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Sample records for wilhelm konrad roentgen

  1. Konrad Bajer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    These Proceedings are dedicated to our co-editor Konrad Bajer, who carried the lion's share of the work involved until his sudden and untimely death from cancer on 29th August 2014. Konrad was one of the key Organisers of the program "Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences" held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge from July to December 2012. During that time, he was on leave from the University of Warsaw, and held a Visiting Fellow Commonership at Trinity College, Cambridge. He had particular responsibility for the satellite workshop Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, held at ICMS, Edinburgh, in October 2012. Konrad graduated in Physics from the University of Warsaw in 1980, and took his PhD in Fluid Dynamics at DAMTP, Cambridge, 1984-89. He was active in EUROMECH, having been a principal organiser of the European Turbulence Conference (ETC13) in Warsaw 2011, and the meeting Turbulence: the Historical Perspective that followed it. He has been equally active in IUTAM; his distinction was recognised by his very recent election to the Congress Committee of IUTAM. Konrad's research interests were in magnetohydrodynamics and vortex dynamics in classical and quantum systems; also in problems of gasifcation, in which he played a coordinating role at the University of Warsaw. He impressed all with his exceptionally warm and friendly personality, and will be greatly missed in the whole scientifc community.

  2. Konrad Repository Facing its Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, V.

    2008-07-01

    According to the German Atomic Energy Act the Federation is responsible for the construction and operation of installations for the safekeeping and disposal of radioactive waste. This duty was assigned to the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS). In 1982, the Federal Institute of Physics and Metrology (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt - PTB) as the precursor of BfS applied for a license for the disposal of radioactive waste with negligible heat generation in the Konrad iron ore mine near Salzgitter at the Ministry for Environment of Lower Saxony. After 25 years of plan approval procedure and subsequent lawsuits the license is now valid and Konrad is waiting for construction. Facing this challenge BfS has established a project team to supervise the in-house and external activities to be done. It is intended to construct the Konrad repository within a preparation period of two years and a subsequent erection phase of four years. Thus, Konrad is planned to come into operation in 2013. In this paper the development of the plan approval procedure, the technical design of the planned repository, especially with regard to safety-related aspects, and the planning for the construction will be discussed. (authors)

  3. Spectrum Roentgen Gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predehl, P.; Pavlinsky, M.

    2014-07-01

    Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) is an X-ray astrophysical observatory, developed by Russia in collaboration with Germany. The mission will be launched in 2016 into a 6-month-period halo orbit around L2. The mission lifetime is planned to be more than seven years. While the first four years of the mission are devoted to an all sky survey, the rest of the mssion will be used for pointed observations. The payload consists of two X-ray telescopes, eROSITA and ART-XC. The eROSITA sky survey will be about 30 times more sensitive than ROSAT at energies between 0.5 and 2 keV, while in the hard band (2-8 keV) it will provide the first ever true imaging survey of the sky. The design driving science is the detection of large samples of galaxy clusters out to redshifts z>1 in order to study the large scale structure in the universe and test cosmological models including Dark Energy. ART-XC's role is to extend the energy range of eROSITA alone, thereby doubling the effective area in the critical 4-7 keV range. The harder response of ART-XC also facilitates the x-ray detection of obscured AGN. Both instruments are currently in the flight model and calibration phase.

  4. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  5. Roentgen signs in diagnostic imaging. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Meschan, I. Farrer-Meschan, R.M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiology of the diaphragm, pleura, thoracic cage, and upper air passages; Radiology of the breasts; Radiology of nodular lesions of the lung parenchyma; Roentgen signs of abnormalities in the lung: and overview; and Special examination of the larynx.

  6. License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

    2003-02-24

    Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

  7. A roentgen centennial legacy: the first use of the X-ray by the U.S. military in the Spanish-American War.

    PubMed

    Keller, T M

    1997-08-01

    The year 1996 marked the centennial of the advent of the roentgen ray in the United States. The compelling value of this novel scientific discovery by Professor Wilhelm Roentgen of Würzberg, Germany, to image the previously arcane depths of the living human body was astounding and recognized as a major advance. This report details the work of some key personnel and developments in the science of warfare that confirmed the great promise of the X-ray in the diagnostic armamentarium of military surgeons (a leading proponent being Professor Nicholas Senn, the founder of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States) in this last American conflict of the 19th century.

  8. German disposal concept for LLW/ILW: The Project Konrad

    SciTech Connect

    Lempert, J.P.; Czajkowski, U.

    1993-12-31

    The Project Konrad, the future German repository for low and intermediate level waste, currently at the final stages of the licensing procedure, is presented. The repository concept anticipates the final disposal of suitably conditioned LLW and ILW in underground chambers excavated to this purpose in a former iron ore mine. The Konrad mine located near Salzgitter in Lower Saxony, is judged particularly suitable for radioactive waste final disposal due to its very favorable characteristics regarding long-term isolation. The total space available for waste disposal amounts to some 1.1 million m{sup 3}, sufficient to accept some 600,000 m{sup 3} of conditioned wastes.

  9. Roentgen therapy for infections: an historical review.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, L. B.; Hodes, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation was used extensively for the treatment of all types of infections before the advent of antibiotics. Although this mode of therapy is now in disrepute, radiation therapists of that era were firm believers in the ability of radiation to cure infections. A review of the literature suggests, but certainly does not prove, that low-dose local radiation, in the range of 75 to 300 roentgens, is an effective treatment modality for a wide variety of infections. Two then-prevailing rationales held that the effect was due either to radiation damage to the immune cells, causing stimulation of the immune response, or to the increase in local inflammation with resultant increased blood flow. Modern research has been limited but provides support for both arguments. Although there are no present indications for using radiation as therapy for infectious disease, a reasonable argument can be made from the available data that radiation is effective for the treatment of localized infections. The mechanisms of low-dose radiation as a treatment for infections remain unclear. The known and probable long-term sequelae of low-dose local irradiation preclude its common use for this condition. Nevertheless, it is hoped that this review will stimulate investigations into this relatively unexplored area of radiobiology. PMID:1750226

  10. The Construction of the Konrad Repository - Status and Perspective - 13034

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, V.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the Atomic Energy Act of Germany the Federation is responsible for the construction and operation of installations for the safekeeping and disposal of radioactive waste. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) is assigned with this duty. In 1982 the abandoned iron ore mine Konrad near Salzgitter (Federal State of Lower Saxony) was proposed as a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste with negligible heat generation. After 20 years of plan approval procedure the license was granted by the Ministry for Environment of Lower Saxony in May 2002. This decision was finally confirmed by the Federal Administrative Court in March 2007. The construction has started, but former assumptions about the beginning of waste emplacement tuned out to be too optimistic. In the course of the preparatory work and the implementation planning it turned out that many changes need to be done. As a matter of fact most of the documents and planning originate from the 1990's and need to be revised because from that time on until now no adaptation was appropriate. The necessity to apply the state-of-the-art technology and other legal implications give rise to further changes and new licensing procedures, especially building licenses. Furthermore, the license from 2002 also includes a lot of collateral clauses that need to be fulfilled before radioactive waste can be emplaced. With this in mind, the time frame for the construction of the Konrad repository was revised in 2010. As a result, the completion of the erection before 2019 does not seem to be realistic. (authors)

  11. WE-G-213-01: Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sprawls, P.

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  12. Wilhelm Dilthey forerunner of humanist social thought.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H

    Humanist sociology is as a meadow in the forest of positivist science. Much of this space was cleared by Wilhelm Dilthey, not only through his attack on the fundamental assumptions of positivism, but also through his formulation of a critical method by which the works of free human consciousness could be understood. The first tenet of positivism is that the world is made up of "out there" objectively knowable "facts". Dilthey undercut this notion by asserting that the subject matter of the human studies was not mere "facts" of nature, but rather objectified expressions and the human mind. The second central assumption of positivism is that these "facts" are explainable or determined by general casual laws. In contrast, Dilthey asserted that, while we can explain the natural world, human action must be understood through an interpretive rather than a casual logic. In demonstrating and specifically describing such an interpretive procedure, Dilthey provided an epistemiological and methodological grounding for a humanistic science of man.

  13. Historical Connections: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: The Universal Genius.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Wilbert; Reimer, Luetta

    1994-01-01

    Contains biographical facts, contributions, quotations, and anecdotes about mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Presents an activity in which students discover patterns in the sums of the reciprocals of the triangular numbers. Contains reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  14. Wilhelm Ebstein and the history of surgery for Ebstein's Disease.

    PubMed

    Robicsek, Francis

    2013-06-01

    In the mirror of the life-story of Wilhelm Ebstein, the discovery of "Ebstein's Disease" is presented. The readers are guided through the individual stages of the development of surgical treatment of the condition.

  15. [Roentgen rays in the Spanish-American War].

    PubMed

    Bonmatí, J

    2006-01-01

    The Spanish-American War broke out in 1898, only 28 months after Roentgen discovered some mysterious rays. It was a war of short duration in which bloody battles with numerous casualties took place in Cuba within a few days a period. In this conflict North American military physicians employed the recently discovered and poorly known rays in the study of gunshot wounds. The early use of x-rays in the first important war after their discovery reveals a great sensitivity and attention of is highest military command and an exemplary preparation of its Medical Camps to use potentially efficient modern means to achieve their goals. The use of x-rays in this brief but key war conclusively demonstrated the usefulness of this technique in the management of war wounds, brought about a revolutionary change in the methods and criteria of diagnosis and treatment, and represented an enormous benefit for this type of patient. The knowledge acquired was applied in medical and surgical environments throughout the world and profoundly transformed healthcare. This rigorous and opportune experience was a transcendental scientific advance in the field of medicine, is a landmark in the history of radiology and deserves to be well known and recognized by all, especially by those who later on made of these rays their specialty.

  16. Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship: The Paradox of a Liberating Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosevelt, Jinx

    1980-01-01

    In analyzing the educational sequences of Goethe's novel, "Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship," the author suggests ways that this literary genre, the bildungsroman, which portrays an individual's development through a series of educational encounters, can provide teacher education students with material for studying the riddlelike quality…

  17. The Meaning of Disfigurement in Wilhelm Hauff's "Dwarf Nose."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blamires, David

    2002-01-01

    Notes that Wilhelm Hauff's fairy tale "Dwarf Nose" tells of a boy who is turned into a squirrel for seven years, then regains human form as a dwarf with a long nose before finally achieving normal adult proportions. Discusses how the story includes details that suggest a sexual interpretation. (SG)

  18. Sources of Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype theory.

    PubMed

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the historical background and early formation of Wilhelm Johannsen's distinction between genotype and phenotype. It is argued that contrary to a widely accepted interpretation (For instance, W. Provine, 1971. The Origins of Theoretical Population Genetics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press; Mayr, 1973; F. B. Churchill, 1974. Journal of the History of Biology 7: 5-30; E. Mayr, 1982. The Growth of Biological Thought, Cambridge: Harvard University Press; J. Sapp, 2003. Genesis. The Evolution of Biology. New York: Oxford University Press) his concepts referred primarily to properties of individual organisms and not to statistical averages. Johannsen's concept of genotype was derived from the idea of species in the tradition of biological systematics from Linnaeus to de Vries: An individual belonged to a group - species, subspecies, elementary species - by representing a certain underlying type (S. Müller-Wille and V. Orel, 2007. Annals of Science 64: 171-215). Johannsen sharpened this idea theoretically in the light of recent biological discoveries, not least those of cytology. He tested and confirmed it experimentally combining the methods of biometry, as developed by Francis Galton, with the individual selection method and pedigree analysis, as developed for instance by Louis Vilmorin. The term "genotype" was introduced in W. Johannsen's 1909 (Elemente der Exakten Erblichkeitslehre. Jena: Gustav Fischer) treatise, but the idea of a stable underlying biological "type" distinct from observable properties was the core idea of his classical bean selection experiment published 6 years earlier (W. Johannsen, 1903. Ueber Erblichkeit in Populationen und reinen Linien. Eine Beitrag zur Beleuchtung schwebender Selektionsfragen, Jena: Gustav Fischer, pp. 58-59). The individual ontological foundation of population analysis was a self-evident presupposition in Johannsen's studies of heredity in populations from their start in the early 1890s till his

  19. "My goose child Martina": the multiple uses of geese in the writings of Konrad Lorenz.

    PubMed

    Munz, Tania

    2011-01-01

    In 1935, the graylag goose Martina (1935-?) hatched from an egg in the home of the zoologist Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989). Martina imprinted on Lorenz, slept in his bedroom, mated with the gander Martin, and flew off in 1937. Over the following decades, Konrad Lorenz helped to establish the discipline of ethology, received a share of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and continued to write about his famous goose Martina. This essay examines the different instantiations of the geese in general, and Martina in particular, in Lorenz's writings aimed at readerships that included prewar zoologists, National Socialist psychologists, and popular audiences from the 1930s to 1980s. By developing an animal with her own biography, Lorenz created an individual whose lived and rhetorical agency made her especially well suited to perform widely divergent aspects of his evolving science. While a significant literature in the history of science has explored the standardization and stabilization of animals in science, I show how Lorenz's creation of a highly protean and increasingly public Martina was co-constitutive of the establishment of the science and public persona.

  20. Waldemar Wilhelm: father of oral and maxillofacial surgery in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Waldemar Wilhelm (1913-1994) was honored by the Asociación Colombiana de Cirugía Oral y Maxilofacial (Colombian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) as the Father of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Colombia. Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, Wilhelm graduated as a dentist from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in 1936. He emigrated shortly thereafter to Colombia, receiving his dental license there in 1943. He completed his oral and maxillofacial surgery training at Nordwestdeutsche Kieferklinic, under the tutelage of Prof. Dr. Dr. Karl Schuchardt in Hamburg. In 1950, he settled in Bogotá, where he joined the Universidad Nacional School of Dentistry, opened Colombia's first oral and maxillofacial surgery department at Hospital San José, and trained the first maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia in 1958.

  1. High Resolution Imager (HRI) for the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The design of the high resolution imager (HRI) on HEAO 2 was modified for use in the instrument complement of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT). Mechanical models of the front end assembly, central electronics assembly, and detector assembly were used to accurately represent the HRI envelope for both fit checks and focal plane configuration studies. The mechanical and electrical interfaces were defined and the requirements for electrical ground support equipment were established. A summary description of the ROSAT telescope and mission is included.

  2. Worthy heir or treacherous patricide? Konrad Lorenz and Jakob v. Uexküll.

    PubMed

    Mildenberger, Florian

    2005-01-01

    The biologist Jakob v. Uexküll is often seen as the preceptor of modern behavioral theory, who lastingly influenced Konrad Lorenz in particular. Nevertheless, Uexküll has been highly inadequately received by the school Lorenz founded. This neglect of Uexküll's works resulted because Lorenz and Uexküll came into contact at a time when the biological sciences were sundered by a deep ideological division. On the one side stood the Darwin-rejecting Neo-Vitalists (for example Uexküll), on the other side were the Neo-Darwinists (for example Lorenz). After Vitalism was overcome as a consequence of the Evolutionary Synthesis, Darwinists who had taken an intermittent interest in Vitalists and their theories could now only distance themselves completely from earlier ideas. This went not only for biologists and behavioral researchers, but also for medical scientists. The emancipation from the starting points of their own science was so complete that, even decades later, when the earlier debates about Mechanism and Vitalism were long since historically outdated, behavioral research never investigated its own history.

  3. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  4. [100 years roentgen rays--a discovery conquers the medical world].

    PubMed

    Freybott, A

    1995-11-01

    In the second half of the nineteenth century the prerequisites for research on the discharge of electricity in gases and the related phenomena were fulfilled. The first gas discharge tubes are associated with names like GeiBler, Hittorf, Crookes, Goldstein, Lenard and Hertz. These researchers studied the electrons escaping from the cathode, magnetic and electrical influence, chemical results, loss of energy and heating up of the anode. Lenard and Jackson were the first to describe phenomena outside the tube, but related the effects to electrons. It was W.C. Roentgen who discovered the ¿unknown rays¿; he systematically measured their penetrating properties and described them a short time thereafter. The scientific world was ready for this discovery, and the new of Roentgen's findings spread across the world in a matter of days, followed by intensive development of this innovation. The first and most important 35 years of development of the different types of X-rays tubes are described.

  5. Laryngology in Art: The Portrait of Dr Wilhelm Mayer-Hermann.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit A

    2016-12-01

    Otto Dix's portrait of the laryngologist Dr Wilhelm Mayer-Hermann represents a shining example of Neue Sachlichkeit, or New Objectivity, offering a return to unsentimental reality and a focus on the objective world, as opposed to the more abstract and idealistic tendencies of expressionism. However, precious little is known about the subject of the portrait. This article examines the portrait and attempts to shed light on the life and career of the Dr Wilhelm Mayer-Hermann.

  6. A new type of model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis for solving the occluded marker problem.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, B L; Valstar, E R; Stoel, B C; Rozing, P M; Reiber, J H C

    2005-11-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) measures micromotion of an orthopaedic implant with respect to its surrounding bone. A problem in RSA is that the markers are sometimes overprojected by the implant itself. This study describes the so-called Marker Configuration Model-based RSA (MCM-based RSA) that is able to measure the pose of a rigid body in situations where less than three markers could be detected in both images of an RSA radiograph. MCM-based RSA is based on fitting a Marker Configuration model (MC-model) to the projection lines from the marker projection positions in the image to their corresponding Roentgen foci. An MC-model describes the positions of markers relative to each other and is obtained using conventional RSA. We used data from 15 double examinations of a clinical study of total knee prostheses and removed projections of the three tibial component markers, simulating occlusion of markers. The migration of the tibial component with respect to the bone, which should be zero, for the double examination is a measure of the accuracy of algorithm. With the new algorithm, it is possible to estimate the pose of a rigid body of which one or two markers are occluded in one of the images of the RSA radiograph with high accuracy as long as a proper MC-model of the markers in the rigid body is available. The new algorithm makes RSA more robust for occlusion of markers. This improves the results of clinical RSA studies because the number of lost RSA follow-up moments is reduced.

  7. Wilhelm Troll (1897 - 1978): idealistic morphology, physics, and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Rieppel, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Idealistic morphology as articulated by the botanist Wilhelm Troll, the main target of the critique voiced by the early phylogeneticists, was firmly embedded in its contemporary scientific, cultural, and political context. Troll appealed to theoretical developments in contemporary physics in support of his research program. He understood burgeoning quantum mechanics not only to threaten the unity of physics, but also the validity of the principle of causality. Troll used this insight in support of his claim of a dualism in biology, relegating the causal-analytical approach to physiology, while rejuvenating the Goethean paradigm in comparative morphology. This embedded idealistic morphology in the völkisch tradition that characterized German culture during the Weimar Republic and its aftermath. In contrast, the contemporary phylogeneticists anchored their research program in the rise of logical positivism and in Darwin's principle of natural selection. This, in turn, brought phylogenetic systematists of the late 1930s and early 1940s into the orbit of national-socialist racial theory and eugenics. In conclusion, the early debate between idealistic morphologists and phylogenetic systematists was not only ideologically tainted, but also implied a philosophical impasse that is best characterized as a conflict between the Goethean and Newtonian paradigm of natural science.

  8. Wilhelm Weinberg’s Early Contribution to Segregation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862–1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy–Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg’s signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel’s segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861–1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=14. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878–1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg’s article. PMID:24018765

  9. A biplane roentgen videometry system for dynamic /60 per second/ studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, E.; Wood, E. H.; Heintzen, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A roentgen-television digital-computer technique and a display system developed for dynamic circulatory structure studies are described. Details are given for a videoroentgenographic setup which is used for obtaining biplane roentgen silhouettes of a left ventricle. A 60 per sec measurement of the shape and volume of angiographically outlined cardiac chambers can be made by this technique along with simultaneous ECG, pressure, and flow measurements accessible for real-time digital computer processing and analysis.

  10. Stranded in Vienna: Wilhelm Ebert (1871-1916) (German Title: Gestrandet in Wien: Wilhelm Ebert (1871-1916))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Anneliese

    2011-08-01

    Wilhelm Ebert, born 1871 in Leipzig, did study astronomy for a short time in Geneva and afterwards in Munich where he finished his PhD. He spent most of his scientific life in France, working on problems of latitude determination and celestial mechanics, mostly at the Bureau des Longitudes in Paris. He was member of the Astronomische Gesellschaft. Probably he used some of the regular meetings of the AG to introduce his work to German astronomers - for a rather short time he worked at the observatories of Kiel, Straßburg and Greifswald. In Greifswald he qualified for giving university lectures and he started to collect astronomical instruments to establish an observatory. M. Loewy, at that time director of Paris observatory, asked him to come back to France, first he had a position at Nice Observatory and shortly afterwards in Paris again. In 1909 he decided to live in Vienna, once more he applied for the qualification of giving university lectures; this time the procedure was easy going. He announced quite a lot of courses but nobody knows if they really took place. From February 1915 until his death in November 1916 he stayed in a psychiatric hospital in Vienna suffering from a disease which was uncurable at that time. His wife tried to get some information about his death in 1937. Already at that time he was unknown to the members of Vienna Observatory.

  11. [Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen 1845-1923].

    PubMed

    Langfeldt, B

    1995-01-01

    Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen was born on March 27th 1845 in the small town of Lennep on the lower Rhine. In the year of the revolution 1848 the family moved to Apeldoorn in Holland to be with his mother's family. Here he started school at the Martinus van Doorn's private Institute. In December 1862 he commenced his studies at the Utrecht Technical School, but was expelled for doubtful reasons. As he had no School Leaving Certificate he attended closed lectures in philosophy at the University of Utrecht, and in 1865 he passed the entrance exam to the Polytechnicum in Zürich - despite the lack of a School Leaving Certificate - where the famous August Kundt taught him physics. Röntgen went with Kundt to Würzburg and in 1872 to Strasbourg. In 1875 Röntgen became professor in physics in Hohenheim in 1879 in Giessen and in 1888 he was appointed professor in physics in Würzburg. It was here that Röntgen experimented with the Crookes airfree tube and on the afternoon of November 8th 1895 he by chance saw some crystals of bariumplatincyanid shine behind a screen. He took pictures of his weights in their wooden box and later the first "medical" picture of his wife Bertha's hand. ... Röntgen was the first to be awarded the Nobel Prize in 1901. Röntgen died of cancer coli on February 7th, 1923. The world famous Berlin surgeon Ferdinand Sauerbruch was called to see him but too late to help. ...

  12. Analysis of Wilhelm Ostwald's "Colour Organ" with Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridarolli, Alexandra; Atak, Sefkan; Herm, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    The "Scientific Colour Organ" is a collection of 680 pigment powders, created by the chemist Wilhelm Ostwald in 1925 as a means to represent his colour system. Today, it remains a leading part of colour theory. Analysis of these materials was undertaken to understand how the colour system was realised and to gain indications for preservation of the collection to which it belongs. Dispersive Raman microspectroscopy was applied directly to the powders, as well as using alternative techniques to suppress fluorescence. Barium sulphate was detected in all of the samples with one exception. Portable X-ray fluorescence revealed that this compound was a constituent of lithopone pigment. Raman spectroscopy furthermore revealed synthetic ultramarine (C.I. PB 29) as well as six different synthetic organic pigments and dyes (C.I. PY3; C.I. PO5; C.I. PR81:1; C.I. PV2 and two different triarylmethane dyes). Thin-layer chromatography was applied to determine the exact combination of dyes causing the gradual change in colour of each powder compared to the adjacent samples. With the exception of triarylmethane, the synthetic organic dyes could be identified with Raman spectroscopy directly on the chromatographic plate. The efficiency of thin-layer chromatography combined with Raman spectroscopy for identification of organic pigments could thus be shown. X-ray fluorescence indicated the presence of tungsten-molybdenum lakes in some samples. Comparison of the analytical results to information published by Oswald in 1917 showed that he switched to more light-stable synthetic organic pigments used for his "Scientific Colour Organ".

  13. [The private institute of Franz Wilhelm Schweigger-Seidel (1795-1838) in Halle].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, C; Bettin, H; Schulz, A K

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of the chemical-pharmacist institute of Franz Wilhelm Schweigger-Seidel (1795-1838) in Halle. The institute was founded in 1829. Six letters by Johann Salomo Christoph Schweigger (1779-1857) and Franz Wilhelm Schweigger-Seidel to Johann Bartholomäus Trommsdorff (1770-1837) present new detailed information on the institute of Schweigger-Seidel and on his biography, especially on his descent and on his work as a pharmacist. Besides it was possible to show the family links between him and J. S. Chr. Schweigger resulting from adoptation in a correct way for the first time.

  14. Quantitative analysis of structure and function of the cardiovascular system by roentgen-video-computer techniques.

    PubMed

    Heintzen, P H; Brennecke, R; Bürsch, J H; Hahne, H J; Lange, P E; Moldenhauer, K; Onnasch, D; Radtke, W

    1982-07-01

    A survey of the evolution of roentgen-video-computer techniques is given which was initiated by the development of videodensitometry by Wood and his associates. Following fundamental studies of the usefulness and limitations of x-ray equipment for quantitative measurements and the applicability of the Lambert-Beers law to x-ray absorption, videodensitometry has been used experimentally and clinically for various circulatory studies and has proved to be particularly valuable for the quantitation of aortic, pulmonic, and mitral valvular regurgitation. The second offspring of these techniques, so-called videometry, uses dimensional measurements from single and biplane angiocardiograms for the assessment of size, shape, and contraction pattern of the heart chambers. Volumes of the right and left ventricles can be determined clinically with a standard error of estimate below 10%. On the basis of these studies, normal values have been derived for all age groups, and they depict geometric changes of the growing heart. Cardiac index and ejection fractions proved to be age-independent biologic constants. Finally, methods for complete digital processing of video-image sequences in an off-line and real-time mode are described which allow digital image storage and documentation, dynamic background subtraction for contrast enhancement, and intravenous angiocardiography, in addition to functional imaging by parameter extraction from a matrix of pixel densitograms. Wall thickness and motion determinations, regional flow distribution measurements, and various image-composition techniques are also feasible.

  15. Wilhelm von Humboldt and the "Orient": On Edward W. Said's Remarks on Humboldt's Orientalist Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messling, Markus

    2008-01-01

    From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. "Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth…

  16. Perfecting the Individual: Wilhelm von Humboldt's Concept of Anthropology, "Bildung" and Mimesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    In the works of Wilhelm von Humboldt education took on a new quality, focusing firmly on the importance of the individual. "Bildung" was to become the principal task with a view to preparing the individual for the requirements of future life. In this article, the author investigates two aspects relating to the "Bildung" of the individual. First,…

  17. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Atkins, Carolyn; Pavlinskiy, Mikhail N.; Tkachenko, Alexey V.; Lapshov, Igor Y.

    2013-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the Astronomical Roengen Telescope- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC) instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission. ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Each module provides an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. We will present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  18. WE-G-213-00: History Symposium: Radiological Physics Pioneers: Roentgen and the AAPM Award Eponyms - William Coolidge, Edith Quimby, and Marvin Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  19. Mobility of the pubic symphysis. In vivo measurements with an electromechanic method and a roentgen stereophotogrammetric method.

    PubMed

    Walheim, G G; Selvik, G

    1984-12-01

    Mobility of the pubic symphysis can be measured in vivo by two new methods. One is electromechanic (EM), with steel pins inserted into the bone. The other is roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA), with tantalum bone markers implanted into the hip bones. With the first method, movements are directly registered with resistive transducers mounted on the pins. With the second method, movements are deduced with kinematic analysis from roentgen stereophotogrammetric measurements of the positions of the bone markers. Both methods have high precision, about 0.1 mm for translations and 0.1 degrees for rotations. The methods were used in two young volunteers, a man and a woman. In provocative tests with identical loading (alternating, active straight-leg raising in the supine position and standing on alternating left or right leg) there was a good correlation between the two methods. The measured values, i.e., translations of up to 2 mm and rotations of up to 3 degrees, form a basis for more comprehensive studies of normal and pathologic mobility of the pubic symphysis.

  20. Accuracy and repeatability of Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) for measuring knee laxity in longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Fleming, B C; Peura, G D; Abate, J A; Beynnon, B D

    2001-10-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) can be used to assess temporal changes in anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity. However, the accuracy and precision of RSA is dependent on many factors and should be independently evaluated for a particular application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of RSA for measuring A-P knee laxity. The specific aims were to assess the variation or "noise" inherent to RSA, to determine the reproducibility of RSA for repeated A-P laxity testing, and to assess the accuracy of these measurements. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment utilized three rigid models of the tibiofemoral joint to assess the noise and to compare digitization errors of two independent examiners. No differences were found in the kinematic outputs of the RSA due to examiner, repeated trials, or the model used. In a second experiment, A-P laxity values between the A-P shear load limits of +/-60 N of five cadaver goat knees were measured to assess the error associated with repeated testing. The RSA laxity values were also compared to those obtained from a custom designed linkage system. The mean A-P laxity values with the knee 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees of flexion for the ACL-intact goat knee (+/-95% confidence interval) were 0.8 (+/-0.25), 0.9 (+/-0.29), and 0.4 (+/-0.22) mm, respectively. In the ACL-deficient knee, the A-P laxity values increased by an order of magnitude to 8.8 (+/-1.39), 7.6 (+/-1.32), and 3.1 (+/-1.20)mm, respectively. No significant differences were found between the A-P laxity values measured by RSA and the independent measurement technique. A highly significant linear relationship (r(2)=0.83) was also found between these techniques. This study suggests that the RSA method is an accurate and precise means to measure A-P knee laxity for repeated testing over time.

  1. Professor Bernhard Pollack (1865-1928) of Friedrich Wilhelm University, Berlin: neurohistologist, ophthalmologist, pianist.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the life and work of Bernhard Pollack (1865-1928), a pioneer neurohistologist, ophthalmologist, and world-class pianist. In 1897, Pollack published the first standard manual on staining methods for the nervous system. Born into a Prussian-Jewish family, he received his piano education from the composer Moritz Moszkowski and his pathology education from Carl Weigert. Pollack worked in the Institutes of Wilhelm Waldeyer (anatomy), Emanuel Mendel (neuropsychiatry), the later Nobel laureate Robert Koch (infectious diseases), and the Eye Policlinic of Paul Silex (ophthalmology), becoming a Professor of Ophthalmology at Berlin's Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in 1919. The study also chronicles the founding by Pollack of the Berlin Doctors' Orchestra in 1911.

  2. Histrionicotoxins: Roentgen-Ray Analysis of the Novel Allenic and Acetylenic Spiroalkaloids Isolated from a Colombian Frog, Dendrobates histrionicus

    PubMed Central

    Daly, John W.; Karle, Isabella; Myers, Charles W.; Tokuyama, Takashi; Waters, James A.; Witkop, Bernhard

    1971-01-01

    The structures and absolute configuration of two unique alkaloids isolated from the Colombian frog, Dendrobates histrionicus, have been elucidated by Roentgen-ray (x-ray) crystallography. Histrionicotoxin is (2pR, 6S, 7pS, 8aS)-7-(cis-1-buten-3-ynyl)-8-hydroxy-2-(cis-2-penten-4- ynyl)-1-azaspiro[5.5] undecane, while in dihydro-isohistrionicotoxin the acetylenic 2-pentenynyl side chain is replaced by an allenic 2-(3,4 pentadienyl) substituent. Dendrobates histrionicus exhibits remarkable interpopulational variations in amounts and composition of skin toxins, in behavior, and in phenotypic characters, aspects of which are illustrated in a color plate. The histrionico-toxins are the third class of alkaloids isolated from the defensive skin secretions of Neotropical (Dendrobatidae) frogs. Images PMID:5288773

  3. Tribute to an Astronomer: The Work of Max Ernst on Wilhelm Tempel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël

    2016-05-01

    In 1964-1974, the German artist Max Ernst created, with the help of two friends, a series of works (books, movie, and paintings) related to the astronomer Wilhelm Tempel. Mixing actual texts by Tempel and artistic features, this series pays homage to the astronomer by recalling his life and discoveries. Moreover, the core of the project, the book Maximiliana or the Illegal Practice of Astronomy, actually depicts the way science works, making this work of art a most original tribute to a scientist.

  4. Some neglected contributions of Wilhelm Wundt to the psychology of memory.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shana K

    2005-08-01

    Wilhelm Wundt, whose name is rarely associated with the scientific study of memory, conducted a number of memory experiments that appear to have escaped the awareness of modern cognitive psychologists. Aspects of Wundt's system are reviewed, particularly with respect to his experimental work on memory. Wundt investigated phenomena that would fall under the modern headings of iconic memory, short-term memory, and the enactment and generation effects, but this research has been neglected. Revisiting the Wundtian perspective may provide insight into some of the reasons behind the historical course of memory research and in general into the progress of science in psychology.

  5. The Nazi symbiosis: politics and human genetics at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute.

    PubMed

    Berez, Thomas M; Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2004-12-01

    The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA), from its inception in Weimar Republic Germany to its apogee under the rule of the Third Reich, is an example of how politics and human heredity can function as mutually beneficial resources. Whether it was a result of the Nazi bureaucrats' desire to legitimize their racial policy through science, or the KWIA personnel's desire to secure more funding for their research, the symbiotic relationship that developed between human genetics and Nazi politics could help explain why many scientists in the Third Reich undertook research projects that wholly transgressed the boundaries of morally acceptable science.

  6. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Ins1rument Aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma (SRG) mission is a Russian-German X-ray astrophysical observatory that carries two co-aligned and complementary X-ray telescope systems. The primary instrument is the German-led extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (eROSITA), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that covers the energy range from 0.2-12 keV. The complementary instrument is the Russian-led Astronomical Roentgen Telescope -- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC or ART), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that provides higher energy coverage, up to 30 keV (with limited sensitivity above 12 keV).

  7. Innovations from the “ivory tower”: Wilhelm Barthlott and the paradigm shift in surface science

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This article is mainly about borders that have tremendous influence on our daily life, although many of them exist and act mostly unrecognized. In this article the first objective will be to address more generally the relation between university and society or industry, borders within universities, borders in thinking and the huge amount of misunderstandings and losses resulting from these obvious or hidden borders. In the second part and in more detail, the article will highlight the impact of the research conducted by Wilhelm Barthlott throughout his scientific career during which not only one border was removed, shifted or became more penetrable. Among the various fields of interest not mentioned here (e.g., systematics of Cactaceae, diversity and evolution of epiphytes, the unique natural history of isolated rocky outcrops called inselbergs, or the global distribution of biodiversity), plant surfaces and especially the tremendous diversity of minute structures on leaves, fruits, seeds and other parts of plants represent a common thread through 40 years of scientific career of Wilhelm Barthlott. Based on research that was regarded already old-fashioned in the 1970s and 1980s, systematic botany, results and knowledge were accumulated that, some 20 years later, initiated a fundamental turnover in how surfaces were recognized not only in biology, but even more evident in materials science. PMID:28326228

  8. Innovations from the "ivory tower": Wilhelm Barthlott and the paradigm shift in surface science.

    PubMed

    Neinhuis, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    This article is mainly about borders that have tremendous influence on our daily life, although many of them exist and act mostly unrecognized. In this article the first objective will be to address more generally the relation between university and society or industry, borders within universities, borders in thinking and the huge amount of misunderstandings and losses resulting from these obvious or hidden borders. In the second part and in more detail, the article will highlight the impact of the research conducted by Wilhelm Barthlott throughout his scientific career during which not only one border was removed, shifted or became more penetrable. Among the various fields of interest not mentioned here (e.g., systematics of Cactaceae, diversity and evolution of epiphytes, the unique natural history of isolated rocky outcrops called inselbergs, or the global distribution of biodiversity), plant surfaces and especially the tremendous diversity of minute structures on leaves, fruits, seeds and other parts of plants represent a common thread through 40 years of scientific career of Wilhelm Barthlott. Based on research that was regarded already old-fashioned in the 1970s and 1980s, systematic botany, results and knowledge were accumulated that, some 20 years later, initiated a fundamental turnover in how surfaces were recognized not only in biology, but even more evident in materials science.

  9. The timing of Late Pleistocene glaciation at Mount Wilhelm, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephanie; Barrows, Timothy; Hope, Geoff; Pillans, Brad; Fifield, Keith

    2016-04-01

    The highlands of New Guinea were the most extensively glaciated area in the Asian tropical region during the Late Pleistocene. Evidence for glaciation is widespread on most of the mountain peaks above ~3500 m. Glacial landforms include both valley and ice cap forms, but the timing of glaciation remains constrained to only a few local areas. This paper focuses on Mount Wilhelm, which is situated in the central southern region of Papua New Guinea at 5.78°S and is the highest peak (4510 m a.s.l.) We focus on a south easterly valley (Pindaunde Valley) emanating from the peak, where large moraines indicate the maximum ice extent of a valley glacier ~5 km long. Within this extensive moraine complex, recessional moraines document the retreat of the glacier towards the summit region. In order to determine the timing of deglaciation, we collected samples for surface exposure dating using 36Cl and 10Be from diorite boulders positioned on moraine crests. The ages indicate that maximum ice extent was attained during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that ice remained near its maximum extent until after 15 ka but persisted at higher elevations almost until the Holocene. These results are similar to those described from Mt Giluwe to the northwest of Mount Wilhelm, where an ice cap reached its maximum extent at the LGM and remained there for around 3-4,000 years. This indicates that full glacial conditions were only brief in this region of the tropics.

  10. [Psychoanalysis during the Nazi era. Contemporary consequences of a historical controversy: the Wilhelm Reich "case"].

    PubMed

    Nitzschke, B

    1999-01-01

    The paper sheds light on the extent of collaboration between the pre-World War II German Psychoanalytic Society (DPG) and the Nazi regime. This is shown by the story of the expulsion of Wilhelm Reich from membership in the DPG, at Freud's own bid. A leading German psychoanalyst, Carl Müller-Braunschweig, published the paper "Psychoanalysis and Weltanschauung" in the fanatically "national" (so-called "völkisch") Nazi propaganda organ Reichswart in 1993 following consultations with officials of the International Psychoanalytic Association (IPA) who endorsed these policies. This paper by Müller-Braunschweig was used both to prevent the possible outlawing of psychoanalysis by the Nazis and to deny official DPG support to Wilhelm Reich and the group of leftist-oriented IPA analysts who joined forces with him in opposing Nazi ideology. The paper concludes with examples from post-1945 historiography showing how the exclusion of Reich and the related DPG/IPA compromise and "appeasement" policy were either ignored or disclaimed.

  11. Replication and Pedagogy in the History of Psychology V: The Metronome and Wilhelm Wundt's Search for the Components of Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayala, Christopher; Borawski, Steven; Miller, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920) believed that consciousness was represented by the interconnection of psychical processes comprised of temporal elements and compounds. To explore these processes, Wundt used a metronome to measure the amount of information that passed into consciousness across time. The current project replicated some of his procedures,…

  12. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.; Atkins, C.; Zavlin, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission. Four of those modules are being fabricated under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) An additional three flight modules and one spare for the ART-XC Instrument are produced under a Cooperative Agreement between NASA and IKI. The instrument will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Each module consists of 28 nested thin Ni/Co shells giving an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of the first four modules is scheduled for November 2013, while the remaining three modules will be delivered to IKI in January 2014. We present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  13. [The letters of Ernst Wilhelm Brücke to Rudolf Virchow 1850-1857].

    PubMed

    Andree, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Rudolf Virchow is one of the most prominent German physician of the nineteenth century. Virchow pioneered the modern concept of pathological processes by his application of the cell theory to explain the effects of disease in the organs and tissues of the body. He emphasized that diseases arose, not in organs or tissues in general, but primarily in their individual cells. Moreover, he campaigned vigorously for social reforms and contributed to the development of anthropology as a modern science. Ernst Wilhelm Brücke was an important researcher in most fields of physiology. His works were epoch-making and influential for our knowledge of the nature of cells and his optical works made the basis for the invention of the eye mirror which was later constructed by Helmholtz. He also is also known for his work on the physiology of language. For the first time the correspondence between these scientific celebrities is published.

  14. Blood, breath, fears redux, and panic attacks: comment on Roth, Wilhelm, and Pettit (2005).

    PubMed

    Ley, Ronald

    2005-03-01

    This article discusses the hyperventilation theory (HVT) of panic attacks (PAs) proposed by R. Ley in the context of criticisms raised by W. T. Roth, F. H. Wilhelm, and D. Pettit. Their interpretation of HVT is flawed by misunderstanding, misinterpretation, and oversimplification of the complex psychophysiological principles on which current HVT is based. Consequently, the "propositions" they derive are inappropriate. Further, Roth et al. disregarded/overlooked: (a) differences among types of PAs, (b) abundant empirical evidence that PA patients are distinguished by presence or absence of prominent respiratory symptoms (e.g., overbreathing), and (c) Ley's (1992b) classification of PAs based on 10 psychophysiological distinctions. The review by Roth et al. falls short of standards required to falsify HVT. Current HVT of PAs is tenable and testable.

  15. The holist tradition in twentieth century genetics. Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype concept

    PubMed Central

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The terms ‘genotype’, ‘phenotype’ and ‘gene’ originally had a different meaning from that in the Modern Synthesis. These terms were coined in the first decade of the twentieth century by the Danish plant physiologist Wilhelm Johannsen. His bean selection experiment and his theoretical analysis of the difference between genotype and phenotype were important inputs to the formation of genetics as a well-defined special discipline. This paper shows how Johannsen's holistic genotype theory provided a platform for criticism of narrowly genocentric versions of the chromosome theory of heredity that came to dominate genetics in the middle decades of the twentieth century. Johannsen came to recognize the epoch-making importance of the work done by the Drosophila group, but he continued to insist on the incompleteness of the chromosome theory. Genes of the kind that they mapped on the chromosomes could only give a partial explanation of biological heredity and evolution. PMID:24882823

  16. The first ascent to the volcano Cotopaxi in Ecuador by Wilhelm Reiss (1838-1908)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2014-06-01

    The volcano Cotopaxi in South America is 5,897 m high and is one of the highest active volcanoes of the world and the second highest volcano in the Andes after the Chimborazo (6,310 m). In Ecuador, there are more than 20 volcanoes contributing to the spectacular mountain range diving this country between the western and eastern lowlands. There have been more than 50 reports of volcanic activity at Cotopaxi since 1738, among which those from the years 1744, 1768, and 1877 are the largest. During the 1877 eruption, the whole summit glacier collapsed and a huge mudflow spread out for more than 100 km and flooded the city of Latacunga. Five years prior to this catastrophic event, the German geologist Wilhelm Reiss from the University of Heidelberg ascended Cotopaxi for the first time together with his supporter Angel M. Escobar from Columbia.

  17. 1895-1995: diagnostic imaging in its first century.

    PubMed

    Yochum, T R

    1995-01-01

    A brief historical review of the discovery of X-ray by Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen on November 9, 1895, is presented. This synopsis discusses the evolution of X-ray imaging from the primitive Crookes x-ray tube to the state-of-the-art high-frequency generators. Technological advancements from fluoroscopy to plain films, nuclear medicine, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, along with changes in X-ray film and intensifying screens, are also provided. A concise overview of chiropractic radiology and the introduction of X-ray into the chiropractic curriculum, first at Palmer College and then at other colleges is presented. Historical recognition of the development of the American Chiropractic Board of Radiology (ACBR), its founding fathers and its certification program for training chiropractic radiologists is reviewed. General comments pointing to computerized digital imaging as the filmless imaging of the future are offered.

