen, Ingo; Pollard, David; Klemann, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is assumed to be inherently unstable because it is grounded below sea level in a large part, where the bedrock deepens from today's grounding line towards the interior of the ice sheet. Idealized simulations have shown that bedrock uplift due to isostatic adjustment of the solid Earth and the associated sea-level fall may stop the retreat of such a marine-based ice sheet (Gomez et al., 2012). Here, we employ a coupled model for ice-sheet dynamics and solid-Earth dynamics, including a gravitationally consistent description of sea level, to investigate the influence of the viscoelastic Earth structure on the WAIS' future stability (Konrad et al. 2015). For this, we start from a steady-state condition for the Antarctic Ice Sheet close to present-day observations and apply atmospheric and oceanic forcing of different strength to initiate the retreat of the WAIS and investigate the effect of the viscoelastic deformation on the ice evolution for a range of solid-Earth rheologies. We find that the climate forcing is the primary control on the occurrence of the WAIS collapse. However, for moderate climate forcing and a weak solid-Earth rheology associated with the West Antarctic rift system (asthenosphere viscosities of 3x10^19 Pa s or less), we find that the combined effect of bedrock uplift and gravitational sea-level fall limits the retreat to the Amundsen Sea embayment on millennial time scales. In contrast, a stiffer Earth rheology yields a collapse under these conditions. Under a stronger climate forcing, weak Earth structures do not prevent the WAIS collapse; however, they produce a delay of up to 5000 years in comparison to a stiffer solid-Earth rheology. In an additional experiment, we test the impact of sea-level rise from an assumed fast deglaciation of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In cases when the climatic forcing is too weak to force WAIS collapse by itself, the additional rise in sea-level leads to disintegration of the WAIS

  2. Experimentally Derived Mechanical and Flow Properties of Fine-grained Soil Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Peets, C. S.; Flemings, P. B.; Day-Stirrat, R. J.; Germaine, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    As silt content in mudrocks increases, compressibility linearly decreases and permeability exponentially increases. We prepared mixtures of natural Boston Blue Clay (BBC) and synthetic silt in the ratios of 100:0, 86:14, 68:32, and 50:50, respectively. To recreate natural conditions yet remove variability and soil disturbance, we resedimented all mixtures to a total stress of 100 kPa. We then loaded them to approximately 2.3 MPa in a CRS (constant-rate-of-strain) uniaxial consolidation device. The analyses show that the higher the silt content in the mixture, the stiffer the material is. Compression index as well as liquid and plastic limits linearly decrease with increasing silt content. Vertical permeability increases exponentially with porosity as well as with silt content. Fabric alignment determined through High Resolution X-ray Texture Goniometry (HRXTG) expressed as maximum pole density (m.r.d.) decreases with silt content at a given stress. However, this relationship is not linear instead there are two clusters: the mixtures with higher clay contents (100:0, 84:16) have m.r.d. around 3.9 and mixtures with higher silt contents (68:32, 50:50) have m.r.d. around 2.5. Specific surface area (SSA) measurements show a positive correlation to the total clay content. The amount of silt added to the clay reduces specific surface area, grain orientation, and fabric alignment; thus, it affects compression and fluid flow behavior on a micro- and macroscale. Our results are comparable with previous studies such as kaolinite / silt mixtures (Konrad & Samson [2000], Wagg & Konrad [1990]). We are studying this behavior to understand how fine-grained rocks consolidate. This problem is important to practical and fundamental programs. For example, these sediments can potentially act as either a tight gas reservoir or a seal for hydrocarbons or geologic storage of CO2. This study also provides a systematic approach for developing models of permeability and compressibility

  3. Innovative Conditioning Procedures for the Generation of Radioactive Waste Products which are Stable for Intermediate Storage or Repository-Independent in Final Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmetz, H.J.; Heimbach, H.; Odoj, R.; Pruesse, R.; Wartenberg, W.

    2006-07-01

    The German Federal Government aims at a future final storage site for all kinds of radioactive waste within 30 years. Existing and newly-produced radioactive waste therefore has to be stored in interim storage facilities over very long periods of time. At present, most German radioactive waste or waste packages are produced and qualified according to the acceptance criteria of the projected final repository KONRAD. [1] Nevertheless, conditioning strategies for crude radioactive waste have to take into account the open question of the future repository site as well as requirements for long-term interim storage. The Quality Control Group for Radioactive Waste (in German: Produktkontrollstelle fuer radioaktive Abfaelle - PKS) works as an independent expert organisation for the quality checking of radioactive waste packages as well as evaluating conditioning procedures for waste containers suitable for final storage on behalf of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (in German: Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS). The Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (in German: Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung and Reaktortechnik - ISR) of the Research Centre Juelich investigates scientific/technical problems of nuclear disposal, especially in the field of waste treatment. In this context, ISR and PKS investigated and/or evaluated innovative procedures, by means of which radioactive waste flows may be minimized and rendered inert. QSA Global (formerly: AEA Technology QSA) conditions radioactive waste of German users from the fields of medicine, research and industry as well as from its own radioactive source production and operates an intermediate storage facility for radioactive waste containers. This poster deals with the characteristics and possible applications of new waste fixation media on the basis of organic and inorganic mineral polymers; with the approach of producing inherently safe waste forms for various geological formations. Plasma technology

  4. One hundred years of the Fritz Haber Institute.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Bretislav; Hoffmann, Dieter; James, Jeremiah

    2011-10-17

    We outline the institutional history and highlight aspects of the scientific history of the Fritz Haber Institute (FHI) of the Max Planck Society, successor to the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, from its founding in 1911 until about the turn of the 21st century. Established as one of the first two Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes, the Institute began as a much-awaited remedy for what prominent German chemists warned was the waning of Germany's scientific and technological superiority relative to the United States and to other European nations. The history of the Institute has largely paralleled that of 20th century Germany. It spearheaded the research and development of chemical weapons during World War I, then experienced a "golden era" during the 1920s and early 1930s, in spite of financial hardships. Under the National Socialists it suffered a purge of its scientific staff and a diversion of its research into the service of the new regime, accompanied by a breakdown in its international relations. In the immediate aftermath of World War II it suffered crippling material losses, from which it recovered slowly in the postwar era. In 1952, the Institute took the name of its founding director and the following year joined the fledgling Max Planck Society, successor to the Kaiser Wilhelm Society. During the 1950s and 1960s, the Institute supported diverse research into the structure of matter and electron microscopy in its geographically isolated and politically precarious location in West Berlin. In subsequent decades, as Berlin benefited from the policies of détente and later glasnost and the Max Planck Society continued to reassess its preferred model of a research institute, the FHI reorganized around a board of coequal scientific directors and renewed its focus on the investigation of elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces, topics of research that had been central to the work of Fritz Haber and the first "golden era" of

  5. Geospatial assessment of ecological functions and flood-related risks on floodplains along major rivers in the Puget Sound Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological functions and flood-related risks were assessed for floodplains along the 17 major rivers flowing into Puget Sound Basin, Washington. The assessment addresses five ecological functions, five components of flood-related risks at two spatial resolutions—fine and coarse. The fine-resolution assessment compiled spatial attributes of floodplains from existing, publically available sources and integrated the attributes into 10-meter rasters for each function, hazard, or exposure. The raster values generally represent different types of floodplains with regard to each function, hazard, or exposure rather than the degree of function, hazard, or exposure. The coarse-resolution assessment tabulates attributes from the fine-resolution assessment for larger floodplain units, which are floodplains associated with 0.1 to 21-kilometer long segments of major rivers. The coarse-resolution assessment also derives indices that can be used to compare function or risk among different floodplain units and to develop normative (based on observed distributions) standards. The products of the assessment are available online as geospatial datasets (Konrad, 2015; http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7DR2SJC).

  6. Recent international developments in low-level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.

    1986-11-01

    Recent international developments in low-level waste (LLW) disposal have included a move away from ocean dumping and a trend towards engineered and deeper dispoosal. Siting efforts have accelerated as interim storage facilities and existing sites reach capacity. The suspension of ocean dumping by the London Dumping Conventions of 1983 and 1985 has affected the LLW disposal practices of several countries, including the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Japan. Their plans now include disposal in trenches, shallow concrete pits, deep mines, sub-seabed caverns, horizontal mountain tunnels, and long-term storage facilities. Other recent developments include selection of the semi-desert Vaalputs site in South Africa, licensing activities for the Konrad mine site in the Federal Republic of Germany, design of at-reactor sites in Finland, and construction of a Baltic Sea site in Sweden. Also, the French have recently selected the Aube site for engineered disposal in monoliths and tumuli, now used at the La Manche site.

  7. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude.

  8. Gerhart Panning (1900-1944): a German forensic pathologist and his involvement in Nazi crimes during Second World War.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Johanna; Madea, Burkhard

    2009-03-01

    Twenty years after the Second World War the public were made aware of War Crimes committed by the German forensic pathologist, Gerhart Panning (1900-1944). From 1942 till 1944, Panning was professor at the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Bonn. Panning died of tuberculosis on 22 March 1944. After the Second World War, Panning's widow tried to obtain denazification for her husband. There were no particularly serious doubts. In 1965, Konrad Graf von Moltke, the son of Helmuth James Graf von Moltke (1907-1944), presented to the court a private letter from his father to his mother. In this letter, written in 1941, Panning's experiments on Soviet prisoners are described. In the so-called Callsen trial in the court of Darmstadt from 1960 to 1968, the experiments were confirmed by witnesses. In 1941, Panning performed experiments in cooperation with the Sicherheitsstaffel (Nazi special police) in the Ukraine to prove that captured ammunition of the soviet infantry violated international law. For this purpose, different parts of the bodies of living Soviets were used as firing targets. He published the results of these experiments in a scientific journal without any evidence of the origin of these observations. In this article, Panning's life and crimes have been described. PMID:19237846

  9. From lanosterol to cholesterol: structural evolution and differential effects on lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ling; Nielsen, Morten; Thewalt, Jenifer; Ipsen, John H; Bloom, Myer; Zuckermann, Martin J; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2002-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important molecular component of the plasma membranes of mammalian cells. Its precursor in the sterol biosynthetic pathway, lanosterol, has been argued by Konrad Bloch (Bloch, K. 1965. Science. 150:19-28; 1983. CRC Crit. Rev. Biochem. 14:47-92; 1994. Blonds in Venetian Paintings, the Nine-Banded Armadillo, and Other Essays in Biochemistry. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.) to also be a precursor in the molecular evolution of cholesterol. We present a comparative study of the effects of cholesterol and lanosterol on molecular conformational order and phase equilibria of lipid-bilayer membranes. By using deuterium NMR spectroscopy on multilamellar lipid-sterol systems in combination with Monte Carlo simulations of microscopic models of lipid-sterol interactions, we demonstrate that the evolution in the molecular chemistry from lanosterol to cholesterol is manifested in the model lipid-sterol membranes by an increase in the ability of the sterols to promote and stabilize a particular membrane phase, the liquid-ordered phase, and to induce collective order in the acyl-chain conformations of lipid molecules. We also discuss the biological relevance of our results, in particular in the context of membrane domains and rafts. PMID:11867458

  10. Innovators, deep fermentation and antibiotics: promoting applied science before and after the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Bud, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The historiography of penicillin has tended to overlook the importance of developing and disseminating know-how in fermentation technology. A focus on this directs attention to work before the war of a network in the US and Europe concerned with the production of organic acids, particularly gluconic and citric acids. At the heart of this network was the German-Czech Konrad Bernhauer. Other members of the network were a group of chemists at the US Department of Agriculture who first recognized the production possibilities of penicillin. The Pfizer Corporation, which had recruited a leading Department of Agriculture scientist at the end of the First World War, was also an important centre of development as well as of production. However, in wartime Bernhauer was an active member of the SS and his work was not commemorated after his death in 1975. After the war new processes of fermentation were disseminated by penicillin pioneers such as Jackson Foster and Ernst Chain. Because of its commercial context his work was not well known. The conclusion of this paper is that the commercial context, on the one hand, and the Nazi associations of Bernhauer, on the other, have submerged the significance of know-how development in the history of penicillin.

  11. Gerhart Panning (1900-1944): a German forensic pathologist and his involvement in Nazi crimes during Second World War.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Johanna; Madea, Burkhard

    2009-03-01

    Twenty years after the Second World War the public were made aware of War Crimes committed by the German forensic pathologist, Gerhart Panning (1900-1944). From 1942 till 1944, Panning was professor at the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Bonn. Panning died of tuberculosis on 22 March 1944. After the Second World War, Panning's widow tried to obtain denazification for her husband. There were no particularly serious doubts. In 1965, Konrad Graf von Moltke, the son of Helmuth James Graf von Moltke (1907-1944), presented to the court a private letter from his father to his mother. In this letter, written in 1941, Panning's experiments on Soviet prisoners are described. In the so-called Callsen trial in the court of Darmstadt from 1960 to 1968, the experiments were confirmed by witnesses. In 1941, Panning performed experiments in cooperation with the Sicherheitsstaffel (Nazi special police) in the Ukraine to prove that captured ammunition of the soviet infantry violated international law. For this purpose, different parts of the bodies of living Soviets were used as firing targets. He published the results of these experiments in a scientific journal without any evidence of the origin of these observations. In this article, Panning's life and crimes have been described.

  12. The challenge of reducing scientific complexity for different target groups (without losing the essence) - experiences from interdisciplinary audio-visual media production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, Bernd; Broschkowski, Ephraim; Kropp, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Climate Media Factory originates from an interdisciplinary media lab run by the Film and Television University "Konrad Wolf" Potsdam-Babelsberg (HFF) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Climate scientists, authors, producers and media scholars work together to develop media products on climate change and sustainability. We strive towards communicating scientific content via different media platforms reconciling the communication needs of scientists and the audience's need to understand the complexity of topics that are relevant in their everyday life. By presenting four audio-visual examples, that have been designed for very different target groups, we show (i) the interdisciplinary challenges during the production process and the lessons learnt and (ii) possibilities to reach the required degree of simplification without the need for dumbing down the content. "We know enough about climate change" is a short animated film that was produced for the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) for training programs and conferences on adaptation in the target countries including Indonesia, Tunisia and Mexico. "Earthbook" is a short animation produced for "The Year of Science" to raise awareness for the topics of sustainability among digital natives. "What is Climate Engineering?". Produced for the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) the film is meant for an informed and interested public. "Wimmelwelt Energie!" is a prototype of an iPad application for children from 4-6 years of age to help them learn about different forms of energy and related greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude. PMID:25973669

  14. [From the history of Roger commentators].

    PubMed

    Karpp, Gerhard; Riha, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    The biblical manuscript A 12, preserved in Duesseldorf's Federal and University Library (Universitaets- und Landesbibliothek Duesseldorf), dates from the mid-13th century. In the course of its scholarly analysis, a piece of parchment was found in the interior board, where a fragment of a surgical text is written on. Judging from the writing, the original manuscript came from southern France (Montpellier) and dates from the late 13th century. Several pas- sages quote "M[agister] W[ilhelmus] de Congenis", but the text bears only a vague resem- blance to Pagel's (1891) and Sudhoff s (1918) editions. Upon the other hand, the author was guided by Roger Frugardi's 'Chirurgia', which presumably gave the structure for Wilhelm's lectures. The edition of the fragmentary text presents a yet unknown example of student notes referring to William of Congenis and illustrates the complex history of Roger commentaries.

  15. A history of erotic philosophy.

    PubMed

    Soble, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This essay historically explores philosophical views about the nature and significance of human sexuality, starting with the Ancient Greeks and ending with late 20th-century Western philosophy. Important figures from the history of philosophy (and theology) discussed include Sappho, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Jerome, the Pelagians, St. Thomas Aquinas, Michel de Montaigne, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, Arthur Schopenhauer, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Wilhelm Reich, and Herbert Marcuse. Contemporary philosophers whose recent work is discussed include Michel Foucault, Thomas Nagel, Roger Scruton, Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), Catharine MacKinnon, Richard Posner, and John Finnis. To show the unity of the humanities, the writings of various literary figures are incorporated into this history, including Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, James Thurber, E. B. White, Iris Murdoch, and Philip Roth. PMID:19308838

  16. Barrow, Leibniz and the geometrical proof of the fundamental theorem of the calculus.

    PubMed

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-07-01

    In 1693, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz published in the Acta Eruditorum a geometrical proof of the fundamental theorem of the calculus. It is shown that this proof closely resembles Isaac Barrow's proof in Proposition 11, Lecture 10, of his Lectiones Geometricae, published in 1670. This comparison provides evidence that Leibniz gained substantial help from Barrow's book in formulating and presenting his geometrical formulation of this theorem. The analysis herein also supports the work of J. M. Child, who in 1920 studied the early manuscripts of Leibniz and concluded that he had frequently copied his diagrams from Barrow's book, but without acknowledgement. It is also shown that the diagram of Leibniz associated with his 1693 proof has often been reproduced with errors that make some aspects of his text difficult to comprehend.

