Science.gov

Sample records for wind vector fields

  1. Magnetosheath for almost-aligned solar wind magnetic field and flow vectors: Wind observations across the dawnside magnetosheath at X = -12 Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Erkaev, N. V.; Torbert, R. B.; Biernat, H. K.; Gratton, F. T.; Szabo, A.; Kucharek, H.; Matsui, H.; Lin, R. P.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    2010-08-01

    While there are many approximations describing the flow of the solar wind past the magnetosphere in the magnetosheath, the case of perfectly aligned (parallel or anti-parallel) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind flow vectors can be treated exactly in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach. In this work we examine a case of nearly-opposed (to within 15°) interplanetary field and flow vectors, which occurred on October 24-25, 2001 during passage of the last interplanetary coronal mass ejection in an ejecta merger. Interplanetary data are from the ACE spacecraft. Simultaneously Wind was crossing the near-Earth (X ˜ -13 Re) geomagnetic tail and subsequently made an approximately 5-hour-long magnetosheath crossing close to the ecliptic plane (Z = -0.7 Re). Geomagnetic activity was returning steadily to quiet, “ground” conditions. We first compare the predictions of the Spreiter and Rizzi theory with the Wind magnetosheath observations and find fair agreement, in particular as regards the proportionality of the magnetic field strength and the product of the plasma density and bulk speed. We then carry out a small-perturbation analysis of the Spreiter and Rizzi solution to account for the small IMF components perpendicular to the flow vector. The resulting expression is compared to the time series of the observations and satisfactory agreement is obtained. We also present and discuss observations in the dawnside boundary layer of pulsed, high-speed (v ˜ 600 km/s) flows exceeding the solar wind flow speeds. We examine various generating mechanisms and suggest that the most likely cause is a wave of frequency 3.2 mHz excited at the inner edge of the boundary layer by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  2. Wind speed vector restoration algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Nikolay; Petrov, Gleb; Shiriaev, Ilia

    2018-04-01

    Impulse wind lidar (IWL) signal processing software developed by JSC «BANS» recovers full wind speed vector by radial projections and provides wind parameters information up to 2 km distance. Increasing accuracy and speed of wind parameters calculation signal processing technics have been studied in this research. Measurements results of IWL and continuous scanning lidar were compared. Also, IWL data processing modeling results have been analyzed.

  3. SSM/I and ECMWF Wind Vector Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Ashcroft, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Wentz was the first to convincingly show that satellite microwave radiometers have the potential to measure the oceanic wind vector. The most compelling evidence for this conclusion was the monthly wind vector maps derived solely from a statistical analysis of Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) observations. In a qualitative sense, these maps clearly showed the general circulation over the world's oceans. In this report we take a closer look at the SSM/I monthly wind vector maps and compare them to European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) wind fields. This investigation leads both to an empirical comparison of SSM/I calculated wind vectors with ECMWF wind vectors, and to an examination of possible reasons that the SSM/I calculated wind vector direction would be inherently more reliable at some locations than others.

  4. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field.

  5. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  6. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Work towards establishing a vector wind profile gust model for the Space Transportation System flight operations and trade studies is reported. To date, all the statistical and computational techniques required were established and partially implemented. An analysis of wind profile gust at Cape Kennedy within the theoretical framework is presented. The variability of theoretical and observed gust magnitude with filter type, altitude, and season is described. Various examples are presented which illustrate agreement between theoretical and observed gust percentiles. The preliminary analysis of the gust data indicates a strong variability with altitude, season, and wavelength regime. An extension of the analyses to include conditional distributions of gust magnitude given gust length, distributions of gust modulus, and phase differences between gust components has begun.

  7. Magnetosheath for almost-aligned solar wind magnetic field and flow vectors: Windobservations across the dawnside magnetosheath at X = -12 Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Charles

    While there are many approximations describing the flow of the solar wind past the mag-netosphere in the magnetosheath, the case of perfectly aligned (parallel or anti-parallel) in-terplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind flow vectors can be treated exactly in an magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach (Spreiter and Rizzi, 1974). In this work we examine a case of nearly-opposed (to within 15 deg) interplanetary field and flow vectors, which occurred on October 24-25, 2001 during passage of the last interplanetary coronal mass ejection in an ejecta merger. Interplanetary data are from the ACE spacecraft. Simultaneously Wind was crossing the near-Earth (X -13 Re) geomagnetic tail and subsequently made a 5-hour-long magnetosheath crossing close to the ecliptic plane (Z = -0.7 Re). Geomagnetic activity was returning steadily to quiet, "ground" conditions. We first compare the predictions of the Spre-iter and Rizzi theory with the Wind magnetosheath observations and find fair agreement, in particular as regards the proportionality of the magnetic field strength and the product of the plasma density and bulk speed. We then carry out a small-perturbation analysis of the Spreiter and Rizzi solution to account for the small IMF components perpendicular to the flow vector. The resulting expression is compared to the time series of the observations and satisfactory agreement is obtained. We also present and discuss observations in the dawnside boundary layer of pulsed, high-speed (v 600 km/s) flows exceeding the solar wind flow speeds. We examine various generating mechanisms and suggest that the most likely causeis a wave of frequency 3.2 mHz excited at the inner edge of the boundary layer.

  8. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1981-01-01

    To enable development of a vector wind gust model suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies, hypotheses concerning the distributions of gust component variables were verified. Methods for verification of hypotheses that observed gust variables, including gust component magnitude, gust length, u range, and L range, are gamma distributed and presented. Observed gust modulus has been drawn from a bivariate gamma distribution that can be approximated with a Weibull distribution. Zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed. An analytical method for testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables is presented. Two distributions for gust modulus are described and the results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented. The validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  9. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2012-02-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components.

  10. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  11. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  12. Segmentation of discrete vector fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Chen, Wenbin; Shen, I-Fan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for 2D discrete vector field segmentation based on the Green function and normalized cut. The method is inspired by discrete Hodge Decomposition such that a discrete vector field can be broken down into three simpler components, namely, curl-free, divergence-free, and harmonic components. We show that the Green Function Method (GFM) can be used to approximate the curl-free and the divergence-free components to achieve our goal of the vector field segmentation. The final segmentation curves that represent the boundaries of the influence region of singularities are obtained from the optimal vector field segmentations. These curves are composed of piecewise smooth contours or streamlines. Our method is applicable to both linear and nonlinear discrete vector fields. Experiments show that the segmentations obtained using our approach essentially agree with human perceptual judgement.

  13. Elliptic-symmetry vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Li, Yongnan; Li, Si-Min; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Kong, Ling-Jun; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2014-08-11

    We present in principle and demonstrate experimentally a new kind of vector fields: elliptic-symmetry vector optical fields. This is a significant development in vector fields, as this breaks the cylindrical symmetry and enriches the family of vector fields. Due to the presence of an additional degrees of freedom, which is the interval between the foci in the elliptic coordinate system, the elliptic-symmetry vector fields are more flexible than the cylindrical vector fields for controlling the spatial structure of polarization and for engineering the focusing fields. The elliptic-symmetry vector fields can find many specific applications from optical trapping to optical machining and so on.

  14. Determination of key parameters of vector multifractal vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2017-12-01

    For too long time, multifractal analyses and simulations have been restricted to scalar-valued fields (Schertzer and Tchiguirinskaia, 2017a,b). For instance, the wind velocity multifractality has been mostly analysed in terms of scalar structure functions and with the scalar energy flux. This restriction has had the unfortunate consequences that multifractals were applicable to their full extent in geophysics, whereas it has inspired them. Indeed a key question in geophysics is the complexity of the interactions between various fields or they components. Nevertheless, sophisticated methods have been developed to determine the key parameters of scalar valued fields. In this communication, we first present the vector extensions of the universal multifractal analysis techniques to multifractals whose generator belong to a Levy-Clifford algebra (Schertzer and Tchiguirinskaia, 2015). We point out further extensions noting the increased complexity. For instance, the (scalar) index of multifractality becomes a matrice. Schertzer, D. and Tchiguirinskaia, I. (2015) `Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra', Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, 25(12), p. 123127. doi: 10.1063/1.4937364. Schertzer, D. and Tchiguirinskaia, I. (2017) `An Introduction to Multifractals and Scale Symmetry Groups', in Ghanbarian, B. and Hunt, A. (eds) Fractals: Concepts and Applications in Geosciences. CRC Press, p. (in press). Schertzer, D. and Tchiguirinskaia, I. (2017b) `Pandora Box of Multifractals: Barely Open ?', in Tsonis, A. A. (ed.) 30 Years of Nonlinear Dynamics in Geophysics. Berlin: Springer, p. (in press).

  15. Vector wind and vector wind shear models 0 to 27 km altitude for Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, O. E.

    1976-01-01

    The techniques are presented to derive several statistical wind models. The techniques are from the properties of the multivariate normal probability function. Assuming that the winds can be considered as bivariate normally distributed, then (1) the wind components and conditional wind components are univariate normally distributed, (2) the wind speed is Rayleigh distributed, (3) the conditional distribution of wind speed given a wind direction is Rayleigh distributed, and (4) the frequency of wind direction can be derived. All of these distributions are derived from the 5-sample parameter of wind for the bivariate normal distribution. By further assuming that the winds at two altitudes are quadravariate normally distributed, then the vector wind shear is bivariate normally distributed and the modulus of the vector wind shear is Rayleigh distributed. The conditional probability of wind component shears given a wind component is normally distributed. Examples of these and other properties of the multivariate normal probability distribution function as applied to Cape Kennedy, Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, California, wind data samples are given. A technique to develop a synthetic vector wind profile model of interest to aerospace vehicle applications is presented.

  16. Diagnostics of vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the vector magnetic fields derived from observations with a filter magnetograph will be severely distorted if the spatially unresolved magnetic structure is not properly accounted for. Thus the apparent vector field will appear much more horizontal than it really is, but this distortion is strongly dependent on the area factor and the temperature line weakenings. As the available fluxtube models are not sufficiently well determined, it is not possible to correct the filter magnetograph observations for these effects in a reliable way, although a crude correction is of course much better than no correction at all. The solution to this diagnostic problem is to observe simultaneously in suitable combinations of spectral lines, and/or use Stokes line profiles recorded with very high spectral resolution. The diagnostic power of using a Fourier transform spectrometer for polarimetry is shown and some results from I and V spectra are illustrated. The line asymmetries caused by mass motions inside the fluxtubes adds an extra complication to the diagnostic problem, in particular as there are indications that the motions are nonstationary in nature. The temperature structure appears to be a function of fluxtube diameter, as a clear difference between plage and network fluxtubes was revealed. The divergence of the magnetic field with height plays an essential role in the explanation of the Stokes V asymmetries (in combination with the mass motions). A self consistent treatment of the subarcsec field geometry may be required to allow an accurate derivation of the spatially averaged vector magnetic field from spectrally resolved data.

  17. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  18. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  19. User's Guide for Monthly Vector Wind Profile Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1999-01-01

    The background, theoretical concepts, and methodology for construction of vector wind profiles based on a statistical model are presented. The derived monthly vector wind profiles are to be applied by the launch vehicle design community for establishing realistic estimates of critical vehicle design parameter dispersions related to wind profile dispersions. During initial studies a number of months are used to establish the model profiles that produce the largest monthly dispersions of ascent vehicle aerodynamic load indicators. The largest monthly dispersions for wind, which occur during the winter high-wind months, are used for establishing the design reference dispersions for the aerodynamic load indicators. This document includes a description of the computational process for the vector wind model including specification of input data, parameter settings, and output data formats. Sample output data listings are provided to aid the user in the verification of test output.

  20. Poynting Vector in High-Temperature Superconducting Transformers with a Separate Excitation Winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, E. P.; Dzhafarov, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The HTSC transformer with a separate winding for excitation of the mutual magnetic flux is considered; the windings of the transformer are performed of first- or second-generation HTSC wires. The article presents the design and the electrical circuit of the transformer, the equations of electromagnetic balance, and the total resistance of the primary and secondary power windings and the separate excitation winding. The transfer of the electromagnetic field energy is considered in a single-phase HTSC transformer with the separate excitation winding using the Poynting vector. The temporal change in the reactive and active components of the Poynting vector and the decrease in the leakage energy flux of the separate excitation winding are shown, which causes an increase in the critical current density of the HTSC power windings, a decrease in the energy losses in the latter, and an increase the in the specific power of the HTSC transformer.

  1. The relationship between wind vector and normalized radar cross section used to derive Seasat-A Satellite Scatterometer winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Jones, W. L.; Boggs, D. H.; Halberstam, I. M.; Dome, G.; Pierson, W. J.; Wentz, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Seasat-A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS) ocean normalized radar cross section (NRCS) dependence on the 19.5-m neutral stability wind vector may be specified as a function of radar incidence angle, the angle between wind direction and radar azimuth, and the neutral stability wind speed expressed in m/sec at a height of 19.5 m. An account is given of the development of models both expressing this relationship and providing the basis of inversion of NRCS to SASS winds, from initially aircraft scatterometer measurement-based forms to three Seasat field-validation experiments which furnish model NRCS versus surface windspeed data for comparison with SASS data.

  2. Time dependent wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    Two tasks were performed: (1) determination of the accuracy of Seasat scatterometer, altimeter, and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer measurements of wind speed; and (2) application of Seasat altimeter measurements of sea level to study the spatial and temporal variability of geostrophic flow in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The results of the first task have identified systematic errors in wind speeds estimated by all three satellite sensors. However, in all cases the errors are correctable and corrected wind speeds agree between the three sensors to better than 1 ms sup -1 in 96-day 2 deg. latitude by 6 deg. longitude averages. The second task has resulted in development of a new technique for using altimeter sea level measurements to study the temporal variability of large scale sea level variations. Application of the technique to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current yielded new information about the ocean circulation in this region of the ocean that is poorly sampled by conventional ship-based measurements.

  3. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  4. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  5. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  6. Short-interval SMS wind vector determinations for a severe local storms area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Short-interval SMS-2 visible digital image data are used to derive wind vectors from cloud tracking on time-lapsed sequences of geosynchronous satellite images. The cloud tracking areas are located in the Central Plains, where on May 6, 1975 hail-producing thunderstorms occurred ahead of a well defined dry line. Cloud tracking is performed on the Goddard Space Flight Center Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System. Lower tropospheric cumulus tracers are selected with the assistance of a cloud-top height algorithm. Divergence is derived from the cloud motions using a modified Cressman (1959) objective analysis technique which is designed to organize irregularly spaced wind vectors into uniformly gridded wind fields. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using satellite-derived wind vectors and their associated divergence fields in describing the conditions preceding severe local storm development. For this case, an area of convergence appeared ahead of the dry line and coincided with the developing area of severe weather. The magnitude of the maximum convergence varied between -10 to the -5th and -10 to the -14th per sec. The number of satellite-derived wind vectors which were required to describe conditions of the low-level atmosphere was adequate before numerous cumulonimbus cells formed. This technique is limited in areas of advanced convection.

  7. Versatile generation of optical vector fields and vector beams using a non-interferometric approach.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Santosh; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2012-05-07

    We present a versatile, non-interferometric method for generating vector fields and vector beams which can produce all the states of polarization represented on a higher-order Poincaré sphere. The versatility and non-interferometric nature of this method is expected to enable exploration of various exotic properties of vector fields and vector beams. To illustrate this, we study the propagation properties of some vector fields and find that, in general, propagation alters both their intensity and polarization distribution, and more interestingly, converts some vector fields into vector beams. In the article, we also suggest a modified Jones vector formalism to represent vector fields and vector beams.

  8. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  9. Vector wind, horizontal divergence, wind stress and wind stress curl from SEASAT-SASS at one degree resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Sylvester, W. B.; Salfi, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional data obtained in 1983 are contrasted with SEASAT-A scatterometer and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data to show how observations at a single station can be extended to an area of about 150,000 square km by means of remotely sensed data obtained in nine minutes. Superobservations at a one degree resolution for the vector winds were estimated along with their standard deviations. From these superobservations, the horizontal divergence, vector wind stress, and the curl of the wind stress can be found. Weather forecasting theory is discussed and meteorological charts of the North Pacific Ocean are presented. Synoptic meteorology as a technique is examined.

  10. Dynamical downscaling of wind fields for wind power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengelkamp, H.-T.; Huneke, S.; Geyer, J.

    2010-09-01

    Dynamical downscaling of wind fields for wind power applications H.-T. Mengelkamp*,**, S. Huneke**, J, Geyer** *GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH **anemos Gesellschaft für Umweltmeteorologie mbH Investments in wind power require information on the long-term mean wind potential and its temporal variations on daily to annual and decadal time scales. This information is rarely available at specific wind farm sites. Short-term on-site measurements usually are only performed over a 12 months period. These data have to be set into the long-term perspective through correlation to long-term consistent wind data sets. Preliminary wind information is often asked for to select favourable wind sites over regional and country wide scales. Lack of high-quality wind measurements at weather stations was the motivation to start high resolution wind field simulations The simulations are basically a refinement of global scale reanalysis data by means of high resolution simulations with an atmospheric mesoscale model using high-resolution terrain and land-use data. The 3-dimensional representation of the atmospheric state available every six hours at 2.5 degree resolution over the globe, known as NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, forms the boundary conditions for continuous simulations with the non-hydrostatic atmospheric mesoscale model MM5. MM5 is nested in itself down to a horizontal resolution of 5 x 5 km². The simulation is performed for different European countries and covers the period 2000 to present and is continuously updated. Model variables are stored every 10 minutes for various heights. We have analysed the wind field primarily. The wind data set is consistent in space and time and provides information on the regional distribution of the long-term mean wind potential, the temporal variability of the wind potential, the vertical variation of the wind potential, and the temperature, and pressure distribution (air density). In the context of wind power these data are used

  11. A diagram for evaluating multiple aspects of model performance in simulating vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Hou, Zhaolu; Han, Ying; Guo, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    Vector quantities, e.g., vector winds, play an extremely important role in climate systems. The energy and water exchanges between different regions are strongly dominated by wind, which in turn shapes the regional climate. Thus, how well climate models can simulate vector fields directly affects model performance in reproducing the nature of a regional climate. This paper devises a new diagram, termed the vector field evaluation (VFE) diagram, which is a generalized Taylor diagram and able to provide a concise evaluation of model performance in simulating vector fields. The diagram can measure how well two vector fields match each other in terms of three statistical variables, i.e., the vector similarity coefficient, root mean square length (RMSL), and root mean square vector difference (RMSVD). Similar to the Taylor diagram, the VFE diagram is especially useful for evaluating climate models. The pattern similarity of two vector fields is measured by a vector similarity coefficient (VSC) that is defined by the arithmetic mean of the inner product of normalized vector pairs. Examples are provided, showing that VSC can identify how close one vector field resembles another. Note that VSC can only describe the pattern similarity, and it does not reflect the systematic difference in the mean vector length between two vector fields. To measure the vector length, RMSL is included in the diagram. The third variable, RMSVD, is used to identify the magnitude of the overall difference between two vector fields. Examples show that the VFE diagram can clearly illustrate the extent to which the overall RMSVD is attributed to the systematic difference in RMSL and how much is due to the poor pattern similarity.

  12. The optical analogy for vector fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This paper develops the optical analogy for a general vector field. The optical analogy allows the examination of certain aspects of a vector field that are not otherwise readily accessible. In particular, in the cases of a stationary Eulerian flow v of an ideal fluid and a magnetostatic field B, the vectors v and B have surface loci in common with their curls. The intrinsic discontinuities around local maxima in absolute values of v and B take the form of vortex sheets and current sheets, respectively, the former playing a fundamental role in the development of hydrodyamic turbulence and the latter playing a major role in heating the X-ray coronas of stars and galaxies.

  13. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar

  14. Cloud motion in relation to the ambient wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Trajectories of convective clouds were computed from a mathematical model and compared with trajectories observed by radar. The ambient wind field was determined from the AVE IIP data. The model includes gradient, coriolis, drag, lift, and lateral forces. The results show that rotational effects may account for large differences between the computed and observed trajectories and that convective clouds may move 10 to 20 degrees to the right or left of the average wind vector and at speeds 5 to 10 m/sec faster or slower than the average ambient wind speed.

  15. Analyzing neural responses with vector fields.

    PubMed

    Buneo, Christopher A

    2011-04-15

    Analyzing changes in the shape and scale of single cell response fields is a key component of many neurophysiological studies. Typical analyses of shape change involve correlating firing rates between experimental conditions or "cross-correlating" single cell tuning curves by shifting them with respect to one another and correlating the overlapping data. Such shifting results in a loss of data, making interpretation of the resulting correlation coefficients problematic. The problem is particularly acute for two dimensional response fields, which require shifting along two axes. Here, an alternative method for quantifying response field shape and scale based on correlation of vector field representations is introduced. The merits and limitations of the methods are illustrated using both simulated and experimental data. It is shown that vector correlation provides more information on response field changes than scalar correlation without requiring field shifting and concomitant data loss. An extension of this vector field approach is also demonstrated which can be used to identify the manner in which experimental variables are encoded in studies of neural reference frames. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The significance of vector magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of four flaring solar active regions, obtained during 1980-1986 with the NASA Marshall vector magnetograph (Hagyard et al., 1982 and 1985), are presented graphically and characterized in detail, with reference to nearly simultaneous Big Bear Solar Observatory and USAF ASW H-alpha images. It is shown that the flares occurred where local photospheric magnetic fields differed most from the potential field, with initial brightening on either side of a magnetic-neutral line near the point of maximum angular shear (rather than that of maximum magnetic-field strength, typically 1 kG or greater). Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that these significant nonpotential features were detected only by measuring all three components of the vector magnetic field.

  17. Impact of Scatterometer Ocean Wind Vector Data on NOAA Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenak, Z.; Chang, P.; Brennan, M. J.; Sienkiewicz, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Near real-time measurements of ocean surface vector winds (OSVW), including both wind speed and direction from non-NOAA satellites, are being widely used in critical operational NOAA forecasting and warning activities. The scatterometer wind data data have had major operational impact in: a) determining wind warning areas for mid-latitude systems (gale, storm,hurricane force); b) determining tropical cyclone 34-knot and 50-knot wind radii. c) tracking the center location of tropical cyclones, including the initial identification of their formation. d) identifying and warning of extreme gap and jet wind events at all latitudes. e) identifying the current location of frontal systems and high and low pressure centers. f) improving coastal surf and swell forecasts Much has been learned about the importance and utility of satellite OSVW data in operational weather forecasting and warning by exploiting OSVW research satellites in near real-time. Since December 1999 when first data from QuikSCAT scatterometer became available in near real time NOAA operations have been benefiting from ASCAT scatterometer observations on MetOp-A and B, Indian OSCAT scatterometer on OceanSat-3 and lately NASA's RapidScat mission on International Space Station. With oceans comprising over 70 percent of the earth's surface, the impacts of these data have been tremendous in serving society's needs for weather and water information and in supporting the nation's commerce with information for safe, efficient, and environmentally sound transportation and coastal preparedness. The satellite OSVW experience that has been gained over the past decade by users in the operational weather community allows for realistic operational OSVW requirements to be properly stated for future missions. Successful model of transitioning research data into operation implemented by Ocean Winds Team in NOAA's NESDIS/STAR office and subsequent data impacts will be presented and discussed.

  18. The effect of the arbitrary level assignment of satellite cloud motion wind vectors on wind analyses in the pre-thunderstorm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived cloud motion vectors on SESAME rawinsonde wind fields was studied in two separate cases. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of the satellite data is assessed to coordinate surfaces in a severe storm environment marked by strong vertical wind shear. Objective analyses of SESAME rawinsonde winds and combined winds are produced and differences between these two analyzed fields are used to make an assessment of coordinate level choice. It is shown that the standard method of arbitrarily assigning wind vectors to a low level coordinate surface yields systematic differences between the rawinsonde and combined wind analyses. Arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to the 0.9 sigma surface produces smaller differences than assignment to the 825 mb pressure surface. Systematic differences occur near moisture discontinuities and in regions of horizontal and vertical wind shears. The differences between the combined and SESAME wind fields are made smallest by vertically interpolating cloud motions to either a pressure or sigma surface.

  19. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields.

    PubMed

    Houri, Tsuyoshi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank- p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n -dimensions is bounded by ( n + 1)!/ p !( n - p )!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes.

  20. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality.

  1. The vector structure of active magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are needed to show the form of the strains introduced into the fields above the surface of the Sun. The longitudinal component alone does not provide the basic information, so that it has been necessary in the past to use the filamentary structure observed in H sub alpha to supplement the longitudinal information. Vector measurements provide the additional essential information to determine the strains, with the filamentary structure available as a check for consistency. It is to be expected, then, that vector measurements will permit a direct mapping of the strains imposed on the magnetic fields of active regions. It will be interesting to study the relation of those strains to the emergence of magnetic flux, flares, eruptive prominences, etc. In particular we may hope to study the relaxation of the strains via the dynamical nonequilibrium.

  2. Efficient morse decompositions of vector fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoning; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Laramee, Robert S; Zhang, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Existing topology-based vector field analysis techniques rely on the ability to extract the individual trajectories such as fixed points, periodic orbits, and separatrices that are sensitive to noise and errors introduced by simulation and interpolation. This can make such vector field analysis unsuitable for rigorous interpretations. We advocate the use of Morse decompositions, which are robust with respect to perturbations, to encode the topological structures of a vector field in the form of a directed graph, called a Morse connection graph (MCG). While an MCG exists for every vector field, it need not be unique. Previous techniques for computing MCG's, while fast, are overly conservative and usually results in MCG's that are too coarse to be useful for the applications. To address this issue, we present a new technique for performing Morse decomposition based on the concept of tau-maps, which typically provides finer MCG's than existing techniques. Furthermore, the choice of tau provides a natural tradeoff between the fineness of the MCG's and the computational costs. We provide efficient implementations of Morse decomposition based on tau-maps, which include the use of forward and backward mapping techniques and an adaptive approach in constructing better approximations of the images of the triangles in the meshes used for simulation.. Furthermore, we propose the use of spatial tau-maps in addition to the original temporal tau-maps. These techniques provide additional trade-offs between the quality of the MCGs and the speed of computation. We demonstrate the utility of our technique with various examples in the plane and on surfaces including engine simulation data sets.

  3. Conversion of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1972-01-01

    The outflow of the solar magnetic field energy (the radial component of the Poynting vector) per steradian is inversely proportional to the solar wind velocity. It is a decreasing function of the heliocentric distance. When the magnetic field effect is included in the one-fluid model of the solar wind, the transformation of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy during the expansion process increases the solar wind velocity at 1 AU by 17 percent.

  4. Ocean Surface Vector Wind: Research Challenges and Operational Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere and ocean are joined together over seventy percent of Earth, with ocean surface vector wind (OSVW) stress one of the linkages. Satellite OSVW measurements provide estimates of wind divergence at the bottom of the atmosphere and wind stress curl at the top of the ocean; both variables are critical for weather and climate applications. As is common with satellite measurements, a multitude of OSVW data products exist for each currently operating satellite instrument. In 2012 the Joint Technical Commission on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) launched an initiative to coordinate production of OSVW data products to maximize the impact and benefit of existing and future OSVW measurements in atmospheric and oceanic applications. This paper describes meteorological and oceanographic requirements for OSVW data products; provides an inventory of unique data products to illustrate that the challenge is not the production of individual data products, but the generation of harmonized datasets for analysis and synthesis of the ensemble of data products; and outlines a vision for JCOMM, in partnership with other international groups, to assemble an international network to share ideas, data, tools, strategies, and deliverables to improve utilization of satellite OSVW data products for research and operational applications.

  5. A median filter approach for correcting errors in a vector field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, H.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques are presented for detecting and correcting errors in a vector field. These methods employ median filters which are frequently used in image processing to enhance edges and remove noise. A detailed example is given for wind field maps produced by a spaceborne scatterometer. The error detection and replacement algorithm was tested with simulation data from the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) project.

  6. Synoptic scale wind field properties from the SEASAT SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Sylvester, W. B.; Salfi, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Dealiased SEASAT SEASAT A Scatterometer System SASS vector winds obtained during the Gulf Of Alaska SEASAT Experiment GOASEX program are processed to obtain superobservations centered on a one degree by one degree grid. The grid. The results provide values for the combined effects of mesoscale variability and communication noise on the individual SASS winds. These superobservations winds are then processed further to obtain estimates of synoptic scale vector winds stress fields, the horizontal divergence of the wind, the curl of the wind stress and the vertical velocity at 200 m above the sea surface, each with appropriate standard deviations of the estimates for each grid point value. They also explain the concentration of water vapor, liquid water and precipitation found by means of the SMMR Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer at fronts and occlusions in terms of strong warm, moist air advection in the warm air sector accompanied by convergence in the friction layer. Their quality is far superior to that of analyses based on conventional data, which are shown to yield many inconsistencies.

  7. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  8. A vector auto-regressive model for onshore and offshore wind synthesis incorporating meteorological model information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D.; Bell, K. R. W.; McMillan, D.; Infield, D.

    2014-05-01

    The growth of wind power production in the electricity portfolio is striving to meet ambitious targets set, for example by the EU, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020. Huge investments are now being made in new offshore wind farms around UK coastal waters that will have a major impact on the GB electrical supply. Representations of the UK wind field in syntheses which capture the inherent structure and correlations between different locations including offshore sites are required. Here, Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) models are presented and extended in a novel way to incorporate offshore time series from a pan-European meteorological model called COSMO, with onshore wind speeds from the MIDAS dataset provided by the British Atmospheric Data Centre. Forecasting ability onshore is shown to be improved with the inclusion of the offshore sites with improvements of up to 25% in RMS error at 6 h ahead. In addition, the VAR model is used to synthesise time series of wind at each offshore site, which are then used to estimate wind farm capacity factors at the sites in question. These are then compared with estimates of capacity factors derived from the work of Hawkins et al. (2011). A good degree of agreement is established indicating that this synthesis tool should be useful in power system impact studies.

  9. Generation of arbitrary vector fields based on a pair of orthogonal elliptically polarized base vectors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danfeng; Gu, Bing; Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-22

    We present an arbitrary vector field with hybrid polarization based on the combination of a pair of orthogonal elliptically polarized base vectors on the Poincaré sphere. It is shown that the created vector field is only dependent on the latitude angle 2χ but is independent on the longitude angle 2ψ on the Poincaré sphere. By adjusting the latitude angle 2χ, which is related to two identical waveplates in a common path interferometric arrangement, one could obtain arbitrary type of vector fields. Experimentally, we demonstrate the generation of such kind of vector fields and confirm the distribution of state of polarization by the measurement of Stokes parameters. Besides, we investigate the tight focusing properties of these vector fields. It is found that the additional degree of freedom 2χ provided by arbitrary vector field with hybrid polarization allows one to control the spatial structure of polarization and to engineer the focusing field.

  10. Impact of Short Interval SMS Digital Data on Wind Vector Determination for a Severe Local Storms Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of 5 minute interval SMS-2 visible digital image data in analyzing severe local storms is examined using wind vectors derived from cloud tracking on time lapsed sequence of geosynchronous satellite images. The cloud tracking areas are located in the Central Plains, where on 6 May 1975, hail-producing thunderstorms occurred ahead of a well defined dry line. The results demonstrate that satellite-derived wind vectors and their associated divergence fields complement conventional meteorological analyses in describing the conditions preceding severe local storm development.

  11. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    Multivariate analysis was used to determine the joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from 15 years of twice-daily rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, that the joint distribution of wind component change with respect to time is univariate normal, that the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and that the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh are tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from 1 to 5 hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented. Extension of the theoretical prediction (based on rawinsonde data) of wind component change standard deviation to time periods of 1 to 5 hours falls (with a few exceptions) within the 95 percentile confidence band of the population estimate obtained from the Jimsphere sample data. The joint distributions of wind change components, conditional wind components, and 1 km vector wind shear change components are illustrated by probability ellipses at the 95 percentile level.

  12. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  13. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates. PMID:26808718

  14. A ``Cyber Wind Facility'' for HPC Wind Turbine Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James; Paterson, Eric; Schmitz, Sven; Campbell, Robert; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Nandi, Tarak; Jha, Pankaj; Dunbar, Alex; Motta-Mena, Javier; Craven, Brent; Haupt, Sue

    2013-03-01

    The Penn State ``Cyber Wind Facility'' (CWF) is a high-fidelity multi-scale high performance computing (HPC) environment in which ``cyber field experiments'' are designed and ``cyber data'' collected from wind turbines operating within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) environment. Conceptually the ``facility'' is akin to a high-tech wind tunnel with controlled physical environment, but unlike a wind tunnel it replicates commercial-scale wind turbines operating in the field and forced by true atmospheric turbulence with controlled stability state. The CWF is created from state-of-the-art high-accuracy technology geometry and grid design and numerical methods, and with high-resolution simulation strategies that blend unsteady RANS near the surface with high fidelity large-eddy simulation (LES) in separated boundary layer, blade and rotor wake regions, embedded within high-resolution LES of the ABL. CWF experiments complement physical field facility experiments that can capture wider ranges of meteorological events, but with minimal control over the environment and with very small numbers of sensors at low spatial resolution. I shall report on the first CWF experiments aimed at dynamical interactions between ABL turbulence and space-time wind turbine loadings. Supported by DOE and NSF.

  15. DC-magnetic field vector measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    A magnetometer experiment was designed to determine the local magnetic field by measuring the total of the Earth's magnetic field and that of an unknown spacecraft. The measured field vector components are available to all onboard experiments via the Spacelab command and data management system. The experiment consists of two parts, an electronic box and the magnetic field sensor. The sensor includes three independent measuring flux-gate magnetometers, each measuring one component. The physical background is the nonlinearity of the B-H curve of a ferrite material. Two coils wound around a ferrite rod are necessary. One of them, a tank coil, pumps the ferrite rod at approximately 20 kilohertz. As a consequence of the nonlinearity, many harmonics can be produced. The second coil (i.e., the detection coil) resonates to the first harmonic. If an unknown dc or low-frequency magnetic field exists, the amplitude of the first harmonic is a measure for the unknown magnetic field. The voltages detected by the sensors are to be digitized and transferred to the command and data management system.

  16. Interacting vector fields in relativity without relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Edward; Barbour, Julian

    2002-06-01

    Barbour, Foster and Ó Murchadha have recently developed a new framework, called here the 3-space approach, for the formulation of classical bosonic dynamics. Neither time nor a locally Minkowskian structure of spacetime are presupposed. Both arise as emergent features of the world from geodesic-type dynamics on a space of three-dimensional metric-matter configurations. In fact gravity, the universal light-cone and Abelian gauge theory minimally coupled to gravity all arise naturally through a single common mechanism. It yields relativity - and more - without presupposing relativity. This paper completes the recovery of the presently known bosonic sector within the 3-space approach. We show, for a rather general ansatz, that 3-vector fields can interact among themselves only as Yang-Mills fields minimally coupled to gravity.

  17. Wavelet analysis for wind fields estimation.

    PubMed

    Leite, Gladeston C; Ushizima, Daniela M; Medeiros, Fátima N S; de Lima, Gilson G

    2010-01-01

    Wind field analysis from synthetic aperture radar images allows the estimation of wind direction and speed based on image descriptors. In this paper, we propose a framework to automate wind direction retrieval based on wavelet decomposition associated with spectral processing. We extend existing undecimated wavelet transform approaches, by including à trous with B(3) spline scaling function, in addition to other wavelet bases as Gabor and Mexican-hat. The purpose is to extract more reliable directional information, when wind speed values range from 5 to 10 ms(-1). Using C-band empirical models, associated with the estimated directional information, we calculate local wind speed values and compare our results with QuikSCAT scatterometer data. The proposed approach has potential application in the evaluation of oil spills and wind farms.

  18. Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Gladeston C.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Medeiros, Fátima N. S.; de Lima, Gilson G.

    2010-01-01

    Wind field analysis from synthetic aperture radar images allows the estimation of wind direction and speed based on image descriptors. In this paper, we propose a framework to automate wind direction retrieval based on wavelet decomposition associated with spectral processing. We extend existing undecimated wavelet transform approaches, by including à trous with B3 spline scaling function, in addition to other wavelet bases as Gabor and Mexican-hat. The purpose is to extract more reliable directional information, when wind speed values range from 5 to 10 ms−1. Using C-band empirical models, associated with the estimated directional information, we calculate local wind speed values and compare our results with QuikSCAT scatterometer data. The proposed approach has potential application in the evaluation of oil spills and wind farms. PMID:22219699

  19. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  20. Vector optical fields with bipolar symmetry of linear polarization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Li, Yongnan; Li, Si-Min; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Si, Yu; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2013-09-15

    We focus on a new kind of vector optical field with bipolar symmetry of linear polarization instead of cylindrical and elliptical symmetries, enriching members of family of vector optical fields. We design theoretically and generate experimentally the demanded vector optical fields and then explore some novel tightly focusing properties. The geometric configurations of states of polarization provide additional degrees of freedom assisting in engineering the field distribution at the focus to the specific applications such as lithography, optical trapping, and material processing.

  1. Robust point matching via vector field consensus.

    PubMed

    Jiayi Ma; Ji Zhao; Jinwen Tian; Yuille, Alan L; Zhuowen Tu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm, called vector field consensus, for establishing robust point correspondences between two sets of points. Our algorithm starts by creating a set of putative correspondences which can contain a very large number of false correspondences, or outliers, in addition to a limited number of true correspondences (inliers). Next, we solve for correspondence by interpolating a vector field between the two point sets, which involves estimating a consensus of inlier points whose matching follows a nonparametric geometrical constraint. We formulate this a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables indicating whether matches in the putative set are outliers or inliers. We impose nonparametric geometrical constraints on the correspondence, as a prior distribution, using Tikhonov regularizers in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. MAP estimation is performed by the EM algorithm which by also estimating the variance of the prior model (initialized to a large value) is able to obtain good estimates very quickly (e.g., avoiding many of the local minima inherent in this formulation). We illustrate this method on data sets in 2D and 3D and demonstrate that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 90%). We also show that in the special case where there is an underlying parametric geometrical model (e.g., the epipolar line constraint) that we obtain better results than standard alternatives like RANSAC if a large number of outliers are present. This suggests a two-stage strategy, where we use our nonparametric model to reduce the size of the putative set and then apply a parametric variant of our approach to estimate the geometric parameters. Our algorithm is computationally efficient and we provide code for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be applied to other problems, such as learning with a badly corrupted training data set.

  2. Single-Vector Calibration of Wind-Tunnel Force Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibrating a wind-tunnel force balance involves the use of a unique load application system integrated with formal experimental design methodology. The Single-Vector Force Balance Calibration System (SVS) overcomes the productivity and accuracy limitations of prior calibration methods. A force balance is a complex structural spring element instrumented with strain gauges for measuring three orthogonal components of aerodynamic force (normal, axial, and side force) and three orthogonal components of aerodynamic torque (rolling, pitching, and yawing moments). Force balances remain as the state-of-the-art instrument that provide these measurements on a scale model of an aircraft during wind tunnel testing. Ideally, each electrical channel of the balance would respond only to its respective component of load, and it would have no response to other components of load. This is not entirely possible even though balance designs are optimized to minimize these undesirable interaction effects. Ultimately, a calibration experiment is performed to obtain the necessary data to generate a mathematical model and determine the force measurement accuracy. In order to set the independent variables of applied load for the calibration 24 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 experiment, a high-precision mechanical system is required. Manual deadweight systems have been in use at Langley Research Center (LaRC) since the 1940s. These simple methodologies produce high confidence results, but the process is mechanically complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four weeks to complete. Over the past decade, automated balance calibration systems have been developed. In general, these systems were designed to automate the tedious manual calibration process resulting in an even more complex system which deteriorates load application quality. The current calibration approach relies on a one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) methodology, where each independent variable is

  3. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  4. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  5. Evaluation and Validation of Operational RapidScat Ocean Surface Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul; Jelenak, Zorana; Soisuvarn, Seubson; Said, Faozi; Sienkiewicz, Joseph; Brennan, Michael

    2015-04-01

    NASA launched RapidScat to the International Space Station (ISS) on September 21, 2014 on a two-year mission to support global monitoring of ocean winds for improved weather forecasting and climate studies. The JPL-developed space-based scatterometer is conically scanning and operates at ku-band (13.4 GHz) similar to QuikSCAT. The ISS-RapidScat's measurement swath is approximately 900 kilometers and covers the majority of the ocean between 51.6 degrees north and south latitude (approximately from north of Vancouver, Canada, to the southern tip of Patagonia) in 48 hours. RapidScat data are currently being posted at a spacing of 25 kilometers, but a version to be released in the near future will improve the postings to 12.5 kilometers. RapidScat ocean surface wind vector data are being provided in near real-time to NOAA, and other operational users such as the U.S. Navy, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI). The quality of the RapidScat OSVW data are assessed by collocating the data in space and time with "truth" data. Typically "truth" data will include, but are not limited to, the NWS global forecast model analysis (GDAS) fields, buoys, ASCAT, WindSat, AMSR-2, and aircraft measurements during hurricane and winter storm experiment flights. The standard statistical analysis used for satellite microwave wind sensors will be utilized to characterize the RapidScat wind vector retrievals. The global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are a convenient source of "truth" data because they are available 4 times/day globally which results in the accumulation of a large number of collocations over a relatively short amount of time. The NWP model fields are not "truth" in the same way an actual observation would be, however, as long as there are no systematic errors in the NWP model output the collocations will

  6. A note on φ-analytic conformal vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Sharief; Bin Turki, Nasser

    2017-09-01

    Taking clue from the analytic vector fields on a complex manifold, φ-analytic conformal vector fields are defined on a Riemannian manifold (Deshmukh and Al-Solamy in Colloq. Math. 112(1):157-161, 2008). In this paper, we use φ-analytic conformal vector fields to find new characterizations of the n-sphere Sn(c) and the Euclidean space (Rn,<,> ).

  7. Covariance analyses of satellite-derived mesoscale wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, R. A.; Vonder Haar, T. H.

    1979-01-01

    Statistical structure functions have been computed independently for nine satellite-derived mesoscale wind fields that were obtained on two different days. Small cumulus clouds were tracked at 5 min intervals, but since these clouds occurred primarily in the warm sectors of midlatitude cyclones the results cannot be considered representative of the circulations within cyclones in general. The field structure varied considerably with time and was especially affected if mesoscale features were observed. The wind fields on the 2 days studied were highly anisotropic with large gradients in structure occurring approximately normal to the mean flow. Structure function calculations for the combined set of satellite winds were used to estimate random error present in the fields. It is concluded for these data that the random error in vector winds derived from cumulus cloud tracking using high-frequency satellite data is less than 1.75 m/s. Spatial correlation functions were also computed for the nine data sets. Normalized correlation functions were considerably different for u and v components and decreased rapidly as data point separation increased for both components. The correlation functions for transverse and longitudinal components decreased less rapidly as data point separation increased.

  8. Near-ground tornado wind fields

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    A study of near-ground tornado wind fields has been conducted by inspecting damage and debris patterns found in tornado damage paths. Because there were no significant tornado events (F4 or greater) during the contract performance period, data from the literature and the files of the Institute for Disaster Research were used to perform the analyses. The results indicate: (1) maximum tornado wind speed ever experienced or expected is in the range of 250 to 300 mph; (2) appearance of damage, taken by itself, is a misleading parameter of tornado intensity. Type of construction, age of construction, materials and other constructionmore » features significantly affect structural performance of a building subjected to wind loads and should be taken into account in assigning Fujita-Scale ratings; (3) damage to forests gives a good indication of tornado wind field flow patterns, but do not give verifiable values of wind speed; (4) factors such as translational speed, wind direction and path width affect appearance of damage or a tornado; and (5) even the most awesome appearing missiles do not require incredible wind speeds to explain them. Some progress in computer simulation of tornado missiles have been made. 31 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.« less

  9. Vector control of wind turbine on the basis of the fuzzy selective neural net*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    An article describes vector control of wind turbine based on fuzzy selective neural net. Based on the wind turbine system’s state, the fuzzy selective neural net tracks an maximum power point under random perturbations. Numerical simulations are accomplished to clarify the applicability and advantages of the proposed vector wind turbine’s control on the basis of the fuzzy selective neuronet. The simulation results show that the proposed intelligent control of wind turbine achieves real-time control speed and competitive performance, as compared to a classical control model with PID controllers based on traditional maximum torque control strategy.

  10. Comparison of the ocean surface vector winds over the Nordic Seas and their application for ocean modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Bourassa, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Ocean processes in the Nordic Seas and northern North Atlantic are strongly controlled by air-sea heat and momentum fluxes. The predominantly cyclonic, large-scale atmospheric circulation brings the deep ocean layer up to the surface preconditioning the convective sites in the Nordic Seas for deep convection. In winter, intensive cooling and possibly salt flux from newly formed sea ice erodes the near-surface stratification and the mixed layer merges with the deeper domed layer, exposing the very weakly stratified deep water mass to direct interaction with the atmosphere. Surface wind is one of the atmospheric parameters required for estimating momentum and turbulent heat fluxes to the sea ice and ocean surface. In the ocean models forced by atmospheric analysis, errors in surface wind fields result in errors in air-sea heat and momentum fluxes, water mass formation, ocean circulation, as well as volume and heat transport in the straits. The goal of the study is to assess discrepancies across the wind vector fields from reanalysis data sets and scatterometer-derived gridded products over the Nordic Seas and northern North Atlantic and to demonstrate possible implications of these differences for ocean modeling. The analyzed data sets include the reanalysis data from the National Center for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis 2 (NCEPR2), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) and satellite wind products Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) wind product version 1.1 and recently released version 2.0, and Remote Sensing Systems QuikSCAT data. Large-scale and mesoscale characteristics of winds are compared at interannual, seasonal, and synoptic timescales. Numerical sensitivity experiments are conducted with a coupled ice-ocean model forced by different wind fields. The sensitivity experiments demonstrate differences in the net surface heat fluxes during storm events. Next, it is hypothesized that discrepancies in the wind vorticity

  11. Coronal magnetic fields and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Current information is presented on coronal magnetic fields as they bear on problems of the solar wind. Both steady state fields and coronal transient events are considered. A brief critique is given of the methods of calculating coronal magnetic fields including the potential (current free) models, exact solutions for the solar wind and field interaction, and source surface models. These solutions are compared with the meager quantitative observations which are available at this time. Qualitative comparisons between the shapes of calculated magnetic field lines and the forms visible in the solar corona at several recent eclipses are displayed. These suggest that: (1) coronal streamers develop above extended magnetic arcades which connect unipolar regions of opposite polarity; and (2) loops, arches, and rays in the corona correspond to preferentially filled magnetic tubes in the approximately potential field.

  12. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Cape Kennedy, Florida: Wind aloft profile change vs. time, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1977-01-01

    Wind vector change with respect to time at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is examined according to the theory of multivariate normality. The joint distribution of the four variables represented by the components of the wind vector at an initial time and after a specified elapsed time is hypothesized to be quadravariate normal; the fourteen statistics of this distribution, calculated from fifteen years of twice daily Rawinsonde data are presented by monthly reference periods for each month from 0 to 27 km. The hypotheses that the wind component changes with respect to time is univariate normal, the joint distribution of wind component changes is bivariate normal, and the modulus of vector wind change is Rayleigh, has been tested by comparison with observed distributions. Statistics of the conditional bivariate normal distributions of vector wind at a future time given the vector wind at an initial time are derived. Wind changes over time periods from one to five hours, calculated from Jimsphere data, are presented.

  13. The Curl of a Vector Field: Beyond the Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Kimberly Jordan; Choi, Youngna

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that there is some discrepancy in the teaching of vector calculus in mathematics courses and other applied fields. The curl of a vector field is one topic many students can calculate without understanding its significance. In this paper, we explain the origin of the curl after presenting the standard mathematical…

  14. Inflation with a massive vector field nonminimally coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páramos, J.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility that inflation is driven by a massive vector field with SO(3) global symmetry nonminimally coupled to gravity is presented. Through an appropriate Ansatz for the vector field, the behaviour of the equations of motion is studied through the ensuing dynamical system, focusing on the characterisation of the ensuing fixed points.