  18. Genetics as a modernization program: biological research at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes and the political economy of the Nazi State.

    PubMed

    Gausemeier, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    During the Third Reich, the biological institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft) underwent a substantial reorganization and modernization. This paper discusses the development of projects in the fields of biochemical genetics, virus research, radiation genetics, and plant genetics that were initiated in those years. These cases exemplify, on the one hand, the political conditions for biological research in the Nazi state. They highlight how leading scientists advanced their projects by building close ties with politicians and science-funding organizations and companies. On the other hand, the study examines how the contents of research were shaped by, and how they contributed to, the aims and needs of the political economy of the Nazi system. This paper therefore aims not only to highlight basic aspects of scientific development under Nazism, but also to provide general insights into the structure of the Third Reich and the dynamics of its war economy.

  19. PREFACE: The 395th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar: `Time-dependent phenomena in Quantum Mechanics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, Manfred; Kramer, Tobias

    2008-03-01

    The 395th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar: `Time-dependent phenomena in Quantum Mechanics' took place at the Heinrich Fabri Institute in Blaubeuren, Germany, 12-16 September 2007. The conference covered a wide range of topics connected with time-dependent phenomena in quantum mechanical systems. The 20 invited talks and 15 short talks with posters at the workshop covered the historical debate between Schrödinger, Dirac and Pauli about the role of time in Quantum Mechanics (the debate was carried out sometimes in footnotes) up to the almost direct observation of electron dynamics on the attosecond time-scale. Semiclassical methods, time-delay, monodromy, variational principles and quasi-resonances are just some of the themes which are discussed in more detail in the papers. Time-dependent methods also shed new light on energy-dependent systems, where the detour of studying the time-evolution of a quantum states allows one to solve previously intractable problems. Additional information is available at the conference webpage http://www.quantumdynamics.de The organizer would like to thank all speakers, contributors, session chairs and referees for their efforts in making the conference a success. We also gratefully acknowledge the generous financial support from the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation for the conference and the production of this special volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Manfred Kleber Physik Department T30, Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching, Germany mkleber@ph.tum.de Tobias Kramer Institut I: Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg, Germany tobias.kramer@physik.uni-regensburg.de Guest Editors Conference photograph Front row (from left): W Schleich, E J Heller, J B Delos, H Friedrich, K Richter, M Kleber, P Kramer, M Man'ko, A del Campo, V Man'ko, M Efremov, A Ruiz, M O Scully Middle row: A Zamora, R Aganoglu, T Kramer, J

  20. Discovering environmental cancer: Wilhelm Hueper, post-World War II epidemiology, and the vanishing clinician's eye.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, C

    1997-01-01

    Today, our understanding of and approach to the exogenous causes of cancer are dominated by epidemiological practices that came into widespread use after World War II. This paper examines the forces, considerations, and controversies that shaped postwar risk factor epidemiology in the United States. It is argued that, for all of the new capabilities it brought, this risk factor epidemiology has left us with less of a clinical eye for unrecognized cancer hazards, especially from limited and localized exposures in the work-place. The focus here is on Wilhelm Hueper, author of the first textbook on occupational cancer (1942). Hueper became the foremost spokesman for earlier identification practices centering on occupational exposures. The new epidemiological methods and associated institutions that arose in the 1940s and 1950s bore an unsettled relation to earlier claims and methods that some, Hueper among them, interpreted as a challenge. Hueper's critique of the new epidemiology identified some of its limitations and potentially debilitating consequences that remain with us today. Images p1825-a p1827-a p1829-a PMID:9366640

  1. Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the discoverer of oxygen, and a very productive chemist.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-12-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) has an important place in the history of the discovery of respiratory gases because he was undoubtedly the first person to prepare oxygen and describe some of its properties. Despite this, his contributions have often been overshadowed by those of Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, who also played critical roles in preparing the gas and understanding its nature. Sadly, Scheele was slow to publish his discovery and therefore Priestley is rightly recognized as the first person to report the preparation of oxygen. This being said, the thinking of both Scheele and Priestley was dominated by the phlogiston theory, and it was left to Lavoisier to elucidate the true nature of oxygen. In addition to his work on oxygen, Scheele was enormously productive in other areas of chemistry. Arguably he discovered seven new elements and many other compounds. However, he kept a low profile during his life as a pharmacist, and he did not have strong links with contemporary prestigious institutions such as the Royal Society in England or the French Académie des Sciences. He was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Science but only attended one meeting. Partly as a result, he remains a somewhat nebulous figure despite the critical contribution he made to the history of respiratory gases and his extensive researches in other areas of chemistry. His death at the age of 43 may have been hastened by his habit of tasting the chemicals that he worked on.

  2. Charles Darwin and other great men in correspondence with Carl Wilhelm von Naegeli.

    PubMed

    Naegeli, W; Wiedemann, H R

    1993-04-15

    The great Swiss-German botanist Carl Wilhelm von Naegeli (1817-1891) was a student of Lorenz Oken, A.P. de Candolle, and Matthias Jacob Schleiden and became a key figure in "genetic" (i.e., evolutionary-developmental) biology in the mid-late 19th century. He was an expert on the hawk-weed, Hieracium and also made important contributions to microbiology. One of his many outstanding students was Carl Correns, one of the 3 rediscoverers of Mendel's work. Naegeli was an early proponent and defender of Darwin. The correspondence preserved in the Naegeli family contains many important letters between Naegeli and his contemporaries. Those from Mendel to Naegeli have passed out of the Naegeli family and were published by Correns earlier in the century. However, exceptionally notable items still in the archives of the Naegeli family include 4 surviving letters from Darwin, 2 letters from Virchow, and 10 from Justus von Liebig. In spite of a lack of appreciation of Mendel's work, we call attention to the importance of those surviving documents from an era in which very few of the greatest naturalists and founders of modern biology--including Goethe, Darwin, Galton, Agassiz, von Humboldt, von Baer--were without "blind spots."

  3. Physiological optics, cognition and emotion: a novel look at the early work of Wilhelm Wundt.

    PubMed

    Wassmann, Claudia

    2009-04-01

    The German physiologist Wilhelm Wundt, who later founded experimental psychology, arguably developed the first modern scientific conception of emotion. In the first edition of Vorlesungen über die Menschen- und Thierseele (Lectures on human and animal psychology), which was published in 1863, Wundt tried to establish that emotions were essential parts of rational thought. In fact, he considered them unconscious steps of decision-making that were implied in all processes of conscious thought. His early work deserves attention not only because it is the attempt to conceptualize cognition and emotion strictly from a neural point of view but also because it represents the very foundation of the debate about the nature of emotion that revolved around William James' theory of emotion during the 1890s. However, this aspect of his work is little known because scholars who have analyzed Wundt's work focused on his late career. Furthermore, historical analysis interpreted Wundt's work within a philosophical framework, rather than placing it in the context of German medical and physiological research in which it belongs. In addition, Wundt's early works are hardly available to an English speaking audience because they were never translated.

  4. From Wilhelm von Humboldt to Hitler-are prominent people more prone to have Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Horowski; Horowski; Calne; Calne

    2000-10-01

    We describe Parkinsonism in prominent people, where Wilhelm von Humboldt and Adolf Hitler provide just two spectacular, opposing examples. In both of them, there is little if any evidence that the disease did influence their life ambitions, methods of achieving them or cognitive function in general. Thus, Hitler's Parkinsonism should remain a 'footnote' to history, and historians should acknowledge that in his last years, his trembling, his curbed posture, his slow walking, mask-like face and low voice did not indicate remorse, fear or depression as a consequence of his crimes, but were mere expressions of his disease which, until the end, had no impact on his intellectual skills and methods. The apparently higher incidence of Parkinsonism in prominent people may be just due to their higher visibility, or a consequence of disease-related personality traits (e.g. ambition, perfectionism, rigidity) which may contribute to becoming, e.g., a prominent authoritarian person. Perhaps even some early behaviour pattern (such as repressed emotions or acting in public-which could even increase the risk of some infection) contributes to a greater vulnerability for developing Parkinsonism. Further studying other prominent cases might lead us to better understanding of risk factors and the expression of early Parkinsonism.

  5. Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    As result of the Challenger accident, the alternative possibility for launch of the ROSAT mission with an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle is being considered. An overview of the problems involved in having the ROSAT flight ready for either a Shuttle or Atlas/Centaur launch is presented.

  6. DFVLR Roentgen satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The entire engineering model is being concluded in the shuttle configuration. The flight model components are extensively included in the shuttle configuration and will not be changed until after a binding Atlas/Centaur (A/C) booster decision for the A/C configuration. The urgent projects for the altering of the shuttle configuration on the A/C configuration must be carried out before a binding Atlas/Centaur booster decision is completed. All other modification projects are being delayed until the presentation of a binding booster decision.

  7. Replication and Pedagogy in the History of Psychology V: The Metronome and Wilhelm Wundt's Search for the Components of Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Christopher; Borawski, Steven; Miller, Jonathon

    2008-05-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832 1920) believed that consciousness was represented by the interconnection of psychical processes comprised of temporal elements and compounds. To explore these processes, Wundt used a metronome to measure the amount of information that passed into consciousness across time. The current project replicated some of his procedures, to better understand the role of introspection and the complexity of the metronome task for experimenters and observers. The results of the replication were mixed, but the replication helped provide insights into Wundt’s procedures and their relationship to his theories.

  8. Biplane roentgen videometric system for dynamic, 60/sec, studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    An operator interactive video system for the measurement of roentgen angiographically outlined structures is described. Left ventricular volume and three-dimensional shapes are calculated from up to 200 pairs of diameters measured from ventriculograms at the rate of 60 pairs of biplane images per second. The accuracy and reproducibility of volumes calculated by the system were established by analysis of roentgenograms of inanimate objects of known volume and by comparison of left ventricular stroke volumes calculated by the system with the stroke volumes calculated by an indicator-dilution technique and an aortic root electromagnetic flowmeter. Computer-generated display of the large amounts of data obtained by the videometry system is described.

  9. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  10. The Marshall Space Flight Center development of mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-09-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  11. [Edward Wilhelm Drescher--the founder of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania].

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, J H

    1999-01-01

    Professor Edward Wilhelm Drescher--an eminent Polish pediatric surgeon and pioneer of this specialization in West Pomerania--was born in 1912 in Biłgoraj. His young years he spent in his parents familial town Kalisz, where he attended a very famous college--State Humanistic Grammar-School. In 1937 he graduated from Faculty of Medicine at the Warsaw University. Next year he started his career as a surgeon in the Surgery at Orthopedic Ward of Pediatric Clinic in Warsaw, which was directed by prof. Jan Kossakowski--excellent pediatric surgeon and artist. During the September Campaign he took part in the battle of Bzura and in the defense of Polish capital as the physician in the 25th Regiment of Artillery. In 1940 he joined Polish underground army--AK. In 1944, when the Warsaw Uprising broke out, he was the Commander of the insurgent hospital--Poznańska 11. It was a very well arranged and headed hospital, which admitted about eight hundred wounded soldiers and civilians. After the war for two years he lived in Sopot, where he organized and directed the Surgery Hospital and the Town Outpatients' Department. In 1947 he moved to Szczecin, where he arranged the first ward of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania (in Polish Red Cross hospital). Ten years later he was nominated the head of the Clinic of Pediatric Surgery in the Pomeranian Medical Academy in Szczecin. For many years Prof. Drescher was provincial and regional consultant. He helped to organize a few pediatric surgery wards in Pomerania (Koszalin, Gorzów Wlkp., Słupsk). He died in 1977 in Warsaw. Prof. Drescher published almost 80 scientific papers including two medical books. Traumatology of children and the newborn surgery became his principal area of interest. He was the author of Code of the Ethical and Moral Procedure of the Polish Medical Society. For almost twenty years he was co-author the Annales of Pomeranian Medical Academy. He was a co-founder, next was a president of the Polish Association of

  12. Neuroscience in its context. Neuroscience and psychology in the work of Wilhelm Wundt.

    PubMed

    Ziche, P

    1999-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920), the first to establish an Institute devoted exclusively to psychological research in Germany, started his career as a (neuro)physiologist. He gradually turned into a psychologist in the 1860's and 1870's, at a time when neuroscience had to deal with the problem of giving an adequate physiological interpretation of the data accumulated by neuroanatomy. Neither the functional interpretation of brain morphology, nor the options provided by the reflex model seemed acceptable to Wundt. In his Physiological Psychology, first published in 1874, Wundt adds another aspect to this discussion by showing that psychology may help, and indeed is required, to clarify some of the most controversial problems in brain research. He thus became a key figure in neuroscience's struggle to locate itself within the various research traditions. The following theses will be argued for: 1. Wundt's turn to psychology resulted from his view that the methodological basis of physiological brain research of the time was unsatisfactory. 2. Psychology, in its attempt to solve these problems, implied a new conception of an interaction between experimental and theoretical brain research. 3. Wundt tried to demonstrate the necessity of psychological considerations for experimental brain research. These points are discussed with reference to Wundt's treatment of the localization of functions in the brain. According to Wundt, psychology can show, by analyzing the complex structure of intellect and will, that mental phenomena can be realized in the brain only in the form of complex interations of the elements of the brain. The results of the psychological considerations imply that a strict localizations cannot be correct; but they are also turned against the conception of a complete functional equivalence of the various parts of the cortext. For Wundt, a reconstruction of brain processes cannot start with neurones, but only with patterns of a functional organization of brain

  13. Wilhelm Winkler (1842-1910) - a Thuringian private astronomer and maecenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Wilfried; Dorschner, Johann; Schielicke, Reinhardt E.

    Wilhelm Winkler was born in 1842 in Eisenberg, Thuringia, as the son of a lawyer. After attending the trading high school in Gera, Winkler worked as a merchant in Eisenberg, following in the footsteps of his grandfather. In 1875 he gave up this trade and devoted his time entirely to astronomy. Advised by Carl Bruhns, director of the Leipzig University Observatory, he established an observatory on his estate in Gohlis near Leipzig. From 1878 Winkler regularly observed sunspots; other fields of his observational interests were comets, occultations of stars by the Moon, and Jupiter's satellites. In 1887 he went to Jena, where he contacted Ernst Abbe, who was the head of the Jena observatory, too. For some years, Winkler's instruments were used in the new observatory erected by Abbe, which replaced the old Ducal Observatory of the Goethe era. Winkler donated the precision pendulum clock and some other instruments to this observatory. He also offered his observational assistance whenever it was wanted. In 1893 Winkler built up his own observatory in Jena and published annual reports on his work in the Vierteljahrsschrift of the Astronomische Gesellschaft. His observational results mainly appeared in the journal Astronomische Nachrichten. In 1902 he was awarded an honorary doctor's degree by the Philosophical Faculty of Jena University. However, at that time his physical constitution began gradually to fade. He lost his left eye due to a sarcoma, and finally he died at the age of 68. In his will, he left 100 000 Mark in form of securities to Jena University (Winkler Foundation). The University Observatory got his 4.5 m dome, the transport of which from his residence to the final site was also paid for by him, several instruments, and a lot of books. In 1936 Winkler's dome was closed by the University. The observatory was transferred from the University to the Zeiss works in exchange for the observatory in the Jena Forst. Zeiss sponsored the reconstruction of the old dome

  14. "Wenn ich leben soll, so sei es mit dir!" The relationship of father and son in Goethe's "Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre".

    PubMed

    Lee, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between father and son is a highly nuanced and persistent theme in Goethe's late novel Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre, but has received relatively little critical attention. Drawing on various aspects of the text, from the relationship between Wilhelm and his own son Felix, to the theme of migration from the ‘fatherland’, this essay contends that the relationship of the younger generation to the older traces a pattern of departure and return. The development in the son of an identity distinct and independent from that of the father is a preoccupation of the earlier chapters of the Wanderjahre in particular; but this process of individuation tends to be accompanied in the novel by continued, even increased, identification with the father, which may be conscious or unconscious. All the various stages of this fluctuating relationship are telescoped into a few rich, enigmatic images in the novel's closing scene, in which the threat of separation and the desire for proximity are held in suspension.

  15. Wilhelm Reich's self-censorship after his arrest as an enemy alien: the chilling effect of an illegal imprisonment.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Philip W

    2014-04-01

    After discussing Wilhelm Reich's place in psychoanalysis, the article explores his arrest as an 'enemy alien' in December 1941. Reich's emotional responses to his imprisonment (which was illegal and which lasted nearly a month) are explored. A number of scholars have suggested that many European radical psychoanalysts refrained from sharing their former political ideas once they emigrated to the United States. Following a brief discussion of this pattern of 'silencing,' it is argued that Reich's withholding certain documents from publication was due to a self-imposed censorship, motivated in part by the fear of further governmental interference with his life and work. This fear, however, did not extend to his discussion of his newly developed theory of orgone energy.

  16. A new technique using roentgen stereophotogrammetry to measure changes in the spatial conformation of bovine hind claws in response to external loads.

    PubMed

    Ouweltjes, W; Gussekloo, S W S; Spoor, C W; van Leeuwen, J L

    2016-02-01

    Claw and locomotion problems are widespread in ungulates. Although it is presumed that mechanical overload is an important contributor to claw tissue damage and impaired locomotion, deformation and claw injury as a result of mechanical loading has been poorly quantified and, as a result, practical solutions to reduce such lesions have been established mostly through trial and error. In this study, an experimental technique was developed that allowed the measurement under controlled loading regimes of minute deformations in the lower limbs of dissected specimens from large ungulates. Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) was applied to obtain 3D marker coordinates with an accuracy of up to 0.1 mm with optimal contrast and to determine changes in the spatial conformation. A force plate was used to record the applied forces in three dimensions. The results obtained for a test sample (cattle hind leg) under three loading conditions showed that small load-induced deformations and translations as well as small changes in centres of force application could be measured. Accuracy of the order of 0.2-0.3 mm was feasible under practical circumstances with suboptimal contrast. These quantifications of claw deformation during loading improve understanding of the spatial strain distribution as a result of external loading and the risks of tissue overload. The method promises to be useful in determining load-deformation relationships for a wide variety of specimens and circumstances.

  17. Treating Epiphora in Adults With the Wilhelm Plastic Nasolacrimal Stent: Mid-Term Results of a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ciampi, Juan J. Lanciego, Carlos; Navarro, Sofia; Cuena, Rafael; Velasco, Javier; Perea, Miguel; Garcia-Garcia, Lorenzo

    2011-02-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate, in a prospective, single-center study, the effectiveness of the Wilhelm-type stent used in interventional radiology for the management of epiphora. Patients (n = 104; mean age 64 [range 25-88]; 33 male and 71 female) with severe epiphora had the stents inserted (135 stents in 115 eyes) to treat obstruction of the nasolacrimal system. The etiology of the obstruction was idiopathic in 83 cases, chronic dacryocystitis in 31, cases and postsurgical status in 1 case. The overall technical success rate of stent placement was near 94%. Resolution of epiphora was complete in 105 cases and partial in 3 cases. During a mean 13-month follow-up (range 1 week to 28 months), the median duration of primary patency was 11 months, and the percentage of patency at 6 months was 60.8%, at 1 year was 39.6%, and at 2 years was 25%. Stents malfunctioned in 54 cases, and all were easily withdrawn except in 1 case. Of these 27 cases, patency recovered spontaneously in 9 and by way of a second stent in 18. Secondary patency was 50%. Factors presdisposing to lower primary patency are inflammatory etiology and location of the obstruction. The benefit of stent deployment is clear with respect to the resolution of epiphora in candidate patients for percutaneous treatment. Technical and/or design improvements would be welcomed.

  18. The many lives of experiments: Wilhelm Johannsen, selection, hybridization, and the complex relations of genes and characters.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In addition to his experiments on selection in pure lines, Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) performed less well-known hybridisation experiments with beans. This article describes these experiments and discusses Johannsen's motivations and interpretations, in the context of developments in early genetics. I will show that Johannsen first presented the hybridisation experiments as an additional control for his selection experiments. The latter were dedicated to investigating heredity with respect to debates concerning the significance of natural selection of continuous variation for evolution. In the course of the establishment of a Mendelian research program after 1900, the study of heredity gained increasing independence from questions of evolution, and focused more on the modes and mechanisms of heredity. Further to their role as control experiments, Johannsen also saw his hybridisation experiments as contributing to the Mendelian program, by extending the scope of the principles of Mendelian inheritance to quantitative characters. Towards the end of the first decade of genetics, Johannsen revisited his experiments to illustrate the many-many relationship between genes and characters, at a time when that relationship appeared increasingly complex, and the unit-character concept, accordingly, became inadequate. For the philosophy of science, the example shows that experiments can have multiple roles in a research programme, and can be interpreted in the light of questions other than those that motivated the experiments in the first place.

  19. A variation on forced migration: Wilhelm Peters (Prussia via Britain to Turkey) and Muzafer Sherif (Turkey to the United States).

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül

    2016-01-01

    In 1933 the Turkish Republic formally offered university positions to 30 German-speaking academics who were dismissed with the coming to power of the National Socialist Government. That initial number went up to 56 with the inclusion of the technical assistants. By 1948 the estimated total had increased to 199. Given renewable five-year contracts with salaries substantially higher than their Turkish counterparts, the foreign émigrés were to implement the westernization program of higher education. The ten year-old secular Turkish Republic's extensive social reforms had encompassed the adoption of the Latin alphabet, and equal rights for women, removing gender bias in hiring. Such a high concentration of émigré academics in one institution, "the highest anywhere in the world," provides a unique opportunity to study a subject which has been neglected. In this article two cases in psychology will be examined: Wilhelm Peters (1880-1963), who came, via Britain, to Istanbul in 1936 from the University of Jena in Germany, and Muzafer Sherif (1906-1988) who went to the United States from Ankara University in 1945. The purpose of the comparative analysis is to identify the features that are specific to the German experience, and those that are shared and underlie translocation in science within the multifaceted complexity of the process of forced migration.

  20. [Wilhelm Troll (1897-1978). The tradition of idealistic morphology in the German botanical sciences of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Meister, Kay

    2005-01-01

    During the first half of the 19th century, idealistic morphology developed into an influential research program in the German biosciences. This program was based on the concept of an ideal connection existing between various living beings. The growth of Darwinian thought and its new paradigm of historical explanation supplanted the idealistic morphology. Yet in the first half of the 20th century the principles of idealistic morphology experienced a powerful revival. Wilhelm Troll (1897-1978) was one of the most significant figures in this renaissance. Guided by the ideas of J.W. von Goethe, Troll established a research program rejecting causal, functional, and phylogenetic explanations as well as the idea of evolutionary adaptation. Instead, he attempted to create a 'pure' morphology based on the descriptions of various plant species. Governed by some explicitly metaphysical presumptions, Troll based his theory on the description of the organismal Gestalt. In consequence, his theory was actually a return to the proper idealistic morphology as it was known in the early 19th century. It lead German botanical morphology to a period of methodological and epistemological return.

  1. Retracing the footsteps of Wilhelm Wundt: explorations in the disciplinary frontiers of psychology and in Völkerpsychologie.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wan-chi

    2009-11-01

    In 1927, Wilhelm Wundt's daughter, Eleonore Wundt, compiled and published a comprehensive catalogue of her father's works and works in translation. We use this catalogue as a starting point for an examination of the breadth of Wundt's contributions, the reaction to his works from the international psychological community, and the overall trajectory of his academic career. Two areas of particular interest are Wundt's view on the nature of psychology and its relationship to other disciplines, and his discussion of the nature of Völkerpsychologie and its role in psychology. A close examination of original sources reveals that Wundt anchored psychology in the realm of mental sciences. He regarded "psychology [to be] in relation to natural sciences the supplementary, in relation to the mental sciences the fundamental, and in relation to philosophy the propaedeutic empirical science." The accomplishments and limitations of Wundtian Völkerpsychologie are viewed stereoscopically through the lenses of its explicated conceptions, goals, and methods, on one hand, and of the contemporary advancements in psychology, on the other. Current implications of Wundt's works and further developments of his ideas are related to Davidson's theory of epistemology and to present-day deliberations on the biocultural coconstruction of human development. We conclude by considering the continuing relevance of Wundt's intellectual legacy.

  2. The Wilhelm Wundt Center and the first graduate program for the history and philosophy of psychology in Brazil: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas; Caropreso, Fátima Siqueira; Simanke, Richard Theisen; Castañon, Gustavo Arja

    2013-08-01

    The expansion of Brazilian universities since 2009 has promoted a general growth and incentive of scientific activities throughout the country, not only in the so-called hard sciences, but also in the human sciences. In this brief report, we announce the creation of two new institutional spaces dedicated to the history and philosophy of psychology at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) in Brazil: the Wilhelm Wundt Center for the History and Philosophy of Psychology (NUHFIP) and the Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. [The 100th anniversary of Gustav Wilhelm Störring's "Lectures on Psychopathology". A review of his early years].

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H; Künstler, U

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this essay is to retell the life and work of philosopher and psychiatrist Gustav Wilhelm Störring (1860-1946) during his early years in Leipzig and Erdmannshain. His "Lectures on Psychopathology and its Impact on Normal Psychology", written 100 years ago, are acknowledged as his most important work. With this book Störring stands in opposition to many of his contemporaries, which is illustrated with his concept of mania. In some aspects, however, his ideas coincide with those of other well-known psychiatrists such as Emil Kraepelin. Both were inclined to the idea that psychiatry and psychology could mutually stimulate each other. Störring's work in Wundt's laboratory of experimental psychology had a major impact on his work. Wundt's ideas gave impetus to a lot of his work and also influenced papers Störring was to write later on. Störring's biography is followed until 1902 when he was appointed professor of philosophy of Zurich University, in which his friend Ernst Meumann was substantially involved. In Leipzig Störring had started his work as Flechsig's assistant at the hospital of psychiatry and neurology of Leipzig University. In 1897 he founded his own sanitarium for mentally and neurologically ill in Erdmannshain, a village near Leipzig, which he managed together with his wife Marie, née Bonacker. With the help of Wundt Störring qualifies as a university lecturer. During the years regarded here, however, he got more and more attracted to philosophical matters, thus turning away from neurosciences. In time he started to regard his work as physician as nothing more than necessary for making his living. His relationship with Wundt, who together with his laboratory of experimental psychology had previously made him wish to come to Leipzig, cooled down, at least on the part of the first. That puts an end to Störring's early years not only from the point of view of his biography but also from his work.

  4. [The history of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society during the Third Reich. Interim reports of the president's commission of the Max Planck Society].

    PubMed

    Weber, M M

    2002-11-01

    In 1997 the Max Planck Society set up a presidential commission to do research on the historical development of its precursor organization, the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG), during the Third Reich. This paper presents some of the important results given in the interim reports of this commission that are relevant to psychiatry. It focuses on brain research, anthropology, psychiatric genetics, and the role of the well-known biochemist Adolf Butenandt. In general, the interim reports reflect the numerous links between the biomedical research of the KWG and the institutions of the National Socialist (Nazi) state. However, they do not yet allow a final historical assessment as to the complex situation of this field of research during National Socialism.

  5. A review of the history of U.S. radiation protection regulations, recommendations, and standards.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cynthia G

    2005-06-01

    Shortly after the discovery of x rays by Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen in 1895, and the isolation of the element radium by Pierre and Marie Curie three years later, the fascination with and potential for an array of uses of ionizing radiation in medicine, science, and technology was born. As with any new technology, there was a need to balance both the beneficial and potential detrimental effects of uses of these new technologies for the advancement of humankind. In the early days, radiation hazards were not well understood. Over the decades increasing concerns in the scientific community and lay population demanded that standardized guidance and recommendations be developed for the use of ionizing radiation. Today, U.S. radiation protection standards and recommendations to protect the occupational worker, members of the general public, and the environment are numerous and complex. This review summarizes the history of the development and application of radiation protection standards and regulations to assure the safe use of radiation and radioactive materials. The evolution and roles of international and national scientific recommending and regulatory organizations that shape U.S. radiation protection policy are described and discussed.

  6. Konrad Adenauer’s Military Advisors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-13

    Basic and Advanced Courses; the Air Defense Officer’s Advanced Course; the Image Interpretation (Tactical Surveillance) and Electronic Warfare Staff...34swachgSt-1-um . (Dissertation, Universitdt Freiburg/ Schweiz ) Reinheim: E. Lokay, 1971. K611ner, Lutz. Militar und Finanzen: Zur Finanzsoziologie von

  7. Human genetics and politics as mutually beneficial resources: The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics during the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2006-01-01

    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do we explain why the vast majority of German human geneticists and eugenicists were willing to work for the National Socialist state and, at the very least, legitimized its exterminationist racial policy; and (2) what accounts for at least some of Germany's most renowned medically trained professionals' involvement in forms of morally compromised science that wholly transcend the bounds of normal scientific practice? Although a complete answer to this question must await an examination of other German biological research centers, the present study suggests that during the Nazi period the symbiotic relationship between human genetics and politics served to radicalize both. The dynamic between the science of human heredity and Nazi politics changed the research practice of some of the biomedical sciences housed at the KWIA. It also simultaneously made it easier for the Nazi state to carry out its barbaric racial program leading, finally, to the extermination of millions of so-called racial undesirables.

  8. ["A decision meaning a new foundation...": from the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics to the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics].

    PubMed

    Sachse, Carola

    2011-01-01

    The Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) in Berlin-Dahlem dates its establishment to 1964. Its homepage makes no mention of its predecessor institutes, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics (KWIA) and the subsequent MPI for Comparative Genetics and Hereditary Pathology (MPIVEE). This article traces the two critical phases of transition regarding the constellations of academic staff, institutional and epistemic ruptures and continuities specific to the era. Only one of the five department heads from the final war years, Hans Nachtsheim, remained a researcher within the Max Planck Society (MPG); he nevertheless continued to advocate the pre-war and wartime eugenic agenda in the life sciences and social policy. The generational change of 1959/60 became a massive struggle within the institute, in which microbial genetics (with Fritz Kaudewitz) was pitted against human genetics (with Friedrich Vogel) and managed to establish itself after a fresh change in personnel in 1964/65. For the Dahlem institute, this involved a far-reaching reorientation of its research, but for the genetically oriented life sciences in the Max Planck Society as a whole it only meant that molecular biology, which was already being pursued in the West German institutes, gained an additional facility. With this realignment of research traditions, the Society was able to draw a line under the Nazi past without having to address it head-on.

  9. The case of Heinrich Wilhelm Poll (1877-1939): a German-Jewish geneticist, eugenicist, twin researcher, and victim of the Nazis.

    PubMed

    Braund, James; Sutton, Douglas G

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a reconstruction of the life and career of Heinrich Poll as a window into developments and professional relationships in the biological sciences in Germany in the period from the beginning of the twentieth century to the Nazi seizure of power in 1933. Poll's intellectual work involved an early transition from morphometric physical anthropology to comparative evolutionary studies, and also found expression in twin research--a field in which he was an acknowledged early pioneer. His advocacy of eugenics led to participation in state-sponsored committees convened to advise on social policy, one of which debated sterilisation and made recommendations that led eventually to the establishment of the notorious Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics. However, his status as a prominent geneticist and, in particular, as a eugenicist had an ironic and ultimately tragic dimension. Heinrich Poll was of Jewish birth, and this resulted in his career being destroyed by an application of the population policies he had helped put in place.

  10. [The alphabet of nature and the alphabet of culture in the eighteenth century. botany, diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner : Botany, Diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner].

    PubMed

    Gierl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture.

  11. [The search for "od." Karl Ludwig Freiheer von Reichenbach (1788-1869) and Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer (1806-1853), two joined against Justus von Liebig].

    PubMed

    Habacher, M

    1980-05-01

    The author describes the controversy between Justus von Liebig on one side and Reichenbach and Mayrhofer on the other side. It is a controversy about problems of science and medicine which are characteristic for the late 18th and the first half of the 19th century, when Mesmerism and similar ideas of occultic and comparative phenomenona were discussed and often refused as being "not scientific". Justus von Liebig and Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach were both chemists, both interested in scientific progress and working in this field. They were friends in the years 1830 to 1848. But later on this friendship ended when Reichenbach--who in the mean time moved to Vienna--became more and more interested in phenomenons seen by sensitive persons concerning effects of light. Although Reichenbach himself was not able to recognize the phenomenons he was sure that other persons had this ability. He had the impression that there is a special force floating through the universe, and this force he called "od". Liebig, who was not able to follow this theory and rejected it has speculation, turned against Reichenbach in 1852-3. So the controversy began and their old friendship came to an end. Reichenbach's theory of the "od", characteristic for the time of the romanticism and leading back to Mesmerism was accepted and supported by the Austrian physician Dr. Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer who had aroused his interest by describing similar phenomenos some of this patients had. The letters of both men, the chemist and the doctor, which are well preserved (Technical Museum of Vienna) and discussed here, give a good impression of Reichenbach's ideas concerning his theory of the "od" and his philosophical ideas. As Reichenbach tried to find a philosophy corresponding to his theory and as he meant to have found this in the philosophy of Friedrich Eduard Beneke his remarks in those letters give a good information about Beneke's discussion of Reichenbach's theory. Mayrhofer, on the other hand

  12. Wer war Heinrich Wilhelm Dove? [Who was Heinrich Wilhelm Dove?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    Heinrich W. Dove was born in Liegnitz (Legnica) in 1803 and died in 1879 in Berlin. In the early 1820s, he studied in Breslau (Wroclaw) and Berlin. He also studied with the famous philosopher G. W. F. Hegel. In 1845, Dove became full professor of physics in Berlin. Dove was one of the founders of meteorology and weather forecast. The present article presents a summary of his life and his works.

  13. Investigation relative to the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.; Primini, Francis A.; Fabbiano, Guiseppina; Harris, Daniel E.; Jones-Foreman, Christine; Trinchieri, Ginevra; Golub, Leon; Bookbinder, Jay; Seward, Frederick D.; Zombeck, Martin V.

    1994-01-01

    Reports include: High Resolution Observations of the Central Region of M31; The X-ray Emission of Low-X-ray-Luminosity Early-Type Galaxies: Gas Versus Compact Sources; Interaction Between Cluster Gas and Radio Features of Cygnus A; Hot Gas and Dark Halos in Early-Type Galaxies; A Gravitational Lens in X-rays - 0957+461; How Massive are Early-Type Galaxies?; Three Crab-Like SNR in the Large Magellanic Cloud; and Soft X-ray Emission from Boundary Layers in Cataclysmic Variables. Papers submitted to the Astrophysical Journal are attached.

  14. Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma astrophysical mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlinsky, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.; Gilfanov, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Hasinger, G.; Predehl, P.; Mitsuda, K.; Kelley, R.; McCammon, D.; Ohashi, T.; den Herder, J. W.; Ramsey, B.; Gubarev, M.; O'Dell, S.; Fujimoto, R.

    2008-07-01

    The Spectrum-RG (SRG) mission, to be launched in 2011, will conduct the first all-sky survey in the 0.1-15 keV band via two imaging telescope systems, eROSITA and ART-XC. These will enable the detection of about 100 thousand clusters of galaxies and the mapping of the large scale structure of the Universe. They will also discover all obscured accreting Black Holes in nearby galaxies and about >=3 million new, distant AGNs. In the course of the survey mode two sky regions around the celestial polar zones will be observed with much higher sensitivity. Then, selected sources and dedicated sky regions will be observed in a pointing mode with high sensitivity in order to investigate the nature of dark matter and dark energy. An X-Ray Calorimeter, the SXC experiment, will permit observations of the brightest clusters of galaxies with record energy resolution in pointing mode and mapping of the hot intergalactic medium in the survey mode.

  15. ["... that progress in anatomy is most likely to occur when its problems include the study of growth and function, as well as of structure". about the anatomy and physiology of Ernst Heinrich Weber (794-1878 and Wilhelm His (1831-1904) his successor in the department of anatomy at the University of Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Reinhard

    2005-11-01

    The Leipzig anatomist and physiologist Ernst Heinrich Weber had introduced physiological thinking in anatomy and exact methods of mathematical physics to the study of the functioning of the body making him the founder of a physically orientated physiology. But he would not have been that excellent physiologist without being a nonetheless distinguished anatomist since he solved his physiological problems usually following function in close relation to structure. Together with his brother Wilhelm Eduard Weber (1804-1891), who later was to become a famous physicist, in their theory of waves he laid the basis for an exact analysis of the movements of fluids in elastic tubes und was the first to apply the basic laws of hydrodynamics to the circulation of the blood. In collaboration with his youngest brother Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Weber (1806-1871), who worked as a prosector at his institute and together with Wilhelm Weber had studied the mechanics of the walking apparatus, he demonstrated the inhibiting effect of the vagus nerve on the action of the heart. Ernst Heinrich Weber's approach to consider an organ as a whole not neglecting the study of its function set him apart from most of his contemporaries and has characterized the work of the Leipzig anatomists and physiologists since his time. Among those was Wilhelm His from Basle who succeeded him in the chair of anatomy in 1872. On the basis of a systematic analysis of human embryos by means of serial sections and plastic reconstruction His completely reformed the field of embryology and was the first to present a comprehensive treatise on human embryology. The making of modern human embryology was, above all, his achievement. He did not confine himself to mere description but wanted to gain deeper insight into the causal events by developmental-mechanical conceptions. With his detection of the neuroblasts and that they give rise to an axon and later to dendrites His provided the developmental foundations for the

  16. [Roentgen image presentation in the patient's room. Simple equipment for demonstration and storage of roentgen images].

    PubMed

    Prokop, A; Rehm, K E; Sagebiel, A

    1996-12-01

    Immediate presentation of the more significant X-ray pictures facilitates planning and supervision of therapy in trauma surgery and orthopedics. If a wire rope is stretched in front of the window X-ray pictures can be clipped onto it, which avoids time-consuming searches. Suspended filing boxes placed in each sickroom make appropriate storage of each patient's X-ray pictures possible. The expenditure for all this amounted to 100 DM for each two-bedded room. Wire ropes and boxes were technically easy to install with a minimum investment of time. The presentation of X-ray pictures considerably increased the patients' understanding of their illness. It was also very rare for X-ray pictures to get mixed up once this system had been instituted.

  17. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  18. Crystallography: To Infinity and Beyond…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles

    2014-01-01

    William Henry Bragg moved from Cambridge in Britain to South Australia to take up a professorship at the University of Adelaide in 1885. He brought with him a broad interest in many areas of physics, but when Wilhelm Roentgen discovered X-rays in the 1890s, Bragg's interest was stimulated. William's Australian-born son, Lawrence (WL Bragg), began…

  19. Human heredity and politics: A comparative institutional study of the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor (United States), the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity, and Eugenics (Germany), and the Maxim Gorky Medical Genetics Institute (USSR).

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark B; Allen, Garland E; Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2005-01-01

    Despite the fact that much has been written in recent years about the science of heredity under the Third Reich, there is as yet no satisfying analysis of two central questions: What, if anything, was peculiarly "Nazi" about human genetics under National Socialism? How, under whatever set of causes, did at least some of Germany's most well-known and leading biomedical practioners become engaged in entgrenzte Wissenschaft (science without moral boundaries)? This paper attempts to provide some answers to these two questions comparing three institutes that studied eugenics and human heredity in the 1920s and 1930s: the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor, New York, directed by Charles B. Davenport; the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics, in Berlin, directed by Eugen Fischer; and the Maxim Gorky Medical Genetics Institute in Moscow, directed by Solomon G. Levit. The institutes are compared on the basis of the kind and quality of their research in eugenics and medical genetics, organizational structure, leadership, patronage (private or state), and the economic-social-political context in which they functioned.

  20. The Alphabet of Nature and the Alphabet of Culture in the Eighteenth Century. Botany, Diplomatics, and Ethno-Linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture. PMID:20665241

  1. Olbers, Heinrich Wilhelm (1758-1840)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Doctor, astronomer, born in Arbergen, Germany, enthusiast for astronomy. He discovered several comets. In 1800 he joined the team of 24 `celestial police', organized by FRANZ VON ZACH, who were to patrol a share of the zodiac looking for the planet missing (according to BODE's law) between Mars and Jupiter. On New Year's Day 1801 PIAZZI discovered Ceres, and, in March 1802, Olbers discovered Pall...

  2. INTRACELLULAR GROWTH OF BACTERIOPHAGE STUDIED BY ROENTGEN IRRADIATION

    PubMed Central

    Latarjet, Raymond

    1948-01-01

    Growing Escherichia coli infected with bacteriophage T2 was x-rayed during the 21 minute latent period which elapses between infection and lysis of the cells. Survival curves of the infected bacteria were determined almost from minute to minute; they disclosed the following facts which are related to the process of phage growth: During the first 7 minutes, the infective virus particle remains in the cell unique and genetically intact. The host cell synthesizes some ultraviolet-absorbing material probably devoted to building future particles. From the 7th to 9th minute the x-ray resistance of the virus particle increases, probably because of some internal change. Then, multiplication starts and is completed at about the 13th minute, when an average of 130 virulent units is present per cell, displaying an x-ray resistance twice as high as that of the extracellular virus particle. From 13 minutes to the end, the new units progressively recover the x-ray sensitivity of the extracellular virus. Nothing can be said about either the rate of multiplication between 9 and 13 minutes, or the nature of the multiplying units, except that they are more radiation-resistant (probably smaller) than the extracellular virus. The first steps of the growth process are favored by an unknown component of the lysate, different from the active particles. Several particles can grow in the same host cell. PMID:18870871

  3. Fortieth Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: Radiation Protection and Regulatory Science.

    PubMed

    Poston, John W

    2017-02-01

    It took about 30 y after Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen's discovery of x rays and Henri Becquerel's discovery of natural radioactivity for scientists in the civilized world to formulate recommendations on exposure to ionizing radiation. We know of these efforts today because the organizations that resulted from the concerns raised in 1928 at the Second International Congress of Radiology still play a role in radiation protection. The organizations are known today as the International Commission on Radiological Protection and, in the United States, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Today, as we have many times in the past, we honor Dr. Lauriston Sale Taylor, the U.S. representative to the 1928 Congress, for his dedication and leadership in the early growth of NCRP. NCRP's mission is "to support radiation protection by providing independent scientific analysis, information, and recommendations that represent the consensus of leading scientists." The developments in science and technology, including radiation protection, are occurring so rapidly that NCRP is challenged to provide its advice and guidance at a faster pace than ever before. NCRP's role has also expanded as the Council considers newer uses and applications of ionizing radiation in research and medicine as well as the response to nuclear or radiological terrorism. In such a technical world, new areas have been established to deal with the nexus of science and regulation, especially in the United States. Lord Ernest Rutherford supposedly said, "That which is not measurable is not science. That which is not physics is stamp collecting." I wonder what he would say if he were alive today as now many embrace a new field called "regulatory science." This term was suggested by Professor Mitsuru Uchiyama in Japan in 1987 and was reviewed in literature published in English in 1996. Some have attributed a similar idea to Dr. Alvin Weinberg, for many years Director of the Oak Ridge

  4. The Evolution of Naval Warfare Technology and the Impact of Space Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    gave Marconi the background for the wireless telegraph. In 1902 and 1903 Nobel prizes were awarded to Wilhelm Roentgen and Pierre and Marie Curie for...pigeonholed in the Bureau of Construction and Repair for years, with no action taken on them. [Ref. 24: p. 405] On December 12, 1901 Guglielmo ... Marconi sat in a little room in Newfoundland and listened to three short sounds in a device with which he had been experimenting since 1894. The sound

  5. Positrons, Quantum Crystals, and Nanoparticles (Oh My!) - Quantum Mechanics in Action at the USAF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Vis, FIR, MIR, NIR spectroscopy • γ- ray spectroscopy • Positron spectroscopy • Matrix isolation spectroscopy • TOF/QMS – mass spectrometry • XRF /XRD...phosphorescent materials using photographic plates, he stumbled upon uranium. – X rays , by Wilhelm Roentgen. Interested in investigating cathodic ray tubes, he...tool for spectroscopy . • In 1957-58 they worked out the details on extending the MASER to the visible and applied for a patent. They were awarded

  6. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  7. Forensic radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the first instance of forensic radiography occurred in the 1890s when Professor AW Wright of Yale University tested Wilhelm Roentgen's newly discovered x-ray photography on a deceased rabbit. Of interest were small, round objects inside the rabbit that appeared as dark spots on the positive film. The objects were extracted and identified as bullets, thereby helping to determine the cause of the rabbit's death. In the years since Roentgen's discovery, the use of radiography and other medical imaging specialties to aid in investigating civil and criminal matters has increased as investigators realize how radiologic technology can yield information that otherwise is unavailable. Radiologic technologists can play a key role in forensic investigations.