  17. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine.

  18. Synchronicity and the I Ching: Jung, Pauli, and the Chinese woman.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2005-04-01

    The capacity of the human mind to discover and invent both imagistic analogies and mathematical structures to represent reality is strikingly juxtaposed in the ancient Chinese text of the I Ching. Its emphasis on containing all sorts of opposites and its plastic appeal to multi-valenced experience has kept it alive through millennia and across cultures. Jung was introduced to its Taoist wisdom by the Sinologist Richard Wilhelm. The Nobel Laureate quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli became familiar with its philosophy and mathematics through his reading of Schopenhauer and Leibniz. In their correspondence about the nature of the unconscious and synchronicity, Pauli and Jung also exchanged their musings on Pauli's dreams of a Chinese woman, her role in his psyche and his scientific theories(1).

  19. Reinventing machines: the transmission history of the Leibniz calculator.

    PubMed

    Morar, Florin-Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper argues that we should take into account the process of historical transmission to enrich our understanding of material culture. More specifically, I want to show how the rewriting of history and the invention of tradition impact material objects and our beliefs about them. I focus here on the transmission history of the mechanical calculator invented by the German savant Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Leibniz repeatedly described his machine as functional and wonderfully useful, but in reality it was never finished and didn't fully work. Its internal structure also remained unknown. In 1879, however, the machine re-emerged and was reinvented as the origin of all later calculating machines based on the stepped drum, to protect the priority of the German Leibniz against the Frenchman Thomas de Colmar as the father of mechanical calculation. The calculator was later replicated to demonstrate that it could function 'after all', in an effort to deepen this narrative and further enhance Leibniz's computing acumen.

  20. Woman astronomers in Berlin and Potsdam. (German Title: Astronominnen in Berlin und Potsdam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Annette

    This article examines the role of women astronomers in the region of Berlin-Potsdam. Were there any women astronomers? When and where were they employed? What were the training conditions for these women astronomers? And where can one find traces of their work? The article discusses the situation for women astronomers from the 18th century. It also offers an overview about all women who received their doctorates in astronomy, geophysics, and meteorology at the Berlin University (Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitat zu Berlin) between 1899 and 1945. Finally, the article deals with the emergence of two patterns of women scientists. Both patterns are examples of different strategies used by women scientists to obtain positions in classical fields of male dominance and to illustrate the range of the reception of women scientists in the first half of the 20th century.

  1. Redescription of Jenkina articulata Brøndsted from the deep Eckström Shelf, E-Weddell Sea, Antarctica and a comment on the possible mass occurrence of this species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janussen, Dorte; Tore Rapp, Hans

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on an unexpected large catch of the rare calcareous sponge species Jenkina articulataBrøndsted, 1931, taken in the Antarctic Weddell Sea during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expedition in January 2008. This species is only known from the original description from two specimens collected from the type locality off Wilhelm II-Land. During the SYSTCO expedition more than 60 specimens were collected using an Agassiz trawl at 600 m depth on the Eckström Shelf, Eastern Weddell Sea. Based on this collection, we give a redescription of the incompletely known species, place the locality of catch in a major context, and discuss possible explanations for the rich occurrence of this species in the sponge-ground fauna.

  2. [Anthropology and synthetic Darwinism in the Third Reich: The Evolution of Organisms (1943)].

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Junker, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    This essay will analyse early attempts to base anthropology on the theoretical model provided by the emerging synthetic Darwinism of the 1940s. In the first section we will investigate the historical context of the publication of one of the central documents of synthetic Darwinism in Germany: Gerhard Heberer's Die Evolution der Organismen (1943). Anthropology was covered extensively in this book. The second section will give an impression of the live and work of the five anthropologists represented in Heberer's book: Christian von Krogh, Wilhelm Gieseler, Otto Reche, Hans Weinert, and Gerhard Heberer. The third part of our paper will clarify whether these anthropologists shared a common theoretical outlook with the founders of synthetic Darwinism, and to what degree they were committed to the racial ideas of the Third Reich.

  3. [On the road to a new humanity: the reception of psychoanalysis in the early Kinderladen movement].

    PubMed

    Kauders, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1960s a group of students in West Germany founded the so-called Kinderläden (day care centers) in order to experiment with new forms of early childhood education. Members of the early Kinderladen movement in particular pursued a radically utopian approach that, they hoped, would engender new human beings. With the aid of psychoanalytic writings, especially those of Wilhelm Reich, they sought to create subjects that would overcome repressive bourgeois norms and live out their sexuality freely. This reliance on Reich entailed a new interpretation of the "base", as psychoanalytic drive theory supplanted Marxist theory. As such, the early Kinderladen ac- tivists regarded the "basis" of society in biological, psychological, and pedagogic rather than economic terms.

  4. [Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reich, H; Hollwich, F

    1984-06-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition that comprises, apart from angiomas of the retina, the cerebellum, the spinal cord, and the cerebrum, also cystic and blastomatous dysplasias resulting from maldevelopment, namely cystic kidney and pancreas, hypernephroma, and pheochromocytoma. Early observers of the syndrome were the English neurologist John Hughlings Jackson (1872) and the German ophthalmologist Hugo Magnus (1874). The typical association of angiomas of the retina with the cerebellum was first described in 1905 by the Prague ophthalmologist Wilhelm Czermak, long before Lindau (1926). The fact that hypernephromas and pheochromocytomas may form parts of it characterizes the syndrome as a polyneoplastic hereditary disease and the sufferers as members of families at risk. Since the ophthalmologist is often the first to recognize this disease by direct inspection of the fundi, he is responsible for ensuring proper medical care for the affected person and his or her entire family.

  5. The "Jews" of the antifascist left: homosexuality and socialist resistance to Nazism.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, H

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1930s, German Social Democrats and Communists seized upon the homosexual orientation of some Nazi leaders, especially Ernst Röhm, with the aim of discrediting the entire National Socialist movement. In Western Europe as well as the Soviet Union, there was a general tendency among socialists in the 1930s to identify homosexuality with Nazism. Antifascist leftists created the impression that homosexuality was widespread in Nazi organizations. Such socialist theorists as Wilhelm Reich tended to view homosexuality sociologically and psychologically as a typical rightist, nationalist, and above all fascist aberration. Leftist aversion to homosexuality was not only an expression of political opportunism. Prejudices against homosexuality were part and parcel of socialist thinking and became even more deep-rooted among leftists as a consequence of the ideological and moral confrontation with National Socialism. Against the presumed immortality and perversion of the Nazis, the antifascists stressed their own rationality and purity.

  6. Discovery of the sinus node by Keith and Flack: on the centennial of their 1907 publication.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Hollman, Arthur

    2007-10-01

    In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered a net of gelatinous fibres in the subendocardium of the heart. Walter Gaskell in the 1880s observed that the impulse of the heart began in the sinus venosus, and that this region had the most rhythmic ability. A conducting bundle between the atrium and the ventricle was found by Wilhelm His, Jr in 1893. In 1906, Sunao Tawara found a "complex knoten" of tissue at the proximal end of the His bundle. He concluded that this was the inception of an electrical conducting system which continued from the AV node through the bundle of His, divided into the bundle branches, and terminated as the Purkinje fibres. The collaboration of Arthur Keith and Martin Flack led to discovery of the sinus node, finalising the discovery of the electrical system of the heart and providing an anatomical answer to the baffling mystery: "Why does the heart beat?" PMID:17890694

  7. [Schelling and experiential science].

    PubMed

    Breidbach, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Schelling's philosophy of nature is shown to be part of the scientific discussions of his day, not set apart from it. His terminology describing the potentialities and polarities of nature was formed during Schelling's collaboration with the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter. This scientist adopted the schema Schelling had developed for the categorization of natural phenomena to describe the peculiar facts that interested him in his area of research. Thus Ritter was able to develop a classification of the various phenomena of animal galvanism. Thus it can be shown that the idealistic "Naturphilosophie" was part of the scientific culture of about 1800. It is to be interpreted as philosophy of science and has to be evaluated not only in a philosophically systematic way but in particular in its influence on the way scientific categories were ordered at the time. Thereby it can be shown that the idealistic vocabulary had close correspondence to French morphology and English Natural Theology. PMID:15730143

  8. Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens.

    PubMed

    Haaning, Aksel

    2014-02-01

    The paper focuses on the year 1929 when Jung published 'A European commentary' to Richard Wilhelm's German translation of the Taoist text The Secret of the Golden Flower. This shows that Jung had already started on the track of European alchemy by following up Conrad Waldkirch's preface in Artis Auriferae (1593); and it raises the question of whether this could be the possible missing link to Jung's subsequent research in Alchemy and Hermetic Philosophy in the years to come. It is argued that here was the beginning of Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens, the publication of which concludes the Mysterium Conuinctionis more than twenty years later. It is further maintained that this choice of the Aurora is a profound expression of Jung's ambition to revitalize the past from within the individual, and helps explain Jung's deep concern with the welfare and future of modern society. PMID:24467350

  9. Withstanding trauma: the significance of Emma Eckstein's circumcision to Freud's Irma dream.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Carlo

    2013-07-01

    The author considers the medical rationale for Wilhelm Fliess's operation on Emma Eckstein's nose in February 1895 and interprets the possible role that this played in Freud's dream of Irma's injection five months later. The author's main argument is that Emma likely endured female castration as a child and that she therefore experienced the surgery to her nose in 1895 as a retraumatization of her childhood trauma. The author further argues that Freud's unconscious identification with Emma, which broke through in his dream of Irma's injection with resistances and apotropaic defenses, served to accentuate his own "masculine protest". The understanding brought to light by the present interpretation of Freud's Irma dream, when coupled with our previous knowledge of Freud, allows us to better grasp the unconscious logic and origins of psychoanalysis itself.(1.) PMID:23824652

  10. Images and Meaning-Making in a World of Resemblance: The Bavarian-Saxon Kidney Stone Affair of 1580

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This article de-constructs and re-constructs the dynamic of a sixteenth-century political dispute between the Catholic Bavarian Duke Wilhelm V and the Protestant Saxon Elector August I. By focusing on the visual imagery which ignited the dispute, the paper explores sixteenth-century ‘ways of seeing’ and the epistemic role realistic images played in the production of knowledge about the natural world. While the peculiar dynamic of the affair is based on a specific understanding of the evidential role of images, the paper also argues that the wider socio-cultural context, in particular certain strategies of truth-telling, provide further clues as to the dynamic and closure of the affair. PMID:26290618

  11. Conception and development of the Second Life® Embryo Physics Course.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The study of embryos with the tools and mindset of physics, started by Wilhelm His in the 1880s, has resumed after a hiatus of a century. The Embryo Physics Course convenes online allowing interested researchers and students, who are scattered around the world, to gather weekly in one place, the virtual world of Second Life®. It attracts people from a wide variety of disciplines and walks of life: applied mathematics, artificial life, bioengineering, biophysics, cancer biology, cellular automata, civil engineering, computer science, embryology, electrical engineering, evolution, finite element methods, history of biology, human genetics, mathematics, molecular developmental biology, molecular biology, nanotechnology, philosophy of biology, phycology, physics, self-reproducing systems, stem cells, tensegrity structures, theoretical biology, and tissue engineering. Now in its fifth year, the Embryo Physics Course provides a focus for research on the central question of how an embryo builds itself.

  12. Extensive curettage using a high-speed burr versus dehydrated alcohol instillation for the treatment of enchondroma of the hand.

    PubMed

    Cha, S M; Shin, H D; Kim, K C; Park, I Y

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients treated with different adjuvant methods after curettage for enchondromas of the hand. Sixty-two patients with enchondroma were treated with high-speed burring (29 patients) or alcohol instillation (33 patients) after curettage. The mean follow-up was 40.8 months. No significant differences in the visual analogue scale, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores, total range of active motion, grip strength, and complete healing time were observed between the groups. The distribution of the results of the formula by Wilhelm and Feldmeier were not significantly different between the groups. No surgery-related complications, postoperative pathological fractures, or recurrence was found in either group. For the treatment of enchondroma in the metacarpal and proximal phalanx, alcohol instillation immediately after curettage was as effective as extensive curettage using a high-speed burr.

  13. "Cosmomorphistic geometry" in the unconscious geometry of Johannes Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Adolf

    Some mathematical aspects of the Music theory by Johannes Kepler are discussed, paying a special attention to the book "De harmonice mundi". Other scientists interested in Music theory are mentioned throughout the paper: The Pythagorean school, Klaudios Ptolemaios, Leonard Euler, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Christian von Goldbach, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholz, Karl Friedrich Gauss. The relation with the ancient chinese schools of cosmography has been discussed: From the the Pythagorean to the ancient Chinese schools of cosmography we find arithmo-geometrical applications of numbers which are emblematic, hold meaning or represent the essence of things, the author writes. It was Johannes Kepler who taught us this "transconstructive method" of forming classical and ancient begginings of structuralistic thinking into a system from which deductions can readily be made.

  14. Hermann von Helmholtz and his students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph F.

    1989-01-01

    During the years 1871-1888, when Hermann von Helmholtz was professor of physics at the University of Berlin, physicists from all over the world flocked to Berlin to study and do research with him. Among these were the German physicists Max Planck, Heinrich Kayser, Eugen Goldstein, Wilhelm Wien, and Heinrich Hertz, and Americans Henry Rowland, A. A. Michelson, and Michael Pupin. Examples of Helmholtz's scientific and personal interactions with these students and research associates show why he is justly considered the outstanding physics mentor of the 19th century. Both his ideas and his students played a major role in the development of physics in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  15. [On the road to a new humanity: the reception of psychoanalysis in the early Kinderladen movement].

    PubMed

    Kauders, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1960s a group of students in West Germany founded the so-called Kinderläden (day care centers) in order to experiment with new forms of early childhood education. Members of the early Kinderladen movement in particular pursued a radically utopian approach that, they hoped, would engender new human beings. With the aid of psychoanalytic writings, especially those of Wilhelm Reich, they sought to create subjects that would overcome repressive bourgeois norms and live out their sexuality freely. This reliance on Reich entailed a new interpretation of the "base", as psychoanalytic drive theory supplanted Marxist theory. As such, the early Kinderladen ac- tivists regarded the "basis" of society in biological, psychological, and pedagogic rather than economic terms. PMID:25872313

  16. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  17. Discovery of the sinus node by Keith and Flack: on the centennial of their 1907 publication.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Hollman, Arthur

    2007-10-01

    In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered a net of gelatinous fibres in the subendocardium of the heart. Walter Gaskell in the 1880s observed that the impulse of the heart began in the sinus venosus, and that this region had the most rhythmic ability. A conducting bundle between the atrium and the ventricle was found by Wilhelm His, Jr in 1893. In 1906, Sunao Tawara found a "complex knoten" of tissue at the proximal end of the His bundle. He concluded that this was the inception of an electrical conducting system which continued from the AV node through the bundle of His, divided into the bundle branches, and terminated as the Purkinje fibres. The collaboration of Arthur Keith and Martin Flack led to discovery of the sinus node, finalising the discovery of the electrical system of the heart and providing an anatomical answer to the baffling mystery: "Why does the heart beat?"