  15. The hopf algebra of vector fields on complex quantum groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabant, Bernhard; Jurčo, Branislav; Schlieker, Michael; Weich, Wolfgang; Zumino, Bruno

    1992-10-01

    We derive the equivalence of the complex quantum enveloping algebra and the algebra of complex quantum vector fields for the Lie algebra types A n , B n , C n , and D n by factorizing the vector fields uniquely into a triangular and a unitary part and identifying them with the corresponding elements of the algebra of regular functionals.

  16. Magnetic field dissipation in pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, John

    Rotation-powered pulsars lose most of their in the form of a relativistic wind containing elec-trons, positrons and possibly ions together with electromagnetic fields. Close to the star, Poynting flux probably accounts for most of the energy flow, but after the termination shock that forms the inner boundary of the nebula, the energy flux is mostly carried by particles. The energy conversion may take place by gradual annihilation of the magnetic field as a "striped" wind accelerates, or suddenly, when the stripes hit the termination shock. I will discuss these processes and the limits that can be placed on them from observation.

  17. Design of 2D time-varying vector fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoning; Kwatra, Vivek; Wei, Li-Yi; Hansen, Charles D; Zhang, Eugene

    2012-10-01

    Design of time-varying vector fields, i.e., vector fields that can change over time, has a wide variety of important applications in computer graphics. Existing vector field design techniques do not address time-varying vector fields. In this paper, we present a framework for the design of time-varying vector fields, both for planar domains as well as manifold surfaces. Our system supports the creation and modification of various time-varying vector fields with desired spatial and temporal characteristics through several design metaphors, including streamlines, pathlines, singularity paths, and bifurcations. These design metaphors are integrated into an element-based design to generate the time-varying vector fields via a sequence of basis field summations or spatial constrained optimizations at the sampled times. The key-frame design and field deformation are also introduced to support other user design scenarios. Accordingly, a spatial-temporal constrained optimization and the time-varying transformation are employed to generate the desired fields for these two design scenarios, respectively. We apply the time-varying vector fields generated using our design system to a number of important computer graphics applications that require controllable dynamic effects, such as evolving surface appearance, dynamic scene design, steerable crowd movement, and painterly animation. Many of these are difficult or impossible to achieve via prior simulation-based methods. In these applications, the time-varying vector fields have been applied as either orientation fields or advection fields to control the instantaneous appearance or evolving trajectories of the dynamic effects.

  18. Student difficulties regarding symbolic and graphical representations of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Laurens; van Kampen, Paul; Baily, Charles; Kelly, Mossy; De Cock, Mieke

    2017-12-01

    The ability to switch between various representations is an invaluable problem-solving skill in physics. In addition, research has shown that using multiple representations can greatly enhance a person's understanding of mathematical and physical concepts. This paper describes a study of student difficulties regarding interpreting, constructing, and switching between representations of vector fields, using both qualitative and quantitative methods. We first identified to what extent students are fluent with the use of field vector plots, field line diagrams, and symbolic expressions of vector fields by conducting individual student interviews and analyzing in-class student activities. Based on those findings, we designed the Vector Field Representations test, a free response assessment tool that has been given to 196 second- and third-year physics, mathematics, and engineering students from four different universities. From the obtained results we gained a comprehensive overview of typical errors that students make when switching between vector field representations. In addition, the study allowed us to determine the relative prevalence of the observed difficulties. Although the results varied greatly between institutions, a general trend revealed that many students struggle with vector addition, fail to recognize the field line density as an indication of the magnitude of the field, confuse characteristics of field lines and equipotential lines, and do not choose the appropriate coordinate system when writing out mathematical expressions of vector fields.

  19. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the temporal variability of wind vectors at 1 km altitude intervals from 0 to 27 km altitude taken from a 10-year data sample of twice-daily rawinsode wind measurements over Vandenberg Air Force Base, California is presented.

  20. Killing spinors are Killing vector fields in Riemannian supergeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseevsky, D. V.; Cortés, V.; Devchand, C.; Semmelmann, U.

    1998-06-01

    A supermanifold M is canonically associated to any pseudo-Riemannian spin manifold ( M0, g0). Extending the metric g0 to a field g of bilinear forms g( p) on TpM, pɛM0, the pseudo-Riemannian supergeometry of ( M, g) is formulated as G-structure on M, where G is a supergroup with even part G 0 ≊ Spin(k, l); (k, l) the signature of ( M0, go). Killing vector fields on ( M, g) are, by definition, infinitesimal automorphisms of this G-structure. For every spinor field s there exists a corresponding odd vector field Xs on M. Our main result is that Xs is a Killing vector field on ( M, g) if and only if s is a twistor spinor. In particular, any Killing spinor s defines a Killing vector field Xs.

  1. NREL to Lead Novel Field Demonstration of Wind Turbine Control at the Wind

    Science.gov Websites

    Power Plant Level | News | NREL to Lead Novel Field Demonstration of Wind Turbine Control at the Wind Power Plant Level NREL to Lead Novel Field Demonstration of Wind Turbine Control at the Wind to test wind turbine technology controls at the overall wind power plant level. This is a significant

  2. Measuring magnetic field vector by stimulated Raman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenli; Wei, Rong, E-mail: weirong@siom.ac.cn; Lin, Jinda

    2016-03-21

    We present a method for measuring the magnetic field vector in an atomic fountain by probing the line strength of stimulated Raman transitions. The relative line strength for a Λ-type level system with an existing magnetic field is theoretically analyzed. The magnetic field vector measured by our proposed method is consistent well with that by the traditional bias magnetic field method with an axial resolution of 6.1 mrad and a radial resolution of 0.16 rad. Dependences of the Raman transitions on laser polarization schemes are also analyzed. Our method offers the potential advantages for magnetic field measurement without requiring additional bias fields,more » beyond the limitation of magnetic field intensity, and extending the spatial measurement range. The proposed method can be widely used for measuring magnetic field vector in other precision measurement fields.« less

  3. Visualizing Vector Fields Using Line Integral Convolution and Dye Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1996-01-01

    We present local and global techniques to visualize three-dimensional vector field data. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method to image the global vector field, our new algorithm allows the user to introduce colored 'dye' into the vector field to highlight local flow features. A fast algorithm is proposed that quickly recomputes the dyed LIC images. In addition, we introduce volume rendering methods that can map the LIC texture on any contour surface and/or translucent region defined by additional scalar quantities, and can follow the advection of colored dye throughout the volume.

  4. On Finsler spacetimes with a timelike Killing vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caponio, Erasmo; Stancarone, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    We study Finsler spacetimes and Killing vector fields taking care of the fact that the generalised metric tensor associated to the Lorentz–Finsler function L is in general well defined only on a subset of the slit tangent bundle. We then introduce a new class of Finsler spacetimes endowed with a timelike Killing vector field that we call stationary splitting Finsler spacetimes. We characterize when a Finsler spacetime with a timelike Killing vector field is locally a stationary splitting. Finally, we show that the causal structure of a stationary splitting is the same of one of two Finslerian static spacetimes naturally associated to the stationary splitting.

  5. Rotation invariants of vector fields from orthogonal moments

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Kostková, Jitka; Flusser, Jan

    Vector field images are a type of new multidimensional data that appear in many engineering areas. Although the vector fields can be visualized as images, they differ from graylevel and color images in several aspects. In order to analyze them, special methods and algorithms must be originally developed or substantially adapted from the traditional image processing area. Here, we propose a method for the description and matching of vector field patterns under an unknown rotation of the field. Rotation of a vector field is so-called total rotation, where the action is applied not only on the spatial coordinates but alsomore » on the field values. Invariants of vector fields with respect to total rotation constructed from orthogonal Gaussian–Hermite moments and Zernike moments are introduced. Their numerical stability is shown to be better than that of the invariants published so far. We demonstrate their usefulness in a real world template matching application of rotated vector fields.« less

  6. Rotation invariants of vector fields from orthogonal moments

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Bo; Kostková, Jitka; Flusser, Jan; ...

    2017-09-11

    Vector field images are a type of new multidimensional data that appear in many engineering areas. Although the vector fields can be visualized as images, they differ from graylevel and color images in several aspects. In order to analyze them, special methods and algorithms must be originally developed or substantially adapted from the traditional image processing area. Here, we propose a method for the description and matching of vector field patterns under an unknown rotation of the field. Rotation of a vector field is so-called total rotation, where the action is applied not only on the spatial coordinates but alsomore » on the field values. Invariants of vector fields with respect to total rotation constructed from orthogonal Gaussian–Hermite moments and Zernike moments are introduced. Their numerical stability is shown to be better than that of the invariants published so far. We demonstrate their usefulness in a real world template matching application of rotated vector fields.« less

  7. Reciprocity relationships in vector acoustics and their application to vector field calculations.

    PubMed

    Deal, Thomas J; Smith, Kevin B

    2017-08-01

    The reciprocity equation commonly stated in underwater acoustics relates pressure fields and monopole sources. It is often used to predict the pressure measured by a hydrophone for multiple source locations by placing a source at the hydrophone location and calculating the field everywhere for that source. A similar equation that governs the orthogonal components of the particle velocity field is needed to enable this computational method to be used for acoustic vector sensors. This paper derives a general reciprocity equation that accounts for both monopole and dipole sources. This vector-scalar reciprocity equation can be used to calculate individual components of the received vector field by altering the source type used in the propagation calculation. This enables a propagation model to calculate the received vector field components for an arbitrary number of source locations with a single model run for each vector field component instead of requiring one model run for each source location. Application of the vector-scalar reciprocity principle is demonstrated with analytic solutions for a range-independent environment and with numerical solutions for a range-dependent environment using a parabolic equation model.

  8. An operational satellite scatterometer for wind vector measurements over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. L.; Bracalente, E. M.; Jones, W. L.; Schrader, J. H.; Schroeder, L. C.; Mitchell, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Performance requirements and design characteristics of a microwave scatterometer wind sensor for measuring surface winds over the oceans on a global basis are described. Scatterometer specifications are developed from user requirements of wind vector measurement range and accuracy, swath width, resolution cell size and measurement grid spacing. A detailed analysis is performed for a baseline fan-beam scatterometer design, and its performance capabilities for meeting the SeaSat-A user requirements. Various modes of operation are discussed which will allow the resolution of questions concerning the effects of sea state on the scatterometer wind sensing ability and to verify design boundaries of the instrument.

  9. Validation of SplitVectors Encoding for Quantitative Visualization of Large-Magnitude-Range Vector Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Henan; Bryant, Garnett W.; Griffin, Wesley; Terrill, Judith E.; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    We designed and evaluated SplitVectors, a new vector field display approach to help scientists perform new discrimination tasks on large-magnitude-range scientific data shown in three-dimensional (3D) visualization environments. SplitVectors uses scientific notation to display vector magnitude, thus improving legibility. We present an empirical study comparing the SplitVectors approach with three other approaches - direct linear representation, logarithmic, and text display commonly used in scientific visualizations. Twenty participants performed three domain analysis tasks: reading numerical values (a discrimination task), finding the ratio between values (a discrimination task), and finding the larger of two vectors (a pattern detection task). Participants used both mono and stereo conditions. Our results suggest the following: (1) SplitVectors improve accuracy by about 10 times compared to linear mapping and by four times to logarithmic in discrimination tasks; (2) SplitVectors have no significant differences from the textual display approach, but reduce cluttering in the scene; (3) SplitVectors and textual display are less sensitive to data scale than linear and logarithmic approaches; (4) using logarithmic can be problematic as participants' confidence was as high as directly reading from the textual display, but their accuracy was poor; and (5) Stereoscopy improved performance, especially in more challenging discrimination tasks. PMID:28113469

  10. Validation of SplitVectors Encoding for Quantitative Visualization of Large-Magnitude-Range Vector Fields.

    PubMed

    Henan Zhao; Bryant, Garnett W; Griffin, Wesley; Terrill, Judith E; Jian Chen

    2017-06-01

    We designed and evaluated SplitVectors, a new vector field display approach to help scientists perform new discrimination tasks on large-magnitude-range scientific data shown in three-dimensional (3D) visualization environments. SplitVectors uses scientific notation to display vector magnitude, thus improving legibility. We present an empirical study comparing the SplitVectors approach with three other approaches - direct linear representation, logarithmic, and text display commonly used in scientific visualizations. Twenty participants performed three domain analysis tasks: reading numerical values (a discrimination task), finding the ratio between values (a discrimination task), and finding the larger of two vectors (a pattern detection task). Participants used both mono and stereo conditions. Our results suggest the following: (1) SplitVectors improve accuracy by about 10 times compared to linear mapping and by four times to logarithmic in discrimination tasks; (2) SplitVectors have no significant differences from the textual display approach, but reduce cluttering in the scene; (3) SplitVectors and textual display are less sensitive to data scale than linear and logarithmic approaches; (4) using logarithmic can be problematic as participants' confidence was as high as directly reading from the textual display, but their accuracy was poor; and (5) Stereoscopy improved performance, especially in more challenging discrimination tasks.

  11. Improvements and Advances to the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) Ocean Vector Wind Analysis (V2.0 release)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. P.; Wentz, F. J.; Hoffman, R. N.; Atlas, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean vector wind is a valuable climate data record (CDR) useful in observing and monitoring changes in climate and air-sea interactions. Ocean surface wind stress influences such processes as heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes between the atmosphere and ocean, driving ocean currents and forcing ocean circulation. The Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) ocean vector wind analysis is a quarter-degree, six-hourly global ocean wind analysis product created using the variational analysis method (VAM) [Atlas et al., 1996; Hoffman et al., 2003]. The CCMP V1.1 wind product is a highly-esteemed, widely-used data set containing the longest gap-free record of satellite-based ocean vector wind data (July 1987 to June 2012). CCMP V1.1 was considered a "first-look" data set that used the most-timely, albeit preliminary, releases of satellite, in situ, and modeled ECMWF-Operational wind background fields. The authors have been working with the original producers of CCMP V1.1 to create an updated, improved, and consistently-reprocessed CCMP V2.0 ocean vector wind analysis data set. With Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) having recently updated all passive microwave satellite instrument calibrations and retrievals to the RSS Version-7 RTM standard, the reprocessing of the CCMP data set into a higher-quality CDR using inter-calibrated satellite inputs became feasible. In addition to the use of SSM/I, SSMIS, TRMM TMI, QuikSCAT, AMSRE, and WindSat instruments, AMSR2, GMI, and ASCAT have been also included in the CCMP V2.0 data set release, which has now been extended to the beginning of 2015. Additionally, the background field has been updated to use six-hourly, quarter-degree ERA-Interim wind vector inputs, and the quality-checks on the in situ data have been carefully reviewed and improved. The goal of the release of the CCMP V2.0 ocean wind vector analysis product is to serve as a merged ocean wind vector data set for climate studies. Diligent effort has been made by the authors to

  12. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  14. Video-rate terahertz electric-field vector imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Mayuko; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Manabu

    We present an experimental setup to dramatically reduce a measurement time for obtaining spatial distributions of terahertz electric-field (E-field) vectors. The method utilizes the electro-optic sampling, and we use a charge-coupled device to detect a spatial distribution of the probe beam polarization rotation by the E-field-induced Pockels effect in a 〈110〉-oriented ZnTe crystal. A quick rotation of the ZnTe crystal allows analyzing the terahertz E-field direction at each image position, and the terahertz E-field vector mapping at a fixed position of an optical delay line is achieved within 21 ms. Video-rate mapping of terahertz E-field vectors is likely to bemore » useful for achieving real-time sensing of terahertz vector beams, vector vortices, and surface topography. The method is also useful for a fast polarization analysis of terahertz beams.« less

  15. Electric fields and vector potentials of thin cylindrical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ronold W. P.

    1990-09-01

    The vector potential and electric field generated by the current in a center-driven or parasitic dipole antenna that extends from z = -h to z = h are investigated for each of the several components of the current. These include sin k(h - absolute value of z), sin k (absolute value of z) - sin kh, cos kz - cos kh, and cos kz/2 - cos kh/2. Of special interest are the interactions among the variously spaced elements in parallel nonstaggered arrays. These depend on the mutual vector potentials. It is shown that at a radial distance rho approximately = h and in the range z = -h to h, the vector potentials due to all four components become alike and have an approximately plane-wave form. Simple approximate formulas for the electric fields and vector potentials generated by each of the four distributions are derived and compared with the exact results. The application of the new formulas to large arrays is discussed.

  16. Stable solutions of inflation driven by vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Razieh; Mukohyama, Shinji; Namba, Ryo; Zhang, Ying-li

    2017-03-01

    Many models of inflation driven by vector fields alone have been known to be plagued by pathological behaviors, namely ghost and/or gradient instabilities. In this work, we seek a new class of vector-driven inflationary models that evade all of the mentioned instabilities. We build our analysis on the Generalized Proca Theory with an extension to three vector fields to realize isotropic expansion. We obtain the conditions required for quasi de-Sitter solutions to be an attractor analogous to the standard slow-roll one and those for their stability at the level of linearized perturbations. Identifying the remedy to the existing unstable models, we provide a simple example and explicitly show its stability. This significantly broadens our knowledge on vector inflationary scenarios, reviving potential phenomenological interests for this class of models.

  17. Comparison of the ocean surface vector winds from atmospheric reanalysis and scatterometer-based wind products over the Nordic Seas and the northern North Atlantic and their application for ocean modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Petersen, Gudrún Nína; Steffen, John

    2017-03-01

    Ocean surface vector wind fields from reanalysis data sets and scatterometer-derived gridded products are analyzed over the Nordic Seas and the northern North Atlantic for the time period from 2000 to 2009. The data sets include the National Center for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis 2 (NCEPR2), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR), Cross-Calibrated Multiplatform (CCMP) wind product version 1.1 and recently released version 2.0, and QuikSCAT. The goal of the study is to assess discrepancies across the wind vector fields in the data sets and demonstrate possible implications of these differences for ocean modeling. Large-scale and mesoscale characteristics of winds are compared at interannual, seasonal, and synoptic timescales. A cyclone tracking methodology is developed and applied to the wind fields to compare cyclone characteristics in the data sets. Additionally, the winds are evaluated against observations collected from meteorological buoys deployed in the Iceland and Irminger Seas. The agreement among the wind fields is better for longer time and larger spatial scales. The discrepancies are clearly apparent for synoptic timescales and mesoscales. CCMP, ASR, and CFSR show the closest overall agreement with each other. Substantial biases are found in the NCEPR2 winds. Numerical sensitivity experiments are conducted with a coupled ice-ocean model forced by different wind fields. The experiments demonstrate differences in the net surface heat fluxes during storms. In the experiment forced by NCEPR2 winds, there are discrepancies in the large-scale wind-driven ocean dynamics compared to the other experiments.

  18. Computation of Surface Integrals of Curl Vector Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Chenglie

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a way of computing a surface integral when the vector field of the integrand is a curl field. Presented in some advanced calculus textbooks such as [1], the technique, as the author experienced, is simple and applicable. The computation is based on Stokes' theorem in 3-space calculus, and thus provides not only a means to…

  19. Improvement of cardiac CT reconstruction using local motion vector fields.

    PubMed

    Schirra, Carsten Oliver; Bontus, Claas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Dössel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The motion of the heart is a major challenge for cardiac imaging using CT. A novel approach to decrease motion blur and to improve the signal to noise ratio is motion compensated reconstruction which takes motion vector fields into account in order to correct motion. The presented work deals with the determination of local motion vector fields from high contrast objects and their utilization within motion compensated filtered back projection reconstruction. Image registration is applied during the quiescent cardiac phases. Temporal interpolation in parameter space is used in order to estimate motion during strong motion phases. The resulting motion vector fields are during image reconstruction. The method is assessed using a software phantom and several clinical cases for calcium scoring. As a criterion for reconstruction quality, calcium volume scores were derived from both, gated cardiac reconstruction and motion compensated reconstruction throughout the cardiac phases using low pitch helical cone beam CT acquisitions. The presented technique is a robust method to determine and utilize local motion vector fields. Motion compensated reconstruction using the derived motion vector fields leads to superior image quality compared to gated reconstruction. As a result, the gating window can be enlarged significantly, resulting in increased SNR, while reliable Hounsfield units are achieved due to the reduced level of motion artefacts. The enlargement of the gating window can be translated into reduced dose requirements.

  20. Managing focal fields of vector beams with multiple polarization singularities.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Liu, Sheng; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Huachao; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-11-10

    We explore the tight focusing behavior of vector beams with multiple polarization singularities, and analyze the influences of the number, position, and topological charge of the singularities on the focal fields. It is found that the ellipticity of the local polarization states at the focal plane could be determined by the spatial distribution of the polarization singularities of the vector beam. When the spatial location and topological charge of singularities have even-fold rotation symmetry, the transverse fields at the focal plane are locally linearly polarized. Otherwise, the polarization state becomes a locally hybrid one. By appropriately arranging the distribution of the polarization singularities in the vector beam, the polarization distributions of the focal fields could be altered while the intensity maintains unchanged.

  1. Combinatorial vector fields and the valley structure of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Bärbel M R; Stadler, Peter F

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive (downhill) walks are a computationally convenient way of analyzing the geometric structure of fitness landscapes. Their inherently stochastic nature has limited their mathematical analysis, however. Here we develop a framework that interprets adaptive walks as deterministic trajectories in combinatorial vector fields and in return associate these combinatorial vector fields with weights that measure their steepness across the landscape. We show that the combinatorial vector fields and their weights have a product structure that is governed by the neutrality of the landscape. This product structure makes practical computations feasible. The framework presented here also provides an alternative, and mathematically more convenient, way of defining notions of valleys, saddle points, and barriers in landscape. As an application, we propose a refined approximation for transition rates between macrostates that are associated with the valleys of the landscape.

  2. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  3. Vector optical fields with polarization distributions similar to electric and magnetic field lines.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Li, Si-Min; Mao, Lei; Kong, Ling-Jun; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Pei; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2013-07-01

    We present, design and generate a new kind of vector optical fields with linear polarization distributions modeling to electric and magnetic field lines. The geometric configurations of "electric charges" and "magnetic charges" can engineer the spatial structure and symmetry of polarizations of vector optical field, providing additional degrees of freedom assisting in controlling the field symmetry at the focus and allowing engineering of the field distribution at the focus to the specific applications.

  4. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields (nonsteady winds)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques to predict the dynamic response and the structural dynamic loads of flat plate photovoltaic arrays due to wind turbulence were analyzed. Guidelines for use in predicting the turbulent portion of the wind loading on future similar arrays are presented. The dynamic response and the loads dynamic magnification factor of the two array configurations are similar. The magnification factors at a mid chord and outer chord location on the array illustrated and at four points on the chord are shown. The wind tunnel test experimental rms pressure coefficient on which magnification factors are based is shown. It is found that the largest response and dynamic magnification factor occur at a mid chord location on an array and near the trailing edge. A technique employing these magnification factors and the wind tunnel test rms fluctuating pressure coefficients to calculate design pressure loads due to wind turbulence is presented.

  5. Scanning wind-vector scatterometers with two pencil beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirimoto, T.; Moore, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    A scanning pencil-beam scatterometer for ocean windvector determination has potential advantages over the fan-beam systems used and proposed heretofore. The pencil beam permits use of lower transmitter power, and at the same time allows concurrent use of the reflector by a radiometer to correct for atmospheric attenuation and other radiometers for other purposes. The use of dual beams based on the same scanning reflector permits four looks at each cell on the surface, thereby improving accuracy and allowing alias removal. Simulation results for a spaceborne dual-beam scanning scatterometer with a 1-watt radiated power at an orbital altitude of 900 km is described. Two novel algorithms for removing the aliases in the windvector are described, in addition to an adaptation of the conventional maximum likelihood algorithm. The new algorithms are more effective at alias removal than the conventional one. Measurement errors for the wind speed, assuming perfect alias removal, were found to be less than 10%.

  6. Vector fields in a tight laser focus: comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Peatross, Justin; Berrondo, Manuel; Smith, Dallas; Ware, Michael

    2017-06-26

    We assess several widely used vector models of a Gaussian laser beam in the context of more accurate vector diffraction integration. For the analysis, we present a streamlined derivation of the vector fields of a uniformly polarized beam reflected from an ideal parabolic mirror, both inside and outside of the resulting focus. This exact solution to Maxwell's equations, first developed in 1920 by V. S. Ignatovsky, is highly relevant to high-intensity laser experiments since the boundary conditions at a focusing optic dictate the form of the focus in a manner analogous to a physical experiment. In contrast, many models simply assume a field profile near the focus and develop the surrounding vector fields consistent with Maxwell's equations. In comparing the Ignatovsky result with popular closed-form analytic vector models of a Gaussian beam, we find that the relatively simple model developed by Erikson and Singh in 1994 provides good agreement in the paraxial limit. Models involving a Lax expansion introduce a divergences outside of the focus while providing little if any improvement in the focal region. Extremely tight focusing produces a somewhat complicated structure in the focus, and requires the Ignatovsky model for accurate representation.

  7. The Astrobiology Field Guide in World Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalice, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    In collaboration with the Australian Centre for Astrobiology (ACA), and NASA Learning Technologies (NLT), and utilizing the powerful visualization capabilities of their "World Wind" software, the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) is crafting a prototype "Astrobiology Field Guide" to bring the field experiences and stories of astrobiology science to the public and classrooms around the world. The prototype focuses on one region in particular - The Pilbara in Western Australia. This first Field Guide "hotspot" is an internationally recognized area hosting the best known example of the earliest evidence of life on Earth - a stromatolitic chert precipitation in the 3.45 Ga Warrawoona Group. The goal of the Astrobiology Field Guide is to engage students of all ages with the ongoing field expeditions of today's astrobiologists as they explore the ends of the Earth searching for clues to life's origin, evolution, and distribution in the Universe. The NAI hopes to expand this Field Guide to include many more astrobiologically relevant areas across the globe such as Cuatro Cienegas in Mexico, the Rio Tinto in Spain, Yellowstone National Park in the US, and the Lost City hydrothermal vent field on the mid-Atlantic ridge - and possibly sites on Mars. To that end, we will be conducting feasibility studies and evaluations with informal and formal education contacts. The Astrobiology Field Guide is also serving as a cornerstone to educational materials being developed focused on the Pilbara region for use in classrooms in Australia, the UK, and potentially the US. These materials are being developed by the Australian Centre for Astrobiology, and the ICT Innovations Centre at Macquarie University in Sydney, in collaboration with the NAI and the Centre for Astronomy and Science Education at the University of Glamorgan in the UK.

  8. REGIONAL-SCALE WIND FIELD CLASSIFICATION EMPLOYING CLUSTER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L G; Glaser, R E; Chin, H S

    2004-06-17

    The classification of time-varying multivariate regional-scale wind fields at a specific location can assist event planning as well as consequence and risk analysis. Further, wind field classification involves data transformation and inference techniques that effectively characterize stochastic wind field variation. Such a classification scheme is potentially useful for addressing overall atmospheric transport uncertainty and meteorological parameter sensitivity issues. Different methods to classify wind fields over a location include the principal component analysis of wind data (e.g., Hardy and Walton, 1978) and the use of cluster analysis for wind data (e.g., Green et al., 1992; Kaufmann and Weber, 1996). The goalmore » of this study is to use a clustering method to classify the winds of a gridded data set, i.e, from meteorological simulations generated by a forecast model.« less

  9. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The three-machine, 7.5 MW Goodnoe Hills located near Goldendale, Washington and is now in a research/experimental operations phase that offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid; and the environment. Following a brief description of the turbine and project history, this paper addresses major problem areas and research and development test results. Field operations, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed. Routine operation to date has produced over 13,379,000 KWh of electrical energy during 11,064 hr of rotation. Nonroutine operation includes suspended activities caused by a crack in the low speed shaft that necessitated a redesign and reinstallation of this assembly on all three turbines. With the world's largest cluster back in full operation, two of the turbines will be operated over the next years to determine their value as energy producer. The third unit will be used primarily for conducting research tests requiring configuration changes to better understand the wind turbine technology. Technical areas summarized pertain to system performance and enhancements. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects conclude the paper.

  10. Surface Wind Vector and Rain Rate Observation Capability of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; El-Nimri, Salem; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is the next-generation Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), and it will offer the capability of simultaneous wide-swath observations of both extreme ocean surface wind vector and strong precipitation from either aircraft (including UAS) or satellite platforms. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce valid wind observations under hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered by precipitation. The SFMR i s a proven aircraft remote sensing system for simultaneously observing extreme ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. The first version of the instrument will be a single polarization system for wind speed and rain rate, with a dual-polarization system to follow for wind vector capability. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by NASA s Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard (laboratory) version of the instrument has been completed and successfully tested in a test chamber. Development of the aircraft instrument is underway, with flight testing planned for the fall of 2009. Preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on surface wind analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor. New off-nadir data collected in 2008 by SFMR that affirms the ability of this measurement technique to obtain wind speed data at non-zero incidence angle will

  11. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1993-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second year of the contract entitled 'Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,' NASW-4728, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into the determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions. The contract began on June 30, 1992 and has a completion date of December 31, 1994. This contract is a continuation of work started in a previous contract, NASW-4571, which covered the period November 15, 1990 to December 14, 1991. During this second year we have concentrated on studying additional active regions and in using the estimated coronal magnetic fields to compare to coronal features inferred from observations.

  12. Apparatus and method for using radar to evaluate wind flow fields for wind energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind flow field using one or more radars. Data is collected from the one or more radars, and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind flow field. The one or more radars are positioned to have a portion of the wind flow field within a scanning sector of the one or more radars.

  13. Gridded Calibration of Ensemble Wind Vector Forecasts Using Ensemble Model Output Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, S. M.; Holman, B. P.; Splitt, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    A computationally efficient method is developed that performs gridded post processing of ensemble wind vector forecasts. An expansive set of idealized WRF model simulations are generated to provide physically consistent high resolution winds over a coastal domain characterized by an intricate land / water mask. Ensemble model output statistics (EMOS) is used to calibrate the ensemble wind vector forecasts at observation locations. The local EMOS predictive parameters (mean and variance) are then spread throughout the grid utilizing flow-dependent statistical relationships extracted from the downscaled WRF winds. Using data withdrawal and 28 east central Florida stations, the method is applied to one year of 24 h wind forecasts from the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS). Compared to the raw GEFS, the approach improves both the deterministic and probabilistic forecast skill. Analysis of multivariate rank histograms indicate the post processed forecasts are calibrated. Two downscaling case studies are presented, a quiescent easterly flow event and a frontal passage. Strengths and weaknesses of the approach are presented and discussed.

  14. Field Tests of Wind Turbine Unit with Tandem Wind Rotors and Double Rotational Armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galal, Ahmed Mohamed; Kanemoto, Toshiaki

    This paper discusses the field tests of the wind turbine unit, in which the front and the rear wind rotors drive the inner and the outer armatures of the synchronous generator. The wind rotors were designed conveniently by the traditional procedure for the single wind rotor, where the diameters of the front and the rear wind rotors are 2 m and 1.33 m. The tests were done on a pick-up type truck driven straightly at constant speed. The rotational torque of the unit is directly proportional to the induced electric current irrespective of the rotational speeds of the wind rotors, while the induced voltage is proportional to the relative rotational speed. The performance of the unit is significantly affected not only by the wind velocity, but also by the blade setting angles of both wind rotors and the applied load especially at lower wind velocity.

  15. Off disk-center potential field calculations using vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gary, G. Allen

    1989-01-01

    A potential field calculation for off disk-center vector magnetograms that uses all the three components of the measured field is investigated. There is neither any need for interpolation of grid points between the image plane and the heliographic plane nor for an extension or a truncation to a heliographic rectangle. Hence, the method provides the maximum information content from the photospheric field as well as the most consistent potential field independent of the viewing angle. The introduction of polarimetric noise produces a less tolerant extrapolation procedure than using the line-of-sight extrapolation, but the resultant standard deviation is still small enough for the practical utility of this method.

  16. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1992-01-01

    The determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions is studied. Two additional active regions were selected and analyzed. The restriction of periodicity in the 3-D code which is used to determine the coronal field was removed giving the new code variable mesh spacing and is thus able to provide a more realistic description of coronal fields. The NOAA active region AR5747 of 20 Oct. 1989 was studied. A brief account of progress during the research performed is reported.

  17. Comparing WSA coronal and solar wind model predictions driven by line-of-sight and vector HMI ADAPT maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Shurkin, K.; Wallace, S.

    2017-12-01

    As the primary input to nearly all coronal models, reliable estimates of the global solar photospheric magnetic field distribution are critical for accurate modeling and understanding of solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model generates synchronic (i.e., globally instantaneous) maps by evolving observed solar magnetic flux using relatively well understood transport processes when measurements are not available and then updating modeled flux with new observations (available from both the Earth and the far-side of the Sun) using data assimilation methods that rigorously take into account model and observational uncertainties. ADAPT is capable of assimilating line-of-sight and vector magnetic field data from all observatory sources including the expected photospheric vector magnetograms from the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI) on the Solar Orbiter, as well as those generated using helioseismic methods. This paper compares Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal and solar wind modeling results at Earth and STEREO A & B using ADAPT input model maps derived from both line-of-site and vector SDO/HMI magnetograms that include methods for incorporating observations of a large, newly emerged (July 2010) far-side active region (AR11087).

  18. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads. The arrays located at the outer boundary of an array field have a protective influence on the interior arrays of the field. A significant decrease of the array wind loads were recorded in the wind tunnel test on array panels located behind a fence and/or interior to the array field compared to the arrays on the boundary and unprotected from the wind. The magnitude of this decrease was the same whether caused by a fence or upwind arrays.

  19. Particle production of vector fields: Scale invariance is attractive

    SciTech Connect

    Wagstaff, Jacques M.; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-15

    In a model of an Abelian vector boson with a Maxwell kinetic term and non-negative mass-squared it is demonstrated that, under fairly general conditions during inflation, a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations for the components of a vector field, massive or not, whose kinetic function (and mass) is modulated by the inflaton field is an attractor solution. If the field is massless, or if it remains light until the end of inflation, this attractor solution also generates anisotropic stress, which can render inflation weakly anisotropic. The above two characteristics of the attractor solution can source (independently or combined together) significant statisticalmore » anisotropy in the curvature perturbation, which may well be observable in the near future.« less

  20. Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1997-01-01

    During the course of the present contract we developed an 'evolutionary technique' for the determination of force-free coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograph observations. The method can successfully generate nonlinear force- free fields (with non-constant-a) that match vector magnetograms. We demonstrated that it is possible to determine coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, and we applied it to vector magnetograms of active regions. We have also studied theoretical models of coronal fields that lead to disruptions. Specifically, we have demonstrated that the determination of force-free fields from exact boundary data is a well-posed mathematical problem, by verifying that the computed coronal field agrees with an analytic force-free field when boundary data for the analytic field are used; demonstrated that it is possible to determine active-region coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, by computing the coronal field above active region 5747 on 20 October 1989, AR6919 on 15 November 1991, and AR7260 on 18 August 1992, from data taken with the Stokes Polarimeter at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii; started to analyze active region 7201 on 19 June 1992 using measurements made with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at NSO/Sac Peak; investigated the effects of imperfections in the photospheric data on the computed coronal magnetic field; documented the coronal field structure of AR5747 and compared it to the morphology of footpoint emission in a flare, showing that the 'high- pressure' H-alpha footpoints are connected by coronal field lines; shown that the variation of magnetic field strength along current-carrying field lines is significantly different from the variation in a potential field, and that the resulting near-constant area of elementary flux tubes is consistent with observations; begun to develop realistic models of coronal fields which can be used to study flare trigger mechanisms; demonstrated that

  1. Attraction of the cutaneous leishmaniasis vector Nyssomyia neivai (Diptera: Psychodidae) to host odour components in a wind tunnel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laboratory studies of host-seeking olfactory behaviour in sandflies have largely been restricted to the American visceral leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis. In comparison, almost nothing is known about the chemical ecology of related species, which transmit American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), due in part to difficulties in raising these insects in the laboratory. Understanding how ACL vectors locate their hosts will be essential to developing new vector control strategies to combat this debilitating disease. Methods This study examined host-odour seeking behaviour of the ACL vector Nyssomyia neivai (Pinto) (=Lutzomyia neivai) using a wind tunnel olfactometer. The primary aim was to determine whether field-collected female N. neivai would respond to host odours in the laboratory, thereby eliminating the need to maintain colonies of these insects for behavioural experiments. Responses to two key host odour components, 1-octen-3-ol and lactic acid, and a commercially-available mosquito lure (BG-Lure™) were assessed and compared relative to an air control. We also tested whether trials could be conducted outside of the normal evening activity period of N. neivai without impacting on fly behaviour, and whether the same flies could be used to assess baseline responses to air without affecting responses to octenol, thereby reducing the number of flies required for experiments. Results Octenol was found to both activate host-seeking behaviour and attract female N. neivai in the wind tunnel, while lactic acid elicited weaker responses of activation and attractiveness under identical conditions. The BG-Lure did not activate or attract N. neivai under test conditions. Further experiments showed that sandfly behaviour in the wind tunnel was not affected by time of day, such that experiments need not be restricted to nocturnal hours. Moreover, using the same flies to measure both baseline responses to air and attraction to test compounds did not affect

  2. Attraction of the cutaneous leishmaniasis vector Nyssomyia neivai (Diptera: Psychodidae) to host odour components in a wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mara C; Bray, Daniel P; Eiras, Alvaro E; Carvalheira, Henrique P; Puertas, Camila P

    2012-09-25

    Laboratory studies of host-seeking olfactory behaviour in sandflies have largely been restricted to the American visceral leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis. In comparison, almost nothing is known about the chemical ecology of related species, which transmit American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), due in part to difficulties in raising these insects in the laboratory. Understanding how ACL vectors locate their hosts will be essential to developing new vector control strategies to combat this debilitating disease. This study examined host-odour seeking behaviour of the ACL vector Nyssomyia neivai (Pinto) (=Lutzomyia neivai) using a wind tunnel olfactometer. The primary aim was to determine whether field-collected female N. neivai would respond to host odours in the laboratory, thereby eliminating the need to maintain colonies of these insects for behavioural experiments. Responses to two key host odour components, 1-octen-3-ol and lactic acid, and a commercially-available mosquito lure (BG-Lure™) were assessed and compared relative to an air control. We also tested whether trials could be conducted outside of the normal evening activity period of N. neivai without impacting on fly behaviour, and whether the same flies could be used to assess baseline responses to air without affecting responses to octenol, thereby reducing the number of flies required for experiments. Octenol was found to both activate host-seeking behaviour and attract female N. neivai in the wind tunnel, while lactic acid elicited weaker responses of activation and attractiveness under identical conditions. The BG-Lure did not activate or attract N. neivai under test conditions. Further experiments showed that sandfly behaviour in the wind tunnel was not affected by time of day, such that experiments need not be restricted to nocturnal hours. Moreover, using the same flies to measure both baseline responses to air and attraction to test compounds did not affect odour-seeking behaviour

  3. A field study of wind over a simulated block building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Shahabi, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A full-scale field study of the wind over a simulated two-dimensional building is reported. The study develops an experiment to investigate the structure and magnitude of the wind fields. A description of the experimental arrangement, the type and expected accuracy of the data, and the range of the data are given. The data are expected to provide a fundamental understanding of mean wind and turbulence structure of the wind field around the bluff body. Preliminary analysis of the data demonstrates the reliability and completeness of the data in this regard.

  4. Analysis of the vector magnetic fields of complex sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the vector magnetic field in the delta-configurations of two complex sunspot groups is presented, noting several characteristics identified in the delta-configurations. The observations of regions 2469 (S12E80) and 2470 (S21E83) took place in May, 1980 with a vector magnetograph, verified by optical viewing. Longitudinal magnetic field plots located the delta-configurations in relation to the transverse field neutral line. It is shown that data on the polarization yields qualitative information on the magnetic field strengths, while the azimuth of the transverse field can be obtained from the relative intensities of linear polarization measurements aligned with respect to the magnetograph analyses axis at 0 and 90 deg, and at the plus and minus 45 deg positions. Details of the longitudinal fields are discussed. A strong, sheared transverse field component is found to be a signature of strong delta. A weak delta is accompanied by a weak longitudinal gradient with an unsheared transverse component of variable strength.

  5. Magsat vector magnetometer calibration using Magsat geomagnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, E. R.; Jennings, T.; Morrissey, M.; Langel, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    From the time of its launch on Oct. 30, 1979 into a nearly polar, Sun synchronous orbit, until it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 11, 1980, Magsat measured and transmitted more than three complete sets of global magnetic field data. The data obtained from the mission will be used primarily to compute a currently accurate model of the Earth's main magnetic field, to update and refine world and regional magnetic charts, and to develop a global scalar and vector crustal magnetic anomaly map. The in-flight calibration procecure used for 39 vector magnetometer system parameters is described as well as results obtained from some data sets and the numerical studies designed to evaluate the results.

  6. High-quality animation of 2D steady vector fields.

    PubMed

    Lefer, Wilfrid; Jobard, Bruno; Leduc, Claire

    2004-01-01

    Simulators for dynamic systems are now widely used in various application areas and raise the need for effective and accurate flow visualization techniques. Animation allows us to depict direction, orientation, and velocity of a vector field accurately. This paper extends a former proposal for a new approach to produce perfectly cyclic and variable-speed animations for 2D steady vector fields (see [1] and [2]). A complete animation of an arbitrary number of frames is encoded in a single image. The animation can be played using the color table animation technique, which is very effective even on low-end workstations. A cyclic set of textures can be produced as well and then encoded in a common animation format or used for texture mapping on 3D objects. As compared to other approaches, the method presented in this paper produces smoother animations and is more effective, both in memory requirements to store the animation, and in computation time.

  7. Probabilistic Path Planning of Montgolfier Balloons in Strong, Uncertain Wind Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Michael; Blackmore, James C.; Kuwata, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Lighter-than-air vehicles such as hot-air balloons have been proposed for exploring Saturn s moon Titan, as well as other bodies with significant atmospheres. For these vehicles to navigate effectively, it is critical to incorporate the effects of surrounding wind fields, especially as these winds will likely be strong relative to the control authority of the vehicle. Predictive models of these wind fields are available, and previous research has considered problems of planning paths subject to these predicted forces. However, such previous work has considered the wind fields as known a priori, whereas in practical applications, the actual wind vector field is not known exactly and may deviate significantly from the wind velocities estimated by the model. A probabilistic 3D path-planning algorithm was developed for balloons to use uncertain wind models to generate time-efficient paths. The nominal goal of the algorithm is to determine what altitude and what horizontal actuation, if any is available on the vehicle, to use to reach a particular goal location in the least expected time, utilizing advantageous winds. The solution also enables one to quickly evaluate the expected time-to-goal from any other location and to avoid regions of large uncertainty. This method is designed for balloons in wind fields but may be generalized for any buoyant vehicle operating in a vector field. To prepare the planning problem, the uncertainty in the wind field is modeled. Then, the problem of reaching a particular goal location is formulated as a Markov decision process (MDP) using a discretized space approach. Solving the MDP provides a policy of what actuation option (how much buoyancy change and, if applicable, horizontal actuation) should be selected at any given location to minimize the expected time-to-goal. The results provide expected time-to-goal values from any given location on the globe in addition to the action policy. This stochastic approach can also provide

  8. Index formulas for higher order Loewner vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broad, Steven

    Let ∂ be the Cauchy-Riemann operator and f be a C real-valued function in a neighborhood of 0 in R in which ∂z¯nf≠0 for all z≠0. In such cases, ∂z¯nf is known as a Loewner vector field due to its connection with Loewner's conjecture that the index of such a vector field is bounded above by n. The n=2 case of Loewner's conjecture implies Carathéodory's conjecture that any C-immersion of S into R must have at least two umbilics. Recent work of F. Xavier produced a formula for computing the index of Loewner vector fields when n=2 using data about the Hessian of f. In this paper, we extend this result and establish an index formula for ∂z¯nf for all n⩾2. Structurally, our index formula provides a defect term, which contains geometric data extracted from Hessian-like objects associated with higher order derivatives of f.

  9. Ferromagnetic Switching of Knotted Vector Fields in Liquid Crystal Colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Ackerman, Paul J; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-08-28

    We experimentally realize polydomain and monodomain chiral ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids that exhibit solitonic and knotted vector field configurations. Formed by dispersions of ferromagnetic nanoplatelets in chiral nematic liquid crystals, these colloidal ferromagnets exhibit spontaneous long-range alignment of magnetic dipole moments of individual platelets, giving rise to a continuum of the magnetization field M(r). Competing effects of surface confinement and chirality prompt spontaneous formation and enable the optical generation of localized twisted solitonic structures with double-twist tubes and torus knots of M(r), which exhibit a strong sensitivity to the direction of weak magnetic fields ∼1  mT. Numerical modeling, implemented through free energy minimization to arrive at a field-dependent three-dimensional M(r), shows a good agreement with experiments and provides insights into the torus knot topology of observed field configurations and the corresponding physical underpinnings.

  10. Measurements of wind vectors, eddy momentum transports, and energy conversions in Jupiter's atmosphere from Voyager 1 images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, R. F.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Hunt, G. E.; Mitchell, J. L.; Muller, J.-P.

    1980-01-01

    Voyager 1 narrow-angle images were used to obtain displacements of features down to 100 to 200 km in size over intervals of 10 hours. A global map of velocity vectors and longitudinally averaged zonal wind vectors as functions of the latitude, is presented and discussed

  11. Initial geomagnetic field model from Magsat vector data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Mead, G. D.; Lancaster, E. R.; Estes, R. H.; Fabiano, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    Magsat data from the magnetically quiet days of November 5-6, 1979, were used to derive a thirteenth degree and order spherical harmonic geomagnetic field model, MGST(6/80). The model utilized both scalar and high-accuracy vector data and fit that data with root-mean-square deviations of 8.2, 6.9, 7.6 and 7.4 nT for the scalar magnitude, B(r), B(theta), and B(phi), respectively. The model includes the three first-order coefficients of the external field. Comparison with averaged Dst indicates that zero Dst corresponds with 25 nT of horizontal field from external sources. When compared with earlier models, the earth's dipole moment continues to decrease at a rate of about 26 nT/yr. Evaluation of earlier models with Magsat data shows that the scalar field at the Magsat epoch is best predicted by the POGO(2/72) model but that the WC80, AWC/75 and IGS/75 are better for predicting vector fields.

  12. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  13. Measuring the turbulent wind vector with a weight-shift Microlight Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Neidl, F.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Beyrich, F.; Zheng, X. H.; Foken, T.

    2009-09-01

    The Small Environmental Research Aircraft (SERA) D-MIFUs initial fields of application are aerosol / cloud and radiation transfer research. Therefore a comparatively slow (True Airspeed, TAS ~25 ms-1) but highly mobile microlight aircraft was envisaged. To broaden the application area of D-MIFU we explore whether the microlight can also be used for Eddy Covariance (EC) flux measurement. To obtain useful data sets for airborne EC a reliable turbulent Wind Vector (WV) measurement is a key requirement. Here we present methodology and results to calibrate and express performance and uncertainty of microlight based WV measurement. Specific attention is given to the influence of the flexible-wing weight-shift geometry on the WV measurement. For the WV measurement we equipped D-MIFU with a 70 cm long noseboom supporting a classical 5 hole probe and a fast 50 μm diameter thermocouple. An Inertial Navigation System (INS) supplies high accuracy ground speeds (Ï?=0.05 ms-1) and attitude angles (Ï?=0.03° , 0.1° respectively for heading). Data are stored with 10 Hz yielding a horizontal resolution of 2.5 m. The INS also allows to analyze aircraft dynamics such as 3d rotation rates and acceleration of the nacelle body. Further estimates for 3d acceleration of airfoil and noseboom are obtained at 100 Hz. The noseboom calibration coefficients under laboratory conditions were obtained by wind tunnel- and thermal bath measurements. To transfer these characteristics for in-flight conditions we carried out a series of flights with D-MIFU above the Boundary Layer under calm conditions. On basis of level flights at different power settings we were able to determine dynamic pressure-, sideslip- and attack angle offsets. Additionally forced maneuvers, such as e.g. phugoids, have been performed. By means of multivariate analysis these data are used to assess and minimize the impact of microlight nacelle and airfoil rapidly varying motions (RVM) on the WV components. In the final

  14. The Alignment of the Mean Wind and Stress Vectors in the Unstable Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, M.; Dias, N. L.