  8. FINAL DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE IN GERMANY: PLAN APPROVAL PROCESS OF KONRAD MINE AND ACCEPTANCE REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bandt, Gabriele; Posnatzki, Britta; Beckers, Klaus-Arno

    2003-02-27

    Currently no final repository for any type of radioactive waste is operated in Germany. Preliminary Final Storage Acceptance Requirements for radioactive waste packages were published in 1995. Up to now these are the basis for treatment of radioactive waste in Germany. After licensing of the final repository these preliminary waste acceptance requirements are completed with licensing conditions. Some of these conditions affect the preliminary waste acceptance requirements, e. g. behavior of chemo-toxic substances in case of accidents in the final repository or the allowed maximum concentration of fissile material. The presented examples of radioactive waste conditioning campaigns demonstrate that no difficulties are expected in management, characterization and quality assurance of radioactive wastes due to the licensing conditions.

  9. The Hopkins rod-lens system.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2007-06-01

    Surgeons have always been ready to adapt advances in technology into their practice. The discovery by Wilhelm Roentgen of X-rays in 1885 was applied within weeks of its publication to the diagnosis of fractures and the location of foreign bodies. The development of the electric light bulb by Edison enabled Max Nitze, Professor of Urology in Berlin, to develop the electrically illuminated cystoscope, which he patented in 1877. By 1911, Hugh Young used a cystoscope with a punch device to perform transurethral prostatectomy. Rapidly other electrically lit 'scopes' were introduced--the gastroscope, bronchoscope, thoracoscope and so on. All had two problems: they were rigid instruments and lacked really brilliant illumination.

  10. SMPTE Test Pattern For Certification Of Medical Diagnostic Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisk, Kenneth G.

    1984-08-01

    Since the invention of x-rays by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, rapid advances have been made in the radiological detection of body abnormalities. This was very evident in the 1960's and 70's when the marriage of computers to radiology gave birth to a new generation of imaging modalities such as computerized tomography, ultrasound, digital radiographic imaging, nuclear medicine, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Many of these devices employ digital computer techniques for signal manipulation, and the resultant analog diagnostic images are displayed on television monitors for viewing and on imaging cathode-ray tubes for a photographic hard copy.

  11. [Periodogram analysis for signal and noise evaluation in roentgen video signals].

    PubMed

    Baehring, T; Keller, A; Raue, I

    1995-11-01

    Movements of the heart, the large vessels and the gastrointestinal tract can be evaluated for diagnostic purposes using fluoroscopic video systems. A new means of quantitatively evaluating the signal and noise components of the video signal is described. The signal and noise power components are determined from the periodogram after prior Fourier analysis. Variance is reduced by averaging and keeping the measuring conditions constant. For measurements of signal transfer properties, a radiological phantom capable of producing sinusoidal movements of the edge of the object was developed. An analysis of the performance of the theoretically derived evaluation parameters was carried out at a fluoroscopic unit under clinical conditions. Periodogram analysis makes possible objective image quality evaluation in clinical motion studies and in the technical quality assurance of fluoroscopic video systems. The use of a compact PC-based video measuring system renders application both practical and easy.

  12. [Significance of roentgen cinematography in the diagnosis of functional disorders of the pharyngo-esophageal junction].

    PubMed

    Augustiny, N; wolfensberger, M; Brühlmann, W

    1984-12-01

    Dysfunction of the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter may escape detection by clinical examination, endoscopy, and routine barium studies. Cineradiographic examination of 300 patients with unexplained dysphagia revealed 57 cases of pharyngo-oesophageal dysfunction. In 25 cases an underlying disorder could be found, and 32 cases were considered idiopathic. Radiologically 3 types of dysfunction may be distinguished, namely late opening, incomplete relaxation, and early contraction of the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter. Cineradiography was found to be an easy and reliable method of detecting pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter dysfunction.

  13. A Roentgen-anatomic study of the relationships between conduction defects and coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Veress, G; Romoda, T; Szatmáry, L; Keltai, M; Palik, I; Gábor, G

    1979-01-01

    Intraventricular conduction defects of various types were correlated to the extent of coronary disease and to the parameters reflecting the function of the left ventricle in 125 patients who had been subjected to coronary arteriography. In the patients with conduction disturbances, coronary disease was found to be more extensive and the proportion of abnormal parameters of left ventricular function higher than in those with normal conduction. The relationship of the various conduction defects with the lesions of the individual coronary branches and with the parameters of left ventricular function are discussed in detail.

  14. [Conventional roentgen diagnosis and computed tomography of the temperomandibular joint in myoarthropathy].

    PubMed

    Hüls, A; Walter, E; Schulte, W

    1984-08-01

    Clinical utilization of the high resolution, thin-slice CT (slice thickness: 1 mm) makes it possible to systemize the bony structure changes of the joint correlated with disfunctions. Using this technique total evaluations of this complex can be made. In patients suffering from myoarthropathy, the partially typical changes in both the functional anatomy, as well as in form, structure and topography of specific regions of the joint can be viewed objectively. The alteration process of the temporomandibular joint is considered causal in connection with muscular disfunctions, which often lay the foundation for chronic pain conditions in the regions of the face and head. The broad spectrum of conventional radiographic techniques documents, on one hand, the extremely unfavorable anatomy of the temporomandibular joint with regard to radiography. On the other hand, it also implies a certain amount of diagnostic uncertainty in this region. Comment is made concerning the informational value as well as the limits of the most important radiologic techniques. It is of utmost importance to evaluate the radiographic findings of the temporomandibular joint in myoarthropathies with a clinical functional analysis, which is easy to carry out.

  15. [1896: How nascent radiotherapy gathered Roentgen, Pasteur and the Lumière brothers].

    PubMed

    Foray, N

    2016-12-01

    On the 4th July, 1896, in his medical office of Les Échelles (Savoie, France), Victor Despeignes performed the very first radiotherapy against cancer, documented by indisputable proofs. However, the intellectual and practical approach that leads to this first radiotherapy may appear unexpected to date. Indeed, it is likely that the treatment that Despeignes applied to his neighbour, who did not suffer from stomach cancer, was born with the indirect support of the Lumière brothers, on the basis of a biological theory (the parasitory theory of cancer) that is irrelevant today, with an experimental protocol based on experiments performed on tuberculosis et in a bifractionated model linked by the constraints of a district medical doctor.

  16. The Teaching of Roentgen Anatomy to Medical Students: A Self-Instructional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegtmeyer, Charles J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This multidisciplinary approach necessitates the involvement of radiology that is suited for inclusion in an anatomy course since it is an ideal instrument for teaching anatomic principles. (Author/PG)

  17. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  18. The Progress of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Arthur

    2015-10-01

    Introduction; 1. Scope of lectures. State of physics in 1875. Science of energy. Theory of gases. Elastic solid theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electricity. Training of students. Maxwell's view. Accurate measurement and discovery of Argon. German methods. Kirchhoff's laboratory. Wilhelm Weber's laboratory. The two laboratories of Berlin. Laboratory instruction at Manchester. Position of physics in mathematical tripos at Cambridge. Todhunter's views. The Cavendish laboratory. Spectrum analysis. The radiometer. Theory of vortex atom; 2. Action at a distance. Elastic solid of theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electrical action. Electro-magnetic theory. Verification of electromagnetic theory by Hertz. Electro-magnetic waves. Wireless telegraphy. First suggestion of molecular structure of electricity. Early experiments in the electric discharge through gases. Kathode rays. Works of Goldstein and Crookes. Hittorf's investigations. Own work on the discharge through gases. Ionization of gases. Magnetic deflexion of kathode rays. J. J. Thomson's experiments. Measurement of atomic charge; 3. Roentgen's discovery. Theories of Roentgen rays. Ionizing power of Roentgen rays. Conduction of electricity through ionized gases. Discovery of radio-activity. Discovery of radium. Magnetic deflexion of rays emitted by radio-active bodies. Discovery of emanations. Theory of radio-active change. Decay of the atom. Connexion between helium and the a ray. Helium produced by radium. Strutt's researches on helium accumulated in rocks. Electric inertia. Constitution of atom. J. J. Thomson's theory of Roentgen radiation. The Michelson-Morley experiment. Principle of relativity. The Zeeman effect. Other consequences of electron theory. Contrast between old and modern school of physics; 4. Observational sciences. Judgment affected by scale. Terrestrial magnetism. Existence of potential. Separation of internal and external causes. Diurnal variation. Magnetic storms. Their causes. Solar

  19. Identification of Lacrymaria velutina (Pers. Ex Fr.) Konrad & Maubl. from Micheon-myeon, Jinju-city, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ki Soo; Volk, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    We identified Lacrymaria velutina of the Coprinaceae in Korea. The unusually large and sturdy fruiting body, fibrillose to fibrillose-scaly cap and stalk without a volva with an obscure superior hairy ring zone or hairy annulus, and blackish brown, warted spores distinguished this species from closely related Psathyrella species. An illustrated account of the microscopic traits is presented. Fruiting bodies with obtusely hemispherical caps, 2.5~6 cm, becoming convex with age; surface dry, densely fibrillose-scaly with split margin; stipe, 4.5~6 cm, equal, hollow, fibrillose, dry, whitish above the superior ring zone, light brown below; crowded gills, adnexed, dark black at maturity. Pileipellis typically cellular with the gill edge appearing white and beaded. Blackish brown basidiospores that discolor in concentrated sulfuric acid. Spores elliptical, warted, 9~11 × 6~8 µm, with prominent snout-like germpores. Cheilocystidia abundant, 57~68 × 19~25 µm, and narrowly elongated clavate, often clustered in threes or fours. Pleurocystidia rarely present, 45~47.5 × 12~13 µm, and clavate to utriform. This trait distinguishes our sample as L. velutina from other Psathyrella spp. of the Coprinaceae, which have smooth spores. This taxon was clarified by the observation that Psathyrella spores fade in concentrated sulfuric acid. A molecular phylogenetic study revealed that our specimen was Lacrymria velutipes, which is closely related to Lacrymaria lacrymabunda. Moreover, those two species are clearly distinguishable from other Psathyrella species, which agreed with the morphologically distinctive traits described above. We believe that this is the first report of this taxon, which has not been described in Korea. PMID:23956664

  20. Travelogue of Konrad Keilhack (1858-1944), Geologist from Berlin, attending the International Geological Congress 1897 in St. Petersburg (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2015-09-01

    Keilhack reported his impressions from his participation at the International Geological Congress in Russia in 1897 in several consecutive articles. In the more than 100 years since that time, a lot has changed. Apart from the totally different style of scientific presentations, with almost no illustrations, except maps, being shown during a talk, field trips were also a very special event, involving huge amounts of logistics. More than 200 people were transported to very remote areas of the European part of Russia. As well as organizing transportation by coaches and horses, places to stay overnight had to be found in large numbers and special regulations had to be issued by the government to allow access to various outcrops. Keilhacks visit of the oil-producing sites around Baku are of special interest, since they belonged obviously to the most productive ones on the globe at that time.

  1. Radiation and health*

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, B.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation has been a source of fascination and concern ever since Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen discovered X-rays on 8 November 1895. Over the years, health workers as well as the public have been concerned about medical uses of X-rays, the presence of radon in buildings, radioactive waste from nuclear power stations, fallout from nuclear test explosions, radioactive consumer products, microwave ovens, and many other sources of radiation. Most recently, the tragic accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the USSR, and the subsequent contamination over most of Europe, has again wakened interest and concern and also reminded us about a number of misconceptions about radiation. This article describes the essentials about radiation (especially ionizing radiation) and its health effects. PMID:3496982

  2. A triboelectric closed loop band system for the generation of x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Lucas, B.; Ganlieli, Z.; Wong, E. W.; Cortes, P.; Mehta, N.; Cuadra, D.; Fong, J.; Hansen, S.; Kotowski, A.; Camara, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    X-ray have been commercially produced using the same basic design since their discovery by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, for which he was awarded the first Nobel prize in physics. This technology requires high voltage elements, ultra high vacuum tubes, and high voltage electronics. The vacuum and high voltage drive up the price of x-ray technology and in order to bring down the cost, a brand new way to produce x-rays is needed. In 2008 Carlos Camara, Juan Escobar, Jonathan R. Hird, and Seth Putterman1 discovered that by pealing scotch tape in a vacuum you could create enough x-rays to take an x-ray radiograph of a finger. This lead to the formation of Tribogenics and the development of the rod and band x-ray architecture.

  3. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2013-01-01

    MSFC is developing eight x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the SRG Mission. The Engineering Unit tests are successful. MSFC is on schedule to deliver flight units in the November of 2013 and January 2014.

  4. Late Effects of Total-Body Roentgen Irradiation. Longevity and Incidence of Nephrosclerosis as Influenced by Partial-Body Shielding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-05-01

    Dowdy, A. H ., L. R. Bennett, and S. M. Chastain. 4. Maisin , J ., P. Maldaque, A. Dunjie, and H . Maisin . Protective action of anoxic anoxia against...1950). J . belge de radiol. 3:346 (1957). 2. Lamson, B. G., M. S. Billings, R. A. Meek, and 5. Lamson, B. G., M. S. Billings, L. H . Ewell, and L. R...enwih f10gm. and, dine oslyan h te vnrly ased pnti egt nestimated age of Radiation was delivered to either the whole 102 days. The other three groups of

  5. Food intake and growth of burro foals after 250 roentgens of cobalt-60 whole-body gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Knapka, J J; Brown, D G; Barth, K M

    1968-10-01

    Possible late effects of sublethal levels of whole-body gamma irradiation on growth of burro foals were studied. Two trials included 31 nonirradiated foals and 32 foals that were exposed to 250 R of 60Co gamma radiation during their fourth month of life. The foals were weaned 90 days postirradiation and allotted into treatment groups based on radiation treatment, weight, sex, and size. Each group was then randomly selected to be fed a ration containing either 9 %, 14 %, or 18 % crude protein in the first trial and either 9 % or 18 % in the second trial. The length of these trials was 364 days. Criteria used to evaluate the treatments included feed consumption, body weight gains, feed efficiency, increase in height, and increase in heart girth. Least-squares analysis of these data indicated that radiation had no significant effect on any of the traits tested. There was a consistent though nonsignificant trend for irradiated foals to be less efficient in feed utilization than their nonirradiated counterparts.

  6. The thermal control system of the x-ray telescope eROSITA on Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürmetz, Maria; Eder, Josef; Pfeffermann, Elmar; Predehl, Peter; Tiedemann, Lars

    2012-09-01

    The X-ray telescope eROSITA is the main instrument besides the Russian ART-XC on the Spektrum-Rontgen-Gamma mission. Starting from 2014, an all-sky survey will be performed in the range between 0.3-10keV, followed by pointed observations. The main objective of thismission is the detection of 100 0000 galaxy clusters in order to constrain cosmological parameters, amongst others the density distribution and evolution of dark energy. Due to the minimum lifetime of seven years the thermal control system has to be completely passive without any consumables. With the ideal operational temperature of the CCD cameras being between 173K and 183K, this requires a very effective heat rejection system, consisting of a complex heat pipe system and a good thermal insulation. Simultaneously, a very sensitive temperature control via variable conductance heat pipes is implemented. For special outgassing requirements at the betinning of the mission these heat pipes are not working after launch but can be switched on any time. On the other hand the mirror moduules have to be tempered at room temperature and more than 200W of the electronics have to be dissipated without affecting the surrounding components or the satellite structure. The thermal control system has to be able to keep up the required temperature range and has to guarantee the optimum working conditions for all parts of the instrument. Calculations and verification tests validated the thermal concept.

  7. Philosophical Anthropology and Educational Change: Wilhelm Von Humbolt and the Prussian Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carla R.

    1973-01-01

    After the defeat by Napoleon, Prussia endeavored to rebuild its war torn country by instituting sweeping social and educational reforms. This effort marked one of the few instances in which philosophical anthropology formed the explicit basis of a successful program of social change. (Author/KM)

  8. [Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen and the discovery of X-rays].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M

    1996-01-01

    W.C. Röntgen reported the discovery of X-rays in December 1895 after seven weeks of assiduous work during which he had studied the properties of this new type of radiation able to go through screens of notable thickness. He named them X-rays to underline the fact that their nature was unknown. The news of this discovery immediately aroused an immense interest in the public and also initiated intense research in several directions. Physicians and physicists began as early as January 1896 to use X-rays on patients to investigate the skeleton and subsequently the lung and other organs. This was the birth or radiology. Rapidly they observed skin erythema, which led to the idea of using X-rays against a variety of lesions. In June 1896 the first patient was treated by radiotherapy. J.J. Thomson (Cambridge, U.K.) showed that X-rays were able to ionize gaz and the study of this phenomenon led to the discovery of electrons in 1897. In order to understand the emission of X-rays, H. Becquerel (Paris) investigated the role of the phosphorescence of the glass of the tube and while doing so discovered radioactivity in March 1896. X-rays and radioactivity were at the origin of the scientific revolution at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Research on radioactive materials demonstrated the existence of atoms which had been till then only a convenient hypothesis for explaining chemical reactions, but whose reality was considered as dubious by most physicists. Moreover, interaction of particles emitted by radionuclides and atoms enabled first the study of the structure of the atom and subsequently its nucleus. Matter, elements which were thought to be immutable were found to be transmutable, and eventually to disintegrate. The origin of the energy transferred to the radiation which was emitted appeared as a mystery and in order to explain it the physicist had to accept that matter could convert energy. In 1903 Einstein established the equivalence between matter and energy. Matter, energy, electricity, light which were formerly considered as continuous quantities were found to be discrete: there are particles of matter (elementary particles), energy (quanta, Planck 1905), electricity (electron), light (photons). Radioactive decay, particle interactions imposed a probabilistic physics which progressively replaced classic deterministic physics. Radioactivity can be used as a clock to measure time in the universe. Datations were made for fossils, art masterpieces and also for the earth, the solar system and universe. X-rays diffraction proved to be a powerful tool for studying crystals and molecules, in particular protein, and in 1953 enabled to demonstrate the DNA double helix. Hence X-rays and radioactivity originated a revolution in physics and science and in the vision of nature. The imperceptible and yet so powerful rays demonstrated the deficiencies of our senses. Mathematical entities and instrumentation must complement our sensations. The huge increment in our knowledge is accompanied by a divorce between the scientist and the layman who now often has great difficulties understanding new concepts not only in physics but also in biology.

  9. Geoneutrinos and heat production in the Earth: constraints and implications (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, W.

    2012-04-01

    The KamLAND and Borexino electron antineutrino (geoneutrino) counting experiments demonstrate that heat derived from the decay of Th and U contributes only about 40% (20±9 TW) of the Earth's total present-day power (46±3 TW) [we consider here only Th and U, since they produce the only detectable geoneutrinos]. Compositional models of the Earth based on geochemical and cosmochemical observations predict that the bulk silicate Earth has 8.2 x 1016 kg of U, Th/U of 3.9 and K/U of 1.4 x 104, with none of these heat producing elements in the metallic core, due to their pronounced chemical affinities for silicates and oxides. Consequently, these particle physics experiments are now establishing limits on acceptable compositional models for the Earth. Soon we will be able to distinguish between different models of the amount of planetary nuclear power inside the Earth, the power driving plate tectonics, the geodynamo and compositional models for the Earth's accretion.

  10. Thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibria in magmatic systems: Progress and future directions (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.

    2010-05-01

    Research over the past thirty years has established that thermodynamic modeling is extremely useful for illuminating the production, transport, chemical differentiation, and eruptive potential of magmas. The key to successful modeling of this kind is the formulation of an internally consistent thermodynamic database that includes properties of liquid and solid endmember components, and - most importantly - a cohesive set of models that describe the thermodynamics of mixing of both liquid (± fluid) and mineral solid solutions. Despite numerous successes in the application of thermodynamic modeling to liquid-solid phase equilibria under crustal and upper mantle pressure-temperature conditions, there are critical and relevant areas of application where the models fail to generate useful results. Importantly, these applications include phase equilibria in hornblende- and biotite-bearing magmas and the melting relations of silicate mantle-like bulk compositions at pressures above 3 GPa. Research is underway to address many of these modeling deficiencies. Approaches include (1) the development of new solution models for igneous pyroxenes and garnets, including majoritic garnet components, (2) the reformulation of thermodynamic models for liquid solution properties in order to implement non-deal associative solutions and a more robust equation of state that allows extrapolation of liquid density and free energy to high-pressures, (3) the creation of an experimental program to generate data necessary for the calibration of solution theory for igneous hornblendes and mica, and (4) the use of molecular dynamics simulations to facilitate the creation of a data base of liquid thermochemical properties at high-pressures that will serve as a basis for the calibration of phase equilibria models under Earth-like lower mantle conditions. All of these approaches give hope that in the future it will be possible to compute melting and melt-rock reaction over a much broader range of pressures, temperatures and bulk compositions than is currently possible, and that consequently a more extensive series of petrologic and geochemical questions will be addressable via the application of thermodynamic modeling of magmatic phase equilibria.

  11. Deep mantle mineralogy and novel materials synthesis using multianvil high-pressure technology (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetsuo, Irifune

    2016-04-01

    Phase relations in mantle and slab materials have been studied using Kawai-type multianvil apparatus (KMA) under pressure and temperature conditions of the mantle transition region and the uppermost lower mantle of the Earth. The associated density and sound velocity changes of these materials have also been determined using the KMA technology combined with synchrotron in situ X-ray and ultrasonic interferometry measurements. The results show that the mantle transition region is made of a pyrolitic composition, while the presence of a harzburgite-rich layer is suggested in the lower parts of this region. Use of sintered diamond anvils for KMA has allowed expansion of these measurements toward deeper region of the lower mantle. Our preliminary results of such measurements indicate that at least upper part of the lower mantle is made of the pyrolitic composition contrary to a recent study based on Brillouin scattering measurements in diamond anvil cell, which concluded a more Si-rich lower mantle. On the other hand, we have been applying KMA technology to synthesis of novel functional materials utilizing its capability of producing very high static pressures and homogeneous temperatures in relatively large sample volumes. These include ultrahard nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) directly converted from graphite, which is now being used for applications to abrasive and cutting tools as well as for some scientific applications such as anvils for some high-pressure devices. Another example of such a novel material is hard and tough nano-polycrystalline stishovite (NPS), which is also potentially important for some industrial applications. Moreover, we recently succeeded in making highly transparent nano-polycrystalline garnet (NPG), which is ideal for the measurements of sound velocities by various methods, such as Brillouin scattering and GHz ultrasonic interferometry. Thus, the KMA technology opens the door to the synthesis of transparent nano-polycrystalline ceramics, in addition to its use for the studies in deep Earth mineralogy.

  12. Geological cycles and a two-stage history of the Continental Crust (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Cawood, Peter A.; Dhuime, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The continental crust is the archive of Earth history, and the apparently cyclical nature of geological evolution is a feature of the geological record. The advent of radiometric ages has highlighted that the spatial and temporal distribution of the Earth's record of rock units and events is heterogeneous with distinctive peaks and troughs in the distribution of ages of igneous crystallization, metamorphism, continental margins and mineralization. It is argued that the temporal distribution largely reflects the different preservation potential of rocks generated in different tectonic settings, rather than fundamental pulses of activity, and the peaks of ages are linked to the timing of supercontinent assembly. In contrast there are other signals, such as the Sr isotope ratios of seawater, mantle temperatures, and redox conditions on the Earth, where the records are regarded as primary because they are not sensitive to the numbers of samples of different ages that have been analysed. Models based on the U-Pb, Hf and O isotope ratios of detrital zircons suggest that at least ~60-70% of the present volume of the continental crust had been generated by 3 Ga. The sedimentary record is biased by preferential sampling of relatively young material in their source terrains. The implication is that there were greater volumes of continental crust in the Archaean than might be inferred from the compositions of detrital zircons and sediments. The growth of continental crust was a continuous rather than an episodic process, but the rates of continental growth were significantly higher before 3 Ga than subsequently. The time-integrated Rb/Sr ratios, and the average SiO2 contents, indicate that new continental crust was largely mafic over the first 1.5 Ga of Earth's evolution, and that significant volumes of pre-3 Ga crust may have been associated with intraplate magmatism. Since ~3 Ga there has been an increase in Rb/Sr, SiO2, and the inferred thickness of new crust, consistent with an increase of continental input into the oceans and the onset of plate tectonics. The 60-70% of the present volume of the continental crust estimated to have been present at 3 Ga, contrasts markedly with the <10% of crust of that age apparently still preserved and it requires ongoing destruction (recycling) of early formed crust and subcontinental mantle lithosphere back into the mantle through processes such as subduction and delamination.

  13. Iron matters: Its influence on what we think we know about the deep Earth's interior (Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    Iron is not only the most abundant element in the Earth, but it is also the only major element with multiple electronic configurations (oxidation and spin state). The loss of a single electron or a change in the distribution of electrons between orbital states may appear minor at the atomic scale, but at the macroscopic level the effects can be profound. The oxidation state of iron varies through the mantle, from predominantly Fe2+ in the upper mantle and transition zone to roughly 50% Fe3+ in the lower mantle due to the strong affinity of (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O3 perovskite for Fe3+, and spin crossover transitions have been discovered to occur in both of the dominant lower mantle phases. This presentation will examine the effect of both oxidation state and spin state of iron on the physical and chemical properties of the mantle, as well as on dynamic processes that occur within our planet.

  14. [Analysis of migration of screwed acetabular components following revision arthroplasty of the hip joint. Results of single-image roentgen analysis].

    PubMed

    Dihlmann, S W; Ochsner, P E; Pfister, A; Mayrhofer, P

    1994-01-01

    Out of 57 revised acetabular components, which were regularly checked, 47 had been replaced by a cemented Müller's acetabular reinforcement ring resp. a cementless Müller's Sl-shell with flange. Both types of cups are anchored in the acetabular roof with cancellous bone screws (tab. 1). 42 cases with radiograph series permitted a detailed analysis with the EBRA-method, a computer aided method for the evaluation of acetabular spatial migration based on standard radiographs of the pelvis. The clinical results were very satisfying (tab. 6). The screwed acetabular components migrated little, although, some essential displacements of the center of rotation (in relation to the anatomical position) had to be accepted. As was recognizable with today's inaccurate methods of measuring the center of the head, the displacement too far towards cranial influenced the migration tendency less than an excessive lateralisation. Especially satisfying is the fact, that no increased migration was observed after reconstruction bone grafting of severe acetabular defects, provided that at least a partly direct contact between the acetabular component and the original bone stock was obtained. For the first time EBRA shall be introduced here as a method which shows the migration and the spatial inclination of the acetabular cup in a vector chart.

  15. The Use of the Roentgen Ray by the Medical Department of the United States Army in the War with Spain (1898)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1900-01-01

    the sacro -lumbar articulation. Complete paralysis of the lower extremities and loss of sensation followed the receipt of the injury. Patient was...keep Il’tter wien’l Ic.kel together in light-tight pastelurml Ioxes,;is they art 4 rliarivly picked, t;,r 4cmimer- cial use. For these reasons, plates...such ls thle E’astmanll .nleralnile lth rellilde. These pIaleHrs art , Ilhowever, ntucl silower than plate, aIldl 1( Io(,t give asw clrar antl well- (l

  16. [Significance of a nonionic renographic contrast medium (Iopamidol 300) in the roentgen diagnosis of the kidneys and urinary tract in children].

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Fendel, H

    1984-10-01

    The ionic contrast media used so far have been associated with considerable risks in infants and children. The high osmolality of these media did not always permit a dosage sufficient for kidney imaging in the nephrographic and in the pyelographic phase. The new non-ionic contrast media have largely reduced these risks so that their general application in infants and young children should be recommended. Intravenous urographies using the non-ionic contrast medium Iopamidol 300 (Solutrast 300) were performed in 195 children aged one day to 12 years. Good to superior urograms were obtained in 85% of the investigations. No adverse reactions caused by the osmolality of the contrast media had been observed in spite of the relative high dosage. As a result of their low osmolality and non-ionic property a safe application of high doses was possible.

  17. Struve family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Struve, Friedrich Georg Wilhelm (1793-1864); Struve, Otto Wilhelm (1819-1905), son of Friedrich; Struve, Karl Hermann (1854-1920), elder son of Otto Wilhelm, brother of Gustav; Struve, Gustav Wilhelm Ludwig (1858-1920), younger son of Otto Wilhelm, brother of Karl; Struve, Otto (1897-1963) [Otto Struve II], son of Gustav....

  18. Anniversary paper: image processing and manipulation through the pages of Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Armato, Samuel G; van Ginneken, Bram

    2008-10-01

    The language of radiology has gradually evolved from "the film" (the foundation of radiology since Wilhelm Roentgen's 1895 discovery of x-rays) to "the image," an electronic manifestation of a radiologic examination that exists within the bits and bytes of a computer. Rather than simply storing and displaying radiologic images in a static manner, the computational power of the computer may be used to enhance a radiologist's ability to visually extract information from the image through image processing and image manipulation algorithms. Image processing tools provide a broad spectrum of opportunities for image enhancement. Gray-level manipulations such as histogram equalization, spatial alterations such as geometric distortion correction, preprocessing operations such as edge enhancement, and enhanced radiography techniques such as temporal subtraction provide powerful methods to improve the diagnostic quality of an image or to enhance structures of interest within an image. Furthermore, these image processing algorithms provide the building blocks of more advanced computer vision methods. The prominent role of medical physicists and the AAPM in the advancement of medical image processing methods, and in the establishment of the "image" as the fundamental entity in radiology and radiation oncology, has been captured in 35 volumes of Medical Physics.

  19. Fritz Reiche and German Refugee Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Fritz Reiche (1883-1969) was a distinguished theoretical physicist, a student and colleague of Wilhelm Roentgen, Max Planck, Fritz Haber, Rudolf Ladenburg, James Franck, Max Born, Max von Laue and other early luminaries. He was coauthor of the famous Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, and author of the seminal book The Quantum Theory, first published in 1920. He was one of the last Jewish physicists to leave Germany during the Nazi period, in 1941. In his book "Heisenberg's War" Thomas Powers relates that Reiche bore news of German work on nuclear fission, in a message from Friedrich Houtermans to Wigner and others in Princeton, where Reiche lived in Einstein's home during the summer of 1941. Reiche's son Hans later claimed that this incident played a significant role in convincing Einstein to write that letter to President Roosevelt. In this talk I will relate the difficulties Reiche experienced, first in leaving Germany and then in reestablishing his physics career in the US. He finally obtained an adjunct position at NYU where he served until his retirement. The role played by the renowned Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced Foreign Scholars will be discussed. The particular role played by Ladenburg, who was instrumental in obtaining a small grant for Reiche permitting him to obtain a US visa, in helping many physicists leave Nazi Germany and occupied countries, will also be described.

  20. [Pioneers of invasive cardiovascular medicine--Charles Theodore Dotter and colleagues: short historical review].

    PubMed

    Kostić, Jelena; Beleslin, Branko; Nedeljković, Milan; Ostojić, Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Within modern medicine at the beginning of 21st century, we are witnessing a revolutionary development of the invasive diagnostics and therapy of cardiovascular system diseases. With the discovery of X-rays at the end of 19th century by Wilhelm Roentgen, it is appropriate to reflect on the gifted individuals whose efforts drastically altered radiology and cardiology. The early techniques used in peripheral percutaneous transluminal angioplasty form the basis for subsequent percutaneous intervention both in the peripheral and coronary arteries and are largely the contribution of Charles Dotter. The main goal of his work was the use of catheters for diagnosis and treatment in an attempt to replace the scalpel. He was 20 years ahead of his time, especially with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. The first percutaneous transluminal angioplasty marked a new era in the treatment of peripheral atherosclerotic lesions. This practical genius dedicated his considerable energy to the belief that there is always a better way to treat disease. His personal contributions to clinical medicine, research, and teaching have saved millions of limbs and lives all over the world. European physicians, who were more open to unproven techniques, almost immediately embraced percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Without the contribution and help of his colleagues, Forssmann, Sones and Gruntzig, all of them pioneers, nothing would be done.They were all ahead of there time and opened completely new chapter in medicine.

  1. The State of the Art of Medical Imaging Technology: from Creation to Archive and Back

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations. PMID:21915232

  2. German-American Cultural Interaction in the Jacksonian Era: Six Unpublished Letters by Francis Lieber and John Pickering to Wilhelm von Humboldt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller-Vollmer, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    Letters by German-American writer and political scientist Francis Lieber and American lawyer and linguist John Pickering to Wilhem von Humboldt in Berlin, published here for the first time, give insight into the cultural interaction between Germany and the United States during the Jacksonian era, and may open new perspectives for German-American…

  3. Comment on 'Observations of Low-Latitude Electron Precipitation' by R. Lieu, J. Watermann, K. Wilhelm, J. J. Quenby, and W. I. Axford

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rassoul, H. K.; Hanson, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Observations made by an electron spectrometer aboard Spacelab 1 and presented by Lieu et al. (1988) are examined critically. The precipitation of electrons in the energy range of 0.1-12.5 keV was measured on December 6 and 7, 1983. Data for 16 passes near 240 km altitude, between + and - 30 deg geographic latitude, outside the South Atlantic Anomaly were included. It is argued that there is no geophysical confirmation of the large electron fluxes reported by Lieu et al. In their response, Lieu et al. discuss the sampling bias in the Spacelab 1 data and the magnetic shielding deficiencies of the calibration facility below about 500 eV.

  4. [From anamnesis to the art of interpretation, or: What is a "genuine" psychoanalyst? Wolfgang Warda, Ludwig Binswanger, Wilhelm Strohmayer and the origins of psychoanalysis in Thuringia].

    PubMed

    May, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Warda and Strohmayer from Thuringia were among the first German physicians who developed an interest in Freuds theory and therapeutic method around 1900. Their contributions reflect the influence of Otto Binswanger, professor of psychiatry in Jena, a representative of the "psychological direction" in psychiatry which in the beginning was relatively receptive to Freud. The paper discusses their rapprochement to, and detachment from, the Freudian school, including also the work of a third young physician: Ludwig Binswanger, Otto's nephew, who was active in Jena at the same time. It points to certain factors contributing to the increasing rejection Freud met in academic circles which have been underrated to date: (1) the transformation of psychoanalysis into an art of interpretation; (2) the introduction of transference. Both factors which were elaborated by Freud as essentials of his theoretical and practical approach around 1900 and published in 1904/05, undermined the claim of academic medicine to objectivity. The paper describes how psychoanalysis officially abandoned the scientific standards of contemporary medicine at the Weimar congress in 1911, at the same time as Warda and Strohmayer left the Freudian group.

  5. A Festschrift of Technical Papers Presented to Wilhelm S. Ericksen on the Occasion of his Joining the Emeritus Faculty of the Air Force Institute of Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    injection region. Copper electrodes, 0.32 cm in dia- meter, were inserted in the cross arms through 1.3 cm thich plexi - glass plates. The electrodes were...result of a number of factors . Plug flow calculations do not take into account frictional effects, since this calculation is based on an ideal flow. In...the continuous-time system. Note that in obtaining PCT systems for the sampled-data systems of Fig. 4, the factor I/T replaces only the sampler that

  6. Institute of Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Research of the Rhineland Friedrich-Wilhelm Bonn University (Germany, F.R.): Research field of interplanetary space and solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    In the field of astrophysics, subjects concerning galactic winds, cosmology, double star wind, and general relativity theory are studied. Contributions to the study of the upper atmosphere are made. Theoretical studies of the solar wind, and of the distribution of interstellar neutral gases on the heliosphere are performed.

  7. 77 FR 51606 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Extravagant Inventions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Furniture of the Roentgens,'' Formerly Titled ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation: The Furniture of Abraham... State pertaining to the exhibition ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation: The Furniture of Abraham and...

  8. Fall 2014 SEI Research Review Eliciting Unstated Requirements at Scale (EURS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    introducing ideation • Affinitize visually as well as virtually • Automate identification of relevant ideas to keep others informed of what might...Review Konrad Stoddard Oct. 28, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Contact Information Presenter / Point of Contact Mike Konrad Software

  9. The Role of Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN) in Hormone Signaling Transduction and Prostate Tumorigenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACTS, AND PRESENTATIONS Peer-Reviewed Scientific Journals • Schild R, Knuppel T, Konrad M, Bergmann C, Trautmann A, Kemper M, Wu K, Yaklichkin S...Schild R, Knuppel T, Konrad M, Bergmann C, Trautmann A, Kemper M, Wu K, Yaklichkin S, Wang J, Pestell RG, Muller-Wiefel DE, Schaefer F, Weber S

  10. WE-G-213-02: The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, L.

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  11. Overview of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (originally called the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - AXAF) is the X-Ray component of NASA's "Great Observatory" Program. Chandra is a NASA facility that provides scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to scientific proposals for its use. The Observatory is the product of the efforts of many organizations in the United States and Europe. The Great Observatories also include the Hubble Space Telescope for space-based observations of astronomical objects primarily in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the now defunct Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory that was designed to observe gamma-ray emission from astronomical objects, and the soon-to-be-launched Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (hereafter CXO) is sensitive to X-rays in the energy range from below 0.1 to above 10.0 keV corresponding to wavelengths from 12 to 0.12 nanometers. The relationship among the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, sorted by characteristic temperature and the corresponding wavelength, is illustrated. The German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered what he thought was a new form of radiation in 1895. He called it X-radiation to summarize its properties. The radiation had the ability to pass through many materials that easily absorb visible light and to free electrons from atoms. We now know that X-rays are nothing more than light (electromagnetic radiation) but at high energies. Light has been given many names: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray and gamma radiation are all different forms. Radio waves are composed of low energy particles of light (photons). Optical photons - the only photons perceived by the human eye - are a million times more energetic than the typical radio photon, whereas the energies of X-ray photons range from hundreds to thousands of times higher than that of optical photons. Very low temperature systems

  12. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  13. Radiation Exposure in X-Ray and CT Examinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... page Measuring radiation dosage The scientific unit of measurement for radiation dose, commonly referred to as effective dose, is the millisievert (mSv) . Other radiation dose measurement units include rad, rem, roentgen, sievert, and gray. ...

  14. 76 FR 53705 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: “Seductive Luxury and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation... ``Seductive Luxury and Innovation: The Furniture of Abraham and David Roentgen,'' imported from abroad...

  15. A User’s Guide to the Coastal Engineering Research Center’s (CERC’S) Field Research Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER’S C(CERC’S) FIELD RESEARCH FACILITY(a 0by 5 William A. Birkemeier, H. Carl Miller, Stanton D. Wilhelm , I,) Allen E. DeWall, and...AUTHOR(.) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(*.) William A. Birkemeier, H. Carl Miller, Stanton D. Wilhelm , Allen E. DeWall, and Carol S. Gorbics 9...Stanton D. Wilhelm , William A. Birkemeier, and H. Carl Miller, under the supervision of Curtis Mason, FRF Group, Research Division, prepared this report

  16. Calibration of the ART-XC/SRG X-ray Mirror Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Elsner, R.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    Seven x-ray mirror modules are being fabricated at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument to be launched on board of the Spektrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. As they are completed, the modules are tested and calibrated at the MSFC's 104-m Stray Flight Facility. The results of these calibration measurements and comparisons with theoretical models will be presented.

  17. Teaching Literacy for Love and Wisdom: Being the Book and Being the Change. Language and Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.; Novak, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This powerful book lays out an inspiring new vision for the teaching of English, building on themes central to Wilhelm's influential "You Gotta BE The Book." With this new work, Wilhelm and Novak challenge business as usual in the language arts. They call for nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the aims and methods of the English…

  18. The Question of Teaching Vocabulary: Which Words? In What Ways?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of vocabulary for comprehension, Wilhelm asks two key questions: "which words do I teach and how should I teach them?" Through years of trial and error, Wilhelm has adopted these principles to answer "which words": teach "important" words students will see and use again; words necessary to conceptual understanding; words…

  19. Our Compulsory Goals: Effective Teaching and Meaningful Learning through Powerful Cultural Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Wilhelm asks, "But are new literacies just fun?" Then he immediately answers, "Absolutely not--if we as teachers provide the right context and conditions of their use." Offering research-based advice on incorporating technology to increase motivation and deepen learning, Wilhelm boils it down to this bottom line: it's engaged, substantive,…

  20. William IV of Hesse-Cassel - the purpose of astronomy for a princely court in the 16th century. (German Title: Wilhelm IV von Hessen-Kassel - Der Nutzen der Astronomie für einen Fürstenhof des 16. Jahrhunderts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulke, Karsten

    For princes in the 16th century, astronomy played a major role. When God wants to give a fair warning to man about terrestrial events by means of the stars, a responsibly acting prince must pay attention to this. Thus astronomers had an influence on political events. This contribution discusses the question whether William IV of Hesse-Cassel had planned his self-formation as an «astronomer-landgrave» from the beginning. It is, however, shown that his first star catalogues can be seen in the context of the construction of astronomical clocks, and not as a pure research programme. For William, astronomical activities thus were no putting himself into service of a pure research programme, but part of his staging of princely reign.

  1. ART-XC/SRG: Status of the X-ray Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Elsner, R. F.; ODell, S.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has approximately 65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  2. Development and Calibration of the ART-XC Mirror Modules for the Spectrum Rontgen Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B.; Gubarev, M.; Elsner, R.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Odell, S.; Swartz, D.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2013-01-01

    The Spectrum-Röntgen-Gamma (SRG) mission is a Russian-lead X-ray astrophysical observatory that carries two co-aligned X-ray telescope systems. The primary instrument is the German-led extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (eROSITA), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that covers the energy range from 0.2-12 keV. The complementary instrument is the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope -- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC or ART), a 7-module Xray telescope system that provides higher energy coverage, up to 30 keV.

  3. ART-XC/SRG: Status of the X-ray Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Elsner, R.; O'Dell, S.; Kolodziejczak, J.; McCracken, J.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinskiy, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard-x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has approximately 65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  4. ART-XC/SRG: Status of the X-ray Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Elsner, R.; O'Dell, S.; Kolodziejczak, J.; McCracken, J.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinskiy, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard-x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has approx. 65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  5. Flight programs and X-ray optics development at MSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Swartz, D.; Gaskin, J.; Weisskopf, M.