  18. Plant breeding on the front: imperialism, war, and exploitation.

    PubMed

    Elina, Olga; Heim, Susanne; Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the development of plant-breeding science in the context of the booming genetic research and autarky policy of the 1930s as well as during World War II in National Socialist-occupied Europe. Soviet scientists, especially Nikolai Vavilov and his VIR institute, had a leading position in the international plant-breeding science of the 1920s. During World War II, German scientists, namely experts from the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Plant Breeding, usurped Soviet institutes and valuable seed collections. In contrast, plant-breeding research in occupied Scandinavia continued with relatively little disturbance. The paper compares behavior of German, Soviet, and Norwegian plant-breeding scientists under the Nazi regime. PMID:20503762

  19. The blood from Auschwitz and the silence of the scholars.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hill, B

    1999-01-01

    The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics in Berlin-Dahlem was the centre of scientific racism in Nazi Germany. Its bad history culminated in a research project to analyse the molecular basis of racial differences in the susceptibility to various infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Josef Mengele, a former postdoc of the director of the institute, Otmar von Verschuer, collected blood samples and other material in Auschwitz from families and twins of Jews and Gypsies. The blood samples were analysed by Günther Hillmann in the Berlin laboratory of Nobel Prize winner Adolf Butenandt. Butenandt had just moved to Tübingen. The project was paid for by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Butenandt, Hillmann and von Verschuer made scientific careers in the Federal Republic. To the present day this past has not been acknowledged by the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft as part of its history.

  20. The Politics of Forgetting: Otto Hahn and the German Nuclear-Fission Project in World War II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2012-03-01

    As the co-discoverer of nuclear fission and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry, Otto Hahn (1879-1968) took part in Germany`s nuclear-fission project throughout the Second World War. I outline Hahn's efforts to mobilize his institute for military-related research; his inclusion in high-level scientific structures of the military and the state; and his institute's research programs in neutron physics, isotope separation, transuranium elements, and fission products, all of potential military importance for a bomb or a reactor and almost all of it secret. These activities are contrasted with Hahn's deliberate misrepresentations after the war, when he claimed that his wartime work had been nothing but "purely scientific" fundamental research that was openly published and of no military relevance.

  1. Gradiva: freud, fetishism, and Pompeian Fantasy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John

    2013-10-01

    This paper is a critical reconsideration of Freud's analysis (1907) of Wilhelm Jensen's novella Gradiva: A Pompeian Fantasy (1903). Freud's interest was aroused by the parallels between Jensen's presentation of dreams and Freud's model of dream formation just published in The Interpretation of Dreams (1900). Freud also acclaims Jensen's presentation of the formation and "cure" of his protagonist's delusion about a marble bas-relief of a woman walking. This paper argues for the centrality of the phenomenon of fetishism, briefly considered but excluded from Freud's analysis. The fantasy of Gradiva as "the necessary conditions for loving" (Freud 1910, pp. 165-166) is also a key thesis of the essay, which makes use of the newly translated Freud-Jensen correspondence contained in this article's Appendix.

  2. Hilpoltstein at Johann Christoph Sturm's times (German Title: Hilpoltstein zu Zeiten Johann Christoph Sturms)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Kai Thomas

    After an overview on the foundations of research, the conditions inside the town of Hilpoltstein in the first half of the 17th century are described. Since Hilpoltstein was situated at the road from Nuremberg to Munich, and thus at one of the most important north-south trading routes of medieval times, the town florished in economic terms at the beginning of the 17th century. Afterwards, however, the inhabitants had to suffer religious troubles, since the count palatine Wolfgang Wilhelm converted to catholicism. We collect the traces of the Sturm family in Hilpoltstein that still exist today, and complete the picture by giving an overview of the architectural, commercial and social conditions of those times.

  3. [Oskar Vogt (1870-1959). Hypnotist and brain researcher, husband of Cecile Vogt (1875-1962)].

    PubMed

    V Stuckrad-Barre, S; Danek, A

    2004-10-01

    Oskar Vogt (1870-1955) and his wife Cecile (1875-1962) were neurologists and neuroanatomists with a strong interest in the cytoarchitectonics and myeloarchitectonics of the brain and in the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia. In the 1920s, Vogt created a multi-disciplinary brain research institute, the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut fur Hirnforschung in Berlin-Buch, with divisions for e.g. neuroanatomy, neurohistology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and genetics. Oskar Vogt's scientific activities are discussed briefly with special regard to his former co-worker Brodmann. After being dismissed from office by the Nazi government in 1937, the Vogts continued their work in a privately funded institute in Neustadt, in the Black Forest.

  4. Oskar and Cécile Vogt, Lenin's brain and the bumble-bees of the Black Forest.

    PubMed

    Kreutzberg, G W; Klatzo, I; Kleihues, P

    1992-10-01

    Oskar Vogt (1870-1955) was a prominent German neurologist and neuroanatomist with a strong interest in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. Together with his wife Cécile (1875-1962), he published landmark papers on the cyto- and myelo-architecture of the brain and the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia. He developed the concept of pathoclisis, i.e., the selective vulnerability of specific neuronal populations in the CNS. In the 1920's, Vogt created a multi-disciplinary brain research institute, the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Hirnforschung in Berlin-Buch. After Lenin's death in 1924, Oskar Vogt was called to Moscow where he formed a new brain research institute, with the main purpose to investigate the revolutionary's brain. After being dismissed from office by the Nazi government in 1937, the Vogts continued their work in a privately funded institute in Neustadt, the Black Forest.

  5. [Psychiatry as cultural science: considerations following Max Weber].

    PubMed

    Bormuth, M

    2010-11-01

    Psychiatry can be seen as a natural and cultural science. According to this the postulate of freedom is its strong value judgment. Since the times of enlightenment it has been described metaphorically by the myth of the expulsion from Paradise. Following Max Weber and Wilhelm Dilthey, Karl Jaspers has introduced this perspective into psychiatry. His strict dichotomy between explaining and understanding has later been critically revised by Werner Janzarik and Hans Heimann. Their concepts of structure dynamic, of pathography and of anthropology are closer to Max Weber who connected natural and cultural sciences in a much stronger way. Especially the pathographic example of Nietzsche allows to demonstrate the differences between Jaspers and the later psychopathologists of the Heidelberg and Tübingen schools.

  6. [The case of Sefeloge: a contribution to the history of forensic psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Haack, K; Herpertz, S C; Kumbier, E

    2007-05-01

    In 1850 the mentally disordered Sergeant Maximilian Joseph Sefeloge (1821-1859) tried to assassinate the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm IV (1795-1861). Besides clarification of the political background to the assassination, the question of the delinquent's criminal responsibility has been posed from the very beginning. For the first time Sefeloge's case is examined from a medicohistorical perspective. Due to the importance of the circumstances, a forensic scientist and three well-known psychiatrists made this forensic examination. These medical professionals seemed particularly competent because of their common experience with psychiatric patients. This unique case from nineteenth century Germany is exemplary in that the psychiatrist was generally accepted as an expert witness to evaluate crimes in the context of unclear mental conditions. From there the development of forensic psychiatry could proceed without hindrance.

  7. A history of erotic philosophy.

    PubMed

    Soble, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This essay historically explores philosophical views about the nature and significance of human sexuality, starting with the Ancient Greeks and ending with late 20th-century Western philosophy. Important figures from the history of philosophy (and theology) discussed include Sappho, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Jerome, the Pelagians, St. Thomas Aquinas, Michel de Montaigne, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, Arthur Schopenhauer, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Wilhelm Reich, and Herbert Marcuse. Contemporary philosophers whose recent work is discussed include Michel Foucault, Thomas Nagel, Roger Scruton, Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), Catharine MacKinnon, Richard Posner, and John Finnis. To show the unity of the humanities, the writings of various literary figures are incorporated into this history, including Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, James Thurber, E. B. White, Iris Murdoch, and Philip Roth.

  8. ["Directed perception", "mood", "social reinforcement". Sketches towards the historical semantics of Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact].

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses three basic concepts of Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. It shows first that Fleck's notion of "directed perception" is closely linked to Jakob von Uexküll's writings on the "Umwelt" of animals and humans. The article then proposes to regard the epistemological debates surrounding parapsychology as an important testing ground for the Fleckian concept of „mood“ and his concomitant hypotheses about „the tenacity of systems of opinion and the harmony of illusions". It finally argues that Fleck's modification of Wilhelm Jerusalem's idea of the "social consolidation" of knowledge helps us to understand the indebtedness of Fleck towards early functionalist sociology as well as his strong belief in "specific historical laws governing the development of ideas"The historical semantics of Fleck's works hence proves that his insights are neither marginal nor revolutionary but rather deeply rooted within scientific traditions from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  9. ["Could not therefore the earth globe also be a large tourmaline?" A crystal, Lichtenberg and the polarity discussion before 1800].

    PubMed

    Wiesenfeldt, Gerhard; Breidbach, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the debate on one particular phenomenon of the research into electrical charge distribution prior to 1800: the description and interpretation of polarities observed on the tourmaline. We show that in the second half of the eighteenth century this crystal became a model to distinguish and categorize different qualities of charges (electric and magnetic fluids). It will become clear that the polarity detected on the tourmaline became a key concept for eighteenth century natural philosophy, which relied on analogizing operations. We illustrate this concentrating on Lichtenbergs first lecture at the Göttingen academy of science in 1778. Thus the concept of polarity is already a central ordering category before the beginnings of the speculative enterprise of idealistic Naturphilosophy. Consequently, the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter, who can be positioned in that context, consciously adheres to the experimental research tradition of polarities portrayed in this paper. PMID:23155759

  10. Mars water discoveries - implications for finding ancient and current life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark

    2015-11-01

    There is some wonderful synchronicity right now for those interested in the search for water and life on Mars. Foremost is the recent announcement by NASA and the publication of a study using spectral imaging which definitively proves that there is seasonal, flowing briny water at a number of locations on Mars (see Fig. 1) (Ojha et al., 2015). This caps some 15 years of accumulating evidence that what was previously considered impossible is actually occurring on the Red Planet. "Water is essential to life as we know it," write Lujendra Ojha, Mary Beth Wilhelm, and their co-authors. "The presence of liquid water on Mars today has astrobiological, geologic, and hydrologic implications and may affect future human exploration".

  11. [The "diagnosis" in the light of Charles S. Peirce, Sherlock Holmes, Sigmund Freud and modern neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Adler, R H

    2006-05-10

    A diagnostic hypothesis is a causa ficta. It is an assumption, suitable to explain phenomena, which are not yet proven to be the only and valid explanation of the observed. One of Wilhelm Hauff's faitales illustrates how a hypothesis is generated. It is based on the interpretation of signs. Signs are of an ikonic, an indexical or a symbolic nature. According to S. Peirce, a hypothesis is created by abduction, to Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes by immersion into thoughts, and to S. Freud by free floating attention. The three procedures are alike. Neurobiological structures and functions, which correspond to these processes, are described; especially the emotional-implicite memory. The technique of hypothesis-generation is meaningful to clinical medicine.

  12. Physics, ballistics, and psychology: a history of the chronoscope in/as context, 1845-1890.

    PubMed

    Schmidgen, Henning

    2005-02-01

    In Wilhelm Wundt's (1832-1920) Leipzig laboratory and at numerous other research sites, the chronoscope was used to conduct reaction time experiments. The author argues that the history of the chronoscope is the history not of an instrument but of an experimental setup. This setup was initially devised by the English physicist and instrument maker Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) in the early 1840s. Shortly thereafter, it was improved by the German clockmaker and mechanic Matthäus Hipp (1813-1893). In the 1850s, the chronoscope was introduced to ballistic research. In the early 1860s, Neuchâtel astronomer Adolphe Hirsch (1830-1901) applied it to the problem of physiological time. The extensions and variations of chronoscope use within the contexts of ballistics, physiology, and psychology presented special challenges. These challenges were met with specific attempts to reduce the errors in chronoscopic experiments on shooting stands and in the psychological laboratory.

  13. [From the history of Roger commentators].

    PubMed

    Karpp, Gerhard; Riha, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    The biblical manuscript A 12, preserved in Duesseldorf's Federal and University Library (Universitaets- und Landesbibliothek Duesseldorf), dates from the mid-13th century. In the course of its scholarly analysis, a piece of parchment was found in the interior board, where a fragment of a surgical text is written on. Judging from the writing, the original manuscript came from southern France (Montpellier) and dates from the late 13th century. Several pas- sages quote "M[agister] W[ilhelmus] de Congenis", but the text bears only a vague resem- blance to Pagel's (1891) and Sudhoff s (1918) editions. Upon the other hand, the author was guided by Roger Frugardi's 'Chirurgia', which presumably gave the structure for Wilhelm's lectures. The edition of the fragmentary text presents a yet unknown example of student notes referring to William of Congenis and illustrates the complex history of Roger commentaries. PMID:26427163

  14. August Rauber (1841-1917): from the primitive streak to Cellularmechanik.

    PubMed

    Brauckmann, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    In the early 19th century Karl Ernst von Baer initiated a new research program searching for the mechanisms by which an egg transforms itself into an embryo. August Rauber (1841-1917) took up this challenge. He considered the phylogenetic principle as the right tool to explain the similitude of embryogenetic processes. In extending Baer's approach, he combined comparative embryology and histology in his studies of avian and mammalian embryos. His earlier work demonstrated that the two-layered chick embryo is a modified gastrula and not a "disc" as Wilhelm His had claimed. From the 1880s onwards, he concentrated on the issue of how the development of germ layers is related to tissue differentiation. To address this, he studied the blastopore, epiblast, primitive streak, teratology and the relative importance of nucleus and cytoplasm in heredity. This paper reconstructs some of Rauber's work and concludes that his observations and reflections constituted a new approach combining embryology and histology with "phylogenetic" reasoning.

  15. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state. PMID:22664943

  16. Conception and development of the Second Life® Embryo Physics Course.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The study of embryos with the tools and mindset of physics, started by Wilhelm His in the 1880s, has resumed after a hiatus of a century. The Embryo Physics Course convenes online allowing interested researchers and students, who are scattered around the world, to gather weekly in one place, the virtual world of Second Life®. It attracts people from a wide variety of disciplines and walks of life: applied mathematics, artificial life, bioengineering, biophysics, cancer biology, cellular automata, civil engineering, computer science, embryology, electrical engineering, evolution, finite element methods, history of biology, human genetics, mathematics, molecular developmental biology, molecular biology, nanotechnology, philosophy of biology, phycology, physics, self-reproducing systems, stem cells, tensegrity structures, theoretical biology, and tissue engineering. Now in its fifth year, the Embryo Physics Course provides a focus for research on the central question of how an embryo builds itself. PMID:23586840

  17. [Precarious matters. The radium economy, episteme of risk and the emergence of tracer technique in national socialism].

    PubMed

    von Schwerin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Following the traces of radioactive material is--as scholars have recently shown--a valuable historical approach in order to evaluate the material 'factor' of science in action. Even though the origins of materials like radium and artificial isotopes are quite different, their circulation is interconnected. A material pathway can be drawn from the radium industry to the scientific rise of artificial isotopes as indicator substances in the 1930s, continuing to the building of networks by German scientists working for the war efforts. Also, this pathway reveals the role of radiation protection in establishing that material culture. Finally, the dynamics of material traces and institutional linkages is shown by the tracer work of biophysicists and radiation biologists working at the Genetic Department of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Brain Research in Berlin and at the Institut de Chimie Nucléaire at Paris, which at that time was occupied by German troops.

  18. Does Cometary Panspermia Falsify Dark Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-10-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian P. Schmidt, and Adam G. Riess "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae", judged to be the "most important discovery or invention within the field of physics" (Excerpt from the will of Alfred Nobel). Are we forced by this claimed discovery to believe the universe is dominated by anti- gravitational dark energy? Can the discovery be falsified? Because life as we observe it on Earth is virtually impossible by the standard ΛCDMHC model, extraterrestrial life and cometary panspermia may provide the first definitive falsification of a Nobel Prize in Physics since its first award in 1901 to Wilhelm Röntgen for his discovery of X-rays.

  19. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state.

  20. Purges in comparative perspective: Rules for exclusion and inclusion in the scientific community under political pressure.