    2010-01-01

    A significant non-alignment between the mean horizontal wind vector and the stress vector was observed for turbulence measurements both above the water surface of a large lake, and over a land surface (soybean crop). Possible causes for this discrepancy such as flow distortion, averaging times and the procedure used for extracting the turbulent fluctuations (low-pass filtering and filter widths etc.), were dismissed after a detailed analysis. Minimum averaging times always less than 30 min were established by calculating ogives, and error bounds for the turbulent stresses were derived with three different approaches, based on integral time scales (first-crossing and lag-window estimates) and on a bootstrap technique. It was found that the mean absolute value of the angle between the mean wind and stress vectors is highly related to atmospheric stability, with the non-alignment increasing distinctively with increasing instability. Given a coordinate rotation that aligns the mean wind with the x direction, this behaviour can be explained by the growth of the relative error of the u- w component with instability. As a result, under more unstable conditions the u- w and the v- w components become of the same order of magnitude, and the local stress vector gives the impression of being non-aligned with the mean wind vector. The relative error of the v- w component is large enough to make it undistinguishable from zero throughout the range of stabilities. Therefore, the standard assumptions of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory hold: it is fair to assume that the v- w stress component is actually zero, and that the non-alignment is a purely statistical effect. An analysis of the dimensionless budgets of the u- w and the v- w components confirms this interpretation, with both shear and buoyant production of u- w decreasing with increasing instability. In the v- w budget, shear production is zero by definition, while buoyancy displays very low-intensity fluctuations around

  15. Hawking radiation of a vector field and gravitational anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Keiju; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2007-10-15

    Recently, the relation between Hawking radiation and gravitational anomalies has been used to estimate the flux of Hawking radiation for a large class of black objects. In this paper, we extend the formalism, originally proposed by Robinson and Wilczek, to the Hawking radiation of vector particles (photons). It is explicitly shown, with the Hamiltonian formalism, that the theory of an electromagnetic field on d-dimensional spherical black holes reduces to one of an infinite number of massive complex scalar fields on 2-dimensional spacetime, for which the usual anomaly-cancellation method is available. It is found that the total energy emitted from themore » horizon for the electromagnetic field is just (d-2) times that for a scalar field. The results support the picture that Hawking radiation can be regarded as an anomaly eliminator on horizons. Possible extensions and applications of the analysis are discussed.« less

  16. Killing vector fields in three dimensions: a method to solve massive gravity field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürses, Metin

    2010-10-01

    Killing vector fields in three dimensions play an important role in the construction of the related spacetime geometry. In this work we show that when a three-dimensional geometry admits a Killing vector field then the Ricci tensor of the geometry is determined in terms of the Killing vector field and its scalars. In this way we can generate all products and covariant derivatives at any order of the Ricci tensor. Using this property we give ways to solve the field equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) and new massive gravity (NMG) introduced recently. In particular when the scalars of the Killing vector field (timelike, spacelike and null cases) are constants then all three-dimensional symmetric tensors of the geometry, the Ricci and Einstein tensors, their covariant derivatives at all orders, and their products of all orders are completely determined by the Killing vector field and the metric. Hence, the corresponding three-dimensional metrics are strong candidates for solving all higher derivative gravitational field equations in three dimensions.

  17. Measurements of lunar magnetic field interaction with the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Snyder, C. W.; Clay, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the compression of the remanent lunar magnetic field by the solar wind, based on measurements of remanent magnetic fields at four Apollo landing sites and of the solar wind at two of these sites. Available data show that the remanent magnetic field at the lunar surface is compressed as much as 40% above its initial value by the solar wind, but the total remanent magnetic pressure is less than the stagnation pressure by a factor of six, implying that a local shock is not formed.

  18. Brushless exciters using a high temperature superconducting field winding

    DOEpatents

    Garces, Luis Jose [Schenectady, NY; Delmerico, Robert William [Clifton Park, NY; Jansen, Patrick Lee [Scotia, NY; Parslow, John Harold [Scotia, NY; Sanderson, Harold Copeland [Tribes Hill, NY; Sinha, Gautam [Chesterfield, MO

    2008-03-18

    A brushless exciter for a synchronous generator or motor generally includes a stator and a rotor rotatably disposed within the stator. The rotor has a field winding and a voltage rectifying bridge circuit connected in parallel to the field winding. A plurality of firing circuits are connected the voltage rectifying bridge circuit. The firing circuit is configured to fire a signal at an angle of less than 90.degree. or at an angle greater than 90.degree.. The voltage rectifying bridge circuit rectifies the AC voltage to excite or de-excite the field winding.

  19. Determination of the coronal magnetic field from vector magnetograph data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1991-01-01

    A new algorithm was developed, tested, and applied to determine coronal magnetic fields above solar active regions. The coronal field above NOAA active region AR5747 was successfully estimated on 20 Oct. 1989 from data taken at the Mees Solar Observatory of the Univ. of Hawaii. It was shown that observational data can be used to obtain realistic estimates of coronal magnetic fields. The model has significantly extended the realism with which the coronal magnetic field can be inferred from observations. The understanding of coronal phenomena will be greatly advanced by a reliable technique, such as the one presented, for deducing the detailed spatial structure of the coronal field. The payoff from major current and proposed NASA observational efforts is heavily dependent on the success with which the coronal field can be inferred from vector magnetograms. In particular, the present inability to reliably obtain the coronal field has been a major obstacle to the theoretical advancement of solar flare theory and prediction. The results have shown that the evolutional algorithm can be used to estimate coronal magnetic fields.

  20. Helicons in uniform fields. II. Poynting vector and angular momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    The orbital and spin angular momenta of helicon modes have been determined quantitatively from laboratory experiments. The current density is obtained unambiguously from three dimensional magnetic field measurements. The only approximation made is to obtain the electric field from Hall Ohm's law which is usually the case for low frequency whistler modes. This allows the evaluation of the Poynting vector from which the angular momentum is obtained. Comparing two helicon modes (m = 0 and m = 1), one can separate the contribution of angular momentum of a rotating and non-rotating wave field. The orbital angular momentum is important to assess the wave-particle interaction by the transverse Doppler shift of rotating waves which has not been considered so far.

  1. Observations of vector magnetic fields in flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jimin; Wang, Haimin; Zirin, Harold; Ai, Guoxiang

    1994-01-01

    We present vector magnetograph data of 6 active regions, all of which produced major flares. Of the 20 M-class (or above) flares, 7 satisfy the flare conditions prescribed by Hagyard (high shear and strong transverse fields). Strong photospheric shear, however, is not necessarily a condition for a flare. We find an increase in the shear for two flares, a 6-deg shear increase along the neutral line after a X-2 flare and a 13-deg increase after a M-1.9 flare. For other flares, we did not detect substantial shear changes.

  2. Impact of assimilation of INSAT cloud motion vector (CMV) wind for the prediction of a monsoon depression over Indian Ocean using a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, V. F.; Chandrasekar, A.; Singh, Devendra

    2006-12-01

    The present study utilized the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), to assimilate the INSAT-CMV (Indian National Satellite System-Cloud Motion Vector) wind observations using analysis nudging to improve the prediction of a monsoon depression which occurred over the Arabian Sea, India during 14 September 2005 to 17 September 2005. NCEP-FNL analysis has been utilized as the initial and lateral boundary conditions and two sets of numerical experiments were designed to reveal the impact of assimilation of satellite-derived winds. The model was integrated from 14 September 2005 00 UTC to 17 September 2005 00 UTC, with just the NCEP FNL analysis in the NOFDDA run. In the FDDA run, the NCEP FNL analysis fields were improved by assimilating the INSAT-CMV (wind speed and wind direction) as well as QuickSCAT sea surface winds during the 24 hour pre-forecast period (14 September 2005 00 UTC to 15 September 2005 00 UTC) using analysis nudging. The model was subsequently run in the free forecast mode from 15 September 2005 00 UTC to 17 September 2005 12 UTC. The simulated sea level pressure field from the NOFDDA run reveals a relatively stronger system as compared to the FDDA run. However, the sea level pressure fields corresponding to the FDDA run are closer to the analysis. The simulated lower tropospheric winds from both experiments reveal a well-developed cyclonic circulation as compared to the analysis.

  3. Investigation of aircraft landing in variable wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Reddy, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A digital simulation study is reported of the effects of gusts and wind shear on the approach and landing of aircraft. The gusts and wind shear are primarily those associated with wind fields created by surface wind passing around bluff geometries characteristic of buildings. Also, flight through a simple model of a thunderstorm is investigated. A two-dimensional model of aircraft motion was represented by a set of nonlinear equations which accounted for both spatial and temporal variations of winds. The landings of aircraft with the characteristics of a DC-8 and a DHC-6 were digitally simulated under different wind conditions with fixed and automatic controls. The resulting deviations in touchdown points and the controls that are required to maintain the desired flight path are presented. The presence of large bluff objects, such as buildings in the flight path is shown to have considerable effect on aircraft landings.

  4. Observed Structure and Characteristics of Cold Pools over Tropical Oceans using Vector Wind Retrievals and WRF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, P.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Lang, T. J.; Chronis, T.; Thayer, J. D.; Hence, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Cold pools generated in the wake of convective activity can enhance the surface sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, and also changes in evaporation out of, and fresh water flux into, the ocean. Recent studies have shown that over the open ocean, cold pool outflow boundaries and their intersections can organize and initiate a spectrum of deep convective clouds, which is a key driver of shallow and deep convection over conditionally-unstable tropical oceans. The primary goal of this study is to understand the structure and characteristics of cold pools over the tropical oceans using observations. With the idea that cold pools will have strong wind gradients at their boundaries, we use ASCAT vector wind retrievals. We identify regions of steep gradients in wind vectors as gradient features (GFs), akin to cold pools. Corresponding to these GFs, sensible and latent heat fluxes were calculated using the observed winds and background temperatures from MERRA-2 reanalysis. To evaluate the proposed technique, cold pools were observed using S-PolKa radar from the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign in the Indian Ocean for the period of 1 October 2011 to 31 March 2012 and were compared with ASCAT GFs. To relate the thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics of observed and simulated cold pools, simulations were carried out on WRF on a 3-km domain explicitly. The areas of cold pools were identified in the models using virtual temperature (Tv), which is a direct measure of air density, while GFs were identified using model simulated winds. Quantitative measures indicate that GFs are highly correspondent with model-simulated cold pools. In global measurements of cold pools from 2007-2015, it is possible to examine the characteristics of GFs across all tropical ocean basins, and relate them to meteorological conditions, as well as the characteristics of the parent precipitation systems. Our results indicate that while there is a general relationship between the amount of precipitation

  5. Numerical simulation of flow field in umbrella wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daorina, Bao; Xiaoxue, Wang; Wei, Shang; Yadong, Liu; Daorina, Bao; Xiaoxue, Wang; Wei, Shang; Yadong, Liu

    2018-05-01

    Umbrella wind turbine can control the swept area by adjusting the shrinking angle of the rotor so as to ensure that output power is near the rated value. This is very helpful for the utilization of wind energy in sandstorms and typhoon-prone areas of our country. In this paper, Fluent software is used to simulate the velocity field and pressure field of 5kW Umbrella Wind Turbine at 0° 45°and 60°angle of contraction. The results provide a theoretical basis for further improving the power adjustment mechanism of Umbrella Wind Turbines, At the same time, it also provide a reference for our country to perfect the wind energy utilization system about the typhoon environment in the coastal areas.

  6. Investigation on wind turbine wakes: wind tunnel tests and field experiments with LIDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo; Wu, Ting; Cöeffé, Juliette; Porté-Agel, Fernando; WIRE Team

    2011-11-01

    An investigation on the interaction between atmospheric boundary layer flow and wind turbines is carried out with wind tunnel and LIDAR measurements. The former were carried out using hot-wire anemometry and multi-hole pressure probes in the wake of a three-bladed miniature wind turbine. The wind turbine wake is characterized by a strong velocity defect in the proximity of the rotor, and its recovery is found to depend on the characteristics of the incoming atmospheric boundary layer (mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles). Field experiments were performed using three wind LIDARs. Bi-dimensional scans are performed in order to analyse the wake wind field with different atmospheric boundary layer conditions. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements with two or three LIDARs allow the reconstruction of multi-component velocity fields. Both LIDAR and wind tunnel measurements highlight an increased turbulence level at the wake boundary for heights comparable to the top-tip of the blades; this flow feature can produce dangerous fatigue loads on following wind turbines.

  7. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  8. Scaling up from field to region for wind erosion prediction using a field-scale wind erosion model and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobeck, T.M.; Parker, N.C.; Haskell, S.; Guoding, K.

    2000-01-01

    Factors that affect wind erosion such as surface vegetative and other cover, soil properties and surface roughness usually change spatially and temporally at the field-scale to produce important field-scale variations in wind erosion. Accurate estimation of wind erosion when scaling up from fields to regions, while maintaining meaningful field-scale process details, remains a challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a field-scale wind erosion model with a geographic information system (GIS) to scale up to regional levels and to quantify the differences in wind erosion estimates produced by different scales of soil mapping used as a data layer in the model. A GIS was used in combination with the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ), a field-scale wind erosion model, to estimate wind erosion for two 50 km2 areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery from 1993 with 30 m resolution was used as a base map. The GIS database layers included land use, soils, and other features such as roads. The major land use was agricultural fields. Data on 1993 crop management for selected fields of each crop type were collected from local government agency offices and used to 'train' the computer to classify land areas by crop and type of irrigation (agroecosystem) using commercially available software. The land area of the agricultural land uses was overestimated by 6.5% in one region (Lubbock County, TX, USA) and underestimated by about 21% in an adjacent region (Terry County, TX, USA). The total estimated wind erosion potential for Terry County was about four times that estimated for adjacent Lubbock County. The difference in potential erosion among the counties was attributed to regional differences in surface soil texture. In a comparison of different soil map scales in Terry County, the generalised soil map had over 20% more of the land area and over 15% greater erosion potential in loamy sand soils than did the detailed soil map. As

  9. Multiresolution and Explicit Methods for Vector Field Analysis and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, Gregory M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a request for a second renewal (3d year of funding) of a research project on the topic of multiresolution and explicit methods for vector field analysis and visualization. In this report, we describe the progress made on this research project during the second year and give a statement of the planned research for the third year. There are two aspects to this research project. The first is concerned with the development of techniques for computing tangent curves for use in visualizing flow fields. The second aspect of the research project is concerned with the development of multiresolution methods for curvilinear grids and their use as tools for visualization, analysis and archiving of flow data. We report on our work on the development of numerical methods for tangent curve computation first.

  10. NASA's GMAO Atmospheric Motion Vectors Simulator: Description and Application to the MISTiC Winds Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, David; McCarty, Will; Errico, Ron; Prive, Nikki

    2018-01-01

    An atmospheric wind vectors (AMVs) simulator was developed by NASA's GMAO to simulate observations from future satellite constellation concepts. The synthetic AMVs can then be used in OSSEs to estimate and quantify the potential added value of new observations to the present Earth observing system and, ultimately, the expected impact on the current weather forecasting skill. The GMAO AMV simulator is a tunable and flexible computer code that is able to simulate AMVs expected to be derived from different instruments and satellite orbit configurations. As a case study and example of the usefulness of this tool, the GMAO AMV simulator was used to simulate AMVs envisioned to be provided by the MISTiC Winds, a NASA mission concept consisting of a constellation of satellites equipped with infrared spectral midwave spectrometers, expected to provide high spatial and temporal resolution temperature and humidity soundings of the troposphere that can be used to derive AMVs from the tracking of clouds and water vapor features. The GMAO AMV simulator identifies trackable clouds and water vapor features in the G5NR and employs a probabilistic function to draw a subset of the identified trackable features. Before the simulator is applied to the MISTiC Winds concept, the simulator was calibrated to yield realistic observations counts and spatial distributions and validated considering as a proxy instrument to the MISTiC Winds the Himawari-8 Advanced Imager (AHI). The simulated AHI AMVs showed a close match with the real AHI AMVs in terms of observation counts and spatial distributions, showing that the GMAO AMVs simulator synthesizes AMVs observations with enough quality and realism to produce a response from the DAS equivalent to the one produced with real observations. When applied to the MISTiC Winds scanning points, it can be expected that the MISTiC Winds will be able to collect approximately 60,000 wind observations every 6 hours, if considering a constellation composed of

  11. Identification of wind fields for wave modeling near Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Sashikant; Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Due to the development of coastal and offshore infrastructure in and around the Arabian Gulf, a large semi-enclosed sea, knowledge of met-ocean factors like prevailing wind systems, wind generated waves, and currents etc. are of great importance. Primarily it is important to identify the wind fields that are used as forcing functions for wave and circulation models for hindcasting and forecasting purposes. The present study investigates the effects of using two sources of wind-fields on the modeling of wind-waves in the Arabian Gulf, in particular near the coastal regions of Qatar. Two wind sources are considered here, those obtained from ECMWF and those generated by us using the WRF model. The wave model SWAN was first forced with the 6 hourly ERA Interim daily winds (from ECMWF) having spatial resolution of 0.125°. For the second option, wind fields were generated by us using the mesoscale wind model (WRF) with a high spatial resolution (0.1°) at every 30 minute intervals. The simulations were carried out for a period of two months (7th October-7th December, 2015) during which measurements were available from two moored buoys (deployed and operated by the Qatar Meteorological Department), one in the north of Qatar ("Qatar North", in water depth of 58.7 m) and other in the south ("Shiraouh Island", in water depth of 16.64 m). This period included a high-sea event on 11-12th of October, recorded by the two buoys where the significant wave heights (Hs) reached as high as 2.9 m (i.e. max wave height H ~ 5.22 m) and 1.9 (max wave height H ~ 3.4 m) respectively. Model results were compared with the data for this period. The scatter index (SI) of the Hs simulated using the WRF wind fields and the observed Hs was found to be about 30% and 32% for the two buoys (total period). The observed Hs were generally reproduced but there was consistent underestimation. (Maximum 27% for the high-sea event). For the Hs obtained with ERA interim wind fields, the underestimation was

  12. Assessment of NOAA Processed OceanSat-2 Scatterometer Ocean Surface Vector Wind Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.; Jelenak, Z.; Soisuvarn, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) launched the Oceansat-2 satellite on 23 September 2009. Oceansat-2 carries a radar scatterometer instrument (OSCAT) capable of measuring ocean surface vector winds (OSVW) and an ocean color monitor (OCM), which will retrieve sea spectral reflectance. Oceansat-2 is ISRO's second in a series of satellites dedicated to ocean research. It will provide continuity to the services and applications of the Oceansat-1 OCM data along with additional data from a Ku-band pencil beam scatterometer. Oceansat-2 is a three-axis, body stabilized spacecraft placed into a near circular sun-synchronous orbit, at an altitude of 720 kilometers (km), with an equatorial crossing time of around 1200 hours. ISRO, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) share the common goal of optimizing the quality and maximizing the utility of the Oceansat-2 data for the benefit of future global and regional scientific and operational applications. NOAA, NASA and EUMETSAT have been collaboratively working with ISRO on the assessment and analysis of OSCAT data to help facilitate continuation of QuikSCAT's decade-long Ku-band scatterometer data record. NOAA's interests are focused on the utilization of OSCAT data to support operational weather forecasting and warning in the marine environment. OSCAT has the potential to significantly mitigate the loss of NASA's QuikSCAT, which has negatively impacted NOAA's marine forecasting and warning services. Since March 2011 NOAA has been receiving near real time OSCAT measurements via EumetSat. NOAA has developed its own OSCAT wind processor. This processor produces ocean surface vector winds with resolution of 25km. Performance of NOAA OSCAT product will and its availability to larger user community will be presented and discussed.

  13. Vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance spectrometer with field differential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaru, S.; Tsunegi, S.; Kubota, H.; Yuasa, S.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents a vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance (VNA-FMR) spectrometer with field differential detection. This technique differentiates the S-parameter by applying a small binary modulation field in addition to the DC bias field to the sample. By setting the modulation frequency sufficiently high, slow sensitivity fluctuations of the VNA, i.e., low-frequency components of the trace noise, which limit the signal-to-noise ratio of the conventional VNA-FMR spectrometer, can be effectively removed, resulting in a very clean FMR signal. This paper presents the details of the hardware implementation and measurement sequence as well as the data processing and analysis algorithms tailored for the FMR spectrum obtained with this technique. Because the VNA measures a complex S-parameter, it is possible to estimate the Gilbert damping parameter from the slope of the phase variation of the S-parameter with respect to the bias field. We show that this algorithm is more robust against noise than the conventional algorithm based on the linewidth.

  14. Differences in simulated fire spread over Askervein Hill using two advanced wind models and a traditional uniform wind field

    Treesearch

    Jason Forthofer; Bret Butler

    2007-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and a mass-consistent model were used to simulate winds on simulated fire spread over a simple, low hill. The results suggest that the CFD wind field could significantly change simulated fire spread compared to traditional uniform winds. The CFD fire spread case may match reality better because the winds used in the fire...

  15. Field test of an autonomous wind-diesel power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, A.; Knoebel, U.; Ruckert, W.

    1985-09-01

    An autonomous power plant composed of a wind energy converter and a diesel generator was tested in laboratory and in the field to assess the wind energy supply as a noninfluenceable parameter in the regulation of the mono and bivalent operation of the power plant, for control of the dynamic behavior of the electrical components, for tuning of the regulation expenditure with comfort requirements, and for model evaluation of energy cost analysis. The interaction between meteorological, technical, economic and energy policy aspects was assessed. The relationship between economical use and comfort limits technical improvement. Development of the concept of a bivalent power supply with wind and diesel is recommended.

  16. Random function representation of stationary stochastic vector processes for probability density evolution analysis of wind-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhangjun; Liu, Zenghui

    2018-06-01

    This paper develops a hybrid approach of spectral representation and random function for simulating stationary stochastic vector processes. In the proposed approach, the high-dimensional random variables, included in the original spectral representation (OSR) formula, could be effectively reduced to only two elementary random variables by introducing the random functions that serve as random constraints. Based on this, a satisfactory simulation accuracy can be guaranteed by selecting a small representative point set of the elementary random variables. The probability information of the stochastic excitations can be fully emerged through just several hundred of sample functions generated by the proposed approach. Therefore, combined with the probability density evolution method (PDEM), it could be able to implement dynamic response analysis and reliability assessment of engineering structures. For illustrative purposes, a stochastic turbulence wind velocity field acting on a frame-shear-wall structure is simulated by constructing three types of random functions to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach. Careful and in-depth studies concerning the probability density evolution analysis of the wind-induced structure have been conducted so as to better illustrate the application prospects of the proposed approach. Numerical examples also show that the proposed approach possesses a good robustness.

  17. Binary stellar winds. [flow and magnetic field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Heinemann, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Stellar winds from a binary star pair will interact with each other along a contact discontinuity. We discuss qualitatively the geometry of the flow and field resulting from this interaction in the simplest case where the stars and winds are identical. We consider the shape of the critical surface (defined as the surface where the flow speed is equal to the sound speed) as a function of stellar separation and the role of shock waves in the flow field. The effect of stellar spin and magnetic sectors on the field configuration is given. The relative roles of mass loss and magnetic torque in the evolution of orbital parameters is discussed.

  18. Binary stellar winds. [flow and magnetic field interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Heinemann, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Stellar winds from a binary star will interact with each other along a contact discontinuity. We discuss qualitatively the geometry of the flow and field resulting from this interaction in the simplest case where the stars and winds are identical. We consider the shape of the critical surface (defined as the surface where the flow speed is equal to the sound speed) as a function of stellar separation and the role of shock waves in the flow field. The effect of stellar spin and magnetic sectors on the field configuration is given. The relative roles of mass loss and magnetic torque in the evolution of orbital parameters are discussed.

  19. Evaluating winds aloft by a simplified field technique

    Treesearch

    Melvin K. Hull

    1966-01-01

    A field technique for evaluating winds aloft is described. It can be used at remote places--even at the site of a wildfire. It has proved accurate as any known single theodolite technique, and is time-saving because the winds aloft are evaluated in miles per hour from direct readout. The tools required are much lower in cost, more portable, and more multi-purpose than...

  20. Lovelock vacua with a recurrent null vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-02-01

    Vacuum solutions of Lovelock gravity in the presence of a recurrent null vector field (a subset of Kundt spacetimes) are studied. We first discuss the general field equations, which constrain both the base space and the profile functions. While choosing a "generic" base space puts stronger constraints on the profile, in special cases there also exist solutions containing arbitrary functions (at least for certain values of the coupling constants). These and other properties (such as the p p - waves subclass and the overlap with VSI, CSI and universal spacetimes) are subsequently analyzed in more detail in lower dimensions n =5 , 6 as well as for particular choices of the base manifold. The obtained solutions describe various classes of nonexpanding gravitational waves propagating, e.g., in Nariai-like backgrounds M2×Σn -2. An Appendix contains some results about general (i.e., not necessarily Kundt) Lovelock vacua of Riemann type III/N and of Weyl and traceless-Ricci type III/N. For example, it is pointed out that for theories admitting a triply degenerate maximally symmetric vacuum, all the (reduced) field equations are satisfied identically, giving rise to large classes of exact solutions.

  1. Wind Field Extractions from SAR Sentinel-1 Images Using Electromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Tran Vu; Khenchaf, Ali; Comblet, Fabrice; Nahum, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Among available wind sources, i.e. measured data, numeric weather models, the retrieval of wind vectors from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data / images is particularly preferred due to a lot of SAR systems (available data in most meteorological conditions, revisit mode, high resolution, etc.). For this purpose, the retrieval of wind vectors is principally based on the empirical (EP) models, e.g. CMOD series in C-band. Little studies have been reported about the use of the electromagnetic (EM) models for wind vector retrieval, since it is quite complicated to invert. However, the EM models can be applied for most cases of polarization, frequency and wind regime. In order to evaluate the advantages and limits of the EM models for wind vector retrieval, we compare in this study estimated results by the EM and EP models for both cases of polarization (vertical-vertical, or VV-pol and horizontal- horizontal, or HH-pol).

  2. A link between torse-forming vector fields and rotational hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bang-Yen; Verstraelen, Leopold

    Torse-forming vector fields introduced by Yano [On torse forming direction in a Riemannian space, Proc. Imp. Acad. Tokyo 20 (1944) 340-346] are natural extension of concurrent and concircular vector fields. Such vector fields have many nice applications to geometry and mathematical physics. In this paper, we establish a link between rotational hypersurfaces and torse-forming vector fields. More precisely, our main result states that, for a hypersurface M of 𝔼n+1 with n ≥ 3, the tangential component xT of the position vector field of M is a proper torse-forming vector field on M if and only if M is contained in a rotational hypersurface whose axis of rotation contains the origin.

  3. Kinetic Interactions Between the Solar Wind and Lunar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Fatemi, S.; Turner, D. L.; Holmstrom, M.

    2016-12-01

    Despite their relatively weak strength, small scale, and incoherence, lunar magnetic anomalies can affect the incoming solar wind flow. The plasma interaction with lunar magnetic fields drives significant compressions of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field, deflections of the incoming flow, and a host of plasma waves ranging from the ULF to the electrostatic range. Recent work suggests that the large-scale features of the solar wind-magnetic anomaly interactions may be driven by ion-ion instabilities excited by reflected ions, raising the possibility that they are analogous to ion foreshock phenomena. Indeed, despite their small scale, many of the phenomena observed near lunar magnetic anomalies appear to have analogues in the foreshock regions of terrestrial planets. We discuss the charged particle distributions, fields, and waves observed near lunar magnetic anomalies, and place them in a context with the foreshocks of the Earth, Mars, and other solar system objects.

  4. Scaling Characteristics of Mesoscale Wind Fields in the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Implications for Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliyanpilakkil, Velayudhan Praju

    Atmospheric motions take place in spatial scales of sub-millimeters to few thousands of kilometers with temporal changes in the atmospheric variables occur in fractions of seconds to several years. Consequently, the variations in atmospheric kinetic energy associated with these atmospheric motions span over a broad spectrum of space and time. The mesoscale region acts as an energy transferring regime between the energy generating synoptic scale and the energy dissipating microscale. Therefore, the scaling characterizations of mesoscale wind fields are significant in the accurate estimation of the atmospheric energy budget. Moreover, the precise knowledge of the scaling characteristics of atmospheric mesoscale wind fields is important for the validation of the numerical models those focus on wind forecasting, dispersion, diffusion, horizontal transport, and optical turbulence. For these reasons, extensive studies have been conducted in the past to characterize the mesoscale wind fields. Nevertheless, the majority of these studies focused on near-surface and upper atmosphere mesoscale regimes. The present study attempt to identify the existence and to quantify the scaling of mesoscale wind fields in the lower atmospheric boundary layer (ABL; in the wind turbine layer) using wind observations from various research-grade instruments (e.g., sodars, anemometers). The scaling characteristics of the mesoscale wind speeds over diverse homogeneous flat terrains, conducted using structure function based analysis, revealed an altitudinal dependence of the scaling exponents. This altitudinal dependence of the wind speed scaling may be attributed to the buoyancy forcing. Subsequently, we use the framework of extended self-similarity (ESS) to characterize the observed scaling behavior. In the ESS framework, the relative scaling exponents of the mesoscale atmospheric boundary layer wind speed exhibit quasi-universal behavior; even far beyond the inertial range of turbulence (Delta

  5. Correlation between solar flare productivity and photospheric vector magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanmei; Wang, Huaning

    2008-11-01

    Studying the statistical correlation between the solar flare productivity and photospheric magnetic fields is very important and necessary. It is helpful to set up a practical flare forecast model based on magnetic properties and improve the physical understanding of solar flare eruptions. In the previous study ([Cui, Y.M., Li, R., Zhang, L.Y., He, Y.L., Wang, H.N. Correlation between solar flare productivity and photospheric magnetic field properties 1. Maximum horizontal gradient, length of neutral line, number of singular points. Sol. Phys. 237, 45 59, 2006]; from now on we refer to this paper as ‘Paper I’), three measures of the maximum horizontal gradient, the length of the neutral line, and the number of singular points are computed from 23990 SOHO/MDI longitudinal magnetograms. The statistical relationship between the solar flare productivity and these three measures is well fitted with sigmoid functions. In the current work, the three measures of the length of strong-shear neutral line, total unsigned current, and total unsigned current helicity are computed from 1353 vector magnetograms observed at Huairou Solar Observing Station. The relationship between the solar flare productivity and the current three measures can also be well fitted with sigmoid functions. These results are expected to be beneficial to future operational flare forecasting models.

  6. Coronal Magnetic Field Topology and Source of Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Sittler, E.; Fisher, R.; McComas, D.; Thompson, B.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a steady state, 2D semi-empirical MHD model of the solar corona and the solar wind with many surprising results. This model for the first time shows, that the boundary between the fast and the slow solar wind as observed by Ulysses beyond 1 AU, is established in the low corona. The fastest wind observed by Ulysses (680-780 km/s) originates from the polar coronal holes at 70 -90 deg. latitude at the Sun. Rapidly diverging magnetic field geometry accounts for the fast wind reaching down to a latitude of +/- 30 deg. at the orbit of Earth. The gradual increase in the fast wind observed by Ulysses, with latitude, can be explained by an increasing field strength towards the poles, which causes Alfven wave energy flux to increase towards the poles. Empirically, there is a direct relationship between this gradual increase in wind speed and the expansion factor, f, computed at r greater than 20%. This relationship is inverse if f is computed very close to the Sun.

  7. Estimation of Discontinuous Displacement Vector Fields with the Minimum Description Length Criterion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    type of approach for finding a dense displacement vector field has a time complexity that allows a real - time implementation when an appropriate control...hardly vector fields as they appear in Stereo or motion. The reason for this is the fact that local displacement vector field ( DVF ) esti- mates bave...2 objects’ motion, but that the quantitative optical flow is not a reliable measure of the real motion [VP87, SU87]. This applies even more to the

  8. Provisionally corrected surface wind data, worldwide ocean-atmosphere surface fields, and Sahelian rainfall variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.N.

    Worldwide ship datasets of sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure (SLP), and surface vector wind are analyzed for a July-September composite of five Sahelian wet years (1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1958) minus five Sahelian dry years (1972, 1973, 1982, 1983, 1984) (W - D). The results are compared with fields for a number of individual years and for 1988 minus 1987 (88 - 87); Sahelian rainfall in 1988 was near the 1951-80 normal, whereas 1987 was very dry. An extensive study of the geostrophic consistency of trends in pressure gradients and observed wind was undertaken. The results suggest, duringmore » the period 1949-88, a mean increase in reported wind speed of about 16% that cannot be explained by trends in geostrophic winds derived from seasonal mean SLP. Estimates of the wind bias are averaged for 18 ocean regions. A map of correlations between Sahelian rainfall and SLP in all available ocean regions is shown to be field significant. Remote atmospheric associations with Sahelian rainfall are consistent with recent suggestions that SST forcing from the tropical Atlantic and the other ocean basins may contribute to variability in seasonal Sahelian rainfall. It is suggested that wetter years in the Sahel are often accompanied by a stronger surface monsoonal flow over the western Indian Ocean and low SLP in the tropical western Pacific near New Guinea, and that there is increased cyclonicity over the extratropical eastern North Atlantic and northwest Europe. In the tropical Atlantic, W - D shows many of the features identified by previous authors. However, the 88-87 fields do not reflect these large-scale tropical Atlantic changes. Instead there is only local strengthening of the pressure gradient and wind flow from Brazil to Senegal. Further individual years are presented (1958, 1972, 1975) to provide specific examples.« less

  9. Drift studies--comparison of field and wind tunnel experiments.

    PubMed

    Stadler, R; Regenauer, W

    2005-01-01

    Drift at pesticide application leads to a pollution of non-target crops, non-target species and surface water. Spray drift is influenced by many factors like environmental conditions, vegetation, technical conditions, and physical properties of the tank mixes and influenced by Chemicals. Field experiments to characterise spray drift effects with the risk of permanent changing weather conditions can be supported by wind tunnel experiments. Wind tunnel experiments do not lead to the same soil deposition curves like field experiments, but the ratio of drift reduction potential is comparable.

  10. Manipulation of dielectric Rayleigh particles using highly focused elliptically polarized vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Xu, Danfeng; Rui, Guanghao; Lian, Meng; Cui, Yiping; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-09-20

    Generation of vectorial optical fields with arbitrary polarization distribution is of great interest in areas where exotic optical fields are desired. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate the versatile generation of linearly polarized vector fields, elliptically polarized vector fields, and circularly polarized vortex beams through introducing attenuators in a common-path interferometer. By means of Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction method, the characteristics of the highly focused elliptically polarized vector fields are studied. The optical force and torque on a dielectric Rayleigh particle produced by these tightly focused vector fields are calculated and exploited for the stable trapping of dielectric Rayleigh particles. It is shown that the additional degree of freedom provided by the elliptically polarized vector field allows one to control the spatial structure of polarization, to engineer the focusing field, and to tailor the optical force and torque on a dielectric Rayleigh particle.

  11. Research on wind field algorithm of wind lidar based on BP neural network and grey prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Chun-Li; Luo, Xiong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Ze-hou; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Xiao-ding; Wang, Lei

    2018-01-01

    This paper uses the BP neural network and grey algorithm to forecast and study radar wind field. In order to reduce the residual error in the wind field prediction which uses BP neural network and grey algorithm, calculating the minimum value of residual error function, adopting the residuals of the gray algorithm trained by BP neural network, using the trained network model to forecast the residual sequence, using the predicted residual error sequence to modify the forecast sequence of the grey algorithm. The test data show that using the grey algorithm modified by BP neural network can effectively reduce the residual value and improve the prediction precision.

  12. A pseudoinverse deformation vector field generator and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Yan, C.; Zhong, H.; Murphy, M.; Weiss, E.; Siebers, J. V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present, implement, and test a self-consistent pseudoinverse displacement vector field (PIDVF) generator, which preserves the location of information mapped back-and-forth between image sets. Methods: The algorithm is an iterative scheme based on nearest neighbor interpolation and a subsequent iterative search. Performance of the algorithm is benchmarked using a lung 4DCT data set with six CT images from different breathing phases and eight CT images for a single prostrate patient acquired on different days. A diffeomorphic deformable image registration is used to validate our PIDVFs. Additionally, the PIDVF is used to measure the self-consistency of two nondiffeomorphic algorithms which do not use a self-consistency constraint: The ITK Demons algorithm for the lung patient images and an in-house B-Spline algorithm for the prostate patient images. Both Demons and B-Spline have been QAed through contour comparison. Self-consistency is determined by using a DIR to generate a displacement vector field (DVF) between reference image R and study image S (DVFR–S). The same DIR is used to generate DVFS–R. Additionally, our PIDVF generator is used to create PIDVFS–R. Back-and-forth mapping of a set of points (used as surrogates of contours) using DVFR–S and DVFS–R is compared to back-and-forth mapping performed with DVFR–S and PIDVFS–R. The Euclidean distances between the original unmapped points and the mapped points are used as a self-consistency measure. Results: Test results demonstrate that the consistency error observed in back-and-forth mappings can be reduced two to nine times in point mapping and 1.5 to three times in dose mapping when the PIDVF is used in place of the B-Spline algorithm. These self-consistency improvements are not affected by the exchanging of R and S. It is also demonstrated that differences between DVFS–R and PIDVFS–R can be used as a criteria to check the quality of the DVF. Conclusions: Use of DVF and its PIDVF

  13. Multifractal Analysis of Velocity Vector Fields and a Continuous In-Scale Cascade Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitton, G.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-04-01

    the order of 1.5 for all three components. Given we have only the horizontal wind components over a grid for the Germany dataset the comparable probability distributions of horizontal and vertical velocity increments shows the field is isotropic. The Germany dataset allows us to compare the spatial velocity increments with that of the temporal. We briefly mentioned above that the winds in Corsica were subject to vertical forcing effects over large scales. This means the velocity field scaled as 11/5 i.e. Bolgiano-Obukhov instead of Kolmogorov's. To test this we were required to invoke Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis since the data was a one point measurement. Having vertical and horizontal velocity increments means we can further justify the claims of an 11/5 scaling law for vertical shears of the velocity and test the validity of the Taylor's hypothesis. We used the results to first simulate the velocity components using continuous in-scale cascades and then discuss the reconstruction of the full vector fields.

  14. Using Fluid Dynamics and Field Experiments to Improve Vehicle-based Wind Measurements for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, T.; Bourlon, E.; Jensen, N.; Risk, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Vehicle-based measurements of wind speed and direction are presently used for a range of applications, including gas plume detection. Theoretically, vehicle-based measurements could also be integrated with fixed-site measurements to add spatial richness in weather and atmospheric observing systems, but the quality and accuracy of such measurements is currently not well understood. Our research objective for this field-simulation study was to understand how anemometer placement and the vehicle's external air flow field affect measurement accuracy of vehicle-mounted anemometers. We used a truck-mounted anemometer to investigate wind measurements at different vehicle speeds and anemometer placements. We conducted field tests on a square 3.2 km route in flat, treeless terrain and positioned stationary sonic anemometers at each corner. We drove the route in replicate under varying wind conditions and vehicle speeds, and with multiple sonic anemometer placements on the vehicle. The vehicle-based anemometer measurements were corrected to remove the vehicle speed and course vector. In the lab, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations were generated in Ansys FLUENT to model the external flow fields at the locations of measurement under varying vehicle speed and yaw angle. In field trials we observed that vehicle-based measurements differed from stationary measurements by a different magnitude in each of the upwind, downwind and crosswind directions. The difference from stationary anemometers increased with vehicle speed, suggesting the vehicle's flow field does indeed impact the accuracy of vehicle-based anemometer measurements. We used the CFD simulations to develop a quantitative understanding of fluid flow around the vehicle, and to develop speed-based corrections that were applied to the field data. We were also able to make recommendations for anemometer placement. This study demonstrates the importance of applying aerodynamics-based correction factors to vehicle

  15. Retrieving current and wind vectors from ATI SAR data: airborne evidence and inversion strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Adrien; Gommenginger, Christine; Chapron, Bertrand; Marquez, José; Doody, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Conventional and along-track interferometric (ATI) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sense the motion of the ocean surface by measuring the Doppler shift of reflected signals. Together with the water displacement associated with ocean currents, the SAR measurements are also affected by a Wind-wave induced Artefact Surface Velocity (WASV) caused by the velocity of Bragg scatterers and the orbital velocity of ocean surface gravity waves. The WASV has been modelled theoretically in past studies but has been estimated empirically only once using Envisat ASAR. Here we propose, firstly, to evaluate this WASV from airborne ATI SAR data, secondly, to validate the airborne retrieved surface current after correction of the WASV against HF radar measurements and thirdly to examine the best inversion strategy for a an Ocean Surface Current (OSC) satellite mission to retrieve accurately both the ocean surface current vector (OSCV) and the wind vector in the frame of an OSC satellite mission. The airborne ATI SAR data were acquired in the tidally dominated Irish Sea using a Wavemill-type dual-beam SAR interferometer. A comprehensive collection of airborne Wavemill data acquired in a star pattern over a well-instrumented site made it possible to estimate the magnitude and dependence on azimuth and incidence angle of the WASV. The airborne results compare favourably with those reported for Envisat ASAR, empirical model, which has been used to correct for it. Validation of the current retrieval capabilities of the proof-of-concept has been conducted against HF radar giving a precisions typically better than 0.1 m/s for surface current speed and 7° for direction. Comparisons with POLCOMS (1.8 km) indicate that the model reproduces well the overall temporal evolution but does not capture the high spatial variability of ocean surface currents at the maximum ebb flow. Airborne retrieved currents highlight a short-scale spatial variability up to 100m related to bathymetry channels, which

  16. ACHIEVING CONSISTENT DOPPLER MEASUREMENTS FROM SDO /HMI VECTOR FIELD INVERSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, Peter W.; Antiochos, S. K.; Leka, K. D.

    NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory is delivering vector magnetic field observations of the full solar disk with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution; however, the satellite is in a highly inclined geosynchronous orbit. The relative spacecraft–Sun velocity varies by ±3 km s{sup −1} over a day, which introduces major orbital artifacts in the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. We demonstrate that the orbital artifacts contaminate all spatial and temporal scales in the data. We describe a newly developed three-stage procedure for mitigating these artifacts in the Doppler data obtained from the Milne–Eddington inversions in the HMI pipeline. The procedure ultimately uses 32more » velocity-dependent coefficients to adjust 10 million pixels—a remarkably sparse correction model given the complexity of the orbital artifacts. This procedure was applied to full-disk images of AR 11084 to produce consistent Dopplergrams. The data adjustments reduce the power in the orbital artifacts by 31 dB. Furthermore, we analyze in detail the corrected images and show that our procedure greatly improves the temporal and spectral properties of the data without adding any new artifacts. We conclude that this new procedure makes a dramatic improvement in the consistency of the HMI data and in its usefulness for precision scientific studies.« less

  17. Efficient Low-Speed Flight in a Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    A new software tool was needed for flight planning of a high altitude, low speed unmanned aerial vehicle which would be flying in winds close to the actual airspeed of the vehicle. An energy modeled NLP (non-linear programming) formulation was used to obtain results for a variety of missions and wind profiles. The energy constraint derived included terms due to the wind field and the performance index was a weighted combination of the amount of fuel used and the final time. With no emphasis on time and with no winds the vehicle was found to fly at maximum lift to drag velocity, V(sub md). When flying in tail winds the velocity was less than V(sub md), while flying in head winds the velocity was higher than V(sub md). A family of solutions was found with varying times of flight and varying fuel amounts consumed which will aid the operator in choosing a flight plan depending on a desired landing time. At certain parts of the flight, the turning terms in the energy constraint equation were found to be significant. An analysis of a simpler vertical plane cruise optimal control problem was used to explain some of the characteristics of the vertical plane NLP results.

  18. Counterstreaming solar wind halo electron events on open field lines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Mccomas, D. J.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Counterstreaming solar wind halo electron events have been identified as a common 1 AU signature of coronal mass ejection events, and have generally been interpreted as indicative of closed magnetic field topologies, i.e., magnetic loops or flux ropes rooted at both ends in the Sun, or detached plasmoids. In this paper we examine the possibility that these events may instead occur preferentially on open field lines, and that counterstreaming results from reflection or injection behind interplanetary shocks or from mirroring from regions of compressed magnetic field farther out in the heliosphere. We conclude that neither of these suggested sources of counterstreaming electron beams is viable and that the best interpretation of observed counterstreaming electron events in the solar wind remains that of passage of closed field structures.

  19. Massive star winds interacting with magnetic fields on various scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Uraz, A.; Petit, V.; Erba, C.; Fullerton, A.; Walborn, N.; MacInnis, R.

    2018-01-01

    One of the defining processes which govern massive star evolution is their continuous mass loss via dense, supersonic line-driven winds. In the case of those OB stars which also host a surface magnetic field, the interaction between that field and the ionized outflow leads to complex circumstellar structures known as magnetospheres. In this contribution, we review recent developments in the field of massive star magnetospheres, including current efforts to characterize the largest magnetosphere surrounding an O star: that of NGC 1624-2. We also discuss the potential of the "analytic dynamical magnetosphere" (ADM) model to interpret multi-wavelength observations. Finally, we examine the possible effects of — heretofore undetected — small-scale magnetic fields on massive star winds and compare their hypothetical consequences to existing, unexplained observations.

  20. Ocean wind field measurement performance of the ERS-1 scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans, P.; Schuessler, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Active Microwave Instrumentation (AMI), which will be implemented on the ERS-1, is a 5.3 GHz multipurpose radar for land surface imaging, ocean wave spectrum measurement and wind observations over oceans. The imaging and wave measurements apply Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques, while wind field detection is performed by the Scatterometer as part of the AMI. The Scatterometer system design was developed and optimized with the aid of a performance simulator. This paper, aimed at giving an overview, is presented about the: (1) ERS-1 Scatterometer system design; (2) Error budget; and the (3) Overall calibration concept.

  1. Two-component wind fields over ocean waves using atmospheric lidar and motion estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical models, such as large eddy simulations, are capable of providing stunning visualizations of the air-sea interface. One reason for this is the inherent spatial nature of such models. As compute power grows, models are able to provide higher resolution visualizations over larger domains revealing intricate details of the interactions of ocean waves and the airflow over them. Spatial observations on the other hand, which are necessary to validate the simulations, appear to lag behind models. The rough ocean environment of the real world is an additional challenge. One method of providing spatial observations of fluid flow is that of particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV has been successfully applied to many problems in engineering and the geosciences. This presentation will show recent research results that demonstate that a PIV-style approach using pulsed-fiber atmospheric elastic backscatter lidar hardware and wavelet-based optical flow motion estimation software can reveal two-component wind fields over rough ocean surfaces. Namely, a recently-developed compact lidar was deployed for 10 days in March of 2015 in the Eureka, California area. It scanned over the ocean. Imagery reveal that breaking ocean waves provide copius amounts of particulate matter for the lidar to detect and for the motion estimation algorithms to retrieve wind vectors from. The image below shows two examples of results from the experiment. The left panel shows the elastic backscatter intensity (copper shades) under a field of vectors that was retrieved by the wavelet-based optical flow algorithm from two scans that took about 15 s each to acquire. The vectors, that reveal offshore flow toward the NW, were decimated for clarity. The bright aerosol features along the right edge of the sector scan were caused by ocean waves breaking on the beach. The right panel is the result of scanning over the ocean on a day when wave amplitudes ranged from 8-12 feet and whitecaps offshore beyond the

  2. Vector velocity profiles of the solar wind within expanding magnetic clouds at 1 AU: Some surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D.; Ferguson, T.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    We investigated the average vector velocity profile of 36 carefully chosen WIND interplanetary magnetic clouds occurring over about a 7 year period since spacecraft launch, to see if a differential pattern of solar wind flow exists. Particular cases were chosen of clouds whose axes were generally within 45 degrees of the ecliptic plane and of relatively well determined characteristics obtained from cloud-parameter (cylindrically symmetric force free) fitting. This study was motivated by the desire to understand the manner in which magnetic clouds expand, a well know phenomenon revealed by most cloud speed-profiles at 1 AU. One unexpected and major result was that, even though cloud expansion was confirmed, it was primarily along the Xgse axis; i.e., neither the Ygse or Zgse velocity components reveal any noteworthy pattern. After splitting the full set of clouds into a north-passing set (spacecraft passing above the cloud, where Nn = 21) and south-passing set (Ns = 15), to study the plasma expansion of the clouds with respect to the position of the observer, it was seen that the Xgse component of velocity differs for these two sets in a rather uniform and measurable way for most of the average cloud's extent. This does not appear to be the case for the Ygse or Zgse velocity components where little measurable differences exists, and clearly no pattern, across the average cloud between the north and south positions. It is not clear why such a remarkably non-axisymmetric plasma flow pattern within the "average magnetic cloud" at 1 AU should exist. The study continues from the perspective of magnetic cloud coordinate representation. ~ ~ ~

  3. Discovering and understanding the vector field using simulation in android app

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, A.; Muliyati, D.