    The X-ray astronomy group at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing electroformed nickel/cobalt x-ray optics for suborbital and orbital experiments. Suborbital instruments include the Focusing X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) and Micro-X sounding rocket experiments and the HEROES balloon payload. Our current orbital program is the fabrication of mirror modules for the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) to be launched on board the Russian-German Spectrum Roentgen Gamma Mission (SRG). A second component of our work is the development of fabrication techniques and optical metrology to improve the angular resolution of thin-shell optics to the arcsecond-level.

  6. ART-XC/SRG: status of the x-ray optics development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Elsner, R.; O'Dell, S.; Kolodziejczak, J.; McCracken, J.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-07-01

    The Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) instrument is a hard-x-ray instrument with energy response up to 30 keV that is to be launched on board of the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) Mission. The instrument consists of seven identical mirror modules coupled with seven CdTe strip focal-plane detectors. The mirror modules are being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each module has ~65 sq. cm effective area and an on-axis angular resolution of 30 arcseconds half power diameter (HPD) at 8 keV. The current status of the mirror module development and testing will be presented.

  7. Nature, Human Nature, and Solutions to Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    This paper promotes an undergraduate course that would discuss the great ideas of Plato, St. Paul, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Paul Sartre, B. F. Skinner, and Konrad Lorenz. This course would help students understand human values and behaviors while focusing on historical, world, and national problems. Tentative solutions would then be…

  8. Remote Sensing of Battlefield Weather Conditions Using Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Konrad, T.G., Hill, M.L., Rowland, J.R., and Mayer , J.H.: "A Small Radio Controlled Aircraft as a Platform for Y.teorological Sensors," APL Technical...simulations were run assuming all the dropsondes were stowed throughout the mission. This presents a worse case condition for range/endurance. 3.1 Roller

  9. Leadership and Diversity in the Canadian Forces: A Conceptual Model and Research Agenda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    persons with disabilities) and also refers to other differences like ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, occupational classification, and context...such as sexual orientation, height, or weight (Konrad et al., in press). Furthermore, individuals can easily be induced to be prejudiced against...or in terms of ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, and so on, but also in terms of regular/reserve force differences, occupational

  10. Considerations for Using Agile in DoD Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Buettner, Aerospace Joe Tatem, Raytheon Stephany Bellomo, SEI Nanette Brown, SEI John Foreman, SEI Dr. John Goodenough, SEI Harry Levinson, SEI...event_details.php?id=452 [2] H. Glazer, J. Dalton, D. Anderson, M. Konrad , and S. Shrum, "CMMI or Agile: Why Not Embrace Both," Carnegie Mellon

  11. Annual Typhoon Report 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    USN *TSGT Bobby L. Setliff, USAF SSGT Charles J. Lee, USAFTI SSGT William H. Taylor, USAF AG2 Kenneth A. Kellogg, USN TIC SGT Konrad W. Crowder...USAF LF AG3 Stephani A. Bubanich, USN AG3 Viitria A. Mae, USN S A2O9 AG3 Carl A. Gantz, USN S SEA John W. Archambeau, USAF *SRA Timothy J. Sowell, USAF

  12. Wireless Sensor Network Metrics for Real-Time Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-20

    107. [99] Victor Shnayder, Bor rong Chen, Konrad Lorincz, Thaddeus R. F. Fulford-Jones, and Matt Welsh, “Sensor networks for medical care,” Division of...Gilman Tolle, Joseph Polastre, Robert Szewczyk, David Culler, Neil Turner, Kevin Tu, Stephen Burgess, Todd Dawson, Phil Buonadonna, David Gay , and Wei

  13. Caveat Lector: Reviewing Popular Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Vivian Scott

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems with reviews and criticisms of popular social science books: the quality and background of reviewers, the difficulty of distinguishing between fact and opinion, and the scarcity of competent reviewers. Analyzes reviews of Robert Ardrey's "African Genesis" and "The Territorial Imperative," Konrad Lorenz's "On Aggression," and…

  14. Some Issues Concerning Aggression and Violence in Human Beings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponton, Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    Examines aggression and violence from an interdisciplinary perspective. Humanistic psychologist Rollo May sees violence as the end product of power deprivation. Anthropologists Konrad Lorenz and Robert Ardrey regard aggression as an innate biological drive. Anthropologist Richard Leakey views it as a learned, culturally determined response.…

  15. 77 FR 14340 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Broadband Technology Opportunities Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request...: National Telecommunications and Information Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of... Anthony G. Wilhelm, Director, BTOP, Office of Telecommunications and Information Applications,...

  16. The Mainzer Sachkatalog and Its Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gordon

    1970-01-01

    The classfied cataloging method worked out by Hans Wilhelm Eppelsheimer was unique and had extensive repercussions on subsequent Developments in the history of the classified catalog in Germany. (Author/NH)

  17. Black Scholars in Europe during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fikes, Robert, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the accomplishments of Juan Latino (1516-1599), Jacobus Eliza Johannes Capitein (1717-1747), and Anton Wilhelm Amo (1703-1753), Blacks who were educated in Europe and became important intellectual and literary figures. (GC)

  18. The Asia-Pacific Century: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    countries were those who were children during the post–World War 2 period. The lesson they could have taken from that time was one associated with the...economic might. The earliest such prediction was by German scholar and poly- math, Wilhelm Fucks , in his economic essay Formeln zur Macht (For- mulas...france.t_0.html. 7. Wilhelm Fucks , Formeln zur Macht [Formulas for Power] (Stuttgart, West Ger- many: Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt, 1965). 8. Joseph A

  19. Physicists and Physics in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Jürgen; Eckert, Michael; Wolff, Stefan

    We give a tour of Munich and some outlying sites that focuses on the lives and work of the most prominent physicists who lived in the city, Count Rumford, Joseph Fraunhofer, Georg Simon Ohm, Max Planck, Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein, Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, Wilhelm Wien, Arnold Sommerfeld, Max von Laue, and Werner Heisenberg. We close with a self-guided tour that describes how to reach these sites in Munich.

  20. Theoretical Approaches to Dealing with Somalia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    with the stalemate in North Korea against a supposed 1 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche , Human...Hunted Al Qai’da in Africa." Army Times 30 October 2011. Nietzsche , Friedrich Wilhelm . Human, All Too Human : A Book for Free Spirits. Lincoln...Friederich Nietzsche critiqued more than just human nature when he said, “[c]onvictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.” 1 Convictions create

  1. State Defense Force Journal. Volume 4, Issue 1, Fall 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    information to the rank and file a much easier process. THE ROLE OF THE SERGEANT MAJOR General George Washington appointed Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben as...the second Inspector General of the Continental Army in 1778. Friedrich von Steuben took great steps to improve the tactics, regulations, and...Training and Doctrine Command, 1 Oct 1999. von Steuben, Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin. “Regulations for the order and discipline of the

  2. In the footsteps of astronomers in Bremen and Lilienthal. (German Title: Auf den Spuren von Astronomen in Bremen und Lilienthal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langkavel, Arno

    When Bremen and Lilienthal are mentioned, people interested in the history of astronomy will first of all remember Wilhelm Olbers (1785-1840) and Johann Hieronymus Schroeter (1745-1816). In addition to them, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784-1846) and Carl Friedrich Gauß (1777-1855) have also left their traces. Two walks describe the main memorial sites, which are all outdoors and easily accessible to the general public.

  3. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  4. Atomic Pioneers, Book 2, From the Mid-19th to the Early 20th Century. A World of the Atom Series Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Ray; Hiebert, Roselyn

    This booklet is concerned with the last half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century when a great surge of knowledge vital to atomic science took place, as illustrated by work by Faraday, Mendeleev, Roentgen, Becquerel and the Curies. Each succeeding discovery brought atomic science closer to the great breakthrough that marked the close…

  5. Tinea corporis overlying the thyroid gland after radioiodine (131I) treatment of Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Yedinak, M.A.; Crooks, L.A.; Fox, B.J.

    1986-04-01

    A case of tinea corporis involving the skin overlying the thyroid gland is described in a 36-year-old man who had received radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease. The dermatophytosis mimicked a delayed roentgen erythema. Radiation to the dermis may have locally altered the cell-mediated immunity and predisposed this patient to the dermatophytosis.

  6. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  7. 21 CFR 900.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... components that radiographically model aspects of breast disease and cancer. (kk) Phantom image means a... dose is delivered by 114 roentgens (R) of exposure. (e) Breast implant means a prosthetic device implanted in the breast. (f) Calendar quarter means any one of the following time periods during a...

  8. Comment on ``The First Accurate Description of an Aurora''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Sam

    2007-11-01

    Schröder [2006] discusses Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature), written by Konrad von Megenberg between 1348 and 1350. The Buch was the first encyclopedia of natural phenomena written in German. (For a contemporary German translation, see Schulz [1897] for definitions of Megenberg's astronomical terminology, see Deschler [1977]). Megenberg translated the Liber de Natura Rerum, written by Thomas of Cantimpré between 1225 and 1240.

  9. Saturn V Dedication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the original Von Braun german rocket team participate in the Saturn V replica didication ceremony at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. Pictured are (L/R): Walter Jacobi, Konrad Dannenberg, Apollo 14's Edgar Mitchell, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, Apollo 12's Dick Gordon, Gerhard Reisig, Werner Dahm, MSFC Director Art Stephenson, Director of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center Mike Wing, Walter Haeusserman, and Ernst Stuhlinger.

  10. Analysis of the Noneroding Penetration of Tungsten Alloy Long Rods into Aluminum Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Solid Mechanics Team for lending photographic support to this effort. The author would like to graciously thank Messrs. Dan Scheffler, Konrad Frank , and...at higher impact velocities. Kinslow (8) noted in the 1960s the disparity between the low-velocity and high- velocity penetration behaviors...transition, the penetration-mode variation of rod strength and target resistance parameters, Y and H, respectively. Frank (26) modeled the penetration

  11. If You’re Living the High Life, You’re Living the Informative Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-17

    Perform causal analyses on the selected defects and problems using Fishbone diagrams. The analysis is qualitatively driven. Propose actions to address...years. Then, we asked our leaders to perform a “ fishbone diagram” exercise for each vision statement providing rich information on barriers to each...Konrad 17 October 2007 © 2007 Carnegie Mellon University Scenario 7 (CAR): “Un-Gestalt” Our projects use pareto analysis and fishbone diagrams to

  12. Study of a Solar X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The highly structured nature of the outer solar atmosphere seems to be intimately linked to the presence, at the solar surface, of magnetic fields that have been generated inside the Sun and have emerged to the surface. The corona is brightest (and also hottest) at just those locations where the magnetic field has emerged from inside the Sun. Dynamo theory predicts that strong magnetic fields will be generated deep in the solar interior and that bundles or 'ropes' of magnetic flux will float to the surface. When this happens, a magnetically bipolar region will become visible, extending above the surface in a three-dimensional structure. The field lines penetrate through the surface, showing two magnetic poles, and also exhibit a three-dimensional structure above the surface. The structure created by the field emergence is rooted in the (relatively) cool photosphere and extends through the chromosphere and transition region to the corona. Thus, the magnetic field creates a region, called an active region, which contains portions at temperatures from less than 10(exp 4) K to greater than 10(exp 6) K, and is therefore visible at wavelengths from the infrared through x-rays. The locations where the magnetic field leaves and reenters the visible surface are called the 'footpoints' of the coronal structures associated with the magnetic field. The magnetic fields themselves are not directly visible. However, the hot coronal plasma is, for the most part, constrained to follow the direction of the magnetic field lines in the atmosphere. Now, 100 years after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1896, we can routinely make observations of the solar corona from outside the Earth's atmosphere in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As shown by comparing x-ray images with magnetograms, the bright corona over these bipolar magnetic regions consists of closed structures that seem to follow the orientation of the magnetic field. Although we can see down to the

  13. Tibial bone mineral distribution as influenced by calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D feeding levels in the growing turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrell, F. A.; Brenes, J.; Waibel, P.

    1974-01-01

    Roentgen signs, subperiosteal, endosteal, and trabecular bone growth are evaluated in turkeys fed phosphorus at the 0.5, 0.56, 0.68, 0.90, and 2.70 percent levels. Calcium levels of 0.30, 0.40, 0.60, 1.2, and 3.60 percent were also tested. Vitamin D levels of 0, 100, 300, 900 and 27,000 I.U. per day were likewise evaluated. Roentgen signs, bone mineral as measured by T-125 gamma ray absorption, and bone mineral growth patterns as shown by radiograph area projection are correlated with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D feeding levels. Differences in bone growth at the various feeding levels were observed which were not reflected by differences in other studied parameters.

  14. Preparation of PbSeO3 as a new material, sensitive to the electromagnetic radiation in UV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaev, V. V.; Smolyaninov, V. D.; Stoyanova, T. V.; Egorov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The new technology of the formation of photoresistive structures sensitive in ultraviolet range of electromagnetic spectrum based on lead selenide and lead selenite composite is discussed. Studies of photosensitivity were carried out using a set of LEDs in the visible and ultraviolet spectral range. Obtained structures show considerable sensitivity in ultraviolet and blue range of radiation, meanwhile that in red and yellow region of light turned to be small. The structures were formed by oxidation of PbSe crystals. Diffusion of the oxygen through the surface layer of PbSe was suggested to be a key mechanism of oxidation. Oxidation kinetics were studied by means of roentgen lines chemical shift and roentgen diffraction.

  15. Flight Programs and X-ray Optics Development at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Swartz, D.; Gaskin, J.; Weisskopf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray astronomy group at the Marshall Space Flight Center is developing electroformed nickel/cobalt x-ray optics for suborbital and orbital experiments. Suborbital instruments include the Focusing X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) and Micro-X sounding rocket experiments and the HERO balloon payload. Our current orbital program is the fabrication of a series of mirror modules for the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope (ART) to be launched on board the Russian-German Spectrum Roentgen Gamma Mission (SRG.) The details and status of these various programs are presented. A second component of our work is the development of fabrication techniques and optical metrology to improve the angular resolution of thin shell optics to the arcsecond-level. The status of these x-ray optics technology developments is also presented.

  16. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  17. Prospects for AGN Science using the ART-XC on the SRG Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    The enhanced hard X-ray sensitivity provided by the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope to the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission facilitates the detection of heavily obscured and other hard-spectrum cosmic X-ray sources. The SRG all-sky survey will obtain large, statistically-well-defined samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) including a significant population of local heavily-obscured AGN. In anticipation of the SRG all-sky survey, we investigate the prospects for refining the bright end of the AGN luminosity function and determination of the local black hole mass function and comparing the spatial distribution of AGN with large-scale structure defined by galaxy clusters and groups. Particular emphasis is placed on studies of the deep survey Ecliptic Pole regions.

  18. The calibration of flight mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the SRG mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2014-07-01

    MSFC is fabricating x-ray optics for the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope - X-Ray Concentrator (ART-XC or ART for short) instrument under agreements with the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI). ART-XC is one of two instruments that will be launched on the Russian-German Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) Mission to be launched in 20161. Delivery of the flight optics for ART-XC (7 mirror modules) is currently scheduled for summer/fall of 20142. MSFC has to date completed assembly of four modules and has performed extensive calibration on two of these. These calibrations show that the modules meet effective area requirements and greatly exceed the angular resolution requirements. Details of the calibration procedure and an overview of the results obtained to date are presented here.

  19. Nils Gustav Dalén, the Unknown Nobel Prize Winner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Hanging on the wall of my museum is a large "Map of Physics" published by the Central Scientific Company in 1938. On it is a list of the Nobel Prizes in physics, starting with Roentgen in 1901 and ending with Fermi in 1938. I can recognize every name except the one for 1912: Nils Gustav Dalén. Perhaps you have had the same experience when looking through the updated list.

  20. Feasibility of Measuring Ruby Luminescence Wavelength Shift under Shock Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    3kilograr-meter 3(kg/rn 111,6186X1 1 rad rradiation dose absorbed)) gray (Gy)* 1.000 000 3 1 -2 roentgen) coulomb/kilogram (C/kg) 25S79 760 X F -4 shake...OF OPTICAL FIBER. We performed three experiments to test the response of hard clad fused silica (Diaguide SMY- UV series) and sapphire (Saphikon

  1. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  2. Early Transient Incapacitation: A Review with Consideration of Underlying Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    circulatinqz histamine is raised over a perod of days in humans undergcing radiation therapy . 34 Rats exposed to X irridiatic.n shov an increase in...2. Bond, V. P., Fliedner, 1. MI., and Archambeau, J. 0. Mam~malian Radiation ethafltjy Aflsturbance in Cellulair Kinetics. Academic Press, Ne Yrad...patients undergoing deep roentgen therapy . American Journal off Roentgenolo, Radium 7berapy and Nuclear Medicine .2 985-988, 1954. 12 Y_’I 󈧓, Levy

  3. The Problem of Radiological Protection, Poland.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    apparatus, better hraining of personnel, by means of protecting the gonads, through ap- propriate administrative regulations making it impossible...approximately 4,000* - 3 - * The number 4,000 includes only the apparatuses owned by the socialized Health Service, privately- practising ...level of the health services bv means of perfecting roentgen research and broadening its area Of effectiveness. We must strive toward acquiring more

  4. The Overutilization of X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    Within 20 years of Roentgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895, it became apparent that large doses of radiation damaged human tissue.1 Yet the medical profession continues to contribute to the overutilization of X-rays, occasionally spending health care dollars to subject our patients to a health risk. This paper discusses the evidence to support the claim that X-rays are overutilized, and offers recommendations to rectify the situation. PMID:21289771

  5. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Axonal Response to Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    path toward quantitative myelin imaging in humans. Reportable Outcomes 1. Wilhelm MJ, Ong HH, Wehrli SL, Tsai PH, Hackney DB, Wehrli FW. Direct...Wilhelm MJ, Ong HH, Wehrli SL, Tsai PH, Hackney DB, Wehrli FW. Prospects for quantitative im- aging of myelin with dual-echo short inversion time 3D UTE...MRI. 2011; Montréal, Québec, Canada. ISMRM. p. 2460. 3. Ong HH, Bhagat YA, Magland JF, Wehrli FW. Feasibility of low q-space diffusion MRI at 1.5T

  6. Novel Topic Impact on Authorship Attribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    sentences on a printed page. The work of Wilhelm Fucks in [7] attributed authorship based on the frequency distribution over word syllables. The most...Unitarian Review, vol. 30, pp. 452–460, 1888. [7] W. Fucks , "On Mathematical Analysis of Style," Biometrika, vol. 39, pp. 122–129, 1952. [8

  7. Using Irony in Teaching the History of Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines historical ironies and stories with surprise endings about Rene Descartes and Wilhelm Wundt that can enliven history of psychology lectures and make certain concepts more memorable. Explains that this approach does not trivialize psychology's history but adds humor to a subject that students sometimes find dull. (CMK)

  8. Proactivity vs Reactivity: Preparing Students for Success with CCSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Wilhelm has studied the Common Core State Standards and come away with a generally positive opinion. His concern is that now that the Standards are written, we let professional teachers mold them into the best possible practices for teaching their students. With specific advice for working with students--developing background knowledge, making…

  9. Drifting from Slow to "D'oh!": Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive Control Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Suss, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects' WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates…

  10. Base Cluster Defense: the Thin Line

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-17

    Waterloo to Vietnam. Strettington: Anthony Biri Publications LTD, 1981. Howell, Edgar M. The Soviet Partisan Movement 1941-1944 (DA PAM 20-244...to Combat Service Support o Forces: A Training Challenge". Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base: Air War College, May 1988. Willemer , Wilhelm

  11. History of experimental psychology from an Estonian perspective.

    PubMed

    Allik, Jüri

    2007-11-01

    A short review of the development of experimental psychology from an Estonian perspective is presented. The first rector after the reopening of the University of Dorpat (Tartu) in 1802, Georg Friedrich Parrot (1767-1852) was interested in optical phenomena which he attempted to explain by introducing the concept of unconscious inferences, anticipating a similar theory proposed by Herman von Helmholtz 20 years later. One of the next rectors, Alfred Wilhelm Volkmann (1800-1878) was regarded by Edwin Boring as one of the founding fathers of the experimental psychology. Georg Wilhelm Struve (1793-1864) played an essential part in solving the problem of personal equations. Arthur Joachim von Oettingen (1836-1920) developed a theory of music harmony, which stimulated his student Wilhelm Friedrich Ostwald (1853-1932) to study colour harmony. Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926), the founder of modern psychiatry, is by far the most important experimental psychologist who has worked in Estonia. His successor Wladimir von Tchisch (1855-1922), another student of Wilhelm Wundt, continued Kraepelin's work in experimental psychology. The lives of Wolfgang Köhler (1887-1967), who was born in Reval (Tallinn), and Oswald Külpe (1862-1915), who graduated from the University of Dorpat, extended the link between the history of experimental psychology and Estonia. Karl Gustav Girgensohn (1875-1925), the founder of the Dorpat School of the psychology of religion, stretched the use of experimental methods to the study of religious experience.

  12. Adult Education in the Federal Republic of Germany: Scholarly Approaches and Professional Practice. Monographs on Comparative and Area Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Wilhelm, Ed.

    This monograph offers insight into the development of the conceptual basis, scholarly inquiry, and professional practice of adult education in West Germany from the end of World War II to the German reunification. Introductory materials are an "Introduction" (Wilhelm Mader) and "Translator's Note and Acknowledgements" (Martin…

  13. Energy Emergency Districts: Concepts and Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    Los Angeles, CA Vice President, Power Supply San Diego Gas & Electric Company * Anita S. Garcia San Diego, CA Public Information Officer California...Volunteer Assistants Ladd Bogdonoff Karen Wilhelm Buckley Elizabeth Abad Michael Collins Florence Beller Louisa Finn Sharon Carrion Paul A. Grabhorn

  14. Mathematical treatise on the recovery from a flat spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, R

    1930-01-01

    In this mathematical investigation, made in collaboration with Dr. Wilhelm Schmidt, we interpret the temporary change (due to some disturbance) in the quantities which define the position of the airplane while in a flat spin. We further examine the effect of this change, of the means resorted to to produce the disturbance, and thus reveal the expedients available for recovering from a flat spin.

  15. The International Relations of the Struves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, W. R.

    At least 10 astronomers in 5 generations belonged to the Struve dynasty, a family having its origin in Holstein and living in Germany, Russia, the USA and other countries. The best known astronomers among them were Wilhelm (1793-1864), Otto Wilhelm (1819-1905), Hermann (1854-1920), Ludwig (1858-1920), Georg (1886-1933) and Otto Ludwig Struve (1897-1963). After a short account of the family's history, its international relations will be regarded, with emphasis on the following aspects: Nationality/citizenship, places of living and work, personal relations to other astronomers including correspondence and cooperation, travels, languages of publications. Although a comparison of the different members of the family is possible only to a certain degree due to their different role and importance in astronomy, some changes which developed over 150 years can be traced: E.g., Wilhelm Struve published in German, Latin, French, Russian and English, whereas his grandsons and great-grandsons wrote their papers mainly in one language -- German or English. Wilhelm had relatively close relations with French astronomers, whereas his great-grandson Georg was the author of verbal assaults on French scientists. Georg published also heavy criticism of the International Astronomical Union, whereas his cousin Otto Luwig later became IAU's President.

  16. The Genealogy of Judgement: Towards a Deep History of Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The classical conception of academic freedom associated with Wilhelm von Humboldt and the rise of the modern university has a quite specific cultural foundation that centres on the controversial mental faculty of "judgement". This article traces the roots of "judgement" back to the Protestant Reformation, through its heyday as the signature…

  17. Alphabet Soup: ERP, CT, and ACT for OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolin, David F.

    2009-01-01

    The present article comments on the case conference presented in this issue, namely, Himle and Franklin's (Himle & Franklin, 2009) exposure and response prevention (ERP); Chosak and colleagues' (Chosak, Marques, Fama, Renaud, & Wilhelm, 2009) cognitive therapy (CT); and (Twohig, 2009) Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Two questions are…

  18. Development and Self-Identity: Hegel's Concept of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, A. W.; George, Michael

    1982-01-01

    This essay draws together various ideas on education that appear in the works of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and demonstrates how these ideas relate to Hegel's total philosophy. Education, by retracing the path of the mind's self-realization, raises the individual's subjective consciousness to recognition of the rationality underlying social…

  19. Training Interventions for Reducing Flight Mishaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    data recorders, and (e) line operations safety audits ( LOSA ), Each illuminates a different aspect of flight operations. Helmreich, Wilhelm, Klinect, and...Merritt, (2001) studied threats to safcty and the nature of errors in three airlines using LOSAs . Striking differences were observed among these air

  20. Reading Motivation: Exploring the Elementary Gender Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinak, Barbara A.; Gambrell, Linda B.

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to more clearly understand the erosion of motivation in some readers, a number of researchers (Mohr, 2006; Smith & Wilhelm, 2002) and organizations (The Education Alliance, 2007) have called for the investigation of gender differences in all readers, including young children. Consequently, this study focused on younger, average…

  1. Changing Homeland Security: Shape, Patterns, Not Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche , Human, All Too Human (Stanford University Press, 2000). 3 The phrase “homeland security community” and the pronoun “we... Nietzsche wrote about this process: To make plans and project designs brings with it many good sensations; and whoever had the strength to be

  2. A Poetic Journey: The Transfer and Transformation of German Strategies for Moral Education in Late Eighteenth-Century Dutch Poetry for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlevliet, Sanne; Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular Dutch educational enlightenment authors was Hieronymus van Alphen. His three volumes of "Little Poems for Children" published in 1778 and 1782 were extremely successful, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Inspired by the German poets Christian Felix Weisse and Gottlob Wilhelm Burmann, Van Alphen brought about an…

  3. "Bildung" and Intercultural Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "Bildung", sometimes translated as self-cultivation, is located at the core of an influential tradition of educational thought. A key question concerns the relationship between "Bildung" and interculturality. Drawing on Wilhelm von Humboldt and Hans-Georg Gadamer, and on the so-called transformative learning…

  4. Rontgen's Discovery of X Rays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thumm, Walter

    1975-01-01

    Relates the story of Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen and presents one view of the extent to which the discovery of the x-ray was an accident. Reconstructs the sequence of events that led to the discovery and includes photographs of the lab where he worked and replicas of apparatus used. (GS)

  5. Hermeneutics and the Study of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossberg, Lawrence; Christians, Clifford G.

    The manner in which hermeneutics (the study of the interpretive process) has treated the phenomenon of interpretation is examined in this paper. Following a historical review of hermeneutics from its Hellenic roots through the phase of traditional hermeneutics to the major reformulation of the field by Friedrich Schleiermacher and Wilhelm Dilthey…

  6. Literacy and Neuroplasticity: Transforming Our Perspectives and Ourselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm applies two of his core beliefs--that anyone can learn the next appropriate concept or process if they are provided with a meaningful situation and proper assistance, and that literacy and the kinds of texts we call literature provide a unique and powerful way of knowing and of transforming the self--to a look at how recent research on the…

  7. Hard-luck Scheele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Bruce C.

    2015-11-01

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele had a hand in the discovery of at least six elements and contributed to the early development of chemistry in numerous other ways. Bruce Gibb looks into Scheele's story and considers why he doesn't get the credit that he deserves.

  8. Bildung as a Powerful Tool in Modern University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesen, Mogens Noergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how powerful "Bildung" is as a tool in modern university teaching. The concept of "Bildung" was originally introduced by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (Kant 1787, 1798, 1804) and the Prussian lawyer and politician Wilhelm von Humboldt (Humboldt 1792, Bohlin 2008). From 1810…

  9. Zum Ausgleich von generativer und energetischer Sprachbetrachtung (A Comparison of the "Generative" and "Energetic" Views of Language)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, Leo

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of two basic conceptions: Wilhelm von Humboldt's idea of language as energeia'' existing within and without man, and Noam Chomsky's idea of language generated by the speaker according to an innate apparatus. Revised version of lectures presented at the University of Bonn, West Germany in August 1971. (RS)

  10. Literary Origins of the Term "School Psychologist" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on the literary origins of the term "school psychologist" is revisited, and conclusions are revised in light of new evidence. It appears that the origin of the term in the American literature occurred as early as 1898 in an article by Hugo Munsterberg, predating the usage by Wilhelm Stern in 1911. The early references to the…

  11. Health care and life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Hitchings, G H

    1993-12-10

    The four pictures of the moon accompanying the review by Ursula B. Marvin of To a Rocky Moon: A Geologist's History of Lunar Exploration by Don E. Wilhelms (9 July, p. 231) should have been in reverse order on the page.

  12. The Rhetoric in Mathematics: Newton, Leibniz, the Calculus, and the Rhetorical Force of the Infinitesimal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, G. Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    This essay investigates the rhetoric surrounding the appearance of the concept of the infinitesimal in the seventeenth-century Calculus of Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Although historians often have positioned rhetoric as a supplemental discipline, this essay shows that rhetoric is the "material" out of which a new and powerful…

  13. Beyond Programs: Asserting Our Authority as Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Reflection and revision are the result of knowledge, experience, and the willingness to risk; they are essential, says Wilhelm, to "play[ing] out the big possibilities" in "something as complex and intensely human as teaching." Even as a contributor to the national standards project, various literature anthologies, and reading and composition…

  14. A Human Achievement: Mathematics without Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzioglu, Tosun

    This paper describes three fundamental principles, dictated by Wilhelm von Humboldt, that were widely adapted as the basic philosophy of higher education in the United States, and proposes to revise the unfulfilled dream of von Humboldt to make it come true. This paper stresses the achievements of humanity not only in technology, health, or the…

  15. Learning to Play the Literacy and Learning Games--A Question of Enculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding that learning must be relevant and purposeful to be effective and engaging, Wilhelm emphasizes the value of teaching students "how to participate in meaningful activity in ways that make them increasingly expert in creating culture and . . . cultural meanings." He offers bullet points that suggest starting with students' experiences,…

  16. The Power of Teacher Inquiry: Developing a Critical Literacy "for Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    While developing critical literacy in our students is a priority for all of us, Wilhelm believes that we must develop a critical literacy of teaching, as well. He asserts that this can best be achieved by 1) teaching through an inquiry context, and 2) taking on a teacher-researcher stance to think both reflectively and reflexively about our…

  17. Attitude as Predictor of Success in Online Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereijo, Maria Victoria Perez

    2006-01-01

    This is the second article in a series of articles published with findings on student perceptions of asynchronous web-based courses (Perez Cereijo, Young, & Wilhelm, 2001). This portion of the study examines the independent relationships between various student characteristics and student's perceived advantages and disadvantages of the…

  18. Photothermal Therapy: Cancer Cell Internalization of Gold Nanostars Impacts Their Photothermal Efficiency In Vitro and In Vivo: Toward a Plasmonic Thermal Fingerprint in Tumoral Environment (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2016).

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Ana; Silva, Amanda K A; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Péchoux, Christine; Desboeufs, Karine; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Wilhelm, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Because the ultimate target for photothermal therapy is the cancer cell, heating performances must be evaluated intracellularly. On page 1040 C. Wilhelm and team provide the first in vitro and in vivo photothermal measurements in cancer cells with gold nanostars. They demonstrate that once nanostars are internalized within endosomes, heat generation can change significantly.

  19. Meeting the Demand: Teaching "Soft" Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, William J.; Logan, Joyce; Smith, Sheila M.; Szul, Linda F.

    This document contains four papers (and an introduction by William Wilhelm) on teaching "soft" skills in business education programs. "The Skill Building Challenge: Preparing a Bridge for the Workforce Skills Gap" (Sheila M. Smith) examines the following topics: the workforce skills gap; the importance of academic and…

  20. Meeting the Challenge: Creating Engaging and Powerful Contexts for Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the conditions of "flow" experience from two studies into the literate lives of young men (Smith and Wilhelm 2002; 2006) that were explanatory, when present, of motivation and engagement in various activities including literacy, and when absent, of a lack of motivation and engagement in various activities including literacy.…

  1. Portrayals of Wundt and Titchener in Introductory Psychology Texts: A Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, David

    2000-01-01

    Examines the content of introductory psychology books by performing a content analysis on texts from the 1970s and 1990s to determine whether the books incorporated recent historical scholarship in discussions of Wilhelm Wundt and Edward Titchener. Finds that some texts still misrepresent the relation between Wundt and Titchener. (CMK)

  2. How Principals Cultivate Shared Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Do teacher leaders in your school mainly fill the traditional roles of department chair or grade-level representative? Or do they lead their peers in collaborative teams whose primary focus is improving student learning? Terry Wilhelm, director of the School Leadership Center for Riverside County Office of Education in California, says that…

  3. Academic Freedom: In Justification of a Universal Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karran, Terence

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the justification for, and benefits of, academic freedom to academics, students, universities and the world at large. It surveys the development of the concept of academic freedom within Europe, more especially the impact of the reforms at the University of Berlin instigated by Wilhelm von Humboldt. Following from this, the…

  4. Digital Renovation of the Geologic Map of the Near Side of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortezzo, C. M.; Hare, T. M.

    2011-03-01

    We have digitally renovated the 1971 Wilhelms and MacCauley lunar near side geologic map. The digital version is in simple cylindrical with the geology and contact locations updated based on the Lunar Orbiter mosaic and a preliminary Kaguya DEM.

  5. New Light on Old Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Collins, M. J. S.

    2011-03-01

    Great resolution and homogeneity of LRO WAC mosaics and LOLA altimetry suggest that Moscoviense sits in an older basin, explaining its thin crust and mare lavas, Orientale and SPA overlap older basins, and Wilhelms and McCauley were right about Imbrium.

  6. What Teachers Need to Know about Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff; Smith, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    Motivation is key to engaging students in meaningful and productive work. Identifying individual students' interests would be ideal, but in the real world, we need to create and sustain "situational interest." Smith and Wilhelm reference their own research as well as other research that is contextually very different to show how the same…

  7. The mystery of the strange formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Tony

    2016-10-01

    On a recent visit to the Wilhelm Röntgen memorial in Wurzburg, Germany, I noticed two strange trigonometric formulae set in the terrazzo floor at the western entrance to the building that houses Röntgen's X-ray laboratory.

  8. Personalizing Our Teaching: No Specific Human Being Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing the challenge of individualizing instruction, Wilhelm reminds us of some specific areas teachers must focus on: developing apprenticeship and inquiry settings in which student difference is a resource; connecting students to their reading and writing; honoring and using students' first languages; situating instruction in real or…

  9. "The Lengthened Shadow of One Man": The Public Intellectual and the Founding of Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, John

    1998-01-01

    Identifies five intellectuals who made distinctive contributions to the founding of new universities in England, Germany, and the United States. Institutional and individual biographies profile: Thomas Jefferson (University of Virginia); Wilhelm von Humboldt (University of Berlin); Lord Brougham (University College, University of London); A.D.…

  10. Speaking Personally--With Borje Holmberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Borje Holmberg is Swedish and has been active in distance education as a theorist and practitioner for more than fifty years. He is the former president of the Wilhelm-Buchner Hochschule, a distance teaching university in Germany. Here, Holmberg is interviewed by William C. Diehl, the Interviews Editor for "The American Journal of Distance…

  11. The Humboldt Legacy: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of the European University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nybom, Thorsten

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the uses and distortions that have been made over the years to the ideas about the university that Wilhelm von Humboldt advocated. Points out, however, that there remains much of value in the ideas articulated by Humboldt and his brother Alexander. (SLD)

  12. Next Steps in the Journey: Teaching with "Urgency:" A Call for Immediate Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    With a staggering number of students dropping out of school, widespread below-grade reading proficiency, and PISA results showing a demoralizing lag internationally in math, science, and general problem solving, teachers need to exercise all the control available to them to engage students in meaningful learning. Wilhelm suggests six steps…

  13. Sisyphus at Work: The Leibniz Edition, The Kaiserreich and Divided Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poser, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Despite several attempts, the prolific writings of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz have not yet been brought together in a single edition. Efforts have been hampered by the sheer volume and diversity of the Leibniz estate, and also by changing political circumstances. This paper traces the history of the Leibniz edition as a long-term project of the…

  14. The Age for Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2006-01-01

    Role-plays and other dramatic activities fulfill tweens' urge to try out different life roles, to explore the world beyond their own reality, and to learn new areas of competence. Wilhelm's research into reading and motivation has shown that students value learning that they can see as immediately meaningful. He argues that drama strategies bring…

  15. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  16. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  17. Determiner Syntax in Middle Low German: Evidence from the "Luebecker Ratsurteile"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gougeon, Elliott E.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I take a look at Middle Low German nominal phrases as evidenced in the Lubecker Ratsurteile, a collection of court proceedings published by Wilhelm Ebel in 1955, which cover the years 1421-1550. By digitizing the corpus, I was able to perform a corpus analysis on noun phrases, where I concentrated on determiner use and form,…

  18. Next Steps in the Journey: Learning to Listen to Student Voices: Teaching with Our Mouths Shut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    According to Wilhelm, a teacher's power lies in learning to work "with" students, starting with listening. He recommends setting up conditions and mechanisms that help you learn from your students what they are learning, what challenges they are facing, and how best to teach them. Through inquiry, the classroom can become a vital and engaging…

  19. Imagining a New Kind of Self: Academic Language, Identity, and Content Area Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Based on the belief that learning is deeper in meaningful contexts, Wilhelm makes a case for creating (authentically or simulated in the classroom) specific contexts that lead students into new identities, new perspectives, and new vocabulary. This is effectively accomplished by framing instructional units or curricular topics as inquiry,…

  20. Creating "Third Spaces": Promoting Learning through Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm offers us a definition of "third spaces" as "more democratic and dialogic spaces than a classroom, as well as a metaphor for a space in which new, hybrid, and challenging discourses and real-world knowledge and applications are created." With helpful background and examples, he urges us to create such spaces for our students, adamant that…

  1. The Origin of the Mole Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    German Chemist, August Wilhelm Hofmann first introduced the term "molar" (from the Latin moles, meaning "a large mass") into chemistry, around 1865. The particular use of the term molar gained currency in the physics literature, where it was in common use at least through the 1940s.

  2. The Doubling Moment: Resurrecting Edgar Allan Poe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnick, J. Bradley; Mergil, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article expands upon Jeffrey Wilhelm's and Brian Edmiston's (1998) concept of a doubling of viewpoints by encouraging middle level students to use dramatization to take on multiple perspectives, to pose interpretive questions, and to enhance critical inquiry from inside and outside of texts. The doubling moment is both the activation of…

  3. The Academy and the Engineering Sciences: An Unwelcome Royal Gift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konig, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    On 19 March 1900, at the bicentenary celebrations of the Prussian Academy of Sciences, Kaiser Wilhelm II established three new fellowships in engineering sciences. This was in many aspects an unwanted gift, and one which tested the Academy's relationship between pure and applied science. In the context of contemporary struggles between traditional…

  4. Technology in Our Schools: A Call for a Cost/Benefit Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm is a vocal advocate for the substantive integration of technology into language arts classes in ways that support the "critical" use of technologies and the learning of new concepts and procedures for reading and composing. He makes the case that no one can be considered fully literate without a familiarity with and appreciation for our…

  5. The Audacity of Service: Students as Agents of Possibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    "Now seems an opportune time to turn our attention back to the question of how our education system is going to contribute to helping our children become thoughtful, ethical, caring, and contributing democratic citizens." Wilhelm documents the fact that students "crave the doing of significant work," and posits that this is what we are teaching…

  6. A Teacher is Forever: The Legacy of Harry Kirke Wolfe (1858-1918).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Ludy T. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This article traces the career of Harry Kirke Wolfe, Nebraska educator and one of the earliest U.S. psychologists to earn a doctorate in psychology from Wilhelm Wundt at Leipzig. Emphasis is placed on Wolfe's blending of psychology and pedagogy, and his qualities as a teacher. (Author/JDH)

  7. Wundt on Introspection: Reflection on Current Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahey, Thomas H.; And Others

    Wilhelm Wundt provided a complete and concise description of his introspective method in a 1907 paper criticizing the thought experiments conducted by the Wurzburg psychologists. This major work is now being translated for the first time. For Wundt, the role of experimental method was to ensure the best conditions for observing and reporting…

  8. Judd's Debt to Wundt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkel, Harold B.

    1977-01-01

    Charles Judd identified closely with Wilhelm Wundt's philosophy and general psychological position. This article traces Judd's views on the American educational system in the early part of this century, some of the persistent themes that were part of Judd's thought, and Wundt's influence on Judd's thinking. Also discusses Judd's efforts to collect…

  9. Psychology's struggle for existence: Second edition, 1913.

    PubMed

    Wundt, Wilhelm; Lamiell, James T

    2013-08-01

    Presents an English translation of Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology's struggle for existence: Second edition, 1913, by James T. Lamiell in August, 2012. In his essay, Wundt advised against the impending divorce of psychology from philosophy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Bildung und bildungstheoretische Ueberlegungen zur Grundung der Republik (Education and the Republic--Educational Theorists Reflections on the Foundation of the Republic).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellekamps, Stephanie

    1996-01-01

    Draws on Wilhelm von Humboldt's typology of the active human being to debate the questions whether and how individuals can produce their social and political world. Discusses, with reference to Marie Condorcet and Immanuel Kant, procedures of the public that are necessary prerequisites for actions aimed at forming the world. (DSK)

  11. Von Steuben and the German Contribution to the American Revolution: A Selective Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krewson, Margrit B.

    This Library of Congress selected bibliography highlights the efforts of Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, other German and German-American military leaders, and the Hessian auxiliary military forces in assisting the American colonies during the Revolutionary War. The booklet is divided into five parts. Part 1 provides historical information…

  12. Astronomical dilettante or misunderstood genius? On Johann Hieronymus Schroeter's image in the history of science. (German Title: Astronomischer Dilettant oder verkanntes Genie? Zum Bild Johann Hieronymus Schroeters in der Wissenschaftsgeschichte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestmann, Günther

    The paper deals with contemporary assessments of Johann Hieronymus Schroeter's (1745-1816) astronomical works - especially by Wilhelm Olbers and Carl Friedrich Gauß - and also later judgements of the scientific importance and significance of his observations voiced by astronomers and historians.

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western Regional Home Management-Family Economics Educators (25th, Scottsdale, Arizona, November 6-8, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ruth E., Ed.

    These proceedings consist of 12 presentations, most of which are followed by responses or comments. The papers include: "Integrating Family Economics and Family Counseling" (Hogan; discussants Schnittgrund, Wilhelm); "A Test of the Deacon-Firebaugh Management Model" (Gage, Schmid); "Perceived Income Adequacy and Selected Financial Management…

  14. [Not like toilet reading- C. W. Hufeland and his publisher Brockhaus].

    PubMed

    Hansen, W

    2014-12-01

    This is to remember Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland (1762-1836) who at his time was one of the most influential German physicians and whose ideas are living even nowadays. Three letters to Brockhaus that have been found recently document an ambivalent attitude towards this publisher.