    PubMed

    Beyler, Richard; Kojevnikov, Alexei; Wang, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    During the intense political upheaval that dominated the middle decades of the twentieth century, modern states intensified their drives to discipline broad sectors of society and ensure their political reliability. Subjected to such pressures, scientific institutions faced the challenge of admitting new, officially mandated criteria into the regulation of scientific life. We examine the effects of these policies on the Kaiser Wilhelm Society in National Socialist Germany, the Max Planck Society in occupied Germany after 1945, the USSR Academy of Sciences throughout the Stalin era, and the National Academy of Sciences in early cold war America. In all these cases, while academic elites largely accepted the required radical changes in the rules for membership in the scientific community, they also sought to manipulate the process to their own institutional advantage.

  1. Discovery of the sinus node by Keith and Flack: on the centennial of their 1907 publication

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Mark E; Hollman, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered a net of gelatinous fibres in the subendocardium of the heart. Walter Gaskell in the 1880s observed that the impulse of the heart began in the sinus venosus, and that this region had the most rhythmic ability. A conducting bundle between the atrium and the ventricle was found by Wilhelm His, Jr in 1893. In 1906, Sunao Tawara found a “complex knoten” of tissue at the proximal end of the His bundle. He concluded that this was the inception of an electrical conducting system which continued from the AV node through the bundle of His, divided into the bundle branches, and terminated as the Purkinje fibres. The collaboration of Arthur Keith and Martin Flack led to discovery of the sinus node, finalising the discovery of the electrical system of the heart and providing an anatomical answer to the baffling mystery: “Why does the heart beat?” PMID:17890694

  2. X-rays for medical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA analysis on remains of a putative son of Louis XVI, King of France and Marie-Antoinette.

    PubMed

    Jehaes, E; Decorte, R; Peneau, A; Petrie, J H; Boiry, P A; Gilissen, A; Moisan, J P; Van den Berghe, H; Pascal, O; Cassiman, J J

    1998-01-01

    Carl Wilhelm Naundorff was buried in 1845 in Delft as Louis Charles, Duc de Normandie, 'Louis XVII'. However, the son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette-Louis XVII--officially died in the Temple of Paris in 1795. In order to resolve the identity of Naundorff, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences of his remains were compared with the sequences obtained from the hairs of two sisters of Marie-Antoinette, Marie-Antoinette herself, and with the sequences obtained from DNA samples of two living maternal relatives. The mtDNA sequence of a bone sample from Naundorff showed two nucleotide differences from the sequences of the three sisters and four differences from the sequences of living maternal relatives. Based on this evidence it becomes very unlikely that Naundroff is the son of Marie-Antoinette. PMID:9781047

  4. Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens.

    PubMed

    Haaning, Aksel

    2014-02-01

    The paper focuses on the year 1929 when Jung published 'A European commentary' to Richard Wilhelm's German translation of the Taoist text The Secret of the Golden Flower. This shows that Jung had already started on the track of European alchemy by following up Conrad Waldkirch's preface in Artis Auriferae (1593); and it raises the question of whether this could be the possible missing link to Jung's subsequent research in Alchemy and Hermetic Philosophy in the years to come. It is argued that here was the beginning of Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens, the publication of which concludes the Mysterium Conuinctionis more than twenty years later. It is further maintained that this choice of the Aurora is a profound expression of Jung's ambition to revitalize the past from within the individual, and helps explain Jung's deep concern with the welfare and future of modern society.

  5. ["As we're not willing to hang and behead and not able to deport...". On Emil Kraepelin's influence on Franz von Liszt].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Recla, A; Steinberg, H

    2008-03-01

    Emil Kraepelin started his scientific career with a pamphlet demanding complete restructure of German penal law. It is well known that Kraepelin was a recipient of Cesare Lombroso's theses on degeneration and atavism. Therefore his demand for a correctional law completely replacing penal law is easily understood. Still undiscussed however is the question of whether Kraepelin's brochure had a decisive effect on German criminal law, especially on the so-called Marburg Program of Franz von Liszt, still viewed as the first emergence of modern criminal law and policies in Germany. Examination of this shows that despite major theoretical faults, Kraepelin came to conclusions that correspond remarkably with von Liszt's. Special focus should be directed on the psychologist Wilhelm Wundt, who criticised Kraepelin's juridical attempt in a very kind yet fundamental way, and on the relationship that existed between Kraepelin and von Liszt.

  6. [Priest Sebastian Kneipp and his hydrotherapeutic method. Point of view after over one hundred years].

    PubMed

    Kierzek, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    Vincenz Priestnitz (1799-1851) and Wilhelm Winternitz (1835-1905) were creators of world hydrotherapy. Sebastian Kneipp (1821-1893), the priest at Worishofen, the owner of the hydro-therapeutic infirmary where are found precursors of many hydro-therapeutic methods. He was the author of several popular books based on his experience. The book "My water treatment" is best known. He was also a builder of the curative houses, such as: Sebastianeum, Kneip pianeum, Kinder-Asyl. About 25 thousand people from far-away lands yearly were Kneipp's patients. Pourning, wrapings, compresses, rinsing off, total-baths and partial-baths were used often. The aim of this paper is to present Kneipp's silhouette and his sometimes uncritical hydro-therapeutic methods. PMID:16786804

  7. ["Could not therefore the earth globe also be a large tourmaline?" A crystal, Lichtenberg and the polarity discussion before 1800].

    PubMed

    Wiesenfeldt, Gerhard; Breidbach, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the debate on one particular phenomenon of the research into electrical charge distribution prior to 1800: the description and interpretation of polarities observed on the tourmaline. We show that in the second half of the eighteenth century this crystal became a model to distinguish and categorize different qualities of charges (electric and magnetic fluids). It will become clear that the polarity detected on the tourmaline became a key concept for eighteenth century natural philosophy, which relied on analogizing operations. We illustrate this concentrating on Lichtenbergs first lecture at the Göttingen academy of science in 1778. Thus the concept of polarity is already a central ordering category before the beginnings of the speculative enterprise of idealistic Naturphilosophy. Consequently, the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter, who can be positioned in that context, consciously adheres to the experimental research tradition of polarities portrayed in this paper.

  8. Gradiva: freud, fetishism, and Pompeian Fantasy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John

    2013-10-01

    This paper is a critical reconsideration of Freud's analysis (1907) of Wilhelm Jensen's novella Gradiva: A Pompeian Fantasy (1903). Freud's interest was aroused by the parallels between Jensen's presentation of dreams and Freud's model of dream formation just published in The Interpretation of Dreams (1900). Freud also acclaims Jensen's presentation of the formation and "cure" of his protagonist's delusion about a marble bas-relief of a woman walking. This paper argues for the centrality of the phenomenon of fetishism, briefly considered but excluded from Freud's analysis. The fantasy of Gradiva as "the necessary conditions for loving" (Freud 1910, pp. 165-166) is also a key thesis of the essay, which makes use of the newly translated Freud-Jensen correspondence contained in this article's Appendix. PMID:24194488

  9. Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, A. W.

    2001-05-01

    The new book "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" chronicles the centuries-long struggle to secure the first distance to a star through detection of stellar parallax. Beginning with the naked-eye attempts of Tycho Brahe and proceeding through the telescopic studies of Robert Hooke, James Bradley, and William Herschel, all three of whom employed observational strategies suggested by Galileo, the effort to measure stellar parallax gained momentum in the early 19th century with dramatic improvements in telescope technology by German craftsmen such as Joseph Fraunhofer. Three near-contemporaneous announcements of stellar parallaxes were made in the late 1830s by Thomas Henderson (Alpha Centauri), Wilhelm Struve (Vega), and Friedrich Bessel (61 Cygni). By consensus of the astronomical community, Bessel was credited with the first successful measurement of a star's distance. With its biographical focus, "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" highlights the human dimensions of scientific achievement.

  10. [Schelling and experiential science].

    PubMed

    Breidbach, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Schelling's philosophy of nature is shown to be part of the scientific discussions of his day, not set apart from it. His terminology describing the potentialities and polarities of nature was formed during Schelling's collaboration with the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter. This scientist adopted the schema Schelling had developed for the categorization of natural phenomena to describe the peculiar facts that interested him in his area of research. Thus Ritter was able to develop a classification of the various phenomena of animal galvanism. Thus it can be shown that the idealistic "Naturphilosophie" was part of the scientific culture of about 1800. It is to be interpreted as philosophy of science and has to be evaluated not only in a philosophically systematic way but in particular in its influence on the way scientific categories were ordered at the time. Thereby it can be shown that the idealistic vocabulary had close correspondence to French morphology and English Natural Theology.

  11. Aerodynamics and mathematics in National Socialist Germany and Fascist Italy: a comparison of research institutes.

    PubMed

    Epple, Moritz; Karachalios, Andreas; Remmert, Volker R

    2005-01-01

    The article is concerned with the mathematical sciences in National Socialist Germany and Fascist Italy, with special attention to research important to the war effort. It focuses on three institutional developments: the expansion of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Göttingen, the foundation of the Reich Institute for Mathematics in Oberwolfach (Black Forest), and the work of the Istituto Nazionale per le Applicazioni del Calcolo in Rome. All three developments are embedded in the general political background, thus providing a basis for comparative conclusions about the conditions of the mathematical sciences and military-related research in Germany and Italy. It turns out that in both countries, the increasing demand for mathematical knowledge in modern warfare led to the establishment of "extra-university" national institutions specifically devoted to mathematical research.

  12. [The "diagnosis" in the light of Charles S. Peirce, Sherlock Holmes, Sigmund Freud and modern neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Adler, R H

    2006-05-10

    A diagnostic hypothesis is a causa ficta. It is an assumption, suitable to explain phenomena, which are not yet proven to be the only and valid explanation of the observed. One of Wilhelm Hauff's faitales illustrates how a hypothesis is generated. It is based on the interpretation of signs. Signs are of an ikonic, an indexical or a symbolic nature. According to S. Peirce, a hypothesis is created by abduction, to Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes by immersion into thoughts, and to S. Freud by free floating attention. The three procedures are alike. Neurobiological structures and functions, which correspond to these processes, are described; especially the emotional-implicite memory. The technique of hypothesis-generation is meaningful to clinical medicine. PMID:16722205

  13. Instead of Erklären and Verstehen: William James on Human Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, David E.

    Perhaps more than any other American psychologist and philosopher, William James (1842-1910) was intimately familiar with contemporary European thought and debate, including the discussion of Erklären and Verstehen advanced by Wilhelm Dilthey (1833-1911) and others around the turn of the twentieth century. Even before this discussion was initiated, James had been dealing with related issues, pondering alternative solutions, and formulating his own original views on human understanding. These views coalesced in a distinctive approach to cognition. Fundamental to this approach was a belief in possibility and probability as innate features of the physical as well as mental manifestations of the universe. Also fundamental was a conviction that understanding is understanding, regardless of its viewpoint, object, or label as either "descriptive" or "explanatory."

  14. The first demonstration of lactic acid in human blood in shock by Johann Joseph Scherer (1814–1869) in January 1843

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, T. C.; van der Hoven, B.; Bakker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid was first found and described in sour milk by Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742–1786) in 1780. The German physician–chemist Johann Joseph Scherer (1841–1869) demonstrated the occurrence of lactic acid in human blood under pathological conditions in 1843 and 1851. In this article we honour the forgotten observations by Scherer and describe the influence of Scherer's finding on further research on lactic acid at the end of the 19th century. We conclude that Scherer's 1843 case reports should be cited as the first description of lactic acid in human blood after death and also as the first demonstration of lactic acid as a pathological finding in septic and haemorrhagic shock. Carl Folwarczny was, in 1858, the first to demonstrate lactic acid in blood in a living patient. PMID:17661014

  15. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 8 (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions span a time interval of more than 450 years. There are biographical investigations on Georg Joachim Rheticus, C.W.A. von Wahl and K.F. Heym, investigation on a reprint of a chapter of the principal work of Nicolaus Copernicus, on Christoph Scheiner and the "camera obscura", and, with respect to the history of timekeeping, on the "big Nuremberg clock". 19th century topics are: a contribution on the honorary doctorate of Joseph Fraunhofer, and on the construction of a lunar globe by Wilhelmine Witte, while the report on Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel and the cholera pandemia in Königsberg in the year 1831 gives a view into everyday life of scientists. 20th century topics are: the contributions on Bruno Thüring in Vienna and his relations with national socialism, as well as on Arthur Beer, Albert Einstein and the Warburg library. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  16. No evolution, no heredity, just development-Julius Schaxel and the end of the Evo-Devo agenda in Jena, 1906-1933: a case study.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Julius Schaxel is an almost forgotten figure in the history of early twentieth century biology. By focusing on his life and work, I would like to illustrate several central developments in that period of history of biology. Julius Schaxel was an early representative and organizer of theoretical biology, discussing and criticizing both Wilhelm Roux's mechanism and Hans Driesch's vitalism. In addition to his theoretical work, Schaxel also did experimental research on developmental issues to support his critique. In this paper, special emphasis is made on the negotiating practice of Schaxel, which he used to establish a new area of biological research and a new audience for that area. In contrast to these new fields, Schaxel can be also portrayed as the endpoint of a research tradition investigating ontogeny and phylogeny together, which today is called Evo-Devo. Following Garland Allen's dialectical processes that led to the decline of the Evo-Devo research agenda, Schaxel's example is used to investigate these processes.

  17. How Einstein made asymmetry disappear: symmetry and relativity in 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Giora; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    2005-07-01

    Contents: I. Introduction II. Einstein's usages of the term symmetry in 1905 1. The dissertation (April 1905) Case 1: isotropy Case 2: analogy Case 3: geometrical usage 2. "On the electrodynamics of moving bodies" (June 1905) Case 1: indifference Case 2: two algebraic usages Case 3: physical usage Case 4: algebraic usage Case 5: rejecting asymmetry 3. The central claim: making asymmetry disappear by appealing to a physical argument 4. Conclusion III. Background. The term symmetry and its "relatives": duality, parallelism, and reciprocity 1. Heinrich Hertz (1857-1894) 2. Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925) 3. August Föppl (1854-1924) 4. Emil Wiechert (1861-1928) 5. Wilhelm Wien (1864-1928) 6. Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (1853-1928) 7. Summary

  18. The Pulkovo Observatory on the Centuries' Borderline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalakin, Viktor K.

    The present paper deals with the development of astrophysical research at the Pulkovo Observatory (now: the Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences) at adjacent time periods separated by the threshold between the 19th and the 20th centuries. The Pulkovo Observatory had been inaugurated in 1839. Its traditional field of research work was astrometry. The confirmation of light absorption phenomenon in interstellar space by Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve marked the turn of the Observatory's research programs toward astrophysics. New tendencies in the development of contemporaneous astronomy in Russia were pointed out by Otto Struve in his paper “About the Place of Astrophysics in Astronomy” presented in 1866 to the Saint-Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Wide-scale astrophysical studies were performed at Pulkovo Observatory around 1900 during the directorships of Theodore Bredikhin, Oscar Backlund and Aristarchos Belopolsky.

  19. [On natural history museums and their purpose. A lecture given by Leopold von Buch (1774-1853) in April 1838].

    PubMed

    Kröger, Björn

    2011-12-01

    A manuscript of a lecture by the Prussian geologist Leopold von Buch given at the Berlin Society of the Friends of the Humanity was discovered at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. The text is a raw version of a passionate plea for the formation of natural history collections as science places, with a partly biting humor. Based on until now unknown anecdotes about naturalists like Kaspar Maria Graf Sternberg (1761-1838) and Friedrich Wilhelm Hoeninghaus (1771-1854) Leopold von Buch argues with von Sternberg for the scientific value of natural history collections. The repeating references to the works of Goethe and an extensive addendum of various Dante translations into German are striking. The lecture manuscript complements our knowledge about the thinking of this important geologist, and provides new insights into the science policy of his time.

  20. ["Even electricity cannot work wonders!". Neglected achievements by German psychiatrists around 1880 in the treatment of depressions and psychoses].