    2018-05-01

    An understanding of vector field’s concepts are fundamental parts of the electrodynamics course. In this paper, we use a simple simulation that can be used to show qualitative imaging results as a variation of the vector field. Android application packages the simulation with consideration of the efficiency of use during the lecture. In addition, this simulation also trying to cover the divergences and curl concepts from the same conditions that students have a complete understanding and can distinguish concepts that have been described only mathematically. This simulation is designed to show the relationship between the field magnitude and its potential. This application can show vector field simulations in various conditions that help to improve students’ understanding of vector field concepts and their relation to particle existence around the field vector.

  4. Prediction of the far field noise from wind energy farms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic physical factors involved in making predictions of wind turbine noise and an approach which allows for differences in the machines, the wind energy farm configurations and propagation conditions are reviewed. Example calculations to illustrate the sensitivity of the radiated noise to such variables as machine size, spacing and numbers, and such atmosphere variables as absorption and wind direction are presented. It is found that calculated far field distances to particular sound level contours are greater for lower values of atmospheric absorption, for a larger total number of machines, for additional rows of machines and for more powerful machines. At short and intermediate distances, higher sound pressure levels are calculated for closer machine spacings, for more powerful machines, for longer row lengths and for closer row spacings.

  5. Multiresolution and Explicit Methods for Vector Field Analysis and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    We first report on our current progress in the area of explicit methods for tangent curve computation. The basic idea of this method is to decompose the domain into a collection of triangles (or tetrahedra) and assume linear variation of the vector field over each cell. With this assumption, the equations which define a tangent curve become a system of linear, constant coefficient ODE's which can be solved explicitly. There are five different representation of the solution depending on the eigenvalues of the Jacobian. The analysis of these five cases is somewhat similar to the phase plane analysis often associate with critical point classification within the context of topological methods, but it is not exactly the same. There are some critical differences. Moving from one cell to the next as a tangent curve is tracked, requires the computation of the exit point which is an intersection of the solution of the constant coefficient ODE and the edge of a triangle. There are two possible approaches to this root computation problem. We can express the tangent curve into parametric form and substitute into an implicit form for the edge or we can express the edge in parametric form and substitute in an implicit form of the tangent curve. Normally the solution of a system of ODE's is given in parametric form and so the first approach is the most accessible and straightforward. The second approach requires the 'implicitization' of these parametric curves. The implicitization of parametric curves can often be rather difficult, but in this case we have been successful and have been able to develop algorithms and subsequent computer programs for both approaches. We will give these details along with some comparisons in a forthcoming research paper on this topic.

  6. Field evaluation of remote wind sensing technologies: Shore-based and buoy mounted LIDAR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Herrington, Thomas

    retrieve accurate wind vectors in the marine environment over large sampling ranges (10 to 12 km) and varying atmospheric aerosol levels. Atmospheric conditions and aerosol content within the coastal ocean region of the Mid-Atlantic seaboard of the US can vary significantly over short time periods in response to frontal passages and extratropical and tropical low pressure system passage offshore of the coast. Since aerosols provide the scattering medium for the determination of LIDAR Doppler shifts in the atmosphere the accuracy and range of LIDAR derived velocity measurements as a function of variation in aerosol content in the marine environment is a key research question to be addressed. In phase 1, it is desired to capture as much variation in atmospheric conditions and aerosol content as possible. To this end, collocated measurements of LIDAR and standard anemometer wind fields will be captured by the project PIs over all four seasons and during specific events (e.g., coastal low pressure system passage) in year 1. Additionally, since the meteorological masts are permanent structures, additional events can be captured over the three year duration of the field research project. All research instruments are owned by Fishermen’s Energy and made available to the PIs though a lease agreement as part of the DOE grant. Energy Fishermen’s Energy will be responsible for the operation and maintenance of the scanning LIDAR and met mast anemometers. On a daily basis, environmental data and systems performance indicators will be transmitted from each measurement station to the Fishermen’s project team consisting of both in-house personnel and equipment manufacturer engineers. Data sets include compiled LIDAR files as well as data sets from ancillary sensors. Diagnostic parameters to be monitored include standard deviations of measured values, battery levels and charging systems output, and the operational status. Once data have been confirmed as complete and reliable, files

  7. Magnetic field of jupiter and its interaction with the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Davis, L; Jones, D E; Colburn, D S; Coleman, P J; Dyal, P; Sonett, C P

    1974-01-25

    Jupiter's magnetic field and its interaction with the magnetized solar wind were observed with the Pioneer 10 vector helium magnetometer. The magnetic dipole is directed opposite to that of the earth with a moment of 4.0 gauss R(J)(3) (R(J), Jupiter radius), and an inclination of 15 degrees lying in a system III meridian of 230 degrees . The dipole is offset about 0.1 R(J) north of the equatorial plane and about 0.2 R(J) toward longitude 170 degrees . There is severe stretching of the planetary field parallel to the equator throughout the outer magnetosphere, accompanied by a systematic departure from meridian planes. The field configuration implies substantial plasma effects inside the magnetosphere, such as thermal pressure, centrifugal forces, and differential rotation. As at the earth, the outer boundary is thin, nor diffuse, and there is a detached bow shock.

  8. Analysis of the Viking Lander 1 surface wind vector for sols 45 to 375

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leovy, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    The Viking Lander 1 wind sensor data during the period between sols 45 and 375 were corrected. During this period, the heating element of the quadrant sensor which provided the primary signal used for determining wind direction had failed, but both hot film wind sensors were functioning normally. The wind speed and direction corrections are explained.

  9. Field Test of Wake Steering at an Offshore Wind Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Paul; Annoni, Jennifer; Shah, Jigar J.

    In this paper, a field test of wake steering control is presented. The field test is the result of a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Envision Energy, a smart energy management company and turbine manufacturer. In the campaign, an array of turbines within an operating commercial offshore wind farm in China have the normal yaw controller modified to implement wake steering according to a yaw control strategy. The strategy was designed using NREL wind farm models, including a computational fluid dynamics model, SOWFA, for understanding wake dynamics and an engineering model, FLORIS, for yaw control optimization.more » Results indicate that, within the certainty afforded by the data, the wake-steering controller was successful in increasing power capture, by amounts similar to those predicted from the models.« less

  10. Doppler lidar for measurement of atmospheric wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of wind fields in the earth's troposphere with daily global coverage is widely considered as a significant advance for forecasting and transport studies. For optimal use by NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) models the horizontal and vertical resolutions should be approximately 100 km and 1 km, respectively. For boundary layer studies vertical resolution of a few hundred meters seems essential. Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar has a unique capability to measure global winds in the troposphere with the high vertical resolution required. The lidar approach depends on transmission of pulses with high spectral purity and backscattering from the atmospheric aerosol particles or layered clouds to provide a return signal. Recent field measurement campaigns using NASA research aircraft have resulted in collection of aerosol and cloud data which can be used to optimize the Doppler lidar instrument design and measurement strategy.

  11. Field Test of Wake Steering at an Offshore Wind Farm

    DOE PAGES

    Fleming, Paul; Annoni, Jennifer; Shah, Jigar J.; ...

    2017-02-06

    In this paper, a field test of wake steering control is presented. The field test is the result of a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Envision Energy, a smart energy management company and turbine manufacturer. In the campaign, an array of turbines within an operating commercial offshore wind farm in China have the normal yaw controller modified to implement wake steering according to a yaw control strategy. The strategy was designed using NREL wind farm models, including a computational fluid dynamics model, SOWFA, for understanding wake dynamics and an engineering model, FLORIS, for yaw control optimization.more » Results indicate that, within the certainty afforded by the data, the wake-steering controller was successful in increasing power capture, by amounts similar to those predicted from the models.« less

  12. Iterative inversion of deformation vector fields with feedback control.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhishek; Iliopoulos, Alexandros-Stavros; Sun, Xiaobai; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei

    2018-05-14

    Often, the inverse deformation vector field (DVF) is needed together with the corresponding forward DVF in four-dimesional (4D) reconstruction and dose calculation, adaptive radiation therapy, and simultaneous deformable registration. This study aims at improving both accuracy and efficiency of iterative algorithms for DVF inversion, and advancing our understanding of divergence and latency conditions. We introduce a framework of fixed-point iteration algorithms with active feedback control for DVF inversion. Based on rigorous convergence analysis, we design control mechanisms for modulating the inverse consistency (IC) residual of the current iterate, to be used as feedback into the next iterate. The control is designed adaptively to the input DVF with the objective to enlarge the convergence area and expedite convergence. Three particular settings of feedback control are introduced: constant value over the domain throughout the iteration; alternating values between iteration steps; and spatially variant values. We also introduce three spectral measures of the displacement Jacobian for characterizing a DVF. These measures reveal the critical role of what we term the nontranslational displacement component (NTDC) of the DVF. We carry out inversion experiments with an analytical DVF pair, and with DVFs associated with thoracic CT images of six patients at end of expiration and end of inspiration. The NTDC-adaptive iterations are shown to attain a larger convergence region at a faster pace compared to previous nonadaptive DVF inversion iteration algorithms. By our numerical experiments, alternating control yields smaller IC residuals and inversion errors than constant control. Spatially variant control renders smaller residuals and errors by at least an order of magnitude, compared to other schemes, in no more than 10 steps. Inversion results also show remarkable quantitative agreement with analysis-based predictions. Our analysis captures properties of DVF data

  13. Measurements of electric fields in the solar wind: Interpretation difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-06-01

    The traditionally measured electric fields in the solar wind plasma (about 1-10 mV/m) are not the natural, primordial ones but are the result of plasma-vehicle interaction. The theory of this interaction is not complete now and current interpretation of the measurements can fail. The state of fully ionized plasma depends on the entropy of the creating source and on the process in which plasma is involved. The increasing twofold of a moving volume in the solar wind (with energy transfer across its surface which is comparable with its whole internal energy) is a more rapid process than the relaxation for the pressure. The presumptive source of the solar wind creation - the induction electric field of the solar origin - has very low entropy. The state of plasma must be very far from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium. The internal energy of plasma can be contained mainly in plasma waves, resonant plasma oscillations, and electric currents. The primordial microscopic oscillating electric fields could be about 1 V/m. It can be checked by special measurements, not ruining the natural plasma state. The tool should be a dielectrical microelectroscope outside the distortion zone of the spacecraft, having been observed from the latter.

  14. Measurements of electric fields in the solar wind: Interpretation difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The traditionally measured electric fields in the solar wind plasma (about 1-10 mV/m) are not the natural, primordial ones but are the result of plasma-vehicle interaction. The theory of this interaction is not complete now and current interpretation of the measurements can fail. The state of fully ionized plasma depends on the entropy of the creating source and on the process in which plasma is involved. The increasing twofold of a moving volume in the solar wind (with energy transfer across its surface which is comparable with its whole internal energy) is a more rapid process than the relaxation for the pressure. The presumptive source of the solar wind creation - the induction electric field of the solar origin - has very low entropy. The state of plasma must be very far from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium. The internal energy of plasma can be contained mainly in plasma waves, resonant plasma oscillations, and electric currents. The primordial microscopic oscillating electric fields could be about 1 V/m. It can be checked by special measurements, not ruining the natural plasma state. The tool should be a dielectrical microelectroscope outside the distortion zone of the spacecraft, having been observed from the latter.

  15. Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VANT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine) in a wind farm array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Buck, J. W.; Germain, A. C.; Hinchee, M. E.; Solt, T. S.; Leroy, G. M.; Srnsky, R. A.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind wind farm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. From the field measurements, we derived the velocity and power/energy deficits under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. A method to estimate the energy deficit was developed based on the measured power deficit and the wind speed distributions. This method may be adopted for other turbine types and sites. Recommendations are made for optimizing wind farm design and operations, as well as for wind energy management.

  16. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  17. Correlation between topological structure and its properties in dynamic singular vector fields.

    PubMed

    Vasilev, Vasyl; Soskin, Marat

    2016-04-20

    A new technique for establishment of topology measurements for static and dynamic singular vector fields is elaborated. It is based on precise measurement of the 3D landscape of ellipticity distribution for a checked singular optical field with C points on the tops of ellipticity hills. Vector fields possess three-component topology: areas with right-hand (RH) and left-hand (LH) ellipses, and delimiting those L lines as the singularities of handedness. The azimuth map of polarization ellipses is common for both RH and LH ellipses of vector fields and do not feel L lines. The strict rules were confirmed experimentally, which define the connection between the sign of underlying optical vortices and morphological parameters of upper-lying C points. Percolation phenomena explain their realization in-between singular vector fields and long duration of their chains of 103  s order.

  18. Nonparaxial propagation and focusing properties of azimuthal-variant vector fields diffracted by an annular aperture.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Xu, Danfeng; Pan, Yang; Cui, Yiping

    2014-07-01

    Based on the vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals, the analytical expressions for azimuthal-variant vector fields diffracted by an annular aperture are presented. This helps us to investigate the propagation behaviors and the focusing properties of apertured azimuthal-variant vector fields under nonparaxial and paraxial approximations. The diffraction by a circular aperture, a circular disk, or propagation in free space can be treated as special cases of this general result. Simulation results show that the transverse intensity, longitudinal intensity, and far-field divergence angle of nonparaxially apertured azimuthal-variant vector fields depend strongly on the azimuthal index, the outer truncation parameter and the inner truncation parameter of the annular aperture, as well as the ratio of the waist width to the wavelength. Moreover, the multiple-ring-structured intensity pattern of the focused azimuthal-variant vector field, which originates from the diffraction effect caused by an annular aperture, is experimentally demonstrated.

  19. Thermospheric Response to Solar Wind Electric Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlongo, N. J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The electron density of the thermosphere is of paramount importance for radio communications and drag on low altitude satellites, particularly during geomagnetic storms. Transient enhancements of ion velocities and subsequent density and temperature increases frequently occur as a result of storm-driven solar wind electric field fluctuations. Since the Earth's dipole magnetic field is tilted and offset from the center of the planet, significant asymmetries arise that alter the thermospheric response to energy input based upon the time of day of the disturbance. This study utilizes the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM) to investigate this phenomenon by enhancing the convective electric field for one hour of the day in 22 different simulations. An additional baseline run was conducted with no IMF perturbation. Furthermore, four configurations of Earth's magnetic field were considered, Internal Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), a perfect dipole, a dipole tilted by 10 degrees, and a tilted and offset dipole. These runs were conducted at equinox when the amount of sunlight falling on the different hemispheres is the same. Two additional runs were conducted at the solstices for comparison. It was found that the most geo-effective times are when the poles are pointed towards the sun. The electron density, neutral density and temperature as well as the winds are explored.

  20. Huygens' optical vector wave field synthesis via in-plane electric dipole metasurface.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeonsoo; Yun, Hansik; Choi, Chulsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Kim, Hwi; Lee, Byoungho

    2018-04-16

    We investigate Huygens' optical vector wave field synthesis scheme for electric dipole metasurfaces with the capability of modulating in-plane polarization and complex amplitude and discuss the practical issues involved in realizing multi-modulation metasurfaces. The proposed Huygens' vector wave field synthesis scheme identifies the vector Airy disk as a synthetic unit element and creates a designed vector optical field by integrating polarization-controlled and complex-modulated Airy disks. The metasurface structure for the proposed vector field synthesis is analyzed in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio of the synthesized field distribution. The design of practical metasurface structures with true vector modulation capability is possible through the analysis of the light field modulation characteristics of various complex modulated geometric phase metasurfaces. It is shown that the regularization of meta-atoms is a key factor that needs to be considered in field synthesis, given that it is essential for a wide range of optical field synthetic applications, including holographic displays, microscopy, and optical lithography.

  1. Wind Field and Trajectory Models for Tornado-Propelled Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmann, G. H.; Radbill, J. R.; Marte, J. E.; Dergarabedian, P.; Fendell, F. E.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model to predict the trajectory of tornado born objects postulated to be in the vicinity of nuclear power plants is developed. An improved tornado wind field model satisfied the no slip ground boundary condition of fluid mechanics and includes the functional dependence of eddy viscosity with altitude. Subscale wind tunnel data are obtained for all of the missiles currently specified for nuclear plant design. Confirmatory full-scale data are obtained for a 12 inch pipe and automobile. The original six degree of freedom trajectory model is modified to include the improved wind field and increased capability as to body shapes and inertial characteristics that can be handled. The improved trajectory model is used to calculate maximum credible speeds, which for all of the heavy missiles are considerably less than those currently specified for design. Equivalent coefficients for use in three degree of freedom models are developed and the sensitivity of range and speed to various trajectory parameters for the 12 inch diameter pipe are examined.

  2. Doppler lidar studies of atmospheric wind field dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardesty, R. M.; Post, M. J.; Lawrence, T. R.; Hall, F. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 5 years the Wave Propagation Lab. has operated a pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar system to evaluate coherent laser radar technology and to investigate applications of the technique in atmospheric research. The capability of the system to provide measurements of atmospheric winds, backscatter, and water vapor has been extensively studied over this period. Because Doppler lidar can measure atmospheric wind structure in the clear air without degradation by terrain features, it offers a unique capability as a research tool for studies of many transient or local scale atmospheric events. This capability was demonstrated in recent field experiments near Boulder, Colo. and Midland, Tex., in which the lidar clearly depicted the wind field structure associated with several types of phenomena, including thunderstorm microbursts, valley drainage flow, and passage of a dryline front. To improve sensitivity during the periods of low aerosol backscatter, the system has recently been upgraded with new transmitter/receiver hardware. The upgraded system, which transmit 2 J per pulse of output energy at a rate of 50 Hz and incorporates computer control for automated operation, underwent calibration testing during the spring of 1986.

  3. Design, construction and calibration of a portable boundary layer wind tunnel for field use

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wind tunnels have been used for several decades to study wind erosion processes. Portable wind tunnels offer the advantage of testing natural surfaces in the field, but they must be carefully designed to insure that a logarithmic boundary layer is formed and that wind erosion processes may develop ...

  4. Observation of wind field over heterogeneous terrain by the French-German airborne Doppler lidar WIND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabas, A.; Werner, C.; Delville, P.; Reitebuch, O.; Drobinski, P.; Cousin, F.

    2003-04-01

    In summer 2001, the French-German airborne Doppler lidar WIND participated to field campaign ESCOMPTE. ESCOMPTE was carried out in the region of Marseille along the Mediterranean coast of France. It was dedicated to the observation of heavy pollution events in this industrialized, densely populated region of nearly 4 million inhabitants. The aim was to gather a data base as comprehensive as possible on several pollution events and use them to check the ability of several regional forecast models to predict such events. The specific mission devoted to WIND was the characterization at mesoscale of the wind field and the topography of the planetary boundary layer. Both are complex around Marseille due the heterogeneity of the surface with a transition sea/land to the south, the fore-Alps to the North, the Rhône valley to the North-West etc... Seven, 3-hr flights were carried out and gave excellent results. In 2002, first comparisons were made with mesoscale models. They will be shown during the presentation. They are good examples of the usefulness of airborne Doppler lidar for validating and improving atmospheric model simulations.

  5. Wind Profiling from a High Energy, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar during Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Yu, J.; Beyon, J. Y.; Demoz, B.

    2009-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. The LaRC mobile lidar was deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland as part of NASA HQ funded (ROSES-2007, Wind Lidar Science Proposal entitled “Intercomparison of Multiple Lidars for Wind Measurements). During the campaign, testing of the lidar was combined with a field campaign to operate a 2-μm coherent lidar alongside a 355-nm direct detection lidar to demonstrate the hybrid wind lidar concept. Besides lidar, many other meteorological sensors were located at the campaign site, including wind measuring balloon sondes, sonic and propeller anemometers mounted on a tower, and a 915-MHz radio acoustic sounding system. Comparisons among these wind measurement sensors are currently being analyzed and should be available for presentation at the Conference.

  6. Attempts to Simulate Anisotropies of Solar Wind Fluctuations Using MHD with a Turning Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    We examine a "two-component" model of the solar wind to see if any of the observed anisotropies of the fields can be explained in light of the need for various quantities, such as the magnetic minimum variance direction, to turn along with the Parker spiral. Previous results used a 3-D MHD spectral code to show that neither Q2D nor slab-wave components will turn their wave vectors in a turning Parker-like field, and that nonlinear interactions between the components are required to reproduce observations. In these new simulations we use higher resolution in both decaying and driven cases, and with and without a turning background field, to see what, if any, conditions lead to variance anisotropies similar to observations. We focus especially on the middle spectral range, and not the energy-containing scales, of the simulation for comparison with the solar wind. Preliminary results have shown that it is very difficult to produce the required variances with a turbulent cascade.

  7. Vector Sky Glint Corrections for Above Surface Retrieval of the Subsurface Polarized Light Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, A.; Foster, R.; McGilloway, A.; Ibrahim, A.; El-habashi, A.; Carrizo, C.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the underwater light field is fundamental to determining the health of the world's oceans and coastal regions. For decades, traditional remote sensing retrieval methods that rely solely on the spectral intensity of the water-leaving light have provided indicators of marine ecosystem health. As the demand for retrieval accuracy rises, use of the polarized nature of light as an additional remote sensing tool is becoming necessary. In order to observe the underwater polarized light field from above the surface (for ship, shore, or satellite applications), a method of correcting the above water signal for the effects of polarized surface-reflected skylight is needed. For three weeks in July-August 2014, the NASA Ship Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) cruise continuously observed the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky using a HyperSAS-POL system. The system autonomously tracks the Sun position and the heading of the research vessel in order to maintain a fixed relative solar azimuth angle (i.e. ±90°) and therefore avoid the specular reflection of the sunlight. Additionally, in-situ inherent optical properties (IOPs) were continuously acquired using a set of instrument packages modified for underway measurement, hyperspectral radiometric measurements were taken manually at all stations, and an underwater polarimeter was deployed when conditions permitted. All measurements, above and below the sea surface, were combined and compared in an effort to first develop a glint (sky + Sun) correction scheme for the upwelling polarized signal from a wind-driven ocean surface and compare with one assuming that the ocean surface is flat. Accurate retrieval of the subsurface vector light field is demonstrated through comparisons with polarized radiative transfer codes and direct measurements made by the underwater polarimeter.

  8. Parametric Study of Preferential Ion Heating Due to Intermittent Magnetic Fields in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal Gomez, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Watkins, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations and remote measurements of the solar wind show strong preferential heating of ions along the ambient magnetic field. Understanding the mechanism for this heating process is an open problem. The observed broad-band spectrum of Alfven waves permeating the fast solar wind provide a candidate mechanism for this preferential heating through wave-particle interactions on ion kinetic scales. Previous analytical and numerical studies have considered a single pump wave [1, 2] or a turbulent, broad-band spectra of Alfven waves [3, 4, 5] to drive the ion heating. The latter studies investigated the effects on ion heating due to different initial 1/fγpower spectral exponents and number of modes and the signals were random phase. However, the observed solar wind fluctuations are intermittent so that the phases of the modes comprising the power spectrum are not random. Non-Gaussian fluctuations are seen both on scales identified with the inertial range of Alfvenic turbulence [6], and on longer scales typified by '1/f' spectra [7]. We present results of the first parametric numerical simulations on the effects of different levels of intermittency of the broad-band spectra of Alfven waves on the preferential heating of ions in the solar wind. We performed hybrid simulations for the local heating of the solar wind, which resolves the full kinetic physics of the ions and treats the electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. Our simulations evolve the full vector velocities and electromagnetic fields in one configuration space coordinate and in time.We compare the efficiency of different levels of intermittency of the initial turbulent fields and their effect on the efficiency of the wave-particle interactions which are a mechanism for driving preferential ion heating in the solar wind. [1] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A04104 (2007). [2] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 125003 (2008) [3] Y. G. Maneva, A

  9. Vector magnetic field and vector current density in and around the δ-spot NOAA 10808†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio; Schmieder, Brigitte; Gelly, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    The context is that of the so-called ``fundamental ambiguity'' (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the ``simulated annealing'' algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I λ 6301.5 and Fe I λ 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the δ-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line (Fe I λ 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I λ 6302.5).

  10. Study of Geomagnetic Field Response to Solar Wind Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Li, X.; Damas, M. C.; Ngwira, C.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind is an integral component of space weather that has a huge impact on the near-Earth space conditions, which can in turn adversely impact technological infrastructure. By analyzing solar wind data, we can investigate the response of the Earth's magnetic field to changes in solar wind conditions, such as dynamic pressure, speed, and interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). When a coronal mass ejection (CME) hits the Earth's magnetosphere, it compresses the dayside magnetosphere, which leads to SSC (Sudden Storm Commencement) seen in Dst or SYM-H index. Dst and SYM-H index are a measure of geomagnetic storm intensity that represents the magnetic field perturbations in the equatorial region originating from ring current. In this study, we focused on SSC intervals with sudden density increase, density, greater than 10 n/cc from 2000 to 2015 using data obtained from the NASA CDAWEB service. A total of 1,049 events were picked for this project. Then using INTERMAGNET service, corresponding horizontal component of magnetic field data were collected from several stations located in equatorial region, mid-latitude region, high-latitude region on the day-side and night-side of Earth. Using MATLAB, we calculated the rate of change of magnetic fields (dB/dt) for each station and each event. We found that in most cases, the sudden increase in proton density is associated with large changes in magnetic fields, dB/dt. The largest magnetic field changes were observed on the day-side than night-side at high latitudes. Interestingly, some exceptions were found such that greater dB/dt was found on night-side than day-side during some events, particularly at high latitudes. We suspect these are driven by magnetospheric substorms, which are manifested by an explosive release of energy in the local midnight sector. The next step will be creating the statistical form to see the correlation between proton density changes and magnetic field changes.

  11. A New Non-gaussian Turbulent Wind Field Generator to Estimate Design-Loads of Wind-Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Gontier, H.; Kleinhans, D.; Friedrich, R.

    Climate change and finite fossil fuel resources make it urgent to turn into electricity generation from mostly renewable energies. One major part will play wind-energy supplied by wind-turbines of rated power up to 10 MW. For their design and development wind field models have to be used. The standard models are based on the empirical spectra, for example by von Karman or Kaimal. From investigation of measured data it is clear that gusts are underrepresented in such models. Based on some fundamental discoveries of the nature of turbulence by Friedrich [1] derived from the Navier-Stokes equation directly, we used the concept of Continuous Time Random Walks to construct three dimensional wind fields obeying non-Gaussian statistics. These wind fields were used to estimate critical fatigue loads necessary within the certification process. Calculations are carried out with an implementation of a beam-model (FLEX5) for two types of state-of-the-art wind turbines The authors considered the edgewise and flapwise blade-root bending moments as well as tilt moment at tower top due to the standard wind field models and our new non-Gaussian wind field model. Clear differences in the loads were found.

  12. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmetz, Johannes; Menzel, W. Paul; Velden, Christopher; Wu, Xiangqian; Vandeberg, Leo; Nieman, Steve; Hayden, Christopher; Holmlund, Kenneth; Geijo, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160 deg W to 50 deg E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-micron absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper-troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about-5 x 10(exp -6) and 5 x 10(exp 6)/s when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. The results from this 1-month analysis suggest the desirability of further GOES and Meteosat studies to characterize

  13. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  14. Coherent Doppler lidar for measurements of wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Hardesty, R. Michael

    1989-01-01

    The signal-processing techniques for obtaining the velocity estimates and the fundamental factors that influence coherent lidar performance are considered. The similarities and distinctions between Doppler lidar and Doppler radars are discussed. The capability of coherent Doppler lidars for mapping wind fields over selected regions in the lower atmosphere and greatly enhancing the capability to visualize flow patterns in real time is discussed, and examples are given. Salient features of a concept for an earth-orbiting Doppler lidar to be launched in the late 1990s are examined.

  15. Representation and display of vector field topology in fluid flow data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1989-01-01

    The visualization of physical processes in general and of vector fields in particular is discussed. An approach to visualizing flow topology that is based on the physics and mathematics underlying the physical phenomenon is presented. It involves determining critical points in the flow where the velocity vector vanishes. The critical points, connected by principal lines or planes, determine the topology of the flow. The complexity of the data is reduced without sacrificing the quantitative nature of the data set. By reducing the original vector field to a set of critical points and their connections, a representation of the topology of a two-dimensional vector field that is much smaller than the original data set but retains with full precision the information pertinent to the flow topology is obtained. This representation can be displayed as a set of points and tangent curves or as a graph. Analysis (including algorithms), display, interaction, and implementation aspects are discussed.

  16. Solar monochromatic images in magneto-sensitive spectral lines and maps of vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shihui, Y.; Jiehai, J.; Minhan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A new method which allows by use of the monochromatic images in some magneto-sensitive spectra line to derive both the magnetic field strength as well as the angle between magnetic field lines and line of sight for various places in solar active regions is described. In this way two dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields may be constructed. This method was applied to some observational material and reasonable results were obtained. In addition, a project for constructing the three dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields was worked out.

  17. Simulation and Assessment of a Ku-Band Full-Polarized Radar Scatterometer for Ocean Surface Vector Wind Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.; Lin, W.; Zhu, D.; Song, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Spaceborne radar scatterometry is the most important tool for global ocean surface wind vector (OSVW) measurement. Performances under condition of high-wind speed and accuracy of wind direction retrievals are two very important concerns for the development of OSVW measurement techniques by radar scatterometry. Co-polarized sigma 0 measurements are employed, for all the spaceborne radar scatterometers developed in past, and future planned missions. The main disadvantages of co-polarized only radar scatterometers for OSVW measurement are: firstly, wind vector retrieval performances varies with the position of the wind vector cells (WVC) within the swath, where WVCs with small incident angels with weaker modulation effect between sigma0 and azimuth incident angle, and the WVCs located in the outer part of the swath with lower signal-to-noise ratio and lower radiometric accuracies, have worse retrieval performances; secondly, for co-polarization measurements, Sigma 0 is the even function of the azimuth incident angle with respect to the real wind direction, which can results in directional ambiguity, and more additional information is need for the ambiguity removal. Theoretical and experimental results show that the cross-polarization measurement can provide complementary directional information to the co-polarization measurements, which can provide useful improvement to the wind vector retrieval performances. In this paper, the simulation and performance assessment of a full-polarized Ku-band radar scatterometer are provided. Some important conclusions are obtained: (1) Compared with available dual co-polarized radar scatterometer, the introduction of cross-polarization information can significantly improve the OSVW retrieval accuracies, where a relatively identical performance can be obtained within the whole swath. Simulation show that without significantly power increase, system design based on rotating-pencil beam design has much better performances than rotation

  18. Space-based surface wind vectors to aid understanding of air-sea interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Bloom, S. C.; Hoffman, R. N.; Ardizzone, J. V.; Brin, G.

    1991-01-01

    A novel and unique ocean-surface wind data-set has been derived by combining the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imager data with additional conventional data. The variational analysis used generates a gridded surface wind analysis that minimizes an objective function measuring the misfit of the analysis to the background, the data, and certain a priori constraints. In the present case, the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts surface-wind analysis is used as the background.

  19. Comparative field trial of alternative vector control strategies for non-domiciliated Triatoma dimidiata.

    PubMed

    Ferral, Jhibran; Chavez-Nuñez, Leysi; Euan-Garcia, Maria; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Najera-Vazquez, M Rosario; Dumonteil, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease is a major vector-borne disease, and regional initiatives based on insecticide spraying have successfully controlled domiciliated vectors in many regions. Non-domiciliated vectors remain responsible for a significant transmission risk, and their control is a challenge. We performed a proof-of-concept field trial to test alternative strategies in rural Yucatan, Mexico. Follow-up of house infestation for two seasons following the interventions confirmed that insecticide spraying should be performed annually for the effective control of Triatoma dimidiata; however, it also confirmed that insect screens or long-lasting impregnated curtains may represent good alternative strategies for the sustained control of these vectors. Ecosystemic peridomicile management would be an excellent complementary strategy to improve the cost-effectiveness of interventions. Because these strategies would also be effective against other vector-borne diseases, such as malaria or dengue, they could be integrated within a multi-disease control program.

  20. Statistics of partially-polarized fields: beyond the Stokes vector and coherence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, the partially-polarized light is characterized by the four Stokes parameters. Equivalent description is also provided by correlation tensor of the optical field. These statistics specify only the second moments of the complex amplitudes of the narrow-band two-dimensional electric field of the optical wave. Electric field vector of the random quasi monochromatic wave is a nonstationary oscillating two-dimensional real random variable. We introduce a novel statistical description of these partially polarized waves: the Period-Averaged Probability Density Function (PA-PDF) of the field. PA-PDF contains more information on the polarization state of the field than the Stokes vector. In particular, in addition to the conventional distinction between the polarized and depolarized components of the field PA-PDF allows to separate the coherent and fluctuating components of the field. We present several model examples of the fields with identical Stokes vectors and very distinct shapes of PA-PDF. In the simplest case of the nonstationary, oscillating normal 2-D probability distribution of the real electrical field and stationary 4-D probability distribution of the complex amplitudes, the newly-introduced PA-PDF is determined by 13 parameters that include the first moments and covariance matrix of the quadrature components of the oscillating vector field.

  1. Closed and open magnetic fields in stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical study of the interaction between a thermal wind and a global dipole field in the sun and in a giant star is reported. In order for closed field lines to persist near the equator (where a helmet-streamer-like configuration appears), the coronal temperature must be less than a critical value Tc, which scales as M/R. This condition is found to be equivalent to the following: for a static helmet streamer to persist, the sonic point above the helmet must not approach closer to the star than 2.2-2.6 stellar radii. Implications for rapid mass loss and X-ray emission from cool giants are pointed out. The results strengthen the case for identifying empirical dividing lines in the H-R diagram with a magnetic topology transition locus (MTTL). Support for the MTTL concept is also provided by considerations of the breakdown of magnetostatic equilibrium.

  2. Observation of high-resolution wind fields and offshore wind turbine wakes using TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Tobias; Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    1. Introduction Numerous large-scale offshore wind farms have been built in European waters and play an important role in providing renewable energy. Therefore, knowledge of behavior of wakes, induced by large wind turbines and their impact on wind power output is important. The spatial variation of offshore wind turbine wake is very complex, depending on wind speed, wind direction, ambient atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stability. In this study we demonstrate the application of X-band TerraSAR-X (TS-X) data with high spatial resolution for studies on wind turbine wakes in the near and far field of the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus, located in the North Sea. Two cases which different weather conditions and different wake pattern as observed in the TS-X image are presented. 2. Methods The space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a unique sensor that provides two-dimensional information on the ocean surface. Due to their high resolution, daylight and weather independency and global coverage, SARs are particularly suitable for many ocean and coastal applications. SAR images reveal wind variations on small scales and thus represent a valuable means in detailed wind-field analysis. The general principle of imaging turbine wakes is that the reduced wind speed downstream of offshore wind farms modulates the sea surface roughness, which in turn changes the Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS, denoted by σ0) in the SAR image and makes the wake visible. In this study we present two cases at the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus to investigate turbine-induced wakes and the retrieved sea surface wind field. Using the wind streaks, visible in the TS-X image and the shadow behind the offshore wind farm, induced by turbine wake, the sea surface wind direction is derived and subsequently the sea surface wind speed is calculated using the latest generation of wind field algorithm XMOD2. 3. Case study alpha ventus Alpha Ventus is located approximately 45 km from the

  3. ERS-1 scatterometer calibration and validation activities at ECMWF. B: From radar backscatter characteristics to wind vector solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffelen, AD; Anderson, David L. T.; Woiceshyn, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    Calibration and validation activities for the ERS-1 scatterometer were carried out at ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast) complementary to the 'Haltenbanken' field campaign off the coast of Norway. At a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) center a wealth of verifying data is available both in time and space. This data is used to redefine the wind retrieval procedure given the instrumental characteristics. It was found that a maximum likelihood estimation procedure to obtain the coefficients of a reformulated sigma deg to wind relationship should use radar measurements in logarithmic rather than physical space, and use winds as the wind components rather than wind speed and direction. Doing this, a much more accurate transfer function than the one currently operated by ESA was derived. Sigma deg measurement space shows no signature of a separation in an upwind solution cone and a downwind solution cone. As such signature was anticipated in ESA's wind direction ambiguity removal algorithm, reconsideration of the procedure is necessary. Despite the fact that revisions have to be made in the process of wind retrieval; a grid potential is shown for scatterometry in meteorology and climatology.

  4. Accelerating 4D flow MRI by exploiting vector field divergence regularization.

    PubMed

    Santelli, Claudio; Loecher, Michael; Busch, Julia; Wieben, Oliver; Schaeffter, Tobias; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    To improve velocity vector field reconstruction from undersampled four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI by penalizing divergence of the measured flow field. Iterative image reconstruction in which magnitude and phase are regularized separately in alternating iterations was implemented. The approach allows incorporating prior knowledge of the flow field being imaged. In the present work, velocity data were regularized to reduce divergence, using either divergence-free wavelets (DFW) or a finite difference (FD) method using the ℓ1-norm of divergence and curl. The reconstruction methods were tested on a numerical phantom and in vivo data. Results of the DFW and FD approaches were compared with data obtained with standard compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. Relative to standard CS, directional errors of vector fields and divergence were reduced by 55-60% and 38-48% for three- and six-fold undersampled data with the DFW and FD methods. Velocity vector displays of the numerical phantom and in vivo data were found to be improved upon DFW or FD reconstruction. Regularization of vector field divergence in image reconstruction from undersampled 4D flow data is a valuable approach to improve reconstruction accuracy of velocity vector fields. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Vector magnetic field changes associated with X-class flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin; Ewell, M. W., Jr.; Zirin, H.; Ai, Guoxiang

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution transverse and longitudinal magnetic field measurements bracketing five X-class solar flares. We show that the magnetic shear, defined as the angular difference between the measured field and calculated potential field, actually increases after all of these flares. In each case, the shear is shown to increase along a substantial portion of the magnetic neutral line. For two of the cases, we have excellent time resolution, on the order of several minutes, and we demonstrate that the shear increase is impulsive. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our results.

  6. The magnetospheric electric field and convective processes as diagnostics of the IMF and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Indirect measurements of the convection field as well as direct of the ionospheric electric field provide a means to at least monitor quanitatively solar wind processes. For instance, asymmetries in the ionospheric electric field and ionospheric Hall currents over the polar cap reflect the solar wind sector polarity. A stronger electric field, and thus convective flow, is found on the side of the polar cap where the y component of the IMF is parallel to the y component of the geomagnetic field. Additionally, the magnitude of the electric field and convective southward B sub Z and/or solar wind velocity, and thus may indicate the arrival at Earth of an interaction region in the solar wind. It is apparent that processes associated with the convention electric field may be used to predict large scale features in the solar wind; however, with present empirical knowledge it is not possible to make quantitative predictions of individual solar wind or IMF parameters.

  7. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Overview and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Hayashi, Keiji; Sun, Xudong; Schou, Jesper; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee; Bobra, Monica; Centeno, Rebecca; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Turmon, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) began near-continuous full-disk solar measurements on 1 May 2010 from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). An automated processing pipeline keeps pace with observations to produce observable quantities, including the photospheric vector magnetic field, from sequences of filtergrams. The basic vector-field frame list cadence is 135 seconds, but to reduce noise the filtergrams are combined to derive data products every 720 seconds. The primary 720 s observables were released in mid-2010, including Stokes polarization parameters measured at six wavelengths, as well as intensity, Doppler velocity, and the line-of-sight magnetic field. More advanced products, including the full vector magnetic field, are now available. Automatically identified HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) track the location and shape of magnetic regions throughout their lifetime. The vector field is computed using the Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector (VFISV) code optimized for the HMI pipeline; the remaining 180∘ azimuth ambiguity is resolved with the Minimum Energy (ME0) code. The Milne-Eddington inversion is performed on all full-disk HMI observations. The disambiguation, until recently run only on HARP regions, is now implemented for the full disk. Vector and scalar quantities in the patches are used to derive active region indices potentially useful for forecasting; the data maps and indices are collected in the SHARP data series, hmi.sharp_720s. Definitive SHARP processing is completed only after the region rotates off the visible disk; quick-look products are produced in near real time. Patches are provided in both CCD and heliographic coordinates. HMI provides continuous coverage of the vector field, but has modest spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. Coupled with limitations of the analysis and interpretation techniques, effects of the orbital velocity, and instrument performance, the resulting measurements have a certain dynamic

  8. Spatial interpolation of fine particulate matter concentrations using the shortest wind-field path distance.

    PubMed

    Li, Longxiang; Gong, Jianhua; Zhou, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Effective assessments of air-pollution exposure depend on the ability to accurately predict pollutant concentrations at unmonitored locations, which can be achieved through spatial interpolation. However, most interpolation approaches currently in use are based on the Euclidean distance, which cannot account for the complex nonlinear features displayed by air-pollution distributions in the wind-field. In this study, an interpolation method based on the shortest path distance is developed to characterize the impact of complex urban wind-field on the distribution of the particulate matter concentration. In this method, the wind-field is incorporated by first interpolating the observed wind-field from a meteorological-station network, then using this continuous wind-field to construct a cost surface based on Gaussian dispersion model and calculating the shortest wind-field path distances between locations, and finally replacing the Euclidean distances typically used in Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) with the shortest wind-field path distances. This proposed methodology is used to generate daily and hourly estimation surfaces for the particulate matter concentration in the urban area of Beijing in May 2013. This study demonstrates that wind-fields can be incorporated into an interpolation framework using the shortest wind-field path distance, which leads to a remarkable improvement in both the prediction accuracy and the visual reproduction of the wind-flow effect, both of which are of great importance for the assessment of the effects of pollutants on human health.

  9. Spatial Interpolation of Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations Using the Shortest Wind-Field Path Distance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longxiang; Gong, Jianhua; Zhou, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Effective assessments of air-pollution exposure depend on the ability to accurately predict pollutant concentrations at unmonitored locations, which can be achieved through spatial interpolation. However, most interpolation approaches currently in use are based on the Euclidean distance, which cannot account for the complex nonlinear features displayed by air-pollution distributions in the wind-field. In this study, an interpolation method based on the shortest path distance is developed to characterize the impact of complex urban wind-field on the distribution of the particulate matter concentration. In this method, the wind-field is incorporated by first interpolating the observed wind-field from a meteorological-station network, then using this continuous wind-field to construct a cost surface based on Gaussian dispersion model and calculating the shortest wind-field path distances between locations, and finally replacing the Euclidean distances typically used in Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) with the shortest wind-field path distances. This proposed methodology is used to generate daily and hourly estimation surfaces for the particulate matter concentration in the urban area of Beijing in May 2013. This study demonstrates that wind-fields can be incorporated into an interpolation framework using the shortest wind-field path distance, which leads to a remarkable improvement in both the prediction accuracy and the visual reproduction of the wind-flow effect, both of which are of great importance for the assessment of the effects of pollutants on human health. PMID:24798197

  10. Critical Point Cancellation in 3D Vector Fields: Robustness and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Skraba, Primoz; Rosen, Paul; Wang, Bei; Chen, Guoning; Bhatia, Harsh; Pascucci, Valerio

    2016-02-29

    Vector field topology has been successfully applied to represent the structure of steady vector fields. Critical points, one of the essential components of vector field topology, play an important role in describing the complexity of the extracted structure. Simplifying vector fields via critical point cancellation has practical merit for interpreting the behaviors of complex vector fields such as turbulence. However, there is no effective technique that allows direct cancellation of critical points in 3D. This work fills this gap and introduces the first framework to directly cancel pairs or groups of 3D critical points in a hierarchical manner with a guaranteed minimum amount of perturbation based on their robustness, a quantitative measure of their stability. In addition, our framework does not require the extraction of the entire 3D topology, which contains non-trivial separation structures, and thus is computationally effective. Furthermore, our algorithm can remove critical points in any subregion of the domain whose degree is zero and handle complex boundary configurations, making it capable of addressing challenging scenarios that may not be resolved otherwise. We apply our method to synthetic and simulation datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  11. Visualization of Morse connection graphs for topologically rich 2D vector fields.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Andrzej; Sipeki, Levente

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in vector field topologymake it possible to compute its multi-scale graph representations for autonomous 2D vector fields in a robust and efficient manner. One of these representations is a Morse Connection Graph (MCG), a directed graph whose nodes correspond to Morse sets, generalizing stationary points and periodic trajectories, and arcs - to trajectories connecting them. While being useful for simple vector fields, the MCG can be hard to comprehend for topologically rich vector fields, containing a large number of features. This paper describes a visual representation of the MCG, inspired by previous work on graph visualization. Our approach aims to preserve the spatial relationships between the MCG arcs and nodes and highlight the coherent behavior of connecting trajectories. Using simulations of ocean flow, we show that it can provide useful information on the flow structure. This paper focuses specifically on MCGs computed for piecewise constant (PC) vector fields. In particular, we describe extensions of the PC framework that make it more flexible and better suited for analysis of data on complex shaped domains with a boundary. We also describe a topology simplification scheme that makes our MCG visualizations less ambiguous. Despite the focus on the PC framework, our approach could also be applied to graph representations or topological skeletons computed using different methods.

  12. Critical Point Cancellation in 3D Vector Fields: Robustness and Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Skraba, Primoz; Rosen, Paul; Wang, Bei

    Vector field topology has been successfully applied to represent the structure of steady vector fields. Critical points, one of the essential components of vector field topology, play an important role in describing the complexity of the extracted structure. Simplifying vector fields via critical point cancellation has practical merit for interpreting the behaviors of complex vector fields such as turbulence. However, there is no effective technique that allows direct cancellation of critical points in 3D. This work fills this gap and introduces the first framework to directly cancel pairs or groups of 3D critical points in a hierarchical manner with amore » guaranteed minimum amount of perturbation based on their robustness, a quantitative measure of their stability. In addition, our framework does not require the extraction of the entire 3D topology, which contains non-trivial separation structures, and thus is computationally effective. Furthermore, our algorithm can remove critical points in any subregion of the domain whose degree is zero and handle complex boundary configurations, making it capable of addressing challenging scenarios that may not be resolved otherwise. Here, we apply our method to synthetic and simulation datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness.« less

  13. Critical Point Cancellation in 3D Vector Fields: Robustness and Discussion

    DOE PAGES

    Skraba, Primoz; Rosen, Paul; Wang, Bei; ...