  15. Centennial of Röntgen's discovery of x-rays.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, R I

    1996-01-01

    November 8, 1995, marked the 100th anniversary of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery of x-rays. This remarkable scientific achievement has had an effect on medicine and science that has been matched by few other advances. I will briefly review the events leading up to Röntgen's discovery and the subsequent development of radiology as a discipline. PMID:8764624

  16. Integrating Fiction and Nonfiction Reading into the Business Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Judy; Pedersen, Erin

    2013-01-01

    One goal of high school teachers is to help students appreciate that reading does not end when they leave the classroom. When students find reading meaningful, they are more likely to see themselves as readers and choose to read long after they leave the classroom setting (Hinchman, Alvermann, Boyd, Brozo, & Vacca, 2003-2004; Wilhelm, 2001).…

  17. Closed-Loop Control of Fluid Therapy for Treatment of Hypovolemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    hypovolemic volunteers. Anesthesiology. 1999;90:81–91. 37. Konrad C, Markl T, Schuepfer G, et al. The effects of in vitro hemodilution with gelatin ...hydroxyethyl starch , and lactated Ringer’s solution on markers of coagulation: an analysis using SONOCLOT. Anesth Analg. 1999;88:483–488. 38. Dubick MA, Davis...1995;3:137–144. 39. Prien T, Thülig B, Wüsten R, et al. Effects of hypertonic saline- hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch infusion prior to coronary

  18. OmegaCAM: The VST Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellarao, E.

    2005-06-01

    OmegaCAM is the large-format CCD pixels imaging camera that has been designed to exploit the square degree field of view of the VST while sampling the excellent seeing of Paranal (Kuijken et al. 2002, The Messenger 110, 15). The instrument is built by a consortium which comprises institutes in the Netherlands, Germany and Italy, and is headed by PI Konrad Kuijken (Groningen and Leiden University) with co-PI's Ralf Bender (Munich USM/MPE) and Enrico Cappellaro (INAF Naples), and project management by Bernhard Muschielok and Reinhold Häfner (USM). The Optical Detector Team at ESO has designed and built the detector system.

  19. Prediction of contaminant migration around radioactive waste repositories in salt formations in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Wollrath, J.

    1995-12-31

    With rock salt as host formation of a radioactive waste repository density effects on the groundwater movement have to be considered. Therefore, the assumptions, results and difficulties of modelling groundwater movement and taking into account density effects are presented and discussed with reference to the calculations performed for the Gorleben repository. The results are compared to results obtained in the safety analyses for the Konrad repository. It is shown that the consideration of variable groundwater density increases groundwater travel times and hence slows down the transport of contaminants from the repository location to the ground surface.

  20. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  1. Geochemistry of Slow-Growing Corals: Reconstructing Sea Surface Temperature, Salinity and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    of historical, geochemical proxies and I am grateful to have been given access to them. Konrad Hughen, William Curry, Edward Boyle and Scott Doney all...Micropaleontology, edited by Ramsay , A. T. S., pp. 1-100, Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1977. Beck, J. W., R. L. Edwards, E. Ito, F. W. Taylor, J. Recy, F...The Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean’s Science’s Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey, 2000. Gil, 1. M., F. Abrantes, and D. Hebbeln, The North

  2. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, Keith; Kephart, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    This online volume contains a selection of papers arising from two workshops organised within the six-month programme Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, from July to December 2012. The first of these was a 'satellite workshop' held at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS), Edinburgh, 15-19 October 2012, under the title Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, and with Scientific Organising Committee: Konrad Bajer (Warsaw), Mitchell Berger (Exeter), Steve Cowley (Culham Centre for Fusion Energy), Andrew Gilbert (Exeter), Gunnar Hornig (Dundee), and Clare Parnell (St Andrews). The second was the workshop Quantised Flux in Tightly Knotted and Linked Systems held at the Newton Institute, 3- 7 December 2012, with Scientific Organising Committee: Natalia Berloff (DAMTP, Cambridge), Anne-Christine Davis (DAMTP, Cambridge), Jason Cantarella (University of Georgia), Thomas Kephart (Vanderbilt University), Paul Sutcliffe (Durham University), and Tanmay Vachaspati (Arizona State University). Videos of the lectures given at this second workshop can be viewed at http://www.newton.ac.uk/webseminars. The papers published here follow a natural progression through the following topics: helicity and related invariants of magnetic fields in ideal MHD; relaxation under topological constraints; lower bounds on magnetic energy; current and vortex filaments; applications in the solar corona, tokamak plasmas, and cyclone dynamics; higher-order invariants; topology of curves and surfaces, and energy measures; tight knots; applications to Bose-Einstein condensates, QCD, and cosmic superstring theory. Some of the papers span more than one of these areas. We owe a great debt of gratitude to Konrad Bajer, who was one of the guiding spirits behind the whole Newton Institute program, and who took particular responsibility for the Satellite Workshop at ICMS

  3. 50 years of membership in AGU recognized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recently, 14 AGU members who joined the Union in 1937 received their recognition pins for 50 years of membership in the Union. They join the distinguished ranks of the 50- year AGU members, who are listed below by the year that they joined:1937 A.B. Bryan, Leonard B. Corwin, Tate Dalrymple, Richard H. Fleming, Harry L. Frauenthal, Konrad B. Krauskopf, J. Stuart Meyers, Brian O'Brien, Joseph F. Poland, Edward J. Rutter, Noel H. Stearn, John P. Tully, Victor Vacquier, G.H. Westby, and Harvey O. Westby.

  4. Freud, his illness, and ourselves.

    PubMed

    Haynal, André

    2008-06-01

    The history of Freud's illness shows that he tried to avoid confrontation with it, and to treat it as unimportant. In his personal letters, the ill body remains outside-as another person, "Konrad," not he himself-and it is not taken into account. Particularly in Freud's correspondence with Ferenczi, we realize to what extent certain phenomena, especially depressive ones, he considered somatic, with a tendency to dismiss them, and this despite important occasional insights, such as about the role played by hate in psychosomatic illnesses. In the post-Freudian development, these topics have been more and more integrated in the dialogue, in the discourse between the analyst and the analysand.

  5. Shot APPLE 2, A Test of the TEAPOT Series, 5 May 1955

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    volume: Shot BEE 9 Multi-shot volume: Shots ESS through MET and Shot ZUCCHINI , the Final TEAPOT ’rests. The volumes addressing the test events of...TURK "- TESLA ]2 \\ 91• POSTl -IL9 BEE ZUCCHINI APPLEl I -WS I -- ~L.. WASP S4 I7’I WASP PRIME APPLE 2 I MOTH HA ___ __ 0 HORNET HADR( I 1 31 I 1 S...roentgens, respectively. These officers were ordered not to enter contaminated areas for the one remaining shot of the series, ZUCCHINI . The other two

  6. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  7. Thyroid neoplasia following irradiation for medulloblastoma: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Roggli, V L; Estrada, R; Fechner, R E

    1979-06-01

    Thyroid neoplasms occurred in two patients 14 and 18 years after treatment with radiation for medulloblastoma. One patient has a papillary cancer and the other patient had multiple adenomas and a Hurthle cell adenoma. In addition, the latter case had foci of hyperplasia plus a microfollicular transformation, which has not been described in association with prior thyroid irradiation. The radiation doses delivered to the thyroid through posterior cervical spinal ports (2000--3000 roentgens) fall within the upper range of radiation dosage associated with induction of neoplastic changes within the thyroid.

  8. Effect of varying ventricular function by extrasystolic potentiation on closure of the mitral valve.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, R. A.; Williams, J. C. P.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood , E. H.

    1971-01-01

    Mitral regurgitant indexes were measured by roentgen videodensitometry in anesthetized dogs without thoracotomy before, during and after extrasystolic potentiation of ventricular contraction while the atria and ventricles were driven in normal temporal sequence simultaneously or in such a way as to induce atrial fibrillation. Small amounts of mitral reflux were observed with simultaneous atrial and ventricular driving and with atrial fibrillation in the control measurements before initiation of extrasystolic potentiation. Reflux became negligible during extrasystolic potentiation and increased beyond control levels after termination of extrasystolic potentiation.

  9. A soft X-ray image of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.; Snowden, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A soft X-ray image of the moon obtained by the Roentgen Observatory Satellite ROSAT clearly shows a sunlit crescent, demonstrating that the moon's X-ray luminosity arises from backscattering of solar X-rays. The moon's optically dark side is also X-ray dark, and casts a distinct shadow on the diffuse cosmic X-ray background. Unexpectedly, the dark side seems to emit X-rays at a level about one percent of that of the bright side; this emission very probably results from energetic solar-wind electrons striking the moon's surface.

  10. Contributions from Women to the Radiation Sciences: A Brief History.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Nicole E

    2017-04-01

    Contributions from men to radiation science are well known, particularly the early contributions from such luminaries as William Roentgen, James Chadwick, Niels Bohr, Robert Oppenheimer, and the like. Although not ignored per se, beyond Marie Curie and Lise Meitner, the contributions of female nuclear scientists are not as widely recognized. This paper provides a concise historical summary of contributions to radiation science from the discovery of radiation through the current status of international leadership within the radiation protection community. Beyond lead scientists and academics, this paper also considers support personnel as well as the role women have played in the advancement of radiation epidemiology.

  11. New Perspectives in the German Final Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thomauske, B.R.

    2007-07-01

    In Germany the Federal Government is responsible for the final disposal of radioactive waste. There is an actual need for a repository for wastes with negligible heat generation (low and intermediate level wastes). The former iron ore mine Konrad, licensed for this type of waste in 2002, could solve this problem and start operation about 2010. A repository for high active heat generating waste is needed by 2030. The Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety has decided, however, to interrupt the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome and to restart an alternative site selection procedure from the very beginning. Following this procedure, it will not be possible to have a repository in operation before 2050. In order to solve the question of final disposal in Germany it is necessary to start the construction of the Konrad repository and to continue the underground exploration of the Gorleben salt dome immediately. An alternative site selection procedure would postpone the start of final disposal by decades and lead to additional costs amounting to billions of euros. It would not be possible to have a repository for high-level radioactive waste in operation by 2030 and the task to solve the waste management issue would be shifted to future generations. (authors)

  12. Disposal of LLW and ILW in Germany - Characterisation and Documentation of Waste Packages with Respect to the Change of Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bandt, G.; Spicher, G.; Steyer, St.; Brennecke, P.

    2008-07-01

    Since the 1998 termination of LLW and ILW emplacement in the Morsleben repository (ERAM), Germany, the treatment, conditioning and documentation of radioactive waste products and packages have been continued on the basis of the waste acceptance requirements as of 1995, prepared for the Konrad repository near Salzgitter in Lower Saxony, Germany. The resulting waste products and packages are stored in interim storage facilities. Due to the Konrad license issued in 2002 the waste acceptance requirements have to be completed by additional requirements imposed by the licensing authority, e. g. for the declaration of chemical waste package constituents. Therefore, documentation of waste products and packages which are checked by independent experts and are in parts approved by the responsible authority (Office for Radiation Protection, BfS) up to now will have to be checked again for fulfilling the final waste acceptance requirements prior to disposal. In order to simplify these additional checks, databases are used to ensure an easy access to all known facts about the waste packages. A short balance of the existing waste products and packages which are already checked and partly approved by BfS as well as an overview on the established databases ensuring a fast access to the known facts about the conditioning processes is presented. (authors)

  13. Otto Hahn: Responsibility and Repression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark

    2006-05-01

    The role that Otto Hahn (1879 1968) played in the discovery of nuclear fission and whether Lise Meitner (1878 1968) should have shared the Nobel Prize for that discovery have been subjects of earlier studies, but there is more to the story. I examine what Hahn and the scientists in his Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry in Berlin-Dahlem did during the Third Reich, in particular, the significant contributions they made to the German uranium project during the Second World War. I then use this as a basis for judging Hahn’s postwar apologia as the last president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and first president of its successor, the Max Planck Society.

  14. The Politics of Memory: Otto Hahn and the Third Reich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2006-03-01

    As President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and its successor, the Max Planck Society, from 1946 until 1960, Otto Hahn (1879 1968) sought to portray science under the Third Reich as a purely intellectual endeavor untainted by National Socialism. I outline Hahn’s activities from 1933 into the postwar years, focusing on the contrast between his personal stance during the National Socialist period, when he distinguished himself as an upright non-Nazi, and his postwar attitude, which was characterized by suppression and denial of Germany’s recent past. Particular examples include Hahn’s efforts to help Jewish friends; his testimony for colleagues involved in denazification and on trial in Nuremberg; his postwar relationships with émigré colleagues, including Lise Meitner; and his misrepresentation of his wartime work in the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry.

  15. A 'German world' shared among doctors: a history of the relationship between Japanese and German psychiatry before World War II.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akira

    2013-06-01

    This article deals with the critical history of German and Japanese psychiatrists who dreamed of a 'German world' that would cross borders. It analyses their discourse, not only by looking at their biographical backgrounds, but also by examining them in a wider context linked to German academic predominance and cultural propaganda before World War II. By focusing on Wilhelm Stieda, Wilhelm Weygandt and Kure Shuzo, the article shows that the positive evaluation of Japanese psychiatry by the two Germans encouraged Kure, who was eager to modernize the treatment of and institutions for the mentally ill in Japan. Their statements on Japanese psychiatry reflect their ideological and historical framework, with reference to national/ethnic identity, academic position, and the relationship between Germany and Japan.

  16. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 9; (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions deal with astronomical events of the past 1000 years. We elucidate the person of the single European observer of the supernova of 1006, and the views of Christoph Scheiner and Otto von Guericke on the structure and substance of the cosmos. A study of the development of the Copernican and the cosmological principles conclude this group of themes. Biographical investigations were carried out on the clockmaker Nikolaus Lilienfeld, the astronomers Johann Wurzelbau, Friedrich Wilhelm Toennies and Boris Karpov as well as the “panbabylonist” Alfred Jeremias. Astronomers can be active also in poetry and fiction. This is shown in the studies of Johann Leonard Rost and Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel. Finally, Johannes Hevelius' Observatory in Danzig/Gdansk, destroyed by a fire in 1679, is reconstructed by means of printed sources, old maps and photographs. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  17. Anomalous Earth flybys of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2015-07-01

    A small deviation from the potential is expected for the gravitational interaction of extended bodies. It is explained as a consequence of a recently proposed gravitational impact model (Wilhelm et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 343:135-144, 2013) and has been applied to anomalous perihelion advances by Wilhelm and Dwivedi (New Astron. 31:51-55, 2014). The effect—an offset of the effective gravitational centre from the geometric centre of a spherical symmetric body—might also be responsible for the observed anomalous orbital energy gains and speed increases during Earth flybys of several spacecraft. However, close flybys would require detailed considerations of the orbit geometry. In this study, an attempt is made to explain the anomalous Earth flybys of the Galileo, NEAR Shoemaker and Rosetta spacecraft.

  18. Helmholtz and the psychophysiology of time.

    PubMed

    Debru, C

    2001-09-01

    After having measured the velocity of the nervous impulse in the 1850s, Helmholtz began doing research on the temporal dimensions of visual perception. Experiments dealing with the velocity of propagation in nerves (as well as with aspects of perception) were carried out occasionally for some fifteen years until their final publication in 1871. Although the temporal dimension of perception seems to have interested Helmholtz less than problems of geometry and space, his experiments on the time of perception were technically rather subtle and seminal, especially compared with experiments performed by his contemporaries, such as Sigmund Exner, William James, Rudolf Hermann Lotze, Ernst Mach, Wilhelm Volkmann, and Wilhelm Wundt. Helmholtz's conception of the temporal aspects of perception reflects the continuity that holds between psychophysiological research and the Kantian philosophical background.

  19. The role of tone sensation and musical stimuli in early experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the role of music in early experimental psychology is examined. Initially, the research of Wilhelm Wundt is considered, as tone sensation and musical elements appear as dominant factors in much of his work. It is hypothesized that this approach was motivated by an understanding of psychology that dates back to Christian Wolff 's focus on sensation in his empirical psychology of 1732. Wolff, however, had built his systematization of psychology on Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, who combined perception with mathematics,and referred to music as the area in which sensation is united with numerical exactitude. Immanuel Kant refused to accept empirical psychology as a science, whereas Johann Friedrich Herbart reintroduced the scientific basis of empirical psychology by, among other things, referring to music.

  20. Authorship Discovery in Blogs Using Bayesian Classification with Corrective Scaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    4 2.3 W. Fucks ’ Diagram of n-Syllable Word Frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.1 Confusion Matrix for All Test Documents of 500...of the books which scholars believed he had. • Wilhelm Fucks discriminated between authors using the average number of syllables per word and average...distance between equal-syllabled words [8]. Fucks , too, concluded that a study such as his reveals a “possibility of a quantitative classification

  1. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota.

  2. JPRS Report, Science & Technology: Europe, Economic Competitiveness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Americans and Japa- nese already announced the information society, in Ger- many Wilhelm Fucks’s book was still a best seller. Fucks believed that...ranging study on the cost to industry of not investing enough in education. The committee feels that all young Europeans should leave school with...needed to attract women into the world of industry. Young people in general are said to be put off by the idea of making a career in scientific or

  3. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Political Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-30

    Churchill, and leading associates of fascist Germany’s secret security service Wilhelm Hettl (Walter Hagen) and Walter Schellenberg mention this in...existence of imaginary ties between Tukhachevskiy and the German General Staff." In their memoirs Hagen and Schellenberg assert that Hitler approved...this plan. In early 1937 Schellenberg received an order to draw up a study about the history of relationships between the Red Army and the Reichs

  4. Ethics and the Military Profession War and Morality,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    System, The Unjustifiability of War,and The Alternative to War. Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich . Hegel’s Philosophy of Right. Trans. T. M. Knox. Oxford...waits for the proper occasion to be expressed. Nietzsche , Friedrich . Thus Spake Zarathustra. New York: Modern Library, 1966. Written in 1892, the...Meinecke, Friedrich . Machiavellism: The Doctrine of Raison d’ Etat and Its Place in Modern History. Trans. Douglas Scott. London: Routledge and Paul

  5. Population Analysis: A Methodology for Understanding Populations in COIN Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    predict cause and effect of human 30 behavior. In the late 19th century, Wilhelm Wundt founded the first psychology department at the University of...on the application of power with respect to managing people, organizations, markets, and populations. Philosophers and authors such as Friedrich ... Nietzsche , Jeffery Pfeffer, Bertram Raven, and John French have each laid out models by which power, and its implementation can be better understood

  6. The Unnecessary Front: Reconsidering The Corps’s East Asian Bases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-10

    database . 2 Chanlett-Avery, E., & Konishi, W. (2009). The Changing U.S.-Japan Alliance: Implications for U.S. Interests: RL33740. Congressional...Research Service: Report, 1-23. Retrieved from International Security & Counter Terrorism Reference Center database . 3 John C. Wilhelm, “US Military...34 Congressional Research Service: Report (February 24, 2010): 1-22. International Security & Counter Terrorism Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed

  7. Conflict or Consensus: East Germany, the Soviet Union and Deutschlandpolitik 1958-1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    the current situation as it has developed in the German Question is staggering". rRef. 62: P. 1143 Furthermore, as ... Wilhelm Bruns has claimed in his...stable leadership condition to develop. This, according to Carl A. Linden, accounts in part "for the stormy and dynamic quality of Soviet politics in the...negotiations. Domestic political differences put off the final negotiations between West German Foreign Minister Scheel and Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko

  8. The Operational Level of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Ramsay III, Dr. William G. Robertson, Major Claude R. Sasso, and Lieutenant Colonel Gary H. Wade. We owe special thanks to a few individuals who...initially assembled this bibliography in response to a requirement by Brigadier General William A. Stofft, then a colonel and director of CSI...and World War I. This battle analysis is accomplished largely at the operational level and is beneficial to the reader. Balck, Wilhelm ( William

  9. The type specimen of Anoura geoffroyi lasiopyga (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Gardner, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1868, Wilhelm Peters described Glossonycteris lasiopyga, based on a specimen provided by Henri de Saussure and collected in Mexico. The type specimen was presumed to be among those housed in the collections of the Zoologisches Museum of the Humboldt Universitat in Berlin, Germany. Our study of one of Saussure?s specimens from Mexico, discovered in the collections of the Museum d?Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland, demonstrates that it and not one of the Berlin specimens is the holotype.

  10. Hind, John R (1823-1895)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    English astronomer, discovered in 1852 a small nebula in Taurus which, in 1861, was found by HEINRICH D'ARREST to have disappeared. By the end of the year, D'Arrest and OTTO WILHELM STRUVE had recovered it. Hind's variable nebula, as it came to be called, demonstrated that at least some nebulae were small, as nothing larger than a light year in dimension can disappear in a year. The nebula is a ...

  11. The East German Research Landscape in Transition Part A: Status and Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-02

    governed by Marxist ideology such as jurisprudence, history, social sciences; and, second, engineering and business management because of the impending...or organizations including such institutes; several of which are located outside of Germany: Federal Ministry for Labor and Social Affairs (2...Telefax: +37 (091) 53409 or 51959 The Ministry is on Breiter Weg (the former Karl-Marx StraBe) north of Wilhelm Pieck Allee, near Alter Markt . Non

  12. 21ST Century United States Military Strategy for East Asia: Countering an Emerging China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    with other nations.16 China opened its diplomatic and economic doors in the 1960s and 1970s. At first glance it might appear as a symbolic gesture to be...both the U.S. and China have avoided direct military engagement, tacitly acknowledging the potential consequences of open conflict on their...Dragon or Dinosaur ? Nuclear Weapons in a Modernizing China, ”Parameters 34 (Winter 2003-04): 101. 6 Alfred D. Wilhelm, Jr., The Chinese at the

  13. Wiener Geologen im Spiegel des Geologenarchivs. Kober - Kieslinger - Ampferer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, I.; Seibold, E.

    2001-05-01

    The bulk of the correspondence in the Geologenarchiv comes in two major groups:a) letters relating mainly to professional matters and b) letters containing predominantly personal communication. This will be demonstrated by material relating to the three above mentioned Viennese Geologists: Leopold Kober's letter to Wilhelm Salomon-Calvi and the correspondence between Alois Kieslinger and Eugen Wegmann are mainly professional, whereas Otto Ampferer's letters to the Bavarian glaciologist Edith Ebers are a documentation of personal friendship.

  14. Karl Julius Lohnert - an unknown astronomer, experimental psychologist and teacher (German Title: Karl Julius Lohnert - ein unbekannter Astronom, experimenteller Psychologe und Lehrer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmadel, Lutz D.; Guski-Leinwand, Susanne

    2011-08-01

    Karl Julius Lohnert (1885-1944) with his double biography as astronomer and psychologist is hardly known in both fields. As a student of astronomy in Heidelberg, Lohnert discovered a couple of minor planets and he dedicated one to his PhD supervisor, the famous Leipzig professor for philosophy, Wilhelm Wundt. This connection is discussed for the first time almost one century after the naming of (635) Vundtia. The paper elucidates some biographical stations of Lohnert.

  15. On the potential energy in a gravitationally bound two-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2015-01-01

    The potential energy problem in a gravitationally bound two-body system is studied in the framework of a recently proposed impact model of gravity (Wilhelm et al., 2013). The concept of a closed system has been modified, before the physical processes resulting in the liberation of the potential energy can be described. The energy is extracted from the background flux of hypothetical interaction entities.

  16. Rebuttal to the comment by Malhotra and Strom on "Constraints on the source of lunar cataclysm impactors"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćuk, Matija; Gladman, Brett J.; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2011-11-01

    Ćuk et al. (Ćuk, M. Gladman, B.J., Stewart, S.T. [2010]. Icarus 207 590-594) concluded that the the lunar cataclysm (late heavy bombardment) was recorded in lunar Imbrian era craters, and that their size distribution is different from that of main belt asteroids (which may have been the dominant pre-Imbrian impactors). This result would likely preclude the asteroid belt as the direct source of lunar cataclysm impactors. Malhotra and Strom (Malhotra, R., Strom, R.G. [2011]. Icarus) maintain that the lunar impactor population in the Imbrian era was the same as in Nectarian and pre-Nectarian periods, and this population had a size distribution identical to that of main belt asteroids. In support of this claim, they present an Imbrian size distribution made from two data sets published by Wilhelms et al. (Wilhelms, D.E., Oberbeck, V.R., Aggarwal, H.R. [1978]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 9, 3735-3762). However, these two data sets cannot be simply combined as they represent areas of different ages and therefore crater densities. Malhotra and Strom (Malhotra, R., Strom, R.G. [2011]. Icarus) differ with the main conclusion of Wilhelms et al. (Wilhelms, D.E., Oberbeck, V.R., Aggarwal, H.R. [1978]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 9, 3735-3762) that the Nectarian and Imbrian crater size distributions were different. We conclude that the available data indicate that the lunar Imbrian-era impactors had a different size distribution from the older ones, with the Imbrian impactor distribution being significantly richer in small impactors than that of older lunar impactors or current main-belt asteroids.

  17. A biographical note on Max Friedrich (1856-1887), Wundt's first PhD student in experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Cezary W

    2004-01-01

    This article unveils some previously unknown facts about the short life of Max Friedrich (1856-1887), the author in 1881 of the first PhD dissertation on experimental psychology, written under the supervision of Wilhelm Wundt: "On the Duration of Apperception for Simple and Complex Visual Stimuli." The article describes Friedrich's family background and life, professional career as a teacher, and works in psychology and mathematics.

  18. Differing Event-Related Patterns of Gamma-Band Power in Brain Waves of Fast- and Slow-Reacting Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Wilhelm Wundt proposed that there are two types of subjects in sim- ple RT experiments: fast-reacting subjects, who respond before they fully...quickly as possible to auditory stimuli. This result appears to confirm long-standing speculations of Wundt that fast- and slow-reacting subjects...accord with the hypothesis of Wundt and others that slower ("sensorial") responders wait to fully perceive a stimulus and then react to their perception

  19. Learning to Obtain Reward, but Not Avoid Punishment, Is Affected by Presence of PTSD Symptoms in Male Veterans: Empirical Data and Computational Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-27

    Volume 8 | Issue 8 | e72508 44. Blanchard EB, Jones-Alexander J, Buckley TC, Forneris CA (1996) Psychomet- ric properties of the PTSD checklist (PCL...validity, and diagnostic utility. Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. San Antonio, TX. 46. Gladstone GL, Parker G...positive adults: A cross-sectional controlled study. AIDS Care 20: 1279–1283. 52. Gladstone GL, Parker GB, Mitchell PB, Wilhelm KA, Malhi GS (2005

  20. [THE HANOVERIAN SCHOLAR AND THE DOCTOR OF THE PEASANTS].

    PubMed

    Giampietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Bernardino Ramazzini met in Modena in autumn 1689, and made friends. Rereading their correspondence and finding other coeval documents, the author reconstructs a scientific relation forgotten by historians. They not only discussed on air pollution, artesian wells and barometric forecast, but - more generally - favored the foundation of social medicine on epidemiology. Hence the Leibnizian contribution to the European fortune of Third Hippocrates.

  1. [Historical development of anthropology in Basel].

    PubMed

    Bay, R

    1986-12-01

    The author reports on the history of physical anthropology in Basel (Switzerland). The anthropological research activities of Carl Gustav Jung (1794-1864), Wilhelm His-Vischer (1831-1904), Ludwig Rütimeyer (1825-1895), Julius Kollmann (1834-1918), Paul and Fritz Sarasin (P.: 1856-1924; F.: 1859-1942), Felix Speiser (1880-1949) and the author himself (b. 1909) are described in detail.

  2. Lecture Notes on Engineering Measurement for Software Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    atmospheric pressure, ioniza- tion of either sign equal to one electrostatic unit of charge Nikola Tesla American physi- tesla : magnetic 1 weber per...scale) Charles R. Richter (scale) Michael Faraday (2 answers) Wilhelm Rontgen Enrico Fermi Nikola Tesla Karl Friedrich Gauss Allesandro Volta Joseph... tesla matician, astro- flux density nomer 1777-1855 Joseph Henry American physi- henry: inductance inductance of a circuit in which cist 1797-1878 the

  3. [Kastner and Trommsdorff].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, C

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the connection between Karl Wilhelm Gottlob Kastner (1783-1857) and Johann Bartholomäus Trommsdorff (1770-1837). Kastner was the teacher of Justus Liebig (1803-1873) in Bonn and Erlangen. The correspondence, which includes unpublished letters from Kastner to Trommsdorff, presents a wealth of detailed information for the biographies of Kastner and Trommsdorff.

  4. Soil Improvement Through Vibro-Compaction and Vibro-Replacement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-28

    controlled improvement of ground materials to form part of the geotechnical construction system (Welsh, 1991). Some of the technologies include...to find stone column technology originating in Germany with the company Wilhelm Degen founded (Glover, 1982). Stone column technology is a logical...occurs, vertical strains will be less than twice the radial strains. This outward movement of the column is enough to mobLilize the passive resistance

  5. The Statistical Interpretation of Entropy: An Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmberlake, Todd

    2010-11-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, which states that the entropy of an isolated macroscopic system can increase but will not decrease, is a cornerstone of modern physics. Ludwig Boltzmann argued that the second law arises from the motion of the atoms that compose the system. Boltzmann's statistical mechanics provides deep insight into the functioning of the second law and also provided evidence for the existence of atoms at a time when many scientists (like Ernst Mach and Wilhelm Ostwald) were skeptical.

  6. Air-borne fungi in the air of Barcelona (Spain). III. The genus Aspergillus Link.

    PubMed

    Calvo, A; Guarro, J; Suarez, G; Ramirez, C

    1980-05-01

    During a survey on the presence of species of the genus Aspergillus in the air of the city of Barcelona (Spain), the following species were identified: Aspergillus flavus Link, A. niger van Tieghem, A. fumigatus Fresenius, A. clavatus Desmazières, A. terreus Thom, A. chevalieri (Mang.) Thom et Church, A. niveus Bloch, emend. Thom et Church, A. ochraceus Wilhelm, A. versicolor (Vuillemin) Tiraboschi, and A. amstelodami (Mang.) Church et Thom.

  7. The eROSITA All-Sky Survey and its spectroscopic follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, Mara

    2015-08-01

    eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) is the core instrument on the Russian/German Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) mission which is current scheduled for launch in 2016. In the soft band (0.5-2 keV), the deep All-sky survey will be 30 times more sensitive than the previous ROSAT All-sky survey, while the first ever true all-sky survey will be mapped in the hard band (2-8 keV).The design driving science is the detection of large samples of galaxy clusters to redshifts z > 1, in order to study the large scale structure in the Universe and test cosmological models including Dark Energy. In addition, eROSITA is expected to yield a sample of around 3 million active galactic nuclei, which is bound to revolutionize our view of the evolution of supermassive black holes and their impact on the process of structure formation in the Universe.I will review the main characteristics of eROSITA All-sky survey, with an eye also on the planned spectroscopic follow-up of the sources with SDSS-IV/SPIDERS and ESO/4MOST.

  8. Intravenous Angiocardiography Using Digital Image Processing: Experience With Axial Projections In Normal Pigs And In Pigs With Experimentally Generated Left-To-Right Shunts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, Hugo G.; Bursch, Joachim H.; Brennecke, Rudiger; Heintzen, Paul H.

    1981-11-01

    Computerized digitization and processing of roentgen video images recorded at a rate of 50 per second was tested in intravenous angiocardiography in normal pigs weighing 15 to 20 kg. Roentgen video images were recorded in the 4-chamber view obtained by 30-35 degrees caudocranial angulation of the x-ray tube and 50-60 degrees LAO obliquity in the pig. Significant contrast enhancement was obtained through ECG-gated background subtraction and rescaling after integration of multiple background as well as contrast images. Occasionally, histogram equalization was used to further enhance contrast. To study temporal changes in cardiac motion, time parameter extraction or functional imaging was applied as well. The left and right heart were well visualized after intravenous injection of 1/3-1 cc. 76% Urografin per kg. bodyweight. Special purpose processing like subtraction of the end systolic phase from the end diastolic in the left and right ventricles as well as subtraction of the right ventricular phase from the left ventricular phase was also performed. If the left ventricular end systolic phase was subtracted from the end diastolic, most of the left atrium was also subtracted whereby the left ventricle was seen without continuity or superimposition of the left atrium. Experimentally generated ventricular and atrial septal defects as well as patent ductus arteriosus could be detected using the described technique. The results of the animal experiments became the basis for subsequent applications in children with congenital heart disease.

  9. Becquerel and the discovery of radioactivity: early concepts.

    PubMed

    Blaufox, M D

    1996-07-01

    It has been 100 years since Becquerel discovered radioactivity shortly after he learned of Roentgens discovery of x-rays at a meeting of the French Academy of Science. His discovery in 1896 was a direct consequence of his work and that of his father and grandfather on phosphorescence and fluorescence. It resulted from the serendipitous use of uranium salts, which have known phosphorescent properties, to reproduce Roentgen rays with the mistaken notion that they were a related phenomenon. Intense investigation by Becquerel and others rapidly revealed the differences in these radiations and led to the discovery of beta, alpha, and gamma rays and the properties of radioactivity in numerous other substances. The work of Becquerel was acknowledged by Madame Curie to be the primary influence on the direction of her thesis toward the work that led to the isolation of radium and the introduction by her of the term radioactivity to describe these phenomena. Although the unit of radioactivity is now called the Becquerel in acknowledgement of his accomplishments, few people, even in the nuclear medicine field, are fully aware of the breadth and importance of his work. This article hopefully will help to resolve this.

  10. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    PubMed

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and

  11. Characterization of radioactive wastes with respect to harmful materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, Karin; Steyer, Stefan; Brennecke, Peter; Gruendler, Detlef; Boetsch, Wilma; Haider, Claudia

    2013-07-01

    In addendum 4 to the license of the German KONRAD repository, which considers mainly radiological aspects, a water law permit was issued in order to prevent the pollution of the near-surface groundwater. The water law permit stipulates limitations for 10 radionuclides and 2 groups of radionuclides as well as mass limitations for 94 substances and materials relevant for water protection issues. Two collateral clauses, i.e. additional requirements imposed by the licensing authority, include demands on the monitoring, registering and balancing of non-radioactive harmful substances and materials /1/. In order to fulfill the requirements of the water law permit the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) being the operator of the KONRAD repository has developed a concept, which ensures the compliance with all requirements of the water law permit and which provides standardized easy manageable guidance for the waste producers to describe their wastes. On 15 March 2011 the competent water authority, the 'Niedersaechsischer Landesbetrieb fuer Wasserwirtschaft, Kuesten- und Naturschutz' (NLWKN) issued the approval for this concept. Being the most essential part of this concept the procedural method and the developed description of nonradioactive waste package constituents by use of standardized lists of materials and containers is addressed and presented in this paper. The waste producer has to describe his waste package in a standardized way on the base of the lists of materials and containers. For each material in the list a comprehensive description is given comprising the composition, scope of application, quality control measures, thresholds and other data. Each entry in the list has to be approved by NLWKN. The scope of the lists is defined by the waste producers' needs. Using some particular materials as examples, the approval procedure for including materials in the list is described. The procedure of describing the material composition has to be

  12. Superconducting qubits on the way to a quantum processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank

    2007-03-01

    generalization of cavity quantum electrodynamics effects [8].[1] M.R. Geller, E.J. Pritchett, A.T. Sornborger, and F.K. Wilhelm quant-ph/0603224 [2] A.G. Fowler, W. Thompson, Z. Yan, A.H. Majedi, and F.K. Wilhelm, in preparation[3] R. de Sousa, K.B. Whaley, F.K. Wilhelm, and J. von Delft, Phys. Rev. Lett 95, 247006 (2005)[5] A.K. Sporl, T. Schulte-Herbrueggen, S.J. Glaser, V. Bergholm, M.J. Storcz, J. Ferber, and F.K. Wilhelm quant-ph/0504202[6] P. Rebentrost, I. Serban, T. Schulte-Herbrueggen, and F.K. Wilhelm, in preparation[7] M. Mariantoni, M.J. Storcz, F.K. Wilhelm, W.D. Oliver, A. Emmert, A. Marx, R. Gross, H. Christ, and E. Solano, cond-mat/0509737[8] I. Serban, E. Solano, F.K. Wilhelm, cond-mat/0606734.

  13. [The development of betatrons in the Siemens centers of Berlin and Erlangen].

    PubMed

    Usch, Uwe; Bautz, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Starting from the fundaments set by Rolf Wideroe and Max Steenbeck, the first medical betatron was developed by Konrad Gund at the Siemens centre in Erlangen. This was the first highly sophisticated, large-scale technical device in medicine. Over a period of 30 years Siemens has manufactured a total of 137 betatrons with different maximum energies and sold them worldwide to scientific institutes and radiotherapy departments, among them the most prestigious therapy centres in Germany and Europe. Methodological investigations on high energy electrons und ultrahard X-rays have paved the way for the establishment of the modern high-energy radiation therapy. The interdisciplinary and increasingly more biophysics-oriented research on and with betatrons has had a decisive influence on the establishment of the profession of the medical physicist.

  14. LL/ILW: Post-Qualification of Old Waste through Non-Destructive Extraction of Barrels from Cement Shields - 13535

    SciTech Connect

    Oehmigen, Steffen; Ambos, Frank

    2013-07-01

    Currently there is a large number of radioactive waste drums entombed in cement shields at German nuclear power plants. These concrete containers used in the past for the waste are not approved for the final repository. Compliance with current acceptance criteria of the final repository has to be proven by qualification measures on the waste. To meet these criteria, a new declaration and new packing is necessary. A simple non-destructive extraction of about 2000 drums from their concrete shields is not possible. So different methods were tested to find a way of non-destructive extraction of old waste drums from cement shields and therefore reduce the final repository volume and final repository costs by using a container accepted and approved for Konrad. The main objective was to build a mobile system to offer this service to nuclear plant stations. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of Incident Risks in a Repository for Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Grundler, D.; Mariae, D.; Muller, W.; Boetsch, W.; Thiel, J.

    2008-07-01

    A probabilistic safety assessment of the operation phase of a repository for radioactive waste requires the knowledge of incident risks. These are evaluated from generic observations. The present method accounts for the uncertainty (1) of whether an incident occurs, (2) of the incident rate, (3) of the duration of generic observation, and (4) of the duration of operation phase of the repository. It yields a mean risk and its standard deviation from a minimum of generic data, comprising only the number of observed incidents and the duration of the observation, as more comprehensive generic data are seldom available. It was shown that incidents sharing a common generic observation must be either merged together to a total incident or the generic observation must be split up in sub-observations, one for each such incident. The method was tested on the example of the German Konrad repository for low-level waste in a deep geological formation. (authors)

  16. Darwin as a student of behavior.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    In The Expression of the Emotions, Charles Darwin documents evolutionary continuity between animals and humans, emphasizing the universality of expressions in man. Most of the book addresses human behavior, and its influence on the study of animal behavior has been weak. The issue of natural selection is remarkably absent from this book, which relies on the inheritance of acquired characters rather than on a genuine Darwinian logic. Yet Konrad Lorenz considered Darwin to be a forerunner of behavioral biology. The reason was to be found in The Descent of Man and chapter VIII of The Origin of Species, where Darwin provides an explanation of behavior through selection, stating that the same mechanisms explaining morphological changes also account for gradual improvements in instincts. He assessed the accuracy of his evolutionary theory by directly studying animal behavior, hence laying the foundations of behavioral research for the next century.

  17. Public and political issues in radioactive waste management in the Federal Republic of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Neis, A.

    1993-12-31

    The Federal Government`s radioactive waste management concept and regulations governing formal public participation in licensing procedures for radioactive waste management facilities are presented. The paper focuses on public and political issues arising from widely diverging views in different social groups on nuclear energy and on radioactive waste management. The resulting conflict between Federal and Laender (Federal constituent states) authorities and the actual course of public participation in a licensing procedure are illustrated with the example of planned final disposal of radioactive waste in the Konrad mine. Major national efforts to overcome the unsatisfying present situation are presented and the role of international consensus is briefly touched. Concluding remarks will particularly justify admissibility and emphasize the need to discuss and eventually decide on radioactive waste management issues regardless of diverging views on nuclear energy.

  18. Alois Alzheimer: A Hundred Years after the Discovery of the Eponymous Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tagarelli, Antonio; Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    The familiar term “Alzheimer’s disease” was coined by Emil Kraepelin to honour his pupil, Alois Alzheimer. However, little is known about the life of the man after whom this important and well-known disease was termed. On the centennial of the discovery of Alzheimer’s disease, it is appropriate to report some aspects of the life and scientific work of Alois Alzheimer. The authors contacted all the libraries of the Universities where Alzheimer studied and/or worked to receive any original material regarding Alois Alzheimer. This review is based for a most part on an original biography written by Konrad and Urlike Maurer after the interviews to Alzheimer’s nieces, Hildegard Koeppen, Ilse Lieblein, Bärbel Lippert, Karin Weiβ, and his nephew, Rupert Finsterwalder. The authors obtained this biography from the Central Library of Medicine in Koeln. PMID:23674983

  19. Synthesis of europium- or terbium-activated calcium tungstate phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgaciu, Flavia; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Ungur, Laura; Vadan, Maria; Vasilescu, Marilena; Nazarov, Mihail

    2001-06-01

    Utilization of luminescent substances in various optoelectronic devices depends on their luminescent properties and sensitivity to various excitation radiation as well as on particle size distribution and crystalline structure of luminous powders. Calcium tungstate phosphors are well excited with roentgen radiation, so that they are largely used for manufacture of x-ray intensifying screens. Being sensitive to short UV-radiation as well, they could be utilized in Plasma Display Panels or in advertising signs fluorescent tubes. In order to diversify the utilization possibilities of this tungstate class, luminescent powders based on CaWO4:Eu3+ and CaWO4:Tb3+ were synthesized and characterized. As compared with the starting self-activated phosphor, larger excitation wavelength domain and emission colors from blue-to-green-to- yellow-to-red were obtained. The good UV excitability and variable luminescence color recommend these phosphors for optoelectronic device manufacture.

  20. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis.

  1. FORMATION BY IRRADIATION OF AN EXPANDED, CELLULAR, POLYMERIC BODY

    DOEpatents

    Charlesby, A.; Ross, M.

    1958-12-01

    The treatment of polymeric esters of methacrylic acid having a softening polnt above 40 icient laborato C to form an expanded cellular mass with a smooth skin is discussed. The disclosed method comprises the steps of subjecting the body at a temperature below the softenpoint to a dose of at least 5 x lO/sup 6/ roentgen of gamma radiation from cobalt-60 source until its average molecular weight is reduced to a value within the range of 3 x lO/sup 5/ to 10/sup 4/, and heating at a temperature within the range of 0 to lO icient laborato C above its softening point to effect expansion.

  2. Initial performance parameters on FXR

    SciTech Connect

    Kulke, B.; Innes, T.G.; Kihara, R.; Scarpetti, R.D.

    1982-06-11

    Construction of the new flash x-ray induction LINAC (FXR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been completed. Initial tuning of the machine has produced stable current pulses in excess of 2 kA at the design energy of 20 MeV, with an 80 ns FWHM pulse width, producing single-pulse radiation doses near 500 Roentgen at one meter from the target. The electronic spot size on the bremsstrahlung target is estimated at 3 to 5 mm. In this paper we will discuss the basic FXR design; running-in and tuning of the machine; emittance measurements; beam stability; switch gap synchronization; and measurements of the radiation dose and angular distribution.

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the project Rio Blanco and surrounding area

    SciTech Connect

    Singman, L.V.

    1994-11-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, conducted an aerial radiation survey of the area surrounding ground zero of Project Rio Blanco in the northwestern section of Colorado in June 1993. The object of the survey was to determine if there were man-made radioisotopes on or near the surface resulting from a nuclear explosion in 1972. No indications of surface contamination were found. A search for the cesium-137 radioisotope was negative. The Minimum Detectable Activity for cesium-137 is presented for several detection probabilities. The natural terrestrial exposure rates in units of Roentgens per hour were mapped and are presented in the form of a contour map over-laid on an aerial photograph. A second team made independent ground-based measurements in four places within the survey area. The average agreement of the ground-based with aerial measurements was six percent.