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H

    2014-07-01

    Parallel to the recent reneurobiologization of psychiatry as a subject, therapies based on electricity and elektrcomagnetism are returning to mental health care. Around 1880, the application of brain stimulating treatment on patients was particularly popular among German psychiatrists. This fact has largely been ignored in historical psychiatric research as present day practices, in particular deep brain stimulation (DBS), have frequently been seen solely within the tradition of brain surgery. Against this background the present study aims to revive the first trials of non-surgical electrical brain stimulation on depressive and psychotic patients, highlighting a 2-part study published by Wilhelm Tigges. It was Tigges along with Rudolph Gottfried Arndt and Wilhelm Erb who tried to establish clear rules on the most beneficial application methods and doses. Interestingly, Tigges's therapy was successful in cases of severe depression with chronification potential, i.e. precisely the clinical picture for which brain stimulation therapies are reserved today as a last option and ascribed an easing and even curing potential. Trigges also found that electricity produced almost no positive effect whatsoever with madly insane patients and hence anticipated the current non-application of DBS on these patients. After 1890 electrotherapeutic approaches in psychiatry were marginalized, first and foremost as no clear and reliable rules could be verified for their application, nor could their mode of action be fully explained. The success of electrotherapy in psychiatry was also restricted due to limitations of the time, namely (1) electrophysiology only emerging as a discipline, (2) the electrophysical medical apparatus industry only beginning to be established and (3) the lack of generally accepted guidelines and electrotherapy restriction to individual, barely generalizable experience (eclecticism). Present day applications of electricity, mainly DBS, have overcome these

  1. Venus surface investigation based on VIRTIS measurements on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer; Döhler, Wolfgang; Kappel, David; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    The dense atmosphere of Venus prevented systematic studies of its surface at optical wavelengths in the past. The discovery of near infrared nightside atmospheric windows has opened a new challenge for detailed surface studies. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) on Venus Express is the first experiment collecting continuously nightside surface emission data from the planet. The observed high variability of measured signatures is mainly due to spatial variations of cloud optical depth and surface elevation. The investigation of surface properties requires a convergent approach of radiative transfer simulations and VIR- TIS data analyses. Therefore, a selection of orbits with well calibrated data over the northern hemisphere was performed for footprints that cover a maximum range of surface elevation variations. Radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that the conservative character of cloud multiple scattering below 2 µm and a strong dependence of radiance ratios on surface elevation in this spectral region allow the mapping of surface topography and a retrieval of the surface temperature. To the first order, the surface temperature is a function of ground elevation. Small deviations from this first order dependence have been identified that are possibly due to different surface materials. 1 Institut f¨r Planetologie, Westf¨lische Wilhelms-Universit¨t M¨nster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str.10, u a a u 48129 M¨nster, Germany u 2 German PlaceNameAerospace PlaceTypeCenter (DLR), Remote Sensing Technology Institute, Dpt. Marine Remote Sensing, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 CityplaceBerlin, countryregionGermany 3 German PlaceNameAerospace PlaceTypeCenter (DLR), Institute for Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 CityplaceBerlin, country-regionGermany 4 LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, e 92195 Meudon, France 5 INAF-IASF (Instituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica), via

  2. [Conception of the history of science in the interpretation of Bogdan Suchodolski].

    PubMed

    Lietz, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    In the article is presented the conception of the history of science in the interpretation of Bogdan Suchodolski. Having described the conception of the history of science created by George Sarton (1884-1956), whose thought was influenced by positivistic philosophy of August Comte, the idea of the history of science of Johan Nordstr6m (1891-1967), who was inspired by the system of Wilhelm Dilthey, and the materialistic conception of the history of science, which was represented, among others, by John Desmond Bernal (1901-1971), the author is making an attempt at revealing to what extent Bogdan Suchodolski was inspired by the above-mentioned visions of the history of science. Having defined the history of science as the history of scientific activity of people and their consciousness formed by the activity, Bogdan Suchodolski applied in the field of his own conception of the history of science the ideas that were put forward by German thinkers and philosophers, and were connected with a way of understanding culture as the constant development of national awareness, which can be exemplified with different dimensions of culture. Undoubtedly, identifying the history of Polish science with constitutive element of the history of national culture and paying attention to the conceptions tending not only to explaining, but also understanding phenomena, B. Suchodolski was influenced by Alfred Vierkandt's and Wilhelm Dilthey's thought. The present article includes several reflections on the conception of the history of science, which was created by B. Suchodolski. Among others, we can find here detailed information on how B. Suchodolski understood: the history of science, its subject, aim and methodology; its status in modern social consciousness and as the history of truth; relations between history of science and theory of science and scientific policy, history of science and the problem of unity and diversity of scientific thinking, history of science and ideas, history of

  3. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  4. The I Ching and the psyche-body connection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shirley S Y

    2005-04-01

    Carl G. Jung's fateful meeting with Richard Wilhelm in 1929 has helped to build a bridge of depth psychological understanding between the East and the West. When Jung emerged from his 'confrontation with the unconscious', he felt validated by Wilhelm in his discovery of the healing power of medieval alchemical symbolism for the European psyche. Analytical psychology however offers a scientific, psychological understanding of Chinese wisdom as contained in the I Ching and Taoist alchemy. The Taoist alchemical tradition (also known as the Inner Elixir tradition of which 'The Secret of the Golden Flower' is a sample text) is based on the premise that psychological experience of the Tao can be achieved through mental and physiological means such as breathing and meditative techniques, gymnastics, dietary regimens such as fasting, consumption of medicinal herbs and minerals, and special sexual practices. This tradition incorporates the I Ching and traditional Chinese medicine in the alchemical opus. Taoist alchemy assumes the primacy of the physical body in the process of self-realization. The psychological and cosmic forces of the trigrams of the I Ching are stored in the internal organs of the body and are the basic material for the experience of Tao. The internal organs are the foundation of the material and subtle bodies and through cultivation, the body becomes spiritualized as the spirits are embodied. The body as a reflection of the entire cosmos becomes the residence of the gods. The realization of a new consciousness is symbolized by the hexagram Fu, meaning rebirth. The Chinese notion of Tao coincides with Jung's postulation of the unus mundus, the unity of existence which underlies the duality of psyche and matter, the psycho-physical background of existence. In this light, in the world of inner experience, East and West follow similar paths symbolically.

  5. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  6. Imaging, Navigation, and Robotics in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Spinal technology involves imaging, navigation, and robotics-collectively known as "image-guided therapy." Imaging coupled with navigation enhances visualization of irregular anatomy, enabling less invasive procedures. With robotics surgeons can perform quicker and safer hand movements with increased accuracy. In the 1890s, X-rays were invented by Roentgen. The first piece of X-ray equipment, the Cryptoscope, would take an image for 15 minutes, with the surgeon placing his hand in front of the beam to guide calibration; radiation exposure for both surgeon and patient was extreme. In the 1950s, fluoroscopy (C-arm) was invented. In the 1970s, computer-assisted tomography (CAT), known as CAT scan, became available; magnetic resonance imaging had its beginnings in the 1980s, and in 1985, the first robotic surgery was performed to obtain a neurosurgical biopsy specimen. The concept of navigation was introduced in the 1990s, and today's niche products for navigation came onto the market in the 2000s. PMID:27015071

  7. MRI: a charmed past and an exciting future.

    PubMed

    Macovski, Albert

    2009-11-01

    The invention and development of MRI took place under very desirable circumstances. Dr. Lauterbur, a distinguished NMR chemist, conceived of the basic idea. Once this concept was presented to the medical imaging community, a wonderful synergy developed between the two mature disciplines of NMR physical chemistry and medical imaging. This resulted in amazingly rapid progress and acceptance by the clinical community. This adventure is in sharp contrast to the history of x-ray imaging. This began with the accidental discovery of x-rays by Roentgen at the end of the 19th century. Unlike NMR, the basic x-ray mechanism was not understood and was mistakenly thought to not be an electromagnetic wave. MRI is now at an advanced stage where investigators study advanced hardware and software improvements. These studies include improved signal-to-noise ratio, resolution, and speed, which generally involve higher B(0). The high readout field results in numerous problems. These can be overcome by prepolarizing techniques using a high polarization field and a relatively low readout field. PMID:19856404

  8. BeppoSAX Observations of MKN 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicastro, Fabrizio; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mkn 110 is a bright, nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy, which underwent a long optical monitoring campaign, during the past 12 years. Optical observations show that Mkn 110 vary, both in flux and spectral shape. The intensity and width of its Broad Emission Lines (BELs) also vary, from typical Seyfert 1, to typical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLSyl) values, so suggesting that this could be the first supermassive black holes where accretion state related transitions, as frequently observed in stellar-size black holes, have finally been observed. To verify these suggestions we asked to monitor Mkn 110 with BeppoSAX with three 50 ksec observations six months apart. The goal of the proposal was to observe spectral variations in X-ray, already suggested by previous, existing ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) and ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) observations of the same source. The first of these three SAX (Satellite per Astronomia X) observations was taken on May 2000, and lacks the Low-Energy instrument (0.1-2 keV is the band in which NLSy1 and Sy1 X-ray spectra differ most).

  9. Radiological evaluation of the metal-bone interface of a porous tantalum monoblock acetabular component.

    PubMed

    Macheras, G A; Papagelopoulos, P J; Kateros, K; Kostakos, A T; Baltas, D; Karachalios, T S

    2006-03-01

    Between January 1998 and December 1998, 82 consecutive patients (86 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty using a trabecular metal monoblock acetabular component. All patients had a clinical and radiological follow-up evaluation at six, 12 and 24 weeks, 12 months, and then annually thereafter. On the initial post-operative radiograph 25 hips had a gap between the outer surface of the component and the acetabular host bed which ranged from 1 to 5 mm. All patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for a mean of 7.3 years (7 to 7.5). The 25 hips with the 1 to 5 mm gaps were studied for component migration at two years using the Einzel-Bild-Roentgen-Analyse (EBRA) digital measurement method. At 24 weeks all the post-operative gaps were filled with bone and no acetabular component had migrated. The radiographic outcome of all 86 components showed no radiolucent lines and no evidence of lysis. No acetabular implant was revised. There were no dislocations or other complications. The bridging of the interface gaps (up to 5 mm) by the trabecular metal monoblock acetabular component indicates the strong osteoconductive, and possibly osteoinductive, properties of trabecular metal.

  10. Commentary on Fukushima and Beneficial Effects of Low Radiation1

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 160,000 people evacuated the area around the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP shortly after it was damage by the earthquake and tsunami. The evacuation order applied to 70,000 of them, while the other 90,000 left voluntarily and returned soon afterward. After more than two years, most of the 70,000 are still not allowed to return to their homes. The 1100 disaster-related deaths caused by the evacuation order show that this pre-cautionary action, taken to minimize cancer risks, was not “conservative.” In this paper, recent studies are reviewed on the consequences of the radioactive releases and on the benefits of many medical treatments with low doses of radiation that were carried out until the 1950s, before the radiation scare was created. Recent research has shed light on the high rate of spontaneous double-strand breaks in DNA and the adaptive protections in cells, tissues and humans that are up-regulated by low radiation. These defences prevent, repair, remove and replace damage, from all causes including external agents. Cancer mortality is reduced. The ICRP’s concept of radiation risk is wrong. It should revert to its 1934 concept, which was a tolerance dose of 0.2 roentgen (r) per day based on more than 35 years of medical experience. PMID:24298222

  11. Successful treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with percutaneous ethanol injection therapy and local hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroto; Ostapenko, Valentina V; Miyano, Motoshige; Nishide, Takahiro; Sonobe, Miyahiko; Toda, Keigorou; Nishide, Iwao; Mune, Masatoshi; Yukawa, Susumu

    2002-01-01

    The patient K.I., a 72-year-old male, was admitted to Nishide Hospital in July 1999 for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage chronic renal failure. At the time of his admission, an ultrasound examination of the patient's liver revealed a large mass in the S5-S8 segment. A hepatocellular carcinoma was suspected from the characteristic mosaic pattern seen with ultrasound and the elevation of alpha-fetoprotein in the serum. The patient's condition was considered to be medically inoperable, due to the patient's adaptation to hemodialysis. Furthermore, transcatheter arterial embolization was not indicated due to the patient's history of hypersensitivity to roentgen-contrast materials. An attempt to palliate the malignancy was made with a combination of local hyperthermia and percutaneous ethanol injection therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tumor structure had changed after 10 days of percutaneous ethanol injection therapy and that 2 months later the tumor size had decreased by about 50%. Moreover, the alpha-fetoprotein level had returned to normal by that time. In addition, this treatment did not cause any disturbance in the liver function. The patient tolerated treatment well. A combined treatment of local hyperthermia with percutaneous ethanol injection therapy appears to be useful in the management of hepatocellular carcinomas, especially in cases in which more aggressive treatment is not acceptable.

  12. Induction of transpositions of MGE Dm412 by {gamma}-radiation in an isogenic line of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Zabanov, S.A.; Vasil`eva, L.A.; Ratner, V.A. |

    1995-06-01

    In an isogenic line of Drosophila, transpositions of mobile genetic elements (MGE) Dm412 were induced by {gamma}-radiation at doses of 300, 800, and 1300 R. The rates of induced transpositions were (for each dose, respectively) 3.9 x 10{sup {minus}3}, 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}2}, and 1.87 x 10{sup {minus}2} events per occupied site per haploid genome of the isogenic line per generation. Thus, the transposition rate increased linearly with the radiation dose. The specific rate of {gamma}-radiation-induced transpositions was (1.3 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup {minus}5} per occupied site per haploid genome of the isogenic line per Roentgen per generation. {gamma}-Radiation-induced hot transposition sites and haplotypes, very similar to those induced by heat shock, were found. It was suggested that the mechanism of induction by {gamma}-radiation involves the heat shock system. Thus, it is more similar to the mechanism of temperature induction than to the direct mutational effect of {gamma}-radiation. Estimates of induced transposition rates per genome for each dose were calculated as 1.1, 3.0, and 5.6 events, respectively, per genome per generation. This level probably corresponds to the subthreshold level of genomes near the {open_quotes}catastrophic border of transpositional losses.{close_quotes} 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Repeat validation of a method to measure in vivo three dimensional hip kinematics using computed tomography and fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mowrin; Alam, Md Jahangir; Pickering, Mark R; Ward, Thomas; Perriman, Diana; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty or THA is a surgical procedure for the relief of significant disabling pain caused by osteoarthritis or hip fracture. Knowledge of the 3D kinematics of the hip during specific functional activities is important for THA component design. In this paper we compare kinematic measurements obtained by a new 2D-3D registration algorithm with measurements provided by the gold standard roentgen stereo analysis (RSA). The study validates a promising method for investigating the kinematics of some pathologies, which involves fitting three dimensional patient specific 3D CT scans to dynamic fluoroscopic images of the hip during functional activities. This is the first study in which single plane fluoroscopy has been used for kinematic measurements of natural hip bones. The main focus of the study is on the out-of-plane translation and rotation movements which are difficult to measure precisely using a single plane approach. From our experimental results we found that the precision of our proposed approach compares favourably with that of the most recent dual plane fluoroscopy approach.

  14. The effect of coordinate system choice and segment reference on RSA-based knee translation measures.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Christina L; Paller, David J; Peura, Glenn D; Brattbakk, Bjarne; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2007-01-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) can be utilized to accurately describe joint kinematics, but even when measuring small displacements within radiographically discernible structures, standardized reference frames are imperative for useful comparison across patients and across studies. In the current paper, accurately controlled laboratory models demonstrated the considerable influence that a mere 1.9-cm offset of the origin of the coordinate system from the rotation axes could exert on translation measures when rotations were occurring. In addition, the use of two different coordinate systems to gauge translation on a radiographic anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity exam resulted in a significant correlation (R(2)=0.562) between the two systems; however, differences of up 9.28 mm were found between corresponding measurements. This implies that clinical conclusions can potentially be upheld or refuted, based on the same data set, subject to coordinate system definition. Although the data analyzed presently involved the knee joint, similar issues surround the RSA motion analysis of other joints as well.