    2016-02-29

    Vector field topology has been successfully applied to represent the structure of steady vector fields. Critical points, one of the essential components of vector field topology, play an important role in describing the complexity of the extracted structure. Simplifying vector fields via critical point cancellation has practical merit for interpreting the behaviors of complex vector fields such as turbulence. However, there is no effective technique that allows direct cancellation of critical points in 3D. This work fills this gap and introduces the first framework to directly cancel pairs or groups of 3D critical points in a hierarchical manner with amore » guaranteed minimum amount of perturbation based on their robustness, a quantitative measure of their stability. In addition, our framework does not require the extraction of the entire 3D topology, which contains non-trivial separation structures, and thus is computationally effective. Furthermore, our algorithm can remove critical points in any subregion of the domain whose degree is zero and handle complex boundary configurations, making it capable of addressing challenging scenarios that may not be resolved otherwise. Here, we apply our method to synthetic and simulation datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness.« less

  14. Polarimetric Ku-Band Scatterometer for High Accuracy, Large Swath Global Wind Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Wu-Yang; Nghiem, Son V.; Huddleston, James; Spencer, Michael; Stiles, Bryan; West, Richard

    2000-01-01

    In the past, wind measurements from space using fan-beam antennas, such as Seasat Scatterometer (SASS-1), ERS-1 &2, and NASA scatterometer (NSCAT), required up to six large stick-like antennas and suffered a nadir gap of up to 400 km. In the near future, a spinning pencil-beam scatterometer system is to be used for the SeaWinds scatterometer on QuikSCAT (QSCAT) and on ADEOS-2 (SeaWinds). This scatterometer, though offering wind measurements in the nadir region, still suffers from degraded performance in the nadir and outer swath. The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced polarimetric spinning pencil-beam scatterometer system, which can significantly improve the wind performance across the entire swath. The polarimetric scatterometer simultaneously measures co-polarized backscatter and the polarimetric correlation of co- and cross-polarized radar returns from the ocean surface. The advantage over the conventional scatterometer system is that, while the co-polarization radar returns are even function of the wind direction, the polarimetric correlation is an odd function of wind direction due to the reflection symmetry of the wind roughened surface. Therefore, this polarimetric scatterometer system can provide additional, equivalent measurements at azimuth angle 45degree away from the corresponding co-polarization measurements. The combined co-polarization and correlation measurements enable good wind performance across the whole swath to be obtained. In this paper, we will first present the theoretical formulation of all of the key components required for designing a polarimetric scatterometer. Then, we show that good wind performance can be achieved by a slight improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the current QSCAT/SeaWinds design. We then present the predicated wind performance using computer simulation based on a model function for the co-polarized backscatter obtained from actual spaceborne scatterometer data and an estimated model function for

  15. Design development and construction of the RFX field shaping winding

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Guarnieri, M.; Stella, A.

    1989-03-01

    The paper describes the development work on the design and the manufacture of the RFX Field Shaping Winding, from the preliminary analysis and the tests on prototypes to the final design. The winding consists of 16 coils, with 24 copper turns each and of diameters up to 5.5 m. The maximum current is 6.25 kA and the maximum voltage to earth is 35 kV. Each coil is supported in 24 radial locations and the electrodynamic load on a single coil is approximately 40 kN/m in normal operation. Fiberglass impregnated with epoxy resin, reinforced in places with polymide tape, has beenmore » used for the insulation. The high levels of the electrical and mechanical strength specified present conflicting constraints, which have required some care in the structural design and the definition of insulation system and impregnation technology. Although the use of copper coils with this kid of insulation may seem obvious and well established, indeed the stringent operational requirements have posed a number of problems which have demanded extensive work on the design and prototype development.« less

  16. Exploring the nearshore marine wind profile from field measurements and numerical hindcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Jesus, F.; Menendez, M.; Guanche, R.; Losada, I.

    2012-12-01

    Wind power is the predominant offshore renewable energy resource. In the last years, offshore wind farms have become a technically feasible source of electrical power. The economic feasibility of offshore wind farms depends on the quality of the offshore wind conditions compared to that of onshore sites. Installation and maintenance costs must be balanced with more hours and a higher quality of the available resources. European offshore wind development has revealed that the optimum offshore sites are those in which the distance from the coast is limited with high available resource. Due to the growth in the height of the turbines and the complexity of the coast, with interactions between inland wind/coastal orography and ocean winds, there is a need for field measurements and validation of numerical models to understand the marine wind profile near the coast. Moreover, recent studies have pointed out that the logarithmic law describing the vertical wind profile presents limitations. The aim of this work is to characterize the nearshore vertical wind profile in the medium atmosphere boundary layer. Instrumental observations analyzed in this work come from the Idermar project (www.Idermar.es). Three floating masts deployed at different locations on the Cantabrian coast provide wind measurements from a height of 20 to 90 meters. Wind speed and direction are measured as well as several meteorological variables at different heights of the profile. The shortest wind time series has over one year of data. A 20 year high-resolution atmospheric hindcast, using the WRF-ARW model and focusing on hourly offshore wind fields, is also analyzed. Two datasets have been evaluated: a European reanalysis with a ~15 Km spatial resolution, and a hybrid downscaling of wind fields with a spatial resolution of one nautical mile over the northern coast of Spain.. These numerical hindcasts have been validated based on field measurement data. Several parameterizations of the vertical wind

  17. Identification of cardiac rhythm features by mathematical analysis of vector fields.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Tamara N; Brooks, Dana H; Triedman, John K

    2005-01-01

    Automated techniques for locating cardiac arrhythmia features are limited, and cardiologists generally rely on isochronal maps to infer patterns in the cardiac activation sequence during an ablation procedure. Velocity vector mapping has been proposed as an alternative method to study cardiac activation in both clinical and research environments. In addition to the visual cues that vector maps can provide, vector fields can be analyzed using mathematical operators such as the divergence and curl. In the current study, conduction features were extracted from velocity vector fields computed from cardiac mapping data. The divergence was used to locate ectopic foci and wavefront collisions, and the curl to identify central obstacles in reentrant circuits. Both operators were applied to simulated rhythms created from a two-dimensional cellular automaton model, to measured data from an in situ experimental canine model, and to complex three-dimensional human cardiac mapping data sets. Analysis of simulated vector fields indicated that the divergence is useful in identifying ectopic foci, with a relatively small number of vectors and with errors of up to 30 degrees in the angle measurements. The curl was useful for identifying central obstacles in reentrant circuits, and the number of velocity vectors needed increased as the rhythm became more complex. The divergence was able to accurately identify canine in situ pacing sites, areas of breakthrough activation, and wavefront collisions. In data from human arrhythmias, the divergence reliably estimated origins of electrical activity and wavefront collisions, but the curl was less reliable at locating central obstacles in reentrant circuits, possibly due to the retrospective nature of data collection. The results indicate that the curl and divergence operators applied to velocity vector maps have the potential to add valuable information in cardiac mapping and can be used to supplement human pattern recognition.

  18. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-05-29

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system.

  19. SeaWinds Scatterometer Wind Vector Retrievals Within Hurricanes Using AMSR and NEXRAD to Perform Corrections for Precipitation Effects: Comparison of AMSR and NEXRAD Retrievals of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla; Callahan, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The opportunity provided by satellite scatterometers to measure ocean surface winds in strong storms and hurricanes is diminished by the errors in the received backscatter (SIGMA-0) caused by the attenuation, scattering and surface roughening produced by heavy rain. Providing a good rain correction is a very challenging problem, particularly at Ku band (13.4 GHz) where rain effects are strong. Corrections to the scatterometer measurements of ocean surface winds can be pursued with either of two different methods: empirical or physical modeling. The latter method is employed in this study because of the availability of near simultaneous and collocated measurements provided by the MIDORI-II suite of instruments. The AMSR was designed to measure atmospheric water-related parameters on a spatial scale comparable to the SeaWinds scatterometer. These quantities can be converted into volumetric attenuation and scattering at the Ku-band frequency of SeaWinds. Optimal estimates of the volume backscatter and attenuation require a knowledge of the three dimensional distribution of reflectivity on a scale comparable to that of the precipitation. Studies selected near the US coastline enable the much higher resolution NEXRAD reflectivity measurements evaluate the AMSR estimates. We are also conducting research into the effects of different beam geometries and nonuniform beamfilling of precipitation within the field-of-view of the AMSR and the scatterometer. Furthermore, both AMSR and NEXRAD estimates of atmospheric correction can be used to produce corrected SIGMA-0s, which are then input to the JPL wind retrieval algorithm.

  20. Vector tomography for reconstructing electric fields with non-zero divergence in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouri, Alexandra; Brookes, Mike; Rimpiläinen, Ville

    2017-01-01

    In vector tomography (VT), the aim is to reconstruct an unknown multi-dimensional vector field using line integral data. In the case of a 2-dimensional VT, two types of line integral data are usually required. These data correspond to integration of the parallel and perpendicular projection of the vector field along the integration lines and are called the longitudinal and transverse measurements, respectively. In most cases, however, the transverse measurements cannot be physically acquired. Therefore, the VT methods are typically used to reconstruct divergence-free (or source-free) velocity and flow fields that can be reconstructed solely from the longitudinal measurements. In this paper, we show how vector fields with non-zero divergence in a bounded domain can also be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements without the need of explicitly evaluating the transverse measurements. To the best of our knowledge, VT has not previously been used for this purpose. In particular, we study low-frequency, time-harmonic electric fields generated by dipole sources in convex bounded domains which arise, for example, in electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. We explain in detail the theoretical background, the derivation of the electric field inverse problem and the numerical approximation of the line integrals. We show that fields with non-zero divergence can be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements with the help of two sparsity constraints that are constructed from the transverse measurements and the vector Laplace operator. As a comparison to EEG source imaging, we note that VT does not require mathematical modeling of the sources. By numerical simulations, we show that the pattern of the electric field can be correctly estimated using VT and the location of the source activity can be determined accurately from the reconstructed magnitudes of the field.

  1. System and method for evaluating wind flow fields using remote sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2016-12-13

    The present invention provides a system and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind field using a first remote sensing device and a second remote sensing device. Coordinated data is collected from the first and second remote sensing devices and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind field. The first remote sensing device is positioned to have a portion of the wind field within a first scanning sector of the first remote sensing device. The second remote sensing device is positioned to have the portion of the wind field disposed within a second scanning sector of the second remote sensing device.

  2. Vector magnetic field observations with the Haleakala polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickey, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several enhancements were recently made to the Haleakala polarimeter. Linear array detectors provide simultaneous resolution over a 3-A wavelength range, with spectral resolution of 40 mA. Optical fibers are now used to carry the intensity-modulated light from the rotating quarter-wave plate polarimeter to the echelle spectrometer, permitting its removal from the spar to a more stable environment. These changes, together with improved quarter-wave plates, reduced systematic errors to a few parts in 10,000 for routine observations. Examples of Stokes profiles and derived magnetic field maps are presented.

  3. An improved exact inversion formula for solenoidal fields in cone beam vector tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsevich, Alexander; Rothermel, Dimitri; Schuster, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we present an improved inversion formula for the 3D cone beam transform of vector fields supported in the unit ball which is exact for solenoidal fields. It is well known that only the solenoidal part of a vector field can be determined from the longitudinal ray transform of a vector field in cone beam geometry. The inversion formula, as it was developed in Katsevich and Schuster (2013 An exact inversion formula for cone beam vector tomography Inverse Problems 29 065013), consists of two parts. The first part is of the filtered backprojection type, whereas the second part is a costly 4D integration and very inefficient. In this article we tackle this second term and obtain an improved formula, which is easy to implement and saves one order of integration. We also show that the first part contains all information about the curl of the field, whereas the second part has information about the boundary values. More precisely, the second part vanishes if the solenoidal part of the original field is tangential at the boundary. A number of numerical tests presented in the paper confirm the theoretical results and the exactness of the formula. Also, we obtain an inversion algorithm that works for general convex domains.

  4. Lefschetz thimbles in fermionic effective models with repulsive vector-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yuto; Kashiwa, Kouji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2018-06-01

    We discuss two problems in complexified auxiliary fields in fermionic effective models, the auxiliary sign problem associated with the repulsive vector-field and the choice of the cut for the scalar field appearing from the logarithmic function. In the fermionic effective models with attractive scalar and repulsive vector-type interaction, the auxiliary scalar and vector fields appear in the path integral after the bosonization of fermion bilinears. When we make the path integral well-defined by the Wick rotation of the vector field, the oscillating Boltzmann weight appears in the partition function. This "auxiliary" sign problem can be solved by using the Lefschetz-thimble path-integral method, where the integration path is constructed in the complex plane. Another serious obstacle in the numerical construction of Lefschetz thimbles is caused by singular points and cuts induced by multivalued functions of the complexified scalar field in the momentum integration. We propose a new prescription which fixes gradient flow trajectories on the same Riemann sheet in the flow evolution by performing the momentum integration in the complex domain.

  5. Spin polarized phases in strongly interacting matter: Interplay between axial-vector and tensor mean fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Nakano, Eiji; Yanase, Kota; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2018-06-01

    The spontaneous spin polarization of strongly interacting matter due to axial-vector- and tensor-type interactions is studied at zero temperature and high baryon-number densities. We start with the mean-field Lagrangian for the axial-vector and tensor interaction channels and find in the chiral limit that the spin polarization due to the tensor mean field (U ) takes place first as the density increases for sufficiently strong coupling constants, and then the spin polarization due to the axial-vector mean field (A ) emerges in the region of the finite tensor mean field. This can be understood as making the axial-vector mean-field finite requires a broken chiral symmetry somehow, which is achieved by the finite tensor mean field in the present case. It is also found from the symmetry argument that there appear the type I (II) Nambu-Goldstone modes with a linear (quadratic) dispersion in the spin polarized phase with U ≠0 and A =0 (U ≠0 and A ≠0 ), although these two phases exhibit the same symmetry breaking pattern.

  6. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, wemore » compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.« less

  7. Tight focusing of spatially variant vector optical fields with elliptical symmetry of linear polarization.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Gilad M; Levy, Uriel

    2007-08-01

    We study the tight-focusing properties of spatially variant vector optical fields with elliptical symmetry of linear polarization. We found the eccentricity of the incident polarized light to be an important parameter providing an additional degree of freedom assisting in controlling the field properties at the focus and allowing matching of the field distribution at the focus to the specific application. Applications of these space-variant polarized beams vary from lithography and optical storage to particle beam trapping and material processing.

  8. High-quality and interactive animations of 3D time-varying vector fields.

    PubMed

    Helgeland, Anders; Elboth, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present an interactive texture-based method for visualizing three-dimensional unsteady vector fields. The visualization method uses a sparse and global representation of the flow, such that it does not suffer from the same perceptual issues as is the case for visualizing dense representations. The animation is made by injecting a collection of particles evenly distributed throughout the physical domain. These particles are then tracked along their path lines. At each time step, these particles are used as seed points to generate field lines using any vector field such as the velocity field or vorticity field. In this way, the animation shows the advection of particles while each frame in the animation shows the instantaneous vector field. In order to maintain a coherent particle density and to avoid clustering as time passes, we have developed a novel particle advection strategy which produces approximately evenly-spaced field lines at each time step. To improve rendering performance, we decouple the rendering stage from the preceding stages of the visualization method. This allows interactive exploration of multiple fields simultaneously, which sets the stage for a more complete analysis of the flow field. The final display is rendered using texture-based direct volume rendering.

  9. Tailored optical vector fields for ultrashort-pulse laser induced complex surface plasmon structuring.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, J; Perrie, W; Allegre, O J; Heil, T; Jin, Y; Fearon, E; Eckford, D; Edwardson, S P; Dearden, G

    2015-05-18

    Precise tailoring of optical vector beams is demonstrated, shaping their focal electric fields and used to create complex laser micro-patterning on a metal surface. A Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) and a micro-structured S-waveplate were integrated with a picosecond laser system and employed to structure the vector fields into radial and azimuthal polarizations with and without a vortex phase wavefront as well as superposition states. Imprinting Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) elucidates the detailed vector fields around the focal region. In addition to clear azimuthal and radial plasmon surface structures, unique, variable logarithmic spiral micro-structures with a pitch Λ ∼1μm, not observed previously, were imprinted on the surface, confirming unambiguously the complex 2D focal electric fields. We show clearly also how the Orbital Angular Momentum(OAM) associated with a helical wavefront induces rotation of vector fields along the optic axis of a focusing lens and confirmed by the observed surface micro-structures.

  10. Evolution of vector magnetic fields and the August 27 1990 X-3 flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin

    1992-01-01

    Vector magnetic fields in an active region of the sun are studied by means of continuous observations of magnetic-field evolution emphasizing magnetic shear build-up. The vector magnetograms are shown to measure magnetic fields correctly based on concurrent observations and a comparison of the transverse field with the H alpha fibril structure. The morphology and velocity pattern are examined, and these data and the shear build-up suggest that the active region's two major footprints are separated by a region with flows, new flux emergence, and several neutral lines. The magnetic shear appears to be caused by the collision and shear motion of two poles of opposite polarities. The transverse field is shown to turn from potential to sheared during the process of flux cancellation, and this effect can be incorporated into existing models of magnetic flux cancellation.

  11. Achievement of needle-like focus by engineering radial-variant vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Wu, Jia-Lu; Pan, Yang; Cui, Yiping

    2013-12-16

    We present and demonstrate a novel method for engineering the radial-variant polarization on the incident field to achieve a needle of transversally polarized field without any pupil filters. We generate a new kind of localized linearly-polarized vector fields with distributions of states of polarization (SoPs) describing by the radius to the power p and explore its tight focusing, nonparaxial focusing, and paraxial focusing properties. By tuning the power p, we obtain the needle-like focal field with hybrid SoPs and give the formula for describing the length of the needle. Experimentally, we systematically investigate both the intensity distributions and the polarization evolution of the optical needle by paraxial focusing the generated vector field. Such an optical needle, which enhances the light-matter interaction, has intriguing applications in optical microma-chining and nonlinear optics.

  12. On the Lamb vector divergence as a momentum field diagnostic employed in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamman, Curtis W.; Kirby, Robert M.; Klewicki, Joseph C.

    2006-11-01

    Vorticity, enstrophy, helicity, and other derived field variables provide invaluable information about the kinematics and dynamics of fluids. However, whether or not derived field variables exist that intrinsically identify spatially localized motions having a distinct capacity to affect a time rate of change of linear momentum is seldom addressed in the literature. The purpose of the present study is to illustrate the unique attributes of the divergence of the Lamb vector in order to qualify its potential for characterizing such spatially localized motions. Toward this aim, we describe the mathematical properties, near-wall behavior, and scaling characteristics of the divergence of the Lamb vector for turbulent channel flow. When scaled by inner variables, the mean divergence of the Lamb vector merges to a single curve in the inner layer, and the fluctuating quantities exhibit a strong correlation with the Bernoulli function throughout much of the inner layer.

  13. Ghost instabilities of cosmological models with vector fields nonminimally coupled to the curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Himmetoglu, Burak; Peloso, Marco; Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2009-12-15

    We prove that many cosmological models characterized by vectors nonminimally coupled to the curvature (such as the Turner-Widrow mechanism for the production of magnetic fields during inflation, and models of vector inflation or vector curvaton) contain ghosts. The ghosts are associated with the longitudinal vector polarization present in these models and are found from studying the sign of the eigenvalues of the kinetic matrix for the physical perturbations. Ghosts introduce two main problems: (1) they make the theories ill defined at the quantum level in the high energy/subhorizon regime (and create serious problems for finding a well-behaved UV completion), andmore » (2) they create an instability already at the linearized level. This happens because the eigenvalue corresponding to the ghost crosses zero during the cosmological evolution. At this point the linearized equations for the perturbations become singular (we show that this happens for all the models mentioned above). We explicitly solve the equations in the simplest cases of a vector without a vacuum expectation value in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry, and of a vector with a vacuum expectation value plus a cosmological constant, and we show that indeed the solutions of the linearized equations diverge when these equations become singular.« less

  14. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  15. Vector tomography for reconstructing electric fields with non-zero divergence in bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Koulouri, Alexandra, E-mail: koulouri@uni-muenster.de; Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2BT; Brookes, Mike

    In vector tomography (VT), the aim is to reconstruct an unknown multi-dimensional vector field using line integral data. In the case of a 2-dimensional VT, two types of line integral data are usually required. These data correspond to integration of the parallel and perpendicular projection of the vector field along the integration lines and are called the longitudinal and transverse measurements, respectively. In most cases, however, the transverse measurements cannot be physically acquired. Therefore, the VT methods are typically used to reconstruct divergence-free (or source-free) velocity and flow fields that can be reconstructed solely from the longitudinal measurements. In thismore » paper, we show how vector fields with non-zero divergence in a bounded domain can also be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements without the need of explicitly evaluating the transverse measurements. To the best of our knowledge, VT has not previously been used for this purpose. In particular, we study low-frequency, time-harmonic electric fields generated by dipole sources in convex bounded domains which arise, for example, in electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. We explain in detail the theoretical background, the derivation of the electric field inverse problem and the numerical approximation of the line integrals. We show that fields with non-zero divergence can be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements with the help of two sparsity constraints that are constructed from the transverse measurements and the vector Laplace operator. As a comparison to EEG source imaging, we note that VT does not require mathematical modeling of the sources. By numerical simulations, we show that the pattern of the electric field can be correctly estimated using VT and the location of the source activity can be determined accurately from the reconstructed magnitudes of the field. - Highlights: • Vector tomography is used to reconstruct electric fields generated by

  16. Improving the detection of wind fields from LIDAR aerosol backscatter using feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Brady R.; Rotthoff, Eric R.; Walters, Gage S.; Kane, Timothy J.; Mayor, Shane D.

    2016-04-01

    The tracking of winds and atmospheric features has many applications, from predicting and analyzing weather patterns in the upper and lower atmosphere to monitoring air movement from pig and chicken farms. Doppler LIDAR systems exist to quantify the underlying wind speeds, but cost of these systems can sometimes be relatively high, and processing limitations exist. The alternative is using an incoherent LIDAR system to analyze aerosol backscatter. Improving the detection and analysis of wind information from aerosol backscatter LIDAR systems will allow for the adoption of these relatively low cost instruments in environments where the size, complexity, and cost of other options are prohibitive. Using data from a simple aerosol backscatter LIDAR system, we attempt to extend the processing capabilities by calculating wind vectors through image correlation techniques to improve the detection of wind features.

  17. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Todd D.; Salinas, Felipe S.; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T.; Mogul, David J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Approach. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject’s cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. Main results. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. Significance. These results provide critical new

  18. SPECIAL ISSUE ON OPTICAL PROCESSING OF INFORMATION: Reconstruction of vector physical fields by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchin, Yurii N.; Vitrik, O. B.; Kamenev, O. T.; Kirichenko, O. V.; Petrov, Yu S.

    1995-10-01

    Reconstruction of vector physical fields by optical tomography, with the aid of a system of fibre-optic measuring lines, is considered. The reported experimental results are used to reconstruct the distribution of the square of the gradient of transverse displacements of a flat membrane.

  19. Rippled graphene in an in-plane magnetic field: effects of a random vector potential.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, Mark B; Folk, Joshua A

    2010-10-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a random vector potential generated by applying an in-plane magnetic field to a graphene flake. Magnetic flux through the ripples cause orbital effects: Phase-coherent weak localization is suppressed, while quasirandom Lorentz forces lead to anisotropic magnetoresistance. Distinct signatures of these two effects enable the ripple size to be characterized.

  20. Flow velocity vector fields by ultrasound particle imaging velocimetry: in vitro comparison with optical flow velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Westerdale, John; Belohlavek, Marek; McMahon, Eileen M; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Heys, Jeffrey J; Milano, Michele

    2011-02-01

    We performed an in vitro study to assess the precision and accuracy of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) data acquired using a clinically available portable ultrasound system via comparison with stereo optical PIV. The performance of ultrasound PIV was compared with optical PIV on a benchmark problem involving vortical flow with a substantial out-of-plane velocity component. Optical PIV is capable of stereo image acquisition, thus measuring out-of-plane velocity components. This allowed us to quantify the accuracy of ultrasound PIV, which is limited to in-plane acquisition. The system performance was assessed by considering the instantaneous velocity fields without extracting velocity profiles by spatial averaging. Within the 2-dimensional correlation window, using 7 time-averaged frames, the vector fields were found to have correlations of 0.867 in the direction along the ultrasound beam and 0.738 in the perpendicular direction. Out-of-plane motion of greater than 20% of the in-plane vector magnitude was found to increase the SD by 11% for the vectors parallel to the ultrasound beam direction and 8.6% for the vectors perpendicular to the beam. The results show a close correlation and agreement of individual velocity vectors generated by ultrasound PIV compared with optical PIV. Most of the measurement distortions were caused by out-of-plane velocity components.

  1. Jupiter's Magnetic Field. Magnetosphere, and Interaction with the Solar Wind: Pioneer 11.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Davis, L; Jones, D E; Coleman, P J; Colburn, D S; Dyal, P; Sonett, C P

    1975-05-02

    The Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer provided precise, contititious measurements of the magnetic fields in interplanetary space, inside Jupiter's magnetosphere, and in the near vicinity of Jupiter. As with the Pioneer 10 data, evidence was seen of the dynanmic interaction of Jupiter with the solar wind which leads to a variety of phenomena (bow shock, upstream waves, nonlinear magnetosheath impulses) and to changes in the dimension of the dayside magnetosphere by as much as a factor of 2. The magnetosphere clearly appears to be blunt, not disk-shaped, with a well-defined outer boundary. In the outer magnetosphere, the magnetic field is irregular but exhibits a persistent southward component indicative of a closed magnetosphere. The data contain the first clear evidence in the dayside magnetosphere of the current sheet, apparently associated with centrifugal forces, that was a donminatnt feature of the outbound Pionieer 10 data. A modest westward spiraling of the field was again evident inbound but not outbound at higher latitudes and nearer the Sun-Jupiter direction. Measurements near periapsis, which were nearer the planet and provide better latitude and longitude coverage than Pioneer 10, have revealed a 5 percent discrepancy with the Pioneer 10 offset dipole mnodel (D(2)). A revised offset dipole (6-parameter fit) is presented as well as the results of a spherical harmonic analysis (23 parameters) consisting of an interior dipole, quadrupole, and octopole and an external dipole and quadrupole. The dipole moment and the composite field appear moderately larger than inferred from Pioneer 10. Maximum surface fields of 14 and 11 gauss in the northern and southern hemispheres are inferred. Jupiter's planetary field is found to be slightly more irregular than that of Earth.

  2. Simulating Turbulent Wind Fields for Offshore Turbines in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    Extreme wind load cases are one of the most important external conditions in the design of offshore wind turbines in hurricane prone regions. Furthermore, in these areas, the increase in load with storm return-period is higher than in extra-tropical regions. However, current standards have limited information on the appropriate models to simulate wind loads from hurricanes. This study investigates turbulent wind models for load analysis of offshore wind turbines subjected to hurricane conditions. Suggested extreme wind models in IEC 61400-3 and API/ABS (a widely-used standard in oil and gas industry) are investigated. The present study further examines the wind turbinemore » response subjected to Hurricane wind loads. Three-dimensional wind simulator, TurbSim, is modified to include the API wind model. Wind fields simulated using IEC and API wind models are used for an offshore wind turbine model established in FAST to calculate turbine loads and response.« less

  3. Cryogenic STM in 3D vector magnetic fields realized through a rotatable insert.

    PubMed

    Trainer, C; Yim, C M; McLaren, M; Wahl, P

    2017-09-01

    Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) performed in vector magnetic fields promises atomic scale imaging of magnetic structure, providing complete information on the local spin texture of a sample in three dimensions. Here, we have designed and constructed a turntable system for a low temperature STM which in combination with a 2D vector magnet provides magnetic fields of up to 5 T in any direction relative to the tip-sample geometry. This enables STM imaging and spectroscopy to be performed at the same atomic-scale location and field-of-view on the sample, and most importantly, without experiencing any change on the tip apex before and after field switching. Combined with a ferromagnetic tip, this enables us to study the magnetization of complex magnetic orders in all three spatial directions.

  4. Estimating Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Field Parameters with the CYGNSS Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, M.; Ruf, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of parameters can be used to describe the wind field of a tropical cyclone (TC). Of particular interest to the TC forecasting and research community are the maximum sustained wind speed (VMAX), radius of maximum wind (RMW), 34-, 50-, and 64-kt wind radii, and integrated kinetic energy (IKE). The RMW is the distance separating the storm center and the VMAX position. IKE integrates the square of surface wind speed over the entire storm. These wind field parameters can be estimated from observations made by the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) constellation. The CYGNSS constellation consists of eight small satellites in a 35-degree inclination circular orbit. These satellites will be operating in standard science mode by the 2017 Atlantic TC season. CYGNSS will provide estimates of ocean surface wind speed under all precipitating conditions with high temporal and spatial sampling in the tropics. TC wind field data products can be derived from the level-2 CYGNSS wind speed product. CYGNSS-based TC wind field science data products are developed and tested in this paper. Performance of these products is validated using a mission simulator prelaunch.

  5. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-08-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that the pattern is complex, representing two constructional generations of dunes. The oldest and best-organized generation forms the primary crestlines and is transverse to circumpolar easterly winds. Gross bed form-normal analysis of the younger pattern of crestlines indicates that it emerged with both circumpolar easterly winds and NE winds and is reworking the older pattern. Mapping of secondary flow fields over the dunes indicates that the most recent transporting winds were from the NE. The younger pattern appears to represent an influx of sediment to the dune field associated with the development of the Olympia Cavi reentrant, with NE katabatic winds channeling through the reentrant. A model of the pattern reformation based upon the reconstructed primary winds and resulting secondary flow fields shows that the development of the secondary pattern is controlled by the boundary condition of the older dune topography.

  6. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines & wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre Yilmaz, Ali; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit.

  7. Near-field vector intensity measurements of a small solid rocket motor.

    PubMed

    Gee, Kent L; Giraud, Jarom H; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Near-field vector intensity measurements have been made of a 12.7-cm diameter nozzle solid rocket motor. The measurements utilized a test rig comprised of four probes each with four low-sensitivity 6.35-mm pressure microphones in a tetrahedral arrangement. Measurements were made with the rig at nine positions (36 probe locations) within six nozzle diameters of the plume shear layer. Overall levels at these locations range from 135 to 157 dB re 20 microPa. Vector intensity maps reveal that, as frequency increases, the dominant source region contracts and moves upstream with peak directivity at greater angles from the plume axis.

  8. A new method for distortion magnetic field compensation of a geomagnetic vector measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongyan; Pan, Mengchun; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Geng, Yunling; Wan, Chengbiao; Chen, Dixiang; Tian, Wugang

    2016-12-01

    The geomagnetic vector measurement system mainly consists of three-axis magnetometer and an INS (inertial navigation system), which have many ferromagnetic parts on them. The magnetometer is always distorted by ferromagnetic parts and other electric equipments such as INS and power circuit module within the system, which can lead to geomagnetic vector measurement error of thousands of nT. Thus, the geomagnetic vector measurement system has to be compensated in order to guarantee the measurement accuracy. In this paper, a new distortion magnetic field compensation method is proposed, in which a permanent magnet with different relative positions is used to change the ambient magnetic field to construct equations of the error model parameters, and the parameters can be accurately estimated by solving linear equations. In order to verify effectiveness of the proposed method, the experiment is conducted, and the results demonstrate that, after compensation, the components errors of measured geomagnetic field are reduced significantly. It demonstrates that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of the geomagnetic vector measurement system.

  9. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  10. Spacebased Observation of Global Ocean Surface Wind Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polito, P. S.; Liu, W. T.

    1997-01-01

    The ocean and the atmosphere are dynamically coupled by the transport of momentum which is driven by the wind shear at the sea surface. However, in situ wind measurements are relatively sparse over most of the world's ocean and are largely limited to the locations of shipping routes.

  11. Fields of Opportunity: Wind Machines Return to the Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowers, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a rebirth of wind machines on the rural landscape. In ironic fashion the wind's kinetic energy has grown in significance through its ability to generate commercial amounts of electricity, the commodity that a few generations earlier hastened the demise of the old Great Plains windmill. Yet the reemergence of wind…

  12. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  13. Vector magnetic fields in sunspots. I - Stokes profile analysis using the Marshall Space Flight Center magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; West, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph is a tunable filter magnetograph with a bandpass of 125 mA. Results are presented of the inversion of Stokes polarization profiles observed with the MSFC vector magnetograph centered on a sunspot to recover the vector magnetic field parameters and thermodynamic parameters of the spectral line forming region using the Fe I 5250.2 A spectral line using a nonlinear least-squares fitting technique. As a preliminary investigation, it is also shown that the recovered thermodynamic parameters could be better understood if the fitted parameters like Doppler width, opacity ratio, and damping constant were broken down into more basic quantities like temperature, microturbulent velocity, or density parameter.

  14. Joint Offshore Wind Field Monitoring with Spaceborne SAR and Platform-Based Doppler LIDAR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S.; Lehner, S.; Hieronimus, J.; Schneemann, J.; Kuhn, M.

    2015-04-01

    The increasing demand for renewable energy resources has promoted the construction of offshore wind farms e.g. in the North Sea. While the wind farm layout consists of an array of large turbines, the interrelation of wind turbine wakes with the remaining array is of substantial interest. The downstream spatial evolution of turbulent wind turbine wakes is very complex and depends on manifold parameters such as wind speed, wind direction and ambient atmospheric stability conditions. To complement and validate existing numerical models, corresponding observations are needed. While in-situ measurements with e.g. anemometers provide a time-series at the given location, the merits of ground-based and space- or airborne remote sensing techniques are indisputable in terms of spatial coverage. Active microwave devices, such as Scatterometer and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), have proven their capabilities of providing sea surface wind measurements and particularly SAR images reveal wind variations at a high spatial resolution while retaining the large coverage area. Platform-based Doppler LiDAR can resolve wind fields with a high spatial coverage and repetition rates of seconds to minutes. In order to study the capabilities of both methods for the investigation of small scale wind field structures, we present a direct comparison of observations obtained by high resolution TerraSAR-X (TS-X) X-band SAR data and platform-based LiDAR devices at the North Sea wind farm alpha ventus. We furthermore compare the results with meteorological data from the COSMO-DE model run by the German Weather Service DWD. Our study indicates that the overall agreement between SAR and LiDAR wind fields is good and that under appropriate conditions small scale wind field variations compare significantly well.

  15. Appendix I1-2 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Zack; Deborah Hanley; Dora Nakafuji

    This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to dev elop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET field campaign deployment experiences and challenges. As part of the WindNET project on the Big Island of Hawaii, AWS Truepower (AWST) conducted a field campaign to assess the viability of deploying a network of monitoring systems to aid in local wind energy forecasting. The data provided at these monitoring locations, which were strategically placed around the Big Island of Hawaii based upon results from the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Studymore » (OWITS) observational targeting study (Figure 1), provided predictive indicators for improving wind forecasts and developing responsive strategies for managing real-time, wind-related system events. The goal of the field campaign was to make measurements from a network of remote monitoring devices to improve 1- to 3-hour look ahead forecasts for wind facilities.« less

  16. Geometric Representations of Condition Queries on Three-Dimensional Vector Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Condition queries on distributed data ask where particular conditions are satisfied. It is possible to represent condition queries as geometric objects by plotting field data in various spaces derived from the data, and by selecting loci within these derived spaces which signify the desired conditions. Rather simple geometric partitions of derived spaces can represent complex condition queries because much complexity can be encapsulated in the derived space mapping itself A geometric view of condition queries provides a useful conceptual unification, allowing one to intuitively understand many existing vector field feature detection algorithms -- and to design new ones -- as variations on a common theme. A geometric representation of condition queries also provides a simple and coherent basis for computer implementation, reducing a wide variety of existing and potential vector field feature detection techniques to a few simple geometric operations.

  17. Unsupervised segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs using multiresolution fractal feature vector and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Li; Chang, Koyin; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting lung fields in a chest radiograph is essential for automatically analyzing an image. We present an unsupervised method based on multiresolution fractal feature vector. The feature vector characterizes the lung field region effectively. A fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is then applied to obtain a satisfactory initial contour. The final contour is obtained by deformable models. The results show the feasibility and high performance of the proposed method. Furthermore, based on the segmentation of lung fields, the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) can be measured. The CTR is a simple index for evaluating cardiac hypertrophy. After identifying a suspicious symptom based on the estimated CTR, a physician can suggest that the patient undergoes additional extensive tests before a treatment plan is finalized.

  18. The derivation of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles - Integral versus least squares fitting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1987-01-01

    The results of two methods for deriving photospheric vector magnetic fields from the Zeeman effect, as observed in the Fe I line at 6302.5 A at high spectral resolution (45 mA), are compared. The first method does not take magnetooptical effects into account, but determines the vector magnetic field from the integral properties of the Stokes profiles. The second method is an iterative least-squares fitting technique which fits the observed Stokes profiles to the profiles predicted by the Unno-Rachkovsky solution to the radiative transfer equation. For sunspot fields above about 1500 gauss, the two methods are found to agree in derived azimuthal and inclination angles to within about + or - 20 deg.

  19. Magnetic field vector and electron density diagnostics from linear polarization measurements in 14 solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bommier, V.

    1986-01-01

    The Hanle effect is the modification of the linear polarization parameters of a spectral line due to the effect of the magnetic field. It has been successfully applied to the magnetic field vector diagnostic in solar prominences. The magnetic field vector is determined by comparing the measured polarization to the polarization computed, taking into account all the polarizing and depolarizing processes in line formation and the depolarizing effect of the magnetic field. The method was applied to simultaneous polarization measurements in the Helium D3 line and in the hydrogen beta line in 14 prominences. Four polarization parameters are measured, which lead to the determination of the three coordinates of the magnetic field vector and the electron density, owing to the sensitivity of the hydrogen beta line to the non-negligible effect of depolarizing collisions with electrons and protons of the medium. A mean value of 1.3 x 10 to the 10th power cu. cm. is derived in 14 prominences.

  20. Linear and angular coherence momenta in the classical second-order coherence theory of vector electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2006-09-01

    A new concept of vector and tensor densities is introduced into the general coherence theory of vector electromagnetic fields that is based on energy and energy-flow coherence tensors. Related coherence conservation laws are presented in the form of continuity equations that provide new insights into the propagation of second-order correlation tensors associated with stationary random classical electromagnetic fields.

  1. Synthetic Sex Pheromone Attracts the Leishmaniasis Vector Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) to Traps in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Bray, D. P.; Bandi, K. K.; Brazil, R. P.; Oliveira, A. G.; Hamilton, J.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Improving vector control remains a key goal in reducing the world’s burden of infectious diseases. More cost-effective approaches to vector control are urgently needed, particularly as vaccines are unavailable and treatment is prohibitively expensive. The causative agent of AVL, Leishmania chagasi, Cunha and Chagas (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) is transmitted between animal and human hosts by blood-feeding female sand flies, attracted to mating aggregations formed on or above host animals by male-produced sex pheromones. Our results demonstrate the potential of using synthetic pheromones to control populations of Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz and Neiva (Diptera: Psychodidae), the sand fly vector of one of the world’s most important neglected diseases, American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL). We showed that a synthetic pheromone, (±)-9-methylgermacrene-B, produced from a low-cost plant intermediate, attracted females in the laboratory. Then by formulating dispensers that released this pheromone at a rate similar to that released by aggregating males, we were able to attract flies of both sexes to traps in the field. These dispensers worked equally well when deployed with mechanical light traps and inexpensive sticky traps. If deployed effectively, pheromone-based traps could be used to decrease AVL transmission rates through specific targeting and reduction of L. longipalpis populations. This is the first study to show attraction of a human disease-transmitting insect to a synthetic pheromone in the field, demonstrating the general applicability of this novel approach for developing new tools for use in vector control. PMID:19496409

  2. Synthetic sex pheromone attracts the leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) to traps in the field.

    PubMed

    Bray, D P; Bandi, K K; Brazil, R P; Oliveira, A G; Hamilton, J G C

    2009-05-01

    Improving vector control remains a key goal in reducing the world's burden of infectious diseases. More cost-effective approaches to vector control are urgently needed, particularly because vaccines are unavailable and treatment is prohibitively expensive. The causative agent of American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL), Leishmania chagasi, Cunha and Chagas (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), is transmitted between animal and human hosts by blood-feeding female sand flies attracted to mating aggregations formed on or above host animals by male-produced sex pheromones. Our results show the potential of using synthetic pheromones to control populations of Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz and Neiva (Diptera: Psychodidae), the sand fly vector of one of the world's most important neglected diseases, AVL. We showed that a synthetic pheromone, (+/-)-9-methylgermacrene-B, produced from a low-cost plant intermediate, attracted females in the laboratory. By formulating dispensers that released this pheromone at a rate similar to that released by aggregating males, we were able to attract flies of both sexes to traps in the field. These dispensers worked equally well when deployed with mechanical light traps and inexpensive sticky traps. If deployed effectively, pheromone-based traps could be used to decrease AVL transmission rates through specific targeting and reduction of L. longipalpis populations. This is the first study to show attraction of a human disease-transmitting insect to a synthetic pheromone in the field, showing the general applicability of this novel approach for developing new tools for use in vector control.

  3. Field-induced metastability of the modulation wave vector in a magnetic soliton lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, M.; Peng, J.; Hong, T.; ...

    2017-04-19

    We present magnetic-field-induced metastability of the magnetic soliton lattice in a bilayer ruthenate Ca 3(Ru 1–xFe x) 2O 7(x=0.05) through single-crystal neutron diffraction study. We show that the incommensurability of the modulation wave vector at zero field strongly depends on the history of magnetic field at low temperature, and that the equilibrium ground state can be achieved by warming above a characteristic temperature T g~37K. Lastly, we suggest that such metastability might be associated with the domain wall pinning by the magnetic Fe dopants.

  4. Field-induced metastability of the modulation wave vector in a magnetic soliton lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, M.; Peng, J.; Hong, T.

    We present magnetic-field-induced metastability of the magnetic soliton lattice in a bilayer ruthenate Ca 3(Ru 1–xFe x) 2O 7(x=0.05) through single-crystal neutron diffraction study. We show that the incommensurability of the modulation wave vector at zero field strongly depends on the history of magnetic field at low temperature, and that the equilibrium ground state can be achieved by warming above a characteristic temperature T g~37K. Lastly, we suggest that such metastability might be associated with the domain wall pinning by the magnetic Fe dopants.

  5. Logarithmic violation of scaling in strongly anisotropic turbulent transfer of a passive vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form ∝δ (t -t') /k⊥d -1 +ξ , where k⊥=|k⊥| and k⊥ is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction ("direction of the flow")—the d -dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [Commun. Math. Phys. 131, 381 (1990), 10.1007/BF02161420]. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier-Stokes equation. In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale L has a logarithmic behavior: Instead of powerlike corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of L . The key point is that the matrices of scaling dimensions of the relevant families of composite operators appear nilpotent and cannot be diagonalized. The detailed proof of this fact is given for the correlation functions of arbitrary order.

  6. The variability of the surface wind field in the equatorial Pacific Ocean: Criteria for satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.

    1984-01-01

    The natural variability of the equatorial Pacific surface wind field is described from long period surface wind measurements made at three sites along the equator (95 deg W, 109 deg 30 W, 152 deg 30 W). The data were obtained from surface buoys moored in the deep ocean far from islands or land, and provide criteria to adequately sample the tropical Pacific winds from satellites.

  7. Electric field measurements during the blowing snow in a cryogenic wind tunnel by a non-contact voltmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, A.; Omiya, S.

    2011-12-01

    It is known that the average atmospheric electric field is +100V/m in fair weather (positive electric field vector points downward). An increase of atmospheric electric field is reported when the blowing snow occurred. This phenomenon is mainly explained by the fact that the blowing snow particles have negative charge in average. It is suggested that an electrostatic force, given by the product of the electric field and the charge of the particle, may influence the particle trajectory and change those movements, saltation and suspension. The purpose of this experiment is to clarify the characteristics of the electric field during blowing snow event. Experiments were carried out in the cryogenic wind tunnel of Snow and Ice Research Center, NIED. A non-contact voltmeter was used to measure the electric field. An artificial blowing snow was generated by a snow particle supply machine. The rolling brushes of the machine scratch the snow surface and supply snow particles into the airflow. This machine made it possible to supply the snow particles at an arbitrary rate. This experiment was conducted in the following experimental conditions; wind speed of 5 to 7 m/s (3 patterns), supply snow quantity of 8.7 to 34.9 g/m/s (4 patterns), air temperature of -10 degree Celsius, fetch of 10 m and hard snow surface. Measured electric field was all negative, which is opposite direction to the previous measurements. This means that the blowing snow particles had positive charges. The negative electric field tended to increase with increase of the wind speed and the mass flux. These results can be explained from the previous experiment by Omiya and Sato (2010). The snow particles gain positive charges by the friction with the rolling brush which is made from polypropylene, however the particles accumulate negative charges gradually with increase of the collisions to the snow surface. Probably, the positive charges might have remained on the snow particles that had passed over the

  8. Wind Loads on Flat Plate Photovoltaic Array Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.; Zimmerman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays were investigated. Local pressure distributions and total aerodynamic forces on the arrays are shown. Design loads are presented to cover the conditions of array angles relative to the ground from 20 deg to 60 deg, variable array spacings, a ground clearance gap up to 1.2 m (4 ft) and array slant heights of 2.4 m (8 ft) and 4.8 m (16 ft). Several means of alleviating the wind loads on the arrays are detailed. The expected reduction of the steady state wind velocity with the use of fences as a load alleviation device are indicated to be in excess of a factor of three for some conditions. This yields steady state wind load reductions as much as a factor of ten compared to the load incurred if no fence is used to protect the arrays. This steady state wind load reduction is offset by the increase in turbulence due to the fence but still an overall load reduction of 2.5 can be realized. Other load alleviation devices suggested are the installation of air gaps in the arrays, blocking the flow under the arrays and rounding the edges of the array. A wind tunnel test plan to supplement the theoretical study and to evaluate the load alleviation devices is outlined.

  9. Vector electric field measurement via position-modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Ryan P.; Smieska, Louisa M.; Tirmzi, Ali Moeed; Marohn, John A.

    2017-10-01

    High-quality spatially resolved measurements of electric fields are critical to understanding charge injection, charge transport, and charge trapping in semiconducting materials. Here, we report a variation of frequency-modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy that enables spatially resolved measurements of the electric field. We measure electric field components along multiple directions simultaneously by employing position modulation and lock-in detection in addition to numeric differentiation of the surface potential. We demonstrate the technique by recording linescans of the in-plane electric field vector in the vicinity of a patch of trapped charge in a 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (DPh-BTBT) organic field-effect transistor. This technique is simple to implement and should be especially useful for studying electric fields in spatially inhomogeneous samples like organic transistors and photovoltaic blends.

  10. On the electromagnetic fields, Poynting vector, and peak power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial radiation fields, Poynting vector, and total electromagnetic power that a vertical return stroke radiates into the upper half space have been computed when the speed of the stroke, nu, is a significant fraction of the speed of light, c, assuming that at large distances and early times the source is an infinitesimal dipole. The initial current is also assumed to satisfy the transmission-line model with a constant nu and to be perpendicular to an infinite, perfectly conducting ground. The effect of a large nu is to increase the radiation fields by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -1, where beta = nu/c and theta is measured from the vertical, and the Poynting vector by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -2.

  11. A Genealogy of Convex Solids Via Local and Global Bifurcations of Gradient Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Holmes, Philip; Lángi, Zsolt

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional convex bodies can be classified in terms of the number and stability types of critical points on which they can balance at rest on a horizontal plane. For typical bodies, these are non-degenerate maxima, minima, and saddle points, the numbers of which provide a primary classification. Secondary and tertiary classifications use graphs to describe orbits connecting these critical points in the gradient vector field associated with each body. In previous work, it was shown that these classifications are complete in that no class is empty. Here, we construct 1- and 2-parameter families of convex bodies connecting members of adjacent primary and secondary classes and show that transitions between them can be realized by codimension 1 saddle-node and saddle-saddle (heteroclinic) bifurcations in the gradient vector fields. Our results indicate that all combinatorially possible transitions can be realized in physical shape evolution processes, e.g., by abrasion of sedimentary particles.