  4. An intelligent ground operator support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goerlach, Thomas; Ohlendorf, Gerhard; Plassmeier, Frank; Bruege, Uwe

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents first results of the project 'Technologien fuer die intelligente Kontrolle von Raumfahrzeugen' (TIKON). The TIKON objective was the demonstration of feasibility and profit of the application of artificial intelligence in the space business. For that purpose a prototype system has been developed and implemented for the operation support of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), a scientific spacecraft designed to perform the first all-sky survey with a high-resolution X-ray telescope and to investigate the emission of specific celestial sources. The prototype integrates a scheduler and a diagnosis tool both based on artificial intelligence techniques. The user interface is menu driven and provides synoptic displays for the visualization of the system status. The prototype has been used and tested in parallel to an already existing operational system.

  5. Two spectral states of the black-hole candidate GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, S. V.; Borozdin, K. N.; Aleksandrovich, N. L.; Aref'ev, V. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Skinner, G. K.

    1997-07-01

    We performed two series of observations of the X-ray source GX 339-4, a black-hole candidate, between 1989 and 1994 using the TTM instrument of the Roentgen Observatory. In March 1989, the source was in a soft state with a spectrum described by a multicolor accretion disk model (Shakura and Sunyaev 1973). In March 1994, a hard state with a power-law spectrum and a transition from the hard to the soft state was observed. The spectral states of the source show similarities to the spectra of other black-hole candidates. The presence of two states is considered as evidence that GX 339-4 belongs to this class of objects.

  6. Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; Floyd, T.S.; Manchester, D.P.

    1986-10-01

    Microwave systems provide quick and easy determination of solids content of samples in high-level radioactive cells. In addition, dissolution of samples is much faster when employing microwave techniques. These are great advantages because work in cells,using master-slave manipulators through leaded glass walls, is normally slower by an order of magnitude than direct contact methods. This paper describes the modifiction of a moisture/solids analyzer microwave system and a drying/digestion microwave system for remote operation in radiation environments. The moisture/solids analyzer has operated satisfactorily for over a year in a gamma radiation field of 1000 roentgens per hour and the drying/digestion system is ready for installation in a cell.

  7. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of cell proliferation is studied in the lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose-rate of 10 roentgens per day for 105 days. Autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine were utilized. It was found that at least four compensatory mechanisms maintained a near-steady state of cellular growth: (1) an increase in the proportion of PAS-positive cells which stimulate mitotic activity, (2) maturation arrest of proliferating and differentiating cells which tend to replenish the cells damaged or destroyed by irradiation, (3) an increase in the proportion of cells proliferating, and (4) an increase in the proportion of precursor cells. The results are compared to previous findings observed in the thymus.

  8. Biomedical technology transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ongoing projects described address: (1) intracranial pressure monitoring; (2) versatile portable speech prosthesis; (3) cardiovascular magnetic measurements; (4) improved EMG biotelemetry for pediatrics; (5) ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration; (6) pediatric roentgen densitometry; (7) X-ray spatial frequency multiplexing; (8) mechanical impedance determination of bone strength; (9) visual-to-tactile mobility aid for the blind; (10) Purkinje image eyetracker and stabilized photocoalqulator; (11) neurological applications of NASA-SRI eyetracker; (12) ICU synthesized speech alarm; (13) NANOPHOR: microelectrophoresis instrument; (14) WRISTCOM: tactile communication system for the deaf-blind; (15) medical applications of NASA liquid-circulating garments; and (16) hip prosthesis with biotelemetry. Potential transfer projects include a person-portable versatile speech prosthesis, a critical care transport sytem, a clinical information system for cardiology, a programmable biofeedback orthosis for scoliosis a pediatric long-bone reconstruction, and spinal immobilization apparatus.

  9. Food Irradiation Is Done in Grays, not Rads

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2002-07-01

    One federal agency has chosen to use exclusively modern SI units of radiation dose in its regulations: the FDA. While not exactly hot news, this bold move by a U.S. government agency on November 26, 1997, should be noted by those who wish to encourage the switch from curies, working level months, rads, rems, and roentgens to becquerels, joule hours per cubic meter, grays, sieverts, and coulombs per kilogram. The regulation is 21 CFR 179, Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Food. Specifically, 21 CFR 179.26 (b) 8. permits meat irradiation up to 4.5 kGy for refrigerated meat and 7.0 kGy for frozen meat. Prior to the 1997 addition, radiation doses had been quoted in grays (kGy) with rad (Mrad) values in parentheses. In the 1997 addition, the Mrads disappeared.

  10. The axis of rotation of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, A; Svensson, O K; Németh, G; Selvik, G

    1989-01-01

    The axis of the talo-crural joint was analysed by roentgen stereophotogrammetry in eight healthy volunteers. Examinations were performed at 10 degrees increments of flexion and pronation/supination of the foot as well as medial and lateral rotation of the leg. Results indicate that the talo-crural joint axis changes continuously throughout the range of movement. In dorsiflexion it tended to be oblique downward and laterally. In rotation of the leg, the axis took varying inclinations between horizontal and vertical. All axes in each subject lay close to the midpoint of a line between the tips of the malleoli. Our study indicates that the talo-crural joint axis may alter considerably during the arc of motion and differ significantly between individuals. This prompts caution in the use of hinge axes in orthoses and prostheses for the ankle.

  11. [Crohn disease: diagnosis by graded compression ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Z; Makó, E; Dévai, T; Tulassay, Z

    1995-08-27

    Fifty-four patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel underwent ultrasound examination with graded compression. The pathologic sonographic findings were compared with the clinical, endoscopic and in 32 cases with the parallel performed CT and selective enterographic examinations. Of the 29 proven cases of Crohn's disease 26 (89.7%) had bowel wall thickening detectable with US. The change in the bowel wall structure correlated to the stage of the disease. The luminal narrowing, the mesenteric involvement, the enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the abscesses and fistulas were judged easily, but the length and the location of the bowel segment were estimated only approximately. The characteristic but nonspecific signs observed by ultrasound were found to be a useful adjunct to the endoscopic and roentgen examinations. The ultrasound with graded compression in our view is a well usable alternative method for both diagnosis and follow-up, informing about the transmural spread of the pathology.

  12. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS—Diagnosis in Peripheral Joint Affliction

    PubMed Central

    Mettier, Stacy R.

    1955-01-01

    The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in a typical case depends upon a history of pain and swelling of various joints throughout the body. In the first stages the disease usually involves only the small joints of the hands and feet, but sooner or later it spreads to the larger joints. This may be accompanied by fibrosis of one or more joints, causing disability ranging from disuse of one joint up to total incapacity. Diagnosis in early or atypical cases is often impossible until the patient has been under observation a long time. It is important that diagnosis be made as early as possible, in order that appropriate therapy may be started and ankylosis and disability of the joints prevented. Since laboratory procedures and roentgen films do not show early changes, emphasis is placed on the history and physical examination for diagnosis. PMID:14351989

  13. Recognition of distinctive patterns of gallium-67 distribution in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sulavik, S.B.; Spencer, R.P.; Weed, D.A.; Shapiro, H.R.; Shiue, S.T.; Castriotta, R.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Assessment of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga) uptake in the salivary and lacrimal glands and intrathoracic lymph nodes was made in 605 consecutive patients including 65 with sarcoidosis. A distinctive intrathoracic lymph node {sup 67}Ga uptake pattern, resembling the Greek letter lambda, was observed only in sarcoidosis (72%). Symmetrical lacrimal gland and parotid gland {sup 67}Ga uptake (panda appearance) was noted in 79% of sarcoidosis patients. A simultaneous lambda and panda pattern (62%) or a panda appearance with radiographic bilateral, symmetrical, hilar lymphadenopathy (6%) was present only in sarcoidosis patients. The presence of either of these patterns was particularly prevalent in roentgen Stages I (80%) or II (74%). We conclude that simultaneous (a) lambda and panda images, or (b) a panda image with bilateral symmetrical hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray represent distinctive patterns which are highly specific for sarcoidosis, and may obviate the need for invasive diagnostic procedures.

  14. Taste aversions conditioned with partial body radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R.; Spector, A.C. . Dept. of Psychology)

    1981-11-01

    Radiation-induced taste aversion was compared in rats which received partial body exposure to the head or abdomen with rats receiving whole body irradiation. Exposure levels ranged from 25 to 300 roentgens (R). In additional groups, saccharin aversion to partial body gamma ray exposures of the abdomen were conditioned in animals which had prior experience with the saccharin solution. Aversion was measured with a single-bottle short-term test, a 23-hour preference test and by the number of days taken to recover from the aversion. Whole-body exposure was most effective in conditioning the aversion, and exposure of the abdominal area was more effective than exposure to the head. Also, the higher the exposure, the stronger the aversion. Rats receiving prior experience with the saccharin did not condition as well as control rats with no prior saccharin experience. The possible role of radiation-induced taste aversion in human radiotherapy patients was discussed.

  15. New horizons for study of the cardiopulmonary and circulatory systems. [image reconstruction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of computer-controlled three-dimensional reconstruction techniques designed to determine the dynamic changes in the true shape and dimensions of the epi- and endocardial surfaces of the heart, along with variable time base (stop-action to real-time) displays of the transmural distribution of the coronary microcirculation and the three-dimensional anatomy of the macrovasculature in all regions of the body throughout individual cardiac and/or respiratory cycles. A technique for reconstructing a cross section of the heart from multiplanar videoroentgenograms is outlined. The capability of high spatial and high temporal resolution scanning videodensitometry makes possible measurement of the appearance, mean transit and clearance of roentgen opaque substances in three-dimensional space through the myocardium with a degree of simultaneous anatomic and temporal resolution not obtainable by current isotope techniques. The distribution of a variety of selected chemical elements or biologic materials within a body portion can also be determined.

  16. ROSI and GEANT4 - A comparison in the context of high energy X-ray physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiunke, Markus; Stritt, Carina; Schielein, Richard; Sukowski, Frank; Hölzing, Astrid; Zabler, Simon; Hofmann, Jürgen; Flisch, Alexander; Kasperl, Stefan; Sennhauser, Urs; Hanke, Randolf

    2016-06-01

    This work compares two popular MC simulation frameworks ROSI (Roentgen Simulation) and GEANT4 (Geometry and Tracking in its fourth version) in the context of X-ray physics. The comparison will be performed with the help of a parameter study considering energy, material and length variations. While the total deposited energy as well as the contribution of Compton scattering show a good accordance between all simulated configurations, all other physical effects exhibit large deviations in a comparison of data-sets. These discrepancies between simulations are shown to originate from the different cross sectional databases used in the frameworks, whereas the overall simulation mechanics seem to not have an influence on the agreement of the simulations. A scan over energy, length and material shows that the two parameters energy and material have a significant influence on the agreement of the simulation results, while the length parameter shows no noticeable influence on the deviations between the data-sets.

  17. A century of endodontics: from Philadelphia to Boston.

    PubMed

    Millstein, Charles B

    2010-01-01

    While Dr. Grossman was in Rostock with a letter of introduction from Dr. Prinz, he visited several distinguished dentists in Berlin. One was the aged Dr. Otto Walkoff, who, with the help of a physicist while in Wurzberg, was the first dentist to capture the image of a tooth soon after the discovery of radiology by Roentgen in 1895. At his home, Dr. Walkoff passed the X-ray tube head that had taken the historic film to Dr. Grossman, who then held this treasured artifact in his hands. This transfer of culture from Germany to the United States marked the beginning of modern endodontics. Similarly, when Dr. Goldman gave Dr. Schilder his backing by sending him to study under Dr. Grossman at the University of Pennsylvania, the progress of endodontic excellence moved forward, ensuring a Century of Endodontics.

  18. Radiation Protection in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, H. E.

    1964-01-01

    Factors that may reduce the dose of radiation, from diagnostic and therapeutic x-ray procedures, to the patient and to the occupational and non-occupational worker are outlined. Suitable basic radiation measuring apparatus is described. It is recommended that, in diagnostic radiography, relatively high kilovoltage, proper cones, collimation and adequate filtration be used. Some specific recommendations are made concerning fluoroscopic, photoroentgen and portable x-ray examinations. Film monitoring of personnel is advisable. Examples are given of protective devices to lessen the dosage to the occupational worker. It is the responsibility of the radiologist or physician in charge to ensure that the x-ray equipment is safe to operate and the radiation dose to the patient is kept to a minimum. The roentgen output for all radiographic examinations should be known by the responsible user. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:14199820

  19. Research and technology, 1990: Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Goddard celebrates 1990 as a banner year in space based astronomy. From above the Earth's obscuring atmosphere, four major orbiting observatories examined the heavens at wavelengths that spanned the electromagnetic spectrum. In the infrared and microwave, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), measured the spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic background radiation to extraordinary precision. In the optical and UV, the Hubble Space Telescope has returned spectacular high resolution images and spectra of a wealth of astronomical objects. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph has resolved dozens of UV spectral lines which are as yet unidentified because they have never before been seen in any astronomical spectrum. In x rays, the Roentgen Satellite has begun returning equally spectacular images of high energy objects within our own and other galaxies.

  20. The evolution of the quasar continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have in hand a large data base of Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), optical, and IR complementary data. We are in the process of obtaining a large amount of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data for the same quasar sample. For our complementary sample at high redshifts, where the UV was redshifted into the optical, we have just had approved large amounts of observing time to cover the quasar continuum in the near-IR using the new Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) array spectrographs. Ten micron, optical, and VLA radio, data also have approved time. An ISO US key program was approved to extend this work into the far-IR, and the launch of ASTRO-D (early in 1993) promises to extend it to higher energy X-rays.

  1. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART -XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module provides an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. We will present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  2. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  3. Spectrum-RG astrophysical project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlinsky, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.; Vikhlinin, A.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Arefiev, V.; Lapshov, I.; Akimov, V.; Levin, V.; Buntov, M.; Semena, N.; Grigorovich, S.; Babyshkin, V.; Predehl, P.; Hasinger, G.; Böhringer, H.; Schmitt, J.; Santangelo, A.; Schwope, A.; Wilms, J.

    2009-08-01

    The Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission will be launched in the 2012 year into a L2 orbit with Soyuz launcher and Fregat buster from Baikonur. The mission will conduct all-sky survey with X-ray mirror telescopes eROSITA and ART-XC up to 11 keV. It will allow detection of about 100 thousand clusters of galaxies and discovery large scale Universe structure. It will also discover all obscured accreting Black Holes in nearby galaxies and many (about 3 millions) new distant AGN. Then it is planned to observe dedicated sky regions with high sensitivity and thereafter to perform follow-up pointed observations of selected sources.

  4. Latitude and Longitude Patterns of Soft X-Rays Emitted from the Earth's Upper Atmosphere as Observed with the Coronas-F Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Spjeldvik, Walther; Martin, Inacio

    Long-term monitoring during 2001 through 2005 of the low energy 3-8 keV X-ray emission was carried out with CdTe solid state detector on Low Earth Orbit CORONAS-F spacecraft. Care was taken to exclude the sections of the spacecraft orbit where direct or scattered solar X-ray fluxes would reach the detector. We have found definite patterns as well as irregularities in these soft X-rays emanating from the upper Earth atmosphere. In the northern hemisphere we have found latitudinal distributions extending over +/- 10 degrees latitude centered on the middle latitudes and extending over half of the Earth latitude range. We report that the X-ray intensity is up to 10 kW in this soft X-ray band. Luminosity of the whole the Earth’s globe at altitude of 500 km amounts to several tens kW. The radiation possesses the seasonal variations; it intensity significantly depends on solar activity level. We reason that these X-ray fluxes can not be scattering solar roentgen ones as these photons are observed on night side of the Earth, and we note that solar roentgen emission has a little lower energy, typically less than about 2 keV. We surmise that the observed emission is mostly the result from Bremsstrahlung radiation due to magnetospheric electrons precipitating from the Earth’s radiation belts being influenced by electromagnetic disturbances of different origin (e.g., persistent ELF and VLF plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, possible ducted lightning electromagnetic emissions, electromagnetic pulses in earthquakes, enhancement of plasma waves geomagnetic storms and/or substorms, etc.).

  5. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treis, J.; Andritschke, R.; Hartmann, R.; Herrmann, S.; Holl, P.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Meidinger, N.; Porro, M.; Richter, R. H.; Schopper, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2009-03-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 × 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  6. Ultrasonographic localization of the thyroid gland for its optimal shielding prior to lateral cephalometric radiography: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hurmerinta, Kirsti; Rice, David; Suomalainen, Anni

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lateral cephalometric radiography is a common radiographic examination technique in children. The exclusion of the thyroid gland from the primary X-ray beam is important especially with children. However, patient treatment might require displaying the four most cranial cervical vertebrae (C1–C4) for the assessment of cervical vertebral maturation. Our aim was to present a safe way to display C1–C4 and exclude the thyroid gland from the X-ray beam during lateral cephalometric radiography. Methods: The thyroid glands of 25, 7- to 12-year-old patients were localized by ultrasound examination and shielded prior to lateral cephalometric radiography. A roentgen-positive mark was taped on the patient's skin at the level of most cranial level of the thyroid gland in the midsagittal plane. After exposure, each lateral cephalometric radiograph (LCR) was analyzed for the visibility of the cervical vertebrae. The distance between the ear post and the highest edge of the thyroid shield (TS) at the lateral part of the neck was measured and compared with the distance between the centre of the radiological external auditory meatus, and a roentgen-positive mark was made on the LCR. Results: 68% of the LCRs displayed C1–C4, and the rest of them displayed C1–C3. In all of the patients, the highest edge of the TS in the lateral parts of the neck was located in a higher position than the actual most cranial level of the thyroid gland. Conclusions: Despite localizing the thyroid gland prior to lateral cephalometric radiography, simultaneous visualization of C1–C4 and exclusion of the thyroid gland from the primary X-ray beam during lateral cephalometric radiography might not be completely possible in children because of the design and poor fitness of the TS. PMID:26764584

  7. Accuracy of methods to measure femoral head penetration within metal-backed acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Howie, Donald W

    2016-06-30

    A number of different software programs are used to investigate the in vivo wear of polyethylene bearings in total hip arthroplasty. With wear rates below 0.1 mm/year now commonly being reported for highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) components, it is important to identify the accuracy of the methods used to measure such small movements. The aims of this study were to compare the accuracy of current software programs used to measure two-dimensional (2D) femoral head penetration (FHP) and to determine whether the accuracy is influenced by larger femoral heads or by different methods of representing the acetabular component within radiostereometric analysis (RSA). A hip phantom was used to compare known movements of the femoral head within a metal-backed acetabular component to FHP measured radiographically using RSA, Hip Analysis Suite (HAS), PolyWare, Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse (EBRA), and Roentgen Monographic Analysis Tool (ROMAN). RSA was significantly more accurate than the HAS, PolyWare, and ROMAN methods when measuring 2D FHP with a 28 mm femoral head. Femoral head size influenced the accuracy of HAS and ROMAN 2D FHP measurements, EBRA proximal measurements, and RSA measurements in the proximal and anterior direction. The use of different acetabular reference segments did not influence accuracy of RSA measurements. The superior accuracy and reduced variability of RSA wear measurements allow much smaller cohorts to be used in RSA clinical wear studies than those utilizing other software programs. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  8. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Position-specific behaviors and their impact on crew performance: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, J. Randolph

    1993-01-01

    The present study was motivated by results from a preliminary report documenting the impact of specific crewmembers on overall crew performance (Wilhelm & Law, 1992), and a cross-airline cross-fleet project investigating human factors behaviors of commercial aviation flightcrews (Helmreich, Butler, Whilhelm, & Lofaro, 1992). The purpose of the current investigation is to study how position-specific behaviors impact flightcrew performance, and how these position-specific behaviors differ between two airlines and two flying environments. Implications for training will also be addressed.

  10. Exploring the brain, looking for thoughts: on Asimov's second Fantastic Voyage.

    PubMed

    Cassou-Noguès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate various concerns which appear in Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain. I will disregard his first voyage inside a human body in Fantastic Voyage I, which the author disavows as not being his own work. In contrast, the second voyage is intricate, suggesting problems drawn from a variety of sources. In a nutshell, Asimov's explorers enter the body of a comatose man in order to read his thoughts. The story can be related both to philosophical thought-experiments, such as those of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and of Herbert Feigl, as well as to personal anxieties peculiar to Asimov.

  11. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Granada, Miguel A; Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We report on a newly discovered letter by Christoph Rothmann, dated July 1st 1584, and addressed to Johann Ernst of Anhalt. The letter supports the earlier assumption that Johann Ernst recommended Rothmann to Landgrave Wilhelm of Hesse, as Rothmann asks for Johann Ernst's help on the matter in this new source. More importantly Rothmann refers to his attempts to make Copernicus' calculations compatible with the Ptolomean model, which demonstrates that already at this stage of his career he was working on such a compromise, and not only after being influenced by Raimarus Ursus or Tycho Brahe, as has been argued by some authors.

  12. Quantum Simulations of Condensed Matter Systems Using Ultra-Cold Atomic Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Feynman  diagrams  versus  Fermi-­‐gas   Feynman  emulator”,  Nature   Physics  8,  366...BEC-­‐BCS  Crossover  and  the  Unitary  Fermi  Gas”,   Lecture  Notes  in   Physics ,  Volume  836,  edited  by  Wilhelm... Lecture  at  100th  Anniversary  Solvay  Conference   on   Physics ,  "The  Theory  of  the

  13. Recent notes on Tycho Brahe's library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    Wilhelm Norlind lists 216 books presumed to have been in Tycho's library, but the actual count must have been much higher. The largest block of surviving books are in the Clementinum in Prague, just over 50 volumes but nearly 100 titles. Tycho tried to acquire books in many ways, and particularly by buying the library of Paul Wittich after the death of this one-time visitor to Hven. This talk will also describe two annotated volumes from Tycho's library that have recently come onto the antiquarian market: Apianus' Astronomicum Caesareum (Ingolstadt, 1540) and Cornelius Gemma's De naturae divinis characterismis (Antwerp, 1575).

  14. Evaluating the Degree of Annoyance Caused by Military Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    U. S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories Edmon Buchta U 2 3. " Kad-Willhelm Hirsch • . fl Ded~ef Krah6 Institute fOr Larmschutz Of...4AI62720 A896 NN-TG I G. AUThOR() Paul D. Schomer, L. Ray Wagner, L. Jerome Benson, Edmon Buchta, KauI-Willhelm Hirsch, and Detlef Krah6 7. PERFORMING...Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (USACERL], 1991). Schomer, Paul D., Edmon Buchta, and Karl-Wilhelm Hirsch, ’Decibel Annoyance Reduction of Low

  15. Geologic Map of Part of the Western Hellas Planitia, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Wilhelms, Don E.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Rock units were deposited on Mars by meteorite impact, volcanism, wind, flowing water, standing water, and ice, acting separately or in concert. Hellas Planitia, the deepest tract on Mars, is a broad depression lying within the high-rimmed, approximately 2,300-km-wide Hellas impact basin. The basin and the planitia are centered about 250 km east of the southeast corner of the map area. Like other stratigraphy-based planetary mapping (Wilhelms, 1990), we suggest the most likely origins for age relations and morphologies visible in the map area.

  16. Uhthoff`s phenomenon 125 years later - what do we know today?

    PubMed Central

    Opara, JA; Brola, W; Wylegala, AA; Wylegala, E

    2016-01-01

    125 years have passed since Wilhelm Uhthoff reported the symptoms he observed after an increased body temperature from physical exertion. Those symptoms, which might have led to the transient impairment of vision in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and also observed in optic neuritis, were later named after him "Uhthoff's phenomenon". This has defined the strategy of rehabilitation procedures in Multiple Sclerosis for more than 100 years, restricting the use of thermal treatments and the possibility of aerobic exercises. The current state of knowledge concerning the Uhthoff's phenomenon and its influence on comprehensive rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis were presented in the current review report. PMID:27974923

  17. Astro-Dynasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkora, Leila

    2001-05-01

    Four generations of Struves directed eight observatories over two centuries. The first, Wilhelm Struve moved to Estonia from northern Germany to escape Napoleon's military conscription. He pursued university studies and ended up running an observatory for 20 years. Raising his family at the observatory in isolated conditions encouraged his offspring to follow his career path. The last, Otto Struve, was the first director of McDonald Observatory. The Struves were winners of several Gold Medals from Britain's Royal Astronomical Society for their research.

  18. [Habitus, capital and fields: the search for an acting head of the Hamburg Asylum Friedrichsberg in 1897].

    PubMed

    Sammet, Kai

    2005-01-01

    In 1897 Hamburg was in search of an Oberarzt for the asylum Friedrichsberg who should function as the acting head of the head Wilhelm Reye (1833-1912). This search was part of the intended reformation of the outmoded psychiatric care in Hamburg. During this application procedure the Hamburg Physikus John Wahncau examined all possible candidates and applicants. The article explores the election process by using some sociological categories developed by Pierre Bourdieu (habitus, capital, field). The author argues that not only meritocratic attributes led to the choice of one candidate, but also his functional "fitting" into the field in Hamburg.

  19. A structural and intertextual reading of Freud's "On Dreams".

    PubMed

    Mahlendorf, U

    2000-04-01

    By using the framework of a "quest" narrative based on literary allusions to Virgil's Aeneid and Goethe's Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, Freud transformed the 500 pages of The Interpretation of Dreams into some fifty pages entitled "On Dreams." This paper elucidates the narrative means by which Freud achieved the feat of turning a highly complex, lengthy theoretical work into an engaging narrative. Its main plot, provided by a specimen dream, reveals Freud's working through of the personal and professional conflicts of his life up to 1901, and serves as a practical demonstration of and paradigm for the process of working through in psychoanalysis.

  20. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: a cultural-historical science of consciousness in three acts.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michel; Robinson, David K; Yasnitsky, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural foil to an overemphasis on the biological basis of consciousness, sometimes associated with biological determinism.

  1. A Special Sort of Forgetting: Negation in Freud and Augustine.

    PubMed

    Rosengart, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The development from a positive, dualistic theory of memory and forgetting to a concept of memory that includes forgetting as a variety of remembering is traced in two thinkers. Freud's concept of repression is discussed as a complex negation of both remembering and forgetting, and the development of this construct is shown in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess. A close reading of Augustine of Hippo's Confessions shows a similar concept of a special sort of forgetting, in which what is forgotten is remembered nonetheless. Finally, the limits of the comparison are discussed, and a reading of Freud's "Negation" reveals ways in which the unconscious is fundamentally unlike Augustine's interiority.

  2. On an early proposal for a unified system of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    2015-02-01

    In the present SI system, the units of length and time are related by defining the speed of light as exactly 299,792,458 m/s. In 1857, Wilhelm Weber and Rudolf Kohlrausch proposed a system of units in which the units of length and time were also related by defining a speed, although not the speed of light. The system was extended to include a unit of mass. The Weber-Kohlrausch system was impractical and was apparently never adopted. Nevertheless, it remains of historical interest as an early attempt at a systematic treatment of physical units.

  3. [Kraepelin's basic nosologic postulates. An attempt at a critical evaluation of the later works of Kraepelin].

    PubMed

    Hoff, P

    1988-01-01

    This study discusses three important papers by Emil Kraepelin, published between 1918 and 1920. Kraepelin supports--in accordance with his teacher Wilhelm Wundt--the view of psychophysical parallelism as a basic principle of dealing with the questions of mental illness. Kraepelin is often called a nosologist; but one must not forget that Kraepelins nosology was not a static one, nor did he vote in favor of any kind of dogmatism. Only when Kraepelin's basic positions are reflected in a differentiated way, his enormous influence on very different parts of psychiatry as science can be understood.

  4. Helmholtz and Zoellner: nineteenth-century empiricism, spiritism, and the theory of space perception.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, W H

    1989-10-01

    J. K. F. Zoellner began writing on "experimental proofs" of a fourth spatial dimension, and of the existence of spirits, in 1878. His arguments caused strong controversy, with rebuttal essays by Wilhelm Wundt and others. The author argues that Zoellner's case that these matters are experimental questions rested on arguments which Hermann von Helmholtz, inveighing against rationalist views of space and space perception, had recently published. Zoellner's use of Helmholtz's arguments to advance and defend his spiritist views occasioned strong criticism of Helmholtz, affected careers and reputations of scholars in Berlin and Leipzig, and caused enduring controversy over the credibility of Helmholtz's empiricist theory of space perception.

  5. The bias of "music-infected consciousness": the aesthetics of listening in the laboratory and on the city streets of Fin-de-Siècle Berlin and Vienna.

    PubMed

    Hui, Alexandra E

    2012-01-01

    Shifts in the psychophysical study of sound sensation reinforced the changing status of musical expertise in the nineteenth century. The Carl Stumpf-Wilhelm Wundt debate about tone-differentiation experimentation narrowed the conception of hearing. For Stumpf, "music consciousness" (Musikbewusstsein) granted the experimental subjects exceptional insight into sound sensation. This belief reflected a cultural reevaluation of listening, exemplified in music critic Eduard Hanslick decrying the scourge of the city: the piano playing of the neighbors. Stumpf and Hanslick's defenses of subjective musical expertise both inside the laboratory and on the city streets reveal the increasingly divergent conceptions of hearing and listening.

  6. Conceptual resistance in the disciplines of the mind: the Leipzig-Buenos Aires connection at the beginning of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Taiana, Cecilia

    2005-11-01

    Personal correspondence written by Prof. Felix Krueger from Argentina in 1906-1907 to his teacher and mentor Wilhelm Wundt in Leipzig is situated in the historical context of the theoretical debates taking place at the University of Buenos Aires at the beginning of the 20th century. A critical survey of the transatlantic migration of psychological theories and their reception in Argentina raises the broader issues of the nature of the cultural and social roots of local interpretations induced by the circulation of theories across national fields of scientific inquiry. It is argued that national intellectual fields and the historicity of their categories of interpretation mediate in the foreign trade of theories.

  7. Vienna University Observatory and Bruno Thüring (German Title: Die Wiener Universitätssternwarte und Bruno Thüring )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, Franz; Posch, Thomas; Lackner, Karin

    We investigate Bruno Thüring's political attitude during the time of National Socialism, based on material from the Vienna Observatory archive, and on statements by his contemporaries. The contribution focuses on the filling of astronomy positions in Vienna, and also on the expulsion of Kasimir Graff. A central role is played by Wilhelm Führer, Obersturmführer der Waffen-SS (Senior Storm Leader of the Armed Protection Squad) and chief civil servant in the Reich science ministry. The transcription of an original letter of 1939 by Führer, addressed to Thüring, is given.

  8. Naval Aviation Costs: Targeting Operations and Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    17 Defense AT&L: November–December 2013 Naval Aviation Costs Targeting Operations and Support Capt. Robert Farmer n Capt. Keith Nixon n Capt...ONR Maj. Gen. Murray, TECOM Brig. Gen. Jansson, DLA Aviation SES Gilpin , DASN (Air) SES Stiller, DASN (Ships) SES Zangardi, DASN (C4I) *NAE Air... Robert Brown Training/Training Supt 6.7.6 – Lorie Nace Support Equipment 6.7.7 – Bruce Wilhelm Industrial Business Ops 6.8D – Roy Harris Tech Dir

  9. Bach and His.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Wyn

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the career of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) and the role played by Wilhelm His I (who was, with Albert von Haller, a noted pioneer of physiology) in the exhumation of Bach's remains in 1894. His's examination of these remains allowed the sculptor Carl Seffner to produce the celebrated statue of Bach which stands outside the church of St Thomas in Leipzig, where the composer was employed from 1723 until his death. Modern forensic techniques have recently enabled Bach's image to be reconstructed in even more spectacular detail.

  10. LSWAVE 2000: Lasers and short-wavelength applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, W.

    2001-07-01

    LSWAVE 2000 was organized as a Satellite Workshop to the Seventh International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI 2000. It was held on Saturday, August 26, 2000, at the Technische Universität Berlin, and was jointly organized by the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) and the Technical University Berlin (TUB). The organizing committee consisted of Wilhelm Raith (chairman), Wolfgang Sandner, Ingolf Hertel, Manfred Wick, Bernd Winter, Tatjana Gießel, Holger Stiel, Ingo Will, Ursula Bayr (secretary) and Silvia Szlapka (secretary). Continuing information on the Workshop and its proceedings may be found under http://www.mbi-berlin.de/lswave2000/.

  11. Who Discovered the Binary System and Arithmetic? Did Leibniz Plagiarize Caramuel?

    PubMed

    Ares, J; Lara, J; Lizcano, D; Martínez, M A

    2017-03-09

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) is the self-proclaimed inventor of the binary system and is considered as such by most historians of mathematics and/or mathematicians. Really though, we owe the groundwork of today's computing not to Leibniz but to the Englishman Thomas Harriot and the Spaniard Juan Caramuel de Lobkowitz (1606-1682), whom Leibniz plagiarized. This plagiarism has been identified on the basis of several facts: Caramuel's work on the binary system is earlier than Leibniz's, Leibniz was acquainted-both directly and indirectly-with Caramuel's work and Leibniz had a natural tendency to plagiarize scientific works.

  12. A Diversity of Divisions: Tracing the History of the Demarcation between the Sciences and the Humanities.

    PubMed

    Bouterse, Jeroen; Karstens, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Throughout history, divides between the sciences and the humanities have been drawn in many different ways. This essay shows that the notion of a divide became more urgent and pronounced in the second half of the nineteenth century. While this shift has several causes, the essay focuses on the rise of the social sciences, which is interpreted as posing a profound challenge to the established disciplines of the study of humankind. This is demonstrated by zooming in on linguistics, one of the key traditional disciplines of the humanities. Through the assumption of a correspondence between mental and linguistic categories, psychology became of central importance in the various conceptions of linguistics that emerged in the nineteenth century. Both linguistics and psychology were very much engaged in a process of discipline formation, and opinions about the proper directions of the fields varied considerably. Debates on these issues catalyzed the construction of more radical divisions between the sciences and the humanities. Both Wilhelm Dilthey's dichotomy between understanding and explanation and Wilhelm Windelband's dichotomy between nomothetic and idiographic sciences respond to these debates. While their constructions are often lumped together, the essay shows that they actually meant very different things and have to be treated accordingly.

  13. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  14. Understanding and Explanation in France: From Maine de Biran's Méthode Psychologique to Durkheim's Les Formes Élémentaires de la vie Religieuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaus, Warren

    My task here is to compare the ways in which the relations between the human and the natural sciences were conceived in late nineteenth and early twentieth century France and Germany. Historical generalization may be a mug's game. But if I had to generalize, I would say that the French distinguished the human or cultural sciences from the natural sciences only in terms of their subject matters, while the Germans were more likely to try to distinguish them in terms of their goals, methods, foundations, and normative content as well. Although we may be able to find many philosophical positions among the French that resemble certain aspects of the thought of Wilhelm Dilthey, Wilhelm Windelband, or Heinrich Rickert, no one in France held exactly the same combination of philosophical views concerning the human sciences as that held by any of these German thinkers. In particular, no one in France tried to distinguish the human from the natural sciences in terms of understanding versus explanation in the way that Dilthey did. Thus, although there were other disputes in France in regard to the human sciences, such as that between Émile Durkheim and Gabriel Tarde over the role of psychology in sociological explanation, or that between sociologists and philosophers over the methods of ethics, there was no controversy analogous to the conflict among Dilthey, Windelband, and Rickert over the best way to distinguish the human from the natural sciences.

  15. Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Hannes; Sasgen, Ingo; Pollard, David; Klemann, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is assumed to be inherently unstable because it is grounded below sea level in a large part, where the bedrock deepens from today's grounding line towards the interior of the ice sheet. Idealized simulations have shown that bedrock uplift due to isostatic adjustment of the solid Earth and the associated sea-level fall may stop the retreat of such a marine-based ice sheet (Gomez et al., 2012). Here, we employ a coupled model for ice-sheet dynamics and solid-Earth dynamics, including a gravitationally consistent description of sea level, to investigate the influence of the viscoelastic Earth structure on the WAIS' future stability (Konrad et al. 2015). For this, we start from a steady-state condition for the Antarctic Ice Sheet close to present-day observations and apply atmospheric and oceanic forcing of different strength to initiate the retreat of the WAIS and investigate the effect of the viscoelastic deformation on the ice evolution for a range of solid-Earth rheologies. We find that the climate forcing is the primary control on the occurrence of the WAIS collapse. However, for moderate climate forcing and a weak solid-Earth rheology associated with the West Antarctic rift system (asthenosphere viscosities of 3x10^19 Pa s or less), we find that the combined effect of bedrock uplift and gravitational sea-level fall limits the retreat to the Amundsen Sea embayment on millennial time scales. In contrast, a stiffer Earth rheology yields a collapse under these conditions. Under a stronger climate forcing, weak Earth structures do not prevent the WAIS collapse; however, they produce a delay of up to 5000 years in comparison to a stiffer solid-Earth rheology. In an additional experiment, we test the impact of sea-level rise from an assumed fast deglaciation of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In cases when the climatic forcing is too weak to force WAIS collapse by itself, the additional rise in sea-level leads to disintegration of the WAIS

  16. Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Kai D.

    2007-07-01

    During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete

  17. Innovative Conditioning Procedures for the Generation of Radioactive Waste Products which are Stable for Intermediate Storage or Repository-Independent in Final Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmetz, H.J.; Heimbach, H.; Odoj, R.; Pruesse, R.; Wartenberg, W.

    2006-07-01

    The German Federal Government aims at a future final storage site for all kinds of radioactive waste within 30 years. Existing and newly-produced radioactive waste therefore has to be stored in interim storage facilities over very long periods of time. At present, most German radioactive waste or waste packages are produced and qualified according to the acceptance criteria of the projected final repository KONRAD. [1] Nevertheless, conditioning strategies for crude radioactive waste have to take into account the open question of the future repository site as well as requirements for long-term interim storage. The Quality Control Group for Radioactive Waste (in German: Produktkontrollstelle fuer radioaktive Abfaelle - PKS) works as an independent expert organisation for the quality checking of radioactive waste packages as well as evaluating conditioning procedures for waste containers suitable for final storage on behalf of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (in German: Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS). The Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (in German: Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung and Reaktortechnik - ISR) of the Research Centre Juelich investigates scientific/technical problems of nuclear disposal, especially in the field of waste treatment. In this context, ISR and PKS investigated and/or evaluated innovative procedures, by means of which radioactive waste flows may be minimized and rendered inert. QSA Global (formerly: AEA Technology QSA) conditions radioactive waste of German users from the fields of medicine, research and industry as well as from its own radioactive source production and operates an intermediate storage facility for radioactive waste containers. This poster deals with the characteristics and possible applications of new waste fixation media on the basis of organic and inorganic mineral polymers; with the approach of producing inherently safe waste forms for various geological formations. Plasma technology

  18. Mechanistic modelling of Middle Eocene atmospheric carbon dioxide using fossil plant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Michaela; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Wilde, Volker; Konrad, Wilfried; Utescher, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Various proxies (such as pedogenic carbonates, boron isotopes or phytoplankton) and geochemical models were applied in order to reconstruct palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide, partially providing conflicting results. Another promising proxy is the frequency of stomata (pores on the leaf surface used for gaseous exchange). In this project, fossil plant material from the Messel Pit (Hesse, Germany) is used to reconstruct atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration in the Middle Eocene by analyzing stomatal density. We applied the novel mechanistic-theoretical approach of Konrad et al. (2008) which provides a quantitative derivation of the stomatal density response (number of stomata per leaf area) to varying atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The model couples 1) C3-photosynthesis, 2) the process of diffusion and 3) an optimisation principle providing maximum photosynthesis (via carbon dioxide uptake) and minimum water loss (via stomatal transpiration). These three sub-models also include data of the palaeoenvironment (temperature, water availability, wind velocity, atmospheric humidity, precipitation) and anatomy of leaf and stoma (depth, length and width of stomatal porus, thickness of assimilation tissue, leaf length). In order to calculate curves of stomatal density as a function of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, various biochemical parameters have to be borrowed from extant representatives. The necessary palaeoclimate data are reconstructed from the whole Messel flora using Leaf Margin Analysis (LMA) and the Coexistence Approach (CA). In order to obtain a significant result, we selected three species from which a large number of well-preserved leaves is available (at least 20 leaves per species). Palaeoclimate calculations for the Middle Eocene Messel Pit indicate a warm and humid climate with mean annual temperature of approximately 22°C, up to 2540 mm mean annual precipitation and the absence of extended periods of drought. Mean relative air

  19. New Crater Counts for Mare Basalts in Mare Frigoris and Other Nearside Maria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Head, J. W., III; Wolf, U.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.

    2003-04-01

    Lunar mare basalts cover about 17% of the lunar surface, occur preferentially on the lunar nearside, and often fill the low-lying inner depressions of large impact basins and craters. Basalts in Mare Frigoris are special in that they occur in an area that is not clearly related to any unambiguously accepted impact structure. Mare Frigoris may be part of the large and very old Procellarum basin, but the existence of this basin is still debated. Mare basalts in Mare Frigoris are relatively homogeneous, low in titanium, have a bright albedo, and strong 1 µm- and prominent 2 µm-absorption bands. The thickness of these basalts has been estimated to be less than 500 m. Wilhelms found the basalts of eastern Mare Frigoris to be of Imbrian age and the basalts of central and western Frigoris (west of ~10deg E) to be Eratosthenian in age. Whitford-Stark proposed that the basalts in Mare Frigoris were emplaced by flood-style eruptions 3.2-3.6 b.y. ago. We report on crater counts for Mare Frigoris, Mare Nectaris, Mare Smythii, Mare Marginis, Mare Vaporum, Sinus Medii, and Palus Putredinis. We also determined ages for basalts exposed in the craters Schickard, Grimaldi, Crüger, Hubble, Joliot, Goddard, and two lava ponds south of the crater Endymion. Our crater counts let us conclude that (1) Mare Frigoris is mostly filled with Imbrian basalts but there are a few areas that are covered with Eratosthenian basalts, (2) these Eratosthenian basalts occur in few small-sized areas north of the crater Plato but are not connected with each other as shown by Wilhelms, (3) basalts in Mare Nectaris, Mare Vaporum, Sinus Medii and Palus Putredinis are Imbrian in age, (4) basalts in Mare Smythii are younger than in Mare Marginis, contrary to the geologic map of Wilhelms and El-Baz, (5) basaltic fills of the craters Goddard, Hubble, and Joliot are of Imbrian age, (6) there are no Eratosthenian basalts in the crater Schickard but basalts in the crater Grimaldi are Eratosthenian in age as

  20. Prevalence of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis in Patients with Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Terai, Hidetomi; Suzuki, Akinobu; Dohzono, Sho; Matsumoto, Tomiya

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in patients with spinal diseases determined by roentgen images of the whole spine. Overview of Literature Although several studies have investigated the prevalence of DISH in healthy subjects, no detailed data have been reported on the prevalence of DISH in patients with degenerative spinal disorders. Methods Standing whole-spine roentgen images of 345 consecutive patients who underwent surgery in our hospital were obtained. Patients aged <18 years or with congenital spinal disease, metastatic spinal tumors, or inflammatory spinal disease were excluded. In total, 281 patients were eligible for inclusion. The presence of DISH was assessed according to Resnick's criteria and Mata's scoring system. The prevalence, location, and numbers of fused vertebral bodies of DISH were recorded. Results DISH was present in 25.6% of patients (72/281). The prevalence of DISH in the 41–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and ≥80 year age groups was 8.3% (2/24), 9.8% (5/51), 16.0% (12/75), 49.5% (48/97), and 33.3% (4/12), respectively; the prevalence increased with age. The average number of fused vertebral bodies was 7.5. More than 80% of DISH was located from T7 to T11, and more than 95% of DISH was located at T9/10. Patients with DISH were significantly older (71.1 years vs. 60.9 years, p<0.05), and men were more likely to have DISH than women (p<0.05). Conclusions In patients with degenerative spinal diseases with DISH, fused vertebrae were found most frequently in the lower thoracic spine, and their prevalence increased with age. DISH may be an age-related skeletal disorder with a higher overall prevalence in patients with spinal disorders than that in healthy subjects. PMID:28243371

  1. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  2. Recent international developments in low-level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.