  15. The X-ray emission of 3C 273 observed with ASCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter; Mushotzky, Richard; Ricker, George; Woo, Jonathan; Weaver, Kim; Kii, Tsuneo; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kotani, Taro; Hayashida, Kiyoshi

    1994-01-01

    We report preliminary results of an Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observation of 3C 273. There is no spectral variability within the ASCA observation, in contrast to the longer term behavior found with European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) and Ginga which established significant changes in the spectral index of the power-law continuum on timescales of a week or more, uncorrelated with luminosity. Comparison of the ASCA data with a simultaneous Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) Ginga observation in 1990 December shows that while the shape of the spectrum above approximately 1 keV is essentially the same, the flux in the soft component, below approximately 1 keV, considerably weaker relative to the hard component in the ASCA observation. The 2-10 keV luminosity is at least a factor of approximately 1.5 greater in the ASCA observation than in the ROSAT/Ginga observation while the ratio of 2-10 keV luminosity to 0.4-1.0 keV luminosity increases by a factor of approximately 1.2. Thus the spectral shape of the hard component appears to be independent of the relative magnitude of the soft component and is an important constraint on emission and reprocessing models. We find no significant Fe K line-emission in this observation. The data also highlight very well some of the outstanding problems in the instrumental responses.

  16. Are engineers unsung heroes of medical progress?: the historic bond between physics, engineering, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Laufman, Harold

    2002-01-01

    This review traces the heretofore unsung hero role of engineering in the evolution of today's healthcare and the growing bond between physics, engineering, and medicine. It recognizes the debt owed to the various specialties of healthcare engineering, especially the bioengineers who contribute not only to a better understanding of basic physiologic and pathologic processes but also to the development and application of technology and the adaptation of new engineering discoveries to medicine. In the past half-millennium, the fields of physics, engineering, and medicine have made a large number of seminal contributions to each other, resulting in ever-advancing healthcare methodologies, although only a precious few remain identified by the originators' names. In this review, 3 engineers are cited in detail for their milestone contributions to medical progress: Roentgen in radiology, Bovie in electrosurgery, and, more recently, Greatbatch in implantable cardiac pacemakers. Future horizons in medicine appear to be ever more attainable because of the synergism between the physical and biological sciences.

  17. Clinical management of a fused upper premolar with supernumerary tooth: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In dentistry, the term 'fusion' is used to describe a developmental disorder of dental hard tissues. In the permanent dentition, fusion of a normal tooth and a supernumerary tooth usually involves the incisors or canines. However, a few cases of fusion involving premolars have also been reported to date. We present a rare case in which fusion of the maxillary left second premolar and a supernumerary tooth in a 13-year-old girl was diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, Alphard-3030, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd.). The tooth was bicuspidized after routine nonsurgical root canal treatment, and the separated teeth underwent appropriate restoration procedures. The second premolar and supernumerary tooth remained asymptomatic without any signs of inflammation after a follow-up period of 9 years. Identification of anatomical anomalies is important for treatment in cases involving fusion with supernumerary tooth, and therefore the microscopic examinations and CBCT are essential for the diagnosis. Fused teeth can be effectively managed by the comprehensive treatment which includes both endodontic and periodontal procedures. PMID:25383352

  18. Whispering gallery states of neutrons and anti-hydrogen atoms and their applications to fundamental and surface physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2013-03-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It is intensively used and explored due to its numerous crucial applications. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for neutrons and (anti)atoms. For (anti)matter waves, it includes a new feature: a massive particle is settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. In this talk, we present the first observation of the quantum whispering-gallery effect for matter particles (cold neutrons) 1-2. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to recently discovered gravitational quantum states of neutrons3. These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a quantum state. Deeply bound long-living states are weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited short-living states are very sensitive to the wall nuclear potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. Analogous phenomena could be measured with atoms and anti-atoms 4-5.

  19. Neutron whispering gallery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Voronin, Alexei Yu.; Cubitt, Robert; Protasov, Konstantin V.

    2010-02-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for atoms and neutrons. For matter waves, it would include a new feature: a massive particle would be settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. Here, we present for the first time the quantum whispering-gallery effect for cold neutrons. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to the recently discovered gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons . These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a pure quantum state. Deeply bound whispering-gallery states are long-living and weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited states are short-living and very sensitive to the wall potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects.

  20. X-ray Variability in the Hot Supergiant zgr Orionis.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, T W; Schmitt, J H

    1994-09-16

    Hot massive stars represent only a small fraction of the stellar population of the galaxy, but their enormous luminosities make them visible over large distances. Therefore, they are ideal standard candles, used to determine distances of near galaxies. Their mass loss due to supersonic winds driven by radiation pressure contributes significantly to the interstellar medium and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. All hot stars are soft x-ray sources; in contrast to the sun with its highly variable x-ray flux, long time scale x-ray variability is not common among hot stars. An analysis is presented here of an unusual increase in x-ray flux observed with the roentgen observatory satellite during a period of 2 days for the hot supergiant zeta Orionis, the only episode of x-ray variability that has been found in a hot star. These observations provide the most direct evidence so far for the scenario of shock-heated gas in the winds of hot stars. PMID:17770897

  1. Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  2. Comparisons of surface vs. volumetric model-based registration methods using single-plane vs. bi-plane fluoroscopy in measuring spinal kinematics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Shih, Ting-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Several 2D-to-3D image registration methods are available for measuring 3D vertebral motion but their performance has not been evaluated under the same experimental protocol. In this study, four major types of fluoroscopy-to-CT registration methods, with different use of surface vs. volumetric models, and single-plane vs. bi-plane fluoroscopy, were evaluated: STS (surface, single-plane), VTS (volumetric, single-plane), STB (surface, bi-plane) and VTB (volumetric, bi-plane). Two similarity measures were used: 'Contour Difference' for STS and STB and 'Weighted Edge-Matching Score' for VTS and VTB. Two cadaveric porcine cervical spines positioned in a box filled with paraffin and embedded with four radiopaque markers were CT scanned to obtain vertebral models and marker coordinates, and imaged at ten static positions using bi-plane fluoroscopy for subsequent registrations using different methods. The registered vertebral poses were compared to the gold standard poses defined by the marker positions determined using CT and Roentgen stereophotogrammetry analysis. The VTB was found to have the highest precision (translation: 0.4mm; rotation: 0.3°), comparable with the VTS in rotations (0.3°), and the STB in translations (0.6mm). The STS had the lowest precision (translation: 4.1mm; rotation: 2.1°). PMID:24011956

  3. Prospective five-year subsidence analysis of a cementless fully hydroxyapatite-coated femoral hip arthroplasty component.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Martin; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Goossens, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Early subsidence >1.5 mm is considered to be a predictive factor for later aseptic loosening of the femoral component following total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was to assess five-year subsidence rates of the cementless hydroxyapatite-coated twinSys stem (Mathys Ltd., Bettlach, Switzerland).This prospective single-surgeon series examined consecutive patients receiving a twinSys stem at Maria Middelares Hospital, Belgium. Patients aged >85 years or unable to come to follow-up were excluded. Subsidence was assessed using Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse--Femoral Component Analysis (EBRA-FCA). Additional clinical and radiographic assessments were performed. Follow-ups were prospectively scheduled at two, five, 12, 24, and 60 months.In total, 218 THA (211 patients) were included. At five years, mean subsidence was 0.66 mm (95% CI: 0.43-0.90). Of the 211 patients, 95.2% had an excellent or good Harris Hip Score. There were few radiological changes. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated five-year stem survival to be 98.4% (95% CI: 97.6-100%).Subsidence levels of the twinSys femoral stem throughout the five years of follow-up were substantially lower than the 1.5 mm level predictive of aseptic loosening. This was reflected in the high five-year survival rate.

  4. [The dawn of radiotherapy, between strokes of genius, dramas and controversies].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J-M

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy is 120 years old. A few months only after the discoveries of Roentgen, Becquerel and Marie and Pierre Curie, a few scientists tried to use the newly discovered rays to treat patients. The question of the name of the first "radiation therapist" remains debated. Although often proposed, Emil Grubbé from Chicago seems to have been disqualified. Leopold Freund from Vienna treated a benign cutaneous lesion. Finally, Victor Despeignes from Lyon appears to be the most serious candidate, having treated in 1896 a gastric cancer, and obtaining a very significant tumour regression. The pioneers of radiotherapy paid a heavy tribute to the development of the specialty; a number of them appears on the - most probably incomplete - list of 352 names engraved on the monument dedicated to the "radiation martyrs" in Hamburg. We must keep in mind that it is only within a few years that a handful of brilliant pioneers built the foundations on which radiotherapy could emerge. PMID:27614525

  5. Quantitative X-Ray Imaging of Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Aortas of ApoE-/-/LDL-/- Double Knockout Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Langheinrich,A.; Michniewicz, A.; Sedding, D.; Lai, B.; Jorgensen, S.; Bohle, R.; Ritman, E.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if hemorrhage into an arterial wall can be detected in CT images by virtue of the iron content. Materials and Methods: Aortas from male apoE-/-/LDL-/- mice (n = 31) were infused in situ with contrast agent, for micro-CT scanning and histology. Roentgen-opacities within the aortic walls were identified by histology and micro-x-ray fluorescence to be iron or calcium. Dual-energy scanning was performed at 2 energy levels using synchrotron-based micro-CT [(2 {mu}m)3 voxels, 16 and 20 keV] and 64-slice CT (0.4 x 0.4 x 0.6 mm voxels, 80 and 120 kVp). Results: Opacities were identified as hemorrhage-related clusters of multiple punctate deposits, containing both Fe (0.48 x 10-12 g/voxel) and Ca (3.18 x 10-2 g/voxel), or as isolated confluent accumulations of exclusively calcium. Subtraction of the dual-energy CT scans discriminated iron from calcium deposits. Conclusion: Detection and quantification of iron deposits in hemorrhaged atherosclerotic lesions is feasible by dual-energy CT imaging.

  6. Sensitometric characteristics of dental xeroradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1983-11-01

    Dental xeroradiography is a high-quality intraoral imaging system which provides a potentially convenient, rapid, low-dose alternative to conventional film radiography. In this study the sensitometric properties of dental xeroradiography were investigated via assessment of high- and low-contrast xeroradiographic processor settings, transmission versus reflection densitometry, reciprocity-law failure, and kVp (tube voltage) plate dependence. Findings of the study indicated that imaging at high-contrast processor settings results in greater dynamic range but less exposure latitude than imaging at low-contrast processor settings. Determination of characteristic curves demonstrated greater contrast in reflection mode than imaging by transillumination for all but the very densest of images (greater than 1.6 O.D.). There was also little difference in characteristic curves produced from 50 to 90 kVp, indicating that the xeroradiographic plate exhibits a relatively constant sensitivity over the tube voltages tested if exposure is expressed in roentgens. Finally, no substantial reciprocity-law failure was observed for dental xeroradiography over a clinically relevant range of exposure times.

  7. [Irreversible image compression in radiology. Current status].

    PubMed

    Pinto dos Santos, D; Jungmann, F; Friese, C; Düber, C; Mildenberger, P

    2013-03-01

    Due to increasing amounts of data in radiology methods for image compression appear both economically and technically interesting. Irreversible image compression allows markedly higher reduction of data volume in comparison with reversible compression algorithms but is, however, accompanied by a certain amount of mathematical and visual loss of information. Various national and international radiological societies have published recommendations for the use of irreversible image compression. The degree of acceptable compression varies across modalities and regions of interest.The DICOM standard supports JPEG, which achieves compression through tiling, DCT/DWT and quantization. Although mathematical loss due to rounding up errors and reduction of high frequency information occurs this results in relatively low visual degradation.It is still unclear where to implement irreversible compression in the radiological workflow as only few studies analyzed the impact of irreversible compression on specialized image postprocessing. As long as this is within the limits recommended by the German Radiological Society irreversible image compression could be implemented directly at the imaging modality as it would comply with § 28 of the roentgen act (RöV). PMID:23456043

  8. X-ray optic developments at NASA's MSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, C.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Gubarev, M.; O'Dell, S.; Elsner, R.; Swartz, D.; Gaskin, J.; Weisskopf, M.

    2013-05-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a successful history of fabricating optics for astronomical x-ray telescopes. In recent years optics have been created using electroforming replication for missions such as the balloon payload HERO (High energy replicated optics) and the rocket payload FOXSI (Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager). The same replication process is currently being used in the creation seven x-ray mirror modules (one module comprising of 28 nested shells) for the Russian ART-XC (Astronomical Rontgen Telescope) instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission and for large-diameter mirror shells for the Micro-X rocket payload. In addition to MSFC's optics fabrication, there are also several areas of research and development to create the high resolution light weight optics which are required by future x-ray telescopes. Differential deposition is one technique which aims to improve the angular resolution of lightweight optics through depositing a filler material to smooth out fabrication imperfections. Following on from proof of concept studies, two new purpose built coating chambers are being assembled to apply this deposition technique to astronomical x-ray optics. Furthermore, MSFC aims to broaden its optics fabrication through the recent acquisition of a Zeeko IRP 600 robotic polishing machine. This paper will provide a summary of the current missions and research and development being undertaken at NASA's MSFC.

  9. Entire litters developed from transferred eggs in whole body x-irradiated female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.P.

    1980-07-01

    The sensitivity of mouse eggs to sublethal x-irradiation was determined in vitro and in vivo with regard to the development of donor litters in foster mothers. One thousand seven hundred fifty-eight unfertilized eggs of agouti dark-eyed donor mice were transferred into 293 unirradiated or x-irradiated, mated female pink-eyed mice. Two hundred thirty-nine recipients became pregnant; of these 35 produced litters containing solely dark-eyed fetuses. Sublethal doses of x-radiation administered to donor eggs in vitro before transferring into unirradiated recipients did not influence significantly the number of litters of exclusively dark-eyed fetuses produced. However, recipients irradiated by 250 roentgens (r) produced more solely dark-eyed litters than did those irradiated with 100 r. In 21 pregnant females irradiated by 100 r, only 3 (14%) developed solely dark-eyed fetuses as compared to 22 pregnant females irradiated by 250 r, of which 13 (59%) developed solely dark-eyed fetuses, all from unirradiated, transferred eggs. Of another group of 22 pregnant females which received 250 r body irradiation and subsequently received eggs also irradiated by 250 r, only 7 (32%) produced litters of dark-eyed fetuses. No one female of these three groups carried native fetuses. Such radiation-induced infertility resulting from damage of native eggs rather than loss of mother's ability to carry a pregnancy, is frequently remedied by egg transfer.

  10. Imaging, Navigation, and Robotics in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Spinal technology involves imaging, navigation, and robotics-collectively known as "image-guided therapy." Imaging coupled with navigation enhances visualization of irregular anatomy, enabling less invasive procedures. With robotics surgeons can perform quicker and safer hand movements with increased accuracy. In the 1890s, X-rays were invented by Roentgen. The first piece of X-ray equipment, the Cryptoscope, would take an image for 15 minutes, with the surgeon placing his hand in front of the beam to guide calibration; radiation exposure for both surgeon and patient was extreme. In the 1950s, fluoroscopy (C-arm) was invented. In the 1970s, computer-assisted tomography (CAT), known as CAT scan, became available; magnetic resonance imaging had its beginnings in the 1980s, and in 1985, the first robotic surgery was performed to obtain a neurosurgical biopsy specimen. The concept of navigation was introduced in the 1990s, and today's niche products for navigation came onto the market in the 2000s.

  11. The Evolution of External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) from a Technological Perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detorie, Nicholas

    2008-03-01

    Since the discovery of x-rays by Roentgen in 1895 ionizing radiations have been used as a treatment for cancer. Such treatments have been based on either implantation of radioactive materials at the site of disease or by aiming external radiation beams at the diseased site. This later method is referred to as teletherapy because the beams originate from a location outside of the body distant from the disease site itself. A brief review of the basic radiation biology will be given to illustrate the rationale for therapeutic use of ionizing radiations and the effects of beam energy and beam type- particulate or photon. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the technological teletherapy developments supported by the required physical properties of the beams and their associated characteristics that make them suitable for patient treatments. Chronological highlights will include the following sources or devices: superficial x-rays, orthovaltage x-rays, megavoltage x-rays and Cobalt 60 photons, electron beams, neutron beams, negative pi mesons, protons, and heavy ions. The presentation will illustrate how the physical beam properties have been incorporated into modern radiation treatment devices, many of which are equipped with radiation imaging capability. Such devices include: linacs equipped with multileaf collimators for beam shaping and intensity modulation, the Gamma Knife for precise and accurate irradiation of brain tumors or arterial-venous malformations (AVM), the robotic arm based Cyber Knife, and the Helical Tomotherapy unit.