  12. Concircular vector fields on Lorentzian manifold of Bianchi type-I spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Amjad; Ali, Ahmad T.; Khan, Suhail

    2018-04-01

    Our aim in this paper is to obtain concircular vector fields (CVFs) on the Lorentzian manifold of Bianchi type-I spacetimes. For this purpose, two different sets of coupled partial differential equations comprising ten equations each are obtained. The first ten equations, known as conformal Killing equations are solved completely and components of conformal Killing vector fields (CKVFs) are obtained in different possible cases. These CKVFs are then substituted into second set of ten differential equations to obtain CVFs. It comes out that Bianchi type-I spacetimes admit four-, five-, six-, seven- or 15-dimensional CVFs for particular choices of the metric functions. In many cases, the CKVFs of a particular metric are same as CVFs while there exists few cases where proper CKVFs are not CVFs.

  13. Deformation structure analysis of material at fatigue on the basis of the vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibitkin, Vladimir V.; Solodushkin, Andrey I.; Pleshanov, Vasily S.

    2017-12-01

    In the paper, spatial distributions of deformation, circulation, and shear amplitudes and shear angles are obtained from the displacement vector field measured by the DIC technique. This vector field and its characteristics of shears and vortices are given as an example of such approach. The basic formulae are also given. The experiment shows that honeycomb deformation structures can arise in the center of a macrovortex at developed plastic flow. The spatial distribution of local circulation and shears is discovered, which coincides with the deformation structure but their amplitudes are different. The analysis proves that the spatial distribution of shear angles is a result of maximum tangential and normal stresses. The anticlockwise circulation of most local vortices obeys the normal Gaussian law in the area of interest.

  14. Double gauge invariance and covariantly-constant vector fields in Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassandrov, Vladimir V.; Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2014-08-01

    The wave equation and equations of covariantly-constant vector fields (CCVF) in spaces with Weyl nonmetricity turn out to possess, in addition to the canonical conformal-gauge, a gauge invariance of another type. On a Minkowski metric background, the CCVF system alone allows us to pin down the Weyl 4-metricity vector, identified herein with the electromagnetic potential. The fundamental solution is given by the ordinary Lienard-Wiechert field, in particular, by the Coulomb distribution for a charge at rest. Unlike the latter, however, the magnitude of charge is necessarily unity, "elementary", and charges of opposite signs correspond to retarded and advanced potentials respectively, thus establishing a direct connection between the particle/antiparticle asymmetry and the "arrow of time".

  15. Neutral winds and electric fields from model studies using reduced ionograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baran, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A relationship between the vertical component of the ion velocity and electron density profiles derived from reduced ionograms is developed. Methods for determining the horizontal components of the neutral winds and electric fields by using this relationship and making use of the variations of the inclinations and declinations of the earth's magnetic field are presented. The effects that electric fields have on the neutral wind calculations are estimated to be small but not second order. Seasonal and latitudinal variations of the calculated neutral winds are presented. From the calculated neutral winds a new set of neutral pressure gradients is determined. The new pressure gradients are compared with those generated from several static neutral atmospheric models. Sensitivity factors relating the pressure gradients and neutral winds are calculated and these indicate that mode coupling and harmonic generation are important to studies which assume linearized theories.

  16. Internal and external potential-field estimation from regional vector data at varying satellite altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik J.

    2017-10-01

    When modelling satellite data to recover a global planetary magnetic or gravitational potential field, the method of choice remains their analysis in terms of spherical harmonics. When only regional data are available, or when data quality varies strongly with geographic location, the inversion problem becomes severely ill-posed. In those cases, adopting explicitly local methods is to be preferred over adapting global ones (e.g. by regularization). Here, we develop the theory behind a procedure to invert for planetary potential fields from vector observations collected within a spatially bounded region at varying satellite altitude. Our method relies on the construction of spatiospectrally localized bases of functions that mitigate the noise amplification caused by downward continuation (from the satellite altitude to the source) while balancing the conflicting demands for spatial concentration and spectral limitation. The `altitude-cognizant' gradient vector Slepian functions (AC-GVSF) enjoy a noise tolerance under downward continuation that is much improved relative to the `classical' gradient vector Slepian functions (CL-GVSF), which do not factor satellite altitude into their construction. Furthermore, venturing beyond the realm of their first application, published in a preceding paper, in the present article we extend the theory to being able to handle both internal and external potential-field estimation. Solving simultaneously for internal and external fields under the limitation of regional data availability reduces internal-field artefacts introduced by downward-continuing unmodelled external fields, as we show with numerical examples. We explain our solution strategies on the basis of analytic expressions for the behaviour of the estimation bias and variance of models for which signal and noise are uncorrelated, (essentially) space- and band-limited, and spectrally (almost) white. The AC-GVSF are optimal linear combinations of vector spherical harmonics

  17. On parasupersymmetric oscillators and relativistic vector mesons in constant magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debergh, Nathalie; Beckers, Jules

    1995-01-01

    Johnson-Lippmann considerations on oscillators and their connection with the minimal coupling schemes are visited in order to introduce a new Sakata-Taketani equation describing vector mesons in interaction with a constant magnetic field. This new proposal, based on a specific parasupersymmetric oscillator-like system, is characterized by real energies as opposed to previously pointed out relativistic equations corresponding to this interacting context.

  18. Studies of the Vector Field in Shallow Water and in the Presence of 3-D Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Studies of the Vector Field in Shallow Water and in the...including noise variability in shallow water and the influence of three-dimensional environmental variability on the propagation of acoustic energy...issue, known to be a problem in SSF algorithms in shallow water . Figure 1 displays results of TL traces at a depth of 100m for a 100Hz source

  19. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nearly all wind erosion models require the specification of threshold friction velocity (TFV). Yet determining TFV of wind erosion in field conditions is difficult as it depends on both soil characteristics and distribution of vegetation or other roughness elements. While several reliable methods ha...

  20. Robustness-Based Simplification of 2D Steady and Unsteady Vector Fields.

    PubMed

    Skraba, Primoz; Bei Wang; Guoning Chen; Rosen, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Vector field simplification aims to reduce the complexity of the flow by removing features in order of their relevance and importance, to reveal prominent behavior and obtain a compact representation for interpretation. Most existing simplification techniques based on the topological skeleton successively remove pairs of critical points connected by separatrices, using distance or area-based relevance measures. These methods rely on the stable extraction of the topological skeleton, which can be difficult due to instability in numerical integration, especially when processing highly rotational flows. In this paper, we propose a novel simplification scheme derived from the recently introduced topological notion of robustness which enables the pruning of sets of critical points according to a quantitative measure of their stability, that is, the minimum amount of vector field perturbation required to remove them. This leads to a hierarchical simplification scheme that encodes flow magnitude in its perturbation metric. Our novel simplification algorithm is based on degree theory and has minimal boundary restrictions. Finally, we provide an implementation under the piecewise-linear setting and apply it to both synthetic and real-world datasets. We show local and complete hierarchical simplifications for steady as well as unsteady vector fields.

  1. Associated patterns of insecticide resistance in field populations of malaria vectors across Africa.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Penelope A; Wiebe, Antoinette; Gleave, Katherine A; Bhatt, Samir; Cameron, Ewan; Trett, Anna; Weetman, David; Smith, David L; Hemingway, Janet; Coleman, Michael; Gething, Peter W; Moyes, Catherine L

    2018-06-05

    The development of insecticide resistance in African malaria vectors threatens the continued efficacy of important vector control methods that rely on a limited set of insecticides. To understand the operational significance of resistance we require quantitative information about levels of resistance in field populations to the suite of vector control insecticides. Estimation of resistance is complicated by the sparsity of observations in field populations, variation in resistance over time and space at local and regional scales, and cross-resistance between different insecticide types. Using observations of the prevalence of resistance in mosquito species from the Anopheles gambiae complex sampled from 1,183 locations throughout Africa, we applied Bayesian geostatistical models to quantify patterns of covariation in resistance phenotypes across different insecticides. For resistance to the three pyrethroids tested, deltamethrin, permethrin, and λ-cyhalothrin, we found consistent forms of covariation across sub-Saharan Africa and covariation between resistance to these pyrethroids and resistance to DDT. We found no evidence of resistance interactions between carbamate and organophosphate insecticides or between these insecticides and those from other classes. For pyrethroids and DDT we found significant associations between predicted mean resistance and the observed frequency of kdr mutations in the Vgsc gene in field mosquito samples, with DDT showing the strongest association. These results improve our capacity to understand and predict resistance patterns throughout Africa and can guide the development of monitoring strategies. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  2. Anisotropic Bispectrum of Curvature Perturbations from Primordial Non-Abelian Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Matarrese, Sabino; Riotto, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    We consider a primordial SU(2) vector multiplet during inflation in models where quantum fluctuations of vector fields are involved in producing the curvature perturbation. Recently, a lot of attention has been paid to models populated by vector fields, given the interesting possibility of generating some level of statistical anisotropy in the cosmological perturbations. The scenario we propose is strongly motivated by the fact that, for non-Abelian gauge fields, self-interactions are responsible for generating extra terms in the cosmological correlation functions, which are naturally absent in the Abelian case. We compute these extra contributions to the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation, using the δN formula and the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. The primordial violation of rotational invariance (due to the introduction of the SU(2) gauge multiplet) leaves its imprint on the correlation functions introducing, as expected, some degree of statistical anisotropy in our results. We calculate the non-Gaussianity parameter fNL, proving that the new contributions derived from gauge bosons self-interactions can be important, and in some cases the dominat ones. We study the shape of the bispectrum and we find that it turns out to peak in the local configuration, with an amplitude that is modulated by the preferred directions that break statistical isotropy.

  3. The Vector Electric Field Instrument on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Kujawski, J.; Uribe, P.; Bromund, K.; Fourre, R.; Acuna, M.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Holzworth, R.; McCarthy, M.; hide

    2008-01-01

    We provide an overview of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. VEFI is a NASA GSFC instrument designed 1) to investigate the role of the ambient electric fields in initiating nighttime ionospheric density depletions and turbulence; 2) to determine the electric fields associated with abrupt, large amplitude, density depletions and 3) to quantify the spectrum of the wave electric fields and plasma densities (irregularities) associated with density depletions or Equatorial Spread-F. The VEFI instrument includes a vector electric field double probe detector, a Langmuir trigger probe, a flux gate magnetometer, a lightning detector and associated electronics. The heart of the instrument is the set of double probe detectors designed to measure DC and AC electric fields using 6 identical, mutually orthogonal, deployable 9.5 m booms tipped with 10 cm diameter spheres containing embedded preamplifiers. A description of the instrument and its sensors will be presented. If available, representative measurements will be provided.

  4. Small wind systems field evaluation. Volume I. Program description. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, D.M.; Liske, C.

    1982-07-01

    A Field Evaluation Program (FEP) was developed in 1978 to assist in the commercialization process for small wind systems. The program is described, and a description is provided of the institutional issues and barriers encountered and measures taken to assist the state and local governments in resolving them. Barriers were found to involve not only government regulations, but also the distribution of costs and benefits of wind technology and the rate of diffusion of knowledge about wind technology. The availability of capital to finance the production and purchase of wind machines, and the training of qualified dealers and service personnelmore » were also considerable problem areas. (LEW)« less

  5. The Ocean's Abyssal Mass Flux Sustained Primarily By the Wind: Vector Correlation of Time Series in Upper and Abyssal Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.

    2003-12-01

    As Wunsch has recently noted (2002), use of the term "thermohaline circulation" is muddled. The term is used with at least seven inconsistent meanings, among them abyssal circulation, the circulation driven by density and pressure differences in the deep ocean, the global conveyor, and at least four others. The use of a single term for all these concepts can create an impression that an understanding exists whereby in various combinations the seven meanings have been demonstrated to mean the same thing. But that is not the case. A particularly important consequence of the muddle is the way in which abyssal circulation is sometimes taken to be driven mostly or entirely by temperature and density differences, and equivalent to the global conveyor. But in fact the distinction between abyssal and upper-layer circulation has not been measured. To find out whether available data justifies a distinction between the upper-layer and abyssal circulations, this study surveyed velocity time series obtained by deep current meter moorings. Altogether, 114 moorings were identified, drawn from about three dozen experiments worldwide over the period 1973-1996, each of which deployed current meters in both the upper (2003750) layers. For each pair of current meters, the Kundu and Crosby measures of vector correlation were estimated, as well as coherences for periods from 10 to 60 days. In the North Atlantic, for example, Kundu vector correlation (50-day window): 0.48 +/- .03 Crosby vector correlation (absolute value, 50 day window): 0.46 +/- .07 Coherence at 60 days: .36 +/- .07 - at 30 days: 0.40 +/- .06 - at 10 days: 0.22 +/- .05 Most figures for the South Atlantic, Pacific and Southern Oceans are similar. Those obtained in the Indian Ocean or near the Equator are somewhat different. The statistics obtained here are consistent with the work of Wunsch (1997), and tend to confirm Wunsch's result that current velocities at depth are linked with those in the

  6. The Vector Magnetic Fields and Thermodynamics of Sunspot Light Bridges: The Case for Field-free Disruptions in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    1997-07-01

    We present observations with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter of 11 light bridges in sunspots of various ages and sizes, all very close to disk center. Full vector spectropolarimetry and a nonlinear least-squares inversion algorithm allows us to determine not only the vector magnetic field in the bridges and host sunspots but also thermodynamic parameters such as continuum brightness, Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, opacity ratio, and the source function parameters. We can also separate the magnetic and nonmagnetic components of the spectral signal within each resolution element. We find that there is a disruption of the magnetic fields in light bridges, relative both to neighboring umbrae and to normal, undisturbed penumbrae. This change takes the form of lower intrinsic field strength and sparser, more horizontal fields in the bridges relative to umbrae. The magnetic fields in the bridges remain more vertically oriented, however, than those in undisturbed penumbra. There are systematic upflows observed in the bridge plasma relative to the neighboring umbrae, and the evidence points toward a component that is heated and departs from radiative equilibrium. In four cases, we follow a light bridge over several days and find that as the bridges age, they grow wider and brighter, the fields weaken and become sparser, and the heating increases. We also find some evidence that the magnetic field begins to reorganize itself to accommodate the (now) two azimuth centers before there are strong signals of a light bridge in the thermodynamic parameters. This paper presents the first systematic look at sunspot light bridges with full vector polarimetry and thermodynamic determination. The results show that there is an intrusion of field-free, possibly convective material into an otherwise stable, magnetic sunspot. The departure from stability is seen in the magnetic field orientation prior to its appearance in continuum intensity, and the effects of this disruption are evident

  7. Solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae.

    PubMed

    Crary, F J; Clarke, J T; Dougherty, M K; Hanlon, P G; Hansen, K C; Steinberg, J T; Barraclough, B L; Coates, A J; Gérard, J-C; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Mitchell, D G; Rymer, A M; Young, D T

    2005-02-17

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms, but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system, whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere.

  8. Winds of Massive Magnetic Stars: Interacting Fields and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley-Yates, S.; Stevens, I. R.

    2018-01-01

    We present results of 3D numerical simulations of magnetically confined, radiatively driven stellar winds of massive stars, conducted using the astrophysical MHD code Pluto, with a focus on understanding the rotational variability of radio and sub-mm emission. Radiative driving is implemented according to the Castor, Abbott and Klein theory of radiatively driven winds. Many magnetic massive stars posses a magnetic axis which is inclined with respect to the rotational axis. This misalignment leads to a complex wind structure as magnetic confinement, centrifugal acceleration and radiative driving act to channel the circumstellar plasma into a warped disk whose observable properties should be apparent in multiple wavelengths. This structure is analysed to calculate free-free thermal radio emission and determine the characteristic intensity maps and radio light curves.

  9. Weaving the history of the solar wind with magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado Gomez, Julian

    2017-08-01

    Despite its fundamental role for the evolution of the solar system, our observational knowledge of the wind properties of the young Sun comes from a single stellar observation. This unexpected fact for a field such as astrophysics arises from the difficulty of detecting Sun-like stellar winds. Their detection relies on the appearance of an astrospheric signature (from the stellar wind-ISM interaction region), visible only with the aid of high-resolution HST Lyman-alpha spectra. However, observations and modelling of the present day Sun have revealed that magnetic fields constitute the main driver of the solar wind, providing guidance on how such winds would look like back in time. In this context we propose observations of four young Sun-like stars in order to detect their astrospheres and characterise their stellar winds. For all these objects we have recovered surface magnetic field maps using the technique of Zeeman Doppler Imaging, and developed detailed wind models based on these observed field distributions. Even a single detection would represent a major step forward for our understanding of the history of the solar wind, and the outflows in more active stars. Mass loss rate estimates from HST will be confronted with predictions from realistic models of the corona/stellar wind. In one of our objects the comparison would allow us to quantify the wind variability induced by the magnetic cycle of a star, other than the Sun, for the first time. Three of our targets are planet hosts, thus the HST spectra would also provide key information on the high-energy environment of these systems, guaranteeing their legacy value for the growing field of exoplanet characterisation.

  10. Development of Techniques for Visualization of Scalar and Vector Fields in the Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, Hari B.; Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Visualization of scalar and vector fields in the immersive environment (CAVE - Cave Automated Virtual Environment) is important for its application to radiation shielding research at NASA Langley Research Center. A complete methodology and the underlying software for this purpose have been developed. The developed software has been put to use for the visualization of the earth s magnetic field, and in particular for the study of the South Atlantic Anomaly. The methodology has also been put to use for the visualization of geomagnetically trapped protons and electrons within Earth's magnetosphere.

  11. Topological events on the lines of circular polarization in nonparaxial vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Freund, Isaac

    2017-02-01

    In nonparaxial vector optical fields, the following topological events are shown to occur in apparent violation of charge conservation: as one translates the observation plane along a line of circular polarization (a C line), the points on the line (C points) are seen to change not only the signs of their topological charges, but also their handedness, and, at turning points on the line, paired C points with the same topological charge and opposite handedness are seen to nucleate. These counter-intuitive events cannot occur in paraxial fields.

  12. Massive Vector Fields in Rotating Black-Hole Spacetimes: Separability and Quasinormal Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Krtouš, Pavel; KubizÅák, David; Santos, Jorge E.

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate the separability of the massive vector (Proca) field equation in general Kerr-NUT-AdS black-hole spacetimes in any number of dimensions, filling a long-standing gap in the literature. The obtained separated equations are studied in more detail for the four-dimensional Kerr geometry and the corresponding quasinormal modes are calculated. Two of the three independent polarizations of the Proca field are shown to emerge from the separation ansatz and the results are found in an excellent agreement with those of the recent numerical study where the full coupled partial differential equations were tackled without using the separability property.

  13. Massive Vector Fields in Rotating Black-Hole Spacetimes: Separability and Quasinormal Modes.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Valeri P; Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David; Santos, Jorge E

    2018-06-08

    We demonstrate the separability of the massive vector (Proca) field equation in general Kerr-NUT-AdS black-hole spacetimes in any number of dimensions, filling a long-standing gap in the literature. The obtained separated equations are studied in more detail for the four-dimensional Kerr geometry and the corresponding quasinormal modes are calculated. Two of the three independent polarizations of the Proca field are shown to emerge from the separation ansatz and the results are found in an excellent agreement with those of the recent numerical study where the full coupled partial differential equations were tackled without using the separability property.

  14. Changes in measured vector magnetic fields when transformed into heliographic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The changes that occur in measured magnetic fields when they are transformed into a heliographic coordinate system are investigated. To carry out this investigation, measurements of the vector magnetic field of an active region that was observed at 1/3 the solar radius from disk center are taken, and the observed field is transformed into heliographic coordinates. Differences in the calculated potential field that occur when the heliographic normal component of the field is used as the boundary condition rather than the observed line-of-sight component are also examined. The results of this analysis show: (1) that the observed fields of sunspots more closely resemble the generally accepted picture of the distribution of umbral fields if they are displayed in heliographic coordinates; (2) that the differences in the potential calculations are less than 200 G in field strength and 20 deg in field azimuth outside sunspots; and (3) that differences in the two potential calculations in the sunspot areas are no more than 400 G in field strength but range from 60 to 80 deg in field azimuth in localized umbral areas.

  15. On scalar and vector fields coupled to the energy-momentum tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Cembranos, Jose A. R.; Sánchez Velázquez, Jose M.

    2018-05-01

    We consider theories for scalar and vector fields coupled to the energy-momentum tensor. Since these fields also carry a non-trivial energy-momentum tensor, the coupling prescription generates self-interactions. In analogy with gravity theories, we build the action by means of an iterative process that leads to an infinite series, which can be resumed as the solution of a set of differential equations. We show that, in some particular cases, the equations become algebraic and that is also possible to find solutions in the form of polynomials. We briefly review the case of the scalar field that has already been studied in the literature and extend the analysis to the case of derivative (disformal) couplings. We then explore theories with vector fields, distinguishing between gauge-and non-gauge-invariant couplings. Interactions with matter are also considered, taking a scalar field as a proxy for the matter sector. We also discuss the ambiguity introduced by superpotential (boundary) terms in the definition of the energy-momentum tensor and use them to show that it is also possible to generate Galileon-like interactions with this procedure. We finally use collider and astrophysical observations to set constraints on the dimensionful coupling which characterises the phenomenology of these models.

  16. Initial Results from the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Acuna, M.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Holzworth, R.; Wilson, G.; Burke, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. The DC electric field detector has revealed zonal and meridional electric fields that undergo a diurnal variation, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. In general, the measured DC electric field amplitudes are in the 0.5-2 mV/m range, corresponding to I3 x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. What is surprising is the high degree of large-scale (10's to 100's of km) structure in the DC electric field, particularly at night, regardless of whether well-defined spread-F plasma density depletions are present. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. On some occasions, localized regions of low frequency (< 8 Hz) magnetic field broadband irregularities have been detected, suggestive of filamentary currents, although there is no one-to-one correspondence of these waves with the observed plasma density depletions, at least within the data examined thus far. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF waves corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence

  17. On the angular error of intensity vector based direction of arrival estimation in reverberant sound fields.

    PubMed

    Levin, Dovid; Habets, Emanuël A P; Gannot, Sharon

    2010-10-01

    An acoustic vector sensor provides measurements of both the pressure and particle velocity of a sound field in which it is placed. These measurements are vectorial in nature and can be used for the purpose of source localization. A straightforward approach towards determining the direction of arrival (DOA) utilizes the acoustic intensity vector, which is the product of pressure and particle velocity. The accuracy of an intensity vector based DOA estimator in the presence of noise has been analyzed previously. In this paper, the effects of reverberation upon the accuracy of such a DOA estimator are examined. It is shown that particular realizations of reverberation differ from an ideal isotropically diffuse field, and induce an estimation bias which is dependent upon the room impulse responses (RIRs). The limited knowledge available pertaining the RIRs is expressed statistically by employing the diffuse qualities of reverberation to extend Polack's statistical RIR model. Expressions for evaluating the typical bias magnitude as well as its probability distribution are derived.

  18. Estimation of 3-D conduction velocity vector fields from cardiac mapping data.

    PubMed

    Barnette, A R; Bayly, P V; Zhang, S; Walcott, G P; Ideker, R E; Smith, W M

    2000-08-01

    A method to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) conduction velocity vector fields in cardiac tissue is presented. The speed and direction of propagation are found from polynomial "surfaces" fitted to space-time (x, y, z, t) coordinates of cardiac activity. The technique is applied to sinus rhythm and paced rhythm mapped with plunge needles at 396-466 sites in the canine myocardium. The method was validated on simulated 3-D plane and spherical waves. For simulated data, conduction velocities were estimated with an accuracy of 1%-2%. In experimental data, estimates of conduction speeds during paced rhythm were slower than those found during normal sinus rhythm. Vector directions were also found to differ between different types of beats. The technique was able to distinguish between premature ventricular contractions and sinus beats and between sinus and paced beats. The proposed approach to computing velocity vector fields provides an automated, physiological, and quantitative description of local electrical activity in 3-D tissue. This method may provide insight into abnormal conduction associated with fatal ventricular arrhythmias.

  19. Cloud field classification based upon high spatial resolution textural features. II - Simplified vector approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. W.; Sengupta, S. K.; Welch, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper compares the results of cloud-field classification derived from two simplified vector approaches, the Sum and Difference Histogram (SADH) and the Gray Level Difference Vector (GLDV), with the results produced by the Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) approach described by Welch et al. (1988). It is shown that the SADH method produces accuracies equivalent to those obtained using the GLCM method, while the GLDV method fails to resolve error clusters. Compared to the GLCM method, the SADH method leads to a 31 percent saving in run time and a 50 percent saving in storage requirements, while the GLVD approach leads to a 40 percent saving in run time and an 87 percent saving in storage requirements.

  20. User's guide for NASCRIN: A vectorized code for calculating two-dimensional supersonic internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program NASCRIN has been developed for analyzing two-dimensional flow fields in high-speed inlets. It solves the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form by an explicit, two-step finite-difference method. An explicit-implicit method can also be used at the user's discretion for viscous flow calculations. For turbulent flow, an algebraic, two-layer eddy-viscosity model is used. The code is operational on the CDC CYBER 203 computer system and is highly vectorized to take full advantage of the vector-processing capability of the system. It is highly user oriented and is structured in such a way that for most supersonic flow problems, the user has to make only a few changes. Although the code is primarily written for supersonic internal flow, it can be used with suitable changes in the boundary conditions for a variety of other problems.

  1. A sensor for vector electric field measurements through a nonlinear anisotropic optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Luca; Gondola, Marco; Potenza, Marco; Villa, Andrea; Malgesini, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Electrical applications require the development of electric field sensors that can reproduce vector electric field waveforms with a very large spectral width ranging from 50 Hz to at least 70 MHz. This makes it possible to measure both the normal operation modes of electrical components and abnormal behaviors such as the corona emission and partial discharges. In this work, we aim to develop a fully dielectric sensor capable of measuring two components of the electric field using a wide class of optical crystals including anisotropic ones, whereas most of the efforts in this field have been devoted to isotropic crystals. We report the results of the measurements performed at 50 Hz and with a lightning impulse, to validate the sensor.

  2. Superradiant Instability and Backreaction of Massive Vector Fields around Kerr Black Holes.

    PubMed

    East, William E; Pretorius, Frans

    2017-07-28

    We study the growth and saturation of the superradiant instability of a complex, massive vector (Proca) field as it extracts energy and angular momentum from a spinning black hole, using numerical solutions of the full Einstein-Proca equations. We concentrate on a rapidly spinning black hole (a=0.99) and the dominant m=1 azimuthal mode of the Proca field, with real and imaginary components of the field chosen to yield an axisymmetric stress-energy tensor and, hence, spacetime. We find that in excess of 9% of the black hole's mass can be transferred into the field. In all cases studied, the superradiant instability smoothly saturates when the black hole's horizon frequency decreases to match the frequency of the Proca cloud that spontaneously forms around the black hole.

  3. Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

  4. Maximum power extraction under different vector-control schemes and grid-synchronization strategy of a wind-driven Brushless Doubly-Fed Reluctance Generator.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Mohamed G; Allam, S M; Rashad, Essam M

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes an advanced strategy to synchronize the wind-driven Brushless Doubly-Fed Reluctance Generator (BDFRG) to the grid-side terminals. The proposed strategy depends mainly upon determining the electrical angle of the grid voltage, θ v and using the same transformation matrix of both the power winding and grid sides to ensure that the generated power-winding voltage has the same phase-sequence of the grid-side voltage. On the other hand, the paper proposes a vector-control (power-winding flux orientation) technique for maximum wind-power extraction under two schemes summarized as; unity power-factor operation and minimum converter-current. Moreover, a soft-starting method is suggested to avoid the employed converter over-current. The first control scheme is achieved by adjusting the command power-winding reactive power at zero for a unity power-factor operation. However, the second scheme depends on setting the command d-axis control-winding current at zero to maximize the ratio of the generator electromagnetic-torque per the converter current. This enables the system to get a certain command torque under minimum converter current. A sample of the obtained simulation and experimental results is presented to check the effectiveness of the proposed control strategies. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using wind fields from a high resolution atmospheric model for simulating snow dynamics in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, M.; Strasser, U.; Zängl, G.; Mauser, W.; Liston, G.; Pohl, S.

    2008-12-01

    Wind-induced snow transport processes lead to a significant variability of the snow cover. Knowledge about this variability is important for e.g. determining the temporal dynamics of the snowmelt runoff. For predicting the correct amount of transported snow knowledge of the local wind-field is an essential. In high-alpine rugged relief wind fields can hardly be provided by a simple interpolation of station recordings. In this work we use a modified version of the PSU/NCAR Mesoscale Model MM5 to derive wind fields for a 450 km² area at a target resolution of 200 m, accounting for topography and related dynamic effects. We have modelled 220 wind fields representing the most characteristic wind situations within the test-area. The criteria for the extraction of the wind field for the current snowmodel (SNOWTRAND-3D) time step are mean wind speeds and directions in the 700 hPa level derived from DWD (German Weather Service) Local Model reanalysis data with a temporal resolution of one hour. These data are then compared with the corresponding mean wind speeds and directions from the appropriate MM5 nesting area indicating which one of the library files represents the best fit. Verification is conducted by comparison of historical station measurements with corresponding downscaled simulation results. For this downscaling a semi-empirical approach is utilized which accounts for topographic effects. Results for the winter seasons 2003/04 and 2004/05 showing that the presented scheme is able to improve the quality of SNOWTRAN-3D runs with respect to the snow height.

  6. Hairy Slices: Evaluating the Perceptual Effectiveness of Cutting Plane Glyphs for 3D Vector Fields.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Andrew H; Butkiewicz, Thomas; Ware, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional vector fields are common datasets throughout the sciences. Visualizing these fields is inherently difficult due to issues such as visual clutter and self-occlusion. Cutting planes are often used to overcome these issues by presenting more manageable slices of data. The existing literature provides many techniques for visualizing the flow through these cutting planes; however, there is a lack of empirical studies focused on the underlying perceptual cues that make popular techniques successful. This paper presents a quantitative human factors study that evaluates static monoscopic depth and orientation cues in the context of cutting plane glyph designs for exploring and analyzing 3D flow fields. The goal of the study was to ascertain the relative effectiveness of various techniques for portraying the direction of flow through a cutting plane at a given point, and to identify the visual cues and combinations of cues involved, and how they contribute to accurate performance. It was found that increasing the dimensionality of line-based glyphs into tubular structures enhances their ability to convey orientation through shading, and that increasing their diameter intensifies this effect. These tube-based glyphs were also less sensitive to visual clutter issues at higher densities. Adding shadows to lines was also found to increase perception of flow direction. Implications of the experimental results are discussed and extrapolated into a number of guidelines for designing more perceptually effective glyphs for 3D vector field visualizations.

  7. Optical Vector Near-Field Imaging for the Design of Impedance Matched Optical Antennas and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmon, Robert L.

    Antennas control and confine electromagnetic energy, transforming free-space propagating modes to localized regions. This is not only true for the traditional classical radio antenna, but also for structures that interact resonantly at frequencies throughout the visible regime, that are on the micro- and nanometer size scales. The investigation of these optical antennas has increased dramatically in recent years. They promise to bring the transformative capabilities of radio antennas to the nanoscale in fields such as plasmonics, photonics, spectroscopy, and microscopy. However, designing optical antennas with desired properties is not straightforward due to different material properties and geometric considerations in the optical regime compared to the RF. New antenna characterization tools and techniques must be developed for the optical frequency range. Here, the optical analogue of the vector network analyzer, based on a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope, is described and demonstrated for the investigation of the electric and magnetic properties of optical antennas through their electromagnetic vector near-field. Specifically, bringing this microwave frequency tool to the optical regime enables the study of antenna resonant length scaling, optical frequency electromagnetic parameters including current density and impedance, optical antenna coupling to waveguides and nanoloads, local electric field enhancement, and electromagnetic duality of complementary optical antenna geometries.

  8. Arrows as anchors: An analysis of the material features of electric field vector arrows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2014-12-01

    Representations in physics possess both physical and conceptual aspects that are fundamentally intertwined and can interact to support or hinder sense making and computation. We use distributed cognition and the theory of conceptual blending with material anchors to interpret the roles of conceptual and material features of representations in students' use of representations for computation. We focus on the vector-arrows representation of electric fields and describe this representation as a conceptual blend of electric field concepts, physical space, and the material features of the representation (i.e., the physical writing and the surface upon which it is drawn). In this representation, spatial extent (e.g., distance on paper) is used to represent both distances in coordinate space and magnitudes of electric field vectors. In conceptual blending theory, this conflation is described as a clash between the input spaces in the blend. We explore the benefits and drawbacks of this clash, as well as other features of this representation. This analysis is illustrated with examples from clinical problem-solving interviews with upper-division physics majors. We see that while these intermediate physics students make a variety of errors using this representation, they also use the geometric features of the representation to add electric field contributions and to organize the problem situation productively.

  9. Paratransgenesis to control malaria vectors: a semi-field pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Maria Vittoria; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Damiani, Claudia; Accoti, Anastasia; Tallarita, Mario; Petraglia, Elisabetta; Rossi, Paolo; Cappelli, Alessia; Capone, Aida; Peruzzi, Giulia; Valzano, Matteo; Picciolini, Matteo; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Facchinelli, Luca; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido

    2016-03-10

    Malaria still remains a serious health burden in developing countries, causing more than 1 million deaths annually. Given the lack of an effective vaccine against its major etiological agent, Plasmodium falciparum, and the growing resistance of this parasite to the currently available drugs repertoire and of Anopheles mosquitoes to insecticides, the development of innovative control measures is an imperative to reduce malaria transmission. Paratransgenesis, the modification of symbiotic organisms to deliver anti-pathogen effector molecules, represents a novel strategy against Plasmodium development in mosquito vectors, showing the potential to reduce parasite development. However, the field application of laboratory-based evidence of paratransgenesis imposes the use of more realistic confined semi-field environments. Large cages were used to evaluate the ability of bacteria of the genus Asaia expressing green fluorescent protein (Asaia (gfp)), to diffuse in Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles gambiae target mosquito populations. Asaia (gfp) was introduced in large cages through the release of paratransgenic males or by sugar feeding stations. Recombinant bacteria transmission was directly detected by fluorescent microscopy, and further assessed by molecular analysis. Here we show the first known trial in semi-field condition on paratransgenic anophelines. Modified bacteria were able to spread at high rate in different populations of An. stephensi and An. gambiae, dominant malaria vectors, exploring horizontal ways and successfully colonising mosquito midguts. Moreover, in An. gambiae, vertical and trans-stadial diffusion mechanisms were demonstrated. Our results demonstrate the considerable ability of modified Asaia to colonise different populations of malaria vectors, including pecies where its association is not primary, in large environments. The data support the potential to employ transgenic Asaia as a tool for malaria control, disclosing promising perspective

  10. Wind loading analysis and strategy for deflection reduction on HET wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Brian J.; Soukup, Ian M.; Worthington, Michael S.; Zierer, Joseph J.; Booth, John A.; Good, John M.

    2010-07-01

    Wind loading can be a detrimental source of vibration and deflection for any large terrestrial optical telescope. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope* (HET) in the Davis Mountains of West Texas is undergoing a Wide Field Upgrade (WFU) in support of the Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) that will greatly increase the size of the instrumentation subjected to operating wind speeds of up to 20.1 m/s (45 mph). A non-trivial consideration for this telescope (or others) is to quantify the wind loads and resulting deflections of telescope structures induced under normal operating conditions so that appropriate design changes can be made. A quasi-static computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was generated using wind speeds collected on-site as inputs to characterize dynamic wind forces on telescope structures under various conditions. The CFD model was refined until predicted wind speed and direction inside the dome agreed with experimental data. The dynamic wind forces were then used in static loading analysis to determine maximum deflections under typical operating conditions. This approach also allows for exploration of operating parameters without impact to the observation schedule of the telescope. With optimum combinations of parameters (i.e. dome orientation, tracker position, and louver deployment), deflections due to current wind conditions can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, the upper limit for operating wind speed could be increased, provided these parameters are monitored closely. This translates into increased image quality and observing time.

  11. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  12. Implementing a wind measurement Doppler Lidar based on a molecular iodine filter to monitor the atmospheric wind field over Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Li-fang; Yang, Guo-tao; Wang, Ji-hong; Yue, Chuan; Chen, Lin-xiang

    2017-02-01

    A wind measurement Doppler Lidar system was developed, in which injection seeded laser was used to generate narrow linewidth laser pulse. Frequency stabilization was achieved through absorption of iodine molecules. Commands that control the instrumental system were based on the PID algorithm and coded using VB language. The frequency of the seed laser was locked to iodine molecular absorption line 1109 which is close to the upper edge of the absorption range,with long-time (>4 h) frequency-locking accuracy being ≤0.5 MHz and long-time frequency stability being 3.55×10-9. Design the continuous light velocity measuring system, which concluded the cure about doppler frequency shift and actual speed of chopped wave plate, the velocity error is less than 0.4 m/s. The experiment showed that the stabilized frequency of the seed laser was different from the transmission frequency of the Lidar. And such frequency deviation is known as Chirp of the laser pulse. The real-time measured frequency difference of the continuous and pulsed lights was about 10 MHz, long-time stability deviation was around 5 MHz. When the temporal and spatial resolutions were respectively set to 100 s and 96 m, the wind velocity measurement error of the horizontal wind field at the attitude of 15-35 km was within ±5 m/s, the results showed that the wind measurement Doppler Lidar implemented in Yanqing, Beijing was capable of continuously detecting in the middle and low atmospheric wind field at nighttime. With further development of this technique, system measurement error could be lowered, and long-run routine observations are promising.

  13. The Vector Electric Field Investigation on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Acuna, M.; Kujawski, J.; Fourre, R.; Uribe, P.; Hunsaker, F.; Rowland, D.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Maynard, N.; hide

    2008-01-01

    We provide an overview of the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. VEFI is a NASA/GSFC instrument funded by the Air Force Research Laboratory whose main objectives are to: 1) investigate the role of the ambient electric fields in initiating nighttime ionospheric density depletions and turbulence; 2) determine the quasi-DC electric fields associated with abrupt, large amplitude, density depletions, and 3) quantify the spectrum of the wave electric fields and plasma densities (irregularities) associated with density depletions typically referred to as equatorial spread-F. The VEFI instrument includes a vector electric field double probe detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux-gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics. The heart of the instrument is the set of detectors designed to measure DC and AC electric fields using 6 identical booms that provide 3 axis, 20-m tip-to-tip orthogonal double probes. Each probe extends a 10 cm diameter sphere containing an embedded preamplifier. VEFI also includes a burst memory that enables snapshots of data from 1-8 channels of selected instruments to be sampled at rates of up to 32 kHz each. The bursts may be triggered by the detection of density depletions, intense electric field wave activity in a given band, lightning detector pulses, or an event at a pre-determined time or location. All VEFI instrument components are working exceptionally well. A description of the instrument, its sensors, and their sampling frequencies and sensitivities will be presented. Representative measurements will be shown.

  14. The effects of vortex structure and vortex translation on the tropical cyclone boundary layer wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2015-03-01

    The effects of vortex translation and radial vortex structure in the distribution of boundary layer winds in the inner core of mature tropical cyclones are examined using a high-resolution slab model and a multilevel model. It is shown that the structure and magnitude of the wind field (and the corresponding secondary circulation) depends sensitively on the radial gradient of the gradient wind field above the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is shown that vortex translation creates low wave number asymmetries in the wind field that rotate anticyclonically with height. A budget analysis of the steady state wind field for both models was also performed in this study. Although the agradient force drives the evolution of the boundary layer wind field for both models, it is shown that the manner in which the boundary layer flow responds to this force differs between the two model representations. In particular, the inner core boundary layer flow in the slab model is dominated by the effects of horizontal advection and horizontal diffusion, leading to the development of shock structures in the model. Conversely, the inner core boundary layer flow in the multilevel model is primarily influenced by the effects of vertical advection and vertical diffusion, which eliminates shock structures in this model. These results further indicate that special care is required to ensure that qualitative applications from slab models are not unduly affected by the neglect of vertical advection. This article was corrected on 31 MAR 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  15. Measuring electromagnetic fields (EMF) around wind turbines in Canada: is there a human health concern?

    PubMed

    McCallum, Lindsay C; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Knopper, Loren D; Ferguson, Glenn M; Ollson, Christopher A

    2014-02-15

    The past five years has seen considerable expansion of wind power generation in Ontario, Canada. Most recently worries about exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) from wind turbines, and associated electrical transmission, has been raised at public meetings and legal proceedings. These fears have not been based on any actual measurements of EMF exposure surrounding existing projects but appear to follow from worries from internet sources and misunderstanding of the science. The study was carried out at the Kingsbridge 1 Wind Farm located near Goderich, Ontario, Canada. Magnetic field measurements were collected in the proximity of 15 Vestas 1.8 MW wind turbines, two substations, various buried and overhead collector and transmission lines, and nearby homes. Data were collected during three operational scenarios to characterize potential EMF exposure: 'high wind' (generating power), 'low wind' (drawing power from the grid, but not generating power) and 'shut off' (neither drawing, nor generating power). Background levels of EMF (0.2 to 0.3 mG) were established by measuring magnetic fields around the wind turbines under the 'shut off' scenario. Magnetic field levels detected at the base of the turbines under both the 'high wind' and 'low wind' conditions were low (mean = 0.9 mG; n = 11) and rapidly diminished with distance, becoming indistinguishable from background within 2 m of the base. Magnetic fields measured 1 m above buried collector lines were also within background (≤ 0.3 mG). Beneath overhead 27.5 kV and 500 kV transmission lines, magnetic field levels of up to 16.5 and 46 mG, respectively, were recorded. These levels also diminished rapidly with distance. None of these sources appeared to influence magnetic field levels at nearby homes located as close as just over 500 m from turbines, where measurements immediately outside of the homes were ≤ 0.4 mG. The results suggest that there is nothing unique to wind farms with respect to EMF exposure; in

  16. The effect of transverse wave vector and magnetic fields on resonant tunneling times in double-barrier structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yafei; Xu, Huaizhe

    2007-01-01

    The effect of transverse wave vector and magnetic fields on resonant tunneling times in double-barrier structures, which is significant but has been frequently omitted in previous theoretical methods, has been reported in this paper. The analytical expressions of the longitudinal energies of quasibound levels (LEQBL) and the lifetimes of quasibound levels (LQBL) in symmetrical double-barrier (SDB) structures have been derived as a function of transverse wave vector and longitudinal magnetic fields perpendicular to interfaces. Based on our derived analytical expressions, the LEQBL and LQBL dependence upon transverse wave vector and longitudinal magnetic fields has been explored numerically for a SDB structure. Model calculations show that the LEQBL decrease monotonically and the LQBL shorten with increasing transverse wave vector, and each original LEQBL splits to a series of sub-LEQBL which shift nearly linearly toward the well bottom and the lifetimes of quasibound level series (LQBLS) shorten with increasing Landau-level indices and magnetic fields.

  17. Field and laboratory comparison of PM10 instruments in high winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharratt, Brenton; Pi, Huawei

    2018-06-01

    Instruments capable of measuring PM10 (particulate matter ≤10 μm in aerodynamic diameter) concentrations may vary in performance as a result of different technologies utilized in measuring PM10. Therefore, the performance of five instruments capable of measuring PM10 concentrations above eroding soil surfaces was tested during high wind events at field sites in the Columbia Plateau and inside a wind tunnel. Comparisons among the Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) sampler, DustTrak monitor, E-sampler, High-Volume sampler, and Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) monitor were made at field sites during nine wind erosion events and inside a wind tunnel at two wind speeds (7 and 12 m s-1) and two ambient PM10 concentrations (2 and 50 mg m-3). PM10 concentrations were similar for the High-Volume sampler and TEOM monitor as well as for the BSNE samplers and DustTrak monitors but higher for the High-Volume sampler and TEOM monitor than the E-sampler during field erosion events. Based upon wind tunnel experiments, the TEOM monitor measured the highest PM10 concentration while the DustTrak monitor typically measured the lowest PM10 concentration as compared with other instruments. In addition, PM10 concentration appeared to lower for all instruments at a wind speed of 12 as compared with 7 m s-1 inside the wind tunnel. Differences in the performance of instruments in measuring PM10 concentration poses risks in comparing PM10 concentration among different instrument types or using multiple instrument types to jointly measure concentrations in the field or laboratory or even the same instrument type subject to different wind speeds.

  18. Focusing behavior of the fractal vector optical fields designed by fractal lattice growth model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Meng-Dan; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2018-01-22

    We introduce a general fractal lattice growth model, significantly expanding the application scope of the fractal in the realm of optics. This model can be applied to construct various kinds of fractal "lattices" and then to achieve the design of a great diversity of fractal vector optical fields (F-VOFs) combinating with various "bases". We also experimentally generate the F-VOFs and explore their universal focusing behaviors. Multiple focal spots can be flexibly enginnered, and the optical tweezers experiment validates the simulated tight focusing fields, which means that this model allows the diversity of the focal patterns to flexibly trap and manipulate micrometer-sized particles. Furthermore, the recovery performance of the F-VOFs is also studied when the input fields and spatial frequency spectrum are obstructed, and the results confirm the robustness of the F-VOFs in both focusing and imaging processes, which is very useful in information transmission.

  19. New models of Saturn's magnetic field using Pioneer 11 Vector Helium Magnetometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    In a reanalysis of the Vector Helium Magnetometer data taken by Pioneer 11 during its Saturn encounter in 1979, using improvements in the data set and in the procedures, studies are made of a variety of models. The best is the P(11)84 model, an axisymmetric spherical harmonic model of Saturn's magnetic field within 8 Saturn radii of the planet. The appropriately weighted root mean square average of the difference between the observed and the modeled field is 1.13 percent. For the Voyager-based Z3 model of Connerney, Acuna, and Ness, this average difference from the Pioneer 11 data is 1.81 percent. The external source currents in the magnetopause, tail, bow shock, and perhaps ring currents vary with time and can only be crudely modeled. An algebraic formula is derived for calculating the L shells on which energetic charged particles drift in axisymmetric fields.

  20. 3D vector distribution of the electro-magnetic fields on a random gold film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canneson, Damien; Berini, Bruno; Buil, Stéphanie; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Quélin, Xavier

    2018-05-01

    The 3D vector distribution of the electro-magnetic fields at the very close vicinity of the surface of a random gold film is studied. Such films are well known for their properties of light confinement and large fluctuations of local density of optical states. Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations, we show that it is possible to determine the local orientation of the electro-magnetic fields. This allows us to obtain a complete characterization of the fields. Large fluctuations of their amplitude are observed as previously shown. Here, we demonstrate large variations of their direction depending both on the position on the random gold film, and on the distance to it. Such characterization could be useful for a better understanding of applications like the coupling of point-like dipoles to such films.

  1. On the 4D generalized Proca action for an Abelian vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allys, Erwan; Beltrán Almeida, Juan P.; Peter, Patrick; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-09-01

    We summarize previous results on the most general Proca theory in 4 dimensions containing only first-order derivatives in the vector field (second-order at most in the associated Stückelberg scalar) and having only three propagating degrees of freedom with dynamics controlled by second-order equations of motion. Discussing the Hessian condition used in previous works, we conjecture that, as in the scalar galileon case, the most complete action contains only a finite number of terms with second-order derivatives of the Stückelberg field describing the longitudinal mode, which is in agreement with the results of JCAP 05 (2014) 015 and Phys. Lett. B 757 (2016) 405 and complements those of JCAP 02 (2016) 004. We also correct and complete the parity violating sector, obtaining an extra term on top of the arbitrary function of the field Aμ, the Faraday tensor Fμν and its Hodge dual tilde Fμν.