    1986-11-01

    Recent international developments in low-level waste (LLW) disposal have included a move away from ocean dumping and a trend towards engineered and deeper dispoosal. Siting efforts have accelerated as interim storage facilities and existing sites reach capacity. The suspension of ocean dumping by the London Dumping Conventions of 1983 and 1985 has affected the LLW disposal practices of several countries, including the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Japan. Their plans now include disposal in trenches, shallow concrete pits, deep mines, sub-seabed caverns, horizontal mountain tunnels, and long-term storage facilities. Other recent developments include selection of the semi-desert Vaalputs site in South Africa, licensing activities for the Konrad mine site in the Federal Republic of Germany, design of at-reactor sites in Finland, and construction of a Baltic Sea site in Sweden. Also, the French have recently selected the Aube site for engineered disposal in monoliths and tumuli, now used at the La Manche site.

  3. Advanced techniques in safeguarding a conditioning facility for spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, K.; Weh, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Although reprocessing continues to be the main factor in the waste management of nuclear reactors, the alternative of direct final disposal is currently being developed to the level of industrial applications, based on an agreement between the heads of the federal government and the federal states of Germany. Thus, the Konrad and Gorleben sites are being studied as potential final repositories as is the pilot conditioning facility (PKA) under construction. Discussions on the application of safeguards measures have led to the drafting of an approach that will cover the entire back end of the fuel cycle. The conditioning of fuel prior to direct final disposal represents one element in the overall approach. A modern facility equipped with advanced technology, PKA is a pilot plant with regard to conditioning techniques as well as to safeguards. Therefore, the PKA safeguards approach is expected to facilitate future industrial applications of the conditioning procedure. This cannot be satisfactorily implemented without advanced safeguards techniques. The level of development of the safeguards techniques varies. While advanced camera and seal systems are basically available, the other techniques and methods still require research and development. Feasibility studies and equipment development are geared to providing applicable safeguards techniques in time for commissioning of the PKA.

  4. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  5. “Advice to the medical students in my service”: the rediscovery of a golden book by Jean Hamburger, father of nephrology and of medical humanities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Jean Hamburger (1909–1992) is considered the founder of the concept of medical intensive care (réanimation médicale) and the first to propose the name Nephrology for the branch of medicine dealing with kidney diseases. One of the first kidney grafts in the world (with short-term success), in 1953, and the first dialysis session in France, in 1955, were performed under his guidance. His achievements as a writer were at least comparable: Hamburger was awarded several important literary prizes, including prix Femina, prix Balzac and the Cino del Duca prize (1979), awarded, among others, to Jorge Luis Borges and Konrad Lorenz. Here we would like to offer a selected reading of a “golden” book, “Conseils aux étudiants en medicine de mon service” (“Advice to the Medical Students in my Service”), the first book dedicated to patient-physician relationship in Nephrology, written when dialysis and transplantation were becoming clinical options (1963). The themes include: the central role of the patient, who should be known by name, profession, life style, and not by disease; the importance of the setting of the care; the need for truth-telling and for leaving hope; the role of research not only in the progression of science, but also in the daily clinical practice. PMID:23497662

  6. "Advice to the medical students in my service": the rediscovery of a golden book by Jean Hamburger, father of nephrology and of medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Piccoli Giorgina

    2013-03-15

    Jean Hamburger (1909-1992) is considered the founder of the concept of medical intensive care (réanimation médicale) and the first to propose the name Nephrology for the branch of medicine dealing with kidney diseases. One of the first kidney grafts in the world (with short-term success), in 1953, and the first dialysis session in France, in 1955, were performed under his guidance. His achievements as a writer were at least comparable: Hamburger was awarded several important literary prizes, including prix Femina, prix Balzac and the Cino del Duca prize (1979), awarded, among others, to Jorge Luis Borges and Konrad Lorenz.Here we would like to offer a selected reading of a "golden" book, "Conseils aux étudiants en medicine de mon service" ("Advice to the Medical Students in my Service"), the first book dedicated to patient-physician relationship in Nephrology, written when dialysis and transplantation were becoming clinical options (1963). The themes include: the central role of the patient, who should be known by name, profession, life style, and not by disease; the importance of the setting of the care; the need for truth-telling and for leaving hope; the role of research not only in the progression of science, but also in the daily clinical practice.

  7. Issues and Experiences on Radioactive Waste Quality Control / Quality Assurance with Regard to Future Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmerhagen, I.; Brennecke, P.; Steyer, S.; Bandt, G.

    2006-07-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany all types of radioactive waste (short-lived, long-lived) are to be disposed of in deep geological formations. Thus, the safe management of radioactive waste presupposes an appropriate conditioning of primary waste-to-waste packages suitable for emplacement in a repository as well as the documentation of pre-treatment, processing and packaging steps and the waste package characteristics being relevant for disposal. Due to the operation, decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities as well as the application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine and research and development radioactive waste continuously arises in Germany. In order to manage this waste different measures and procedures regarding its conditioning and quality control/quality assurance were introduced and since many years successfully applied. Waste conditioning is especially characterized by a flexible application of the Konrad waste acceptance requirements. The rationale for this approach is due to the present non-availability of a repository in Germany. Several examples of a 'tailor-made' application of the waste acceptance requirements in treatment, conditioning and documentation processes as well as the quality assurance/quality control processes illustrate the current German approach. (authors)

  8. An approach for the limitation of fissile material resulting from criticality safety analysis of a waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, H.P. ); Gmal, B. )

    1993-01-01

    The Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Germany's Federal Office of Radiation Protection, intends to dispose of non-heat-generating radioactive waste, which may contain residual quantities of fissile materials like U 235 or Pu 239 in solid form, in the planned German Konrad repository. Within the framework of a comprehensive safety analysis, criticality safety for both the operational phase and the post-operational phase of the repository has been investigated. The performed analysis and the investigated scenarios as well as the calculation methods are described. As a result of the criticality safety considerations, limitations of fissionable materials are derived. These limitations restrict on the one hand the admissible mass concentration of fissile materials in the waste form and--on the other hand--the admissible mass of these materials in the cross section of an emplacement room, leading at the end to admissible masses per waste package. The mass limitations are determined separately for four radionuclides. In practice, a mixture of these radionuclides in a waste package has to be taken into account. Therefore, a summation criterion has been derived in order to ensure a high flexibility for the conditioning of the waste. This flexibility option does not result in a lower safety level of the repository.

  9. Innovators, deep fermentation and antibiotics: promoting applied science before and after the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Bud, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The historiography of penicillin has tended to overlook the importance of developing and disseminating know-how in fermentation technology. A focus on this directs attention to work before the war of a network in the US and Europe concerned with the production of organic acids, particularly gluconic and citric acids. At the heart of this network was the German-Czech Konrad Bernhauer. Other members of the network were a group of chemists at the US Department of Agriculture who first recognized the production possibilities of penicillin. The Pfizer Corporation, which had recruited a leading Department of Agriculture scientist at the end of the First World War, was also an important centre of development as well as of production. However, in wartime Bernhauer was an active member of the SS and his work was not commemorated after his death in 1975. After the war new processes of fermentation were disseminated by penicillin pioneers such as Jackson Foster and Ernst Chain. Because of its commercial context his work was not well known. The conclusion of this paper is that the commercial context, on the one hand, and the Nazi associations of Bernhauer, on the other, have submerged the significance of know-how development in the history of penicillin.

  10. Release and disposal of materials during decommissioning of Siemens MOX fuel fabrication plant at Hanau, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Werner; Baumann, Roland

    2007-07-01

    In September 2006, decommissioning and dismantling of the Siemens MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Hanau were completed. The process equipment and the fabrication buildings were completely decommissioned and dismantled. The other buildings were emptied in whole or in part, although they were not demolished. Overall, the decommissioning process produced approximately 8500 Mg of radioactive waste (including inactive matrix material); clearance measurements were also performed for approximately 5400 Mg of material covering a wide range of types. All the equipment in which nuclear fuels had been handled was disposed of as radioactive waste. The radioactive waste was conditioned on the basis of the requirements specified for the projected German final disposal site 'Schachtanlage Konrad'. During the pre-conditioning, familiar processes such as incineration, compacting and melting were used. It has been shown that on account of consistently applied activity containment (barrier concept) during operation and dismantling, there has been no significant unexpected contamination of the plant. Therefore almost all the materials that were not a priori destined for radioactive waste were released without restriction on the basis of the applicable legal regulations (chap. 29 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance), along with the buildings and the plant site. (authors)

  11. [An image of Saint Ottilia with reading stones].

    PubMed

    Daxecker, F; Broucek, A

    1995-01-01

    Reading stones to facilitate reading in cases of presbyopia are mentioned in the literature, for example in the works of the Middle High German poet Albrecht and of Konrad of Würzburg. Most representations of the abbess, Saint Ottilia, show her holding a book with a pair of eyes in her hands. A gothic altarpiece (1485-1490), kept in the museum of the Premonstratensian Canons of Wilten in Innsbruck, Tyrol, shows a triune representation of St. Anne, the mother of the Virgin, with Mary and Jesus and St. Ursula with her companions. St. Ottilia is depicted on the edge of the painting. Two lenses, one on either side of the open book in her hand, magnify the letters underneath. As the two lenses are not held together by bows or similar devices, they are probably a rare representation of reading stones. The alter showing scenes of the life of St. Mary and St. Ursula was done by Ludwig Konraiter. A panel on the same alter, depicting the death of the Virgin, shows an apostle with rivet spectacles.

  12. (Immobilization of radioactive wastes)

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.

    1986-12-18

    The traveler participated as the co-chairman of the France/US Workshop in Cadarache, France, on the immobilization of radioactive wastes in cement-based materials. These meetings and site visits were conducted under the bilateral exchange agreement between the US-DOE and the Commissariate a l'Energie Atomique (CEA-France). Visits in France included the Cadarache, Valduc, Saclay, and Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centers. As a result of these discussions, an exchange of scientists between Saclay and ORNL was proposed. The traveler continued on to the FRG to visit a hazardous waste site remedial action project in Sprendlingen and the nuclear research and production facilities at the Karlsruhe Kernforschungszentrum (KfK) and the Alkem/Nukem/Transnuklear facilities at Hanau. Visits in the FRG were under the bilateral exchange agreement between the US-DOE and the Bundes Ministerium fur Forschung und Technologie (BMFT). The FRG supplied the traveler data on studies of super-compaction volume reduction efficiencies by KfK and Nukem. Also, Transnuklear is considering contributing two of their larger Konrad-certified packages to the MDU studies at ORNL. 1 tab.

  13. Gerhart Panning (1900-1944): a German forensic pathologist and his involvement in Nazi crimes during Second World War.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Johanna; Madea, Burkhard

    2009-03-01

    Twenty years after the Second World War the public were made aware of War Crimes committed by the German forensic pathologist, Gerhart Panning (1900-1944). From 1942 till 1944, Panning was professor at the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Bonn. Panning died of tuberculosis on 22 March 1944. After the Second World War, Panning's widow tried to obtain denazification for her husband. There were no particularly serious doubts. In 1965, Konrad Graf von Moltke, the son of Helmuth James Graf von Moltke (1907-1944), presented to the court a private letter from his father to his mother. In this letter, written in 1941, Panning's experiments on Soviet prisoners are described. In the so-called Callsen trial in the court of Darmstadt from 1960 to 1968, the experiments were confirmed by witnesses. In 1941, Panning performed experiments in cooperation with the Sicherheitsstaffel (Nazi special police) in the Ukraine to prove that captured ammunition of the soviet infantry violated international law. For this purpose, different parts of the bodies of living Soviets were used as firing targets. He published the results of these experiments in a scientific journal without any evidence of the origin of these observations. In this article, Panning's life and crimes have been described.

  14. Reconstruction of palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities of various beech plants (Fagaceae): testing and application of a mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, M.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Konrad, W.

    2006-12-01

    A mechanistic model (Konrad &Roth-Nebelsick a, in prep.) was applied for the reconstruction of atmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities and photosynthesis parameters of extant and fossil Fagaceae. The model is based on an approach which couples diffusion and the biochemical process of photosynthesis. Atmospheric CO2 is calculated on the basis of stomatal diffusion and photosynthesis parameters of the considered taxa. The considered species include the castanoid Castanea sativa, two quercoids Quercus petraea and Quercus rhenana and an intermediate species Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis. In the case of Quercus petraea literature data were used. Stomatal data of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis, Quercus rhenana and Castanea sativa were determined by the authors. Data of the extant Castanea sativa were collected by applying a peeling method and by counting of stomatal densities on the digitalized images of the peels. Additionally, isotope data of leaf samples of Castanea sativa were determined to estimate the ratio of intercellular to ambient carbon dioxide. The CO2 values calculated by the model (on the basis of stomatal data and measured or estimated biochemical parameters) are in good agreement with literature data, with the exception of the Late Eocene. The results thus demonstrate that the applied approach is principally suitable for reconstructing palaeoatmospheric CO2.

  15. From lanosterol to cholesterol: structural evolution and differential effects on lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ling; Nielsen, Morten; Thewalt, Jenifer; Ipsen, John H; Bloom, Myer; Zuckermann, Martin J; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2002-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important molecular component of the plasma membranes of mammalian cells. Its precursor in the sterol biosynthetic pathway, lanosterol, has been argued by Konrad Bloch (Bloch, K. 1965. Science. 150:19-28; 1983. CRC Crit. Rev. Biochem. 14:47-92; 1994. Blonds in Venetian Paintings, the Nine-Banded Armadillo, and Other Essays in Biochemistry. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.) to also be a precursor in the molecular evolution of cholesterol. We present a comparative study of the effects of cholesterol and lanosterol on molecular conformational order and phase equilibria of lipid-bilayer membranes. By using deuterium NMR spectroscopy on multilamellar lipid-sterol systems in combination with Monte Carlo simulations of microscopic models of lipid-sterol interactions, we demonstrate that the evolution in the molecular chemistry from lanosterol to cholesterol is manifested in the model lipid-sterol membranes by an increase in the ability of the sterols to promote and stabilize a particular membrane phase, the liquid-ordered phase, and to induce collective order in the acyl-chain conformations of lipid molecules. We also discuss the biological relevance of our results, in particular in the context of membrane domains and rafts. PMID:11867458

  16. Geospatial assessment of ecological functions and flood-related risks on floodplains along major rivers in the Puget Sound Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological functions and flood-related risks were assessed for floodplains along the 17 major rivers flowing into Puget Sound Basin, Washington. The assessment addresses five ecological functions, five components of flood-related risks at two spatial resolutions—fine and coarse. The fine-resolution assessment compiled spatial attributes of floodplains from existing, publically available sources and integrated the attributes into 10-meter rasters for each function, hazard, or exposure. The raster values generally represent different types of floodplains with regard to each function, hazard, or exposure rather than the degree of function, hazard, or exposure. The coarse-resolution assessment tabulates attributes from the fine-resolution assessment for larger floodplain units, which are floodplains associated with 0.1 to 21-kilometer long segments of major rivers. The coarse-resolution assessment also derives indices that can be used to compare function or risk among different floodplain units and to develop normative (based on observed distributions) standards. The products of the assessment are available online as geospatial datasets (Konrad, 2015; http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7DR2SJC).

  17. The challenge of reducing scientific complexity for different target groups (without losing the essence) - experiences from interdisciplinary audio-visual media production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, Bernd; Broschkowski, Ephraim; Kropp, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Climate Media Factory originates from an interdisciplinary media lab run by the Film and Television University "Konrad Wolf" Potsdam-Babelsberg (HFF) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Climate scientists, authors, producers and media scholars work together to develop media products on climate change and sustainability. We strive towards communicating scientific content via different media platforms reconciling the communication needs of scientists and the audience's need to understand the complexity of topics that are relevant in their everyday life. By presenting four audio-visual examples, that have been designed for very different target groups, we show (i) the interdisciplinary challenges during the production process and the lessons learnt and (ii) possibilities to reach the required degree of simplification without the need for dumbing down the content. "We know enough about climate change" is a short animated film that was produced for the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) for training programs and conferences on adaptation in the target countries including Indonesia, Tunisia and Mexico. "Earthbook" is a short animation produced for "The Year of Science" to raise awareness for the topics of sustainability among digital natives. "What is Climate Engineering?". Produced for the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) the film is meant for an informed and interested public. "Wimmelwelt Energie!" is a prototype of an iPad application for children from 4-6 years of age to help them learn about different forms of energy and related greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. [Sheehan's syndrome--a forgotten disease with 100 years' history].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Although named after Harold Sheehan, postpartum ischemic pituitary necrosis was reported for the first time 100 years ago in Przeglad Lekarski by Leon Konrad Gliński. In the majority of cases, the syndrome is a consequence of severe postpartum bleeding episode resulting in severe hypotension or hemorrhagic shock. The frequency of Sheehan's syndrome has decreased in developed countries as a result of improved obstetrical care, but this clinical entity remains a common cause of hypopituitarism in developing countries. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of anterior pituitary dysfunction resulting from the deficiency of multiple pituitary hormones. The order of frequency of hormone loss has generally been found to be growth hormone and prolactin, gonadotropins, ACTH and thyrotropin. Women with Sheehan's syndrome exhibit a variety of signs and symptoms including failure to lactate or resume menses, loss of genital and axillary hair, and often occurring long after delivery clinical manifestations of central hypothyroidism and secondary adrenal insufficiency. Diagnosis is based on laboratory studies, including hormone levels and hormone stimulation tests. Treatment of Sheehan's syndrome involves hormone replacement therapy. The aim of this study is to review current knowledge on clinically relevant aspects of this clinical entity and to provide the reader with recommendations concerning its diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Hilpoltstein at Johann Christoph Sturm's times (German Title: Hilpoltstein zu Zeiten Johann Christoph Sturms)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Kai Thomas

    After an overview on the foundations of research, the conditions inside the town of Hilpoltstein in the first half of the 17th century are described. Since Hilpoltstein was situated at the road from Nuremberg to Munich, and thus at one of the most important north-south trading routes of medieval times, the town florished in economic terms at the beginning of the 17th century. Afterwards, however, the inhabitants had to suffer religious troubles, since the count palatine Wolfgang Wilhelm converted to catholicism. We collect the traces of the Sturm family in Hilpoltstein that still exist today, and complete the picture by giving an overview of the architectural, commercial and social conditions of those times.

  20. Hermann von Helmholtz and his students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph F.

    1989-01-01

    During the years 1871-1888, when Hermann von Helmholtz was professor of physics at the University of Berlin, physicists from all over the world flocked to Berlin to study and do research with him. Among these were the German physicists Max Planck, Heinrich Kayser, Eugen Goldstein, Wilhelm Wien, and Heinrich Hertz, and Americans Henry Rowland, A. A. Michelson, and Michael Pupin. Examples of Helmholtz's scientific and personal interactions with these students and research associates show why he is justly considered the outstanding physics mentor of the 19th century. Both his ideas and his students played a major role in the development of physics in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  1. "Cosmomorphistic geometry" in the unconscious geometry of Johannes Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Adolf

    Some mathematical aspects of the Music theory by Johannes Kepler are discussed, paying a special attention to the book "De harmonice mundi". Other scientists interested in Music theory are mentioned throughout the paper: The Pythagorean school, Klaudios Ptolemaios, Leonard Euler, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Christian von Goldbach, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholz, Karl Friedrich Gauss. The relation with the ancient chinese schools of cosmography has been discussed: From the the Pythagorean to the ancient Chinese schools of cosmography we find arithmo-geometrical applications of numbers which are emblematic, hold meaning or represent the essence of things, the author writes. It was Johannes Kepler who taught us this "transconstructive method" of forming classical and ancient begginings of structuralistic thinking into a system from which deductions can readily be made.

  2. Ludwig: the physiologist.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max; Beneke, Klaus; Gonzalez, German

    2012-01-01

    The thought reproduced in the above epigraph is taken from an article by Thurau et al. [1], who attribute it to Arthur Schopenhauer (17881860), an outstanding philosopher and author of the far-reaching piece Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung (The World as Will and Representation). In German, it would perhaps read as etwas denken, das niemand vorher gedacht hat, während etwas sehen, was jeder sieht. We could not assert whether Schopenhauer really said that, but it should not be at all surprising if it were, because it sounds simple, perhaps even naïve, and very deep, indeed. It fits perfectly to Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwigs personality (18161895), whom we will look at as physiologist in this second note. Yes, second note-because in the first one [2], we looked at him as bioengineer. A third and last Retrospectroscope column completing this series will deal with his wonderful and always humble and generous activities as teacher.

  3. Synchronicity and the I Ching: Jung, Pauli, and the Chinese woman.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2005-04-01

    The capacity of the human mind to discover and invent both imagistic analogies and mathematical structures to represent reality is strikingly juxtaposed in the ancient Chinese text of the I Ching. Its emphasis on containing all sorts of opposites and its plastic appeal to multi-valenced experience has kept it alive through millennia and across cultures. Jung was introduced to its Taoist wisdom by the Sinologist Richard Wilhelm. The Nobel Laureate quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli became familiar with its philosophy and mathematics through his reading of Schopenhauer and Leibniz. In their correspondence about the nature of the unconscious and synchronicity, Pauli and Jung also exchanged their musings on Pauli's dreams of a Chinese woman, her role in his psyche and his scientific theories(1).

  4. [From the history of Roger commentators].

    PubMed

    Karpp, Gerhard; Riha, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    The biblical manuscript A 12, preserved in Duesseldorf's Federal and University Library (Universitaets- und Landesbibliothek Duesseldorf), dates from the mid-13th century. In the course of its scholarly analysis, a piece of parchment was found in the interior board, where a fragment of a surgical text is written on. Judging from the writing, the original manuscript came from southern France (Montpellier) and dates from the late 13th century. Several pas- sages quote "M[agister] W[ilhelmus] de Congenis", but the text bears only a vague resem- blance to Pagel's (1891) and Sudhoff s (1918) editions. Upon the other hand, the author was guided by Roger Frugardi's 'Chirurgia', which presumably gave the structure for Wilhelm's lectures. The edition of the fragmentary text presents a yet unknown example of student notes referring to William of Congenis and illustrates the complex history of Roger commentaries.

  5. Discovery of the sinus node by Keith and Flack: on the centennial of their 1907 publication

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Mark E; Hollman, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered a net of gelatinous fibres in the subendocardium of the heart. Walter Gaskell in the 1880s observed that the impulse of the heart began in the sinus venosus, and that this region had the most rhythmic ability. A conducting bundle between the atrium and the ventricle was found by Wilhelm His, Jr in 1893. In 1906, Sunao Tawara found a “complex knoten” of tissue at the proximal end of the His bundle. He concluded that this was the inception of an electrical conducting system which continued from the AV node through the bundle of His, divided into the bundle branches, and terminated as the Purkinje fibres. The collaboration of Arthur Keith and Martin Flack led to discovery of the sinus node, finalising the discovery of the electrical system of the heart and providing an anatomical answer to the baffling mystery: “Why does the heart beat?” PMID:17890694

  6. Physics, ballistics, and psychology: a history of the chronoscope in/as context, 1845-1890.

    PubMed

    Schmidgen, Henning

    2005-02-01

    In Wilhelm Wundt's (1832-1920) Leipzig laboratory and at numerous other research sites, the chronoscope was used to conduct reaction time experiments. The author argues that the history of the chronoscope is the history not of an instrument but of an experimental setup. This setup was initially devised by the English physicist and instrument maker Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) in the early 1840s. Shortly thereafter, it was improved by the German clockmaker and mechanic Matthäus Hipp (1813-1893). In the 1850s, the chronoscope was introduced to ballistic research. In the early 1860s, Neuchâtel astronomer Adolphe Hirsch (1830-1901) applied it to the problem of physiological time. The extensions and variations of chronoscope use within the contexts of ballistics, physiology, and psychology presented special challenges. These challenges were met with specific attempts to reduce the errors in chronoscopic experiments on shooting stands and in the psychological laboratory.

  7. Freud's Irma dream: a psychoanalytic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Mautner, B

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the hypothesis that Freud may have been haunted by the repressed memory of an incident of erotic aggression enacted by himself against his sister Anna when he was 5 years old and she 3 years old. It is suggested that this experience and its psychic ramifications make up the latent content of the Irma dream. The Irma dream is viewed here as the first dream of Freud's self-analysis. As in the analysis of the first reported dream in an actual treatment situation, meaning emerges progressively over time. The interpretation proposed in this paper is based on data emerging from 1895 until 1924. Principal sources are 'The interpretation of dreams', which is seen as an associative monologue, the letters to Wilhelm Fliess and Freud's early theoretical works.

  8. Plant breeding on the front: imperialism, war, and exploitation.

    PubMed

    Elina, Olga; Heim, Susanne; Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the development of plant-breeding science in the context of the booming genetic research and autarky policy of the 1930s as well as during World War II in National Socialist-occupied Europe. Soviet scientists, especially Nikolai Vavilov and his VIR institute, had a leading position in the international plant-breeding science of the 1920s. During World War II, German scientists, namely experts from the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Plant Breeding, usurped Soviet institutes and valuable seed collections. In contrast, plant-breeding research in occupied Scandinavia continued with relatively little disturbance. The paper compares behavior of German, Soviet, and Norwegian plant-breeding scientists under the Nazi regime.

  9. The blood from Auschwitz and the silence of the scholars.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hill, B

    1999-01-01

    The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics in Berlin-Dahlem was the centre of scientific racism in Nazi Germany. Its bad history culminated in a research project to analyse the molecular basis of racial differences in the susceptibility to various infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Josef Mengele, a former postdoc of the director of the institute, Otmar von Verschuer, collected blood samples and other material in Auschwitz from families and twins of Jews and Gypsies. The blood samples were analysed by Günther Hillmann in the Berlin laboratory of Nobel Prize winner Adolf Butenandt. Butenandt had just moved to Tübingen. The project was paid for by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Butenandt, Hillmann and von Verschuer made scientific careers in the Federal Republic. To the present day this past has not been acknowledged by the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft as part of its history.

  10. Neurosurgery in Würzburg until World War II.

    PubMed

    Arnold, H; Collmann, H

    2012-01-01

    The institution of German neurosurgery as an autonomous surgical specialty, starting in Würzburg in 1934, is closely linked to the names of Fritz König and Wilhelm Tönnis. They were acting at a time when the global economic crisis and a consolidating Nazi dictatorship caused a cascade of alarming changes in political and social life. On the one hand it is fascinating to see how the restless work and energy of Tönnis managed to build up the first independent neurosurgical unit in Germany and to tighten efficient international connections all over the world within a few years. On the other hand-from a present-day perspective-it is difficult to understand how his strive towards a specialist's success, in contrast to that of Otfrid Foerster, was barely affected by the threatening political development, until the Second World War stopped his plans and ideas for many years.

  11. Conception and development of the Second Life® Embryo Physics Course.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The study of embryos with the tools and mindset of physics, started by Wilhelm His in the 1880s, has resumed after a hiatus of a century. The Embryo Physics Course convenes online allowing interested researchers and students, who are scattered around the world, to gather weekly in one place, the virtual world of Second Life®. It attracts people from a wide variety of disciplines and walks of life: applied mathematics, artificial life, bioengineering, biophysics, cancer biology, cellular automata, civil engineering, computer science, embryology, electrical engineering, evolution, finite element methods, history of biology, human genetics, mathematics, molecular developmental biology, molecular biology, nanotechnology, philosophy of biology, phycology, physics, self-reproducing systems, stem cells, tensegrity structures, theoretical biology, and tissue engineering. Now in its fifth year, the Embryo Physics Course provides a focus for research on the central question of how an embryo builds itself.

  12. [On the road to a new humanity: the reception of psychoanalysis in the early Kinderladen movement].

    PubMed

    Kauders, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1960s a group of students in West Germany founded the so-called Kinderläden (day care centers) in order to experiment with new forms of early childhood education. Members of the early Kinderladen movement in particular pursued a radically utopian approach that, they hoped, would engender new human beings. With the aid of psychoanalytic writings, especially those of Wilhelm Reich, they sought to create subjects that would overcome repressive bourgeois norms and live out their sexuality freely. This reliance on Reich entailed a new interpretation of the "base", as psychoanalytic drive theory supplanted Marxist theory. As such, the early Kinderladen ac- tivists regarded the "basis" of society in biological, psychological, and pedagogic rather than economic terms.

  13. ["Could not therefore the earth globe also be a large tourmaline?" A crystal, Lichtenberg and the polarity discussion before 1800].

    PubMed

    Wiesenfeldt, Gerhard; Breidbach, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the debate on one particular phenomenon of the research into electrical charge distribution prior to 1800: the description and interpretation of polarities observed on the tourmaline. We show that in the second half of the eighteenth century this crystal became a model to distinguish and categorize different qualities of charges (electric and magnetic fluids). It will become clear that the polarity detected on the tourmaline became a key concept for eighteenth century natural philosophy, which relied on analogizing operations. We illustrate this concentrating on Lichtenbergs first lecture at the Göttingen academy of science in 1778. Thus the concept of polarity is already a central ordering category before the beginnings of the speculative enterprise of idealistic Naturphilosophy. Consequently, the physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter, who can be positioned in that context, consciously adheres to the experimental research tradition of polarities portrayed in this paper.

  14. Bringing new archival sources to Wundt scholarship: the case of Wundt's assistantship with Helmholtz.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas

    2014-02-01

    Wilhelm Wundt's biography is one of the main domains in Wundt scholarship that deserves more detailed attention. The few existing biographical works present many problems, ranging from vagueness to chronological inaccuracies, among others. One of the important gaps concerns the so-called Heidelberg period (1852-1874), during which he went from being a medical student to holding a professorship at the University of Heidelberg. The aim of this article is to dispel a very common confusion in the secondary literature, which refers to Wundt's assistantship with Helmholtz at the Physiological Institute, by establishing the precise dates of his assistantship. Contrary to what is generally repeated in the secondary literature, the primary sources allow us to determine precisely this period from October 1858 to March 1865. I conclude by pointing out the indispensability of the primary sources not only to Wundt scholarship but also to the historiography of psychology in general.

  15. [The shipwreck of "Der Brandtaucher" in the then territory of the Danish monarchy - in Kiel's harbor - February 1, 1851].

    PubMed

    Brorson, I

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the first German submarine - "Der Brandtaucher" - constructed in Schleswig-Holstein by Wilhelm V. Bauer in 1850. The submarine was built as a special weapon to attack the Danish blokading warships of the harbour of Kiel during the First Danish-German War 1848-51. The military-medical aspects are dealing with the shipwreck of a submarine because of an overpressure during submerge, and the rescue of its crew of 3 men through a "free ascent" of 52 feet - followed by comments of today. As for the description of the construction of "Der Brandtaucher", the shipwreck and the "free ascent", it was originally retold in German by Gerd Stolz in his book: "Die Schleswig-Holsteinische Marine 1848-1852". (1987).

  16. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  17. The first demonstration of lactic acid in human blood in shock by Johann Joseph Scherer (1814–1869) in January 1843

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, T. C.; van der Hoven, B.; Bakker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid was first found and described in sour milk by Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742–1786) in 1780. The German physician–chemist Johann Joseph Scherer (1841–1869) demonstrated the occurrence of lactic acid in human blood under pathological conditions in 1843 and 1851. In this article we honour the forgotten observations by Scherer and describe the influence of Scherer's finding on further research on lactic acid at the end of the 19th century. We conclude that Scherer's 1843 case reports should be cited as the first description of lactic acid in human blood after death and also as the first demonstration of lactic acid as a pathological finding in septic and haemorrhagic shock. Carl Folwarczny was, in 1858, the first to demonstrate lactic acid in blood in a living patient. PMID:17661014

  18. The history of examination of reflexes.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    In the late 1800s, Wilhelm Erb, Joseph Babinski, William Gowers, and others helped develop the neurologic examination as we know it today. Erb was one of the first to emphasize a detailed and systematic neurologic exam and was co-discoverer of the muscle stretch reflex, Gowers began studying the knee jerk shortly after it was described, and Babinski focused on finding reliable signs that could differentiate organic from hysterical paralysis. These physicians and others emphasized the bedside examination of reflexes, which have been an important part of the neurologic examination ever since. This review will focus on the history of the examination of the following muscle stretch and superficial/cutaneous reflexes: knee jerk, jaw jerk, deep abdominal reflexes, superficial abdominal reflexes, plantar reflex/Babinski sign, and palmomental reflex. The history of reflex grading will also be discussed.

  19. [The "diagnosis" in the light of Charles S. Peirce, Sherlock Holmes, Sigmund Freud and modern neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Adler, R H

    2006-05-10

    A diagnostic hypothesis is a causa ficta. It is an assumption, suitable to explain phenomena, which are not yet proven to be the only and valid explanation of the observed. One of Wilhelm Hauff's faitales illustrates how a hypothesis is generated. It is based on the interpretation of signs. Signs are of an ikonic, an indexical or a symbolic nature. According to S. Peirce, a hypothesis is created by abduction, to Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes by immersion into thoughts, and to S. Freud by free floating attention. The three procedures are alike. Neurobiological structures and functions, which correspond to these processes, are described; especially the emotional-implicite memory. The technique of hypothesis-generation is meaningful to clinical medicine.

  20. Gradiva: freud, fetishism, and Pompeian Fantasy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John

    2013-10-01

    This paper is a critical reconsideration of Freud's analysis (1907) of Wilhelm Jensen's novella Gradiva: A Pompeian Fantasy (1903). Freud's interest was aroused by the parallels between Jensen's presentation of dreams and Freud's model of dream formation just published in The Interpretation of Dreams (1900). Freud also acclaims Jensen's presentation of the formation and "cure" of his protagonist's delusion about a marble bas-relief of a woman walking. This paper argues for the centrality of the phenomenon of fetishism, briefly considered but excluded from Freud's analysis. The fantasy of Gradiva as "the necessary conditions for loving" (Freud 1910, pp. 165-166) is also a key thesis of the essay, which makes use of the newly translated Freud-Jensen correspondence contained in this article's Appendix.

  1. Aerodynamics and mathematics in National Socialist Germany and Fascist Italy: a comparison of research institutes.

    PubMed

    Epple, Moritz; Karachalios, Andreas; Remmert, Volker R

    2005-01-01

    The article is concerned with the mathematical sciences in National Socialist Germany and Fascist Italy, with special attention to research important to the war effort. It focuses on three institutional developments: the expansion of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Göttingen, the foundation of the Reich Institute for Mathematics in Oberwolfach (Black Forest), and the work of the Istituto Nazionale per le Applicazioni del Calcolo in Rome. All three developments are embedded in the general political background, thus providing a basis for comparative conclusions about the conditions of the mathematical sciences and military-related research in Germany and Italy. It turns out that in both countries, the increasing demand for mathematical knowledge in modern warfare led to the establishment of "extra-university" national institutions specifically devoted to mathematical research.

  2. Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens.

    PubMed

    Haaning, Aksel

    2014-02-01

    The paper focuses on the year 1929 when Jung published 'A European commentary' to Richard Wilhelm's German translation of the Taoist text The Secret of the Golden Flower. This shows that Jung had already started on the track of European alchemy by following up Conrad Waldkirch's preface in Artis Auriferae (1593); and it raises the question of whether this could be the possible missing link to Jung's subsequent research in Alchemy and Hermetic Philosophy in the years to come. It is argued that here was the beginning of Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens, the publication of which concludes the Mysterium Conuinctionis more than twenty years later. It is further maintained that this choice of the Aurora is a profound expression of Jung's ambition to revitalize the past from within the individual, and helps explain Jung's deep concern with the welfare and future of modern society.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of the putative heart of Louis XVII, son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette.

    PubMed

    Jehaes, E; Pfeiffer, H; Toprak, K; Decorte, R; Brinkmann, B; Cassiman, J J

    2001-03-01

    According to official historiography, the 10-year-old Louis XVII died in the Temple of Paris on June 8, 1795. However, public rumour spread the theory that Louis XVII escaped and that his descendants would be alive today. One such putative 'Louis XVII' was Carl Wilhelm Naundorff, who died in 1845 in Delft (the Netherlands). Comparative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis gave evidence that his remains could not be identified as those of Louis XVII. In the present study, mtDNA analysis was performed on the heart of the young boy who died in the prison of Paris in 1795. In order to obtain the strongest evidence possible, two laboratories independently analysed the heart. The results showed that the consensus mtDNA sequence of the heart was identical to that of the maternal relatives of Louis XVII.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA analysis on remains of a putative son of Louis XVI, King of France and Marie-Antoinette.

    PubMed

    Jehaes, E; Decorte, R; Peneau, A; Petrie, J H; Boiry, P A; Gilissen, A; Moisan, J P; Van den Berghe, H; Pascal, O; Cassiman, J J

    1998-01-01

    Carl Wilhelm Naundorff was buried in 1845 in Delft as Louis Charles, Duc de Normandie, 'Louis XVII'. However, the son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette-Louis XVII--officially died in the Temple of Paris in 1795. In order to resolve the identity of Naundorff, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences of his remains were compared with the sequences obtained from the hairs of two sisters of Marie-Antoinette, Marie-Antoinette herself, and with the sequences obtained from DNA samples of two living maternal relatives. The mtDNA sequence of a bone sample from Naundorff showed two nucleotide differences from the sequences of the three sisters and four differences from the sequences of living maternal relatives. Based on this evidence it becomes very unlikely that Naundroff is the son of Marie-Antoinette.

  5. Historicism and neo-Kantianism.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Fred

    2008-12-01

    This article treats the conflict between historicism and neo-Kantianism in the late nineteenth century by a careful examination of the writings of Wilhelm Windelband, the leader of the Southwestern neo-Kantians. Historicism was a profound challenge to the fundamental principles of Kant's philosophy because it seemed to imply that there are no universal and necessary principles of science, ethics or aesthetics. Since all such principles are determined by their social and historical context, they differ with each culture and epoch. Windelband attempted to respond to the challenge of this relativism by either broadening Kantian principles, so that they could accommodate the results of historicism, or by reformulating Kantian principles, so that they were impregnable to historical change. The article examines both aspects of Windelband's strategy in some detail, noting the many changes and different formulations in his views. A final section considers some of the difficulties of Windelband's strategy and concludes that, despite its heroic efforts, it was a failure.

  6. ["Directed perception", "mood", "social reinforcement". Sketches towards the historical semantics of Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact].

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses three basic concepts of Ludwik Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. It shows first that Fleck's notion of "directed perception" is closely linked to Jakob von Uexküll's writings on the "Umwelt" of animals and humans. The article then proposes to regard the epistemological debates surrounding parapsychology as an important testing ground for the Fleckian concept of „mood“ and his concomitant hypotheses about „the tenacity of systems of opinion and the harmony of illusions". It finally argues that Fleck's modification of Wilhelm Jerusalem's idea of the "social consolidation" of knowledge helps us to understand the indebtedness of Fleck towards early functionalist sociology as well as his strong belief in "specific historical laws governing the development of ideas"The historical semantics of Fleck's works hence proves that his insights are neither marginal nor revolutionary but rather deeply rooted within scientific traditions from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  7. Elevational gradient of Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha) on a tropical mountain in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen W.; Soulier-Perkins, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    Malaise trap sampling of Hemiptera (Heteroptera; Auchenorrhyncha) was conducted at 500 m intervals along an elevational gradient from 200 m to 3,700 m on the east slope of Mount Wilhelm, Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. Hemiptera had a decrease in morphospecies richness and overall abundance with increasing elevation, however, the Heteroptera did not exhibit either pattern. A few species were relatively abundant at each elevation, whereas the majority of species were represented by ≤5 specimens. Morphospecies richness of Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadomorpha, Fulgoromorpha, Cicadellidae, Cixiidae, and Derbidae also decreased with increasing elevation but abundance decline was not significant due to the large number of specimens captured at 200 m relative to those captured at higher elevations. The percentage of Cicadomorpha specimens decreased with increasing elevation relative to that of the Fulgoromorpha which increased with increasing elevation. Environmental factors that may influence patterns of species richness along the elevational gradient are discussed. PMID:26056617

  8. [Psychiatry as cultural science: considerations following Max Weber].

    PubMed

    Bormuth, M

    2010-11-01

    Psychiatry can be seen as a natural and cultural science. According to this the postulate of freedom is its strong value judgment. Since the times of enlightenment it has been described metaphorically by the myth of the expulsion from Paradise. Following Max Weber and Wilhelm Dilthey, Karl Jaspers has introduced this perspective into psychiatry. His strict dichotomy between explaining and understanding has later been critically revised by Werner Janzarik and Hans Heimann. Their concepts of structure dynamic, of pathography and of anthropology are closer to Max Weber who connected natural and cultural sciences in a much stronger way. Especially the pathographic example of Nietzsche allows to demonstrate the differences between Jaspers and the later psychopathologists of the Heidelberg and Tübingen schools.

  9. The Pulkovo Observatory on the Centuries' Borderline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalakin, Viktor K.

    The present paper deals with the development of astrophysical research at the Pulkovo Observatory (now: the Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences) at adjacent time periods separated by the threshold between the 19th and the 20th centuries. The Pulkovo Observatory had been inaugurated in 1839. Its traditional field of research work was astrometry. The confirmation of light absorption phenomenon in interstellar space by Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve marked the turn of the Observatory's research programs toward astrophysics. New tendencies in the development of contemporaneous astronomy in Russia were pointed out by Otto Struve in his paper “About the Place of Astrophysics in Astronomy” presented in 1866 to the Saint-Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Wide-scale astrophysical studies were performed at Pulkovo Observatory around 1900 during the directorships of Theodore Bredikhin, Oscar Backlund and Aristarchos Belopolsky.

  10. [Precarious matters. The radium economy, episteme of risk and the emergence of tracer technique in national socialism].

    PubMed

    von Schwerin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Following the traces of radioactive material is--as scholars have recently shown--a valuable historical approach in order to evaluate the material 'factor' of science in action. Even though the origins of materials like radium and artificial isotopes are quite different, their circulation is interconnected. A material pathway can be drawn from the radium industry to the scientific rise of artificial isotopes as indicator substances in the 1930s, continuing to the building of networks by German scientists working for the war efforts. Also, this pathway reveals the role of radiation protection in establishing that material culture. Finally, the dynamics of material traces and institutional linkages is shown by the tracer work of biophysicists and radiation biologists working at the Genetic Department of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Brain Research in Berlin and at the Institut de Chimie Nucléaire at Paris, which at that time was occupied by German troops.