  12. Auroral X ray emission at Jupiter: Depth effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ozak, Nataly; Schultz, David Robert; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Kharchenko, V.; Hui, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    Auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter with a total power of about 1 GW have been observed by the Einstein Observatory, Roentgen satellite, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton. Previous theoretical studies have shown that precipitating energetic sulfur and oxygen ions can produce the observed X-rays. This study presents the results of a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) model for sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation at high latitudes, looks at differences with the continuous slow-down model, and compares the results to synthetic spectra fitted to observations. We concentrate on the effects of altitude on the observed spectrum. The opacity of the atmosphere to the outgoing X-ray photons is found to be important for incident ion energies greater than about 1.2 MeV per nucleon for both sulfur and oxygen. Model spectra are calculated for intensities with and without any opacity effects. These synthetic spectra were compared with the results shown by Hui et al. (2010) which fit Chandra X-ray Observatory observations for the north and south Jovian auroral emissions. Quenching of long-lived excited states of the oxygen ions is found to be important. Opacity considerably diminishes the outgoing X-ray intensity calculated, particularly when the viewing geometry is not favorable.

  13. Status of ART-XC / SRG instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlinsky, M.; Akimov, V.; Levin, V.; Krivchenko, A.; Rotin, A.; Kuznetsova, M.; Lapshov, I.; Tkachenko, A.; Semena, N.; Buntov, M.; Glushenko, A.; Arefiev, V.; Yaskovich, A.; Grebenev, S.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Lutovinov, A.; Molkov, S.; Krivonos, R.; Serbinov, D.; Kudelin, M.; Drozdova, T.; Voronkov, S.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.; Gilfanov, M.; Babyshkin, V.; Lomakin, I.; Menderov, A.; Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; O'Dell, S. L.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Elsner, R.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.

    2015-09-01

    Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) is an X-ray astrophysical observatory, developed by Russia in collaboration with Germany. The mission will be launched in beginning 2017 from Baikonur and placed in a 6-month-period halo orbit around L2. The scientific payload consists of two independent telescopes - a soft-x-ray survey instrument, eROSITA, being provided by Germany and a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument ART-XC being developed by Russia. ART-XC will consist of seven independent, but co-aligned, telescope modules. The ART-XC flight mirror modules has been developed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Each mirror module will be aligned with a focal plane CdTe double-sided strip detector which will operate over the energy range of 6-30 keV, with an angular resolution of <1', a field of view of ~34' and an expected energy resolution of about 12% at 14 keV. The current status of the ART-XC/SRG instrument will be present.

  14. Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, A. W.; Gao, D.; Pogany, A.; Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.

    1999-12-02

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X rays in 1895 the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. In recent years the possibility of utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, much of this activity stemming from the possibility of producing X-ray beams of suitably high coherence at synchrotron sources (1). A description of a phase-contrast imaging (PCI) technique which utilizes a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source to achieve the required spatial coherence, and does not rely on there being a high degree of chromatic coherence, will be described (2). The method employs a relatively large object-to-image distance to allow wave interference (Fresnel diffraction) to occur and manifest itself as contrast formation in the intensity distribution recorded at the image plane. PCI is particularly relevant to the nondestructive characterization of materials and this will be demonstrated by way of some examples. A theoretical description of image structure in terms of the Kirchhoff formulation will be used to elucidate some of the important features of the technique. These include the ability to provide improved information from weakly-absorbing features of an object; edge enhancement; inherent magnification; improved signal-to-noise. Another aspect of PCI which will be discussed is phase-(and absorption-) retrieval (3), whereby images can be used to obtain quantitative physical information about the sample structure.

  15. Evaluation of the resolving potency of a novel reconstruction filter on periodontal ligament space with dental cone-beam CT: a quantitative phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houno, Yuuki; Hishikawa, Toshimitsu; Gotoh, Ken-ichi; Naitoh, Munetaka; Ariji, Eiichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of the alveolar bone condition is important for the treatment planning of periodontal disease. Especially the determination of periodontal ligament space is the most important remark because it represents the periodontal tissue support for tooth retention. However, owing to the image blur of the current cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging technique, the periodontal ligament space is difficult to visualize. In this study, we developed an original periodontal ligament phantom (PLP) and evaluated the image quality of simulated periodontal ligament space using a novel reconstruction filter for CBCT that emphasized high frequency component. PLP was composed from two resin blocks of different materials, the bone equivalent block and the dentine equivalent block. They were assembled to make continuously changing space from 0.0 to 1.0 millimeter that mimics periodontal ligament space. PLP was placed in water and the image was obtained by using Alphard-3030 dental cone-beam CT (Asahi Roentgen Industry Co., Ltd.). Then we reconstructed the projection data with a novel reconstruction filter. The axial images were compared with conventional reconstructed images. In novel filter reconstruction images, 0.4 millimeter of the space width was steadily detected by calculation of pixel value, on the other hand 0.6 millimeter was in conventional images. With our method, the resolving potency of conebeam CT images was improved.

  16. [Selective tomography in the study of the temporo-mandibular joint. (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tréheux, A; Martin, G

    1975-10-01

    The majority of temporo-mandibular pains and dysfunction can be related directly or indirectly to the occlusal relationship of the teeth. The first manifestation is a slight reduction of the interarticular space, that must be early diagnosed, to prevent organic changes. Tomography is the one technique able to give a exact information of temporo-mandibular joint. But if we ask to that examination to detect very slight change of the interarticular space, the technique must be accurate and established in function of morphology of the patient; we have observed great variations in direction of the axis of condyles from one person to the other, and even from one side to the other for the same subject. So that, the first stage of the roentgen examination will be a radiograph taken in submentovertical (Hirtz) position. We measure the angle formed by the axis of each condyle and the sagittal median plane. The maim beam wil be directed in the axis of the condyle for sagittal tomography and perpendicularly for frontal tomography. It is important to state precisely that for tomography "closed mouth", the patient must be in terminal occlusion during the whole examination. For tomography "open mouth" we place a wedge between dental arches.

  17. [Salter-harris fractures in dogs and cats considering problems in radiological reports--a retrospective analysis of 245 cases between 1997 and 2012].

    PubMed

    Engel, Eva; Kneiss, Sibylle

    2014-01-01

    To identify typical trauma patterns or frequent radiological pitfalls that could help a radiologists in their daily routine, a retrospective study of Salter-Harris fractures in dogs and cats was performed. Radiographs obtained in the period 1991-2012 of 288 fractures in 245 patients with suspected injuries affecting growth plates in the appendicular skeleton were retrieved from the imaging archive. The femur was the bone most frequently affected (46.5%), followed by the humerus (19.8%), tibia (13.5%) and radius (11.8%). The distal growth plate was in all bones more often involved than the proximal growth plate (79.5% vs. 20.5%). The frequency of Salter-Harris fractures was 39.9% type I, 37.8% type II, 3.1% type III and 19.1% type IV. In dogs the most common physeal fracture was a type IV fracture of the of the distal femur. Radiographically, physeal fractures were recognized by at least two Roentgen signs, including change in opacity, displacement of the epiphysis or the Thurston-Holland sign. On the basis of the review, the original radiographic reports of 44/288 fractures were considered erroneous regarding the incorrect Salter Harris grouping. In 5/44 instances, the radiological examination had technical deficiencies that may have contributed to the errors, including 3 with oblique projections. Minimal variations in the projection was evident in the majority of reviewed cases. Measures to help optimize radiographic reports will be discussed.

  18. Design of a MeV, 4kA linear induction accelerator for flash radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kulke, B.; Brier, R.; Chapin, W.

    1981-02-10

    For verifying the hydrodynamics of nuclear weapons design it is useful to have flash x-ray machines that can deliver a maximum dose in a minimum pulse length and with very high reliability. At LLNL, such a requirement was identified some years ago as 500 roentgens at one meter, in a 60 nsec pulse length. In response to this requirement, a linear induction accelerator was proposed to and funded by DOE in 1977. The design of this machine, called FXR, has now been completed and construction has begun. The FXR design extends the parameters of a similar machine that had been built and operated at LBL, Berkeley, some ten years ago. Using a cold cathode injector followed by 48 accelerator modules rated at 400 kV each, the FXR machine will accelerate a 4 kA electron beam pulse to 20 MeV final energy. Key design features are the generation and the stable transport of a low emittance (100 mr-cm) beam from a field emitter diode, the design of reliable, compact energy storage components such as Blumleins, feedlines and accelerator modules, and a computer-assisted control system.

  19. Segmental mobility, disc height and patient-reported outcomes after surgery for degenerative disc disease: a prospective randomised trial comparing disc replacement and multidisciplinary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, L G; Brinckmann, P; Hellum, C; Rossvoll, I; Leivseth, G

    2013-01-01

    This prospective multicentre study was undertaken to determine segmental movement, disc height and sagittal alignment after total disc replacement (TDR) in the lumbosacral spine and to assess the correlation of biomechanical properties to clinical outcomes.A total of 173 patients with degenerative disc disease and low back pain for more than one year were randomised to receive either TDR or multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MDR). Segmental movement in the sagittal plane and disc height were measured using distortion compensated roentgen analysis (DCRA) comparing radiographs in active flexion and extension. Correlation analysis between the range of movement or disc height and patient-reported outcomes was performed in both groups. After two years, no significant change in movement in the sagittal plane was found in segments with TDR or between the two treatment groups. It remained the same or increased slightly in untreated segments in the TDR group and in this group there was a significant increase in disc height in the operated segments. There was no correlation between segmental movement or disc height and patient-reported outcomes in either group.In this study, insertion of an intervertebral disc prosthesis TDR did not increase movement in the sagittal plane and segmental movement did not correlate with patient-reported outcomes. This suggests that in the lumbar spine the movement preserving properties of TDR are not major determinants of clinical outcomes.

  20. The carbon-based structures synthesized through nuclear reactions in helium at 1.1 kbar pressure under irradiation with braking γ-rays of 10 MeV threshold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wisniewski, R.; Wilczynska-Kitowska, T.

    2015-01-01

    A helium high-pressure chamber (HeHPC), made from beryllium bronze, filled with gaseous helium at an initial pressure of about 1.1 kbar was irradiated by braking γ-rays of 10 MeV threshold energy during 1.0×105 \\text{s} at an electron beam current 22\\text-24 μ \\text{A} . Before opening of the chamber, the residual pressure inside was equal to 430 bar. Synthesized foils of black colour and other multiple objects were found inside the HeHPC at the inner surfaces of the reaction chamber made of high-purity copper, at the entrance window for γ-rays of beryllium bronze, and at the copper collector of nuclear and chemical reaction products. The element analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe roentgen analysis (MPRA) allowed us to establish that the foils were predominantly made of carbon and smaller quantities of other elements from carbon to iron. The developed approach agrees well with a series of studies carried out by the authors where dense hydrogen and deuterium gases are acted on by γ-rays in the presence or absence of metals in the reaction chamber.

  1. Holographic and cephalometric study of the relationship between craniofacial morphology and the initial reactions to high-pull headgear traction.

    PubMed

    Duterloo, H S; Kragt, G; Algra, A M

    1985-10-01

    Eight macerated human child skulls with a dental age of approximately 9.5 years (mixed dentition) were consecutively subjected to an experimental standardized high-pull headgear traction system attached to the maxilla at the first permanent molar area via an immovable acrylic resin splint covering all teeth. This system produced tensile forces from 0.5 to 3.5 N (1 N = 0.10 kg) per side. Laser holography was used to measure displacements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. Displacements varied in direction. In addition, conventional cephalometric analysis of standardized lateral roentgen cephalograms was performed. Displacements and cephalometric data were then compared. Results indicate that the direction of initial displacements of bones of the facial skeleton bears a definite relationship to the morphology of the individual skull. In skulls with high divergency values (large angles, sella-nasion-occlusal plane, sella-nasion-mandibular plane), displacements are in a backward and posterior downward direction; in skulls with a small sella-nasion-occlusal plane angle, backward displacements occur in a direction almost parallel to the occlusal plane.

  2. The eROSITA/SRG All-Sky Survey: A new era of large-scale structure studies with AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, A.; Gilfanov, M.; H"utsi, G.; Sunyaev, R.

    2014-07-01

    The four-year X-ray all-sky survey (eRASS) of the eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) satellite will detect ˜3 million active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of z≈1 and typical luminosity of L_{0.5-2.0keV}˜10^{44} erg s^{-1}. We show that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure research. For the first time with a sample of X-ray selected AGN, it will become possible to perform detailed redshift- and luminosity-resolved studies of the linear bias factor. These studies will dramatically improve our understanding of AGN environment, triggering mechanisms, growth of super-massive black holes and their co-evolution with dark matter halos. The eROSITA AGN sample will become a powerful cosmological probe. It will become possible to convincingly detect baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) with ˜8σ confidence in the 0.8

  3. ASCA Observation of an "X-Ray Shadow" in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sangwook; Ebisawa, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The diffuse X-ray background (DXB) emission near the Galactic plane (l,b approximately 25.6 degrees, 0.78 degrees) has been observed with ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). The observed region is toward a Galactic molecular cloud which was recently reported to cast a deep X-ray shadow in the 0.5 - 2.0 keV band DXB. The selection of this particular region is intended to provide a constraint on the spatial distribution of the DXB emission along the line of sight: i.e., the molecular cloud is optically thick at <2 keV and so the bulk of the observed soft X-rays must originate in the foreground of the cloud, which is at approximately 3 kpc from the Sun. In the 0.8 - 9.0 keV band, the observed spectrum is primarily from multiple components of thermal plasmas. We here report a detection of soft X-ray (0.5 - 2 keV) emission from an approximately 10(exp 7) K thermal plasma. Comparisons with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) data suggest that this soft X-ray emission is absorbed by N(sub H) = 1 - 3 x 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), which implies a path-length through the soft X-ray emitting regions of approximately less than 1 kpc from the Sun.

  4. eROSITA in-orbit calibration strategy and plan: from the ground to the science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyberg, Michael J.; Dennerl, Konrad

    2012-09-01

    eROSITA is a German X-ray astronomical observatory on-board Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) with an expected launch in 2014 and operation at libration point L2. It consists of 7 identical mirror modules with 7 identical CCD cameras as focal plane instrumentation. It will observe the X-ray sky in the 0.25 - 10 keV range (4 yr all-sky survey, then pointed observations). Another instrument aboard SRG, ART-XC, will extend the spectral range to higher energies. We describe how the on-ground calibration is planned for the PANTER and PUMA X-ray test facilities, with respect to maximum scientific exploitation, in combination with an in-orbit calibration. This will be performed within one module and between the 7 eROSITA modules. If XMM-Newton will still be operational, a dedicated cross-calibration campaign is envisaged. The selection of the celestial targets and the procedure of the measurements with the internal Fe-55 calibration source are outlined.

  5. X-ray Variability in the Hot Supergiant zgr Orionis.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, T W; Schmitt, J H

    1994-09-16

    Hot massive stars represent only a small fraction of the stellar population of the galaxy, but their enormous luminosities make them visible over large distances. Therefore, they are ideal standard candles, used to determine distances of near galaxies. Their mass loss due to supersonic winds driven by radiation pressure contributes significantly to the interstellar medium and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. All hot stars are soft x-ray sources; in contrast to the sun with its highly variable x-ray flux, long time scale x-ray variability is not common among hot stars. An analysis is presented here of an unusual increase in x-ray flux observed with the roentgen observatory satellite during a period of 2 days for the hot supergiant zeta Orionis, the only episode of x-ray variability that has been found in a hot star. These observations provide the most direct evidence so far for the scenario of shock-heated gas in the winds of hot stars.

  6. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  7. X-ray-induced changes in growth of Mozambique tilapia

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, B.B.; Basu, M.