  2. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude ofmore » the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.« less

  3. Field Calibration of Wind Direction Sensor to the True North and Its Application to the Daegwanryung Wind Turbine Test Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Wan

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a field calibration technique for aligning a wind direction sensor to the true north. The proposed technique uses the synchronized measurements of captured images by a camera, and the output voltage of a wind direction sensor. The true wind direction was evaluated through image processing techniques using the captured picture of the sensor with the least square sense. Then, the evaluated true value was compared with the measured output voltage of the sensor. This technique solves the discordance problem of the wind direction sensor in the process of installing meteorological mast. For this proposed technique, some uncertainty analyses are presented and the calibration accuracy is discussed. Finally, the proposed technique was applied to the real meteorological mast at the Daegwanryung test site, and the statistical analysis of the experimental testing estimated the values of stable misalignment and uncertainty level. In a strict sense, it is confirmed that the error range of the misalignment from the exact north could be expected to decrease within the credibility level. PMID:27873957

  4. The Z3 model of Saturns magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1%) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  5. The Z3 model of Saturn's magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1 percent) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  6. Hess Tower field study: sonic measurements at a former building-integrated wind farm site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Built in 2010, Hess Tower is a 29-story office building located in the heart of downtown Houston, TX. Unique to the building is a roof structure that was specifically engineered to house ten vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) to partially offset the energy demands of the building. Despite extensive atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel tests to predict the flow conditions on the roof before the building was constructed, the Hess VAWTs were eventually removed after allegedly one of the turbines failed and fell to the ground. This talk presents in-situ sonic anemometry measurements taken on the roof of Hess Tower at the former turbine locations. We compare this wind field characterization to the ABL wind tunnel data to draw conclusions about building-integrated wind farm performance and prediction capability.

  7. The inference of vector magnetic fields from polarization measurements with limited spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, B. W.; Skumanich, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for recovery of the vector magnetic field and thermodynamic parameters from polarization measurement of photospheric line profiles measured with filtergraphs. The method includes magneto-optic effects and may be utilized on data sampled at arbitrary wavelengths within the line profile. The accuracy of this method is explored through inversion of synthetic Stokes profiles subjected to varying levels of random noise, instrumental wave-length resolution, and line profile sampling. The level of error introduced by the systematic effect of profile sampling over a finite fraction of the 5 minute oscillation cycle is also investigated. The results presented here are intended to guide instrumental design and observational procedure.

  8. A Heisenberg Algebra Bundle of a Vector Field in Three-Space and its Weyl Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binz, Ernst; Pods, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    In these notes we associate a natural Heisenberg group bundle Ha with a singularity free smooth vector field X = (id,a) on a submanifold M in a Euclidean three-space. This bundle yields naturally an infinite dimensional Heisenberg group HX∞. A representation of the C*-group algebra of HX∞ is a quantization. It causes a natural Weyl-deformation quantization of X. The influence of the topological structure of M on this quantization is encoded in the Chern class of a canonical complex line bundle inside Ha.

  9. Distinct sensory representations of wind and near-field sound in the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Yorozu, Suzuko; Wong, Allan; Fischer, Brian J.; Dankert, Heiko; Kernan, Maurice J.; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Ito, Kei; Anderson, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral responses to wind are thought to play a critical role in controlling the dispersal and population genetics of wild Drosophila species1,2, as well as their navigation in flight3, but their underlying neurobiological basis is unknown. We show that Drosophila melanogaster, like wild-caught Drosophila strains4, exhibits robust wind-induced suppression of locomotion (WISL), in response to air currents delivered at speeds normally encountered in nature1,2. Here we identify wind-sensitive neurons in Johnston’s Organ (JO), an antennal mechanosensory structure previously implicated in near-field sound detection (reviewed in5,6). Using Gal4 lines targeted to different subsets of JO neurons7, and a genetically encoded calcium indicator8, we show that wind and near-field sound (courtship song) activate distinct populations of JO neurons, which project to different regions of the antennal and mechanosensory motor center (AMMC) in the central brain. Selective genetic ablation of wind-sensitive JO neurons in the antenna abolishes WISL behavior, without impairing hearing. Different neuronal subsets within the wind-sensitive population, moreover, respond to different directions of arista deflection caused by airflow and project to different regions of the AMMC, providing a rudimentary map of wind-direction in the brain. Importantly, sound- and wind-sensitive JO neurons exhibit different intrinsic response properties: the former are phasically activated by small, bi-directional, displacements of the aristae, while the latter are tonically activated by unidirectional, static deflections of larger magnitude. These different intrinsic properties are well suited to the detection of oscillatory pulses of near-field sound and laminar airflow, respectively. These data identify wind-sensitive neurons in JO, a structure that has been primarily associated with hearing, and reveal how the brain can distinguish different types of air particle movements, using a common sensory organ

  10. Plasma-field Coupling at Small Length Scales in Solar Wind Near 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; Desai, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    In collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind, the coupling between plasma constituents and the embedded magnetic field occurs on various temporal and spatial scales, and is primarily responsible for the transfer of energy between waves and particles. Recently, it was shown that the transfer of energy between solar wind plasma particles and waves is governed by a new and unique relationship: the ratio between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency is constant, E ms/ω pl ˜ ℏ*. This paper examines the variability and substantial departure of this ratio from ℏ* observed at ˜1 au, which is caused by a dispersion of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves. In contrast to the efficiently transferred energy in the fast solar wind, the lower efficiency of the slow solar wind can be caused by this dispersion, whose relation and characteristics are derived and studied. In summary, we show that (I) the ratio E ms/ω pl transitions continuously from the slow to the fast solar wind, tending toward the constant ℏ* (II) the transition is more efficient for larger thermal, Alfvén, or FMS speeds; (III) the fast solar wind is almost dispersionless, characterized by quasi-constant values of the FMS speed, while the slow wind is subject to dispersion that is less effective for larger wind or magnetosonic speeds; and (IV) the constant ℏ* is estimated with the best known precision, ℏ* ≈ (1.160 ± 0.083) × 10-22 Js.

  11. Algorithms for Computing the Magnetic Field, Vector Potential, and Field Derivatives for Circular Current Loops in Cylindrical Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    A numerical algorithm for computing the field components B r and B z and their r and z derivatives with open boundaries in cylindrical coordinates for circular current loops is described. An algorithm for computing the vector potential is also described. For the convenience of the reader, derivations of the final expressions from their defining integrals are given in detail, since their derivations (especially for the field derivatives) are not all easily found in textbooks. Numerical calculations are based on evaluation of complete elliptic integrals using the Bulirsch algorithm cel. Since cel can evaluate complete elliptic integrals of a fairlymore » general type, in some cases the elliptic integrals can be evaluated without first reducing them to forms containing standard Legendre forms. The algorithms avoid the numerical difficulties that many of the textbook solutions have for points near the axis because of explicit factors of 1=r or 1=r 2 in the some of the expressions.« less

  12. Simulation comparison of a decoupled longitudinal control system and a velocity vector control wheel steering system during landings in wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simulator comparison of the velocity vector control wheel steering (VCWS) system and a decoupled longitudinal control system is presented. The piloting task was to use the electronic attitude direction indicator (EADI) to capture and maintain a 3 degree glide slope in the presence of wind shear and to complete the landing using the perspective runway included on the EADI. The decoupled control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The decoupled control system improved the pilots' ability to control airspeed and flight path angle during the final stages of an approach made in severe wind shear. The system also improved their ability to complete safe landings. The pilots preferred the decoupled control system in severe winds and, on a pilot rating scale, rated the approach and landing task with the decoupled control system as much as 3 to 4 increments better than use of the VCWS system.

  13. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  14. What determines the direction of minimum variance of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grappin, R.; Velli, M.

    1995-01-01

    The solar wind is not an isotropic medium; two symmetry axis are provided, first the radial direction (because the mean wind is radial) and second the spiral direction of the mean magnetic field, which depends on heliocentric distance. Observations show very different anisotropy directions, depending on the frequency waveband; while the large-scale velocity fluctuations are essentially radial, the smaller scale magnetic field fluctuations are mostly perpendicular to the mean field direction, which is not the expected linear (WkB) result. We attempt to explain how these properties are related, with the help of numerical simulations.

  15. Derivation of the horizontal wind field in the polar mesopause region by using successive images of noctilucent clouds observed by a color digital camera in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Yamashita, R.

    2017-12-01

    It is important to quantify amplitude of turbulent motion to understand the energy and momentum budgets and distribution of minor constituents in the upper mesosphere. In particular, to know the eddy diffusion coefficient of minor constituents which are locally and impulsively produced by energetic particle precipitations in the polar mesopause is one of the most important subjects in the upper atmospheric science. One of the straight methods to know the amplitude of the eddy motion is to measure the wind field with both spatial and temporal domain. However, observation technique satisfying such requirements is limited in this region. In this study, derivation of the horizontal wind field in the polar mesopause region by tracking the motion of noctilucent clouds (NLCs) is performed. NLC is the highest cloud in the Earth which appears in a mesopause region during summer season in both polar regions. Since the vertical structure of the NLC is sufficiently thin ( within several hundred meters in typical), the apparent horizontal motion observed from ground can be regarded as the result of transportation by the horizontal winds at a single altitude. In this presentation, initial results of wind field derivation by tracking a motion of noctilucent clouds (NLC) observed by a ground-based color digital camera in Iceland is reported. The procedure for wind field estimation consists with 3 steps; (1) projects raw images to a geographical map (2) enhances NLC structures by using FFT method (3) determines horizontal velocity vectors by applying template matching method to two sequential images. In this talk, a result of the wind derivation by using successive images of NLC with 3 minutes interval and 1.5h duration observed on the night of Aug 1st, 2013 will be reported as a case study.

  16. Solar wind interaction effects on the magnetic fields around Mars: Consequences for interplanetary and crustal field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Brain, D. A.; Ulusen, D.; Lillis, R. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Espley, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The first unambiguous detections of the crustal remanent magnetic fields of Mars were obtained by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) during its initial orbits around Mars, which probed altitudes to within ∼110 km of the surface. However, the majority of its measurements were carried out around 400 km altitude, fixed 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time, mapping orbit. While the general character and planetary origins of the localized crustal fields were clearly revealed by the mapping survey data, their effects on the solar wind interaction could not be investigated in much detail because of the limited mapping orbit sampling. Previous analyses (Brain et al., 2006) of the field measurements on the dayside nevertheless provided an idea of the extent to which the interaction of the solar wind and planetary fields leads to non-ideal field draping at the mapping altitude. In this study we use numerical simulations of the global solar wind interaction with Mars as an aid to interpreting that observed non-ideal behavior. In addition, motivated by models for different interplanetary field orientations, we investigate the effects of induced and reconnected (planetary and external) fields on the Martian field's properties derived at the MGS mapping orbit altitude. The results suggest that inference of the planetary low order moments is compromised by their influence. In particular, the intrinsic dipole contribution may differ from that in the current models because the induced component is so dominant.

  17. Energy-modeled flight in a wind field

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.A.; Cliff, E.M.

    Optimal shaping of aerospace trajectories has provided the motivation for much modern study of optimization theory and algorithms. Current industrial practice favors approaches where the continuous-time optimal control problem is transcribed to a finite-dimensional nonlinear programming problem (NLP) by a discretization process. Two such formulations are implemented in the POST and the OTIS codes. In the present paper we use a discretization that is specially adapted to the flight problem of interest. Among the unique aspects of the present discretization are: a least-squares formulation for certain kinematic constraints; the use of an energy ideas to enforce Newton`s Laws; and, themore » inclusion of large magnitude horizontal winds. In the next section we shall provide a description of the flight problem and its NLP representation. Following this we provide some details of the constraint formulation. Finally, we present an overview of the NLP problem.« less

  18. Autonomous dynamic obstacle avoidance for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs) with modified vector field histogram.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoyeon; Cheang, U Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-01-01

    In order to broaden the use of microrobots in practical fields, autonomous control algorithms such as obstacle avoidance must be further developed. However, most previous studies of microrobots used manual motion control to navigate past tight spaces and obstacles while very few studies demonstrated the use of autonomous motion. In this paper, we demonstrated a dynamic obstacle avoidance algorithm for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs) using electric field in fluidic environments. A BPM consists of an artificial body, which is made of SU-8, and a high dense layer of harnessed bacteria. BPMs can be controlled using externally applied electric fields due to the electrokinetic property of bacteria. For developing dynamic obstacle avoidance for BPMs, a kinematic model of BPMs was utilized to prevent collision and a finite element model was used to characteristic the deformation of an electric field near the obstacle walls. In order to avoid fast moving obstacles, we modified our previously static obstacle avoidance approach using a modified vector field histogram (VFH) method. To validate the advanced algorithm in experiments, magnetically controlled moving obstacles were used to intercept the BPMs as the BPMs move from the initial position to final position. The algorithm was able to successfully guide the BPMs to reach their respective goal positions while avoiding the dynamic obstacles.

  19. Autonomous dynamic obstacle avoidance for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs) with modified vector field histogram

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoyeon; Cheang, U. Kei

    2017-01-01

    In order to broaden the use of microrobots in practical fields, autonomous control algorithms such as obstacle avoidance must be further developed. However, most previous studies of microrobots used manual motion control to navigate past tight spaces and obstacles while very few studies demonstrated the use of autonomous motion. In this paper, we demonstrated a dynamic obstacle avoidance algorithm for bacteria-powered microrobots (BPMs) using electric field in fluidic environments. A BPM consists of an artificial body, which is made of SU-8, and a high dense layer of harnessed bacteria. BPMs can be controlled using externally applied electric fields due to the electrokinetic property of bacteria. For developing dynamic obstacle avoidance for BPMs, a kinematic model of BPMs was utilized to prevent collision and a finite element model was used to characteristic the deformation of an electric field near the obstacle walls. In order to avoid fast moving obstacles, we modified our previously static obstacle avoidance approach using a modified vector field histogram (VFH) method. To validate the advanced algorithm in experiments, magnetically controlled moving obstacles were used to intercept the BPMs as the BPMs move from the initial position to final position. The algorithm was able to successfully guide the BPMs to reach their respective goal positions while avoiding the dynamic obstacles. PMID:29020016

  20. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  1. The effect of the equatorially symmetric zonal winds of Saturn on its gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John D.

    2018-04-01

    The penetration depth of Saturn’s cloud-level winds into its interior is unknown. A possible way of estimating the depth is through measurement of the effect of the winds on the planet’s gravitational field. We use a self-consistent perturbation approach to study how the equatorially symmetric zonal winds of Saturn contribute to its gravitational field. An important advantage of this approach is that the variation of its gravitational field solely caused by the winds can be isolated and identified because the leading-order problem accounts exactly for rotational distortion, thereby determining the irregular shape and internal structure of the hydrostatic Saturn. We assume that (i) the zonal winds are maintained by thermal convection in the form of non-axisymmetric columnar rolls and (ii) the internal structure of the winds, because of the Taylor-Proundman theorem, can be uniquely determined by the observed cloud-level winds. We calculate both the variation ΔJn , n = 2, 4, 6 … of the axisymmetric gravitational coefficients Jn caused by the zonal winds and the non-axisymmetric gravitational coefficients ΔJnm produced by the columnar rolls, where m is the azimuthal wavenumber of the rolls. We consider three different cases characterized by the penetration depth 0.36, R S, 0.2, R S and 0.1, R S, where R S is the equatorial radius of Saturn at the 1-bar pressure level. We find that the high-degree gravitational coefficient (J 12 + ΔJ 12) is dominated, in all the three cases, by the effect of the zonal flow with |ΔJ 12/J 12| > 100% and that the size of the non-axisymmetric coefficients ΔJ mn directly reflects the depth and scale of the flow taking place in the Saturnian interior.

  2. Magnetic Cloud Field Intensities and Solar Wind Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Clau de Gonzalez, Alicia D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.

    1997-01-01

    For the sets of magnetic clouds studied in this work we have shown that there is a general relationship between their magnetic fields strength and velocities. With a clear tendency that the faster the speed of the cloud the higher the magnetic field.

  3. Algorithms for Computing the Magnetic Field, Vector Potential, and Field Derivatives for a Thin Solenoid with Uniform Current Density

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    A numerical algorithm for computing the field components B r and B z and their r and z derivatives with open boundaries in cylindrical coordinates for radially thin solenoids with uniform current density is described in this note. An algorithm for computing the vector potential A θ is also described. For the convenience of the reader, derivations of the final expressions from their defining integrals are given in detail, since their derivations are not all easily found in textbooks. Numerical calculations are based on evaluation of complete elliptic integrals using the Bulirsch algorithm cel. The (apparently) new feature of themore » algorithms described in this note applies to cases where the field point is outside of the bore of the solenoid and the field-point radius approaches the solenoid radius. Since the elliptic integrals of the third kind normally used in computing B z and A θ become infinite in this region of parameter space, fields for points with the axial coordinate z outside of the ends of the solenoid and near the solenoid radius are treated by use of elliptic integrals of the third kind of modified argument, derived by use of an addition theorem. Also, the algorithms also avoid the numerical difficulties the textbook solutions have for points near the axis arising from explicit factors of 1/r or 1/r 2 in the some of the expressions.« less

  4. Suspended sediment diffusion mechanisms in the Yangtze Estuary influenced by wind fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Zhou, Yunxuan; Shen, Fang

    2018-01-01

    The complexity of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) distribution and diffusion has been widely recognized because it is influenced by sediment supply and various hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. Sediment suspended by waves and transported by currents are the dominant sediment transport mechanisms in estuarine and coastal areas. However, it is unclear to what extent the SSC distribution is impacted by each hydrodynamic factor. Research on the quantitative influence of wind fields on the SSC diffusion range will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of sediment transport change and sedimentary geomorphic evolution. This study determined SSC from three Envisat Medium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer acquisitions, covering the Yangtze Estuary and adjacent water area under the same season and tidal conditions but with varying wind conditions. SSC was examined based on the Semi-Empirical Radiative Transfer model, which has been well validated with the observation data. Integrating the corresponding wind field information from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts further facilitated the discussion of wind fields affecting SSC, and in turn the influence of water and suspended sediment transportation and diffusion in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal area. The results demonstrated that the SSC present much more distinctive fluvial features in the inner estuary and wind fields are one of the major factors controlling the range of turbid water diffusion.

  5. Influence of Complex Terrain on Wind Fields in the Mojave Desert, Southwestern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, G. D.; Reynolds, R. L.; Urban, F. E.; Bogle, R.; Vogel, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The complex terrain of southern California has important effects on the winds in this dust-producing region. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) to investigate the influences of rugged topography on the wind field in the Mojave Desert at a variety of scales. For this study, the WRF model was used in a retrospective mode over the time period 2000-to-present, with horizontal resolutions as fine as 1-km in specific areas of interest (i.e., known dust-source areas). At a regional scale, the juxtaposition of California's Central Valley with the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range often generates a band of strong winds extending eastward from the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and Tehachapi Mountains across the Mojave Desert and into Arizona. At finer scales, WRF-derived winds within this band reveal terrain deflection, focusing, channeling, and rapid direction change over short distances. These effects are important for assessing the capacity of wind to produce dust at potential dust-source areas during specific events, and for determining dust-transport pathways. Comparison of the WRF results during strong wind events with data from meteorological stations having dust emission instruments (saltation sensors and/or wind-triggered time-lapse cameras) help elucidate landscape conditions that influence dust emission and patterns of dust transport.

  6. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions- II. Clouds with turbulent density, velocity, and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragán, W. E.; Federrath, C.; Crocker, R. M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2018-01-01

    We present a set of numerical experiments designed to systematically investigate how turbulence and magnetic fields influence the morphology, energetics, and dynamics of filaments produced in wind-cloud interactions. We cover 3D, magnetohydrodynamic systems of supersonic winds impacting clouds with turbulent density, velocity, and magnetic fields. We find that lognormal density distributions aid shock propagation through clouds, increasing their velocity dispersion and producing filaments with expanded cross-sections and highly magnetized knots and subfilaments. In self-consistently turbulent scenarios, the ratio of filament to initial cloud magnetic energy densities is ∼1. The effect of Gaussian velocity fields is bound to the turbulence Mach number: Supersonic velocities trigger a rapid cloud expansion; subsonic velocities only have a minor impact. The role of turbulent magnetic fields depends on their tension and is similar to the effect of radiative losses: the stronger the magnetic field or the softer the gas equation of state, the greater the magnetic shielding at wind-filament interfaces and the suppression of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Overall, we show that including turbulence and magnetic fields is crucial to understanding cold gas entrainment in multiphase winds. While cloud porosity and supersonic turbulence enhance the acceleration of clouds, magnetic shielding protects them from ablation and causes Rayleigh-Taylor-driven subfilamentation. Wind-swept clouds in turbulent models reach distances ∼15-20 times their core radius and acquire bulk speeds ∼0.3-0.4 of the wind speed in one cloud-crushing time, which are three times larger than in non-turbulent models. In all simulations, the ratio of turbulent magnetic to kinetic energy densities asymptotes at ∼0.1-0.4, and convergence of all relevant dynamical properties requires at least 64 cells per cloud radius.

  7. Wind field near complex terrain using numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Kin-Sang

    The PennState/NCAR MM5 model was modified to simulate an idealized flow pass through a 3D obstacle in the Micro- Alpha Scale domain. The obstacle used were the idealized Gaussian obstacle and the real topography of Lantau Island of Hong Kong. The Froude number under study is ranged from 0.22 to 1.5. Regime diagrams for both the idealized Gaussian obstacle and Lantau island were constructed. This work is divided into five parts. The first part is the problem definition and the literature review of the related publications. The second part briefly discuss as the PennState/NCAR MM5 model and a case study of long- range transport is included. The third part is devoted to the modification and the verification of the PennState/NCAR MM5 model on the Micro-Alpha Scale domain. The implementation of the Orlanski (1976) open boundary condition is included with the method of single sounding initialization of the model. Moreover, an upper dissipative layer, Klemp and Lilly (1978), is implemented on the model. The simulated result is verified by the Automatic Weather Station (AWS) data and the Wind Profiler data. Four different types of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) parameterization schemes have been investigated in order to find out the most suitable one for Micro-Alpha Scale domain in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. Bulk Aerodynamic type of PBL parameterization scheme is found to be the most suitable PBL parameterization scheme. Investigation of the free- slip lower boundary condition is performed and the simulated result is compared with that with friction. The fourth part is the use of the modified PennState/NCAR MM5 model for an idealized flow simulation. The idealized uniform flow used is nonhydrostatic and has constant Froude number. Sensitivity test is performed by varying the Froude number and the regime diagram is constructed. Moreover, nondimensional drag is found to be useful for regime identification. The model result is also compared with the analytic

  8. Signature of open magnetic field lines in the extended solar corona and of solar wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Giordano, S.; Benna, C.; Kohl, J. L.; Noci, G.; Michels, J.; Fineschi, S.

    1997-01-01

    The observations carried out with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) are discussed. The purpose of the observations was to determine the line of sight and radial velocity fields in coronal regions with different magnetic topology. The results showed that the regions where the high speed solar wind flows along open field lines are characterized by O VI 1032 and HI Lyman alpha 1216 lines. The global coronal maps of the line of sight velocity were reconstructed. The corona height, where the solar wind reaches 100 km/s, was determined.

  9. SOLAR FLARE PREDICTION USING SDO/HMI VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD DATA WITH A MACHINE-LEARNING ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Bobra, M. G.; Couvidat, S., E-mail: couvidat@stanford.edu

    2015-01-10

    We attempt to forecast M- and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called support vector machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time a large data set of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a databasemore » of 2071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm and we estimate its performances using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.« less

  10. On the Improvement of Convergence Performance for Integrated Design of Wind Turbine Blade Using a Vector Dominating Multi-objective Evolution Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Wang, T. G.; Wu, J. H.; Cheng, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization algorithm incorporating evolution strategies and vector mechanisms, referred as VD-MOEA, is proposed and applied in aerodynamic- structural integrated design of wind turbine blade. In the algorithm, a set of uniformly distributed vectors is constructed to guide population in moving forward to the Pareto front rapidly and maintain population diversity with high efficiency. For example, two- and three- objective designs of 1.5MW wind turbine blade are subsequently carried out for the optimization objectives of maximum annual energy production, minimum blade mass, and minimum extreme root thrust. The results show that the Pareto optimal solutions can be obtained in one single simulation run and uniformly distributed in the objective space, maximally maintaining the population diversity. In comparison to conventional evolution algorithms, VD-MOEA displays dramatic improvement of algorithm performance in both convergence and diversity preservation for handling complex problems of multi-variables, multi-objectives and multi-constraints. This provides a reliable high-performance optimization approach for the aerodynamic-structural integrated design of wind turbine blade.

  11. Configuration and Evaluation of a Dual-Doppler 3-D Wind Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2014-01-01

    Current LSP, GSDO, and SLS space vehicle operations are halted when wind speeds from specific directions exceed defined thresholds and when lightning is a threat. Strong winds and lightning are difficult parameters for the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to forecast, yet are important in the protection of customer vehicle operations and the personnel that conduct them. A display of the low-level horizontal wind field to reveal areas of high winds or convergence would be a valuable tool for forecasters in assessing the timing of high winds, or convection initiation and subsequent lightning occurrence. This is especially important for areas where no weather observation platforms exist. Developing a dual-Doppler radar capability would provide such a display to assist forecasters in predicting high winds and convection initiation. The wind fields can also be used to initialize a local mesoscale numerical weather prediction model to help improve the model forecast winds, convection initiation, and other phenomena. The 45 WS and NWS MLB tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a dual- Doppler wind field display using data from the 45th Space Wing radar, known as the Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR), NWS MLB Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (KMLB), and the Orlando International Airport Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (KMCO). They also stipulated that the software used should be freely available. The AMU evaluated two software packages and, with concurrence from NWS MLB and the 45 WS, chose the Warning Decision Support System-Integrated Information (WDSS-II). The AMU collected data from two significant weather cases: a tornadic event on 14 April 2013 and a severe wind and hail event on 12 February 2014. For the 14 April case, the data were from WSR and KMLB. For the 12 February case, the data were from KMCO and KMLB. The AMU installed WDSS-II on a Linux PC, then processed and quality controlled the radar data for display and analysis using WDSS-II tools

  12. Analysis of the far-field characteristics of hybridly polarized vector beams from the vectorial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Based on the angular spectrum representation of electromagnetic beams, analytical expressions are derived for the TE term, TM term and the whole energy fluxes of a hybridly polarized vector (HPV) beam propagating in the far field. It is shown that both the TE and TM terms of the energy fluxes are strongly dependent of the truncation radius of the circular aperture. By choosing the truncation radius as a certain value, it is found that the far-zone distributions of TE and TM terms exhibit four-petal patterns with surrounding side-lobes displaying oscillating intensities. Interestingly, such phenomenon becomes extremely obvious particularly when the truncation radius is comparable with the wavelength of the propagating beam.

  13. Regularity results for the minimum time function with Hörmander vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Paolo; Cannarsa, Piermarco; Scarinci, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    In a bounded domain of Rn with boundary given by a smooth (n - 1)-dimensional manifold, we consider the homogeneous Dirichlet problem for the eikonal equation associated with a family of smooth vector fields {X1 , … ,XN } subject to Hörmander's bracket generating condition. We investigate the regularity of the viscosity solution T of such problem. Due to the presence of characteristic boundary points, singular trajectories may occur. First, we characterize these trajectories as the closed set of all points at which the solution loses point-wise Lipschitz continuity. Then, we prove that the local Lipschitz continuity of T, the local semiconcavity of T, and the absence of singular trajectories are equivalent properties. Finally, we show that the last condition is satisfied whenever the characteristic set of {X1 , … ,XN } is a symplectic manifold. We apply our results to several examples.

  14. Differential Galois theory and non-integrability of planar polynomial vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Humánez, Primitivo B.; Lázaro, J. Tomás; Morales-Ruiz, Juan J.; Pantazi, Chara

    2018-06-01

    We study a necessary condition for the integrability of the polynomials vector fields in the plane by means of the differential Galois Theory. More concretely, by means of the variational equations around a particular solution it is obtained a necessary condition for the existence of a rational first integral. The method is systematic starting with the first order variational equation. We illustrate this result with several families of examples. A key point is to check whether a suitable primitive is elementary or not. Using a theorem by Liouville, the problem is equivalent to the existence of a rational solution of a certain first order linear equation, the Risch equation. This is a classical problem studied by Risch in 1969, and the solution is given by the "Risch algorithm". In this way we point out the connection of the non integrability with some higher transcendent functions, like the error function.

  15. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  16. A continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap: Wind tunnel and field evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, XingHua; Huo, Wen; Ali, Mamtimin; Zheng, XinQian; Zhou, ChengLong; He, Qing

    2017-09-01

    A new continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap (CWHF) has been designed. Its sampling efficiency is evaluated in a wind tunnel and the potential of the new trap has been demonstrated in field trials. The newly designed sand trap allows fully automated and high frequency measurement of sediment fluxes over extensive periods. We show that it can capture the variations and structures of wind-driven sand transport processes and horizontal sediment flux, and reveal the relationships between sand transport and meteorological parameters. Its maximum sampling frequency can reach 10 Hz. Wind tunnel tests indicated that the sampling efficiency of the CWHF sand trap varies between 39.2 to 64.3%, with an average of 52.5%. It achieved a maximum sampling efficiency of 64.3% at a wind speed of 10 m s- 1. This is largely achieved by the inclusion of a vent hole which leads to a higher sampling efficiency than that of a step-like sand trap at high wind speeds. In field experiments, we show a good agreement between the mass of sediment from the CWHF sand trap, the wind speed at 2 m and the number of saltating particles at 5 cm above the ground surface. According to analysis of the horizontal sediment flux at four heights from the CWHF sand trap (25, 35, 50, and 100 cm), the vertical distribution of the horizontal sediment flux up to a height of 100 cm above the sand surface follows an exponential function. Our field experiments show that the new instrument can capture more detailed information on sediment transport with much reduced labor requirement. Therefore, it has great potential for application in wind-blown sand monitoring and process studies.

  17. Influence of pulsed electromagnetic and pulsed vector magnetic potential field on the growth of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Loja, Tomas; Stehlikova, Olga; Palko, Lukas; Vrba, Kamil; Rampl, Ivan; Klabusay, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Tumor diseases cause 20% of deaths in Europe and they are the second most common cause of death and morbidity after cardiovascular diseases. Thus, tumor cells are target of many therapeutic strategies and tumor research is focused on searching more efficient and specific drugs as well as new therapeutic approaches. One of the areas of tumor research is an issue of external fields. In our work, we tested influence of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) and a hypothetic field of the pulsed vector magnetic potential (PVMP) on the growth of tumor cells; and further the possible growth inhibition effect of the PVMP. Both unipolar and bipolar PEMF fields of 5 mT and PVMP fields of 0 mT at frequencies of 15 Hz, 125 Hz and 625 Hz were tested on cancer cell lines derived from various types of tumors: CEM/C2 (acute lymphoblastic leukemia), SU-DHL-4 (B-cell lymphoma), COLO-320DM (colorectal adenocarcinoma), MDA-BM-468 (breast adenocarcinoma), and ZR-75-1 (ductal carcinoma). Cell morphology was observed, proliferation activity using WST assay was measured and simultaneous proportion of live, early apoptotic and dead cells was detected using flow cytometry. A PEMF of 125 Hz and 625 Hz for 24 h-48 h increased proliferation activity in the 2 types of cancer cell lines used, i.e. COLO-320DM and ZR-75-1. In contrast, any of employed methods did not confirm a significant inhibitory effect of hypothetic PVMP field on tumor cells.

  18. Simplest bifurcation diagrams for monotone families of vector fields on a torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baesens, C.; MacKay, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    In part 1, we prove that the bifurcation diagram for a monotone two-parameter family of vector fields on a torus has to be at least as complicated as the conjectured simplest one proposed in Baesens et al (1991 Physica D 49 387–475). To achieve this, we define ‘simplest’ by sequentially minimising the numbers of equilibria, Bogdanov–Takens points, closed curves of centre and of neutral saddle, intersections of curves of centre and neutral saddle, Reeb components, other invariant annuli, arcs of rotational homoclinic bifurcation of horizontal homotopy type, necklace points, contractible periodic orbits, points of neutral horizontal homoclinic bifurcation and half-plane fan points. We obtain two types of simplest case, including that initially proposed. In part 2, we analyse the bifurcation diagram for an explicit monotone family of vector fields on a torus and prove that it has at most two equilibria, precisely four Bogdanov–Takens points, no closed curves of centre nor closed curves of neutral saddle, at most two Reeb components, precisely four arcs of rotational homoclinic connection of ‘horizontal’ homotopy type, eight horizontal saddle-node loop points, two necklace points, four points of neutral horizontal homoclinic connection, and two half-plane fan points, and there is no simultaneous existence of centre and neutral saddle, nor contractible homoclinic connection to a neutral saddle. Furthermore, we prove that all saddle-nodes, Bogdanov–Takens points, non-neutral and neutral horizontal homoclinic bifurcations are non-degenerate and the Hopf condition is satisfied for all centres. We also find it has four points of degenerate Hopf bifurcation. It thus provides an example of a family satisfying all the assumptions of part 1 except the one of at most one contractible periodic orbit.

  19. Upper Thermosphere Winds and Temperatures in the Geomagnetic Polar Cap: Solar Cycle, Geomagnetic Activity, and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Won, Y.-I.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Burns, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers located at Thule, Greenland (76.5 deg. N, 69.0 deg. W, lambda = 86 deg.) and at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland (67.0 deg. N, 50.9 deg. W, lambda = 74 deg.) have monitored the upper thermospheric (approx. 240-km altitude) neutral wind and temperature over the northern hemisphere geomagnetic polar cap since 1983 and 1985, respectively. The thermospheric observations are obtained by determining the Doppler characteristics of the (OI) 15,867-K (630.0-nm) emission of atomic oxygen. The instruments operate on a routine, automatic, (mostly) untended basis during the winter observing seasons, with data coverage limited only by cloud cover and (occasional) instrument failures. This unique database of geomagnetic polar cap measurements now extends over the complete range of solar activity. We present an analysis of the measurements made between 1985 (near solar minimum) and 1991 (near solar maximum), as part of a long-term study of geomagnetic polar cap thermospheric climatology. The measurements from a total of 902 nights of observations are compared with the predictions of two semiempirical models: the Vector Spherical Harmonic (VSH) model of Killeen et al. (1987) and the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM) of Hedin et al. (1991). The results are also analyzed using calculations of thermospheric momentum forcing terms from the Thermosphere-ionosphere General Circulation Model TGCM) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The experimental results show that upper thermospheric winds in the geomagnetic polar cap have a fundamental diurnal character, with typical wind speeds of about 200 m/s at solar minimum, rising to up to about 800 m/s at solar maximum, depending on geomagnetic activity level. These winds generally blow in the antisunward direction, but are interrupted by episodes of modified wind velocity and altered direction often associated with changes in the orientation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The

  20. [Distribution of Regional Pollution and the Characteristics of Vertical Wind Field in the Pearl River Delta].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wu, Dui; Fan, Shao-jia

    2015-11-01

    Based on the data of hourly PM2.5 concentration of 56 environmental monitoring stations and 9 cities over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, the distributions of PM2.5 pollution in PRD region were analyzed by systematic cluster analysis and correlational analysis. It was found that the regional pollution could be divided into 3 types. The first type was the pollution occurred in Dongguan, Guangzhou, Foshan and Jiangmen (I type), and the second type was the pollution occurred in Zhongshan, Zhuhai, Shenzhen and Huizhou (II type), while the last type was the pollution only occurred in Zhaoqing (III type). During the study period, they occurred 47, 7 and 128 days, respectively. During events of pollution type I, except Zhuhai, Shenzhen and Huizhou, the PM2.5 concentrations of other cities were generally high, while the PM2.5 concentration in whole PRD region was over 50.0 μg x m(-3) during events of pollution type II. The regions with higher PM2.5 concentration was mainly concentrated in Zhaoqing, Guangzhou and Foshan during events of pollution type III. The wind data from 4 wind profile radars located in PRD region was used to study the characteristics of vertical wind field of these 3 pollution types. It was found that the wind profiles of type I and III were similar that low layer and high layer were controlled by the southeast wind and the southwest wind, respectively. For type II, the low layer and high layer were influenced by northerly wind and westerly wind, respectively. Compared with other types, the wind speed and ventilation index of type II. were much higher, and the variation of wind direction at lower-middle-layer was much smaller. When PRD region was influenced by northerly winds, the PM2.5 concentration in the entire PRD region was higher. When PRD region was controlled by southeast wind, the PM2.5 concentrations of I and II areas were relatively lower, while the pollution in III area was relatively heavier.

  1. Wide Field-of-View Soft X-Ray Imaging for Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Carter, J. A.; Collado-Vega, Y.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray imagers can be used to study the mesoscale and macroscale density structures that occur whenever and wherever the solar wind encounters neutral atoms at comets, the Moon, and both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. Charge exchange between high charge state solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals results in the isotropic emission of soft X-ray photons with energies from 0.1 to 2.0 keV. At Earth, this process occurs primarily within the magnetosheath and cusps. Through providing a global view, wide field-of-view imaging can determine the significance of the various proposed solar wind-magnetosphere interaction mechanisms by evaluating their global extent and occurrence patterns. A summary of wide field-of-view (several to tens of degrees) soft X-ray imaging is provided including slumped micropore microchannel reflectors, simulated images, and recent flight results.

  2. Effectiveness of methoprene, an insect growth regulator, against malaria vectors in Fars, Iran: a field study.

    PubMed

    Darabi, H; Vatandoost, H; Abaei, M R; Gharibi, O; Pakbaz, F

    2011-01-01

    Methoprene, an insect growth regulator, was evaluated under field conditions against the main malaria vectors in the Islamic Republic of Iran. The effect of 5, 10 and 20 kg ha(-1) concentration ofmethoprene granule formulation and 100 and 200 mL ha(-1) concentration of EC formulation was measured to determine any changes in Anophelini larval abundance and IE ratio in both rice fields and artificial ponds. In artificial ponds, granular methoprene at a dose of 20 kg ha(-1) inhibited adult emergence by 77.1% after 1 day and 65.9% after 3 days. The emulsifiable concentrate formulation of methoprene at 200 mL ha(-1) inhibited adult emergence by 83.7% after 1 day and 32.2% after 3 days. In rice fields, inhibition of emergence was 44.3% at 20 kg ha(-1) granule and 35.8% for emulsifiable concentrate at 200 mL ha(-1) after 3 days. The results vary depending on the mosquito species, treatment methods, breeding places and type of formulation.

  3. On the 4D generalized Proca action for an Abelian vector field

    SciTech Connect

    Allys, Erwan; Almeida, Juan P. Beltrán; Peter, Patrick

    We summarize previous results on the most general Proca theory in 4 dimensions containing only first-order derivatives in the vector field (second-order at most in the associated Stückelberg scalar) and having only three propagating degrees of freedom with dynamics controlled by second-order equations of motion. Discussing the Hessian condition used in previous works, we conjecture that, as in the scalar galileon case, the most complete action contains only a finite number of terms with second-order derivatives of the Stückelberg field describing the longitudinal mode, which is in agreement with the results of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2014/05/015 and http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physletb.2016.04.017 and complements those of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2016/02/004.more » We also correct and complete the parity violating sector, obtaining an extra term on top of the arbitrary function of the field A{sub μ}, the Faraday tensor F{sub μν} and its Hodge dual F-tilde{sub μν}.« less

  4. The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    index of geomagnetic activity (Svalgaard and Cliver, 2005). This empir- ical/historical evidence for a lower limit or floor in B was substantiated by...with the model of Fisk and Schwadron (2001) for the reversal of the polar magnetic fields at solar maximum. The Fisk and Schwadron model, based on the...interdiurnal variability [IDV] index of geomagnetic activity (Svalgaard and Cliver, 2005, 2010). DM, for minima preceding cycles 22 – 24, is the absolute

  5. Measuring electromagnetic fields (EMF) around wind turbines in Canada: is there a human health concern?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The past five years has seen considerable expansion of wind power generation in Ontario, Canada. Most recently worries about exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) from wind turbines, and associated electrical transmission, has been raised at public meetings and legal proceedings. These fears have not been based on any actual measurements of EMF exposure surrounding existing projects but appear to follow from worries from internet sources and misunderstanding of the science. Methods The study was carried out at the Kingsbridge 1 Wind Farm located near Goderich, Ontario, Canada. Magnetic field measurements were collected in the proximity of 15 Vestas 1.8 MW wind turbines, two substations, various buried and overhead collector and transmission lines, and nearby homes. Data were collected during three operational scenarios to characterize potential EMF exposure: ‘high wind’ (generating power), ‘low wind’ (drawing power from the grid, but not generating power) and ‘shut off’ (neither drawing, nor generating power). Results Background levels of EMF (0.2 to 0.3 mG) were established by measuring magnetic fields around the wind turbines under the ‘shut off’ scenario. Magnetic field levels detected at the base of the turbines under both the ‘high wind’ and ‘low wind’ conditions were low (mean = 0.9 mG; n = 11) and rapidly diminished with distance, becoming indistinguishable from background within 2 m of the base. Magnetic fields measured 1 m above buried collector lines were also within background (≤ 0.3 mG). Beneath overhead 27.5 kV and 500 kV transmission lines, magnetic field levels of up to 16.5 and 46 mG, respectively, were recorded. These levels also diminished rapidly with distance. None of these sources appeared to influence magnetic field levels at nearby homes located as close as just over 500 m from turbines, where measurements immediately outside of the homes were ≤ 0.4 mG. Conclusions The results suggest that there is

  6. Wind-tunnel investigation of the powered low-speed longitudinal aerodynamics of the Vectored-Engine-Over (VEO) wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W.; Whitten, P. D.; Stumpfl, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation incorporating both static and wind-on testing was conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the effects of vectored thrust along with spanwise blowing on the low-speed aerodynamics of an advanced fighter configuration. Data were obtained over a large range of thrust coefficients corresponding to takeoff and landing thrust settings for many nozzle configurations. The complete set of static thrust data and the complete set of longitudinal aerodynamic data obtained in the investigation are presented. These data are intended for reference purposes and, therefore, are presented without analysis or comment. The analysis of the thrust-induced effects found in the investigation are not discussed.

  7. Field-testing a portable wind tunnel for fine dust emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A protable wind tunnel has been developed to allow erodibility and dust emissions testing of soil surfaces with the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study we report on the field-testing ...

  8. A field wind tunnel study of fine dust emissions in sandy soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A portable field wind tunnel has been developed to allow measurements of dust emissions from soil surfaces to test the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study, we report on the effect of ...

  9. Wind tunnel and field evaluation of drift from aerial spray applications with multiple spray formulations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of different spray tank modifiers into an active ingredient spray mixture on spray atomization and in-field behavior under aerial application conditions were examined. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated that active ingredient solutions potentially results in significantly different atomizati...

  10. Thigmomorphogenesis: field and laboratory studies of Abies fraseri in response to wind or mechanical perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telewski, F. W.; Jaffe, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Field- and greenhouse-grown Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Fraser fir) were analyzed for wind- or mechanically-induced flexure changes. These changes included inhibition of stem and needle elongation, reinforcement of branch bases around the stem, and increased radial growth in the direction of the mechanical perturbation (MP). Mature trees exposed to high wind conditions were severely flag-formed. These modified tree crowns had a lower drag than crowns of non-flag formed trees in wind-tunnel tests. In both field-grown and greenhouse-grown A. fraseri, MP induced a decrease in flexibility and increased elasticity of the stems. The increased radial growth of the stems overrode the increase in elasticity, resulting in the overall decrease in flexibility. The increase in radial growth caused by wind or mechanical flexure was due to greater cell divisions of the vascular cambium, resulting in increased numbers of tracheids. The decrease in stem elongation in these trees was due, at least in part, to a decrease in tracheid length. The potential biological and mechanical significance of these induced growth changes in trees are addressed. The data support the thigmomorphogenetic theory, which states that plants respond to wind and other mechanical perturbations in a way that is favorable to the plant for continued survival in windy environments.

  11. Thigmomorphogenesis: field and laboratory studies of Abies fraseri in response to wind or mechanical perturbation.

    PubMed

    Telewski, F W; Jaffe, M J

    1986-01-01

    Field- and greenhouse-grown Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Fraser fir) were analyzed for wind- or mechanically-induced flexure changes. These changes included inhibition of stem and needle elongation, reinforcement of branch bases around the stem, and increased radial growth in the direction of the mechanical perturbation (MP). Mature trees exposed to high wind conditions were severely flag-formed. These modified tree crowns had a lower drag than crowns of non-flag formed trees in wind-tunnel tests. In both field-grown and greenhouse-grown A. fraseri, MP induced a decrease in flexibility and increased elasticity of the stems. The increased radial growth of the stems overrode the increase in elasticity, resulting in the overall decrease in flexibility. The increase in radial growth caused by wind or mechanical flexure was due to greater cell divisions of the vascular cambium, resulting in increased numbers of tracheids. The decrease in stem elongation in these trees was due, at least in part, to a decrease in tracheid length. The potential biological and mechanical significance of these induced growth changes in trees are addressed. The data support the thigmomorphogenetic theory, which states that plants respond to wind and other mechanical perturbations in a way that is favorable to the plant for continued survival in windy environments.

  12. Lunar surface magnetic fields and their interaction with the solar wind: results from lunar prospector

    PubMed

    Lin; Mitchell; Curtis; Anderson; Carlson; McFadden; Acuna; Hood; Binder

    1998-09-04

    The magnetometer and electron reflectometer experiment on the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has obtained maps of lunar crustal magnetic fields and observed the interaction between the solar wind and regions of strong crustal magnetic fields at high selenographic latitude (30 degreesS to 80 degreesS) and low ( approximately 100 kilometers) altitude. Electron reflection maps of the regions antipodal to the Imbrium and Serenitatis impact basins, extending to 80 degreesS latitude, show that crustal magnetic fields fill most of the antipodal zones of those basins. This finding provides further evidence for the hypothesis that basin-forming impacts result in magnetization of the lunar crust at their antipodes. The crustal magnetic fields of the Imbrium antipode region are strong enough to deflect the solar wind and form a miniature (100 to several hundred kilometers across) magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and bow shock system.