  11. Neurosciences and research on chemical weapons of mass destruction in Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Florian

    2006-09-01

    As a side-product of industrial research, new chemical nerve agents (Tabun, Sarin, Soman) superior to those available to the Allied Forces were discovered in Nazi Germany. These agents were never used by Germany, even though they were produced at a large scale. This article explores the toxicological and physiological research into the mechanisms of action of these novel nerve agents, and the emergence of military research objectives in neurophysiological and neurotoxicological research. Recently declassified Allied military intelligence files document secret nerve agent research, leading to intensified research on anticholinesterase agents in the peripheral and the central nervous system. The article discusses the involvement of IG Farben scientists, educational, medical and military institutions, and of Nobel Prize laureate Richard Kuhn, director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research.

  12. The Politics of Forgetting: Otto Hahn and the German Nuclear-Fission Project in World War II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2012-03-01

    As the co-discoverer of nuclear fission and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry, Otto Hahn (1879-1968) took part in Germany`s nuclear-fission project throughout the Second World War. I outline Hahn's efforts to mobilize his institute for military-related research; his inclusion in high-level scientific structures of the military and the state; and his institute's research programs in neutron physics, isotope separation, transuranium elements, and fission products, all of potential military importance for a bomb or a reactor and almost all of it secret. These activities are contrasted with Hahn's deliberate misrepresentations after the war, when he claimed that his wartime work had been nothing but "purely scientific" fundamental research that was openly published and of no military relevance.

  13. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  14. Redescription of Jenkina articulata Brøndsted from the deep Eckström Shelf, E-Weddell Sea, Antarctica and a comment on the possible mass occurrence of this species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janussen, Dorte; Tore Rapp, Hans

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on an unexpected large catch of the rare calcareous sponge species Jenkina articulataBrøndsted, 1931, taken in the Antarctic Weddell Sea during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expedition in January 2008. This species is only known from the original description from two specimens collected from the type locality off Wilhelm II-Land. During the SYSTCO expedition more than 60 specimens were collected using an Agassiz trawl at 600 m depth on the Eckström Shelf, Eastern Weddell Sea. Based on this collection, we give a redescription of the incompletely known species, place the locality of catch in a major context, and discuss possible explanations for the rich occurrence of this species in the sponge-ground fauna.

  15. Communication: Supramolecular structures in monohydroxy alcohols: Insights from shear-mechanical studies of a systematic series of octanol structural isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecksher, Tina; Jakobsen, Bo

    2014-09-01

    A recent study [C. Gainaru, R. Figuli, T. Hecksher, B. Jakobsen, J. C. Dyre, M. Wilhelm, and R. Böhmer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098301 (2014)] of two supercooled monohydroxy alcohols close to the glass-transition temperature showed that the Debye peak, thus far mainly observed in the electrical response, also has a mechanical signature. In this work, we apply broadband shear-mechanical spectroscopy to a systematic series of octanol structural isomers, x-methyl-3-heptanol (with x ranging from 2 to 6). We find that the characteristics of the mechanical signature overall follow the systematic behavior observed in dielectric spectroscopy. However, the influence from the molecular structure is strikingly small in mechanics (compared to roughly a factor 100 increase in dielectric strength) and one isomer clearly does not conform to the general ordering. Finally, the mechanical data surprisingly indicate that the size of the supramolecular structures responsible for the Debye process is nearly unchanged in the series.

  16. Results from the intercalibration of optical low light calibration sources 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brändström, B. U. E.; Enell, C.-F.; Widell, O.; Hansson, T.; Whiter, D.; Mäkinen, S.; Mikhaylova, D.; Axelsson, K.; Sigernes, F.; Gulbrandsen, N.; Schlatter, N. M.; Gjendem, A. G.; Cai, L.; Reistad, J. P.; Daae, M.; Demissie, T. D.; Andalsvik, Y. L.; Roberts, O.; Poluyanov, S.; Chernouss, S.

    2012-05-01

    Following the 38th Annual European Meeting on Atmospheric Studies by Optical Methods in Siuntio in Finland, an intercalibration workshop for optical low light calibration sources was held in Sodankylä, Finland. The main purpose of this workshop was to provide a comparable scale for absolute measurements of aurora and airglow. All sources brought to the intercalibration workshop were compared to the Fritz Peak reference source using the Lindau Calibration Photometer built by Wilhelm Barke and Hans Lauche in 1984. The results were compared to several earlier intercalibration workshops. It was found that most sources were fairly stable over time, with errors in the range of 5-25%. To further validate the results, two sources were also intercalibrated at UNIS, Longyearbyen, Svalbard. Preliminary analysis indicates agreement with the intercalibration in Sodankylä within about 15-25%.

  17. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. I. Experimental results on the transmission of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Smejkal, Valerie; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    We report on energy loss measurements of slow (v ≪v0 ), highly charged (Q >10 ) ions upon transmission through a 1-nm-thick carbon nanomembrane. We emphasize here the scaling of the energy loss with the velocity and charge exchange or loss. We show that a weak linear velocity dependence exists, whereas charge exchange dominates the kinetic energy loss, especially in the case of a large charge capture. A universal scaling of the energy loss with the charge exchange and velocity is found and discussed in this paper. A model for charge-state-dependent energy loss for slow ions is presented in paper II in this series [R. A. Wilhelm and W. Möller, Phys. Rev. A 93, 052709 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052709].

  18. Results from the intercalibration of optical low-light calibration sources 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brändström, B. U. E.; Enell, C.-F.; Widell, O.; Hansson, T.; Whiter, D.; Mäkinen, S.; Mikhaylova, D.; Axelsson, K.; Sigernes, F.; Gulbrandsen, N.; Schlatter, N. M.; Gjendem, A. G.; Cai, L.; Reistad, J. P.; Daae, M.; Demissie, T. D.; Andalsvik, Y. L.; Roberts, O.; Poluyanov, S.; Chernouss, S.

    2011-12-01

    Following the 38th Annual Meeting on Atmospheric studies by Optical methods at Siuntio in Finland, an intercalibration workshop for optical low-light calibration sources was held in Sodankylä, Finland. The main purpose of this workshop was to provide a comparable scale for absolute measurements of aurora and airglow. All sources brought to the intercalibration workshop were compared to an international standard source (Fritz-Peak) using the Lindau Calibration Photometer built by Wilhelm Barke and Hans Lauche in 1984. The international standard source is on loan from Michael Gadsden, Aberdeen. The results were compared to several earlier intercalibration workshops. It was found that most sources were fairly stable over time with errors in the range of 5-20%. To further validate the results, two sources were also intercalibrated at UNIS, Longyearbyen, Svalbard. Preliminary analysis indicate good agreement with the intercalibration in Sodankylä.

  19. Metamaterials for circuit QED: Quantum simulations and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, Bruno G.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to design periodically structured materials not present in nature provides scientists with new tools, ranging from sub-wavelength imaging to well controlled band structures for wave propagation in photonic crystals. Superconducting metamaterials have been recently proposed to manipulate the density-of-modes of transmission lines [D. J. Egger and F. K. Wilhelm, Phys. Rev. Letters 111, 163601 (2013)]. We further build on these ideas and develop a toolbox for environment manipulation based on nano-structured, periodic, lossless, superconducting circuits. In particular we show that high density of low energy states can be achieved using a superlattice arrangement of left-handed circuit elements. Multimode, ultra-strong coupling of superconducing qubits to such engineered environments thus allow for experimental implementation of quantum simulation of interesting new phenomena as well as for complex quantum state engineering.

  20. Increase of the mean Sun-Earth distance caused by a secular mass accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2013-09-01

    Based on many planetary observations between the years 1971 and 2003, Krasinsky and Brumberg (Celest. Mech. Dyn. Astron. 90:267-288, 2004) have estimated a rate of increase in the mean Sun-Earth distance of (15±4) m per century. Together with other anomalous observations in the solar system, this increase appears to be unexplained (Lämmerzahl et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. Lib., vol. 349, pp. 75-101, 2008). We explain these findings by invoking a recently proposed gravitational impact model (Wilhelm et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 343:135-144, 2013) that implies a secular mass increase of all massive bodies. This allows us to formulate a quantitative understanding of the effect within the parameter range of the model with a mass accumulation rate of the Sun of (6.4±1.7)×1010 kg s-1.

  1. Does Cometary Panspermia Falsify Dark Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-10-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian P. Schmidt, and Adam G. Riess "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae", judged to be the "most important discovery or invention within the field of physics" (Excerpt from the will of Alfred Nobel). Are we forced by this claimed discovery to believe the universe is dominated by anti- gravitational dark energy? Can the discovery be falsified? Because life as we observe it on Earth is virtually impossible by the standard ΛCDMHC model, extraterrestrial life and cometary panspermia may provide the first definitive falsification of a Nobel Prize in Physics since its first award in 1901 to Wilhelm Röntgen for his discovery of X-rays.

  2. The emergence and development of Bekhterev's psychoreflexology in relation to Wundt's experimental psychology.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Araujo, Saulo

    2014-01-01

    After its foundation, the Laboratory for Experimental Psychology at Leipzig University became an international center for psychological research, attracting students from all over the world. The Russian physiologist and psychiatrist Vladimir Bekhterev (1857-1927) was one of Wilhelm Wundt's students in 1885, and after returning to Russia he continued enthusiastically his experimental research on mental phenomena. However, he gradually distanced himself from Wundt's psychological project and developed a new concept of psychology: the so-called Objective Psychology or Psychoreflexology. The goal of this paper is to analyze Bekhterev's position in relation to Wundt's experimental psychology, by showing how the former came to reject the latter's conception of psychology. The results indicate that Bekhterev's development of a philosophical program, including his growing interest in establishing a new Weltanschauung is the main reason behind his divergence with Wundt, which is reflected in his conception of scientific psychology. Despite this, Wundt remained alive in Bekhterev's mind as an ideal counterpoint.

  3. Translator's preface.

    PubMed

    Lamiell, James T

    2013-08-01

    Presents a preface from James T. Lamiell, who translates Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology's Struggle for Existence (Die Psychologie im Kampf ums Dasein), in which Wundt advised against the impending divorce of psychology from philosophy, into English. Lamiell comments that more than a decade into the 21st century, it appears that very few psychologists have any interest at all in work at the interface of psychology and philosophy. He notes that one clear indication of this is that the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, which is Division 24 of the American Psychological Association (APA), remains one of the smallest of the APA's nearly 60 divisions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. BACK TO THE ORIGINS OF THE REPUDIATION OF WUNDT: OSWALD KÜLPE AND RICHARD AVENARIUS.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    This essay provides a fresh account of the break between Oswald Külpe and his master Wilhelm Wundt. Kurt Danziger's reconstruction of the "repudiation" of Wundt, which has become the canon for this significant episode of history of psychology, focused on the supposed influence of Ernst Mach on this set of events, overshadowing the other exponent of Empiriocriticism: Richard Avenarius. Analyzing archival documents and examining anew the primary sources, the paper shows that Avenarius was himself a member of Wundt's circle, and that his "repudiation" of the master paved the way for Külpe. The essay points out the original anti-Wundtian aspects of Avenarius' notion of psychology, thus showing how they were then adopted by Külpe.

  5. ["As we're not willing to hang and behead and not able to deport...". On Emil Kraepelin's influence on Franz von Liszt].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Recla, A; Steinberg, H

    2008-03-01

    Emil Kraepelin started his scientific career with a pamphlet demanding complete restructure of German penal law. It is well known that Kraepelin was a recipient of Cesare Lombroso's theses on degeneration and atavism. Therefore his demand for a correctional law completely replacing penal law is easily understood. Still undiscussed however is the question of whether Kraepelin's brochure had a decisive effect on German criminal law, especially on the so-called Marburg Program of Franz von Liszt, still viewed as the first emergence of modern criminal law and policies in Germany. Examination of this shows that despite major theoretical faults, Kraepelin came to conclusions that correspond remarkably with von Liszt's. Special focus should be directed on the psychologist Wilhelm Wundt, who criticised Kraepelin's juridical attempt in a very kind yet fundamental way, and on the relationship that existed between Kraepelin and von Liszt.

  6. The linguistic repudiation of Wundt.

    PubMed

    Nerlich, B; Clarke, D D

    1998-08-01

    Wilhelm Wundt's influence on the development of linguistics and psychology was pervasive. The foundations for this web of influence on the sciences of mind and language were laid down in Wundt's own research program, which was quite different from other attempts at founding a new psychology, as it was deeply rooted in German philosophy. This resulted in certain gaps in Wundt's conception of mind and language. These gaps provoked a double repudiation of Wundt's theories, by linguists and psychologists. The psychological repudiation has been studied by historians of psychology, and the linguistic repudiation has been studied by historians of linguistics. The intent of this article is to bring the linguistic repudiation to the attention of historians of psychology, especially the one outlined by two important figures in the history of psychology: Karl Buhler and George Mead.

  7. Wundt as chemist? A fresh look at his practice and theory of experimentation.

    PubMed

    Schmidgen, Henning

    2003-01-01

    Mid-19th-century chemistry constituted a practically and theoretically important resource for experimental psychology as conceived by Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920). In the early 1850s, Wundt began working in Gustav Herth's private chemical laboratory in Heidelberg. The experimental work Wundt conducted under Herth's direction provided the practical model for the psychological methods advocated in Wundt's pioneering publication on visual perception in 1862. With respect to theory, Wundt relied on John Stuart Mill's System of Logic, a book often referring to the chemical writings by Justus Liebig. Wundt not only read and quoted Mill's logic but also was personally acquainted with its German translator, the former Liebig student Jacob Schiel. Thus, in various ways, chemistry influenced Wundt's early theory and practice of experiment.

  8. Wundt, Völkerpsychologie, and experimental social psychology.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John D

    2003-02-01

    Wilhelm Wundt distinguished between "experimental psychology" and Volkerpsychologie. It is often claimed that Wundt maintained that social psychological phenomena, the subject matter of Völkerpsychologie, could not be investigated experimentally but must be explored via comparative-historical methods. In this article it is argued that it is doubtful if many of the passages usually cited as evidence that Wundt held such a view actually such such a view. It is also argued that if Wundt did hold such a view, it was inconsistent with his own general theoretical position and methodological practice. It is suggested that it is anachronistic to attribute such a view to Wundt, because he appears to have had little interest in the experimental analysis of the synchronic social dynamics of psychological processes. Most of Wundt's arguments about the inappropriateness of experimentation were directed against the introspective analysis of diachronic historical processes.

  9. [On natural history museums and their purpose. A lecture given by Leopold von Buch (1774-1853) in April 1838].

    PubMed

    Kröger, Björn

    2011-12-01

    A manuscript of a lecture by the Prussian geologist Leopold von Buch given at the Berlin Society of the Friends of the Humanity was discovered at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. The text is a raw version of a passionate plea for the formation of natural history collections as science places, with a partly biting humor. Based on until now unknown anecdotes about naturalists like Kaspar Maria Graf Sternberg (1761-1838) and Friedrich Wilhelm Hoeninghaus (1771-1854) Leopold von Buch argues with von Sternberg for the scientific value of natural history collections. The repeating references to the works of Goethe and an extensive addendum of various Dante translations into German are striking. The lecture manuscript complements our knowledge about the thinking of this important geologist, and provides new insights into the science policy of his time.

  10. How Einstein made asymmetry disappear: symmetry and relativity in 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Giora; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    2005-07-01

    Contents: I. Introduction II. Einstein's usages of the term symmetry in 1905 1. The dissertation (April 1905) Case 1: isotropy Case 2: analogy Case 3: geometrical usage 2. "On the electrodynamics of moving bodies" (June 1905) Case 1: indifference Case 2: two algebraic usages Case 3: physical usage Case 4: algebraic usage Case 5: rejecting asymmetry 3. The central claim: making asymmetry disappear by appealing to a physical argument 4. Conclusion III. Background. The term symmetry and its "relatives": duality, parallelism, and reciprocity 1. Heinrich Hertz (1857-1894) 2. Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925) 3. August Föppl (1854-1924) 4. Emil Wiechert (1861-1928) 5. Wilhelm Wien (1864-1928) 6. Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (1853-1928) 7. Summary

  11. Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, A. W.

    2001-05-01

    The new book "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" chronicles the centuries-long struggle to secure the first distance to a star through detection of stellar parallax. Beginning with the naked-eye attempts of Tycho Brahe and proceeding through the telescopic studies of Robert Hooke, James Bradley, and William Herschel, all three of whom employed observational strategies suggested by Galileo, the effort to measure stellar parallax gained momentum in the early 19th century with dramatic improvements in telescope technology by German craftsmen such as Joseph Fraunhofer. Three near-contemporaneous announcements of stellar parallaxes were made in the late 1830s by Thomas Henderson (Alpha Centauri), Wilhelm Struve (Vega), and Friedrich Bessel (61 Cygni). By consensus of the astronomical community, Bessel was credited with the first successful measurement of a star's distance. With its biographical focus, "Parallax: The Race to Measure the Cosmos" highlights the human dimensions of scientific achievement.

  12. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 8 (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions span a time interval of more than 450 years. There are biographical investigations on Georg Joachim Rheticus, C.W.A. von Wahl and K.F. Heym, investigation on a reprint of a chapter of the principal work of Nicolaus Copernicus, on Christoph Scheiner and the "camera obscura", and, with respect to the history of timekeeping, on the "big Nuremberg clock". 19th century topics are: a contribution on the honorary doctorate of Joseph Fraunhofer, and on the construction of a lunar globe by Wilhelmine Witte, while the report on Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel and the cholera pandemia in Königsberg in the year 1831 gives a view into everyday life of scientists. 20th century topics are: the contributions on Bruno Thüring in Vienna and his relations with national socialism, as well as on Arthur Beer, Albert Einstein and the Warburg library. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  13. [Anthropology and synthetic Darwinism in the Third Reich: The Evolution of Organisms (1943)].

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Junker, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    This essay will analyse early attempts to base anthropology on the theoretical model provided by the emerging synthetic Darwinism of the 1940s. In the first section we will investigate the historical context of the publication of one of the central documents of synthetic Darwinism in Germany: Gerhard Heberer's Die Evolution der Organismen (1943). Anthropology was covered extensively in this book. The second section will give an impression of the live and work of the five anthropologists represented in Heberer's book: Christian von Krogh, Wilhelm Gieseler, Otto Reche, Hans Weinert, and Gerhard Heberer. The third part of our paper will clarify whether these anthropologists shared a common theoretical outlook with the founders of synthetic Darwinism, and to what degree they were committed to the racial ideas of the Third Reich.

  14. Scientific Psychology in the 18th Century: A Historical Rediscovery.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Katharina A; Pfister, Roland

    2016-05-01

    As early as 1783, the almost forgotten philosopher, metaphysicist, and psychologist Ferdinand Ueberwasser (1752-1812) designated himself "Professor für empirische Psychologie und Logik" (professor of empirical psychology and logic) at the University of Münster, Germany. His position was initiated and supported by the minister and educational reformer Franz von Fürstenberg (1729-1810), who considered psychology a core scientific discipline that should be taught at each school and university. At the end of the 18th century, then, psychology seems to have been on the verge of becoming an independent academic discipline, about 100 years before Wilhelm Wundt founded the discipline's first official laboratory. It seems surprising that Ueberwasser's writings-including a seminal textbook on empirical psychology-have been almost entirely overlooked in most historical accounts. We focus on this important founding moment of psychological science and on the circumstances that eventually brought this seminal development to a halt.

  15. A history of erotic philosophy.

    PubMed

    Soble, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This essay historically explores philosophical views about the nature and significance of human sexuality, starting with the Ancient Greeks and ending with late 20th-century Western philosophy. Important figures from the history of philosophy (and theology) discussed include Sappho, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Jerome, the Pelagians, St. Thomas Aquinas, Michel de Montaigne, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, Arthur Schopenhauer, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Wilhelm Reich, and Herbert Marcuse. Contemporary philosophers whose recent work is discussed include Michel Foucault, Thomas Nagel, Roger Scruton, Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), Catharine MacKinnon, Richard Posner, and John Finnis. To show the unity of the humanities, the writings of various literary figures are incorporated into this history, including Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, James Thurber, E. B. White, Iris Murdoch, and Philip Roth.

  16. The tragic and the metaphysical in philosophy and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Stolorow, Robert D; Atwood, George E

    2013-06-01

    This article elaborates a claim, first introduced by Wilhelm Dilthey, that metaphysics represents an illusory flight from the tragedy of human finitude. Metaphysics, of which psychoanalytic metapsychologies are a form, transforms the unbearable fragility and transience of all things human into an enduring, permanent, changeless reality, an illusory world of eternal truths. Three "clinical cases" illustrate this thesis in the work and lives of a philosopher and two psychoanalytic theorists: Friedrich Nietzsche and his metaphysical doctrine of the eternal return of the same, Sigmund Freud and his dual instinct theory, and Heinz Kohut and his theoretical language of the self. It is contended that the best safeguard against the pitfalls of metaphysical illusion lies in a shared commitment to reflection on the constitutive contexts of all our theoretical ideas.

  17. The Skin Picking Impact Scale: Factor structure, validity and development of a short version.

    PubMed

    Snorrason, Ivar; Olafsson, Ragnar P; Flessner, Christopher A; Keuthen, Nancy J; Franklin, Martin E; Woods, Douglas W

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we examined the psychometric properties of the Skin Picking Impact Scale (SPIS; Keuthen, Deckersbach, Wilhelm et al., 2001), a 10 item self-report questionnaire designed to assess the psychosocial impact of skin picking disorder (SPD). Participants were 650 individuals who met criteria for SPD in an online survey. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated a unitary factor structure with high internal consistency (α = 0.94). Consequently, we constructed an abbreviated 4-item version that retained good internal consistency (α = 0.87) and a robust factor structure. Both the short and the full versions demonstrated discriminant and convergent/concurrent validity. In conclusion, the findings indicate that both versions are psychometrically sound measures of SPD related psychosocial impact; however, some potential limitations of the full scale are discussed.

  18. [Textbook of surgery by W. Schultze, used at the Tokyo Medical Academy in the early Meiji era].

    PubMed

    Koseki, T

    1993-06-01

    Wilhelm Schultze, Professor of Surgery of the Tokyo Medical Academy, wrote "Vortraege der Allgemeine Chirurgie" for the benefit of his students in about 1880. The author examined this book and concluded that it was based upon "Lehrbuch der Chirurgie und Operationslehre" by Prof. Adolf Bardeleben, his teacher at the Charité in Berlin. Schultze's textbook was translated into Japanese and published by G. Yamazaki and U. Ishiguro, his students at the Tokyo Medical Academy, in 1884. This version was widely used as a textbook in many medical schools at that time, as well as S. Sato's translation of "Die Allgemeine Chirurgische Pathologie und Therapie" written by Prof. Theodor Billroth. The author found and introduced two different Japanese versions of Schultze's textbook printed without permission.

  19. [Johann Jaroslaw Marcinowski (1868-1935) and his sanatorium "Haus Sielbeck" at lake Uklei. Psychoanalysis in an in-patient setting].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Heike

    2011-01-01

    Marcinowski came from an aristocratic family. He first joined the army as a lieutenant and later worked as a medical doctor. From 1908 to 1920, Marcinowski was a follower of Freud, additionally influenced by Oskar Vogt. This article describes his restless life in Breslau, Berlin, Sielbeck, Bad Heilbrunn, and Tübingen, with a special focus on his psychoanalytic activities. Freud had high expectations of Marcinowski. In his sanatorium "Haus Sielbeck", Marcinowski treated patients psychoanalytically and published the results in medical journals. This application of psychoanalysis in a sanatorium was virtually unique at that time. Even though Marcinowski could not fulfill Freud's expectations in the long term, he is still one of the pioneers who described phenomena of transference in inpatient settings.--The article is complemented by Freud's letters to Marcinowski, edited by G. Fichtner and M. Schröter. These are mainly concerned with the conflict between Freud and Wilhelm Stekel who was and remained a good friend of Marcinowski.

  20. Images and Meaning-Making in a World of Resemblance: The Bavarian-Saxon Kidney Stone Affair of 1580.

    PubMed

    Stein, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    This article de-constructs and re-constructs the dynamic of a sixteenth-century political dispute between the Catholic Bavarian Duke Wilhelm V and the Protestant Saxon Elector August I. By focusing on the visual imagery which ignited the dispute, the paper explores sixteenth-century 'ways of seeing' and the epistemic role realistic images played in the production of knowledge about the natural world. While the peculiar dynamic of the affair is based on a specific understanding of the evidential role of images, the paper also argues that the wider socio-cultural context, in particular certain strategies of truth-telling, provide further clues as to the dynamic and closure of the affair.

  1. Mars water discoveries - implications for finding ancient and current life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark

    2015-11-01

    There is some wonderful synchronicity right now for those interested in the search for water and life on Mars. Foremost is the recent announcement by NASA and the publication of a study using spectral imaging which definitively proves that there is seasonal, flowing briny water at a number of locations on Mars (see Fig. 1) (Ojha et al., 2015). This caps some 15 years of accumulating evidence that what was previously considered impossible is actually occurring on the Red Planet. "Water is essential to life as we know it," write Lujendra Ojha, Mary Beth Wilhelm, and their co-authors. "The presence of liquid water on Mars today has astrobiological, geologic, and hydrologic implications and may affect future human exploration".

  2. Mars water discoveries - implications for finding ancient and current life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark

    2015-11-01

    There is some wonderful synchronicity right now for those interested in the search for water and life on Mars. Foremost is the recent announcement by NASA and the publication of a study using spectral imaging which definitively proves that there is seasonal, flowing briny water at a number of locations on Mars (see Fig. 1) (Ojha et al., 2015). This caps some 15 years of accumulating evidence that what was previously considered impossible is actually occurring on the Red Planet. ;Water is essential to life as we know it,; write Lujendra Ojha, Mary Beth Wilhelm, and their co-authors. ;The presence of liquid water on Mars today has astrobiological, geologic, and hydrologic implications and may affect future human exploration;.

  3. Kant and the development of the human and cultural sciences.

    PubMed

    Makkreel, Rudolf A

    2008-12-01

    Starting with Kant's doubts about psychology as a natural science capable of explaining human behavior, several alternative attempts to conceive of human life, culture and history are examined. Kant proposes an anthropology that will be a commonly useful human science rather than a universally valid natural science. This anthropology relates to philosophy as a mode of world-cognition. Special attention is given to how Kant's theory of right can help define our appropriate place in a communal world. The different ways in which Wilhelm Dilthey and Hermann Cohen respond to Kant's idea of legitimate appropriation are also considered. The various tasks that descriptive elucidation, explanation, reflective understanding, characterization and interpretation can perform for the human and cultural sciences are examined throughout the essay.

  4. Images and Meaning-Making in a World of Resemblance: The Bavarian-Saxon Kidney Stone Affair of 1580

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This article de-constructs and re-constructs the dynamic of a sixteenth-century political dispute between the Catholic Bavarian Duke Wilhelm V and the Protestant Saxon Elector August I. By focusing on the visual imagery which ignited the dispute, the paper explores sixteenth-century ‘ways of seeing’ and the epistemic role realistic images played in the production of knowledge about the natural world. While the peculiar dynamic of the affair is based on a specific understanding of the evidential role of images, the paper also argues that the wider socio-cultural context, in particular certain strategies of truth-telling, provide further clues as to the dynamic and closure of the affair. PMID:26290618

  5. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state.

  6. The I Ching and the psyche-body connection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shirley S Y

    2005-04-01

    Carl G. Jung's fateful meeting with Richard Wilhelm in 1929 has helped to build a bridge of depth psychological understanding between the East and the West. When Jung emerged from his 'confrontation with the unconscious', he felt validated by Wilhelm in his discovery of the healing power of medieval alchemical symbolism for the European psyche. Analytical psychology however offers a scientific, psychological understanding of Chinese wisdom as contained in the I Ching and Taoist alchemy. The Taoist alchemical tradition (also known as the Inner Elixir tradition of which 'The Secret of the Golden Flower' is a sample text) is based on the premise that psychological experience of the Tao can be achieved through mental and physiological means such as breathing and meditative techniques, gymnastics, dietary regimens such as fasting, consumption of medicinal herbs and minerals, and special sexual practices. This tradition incorporates the I Ching and traditional Chinese medicine in the alchemical opus. Taoist alchemy assumes the primacy of the physical body in the process of self-realization. The psychological and cosmic forces of the trigrams of the I Ching are stored in the internal organs of the body and are the basic material for the experience of Tao. The internal organs are the foundation of the material and subtle bodies and through cultivation, the body becomes spiritualized as the spirits are embodied. The body as a reflection of the entire cosmos becomes the residence of the gods. The realization of a new consciousness is symbolized by the hexagram Fu, meaning rebirth. The Chinese notion of Tao coincides with Jung's postulation of the unus mundus, the unity of existence which underlies the duality of psyche and matter, the psycho-physical background of existence. In this light, in the world of inner experience, East and West follow similar paths symbolically.

  7. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  8. Lunar impact basins: Stratigraphy, sequence and ages from superposed impact crater populations measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-02-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D ≥ 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  9. Photogeneration of, and Efficient Collisional Energy Transfer from, Vibrationally Excited Hydrogen Isocyanide (hnc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2013-06-01

    Time-resolved IR emission spectroscopy has previously been used to characterize the 193 nm photodissociation dynamics of vinyl cyanide, H_{2}CC(H)CN. Of significance, it was observed that the major molecular elimination channels generated ro-vibrationally excited photofragments consisting of: HCN + H_{2}CC: and HNC + HCCH, for which the HCN / HNC branching ratio was deduced to be 3.3 to 1. In the present study, we examine the collisional deactivation of the vibrationally excited (E_{vib}=15 kcal mole^{-1} above the zero-point energy) ν_{1} NH and ν_{3} NC stretches of HNC, in response to collisions with a series of inert rare-gas atoms: Rg=He, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Spectral modeling of the IR emission allows direct determination of the time-dependent average internal energy of HNC, and therefore a quantification of the average energy lost per collision, as a function of the internal energy. Similar to vibrationally excited radicals, collisional deactivation of HNC is shown to be remarkably efficient, likely due to comparatively strong HNC / Rg intermolecular attractive interactions. Subsequently, depending upon the relative rates, excited HNC can either isomerize to the energetically more stable HCN, or be rapidly quenched and kinetically trapped as HNC. Potential implications for the astrophysical HNC / HCN abundance ratio problem will be discussed. M. J. Wilhelm, M. Nikow, L. Letendre, and H. L. Dai J. Chem. Phys. 130, 044307 (2009). M. J. Wilhelm, M. Nikow, J. M. Smith, and H. L. Dai J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 23 (2013).

  10. [The Rosenthal experiment or: about the site of productive research - on move of the physiological experimental laboratory of Isidor Rosenthal (1836-1915) from the city to the country].

    PubMed

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2010-01-01

    The disciplinary development of the new science of experimental physiology is often associated with the conditions of cultural development and increasingly technical working contexts of the Industrial Age. Following this perspective, the germ cells of 19th century institutes of experimental physiology were particularly found in the metropolises of Paris, Leipzig or Berlin. Only the major cities sat the revolutionary trends and within this general process, the scientific trends were no exceptions - the provincial research universities simply followed the central ones in their normal science endeavours. Due to this interpretation, the development of the scientific community was pre-formatted as the interplay of innovation (the city) and reception (the periphery). Isidor Rosenthal (1836-1915) was born in Labischin (District of Bromberg/Posen) in 1836 and got his medical training in Berlin. Like not many other experimental physiologists, he can be used as a historiographical testing probe, to follow the conditions of knowledge transfer from center to periphery: After his studies at the Friedrich Wilhelms University and the completion of his dissertation in 1859, Rosenthal entered the newly founded Physiological Institute in Berlin as the first Research Associate of Emil DuBois-Reymond (1818-1896). Rosenthal worked here particularly on the problem of "direct and indirect muscle irritation" in frogs. These neurophysiological investigations led to his growing scientific renown. In 1872, Rosenthal became offered a first professorship in physiology at the Friedrich Alexander University in Bavaria, as one of only few Jewish scientists (and even before Wilhelm Wundt, 1832-1920). But his life and work proved not only exceptional because of his scientific achievements, but also due to his deep rootedness in cultural life--both during his time in Berlin and in Erlangen. By applying a comparative and microhistorical approach in this article, the working conditions of this

  11. Venus surface investigation based on VIRTIS measurements on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer; Döhler, Wolfgang; Kappel, David; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    The dense atmosphere of Venus prevented systematic studies of its surface at optical wavelengths in the past. The discovery of near infrared nightside atmospheric windows has opened a new challenge for detailed surface studies. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) on Venus Express is the first experiment collecting continuously nightside surface emission data from the planet. The observed high variability of measured signatures is mainly due to spatial variations of cloud optical depth and surface elevation. The investigation of surface properties requires a convergent approach of radiative transfer simulations and VIR- TIS data analyses. Therefore, a selection of orbits with well calibrated data over the northern hemisphere was performed for footprints that cover a maximum range of surface elevation variations. Radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that the conservative character of cloud multiple scattering below 2 µm and a strong dependence of radiance ratios on surface elevation in this spectral region allow the mapping of surface topography and a retrieval of the surface temperature. To the first order, the surface temperature is a function of ground elevation. Small deviations from this first order dependence have been identified that are possibly due to different surface materials. 1 Institut f¨r Planetologie, Westf¨lische Wilhelms-Universit¨t M¨nster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str.10, u a a u 48129 M¨nster, Germany u 2 German PlaceNameAerospace PlaceTypeCenter (DLR), Remote Sensing Technology Institute, Dpt. Marine Remote Sensing, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 CityplaceBerlin, countryregionGermany 3 German PlaceNameAerospace PlaceTypeCenter (DLR), Institute for Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 CityplaceBerlin, country-regionGermany 4 LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, e 92195 Meudon, France 5 INAF-IASF (Instituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica), via

  12. Clinical management of a fused upper premolar with supernumerary tooth: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In dentistry, the term 'fusion' is used to describe a developmental disorder of dental hard tissues. In the permanent dentition, fusion of a normal tooth and a supernumerary tooth usually involves the incisors or canines. However, a few cases of fusion involving premolars have also been reported to date. We present a rare case in which fusion of the maxillary left second premolar and a supernumerary tooth in a 13-year-old girl was diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, Alphard-3030, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd.). The tooth was bicuspidized after routine nonsurgical root canal treatment, and the separated teeth underwent appropriate restoration procedures. The second premolar and supernumerary tooth remained asymptomatic without any signs of inflammation after a follow-up period of 9 years. Identification of anatomical anomalies is important for treatment in cases involving fusion with supernumerary tooth, and therefore the microscopic examinations and CBCT are essential for the diagnosis. Fused teeth can be effectively managed by the comprehensive treatment which includes both endodontic and periodontal procedures. PMID:25383352

  13. X-ray-emitting gas surrounding the spiral galaxy NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Pidis, Rachel A.

    1994-01-01

    We observed the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891 with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) on Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) to search for how extraplanar gas expected in the galactic fountain model. Diffuse X-ray emission surrounds the disk with a Half Width at Half Maximum (HWHM) for the surface brightness perpendicular to the disk of 50 sec (2.4 kpc) and a radial extent of approximately 6.5 kpc, both of which are similar in extent to the extended H(alpha) and radio halo component; the implied density scale height for the hot gas is 7 kpc. The spectrum is best fitted with a hard stellar component and a soft diffuse gas component of temperature 3.6 x 10(exp 6) K. The density of this gas is 2 x 10(exp -3)/cu cm, the luminosity is 4.4 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, the mass is 1 x 10(exp 8) solar mass, and the pressure (P/k) is 1.4 10(exp 4) K/cu cm. These data are consistent with this gas participating in a galactic fountain, where the material approaches hydrostatic equilibrium before cooling at a rate of 0.12 solar mass/yr. The cooled material may be responsible for some of the H(alpha) emission.

  14. Status of ART-XC / SRG instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlinsky, M.; Akimov, V.; Levin, V.; Krivchenko, A.; Rotin, A.; Kuznetsova, M.; Lapshov, I.; Tkachenko, A.; Semena, N.; Buntov, M.; Glushenko, A.; Arefiev, V.; Yaskovich, A.; Grebenev, S.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Lutovinov, A.; Molkov, S.; Krivonos, R.; Serbinov, D.; Kudelin, M.; Drozdova, T.; Voronkov, S.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.; Gilfanov, M.; Babyshkin, V.; Lomakin, I.; Menderov, A.; Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; O'Dell, S. L.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Elsner, R.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.

    2015-09-01

    Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) is an X-ray astrophysical observatory, developed by Russia in collaboration with Germany. The mission will be launched in beginning 2017 from Baikonur and placed in a 6-month-period halo orbit around L2. The scientific payload consists of two independent telescopes - a soft-x-ray survey instrument, eROSITA, being provided by Germany and a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument ART-XC being developed by Russia. ART-XC will consist of seven independent, but co-aligned, telescope modules. The ART-XC flight mirror modules has been developed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Each mirror module will be aligned with a focal plane CdTe double-sided strip detector which will operate over the energy range of 6-30 keV, with an angular resolution of <1', a field of view of ~34' and an expected energy resolution of about 12% at 14 keV. The current status of the ART-XC/SRG instrument will be present.

  15. Status of ART-XC/SRG instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlinsky, M.; Akimov, V.; Levin, V.; Krivchenko, A.; Rotin, A.; Kuznetsova, M.; Lapshov, I.; Tkachenko, A.; Semena, N.; Buntov, M.; Glushenko, A.; Arefiev, V.; Yaskovich, A.; Grebenev, S.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Lutovinov, A.; Molkov, S.; Krivonos, R.; Serbinov, D.; Kudelin, M.; Drozdova, T.; Voronkov, S.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.; Gilfanov, M.; Babyshkin, V.; Lomakin, I.; Menderov, A.; Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; O'Dell, S. L.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Elsner, R.; Zavlin, V.; Swartz, D.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) is an X-ray astrophysical observatory, developed by Russia in collaboration with Germany. The mission will be launched in 2017 from Baikonur and placed in a 6-month-period halo orbit around L2. The scientific payload consists of two independent telescope arrays - a soft-x-ray survey instrument, eROSITA, being provided by Germany and a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument ART-XC being developed by Russia. ART-XC will consist of seven independent, but co-aligned, telescope modules. The ART-XC flight mirror modules have been developed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Each mirror module will be aligned with a focal plane CdTe double-sided strip detector which will operate over the energy range of 6-30 keV, with an angular resolution of <1', a field of view of 34' and an expected energy resolution of about 12% at 14 keV. The current status of the ART-XC/SRG instrument is presented here.

  16. Imaging, Navigation, and Robotics in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Spinal technology involves imaging, navigation, and robotics-collectively known as "image-guided therapy." Imaging coupled with navigation enhances visualization of irregular anatomy, enabling less invasive procedures. With robotics surgeons can perform quicker and safer hand movements with increased accuracy. In the 1890s, X-rays were invented by Roentgen. The first piece of X-ray equipment, the Cryptoscope, would take an image for 15 minutes, with the surgeon placing his hand in front of the beam to guide calibration; radiation exposure for both surgeon and patient was extreme. In the 1950s, fluoroscopy (C-arm) was invented. In the 1970s, computer-assisted tomography (CAT), known as CAT scan, became available; magnetic resonance imaging had its beginnings in the 1980s, and in 1985, the first robotic surgery was performed to obtain a neurosurgical biopsy specimen. The concept of navigation was introduced in the 1990s, and today's niche products for navigation came onto the market in the 2000s.

  17. Beam tests on the 4-kA, 1. 5-MeV injector for FXR

    SciTech Connect

    Kulke, B.; Kihara, R.; Ravenscroft, D.; Scarpetti, R.; Vogtlin, G.

    1981-01-01

    The new flash x-ray machine (FXR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is scheduled for completion in late 1981. This is a 54 module, linear induction accelertor, designed to deliver 500 Roentgen at 1 m as bremsstrahlung from a 20 MeV, 4 kA, 60 ns pulsed electron beam. The 9 cm diameter, cold-cathode electron source generates a 15 kA emitted beam at 1.5 MeV, and collimation is being used to reduce the transmitted current to 3.5 kA, with an emittance of 70 mr-cm. The collimated beam diameter is 4 cm. Six ferrite-loaded cavities are used in tandem to energize the injector. The high voltage performance of the injector cavities and other pulsed-power conditioning elements was tested earlier in a series of 10/sup 5/ shots at 400 kV per cavity. An overview of the injector design and of the beam test results is given.

  18. First cosmic-ray images of bone and soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrdja, Dusan; Bikit, Istvan; Bikit, Kristina; Slivka, Jaroslav; Hansman, Jan; Oláh, László; Varga, Dezső

    2016-11-01

    More than 120 years after Roentgen's first X-ray image, the first cosmic-ray muon images of bone and soft tissue are created. The pictures, shown in the present paper, represent the first radiographies of structures of organic origin ever recorded by cosmic rays. This result is achieved by a uniquely designed, simple and versatile cosmic-ray muon-imaging system, which consists of four plastic scintillation detectors and a muon tracker. This system does not use scattering or absorption of muons in order to deduct image information, but takes advantage of the production rate of secondaries in the target materials, detected in coincidence with muons. The 2D image slices of cow femur bone are obtained at several depths along the bone axis, together with the corresponding 3D image. Real organic soft tissue, polymethyl methacrylate and water, never seen before by any other muon imaging techniques, are also registered in the images. Thus, similar imaging systems, placed around structures of organic or inorganic origin, can be used for tomographic imaging using only the omnipresent cosmic radiation.

  19. BeppoSAX Observations of MKN 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicastro, Fabrizio; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mkn 110 is a bright, nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy, which underwent a long optical monitoring campaign, during the past 12 years. Optical observations show that Mkn 110 vary, both in flux and spectral shape. The intensity and width of its Broad Emission Lines (BELs) also vary, from typical Seyfert 1, to typical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLSyl) values, so suggesting that this could be the first supermassive black holes where accretion state related transitions, as frequently observed in stellar-size black holes, have finally been observed. To verify these suggestions we asked to monitor Mkn 110 with BeppoSAX with three 50 ksec observations six months apart. The goal of the proposal was to observe spectral variations in X-ray, already suggested by previous, existing ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) and ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) observations of the same source. The first of these three SAX (Satellite per Astronomia X) observations was taken on May 2000, and lacks the Low-Energy instrument (0.1-2 keV is the band in which NLSy1 and Sy1 X-ray spectra differ most).

  20. Electron Beam Technology and Other Irradiation Technology Applications in the Food Industry.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Suresh D; Shayanfar, Shima

    2017-02-01

    Food irradiation is over 100 years old, with the original patent for X-ray treatment of foods being issued in early 1905, 20 years after there discovery by W. C. Roentgen in 1885. Since then, food irradiation technology has become one of the most extensively studied food processing technologies in the history of mankind. Unfortunately, it is the one of the most misunderstood technologies with the result that there are rampant misunderstandings of the core technology, the ideal applications, and how to use it effectively to derive the maximum benefits. There are a number of books, book chapters, and review articles that provide overviews of this technology [25, 32, 36, 39]. Over the last decade or so, the technology has come into greater focus because many of the other pathogen intervention technologies have been unable to provide sustainable solutions on how to address pathogen contamination in foods. The uniqueness of food irradiation is that this technology is a non-thermal food processing technology, which unto itself is a clear high-value differentiator from other competing technologies.