    1995-01-01

    Early fry (30 d postfertilization) and 7-8-week-old Mozambique tilapias (Tilapia mossambica) were exposed to X rays in dosages of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 roentgens and reared in outdoor culture tanks between May 1981 and October 1988. Fish of either sex that were irradiated as fry grew faster than controls at all test X-ray doses. Among fish irradiated at 7-8 weeks, males grew significantly faster, but females grew significantly slower, than controls at all test doses. X-ray-induced changes in growth were dose-dependent: growth rates of fry (both sexes) and of juvenile males rose relative to those of controls with increased radiation dose. The growth increase per unit of radiation dose was higher for fry than for older juveniles. The length-weight regression was steeper for irradiated males than for controls. The average weights of F{sub 1} offspring of irradiated fish were greatly reduced as compared with controls, which suggests the transfer of the detrimental effects of X rays from irradiated parents to their offspring. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Solar X-ray Emission Measured by the Vernov Mission During September - October of 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Rozhkov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    Solar hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions were measured by the Detector of the Roentgen and Gamma-ray Emissions (DRGE) instrument, which is part of the RELEC set of instruments operated onboard the Russian satellite Vernov, from July 8, 2014 until December 10, 2014 (on a solar-synchronous orbit with an apogee of 830 km, perigee of 640 km, and an inclination of 98.4°. RELEC measurements of 18 flares with X-ray energy {>} 30 keV, taken in September - October 2014, were connected with the same active region with the number AR 12172 during the first rotation and AR 12192 during the next one. These measurements were compared to the data obtained with RHESSI, Konus-Wind, Fermi Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Net (RSTN), and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) operating at the same time. Quasi-periodicities with similar periods of 7±2 s were found in about one third of all flares measured by RELEC (Vernov) from September 24 until October 30, 2014.

  9. Solar gamma-ray and neutron registration capabilities of the GRIS instrument onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Yury; Kochemasov, Alexey; Yurov, Vitaly; Glyanenko, Alexander; Kotov, Yury; Lupar, Evgeny; Faradzhaev, Rodion

    2016-07-01

    GRIS (Gamma and Roentgen radiation of the Sun) is a prospective hard X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometer of solar flares with the energy range from 50 keV to 200 MeV. It is also designed for registration of high energy neutron fluxes (>30 MeV). The apparatus will be mounted on an oriented platform outside the Russian Orbital Segment of the International Space Station. The instrument includes two detector heads: a low energy spectrometer (LES) based on a fast scintillator with relatively high energy resolution 3.5-4.5% at 662 keV (LaBr _{3}(Ce) or CeBr _{3}) and size of ø7.62×7.62 cm, and a high energy spectrometer (HES) based on ø12×15 cm CsI(Tl) scintillator. Thanks to n/γ discrimination capability of CsI(Tl) crystals, the HES spectrometer is also intended for neutron registration. To estimate GRIS instrument registration capabilities, simulation of the HES neutron and gamma registration channels response to background radiation and to solar flares of different magnitude and spectral compositions was performed. Expected spectral and n/γ discrimination performances based on measurements with detectors prototypes are represented.

  10. Global Studies of Molecular Clouds in the Galaxy, The Magellanic Clouds, and M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Over the course of this grant we used various spacecraft surveys of the Galaxy and M31 in conjunction with our extensive CO spectral line surveys to address central problems in galactic structure and the astrophysics of molecular clouds. These problems included the nature of the molecular ring and its relation to the spiral arms and central bar, the cosmic ray distribution, the origin of the diffuse X-ray background, the distribution and properties of x-ray sources and supernova remnants, and the Galactic stellar mass distribution. For many of these problems, the nearby spiral M31 provided an important complementary perspective. Our CO surveys of GMCs (Galactic Molecular Clouds) were crucial for interpreting Galactic continuum surveys from satellites such as GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory), ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), IRAS (Infrared Astronomy Satellite), and COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite) because they provided the missing dimension of velocity or kinematic distance. GMCs are a well-defined and widespread population of objects whose velocities we could readily measure throughout the Galaxy. Through various emission and absorption mechanisms involving their gas, dust, or associated Population I objects, GMCs modulate the galactic emission in virtually every major wavelength band. Furthermore, the visibility. of GMCs at so many wavelengths provided various methods of resolving the kinematic distance ambiguity for these objects in the inner Galaxy. Summaries of our accomplishments in each of the major wavelength bands discussed in our original proposal are given

  11. The Most Distant X-Ray Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In this program we have used ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite Mission) to observe X-ray emission around several high redshift radio galaxies in a search for extended, hot plasma which may indicate the presence of a rich galaxy cluster. When this program was begun, massive, X-ray emitting galaxy clusters were known to exist out to to z=0.8, but no more distant examples had been identified. However, we had identified several apparently rich clusters around 3CR radio galaxies at z greater than 0.8, and hoped to use ROSAT to confirm the nature of these structures as massive, virialized clusters. We have written up our results and submitted them as a paper to the Astrophysical Journal. This paper has been refereed and requires some significant revisions to accommodate the referees comments. We are in the process of doing this, adding some additional analysis as well. We will resubmit the paper early in 2000, and hopefully will meet with the referee's approval. We are including three copies of the submitted paper here, although it has not yet been accepted for publication.

  12. Image-assisted non-invasive and dynamic biomechanical analysis of human joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhit, Abdullah A.; Pickering, Mark R.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Ward, Tom; Smith, Paul N.

    2013-07-01

    Kinematic analysis provides a strong link between musculoskeletal injuries, chronic joint conditions, treatment planning/monitoring and prosthesis design/outcome. However, fast and accurate 3D kinematic analysis still remains a challenge in order to translate this procedure into clinical scenarios. 3D computed tomography (CT) to 2D single-plane fluoroscopy registration is a promising non-invasive technology for biomechanical examination of human joints. Although this technique has proven to be very precise in terms of in-plane translation and rotation measurements, out-of-plane motion estimations have been a difficulty so far. Therefore, to enable this technology into clinical translation, precise and fast estimation of both in-plane and out-of-plane movements is crucial, which is the aim of this paper. Here, a fast and accurate 3D/2D registration technique is proposed to evaluate biomechanical/kinematic analysis. The proposed algorithm utilizes a new multi-modal similarity measure called ‘sum of conditional variances’, a coarse-to-fine Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach for robust gradient-descent optimization and a novel technique for the analytic calculation of the required gradients for out-of-plane rotations. Computer simulations and in vitro experiments showed that the new approach was robust in terms of the capture range, required significantly less iterations to converge and achieved good registration and kinematic accuracy when compared to existing techniques and to the ‘gold-standard’ Roentgen stereo analysis.

  13. Ischemic stroke with left hemiparesis or shock should be evaluated by computed tomography for aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Shunsuke; Yanagawa, Youichi

    2012-06-01

    An 82-year-old woman with consciousness disturbance, left hemeparesis, and dysarthria was discovered at home by her family and was transported to a hospital. On arrival, she remained in a sleepy and disorientated and shock state. She complained of nausea but no chest or back pain. She obtained stable circulation after infusion. Her chest roentgen results showed widening of the mediastinum and the existence of a separation of the intimal calcification from the outer aortic soft tissue border, thus suggesting a Stanford A–type aortic dissection. Her head computed tomography depicted no signs of cerebral infarction. Because she did not complain of any pain, the possibility of acute phase aortic dissection was rejected. A permissive hypertensive therapy was initiated. Next day, she suddenly died. We diagnosed that she had died of a Stanford A–type aortic dissection based on the following facts: (1) patients presenting with stroke due to a Stanford A–type aortic dissection tend to have left hemiparesis because of malcirculation of the innominate artery and (2) a patient presenting with stroke by aortic dissection may have hypotension, which is unusual in standard stoke cases. Ischemic stroke induced by aortic dissection is not common among the patients with aortic dissection. However, given the high morbidity and mortality after misdiagnosis of aortic dissection, patients with ischemic stroke with left hemiparesis or shock should be evaluated by enhanced truncal computed tomography. PMID:22100071

  14. Early E-modulus of healing Achilles tendons correlates with late function: similar results with or without surgery.

    PubMed

    Schepull, T; Kvist, J; Aspenberg, P

    2012-02-01

    Non-operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is associated with an increased risk of rerupture. We hypothesized that this is due to inferior mechanical properties during an early phase of healing, and performed a randomized trial, using a new method to measure the mechanical properties. Tantalum markers were inserted in the tendon stumps, and tendon strain at different loadings was measured by stereo-radiography (Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis) at 3, 7 and 19 weeks and 18 months after injury. Thirty patients were randomized to operative or non-operative treatment. The primary out-come variable was an estimate for the modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks. Strain per force, cross-sectional area and tendon elongation were also measured. The functional outcome variable was the heel-raise index after 18 months. There was no difference in the mean modulus of elasticity or other mechanical or functional variables between operative and non-operative treatments at any time-point, but strain per force at 7 and 19 weeks had a significantly larger variation in the non-operative group. This group, therefore, might contain more outliers with poor healing. The modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks correlated with the heel-raise index after 18 months in both treatment groups (r(2) =0.75; P=0.0001). This correlation is an intriguing finding.

  15. Observations of GAIA-identified Cataclysmic Variables Using the TUBITAK National Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenoglu, Hasan H.; Kirbiyik, Halil; Kaynar, Suleyman; Okuyan, Oguzhan; Hamitoglu, Irek; Galeev, Almaz; Uluc, Kadir; Kocak, Murat; Kilic, Sila E.; Parmaksizoglu, Murat; Erece, Orhan; Ozisik, Tuncay; Gulsecen, Hulusi

    2016-07-01

    TUBITAK National Observatory supports the GAIA alerts with observations using three telescopes (RTT150, T100, T60) at the site with a limited time quota. We have observed 10 variable stars among GAIA sources discovered in the years 2014-2016 that may be candidate Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). Our TUG observations at this stage involve photometry and spectroscopy to aid the identification of these sources. The first preliminary result of our observations of Gaia14aat among them showed a dwarf nova outburst with an amplitude of 2.69 mag. We aim to construct a GAIA astrophysics group to study CVs along with supported studies using the SRG (Spectrum Roentgen Gamma astrophysical observatory) after the year of 2016. These observations will basically involve spectroscopy, narrow-band CCD imaging and photometry using several filters to aid the identification of these sources. RTT150 observations with very narrow filters (like H-alpha, SII, OIII with band width of range of 2 to 5 nm) will reveal whether shell around the SRG sources to aid identification novae among them.

  16. Status of ART-XC/SRG Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlinsky, M.; Akimov, V.; Levin, V.; Lapshov, I.; Tkachenko, A.; Semena, N.; Buntov, M.; Glushenko, A.; Arefiev, V.; Yaskovich, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.; Gilfanov, M.; Grebenev, S.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Lutovinov, A.; Molkov, S.; Kudelin, M.; Drozdova, T.; Garanin, S.; Grigorovich, S.; Litvin, D.; Lazarchuk, V.; Roiz, I.; Garin, M.; Babyshkin, V.; Lomakin, I.; Menderov, A.; Moskvinov, D.; Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; ODell, S. L.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Elsner, R.

    2014-01-01

    Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) is an X-ray astrophysical observatory, developed by Russia in collaboration with Germany. The mission will be launched in March 2016 from Baikonur, by a Zenit rocket with a Fregat booster and placed in a 6-month-period halo orbit around L2. The scientific payload consists of two independent telescopes - a soft-x-ray survey instrument, eROSITA, being provided by Germany and a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument ART-XC being developed by Russia. ART-XC will consist of seven independent, but co-aligned, telescope modules. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is fabricating the flight mirror modules for the ART-XC/SRG. Each mirror module will be aligned with a focal plane CdTe double-sided strip detectors which will operate over the energy range of 6-30 keV, with an angular resolution of less than 1', a field of view of approximately 34' and an expected energy resolution of about 10 percent at 14 keV.

  17. The ART-XC Instrument on Board the SRG Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlinksy, M.; Akimov, V.; Levin, V.; Lapshov, I.; Tkachenko, A.; Semena, N.; Buntov, M.; Glushenko, A.; Arefiev, V.; Yaskovish, A.; Sunyaeve, R.; Churazov, E.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Lutovinov, A.; Molkov, S.; Kudelin, M.; Garanin, S.; Grigorovich, S.; Litvin, D.; Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) is an X-ray astrophysical observatory, developed by Russia in collaboration with Germany. The mission will be launched in 2014 from Baikonur, by a Zenit rocket with a Fregat booster and placed in a 6-month-period halo orbit around L2. The scientific payload consists of two independent telescopes . a soft-x-ray survey instrument, eROSITA, being provided by Germany and a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument ART-XC being developed by Russia. ART-XC will consist of seven independent, but co-aligned, telescope modules with seven corresponding cadmium-telluride focal plane detectors. Each will operate over the approximate energy range of 6- 30 keV, with an angular resolution of <1 ', a field of view of 30 ' and an energy resolution about 10% at 14 keV. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) will fabricate some of the mirror modules, to complement others fabricated by VNIIEF in Russia.

  18. The race for megavoltage. X-rays versus telegamma.

    PubMed

    Robison, R F

    1995-01-01

    Roentgen's discovery was announced in January, 1896, and x-ray therapy trials followed in 1897. Becquerel rays and radioactive minerals were identified during 1896 through 1898. Radium was used for therapy by 1901, even though a pure standard was not achieved until 1910-1912. Quantities of radium finally became available after 1919, and for 20 years telegamma therapy machines underwent progressive development. Their megavoltage beam was much preferred over the standard 200-250 KV x-ray units of that time. Nuclear physicists during the Great Depression modified electron accelerators into giant 600-900 KV medical x-ray therapy machines and achieved one MV by 1937-1939. These were huge, complex, expensive, and unique to major academic and/or metropolitan centers. During World War II nuclear reactors superseded cyclotrons as efficient factories for few new radioisotopes, including "artificial radium". Few seemed interested in the latter for use in telegamma therapy until 1949-1951, when three competing teams from Canada and the USA designed telecobalt machines. From this competition, among then unknown innovators, emerged three future giants in radiation therapy: A.E.C.L., H. Johns, and G.H. Fletcher. The clinical application of telecobalt therapy was to revolutionize cancer care in community hospitals worldwide.

  19. The composition and structure of white dwarf atmospheres revealed by extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Martin A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Holberg, Jay B.; Sion, Edward M.

    1995-01-01

    The ROentgen SATellite (ROSAT) and Extreme UltraViolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky surveys have resulted in an important change in our understanding of the general composition of hydrogen-rich DA white dwarf atmospheres, with the photospheric opacity dominated by heavy elements rather than helium in the hottest stars (T > 40, 000 K). Most stars cooler than 40,000 K have more or less pure H atmospheres. However, one question, which has not been resolved, concerned the specific nature of the heavy elements and the role of helium in the hottest white dwarfs. One view of white dwarf evolution requires that H-rich DA stars form by gravitational settling of He from either DAO or He-rich central stars of planetary nebulae. In this case, the youngest (hottest) DA white dwarfs may still contain visible traces of He. Spectroscopic observations now available with EUVE provide a crucial test of these ideas. Analysis of data from the EUVE Guest Observer programme and EUVE public archive allows quantitative consideration of the sources of EUV opacity and places limits on the abundance of He which may be present.

  20. Interrelationships between information and energy using knowledge management tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizcano, D.; Martínez, A. María

    2014-10-01

    Edward Fredkin was an enthusiastic advocate of information-based theoretical physics, who, in the early 1980s, proposed a new theory of physics based on the idea that the universe is ultimately composed of software. According to Fredkin, reality should be considered as being composed not of particles, matter and forces or energy but of bits of data or information modified according to computational rules. Fredkin went on to demonstrate that, while energy is necessary for storing and retrieving information, it can be arbitrarily reduced in order to carry out any particular instance of information processing, and this operation does not have a lower bound. This implies that it is information rather than matter or energy that should be considered at the ultimate fundamental constituent of reality. This possibility had already been suggested by other scientists. Norbert Wiener heralded a fundamental shift from energy to information and suggested that the universe was founded essentially on the transformation of information, not energy. However, Konrad Zuse was the first, back in 1967, to defend the idea that a digital computer is computing the universe. Richard P. Feynman showed this possibility in a similar light in his reflections on how information related to matter and energy. Other pioneering research on the theory of digital physics was published by Kantor in 1977 and more recently by Stephen Wolfram in 2002, who thereby joined the host of voices upholding that it is patterns of information, not matter and energy, that constitute the cornerstones of reality. In this paper, we introduce the use of knowledge management tools for the purpose of analysing this topic.