  13. Field evaluation of picaridin repellents reveals differences in repellent sensitivity between Southeast Asian vectors of malaria and arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Karel; Sokny, Mao; Denis, Leen; Van den Broeck, Nick; Heng, Somony; Siv, Sovannaroth; Sluydts, Vincent; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc; Durnez, Lies

    2014-12-01

    Scaling up of insecticide treated nets has contributed to a substantial malaria decline. However, some malaria vectors, and most arbovirus vectors, bite outdoors and in the early evening. Therefore, topically applied insect repellents may provide crucial additional protection against mosquito-borne pathogens. Among topical repellents, DEET is the most commonly used, followed by others such as picaridin. The protective efficacy of two formulated picaridin repellents against mosquito bites, including arbovirus and malaria vectors, was evaluated in a field study in Cambodia. Over a period of two years, human landing collections were performed on repellent treated persons, with rotation to account for the effect of collection place, time and individual collector. Based on a total of 4996 mosquitoes collected on negative control persons, the overall five hour protection rate was 97.4% [95%CI: 97.1-97.8%], not decreasing over time. Picaridin 20% performed equally well as DEET 20% and better than picaridin 10%. Repellents performed better against Mansonia and Culex spp. as compared to aedines and anophelines. A lower performance was observed against Aedes albopictus as compared to Aedes aegypti, and against Anopheles barbirostris as compared to several vector species. Parity rates were higher in vectors collected on repellent treated person as compared to control persons. As such, field evaluation shows that repellents can provide additional personal protection against early and outdoor biting malaria and arbovirus vectors, with excellent protection up to five hours after application. The heterogeneity in repellent sensitivity between mosquito genera and vector species could however impact the efficacy of repellents in public health programs. Considering its excellent performance and potential to protect against early and outdoor biting vectors, as well as its higher acceptability as compared to DEET, picaridin is an appropriate product to evaluate the epidemiological

  14. Field Evaluation of Picaridin Repellents Reveals Differences in Repellent Sensitivity between Southeast Asian Vectors of Malaria and Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Leen; Van den Broeck, Nick; Heng, Somony; Siv, Sovannaroth; Sluydts, Vincent; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc; Durnez, Lies

    2014-01-01

    Scaling up of insecticide treated nets has contributed to a substantial malaria decline. However, some malaria vectors, and most arbovirus vectors, bite outdoors and in the early evening. Therefore, topically applied insect repellents may provide crucial additional protection against mosquito-borne pathogens. Among topical repellents, DEET is the most commonly used, followed by others such as picaridin. The protective efficacy of two formulated picaridin repellents against mosquito bites, including arbovirus and malaria vectors, was evaluated in a field study in Cambodia. Over a period of two years, human landing collections were performed on repellent treated persons, with rotation to account for the effect of collection place, time and individual collector. Based on a total of 4996 mosquitoes collected on negative control persons, the overall five hour protection rate was 97.4% [95%CI: 97.1–97.8%], not decreasing over time. Picaridin 20% performed equally well as DEET 20% and better than picaridin 10%. Repellents performed better against Mansonia and Culex spp. as compared to aedines and anophelines. A lower performance was observed against Aedes albopictus as compared to Aedes aegypti, and against Anopheles barbirostris as compared to several vector species. Parity rates were higher in vectors collected on repellent treated person as compared to control persons. As such, field evaluation shows that repellents can provide additional personal protection against early and outdoor biting malaria and arbovirus vectors, with excellent protection up to five hours after application. The heterogeneity in repellent sensitivity between mosquito genera and vector species could however impact the efficacy of repellents in public health programs. Considering its excellent performance and potential to protect against early and outdoor biting vectors, as well as its higher acceptability as compared to DEET, picaridin is an appropriate product to evaluate the epidemiological

  15. Comparison of collectors of airborne spray drift. Experiments in a wind tunnel and field measurements.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Tommy; Bergström, Lars; Kreuger, Jenny

    2011-06-01

    In this study, the collecting efficiency of different samplers of airborne drift was compared both in wind tunnel and in field experiments. The aim was to select an appropriate sampler for collecting airborne spray drift under field conditions. The wind tunnel study examined three static samplers and one dynamic sampler. The dynamic sampler had the highest overall collecting efficiency. Among the static samplers, the pipe cleaner collector had the highest efficiency. These two samplers were selected for evaluation in the subsequent field study. Results from 29 individual field experiments showed that the pipe cleaner collector on average had a 10% lower collecting efficiency than the dynamic sampler. However, the deposits on the pipe cleaners generally were highest at the 0.5 m level, and for the dynamic sampler at the 1 m level. It was concluded from the wind tunnel part of the study that the amount of drift collected on the static collectors had a more strongly positive correlation with increasing wind speed compared with the dynamic sampler. In the field study, the difference in efficiency between the two types of collector was fairly small. As the difference in collecting efficiency between the different types of sampler was small, the dynamic sampler was selected for further measurements of airborne drift under field conditions owing to its more well-defined collecting area. This study of collecting efficiency of airborne spray drift of static and dynamic samplers under field conditions contributes to increasing knowledge in this field of research. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Field and numerical study of wind and surface waves at short fetches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2016-04-01

    Measurements were carried out in 2012-2015 from May to October in the waters of Gorky Reservoir belonging to the Volga Cascade. The methods of the experiment focus on the study of airflow in the close proximity to the water surface. The sensors were positioned at the oceanographic Froude buoy including five two-component ultrasonic sensors WindSonic by Gill Instruments at different levels (0.1, 0.85, 1.3, 2.27, 5.26 meters above the mean water surface level), one water and three air temperature sensors, and three-channel wire wave gauge. One of wind sensors (0.1 m) was located on the float tracking the waveform for measuring the wind speed in the close proximity to the water surface. Basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer (the friction velocity u∗, the wind speed U10 and the drag coefficient CD) were calculated from the measured profiles of wind speed. Parameters were obtained in the range of wind speeds of 1-12 m/s. For wind speeds stronger than 4 m/s CD values were lower than those obtained before (see eg. [1,2]) and those predicted by the bulk parameterization. However, for weak winds (less than 3 m/s) CD values considerably higher than expected ones. The new parameterization of surface drag coefficient was proposed on the basis of the obtained data. The suggested parameterization of drag coefficient CD(U10) was implemented within wind input source terms in WAVEWATCH III [3]. The results of the numerical experiments were compared with the results obtained in the field experiments on the Gorky Reservoir. The use of the new drag coefficient improves the agreement in significant wave heights HS [4]. At the same time, the predicted mean wave periods are overestimated using both built-in source terms and adjusted source terms. We associate it with the necessity of the adjusting of the DIA nonlinearity model in WAVEWATCH III to the conditions of the middle-sized reservoir. Test experiments on the adjusting were carried out. The work was supported by the

  17. Transient rotation of photospheric vector magnetic fields associated with a solar flare.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Chae, Jongchul; Huang, Nengyi; Deng, Na; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Haimin

    2018-01-03

    As one of the most violent eruptions on the Sun, flares are believed to be powered by magnetic reconnection. The fundamental physics involving the release, transfer, and deposition of energy have been studied extensively. Taking advantage of the unprecedented resolution provided by the 1.6 m Goode Solar Telescope, here, we show a sudden rotation of vector magnetic fields, about 12-20° counterclockwise, associated with a flare. Unlike the permanent changes reported previously, the azimuth-angle change is transient and cospatial/temporal with Hα emission. The measured azimuth angle becomes closer to that in potential fields suggesting untwist of flare loops. The magnetograms were obtained in the near infrared at 1.56 μm, which is minimally affected by flare emission and no intensity profile change was detected. We believe that these transient changes are real and discuss the possible explanations in which the high-energy electron beams or Alfve'n waves play a crucial role.

  18. Trochoidal X-ray Vector Radiography: Directional dark-field without grating stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Y.; Bachche, S.; Kageyama, M.; Kuribayashi, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Lasser, T.; Momose, A.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray Vector Radiography (XVR) is an imaging technique that reveals the orientations of sub-pixel sized structures within a sample. Several dark-field radiographs are acquired by rotating the sample around the beam propagation direction and stepping one of the gratings to several positions for every pose of the sample in an X-ray grating interferometry setup. In this letter, we present a method of performing XVR of a continuously moving sample without the need of any grating motion. We reconstruct the orientations within a sample by analyzing the change in the background moire fringes caused by the sample moving and simultaneously rotating in plane (trochoidal trajectory) across the detector field-of-view. Avoiding the motion of gratings provides significant advantages in terms of stability and repeatability, while the continuous motion of the sample makes this kind of system adaptable for industrial applications such as the scanning of samples on a conveyor belt. Being the first step in the direction of utilizing advanced sample trajectories to replace grating motion, this work also lays the foundations for a full three dimensional reconstruction of scattering function without grating motion.

  19. [INVITED] Magnetic field vector sensor by a nonadiabatic tapered Hi-Bi fiber and ferrofluid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layeghi, Azam; Latifi, Hamid

    2018-06-01

    A magnetic field vector sensor based on super-paramagnetic fluid and tapered Hi-Bi fiber (THB) in fiber loop mirror (FLM) is proposed. A two-dimensional detection of external magnetic field (EMF) is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically simulated by Jones matrix to analyze the physical operation in detail. A birefringence is obtained due to magnetic fluid (MF) in applied EMF. By surrounding the THB with MF, a tunable birefringence of MF affect the transmission of the sensor. Slow and fast axes of this obtained birefringence are determined by the direction of applied EMF. In this way, the transmission response of the sensor is depended on the angle between the EMF orientation and the main axes of polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) in FLM. The wavelength shift and intensity shift versus EMF orientation show a sinusoidal behavior, while the applied EMF is constant. Also, the changes in the intensity of EMF in a certain direction results in wavelength shift in the sensor spectrum. The maximum wavelength sensitivity of 214 pm/mT is observed.

  20. Contributions to the Fourth Solar Wind Conference. [interplanetary magnetic fields and medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R.; Ness, N.; Ogilvie, K.; Pizzo, J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent results in interplanetary physics are examined. These include observations of shock waves and post-shock magnetic fields made by Voyager 1, 2; observations of the electron temperature as a function of distance between 1.36 AU and 2.25 AU; and observations of the structure of sector boundaries observed by Helios 1. A theory of electron energy transport in the collisionless solar wind is presented, and compared with observations. Alfven waves and Alvenic fluctuations in the solar wind are also discussed.

  1. A circular median filter approach for resolving directional ambiguities in wind fields retrieved from spaceborne scatterometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Howard

    1990-01-01

    The retrieval algorithm for spaceborne scatterometry proposed by Schultz (1985) is extended. A circular median filter (CMF) method is presented, which operates on wind directions independently of wind speed, removing any implicit wind speed dependence. A cell weighting scheme is included in the algorithm, permitting greater weights to be assigned to more reliable data. The mathematical properties of the ambiguous solutions to the wind retrieval problem are reviewed. The CMF algorithm is tested on twelve simulated data sets. The effects of spatially correlated likelihood assignment errors on the performance of the CMF algorithm are examined. Also, consideration is given to a wind field smoothing technique that uses a CMF.

  2. Ulysses Observations of Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbations Across Solar Wind Reconnection Exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peng, B.; Markidis, S.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report observations from 15 solar wind reconnection exhausts encountered along the Ulysses orbit beyond 4 AU in 1996-1999 and 2002-2005. The events, which lasted between 17 and 45 min, were found at heliospheric latitudes between -36o and 21o with one event detected as high as 58o. All events shared a common characteristic of a tripolar guide-magnetic field perturbation being detected across the observed exhausts. The signature consists of an enhanced guide field magnitude within the exhaust center and two regions of significantly depressed guide-fields adjacent to the center region. The events displayed magnetic field shear angles as low as 37o with a mean of 89o. This corresponds to a strong external guide field relative to the anti-parallel reconnecting component of the magnetic field with a mean ratio of 1.3 and a maximum ratio of 3.1. A 2-D kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions reveals that tripolar guide fields form at current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as two magnetic islands interact with one another for such strong guide fields. The Ulysses observations are also compared with the results of a 3-D kinetic simulation of multiple flux ropes in a strong guide field.

  3. Electromagnetic Simulation of the Near-Field Distribution around a Wind Farm

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Shang-Te; Ling, Hao

    2013-01-01

    An efficienmore » t approach to compute the near-field distribution around and within a wind farm under plane wave excitation is proposed. To make the problem computationally tractable, several simplifying assumptions are made based on the geometry problem. By comparing the approximations against full-wave simulations at 500 MHz, it is shown that the assumptions do not introduce significant errors into the resulting near-field distribution. The near fields around a 3 × 3 wind farm are computed using the developed methodology at 150 MHz, 500 MHz, and 3 GHz. Both the multipath interference patterns and the forward shadows are predicted by the proposed method.« less

  4. The latitude dependencies of the solar wind. [of interplanetary magnetic field polarity and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, R. L.; Winge, C. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of spacecraft following the earth's orbit occurs within the solar latitude range of 7 deg 15 min N on approximately September 7 to 7 deg 15 min S on approximately March 6. The latitude dependencies so far detected within this range have shown that the photospheric dipole-like field of the sun makes very important contributions to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed near the ecliptic. Changes in geomagnetic activity from even to odd numbered 11-year solar cycles are related to changes in the sun's dipolar field. The north-south IMF component and meridional, nonradial flow are important to a complete understanding of steady-state solar wind dynamics. Coronal conditions must be latitude-dependent in a way that accounts for the observed latitude dependence of the velocity and density of the solar wind.

  5. Robot Training With Vector Fields Based on Stroke Survivors' Individual Movement Statistics.

    PubMed

    Wright, Zachary A; Lazzaro, Emily; Thielbar, Kelly O; Patton, James L; Huang, Felix C

    2018-02-01

    The wide variation in upper extremity motor impairments among stroke survivors necessitates more intelligent methods of customized therapy. However, current strategies for characterizing individual motor impairments are limited by the use of traditional clinical assessments (e.g., Fugl-Meyer) and simple engineering metrics (e.g., goal-directed performance). Our overall approach is to statistically identify the range of volitional movement capabilities, and then apply a robot-applied force vector field intervention that encourages under-expressed movements. We investigated whether explorative training with such customized force fields would improve stroke survivors' (n = 11) movement patterns in comparison to a control group that trained without forces (n = 11). Force and control groups increased Fugl-Meyer UE scores (average of 1.0 and 1.1, respectively), which is not considered clinically meaningful. Interestingly, participants from both groups demonstrated dramatic increases in their range of velocity during exploration following only six days of training (average increase of 166.4% and 153.7% for the Force and Control group, respectively). While both groups showed evidence of improvement, we also found evidence that customized forces affected learning in a systematic way. When customized forces were active, we observed broader distributions of velocity that were not present in the controls. Second, we found that these changes led to specific changes in unassisted motion. In addition, while the shape of movement distributions changed significantly for both groups, detailed analysis of the velocity distributions revealed that customized forces promoted a greater proportion of favorable changes. Taken together, these results provide encouraging evidence that patient-specific force fields based on individuals' movement statistics can be used to create new movement patterns and shape them in a customized manner. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first

  6. Characterization Of Ocean Wind Vector Retrievals Using ERS-2 High-Resolution Long-Term Dataset And Buoy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polverari, F.; Talone, M.; Crapolicchio, R. Levy, G.; Marzano, F.

    2013-12-01

    The European Remote-sensing Satellite (ERS)-2 scatterometer provides wind retrievals over Ocean. To satisfy the needs of high quality and homogeneous set of scatterometer measurements, the European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the project Advanced Scatterometer Processing System (ASPS) with which a long-term dataset of new ERS-2 wind products, with an enhanced resolution of 25km square, has been generated by the reprocessing of the entire ERS mission. This paper presents the main results of the validation work of such new dataset using in situ measurements provided by the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA). The comparison indicates that, on average, the scatterometer data agree well with buoys measurements, however the scatterometer tends to overestimates lower winds and underestimates higher winds.

  7. Flows, Fields, and Forces in the Mars-Solar Wind Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Luhmann, J. G.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Harada, Y.; Fowler, C. M.; Mitchell, D. L.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mazelle, C.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-11-01

    We utilize suprathermal ion and magnetic field measurements from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission, organized by the upstream magnetic field, to investigate the morphology and variability of flows, fields, and forces in the Mars-solar wind interaction. We employ a combination of case studies and statistical investigations to characterize the interaction in both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular regions and under high and low solar wind Mach number conditions. For the first time, we include a detailed investigation of suprathermal ion temperature and anisotropy. We find that the observed magnetic fields and suprathermal ion moments in the magnetosheath, bow shock, and upstream regions have observable asymmetries controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field, with particularly large asymmetries found in the ion parallel temperature and anisotropy. The greatest temperature anisotropies occur in quasi-perpendicular regions of the magnetosheath and under low Mach number conditions. These results have implications for the growth and evolution of wave-particle instabilities and their role in energy transport and dissipation. We utilize the measured parameters to estimate the average ion pressure gradient, J × B, and v × B macroscopic force terms. The pressure gradient force maintains nearly cylindrical symmetry, while the J × B force has larger asymmetries and varies in magnitude in comparison to the pressure gradient force. The v × B force felt by newly produced planetary ions exceeds the other forces in magnitude in the magnetosheath and upstream regions for all solar wind conditions.

  8. Wind tunnel and field assessment of pollen dispersal in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Although genetically modified (GM) soybean has never been cultivated commercially in Japan, it is essential to set up the isolation distance required to prevent out-crossing between GM and conventional soybean in preparation for any future possibility of pollen transfer. The airborne soybean pollen was sampled using some Durham pollen samplers located in the range of 20 m from the field edge. In addition, the dispersal distance was assessed in a wind tunnel under constant air flow and then it was compared with the anticipated distances based on the pollen diameter. In the field, the maximum pollen density per day observed was 1.235 grains cm(-2) day(-1) at three observation points within 2.5 m from the field and inside the field the mean density did not reach the rate of 1 grain cm(-2 )day(-1) during 19 flowering days. The results of the wind tunnel experiment also showed that the plants had almost no airborne release of pollen and the dispersal distance was shorter than theoretical value due to clustered dispersal. This study showed little airborne pollen in and around the soybean field and the dispersal is restricted to a small area. Therefore, wind-mediated pollination appears to be negligible.

  9. Measurement of Unsteady Aerodynamics Load on the Blade of Field Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yasunari; Maeda, Takao; Naito, Keita; Ouchi, Yuu; Kozawa, Masayoshi

    This paper describes an experimental field study of the rotor aerodynamics of wind turbines. The test wind turbine is a horizontal axis wind turbine, or: HAWT with a diameter of 10m. The pressure distributions on the rotating blade are measured with multi point pressure transducers. Sectional aerodynamic forces are analyzed from pressure distribution. Blade root moments are measured simultaneously by a pair of strain gauges. The inflow wind is measured by a three component sonic anemometer, the local inflow of the blade section are measured by a pair of 7 hole Pitot tubes. The relation between the aerodynamic moments on the blade root from pressure distribution and the mechanical moment from strain gauges is discussed. The aerodynamic moments are estimated from the sectional aerodynamic forces and show oscillation caused by local wind speed and direction change. The mechanical moment shows similar oscillation to the aerodynamic excepting the short period oscillation of the blade first mode frequency. The fluctuation of the sectional aerodynamic force triggers resonant blade oscillations. Where stall is present along the blade section, the blade's first mode frequency is dominant. Without stall, the rotating frequency is dominant in the blade root moment.

  10. Polarization Control with Plasmonic Antenna Tips: A Universal Approach to Optical Nanocrystallography and Vector-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Raschke, Markus B.

    2018-05-01

    Controlling the propagation and polarization vectors in linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy enables to probe the anisotropy of optical responses providing structural symmetry selective contrast in optical imaging. Here we present a novel tilted antenna-tip approach to control the optical vector-field by breaking the axial symmetry of the nano-probe in tip-enhanced near-field microscopy. This gives rise to a localized plasmonic antenna effect with significantly enhanced optical field vectors with control of both \\textit{in-plane} and \\textit{out-of-plane} components. We use the resulting vector-field specificity in the symmetry selective nonlinear optical response of second-harmonic generation (SHG) for a generalized approach to optical nano-crystallography and -imaging. In tip-enhanced SHG imaging of monolayer MoS$_2$ films and single-crystalline ferroelectric YMnO$_3$, we reveal nano-crystallographic details of domain boundaries and domain topology with enhanced sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution. The approach is applicable to any anisotropic linear and nonlinear optical response, and provides for optical nano-crystallographic imaging of molecular or quantum materials.

  11. Implementing a vector surveillance-response system for chagas disease control: a 4-year field trial in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Kota; Tercero, Doribel; Pérez, Byron; Nakamura, Jiro; Pérez, Lenin

    2017-03-06

    Chagas disease is one of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). International goals for its control involve elimination of vector-borne transmission. Central American countries face challenges in establishing sustainable vector control programmes, since the main vector, Triatoma dimidiata, cannot be eliminated. In 2012, the Ministry of Health in Nicaragua started a field test of a vector surveillance-response system to control domestic vector infestation. This paper reports the main findings from this pilot study. This study was carried out from 2012 to 2015 in the Municipality of Totogalpa. The Japan International Cooperation Agency provided technical cooperation in designing and monitoring the surveillance-response system until 2014. This system involved 1) vector reports by householders to health facilities, 2) data analysis and planning of responses at the municipal health centre and 3) house visits or insecticide spraying by health personnel as a response. We registered all vector reports and responses in a digital database. The collected data were used to describe and analyse the system performance in terms of amount of vector reports as well as rates and timeliness of responses. During the study period, T. dimidiata was reported 396 times. Spatiotemporal analysis identified some high-risk clusters. All houses reported to be infested were visited by health personnel in 2013 and this response rate dropped to 39% in 2015. Rates of insecticide spraying rose above 80% in 2013 but no spraying was carried out in the following 2 years. The timeliness of house visits improved significantly after the responsibility was transferred from a vector control technician to primary health care staff. We argue that the proposed vector surveillance-response system is workable within the resource-constrained health system in Nicaragua. Integration to the primary health care services was a key to improve the system performance. Continual efforts are necessary to keep adapting

  12. Comparison of wind tunnel and field experiments to measure potential deposition of fenpropimorph following volatilisation from treated crops.

    PubMed

    Hassink, Jan; Platz, Klaus; Stadler, Reinhold; Zangmeister, Werner; Fent, Gunnar; Möndel, Martin; Kubiak, Roland

    2007-02-01

    The potential for short-range transport via air, i.e. volatilisation from the area of application and subsequent deposition on adjacent non-target areas, was investigated for the fungicide fenpropimorph in a wind tunnel system and under outdoor conditions in a higher-tier field study. Fenpropimorph 750 g L(-1) EC was applied post-emergence to cereal along with a reference standard lindane EC. Stainless steel containers of water were placed at different distances downwind of the application area to trap volatile residues during a study period of 24 h following application. Meteorological conditions in the wind tunnel as well as on the field were constantly monitored during the study period. The wind tunnel system was a partly standardised system on a semi-field scale, i.e. wind direction and wind speed (2 m s(-1)) were constant, but temperature and humidity varied according to the conditions outside. In the field experiment, the average wind speed over the 24 h study period was 3 m s(-1) and no rainfall occurred. Three different measuring lines were installed on the non-target area beside the treated field to cover potential variations in the wind direction. However, no significant differences were observed since the wind direction was generally constant. Fenpropimorph was detected in minor amounts of 0.01-0.05% of the applied material in the wind tunnel experiment. Even at a distance of 1 m beside the treated field, no significant deposition occurred (0.04% of applied material after 24 h). In the field, less than 0.1% of the applied fenpropimorph was detected at 0 m directly beside the treated field. At 5 m distance the deposition values were below 0.04%, and at 20 m distance about 0.01%. In general, the amounts of deposited fenpropimorph detected in the partly standardised wind tunnel system and the higher-tier field study were in good agreement.

  13. A model to relate wind tunnel measurements to open field odorant emissions from liquid area sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucernoni, F.; Capelli, L.; Busini, V.; Sironi, S.

    2017-05-01

    Waste Water Treatment Plants are known to have significant emissions of several pollutants and odorants causing nuisance to the near-living population. One of the purposes of the present work is to study a suitable model to evaluate odour emissions from liquid passive area sources. First, the models describing volatilization under a forced convection regime inside a wind tunnel device, which is the sampling device that typically used for sampling on liquid area sources, were investigated. In order to relate the fluid dynamic conditions inside the hood to the open field and inside the hood a thorough study of the models capable of describing the volatilization phenomena of the odorous compounds from liquid pools was performed and several different models were evaluated for the open field emission. By means of experimental tests involving pure liquid acetone and pure liquid butanone, it was verified that the model more suitable to describe precisely the volatilization inside the sampling hood is the model for the emission from a single flat plate in forced convection and laminar regime, with a fluid dynamic boundary layer fully developed and a mass transfer boundary layer not fully developed. The proportionality coefficient for the model was re-evaluated in order to account for the specific characteristics of the adopted wind tunnel device, and then the model was related with the selected model for the open field thereby computing the wind speed at 10 m that would cause the same emission that is estimated from the wind tunnel measurement furthermore, the field of application of the proposed model was clearly defined for the considered models during the project, discussing the two different kinds of compounds commonly found in emissive liquid pools or liquid spills, i.e. gas phase controlled and liquid phase controlled compounds. Lastly, a discussion is presented comparing the presented approach for emission rates recalculation in the field, with other approaches

  14. The role of streamline curvature in sand dune dynamics: evidence from field and wind tunnel measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Livingstone, Ian; Warren, Andrew

    1996-09-01

    Field measurements on an unvegetated, 10 m high barchan dune in Oman are compared with measurements over a 1:200 scale fixed model in a wind tunnel. Both the field and wind tunnel data demonstrate similar patterns of wind and shear velocity over the dune, confirming significant flow deceleration upwind of and at the toe of the dune, acceleration of flow up the windward slope, and deceleration between the crest and brink. This pattern, including the widely reported upwind reduction in shear velocity, reflects observations of previous studies. Such a reduction in shear velocity upwind of the dune should result in a reduction in sand transport and subsequent sand deposition. This is not observed in the field. Wind tunnel modelling using a near-surface pulse-wire probe suggests that the field method of shear velocity derivation is inadequate. The wind tunnel results exhibit no reduction in shear velocity upwind of or at the toe of the dune. Evidence provided by Reynolds stress profiles and turbulence intensities measured in the wind tunnel suggest that this maintenance of upwind shear stress may be a result of concave (unstable) streamline curvature. These additional surface stresses are not recorded by the techniques used in the field measurements. Using the occurrence of streamline curvature as a starting point, a new 2-D model of dune dynamics is deduced. This model relies on the establishment of an equilibrium between windward slope morphology, surface stresses induced by streamline curvature, and streamwise acceleration. Adopting the criteria that concave streamline curvature and streamwise acceleration both increase surface shear stress, whereas convex streamline curvature and deceleration have the opposite effect, the relationships between form and process are investigated in each of three morphologically distinct zones: the upwind interdune and concave toe region of the dune, the convex portion of the windward slope, and the crest-brink region. The

  15. On the Use of Coupled Wind, Wave, and Current Fields in the Simulation of Loads on Bottom-Supported Offshore Wind Turbines during Hurricanes: March 2012 - September 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eungsoo; Manuel, Lance; Curcic, Milan

    In the United States, potential offshore wind plant sites have been identified along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Gulf of Mexico. It is imperative that we define external conditions associated with hurricanes and severe winter storms and consider load cases for which wind turbines may need to be designed. We selected two hurricanes, Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012), and investigated the effect these tropical storms would have on bottom-supported offshore wind turbines that were hypothetically in or close to their path as they made landfall. For realistic turbine loads assessment, it is important that the coupled influences of themore » changing wind, wave, and current fields are simulated throughout the evolution of the hurricanes. We employed a coupled model--specifically, the University of Miami Coupled Model (UMCM)--that integrates atmospheric, wave, and ocean components to produce needed wind, wave, and current data. The wind data are used to generate appropriate vertical wind profiles and full wind velocity fields including turbulence; the current field over the water column is obtained by interpolated discrete output current data; and short-crested irregular second-order waves are simulated using output directional wave spectra from the coupled model. We studied two monopile-supported offshore wind turbines sited in 20 meters of water in the Gulf of Mexico to estimate loads during Hurricane Ike, and a jacket space-frame platform-supported offshore wind turbine sited in 50 meters of water in the mid-Atlantic region to estimate loads during Hurricane Sandy. In this report we discuss in detail how the simulated hurricane wind, wave, and current output data are used in turbine loads studies. In addition, important characteristics of the external conditions are studied, including the relative importance of swell versus wind seas, aerodynamic versus hydrodynamic forces, current velocity effects, yaw control options for the turbine, hydrodynamic drag versus inertia

  16. A Laminar Model for the Magnetic Field Structure in Bow-Shock Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantini, N.

    2018-05-01

    Bow Shock Pulsar Wind Nebulae are a class of non-thermal sources, that form when the wind of a pulsar moving at supersonic speed interacts with the ambient medium, either the ISM or in a few cases the cold ejecta of the parent supernova. These systems have attracted attention in recent years, because they allow us to investigate the properties of the pulsar wind in a different environment from that of canonical Pulsar Wind Nebulae in Supernova Remnants. However, due to the complexity of the interaction, a full-fledged multidimensional analysis is still laking. We present here a simplified approach, based on Lagrangian tracers, to model the magnetic field structure in these systems, and use it to compute the magnetic field geometry, for various configurations in terms of relative orientation of the magnetic axis, pulsar speed and observer direction. Based on our solutions we have computed a set of radio emission maps, including polarization, to investigate the variety of possible appearances, and how the observed emission pattern can be used to constrain the orientation of the system, and the possible presence of turbulence.

  17. An adaptive radiotherapy planning strategy for bladder cancer using deformation vector fields.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Anne; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Høyer, Morten; Søndergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2014-09-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has considerable potential in treatment of bladder cancer due to large inter-fractional changes in shape and size of the target. The aim of this study was to compare our clinically applied method for plan library creation that involves manual bladder delineations (Clin-ART) with a method using the deformation vector fields (DVFs) resulting from intensity-based deformable image registrations (DVF-based ART). The study included thirteen patients with urinary bladder cancer who had daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) acquired for set-up. In both ART strategies investigated, three plan selection volumes were generated using the CBCTs from the first four fractions; in Clin-ART boolean combinations of delineated bladders were used, while the DVF-based strategy applied combinations of the mean and standard deviation of patient-specific DVFs. The volume ratios (VRs) of the course-averaged PTV for the two ART strategies relative the non-adaptive PTV were calculated. Both Clin-ART and DVF-based ART considerably reduced the course-averaged PTV, compared to non-adaptive RT. The VR for DVF-based ART was lower than for Clin-ART (0.65 vs. 0.73; p<0.01). DVF-based ART for bladder irradiation has a considerable normal tissue sparing potential surpassing our already highly conformal clinically applied ART strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitivity vector fields in time-delay coordinate embeddings: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, A R; Epureanu, B I

    2013-02-01

    Identifying changes in the parameters of a dynamical system can be vital in many diagnostic and sensing applications. Sensitivity vector fields (SVFs) are one way of identifying such parametric variations by quantifying their effects on the morphology of a dynamical system's attractor. In many cases, SVFs are a more effective means of identification than commonly employed modal methods. Previously, it has only been possible to construct SVFs for a given dynamical system when a full set of state variables is available. This severely restricts SVF applicability because it may be cost prohibitive, or even impossible, to measure the entire state in high-dimensional systems. Thus, the focus of this paper is constructing SVFs with only partial knowledge of the state by using time-delay coordinate embeddings. Local models are employed in which the embedded states of a neighborhood are weighted in a way referred to as embedded point cloud averaging. Application of the presented methodology to both simulated and experimental time series demonstrates its utility and reliability.

  19. Experimental Characterization of Guided Waves by Their Surface Displacement Vector Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M.; Köhler, B.; Schubert, L.

    2009-03-01

    The development new nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) methods utilizing guided elastic waves needs a good understanding of wave propagation properties and the interaction of the waves with structures and defects. If the geometrical and stiffness properties of the components are well known, these effects can be studied very efficiently by numerical modeling. But very often there is a lack of precise knowledge of all necessary elastic properties; accurate and non-disturbing measurements are without alternative in these cases. The mapping of wave fields can be done by scanning laser vibrometers as demonstrated in a number of cases. Originally, a laser vibrometer provides only information from one displacement component. To get all three displacement components, the simultaneous measurement with three vibrometers is offered commercially. This is a very expensive approach. The paper describes a method which uses only one vibrometer sequentially for getting all three vector components. It allows determining additional parameters for characterizing wave modes as e.g. the ellipticity. The capability of this approach is demonstrated for the characterization of Lamb waves.

  20. Trypanosomes, fleas and field voles: ecological dynamics of a host-vector--parasite interaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Telfer, S; Burthe, S; Bennett, M; Begon, M

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of a flea-borne protozoan (Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) microti) in its field vole (Microtus agrestis) host, we monitored over a 2-year period a range of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters pertaining to host demographics, infection status and vector (flea) prevalence. Generalized Linear Mixed Modelling was used to analyse patterns of both flea and trypanosome occurrence. Overall, males of all sizes and ages were more likely to be infested with fleas than their female counterparts. Flea prevalence also showed direct density dependence during the winter, but patterns of density dependence varied amongst body mass (age) classes during the summer. Trypanosome prevalence did not vary between the sexes but was positively related to past flea prevalence with a lag of 3 months, with the highest levels occurring during the autumn season. A convex age-prevalence distribution was observed, suggesting that individuals develop a degree of immunity to trypanosome infection with age and exposure. An interaction between age and whether the individual was new or recaptured suggested that infected animals are less likely to become territory holders than their uninfected counterparts.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Fascicle Arrangements Can Be Reconstructed Using a Laplacian Vector Field Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hon Fai; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are characterized by a large diversity in anatomical architecture and function. Muscle force and contraction are generated by contractile fiber cells grouped in fascicle bundles, which transmit the mechanical action between origin and insertion attachments of the muscle. Therefore, an adequate representation of fascicle arrangements in computational models of skeletal muscles is important, especially when investigating three-dimensional muscle deformations in finite element models. However, obtaining high resolution in vivo measurements of fascicle arrangements in skeletal muscles is currently still challenging. This motivated the development of methods in previous studies to generate numerical representations of fascicle trajectories using interpolation templates. Here, we present an alternative approach based on the hypothesis of a rotation and divergence free (Laplacian) vector field behavior which reflects observed physical characteristics of fascicle trajectories. To obtain this representation, the Laplace equation was solved in anatomical reconstructions of skeletal muscle shapes based on medical images using a uniform flux boundary condition on the attachment areas. Fascicle tracts were generated through a robust flux based tracing algorithm. The concept of this approach was demonstrated in two-dimensional synthetic examples of typical skeletal muscle architectures. A detailed evaluation was performed in an example of the anatomical human tibialis anterior muscle which showed an overall agreement with measurements from the literature. The utility and capability of the proposed method was further demonstrated in other anatomical examples of human skeletal muscles with a wide range of muscle shapes and attachment morphologies. PMID:24204878

  2. Achieving Consistent Doppler Measurements from SDO/HMI Vector Field Inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Antiochos, S. K.; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory is delivering vector magnetic field observations of the full solar disk with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution; however, the satellite is in a highly inclined geosynchronous orbit. The relative spacecraft-Sun velocity varies by +/-3 kms-1 over a day, which introduces major orbital artifacts in the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. We demonstrate that the orbital artifacts contaminate all spatial and temporal scales in the data. We describe a newly developed three-stage procedure for mitigating these artifacts in the Doppler data obtained from the Milne-Eddington inversions in the HMI pipeline. The procedure ultimately uses 32 velocity-dependent coefficients to adjust 10 million pixels-a remarkably sparse correction model given the complexity of the orbital artifacts. This procedure was applied to full-disk images of AR 11084 to produce consistent Dopplergrams. The data adjustments reduce the power in the orbital artifacts by 31 dB. Furthermore, we analyze in detail the corrected images and show that our procedure greatly improves the temporal and spectral properties of the data without adding any new artifacts. We conclude that this new procedure makes a dramatic improvement in the consistency of the HMI data and in its usefulness for precision scientific studies.

  3. Assimilating concentration observations for transport and dispersion modeling in a meandering wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Sue Ellen; Beyer-Lout, Anke; Long, Kerrie J.; Young, George S.

    Assimilating concentration data into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model can provide information to improve downwind concentration forecasts. The forecast model is typically a one-way coupled set of equations: the meteorological equations impact the concentration, but the concentration does not generally affect the meteorological field. Thus, indirect methods of using concentration data to influence the meteorological variables are required. The problem studied here involves a simple wind field forcing Gaussian dispersion. Two methods of assimilating concentration data to infer the wind direction are demonstrated. The first method is Lagrangian in nature and treats the puff as an entity using feature extraction coupled with nudging. The second method is an Eulerian field approach akin to traditional variational approaches, but minimizes the error by using a genetic algorithm (GA) to directly optimize the match between observations and predictions. Both methods show success at inferring the wind field. The GA-variational method, however, is more accurate but requires more computational time. Dynamic assimilation of a continuous release modeled by a Gaussian plume is also demonstrated using the genetic algorithm approach.

  4. Study on the wind field and pollutant dispersion in street canyons using a stable numerical method.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ji-Yang; Leung, Dennis Y C

    2005-01-01

    A stable finite element method for the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations was used for studying the wind flow and pollutant dispersion within street canyons. A three-step fractional method was used to solve the velocity field and the pressure field separately from the governing equations. The Streamline Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) method was used to get stable numerical results. Numerical oscillation was minimized and satisfactory results can be obtained for flows at high Reynolds numbers. Simulating the flow over a square cylinder within a wide range of Reynolds numbers validates the wind field model. The Strouhal numbers obtained from the numerical simulation had a good agreement with those obtained from experiment. The wind field model developed in the present study is applied to simulate more complex flow phenomena in street canyons with two different building configurations. The results indicated that the flow at rooftop of buildings might not be assumed parallel to the ground as some numerical modelers did. A counter-clockwise rotating vortex may be found in street canyons with an inflow from the left to right. In addition, increasing building height can increase velocity fluctuations in the street canyon under certain circumstances, which facilitate pollutant dispersion. At high Reynolds numbers, the flow regimes in street canyons do not change with inflow velocity.

  5. Moisture convergence using satellite-derived wind fields - A severe local storm case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, A. J.; Vonder Haar, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    Five-minute interval 1-km resolution SMS visible channel data were used to derive low-level wind fields by tracking small cumulus clouds on NASA's Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System. The satellite-derived wind fields were combined with surface mixing ratios to derive horizontal moisture convergence in the prestorm environment of April 24, 1975. Storms began developing in an area extending from southwest Oklahoma to eastern Tennessee 2 h subsequent to the time of the derived fields. The maximum moisture convergence was computed to be 0.0022 g/kg per sec and areas of low-level convergence of moisture were in general indicative of regions of severe storm genesis. The resultant moisture convergence fields derived from two wind sets 20 min apart were spatially consistent and reflected the mesoscale forcing of ensuing storm development. Results are discussed with regard to possible limitations in quantifying the relationship between low-level flow and between low-level flow and satellite-derived cumulus motion in an antecedent storm environment.

  6. New Multigrid Method Including Elimination Algolithm Based on High-Order Vector Finite Elements in Three Dimensional Magnetostatic Field Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hano, Mitsuo; Hotta, Masashi

    A new multigrid method based on high-order vector finite elements is proposed in this paper. Low level discretizations in this method are obtained by using low-order vector finite elements for the same mesh. Gauss-Seidel method is used as a smoother, and a linear equation of lowest level is solved by ICCG method. But it is often found that multigrid solutions do not converge into ICCG solutions. An elimination algolithm of constant term using a null space of the coefficient matrix is also described. In three dimensional magnetostatic field analysis, convergence time and number of iteration of this multigrid method are discussed with the convectional ICCG method.

  7. Determination of statistics for any rotation of axes of a bivariate normal elliptical distribution. [of wind vector components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falls, L. W.; Crutcher, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    Transformation of statistics from a dimensional set to another dimensional set involves linear functions of the original set of statistics. Similarly, linear functions will transform statistics within a dimensional set such that the new statistics are relevant to a new set of coordinate axes. A restricted case of the latter is the rotation of axes in a coordinate system involving any two correlated random variables. A special case is the transformation for horizontal wind distributions. Wind statistics are usually provided in terms of wind speed and direction (measured clockwise from north) or in east-west and north-south components. A direct application of this technique allows the determination of appropriate wind statistics parallel and normal to any preselected flight path of a space vehicle. Among the constraints for launching space vehicles are critical values selected from the distribution of the expected winds parallel to and normal to the flight path. These procedures are applied to space vehicle launches at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

  8. Monte Carlo studies of ocean wind vector measurements by SCATT: Objective criteria and maximum likelihood estimates for removal of aliases, and effects of cell size on accuracy of vector winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The scatterometer on the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS) is studied by means of Monte Carlo techniques so as to determine the effect of two additional antennas for alias (or ambiguity) removal by means of an objective criteria technique and a normalized maximum likelihood estimator. Cells nominally 10 km by 10 km, 10 km by 50 km, and 50 km by 50 km are simulated for winds of 4, 8, 12 and 24 m/s and incidence angles of 29, 39, 47, and 53.5 deg for 15 deg changes in direction. The normalized maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) is correct a large part of the time, but the objective criterion technique is recommended as a reserve, and more quickly computed, procedure. Both methods for alias removal depend on the differences in the present model function at upwind and downwind. For 10 km by 10 km cells, it is found that the MLE method introduces a correlation between wind speed errors and aspect angle (wind direction) errors that can be as high as 0.8 or 0.9 and that the wind direction errors are unacceptably large, compared to those obtained for the SASS for similar assumptions.

  9. The TurbEFA Field Experiment—Measuring the Influence of a Forest Clearing on the Turbulent Wind Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queck, Ronald; Bernhofer, Christian; Bienert, Anne; Schlegel, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Forest ecosystems play an important role in the interaction between the land surface and the atmosphere. Measurements and modelling efforts have revealed significant uncertainties in state-of-the-art flux assessments due to spatial inhomogeneities in the airflow and land surface. Here, a field experiment is used to describe the turbulent flow across a typical Central European forest clearing. A three-dimensional model of the inhomogeneous forest stand was developed using an innovative approach based on terrestrial laser-scanner technology. The comparison of the wind statistics of two measurement campaigns (5 and 12 months long) showed the spatial and temporal representativeness of the ultrasonic anemometer measurements within the canopy. An improved method for the correction of the vertical velocity enables the distinction between the instrumental offsets and the vertical winds due to the inclination of the instrument. Despite a 13 % fraction of deciduous plants within the otherwise evergreen canopy, the effects of phenological seasons on the velocity profiles were small. The data classified according to the wind speed revealed the intermittent nature of recirculating air in the clearing. Furthermore, the development of sub-canopy wind-speed maxima is explained by considering the velocity moments and the momentum equation (including measurements of the local pressure gradient). Clearings deflect the flow downward and feed the sub-canopy flow, i.e., advective fluxes, according to wind speed and, likely, clearing size, whereas local pressure gradients play an important role in the development of sub-canopy flow. The presented dataset is freely available at the project homepage.

  10. Magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Lesur, Vincent; Lane, Richard; Wang, Huilin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the mathematical and computational aspects of the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system (SCS). This work is relevant for 3-D modelling that is performed with lithospheric vertical scales and global, continent or large regional horizontal scales. The curvature of the Earth is significant at these scales and hence, a SCS is more appropriate than the usual Cartesian coordinate system (CCS). The 3-D arrays of spherical prisms (SP; `tesseroids') can be used to model the response of volumes with variable magnetic properties. Analytical solutions do not exist for these model elements and numerical or mixed numerical and analytical solutions must be employed. We compared various methods for calculating the response in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The methods were (1) the spherical coordinate magnetic dipole method (MD), (2) variants of the 3-D Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration method (3-D GLQI) with (i) different numbers of nodes in each of the three directions, and (ii) models where we subdivided each SP into a number of smaller tesseroid volume elements, (3) a procedure that we term revised Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (3-D RGLQI) where the magnetization direction which is constant in a SCS is assumed to be constant in a CCS and equal to the direction at the geometric centre of each tesseroid, (4) the Taylor's series expansion method (TSE) and (5) the rectangular prism method (RP). In any realistic application, both the accuracy and the computational efficiency factors must be considered to determine the optimum approach to employ. In all instances, accuracy improves with increasing distance from the source. It is higher in the percentage terms for potential than the vector or tensor response. The tensor errors are the largest, but they decrease more quickly with distance from the source. In our comparisons of relative computational efficiency, we found

  11. Steady hydromagnetic flows in open magnetic fields. I - A class of analytic solutions. [for stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, B. C.; Tsinganos, K.

    1986-01-01

    In the case of an establishment of theoretical models of the hydromagnetic solar wind, the inclusion of the effects of the magnetic field in the solar wind makes it extremely dificult to solve the mathematical problem. This paper has the objective to present a set of particular analytic solutions. The general formulation of Tsinganos (1982) is used to identify a class of analytic solutions to the equations of steady hydromagnetic flows in spherical coordinates. Flow in an open magnetic field are studied, taking into account the problem in dimensionless form, the special case of radial flows with alpha = 0, general radial flows, illustrative examples for flows in which alpha is not equal to 0, a parametric study of nonradial flows in which alpha is not equal to zero, variations in the parameter nu, and variations in the initial speed eta.

  12. Proton fire hose instabilities in the expanding solar wind: Role of oblique magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr

    2016-04-01

    The double adiabatic (CGL) approximation for the ideal (Parker) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) predicts generation of the parallel particle temperature anisotropy (T∥ > T⊥) for a nearly radial magnetic field whereas for a strongly oblique IMF generation of the opposite temperature anisotropy is expected. The transition between the two behaviours is expected at around 45o, i.e. around 1 AU in the solar wind in the ecliptic plane. We investigate properties of a proton-electron plasma system in the solar wind using hybrid expanding box simulations starting with an oblique IMF. The simulated system becomes unstable with respect to the parallel and oblique fire hose instabilities and is forced to stay around the corresponding marginal stability. Rotation of the IMF reduces the time system stays near the marginal stability regions and for a strongly transverse IMF the system moves away from the regions unstable with respect to the fire hose instabilities.

  13. POD-based constrained sensor placement and field reconstruction from noisy wind measurements: A perturbation study

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiu; Lin, Guang

    2016-04-14

    Sensor placement at the extrema of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is efficient and leads to accurate reconstruction of the wind field from a limited number of measure- ments. In this paper we extend this approach of sensor placement and take into account measurement errors and detect possible malfunctioning sensors. We use the 48 hourly spa- tial wind field simulation data sets simulated using the Weather Research an Forecasting (WRF) model applied to the Maine Bay to evaluate the performances of our methods. Specifically, we use an exclusion disk strategy to distribute sensors when the extrema of POD modes are close.more » It turns out that this strategy can also reduce the error of recon- struction from noise measurements. Also, by a cross-validation technique, we successfully locate the malfunctioning sensors.« less

  14. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  15. An MHD Simulation of Solar Active Region 11158 Driven with a Time-dependent Electric Field Determined from HMI Vector Magnetic Field Measurement Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Keiji; Feng, Xueshang; Xiong, Ming; Jiang, Chaowei

    2018-03-01

    For realistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the solar active region (AR), two types of capabilities are required. The first is the capability to calculate the bottom-boundary electric field vector, with which the observed magnetic field can be reconstructed through the induction equation. The second is a proper boundary treatment to limit the size of the sub-Alfvénic simulation region. We developed (1) a practical inversion method to yield the solar-surface electric field vector from the temporal evolution of the three components of magnetic field data maps, and (2) a characteristic-based free boundary treatment for the top and side sub-Alfvénic boundary surfaces. We simulate the temporal evolution of AR 11158 over 16 hr for testing, using Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager vector magnetic field observation data and our time-dependent three-dimensional MHD simulation with these two features. Despite several assumptions in calculating the electric field and compromises for mitigating computational difficulties at the very low beta regime, several features of the AR were reasonably retrieved, such as twisting field structures, energy accumulation comparable to an X-class flare, and sudden changes at the time of the X-flare. The present MHD model can be a first step toward more realistic modeling of AR in the future.

  16. Prediction of internal and external noise fields for blowdown wind tunnels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosier, R. N.; Mayes, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Empirical methods have been developed to estimate the test section noise levels and the outside noise radiation patterns of blowdown wind tunnels. Included are considerations of noise generation by control valves, burners, turbulent boundary layers, and exhaust jets as appropriate. Sample test section and radiation field noise estimates are presented. The external estimates are noted to be in good agreement with the limited amount of available measurements.

  17. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  18. Correlation of Magnetic Fields with Solar Wind Plasma Parameters at 1AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, F.

    2017-12-01

    The physical parameters of the solar wind observed in-situ near 1AU have been studied for several decades, and relationships between them, such as the positive correlation between the solar wind plasma temperature T and velocity V, and the negative correlation between density N and velocity V, are well known. However, the magnetic field intensity does not appear to be well correlated with any individual plasma parameter. In this paper, we discuss previously under-reported correlations between B and the combined plasma parameters √NV2 as well as between B and √NT. These two correlations are strong during the periods of corotating interaction regions and high speed streams, moderate during intervals of slow solar wind, and rather poor during the passage of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. The results indicate that the magnetic pressure in the solar wind is well correlated both with the plasma dynamic pressure and the thermal pressure. Then, we employ a 3D MHD model to simulate the formation of the relationships between the magnetic strength B and √NV2 as well as √NT observed at 1AU. The inner boundary condition is derived by empirical models, with the magnetic field and density are optional. Five kinds of boundary conditions at the inner boundary of heliosphere are tested. In the cases that the magnetic field is related to speed at the inner boundary, the correlation coefficients between B and √NV2 as well as between B and √NT are even higher than that in the observational results. At 1AU the simulated radial magnetic field shows little latitude dependence, which matches the observation of Ulysses. Most of the modeled characters in these cases are closer to observation than others. This inner boundary condition may more accurately characterize Sun's magnetic influence on the heliosphere. The new input may be able to improve the simulation of CME propagation in the inner heliosphere and the space weather forecasting.

  19. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  20. High resolution modelling of wind fields for optimization of empirical storm flood predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, B.; Frank, H.

    2014-05-01

    High resolution wind fields are necessary to predict the occurrence of storm flood events and their magnitude. Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) created a catalogue of detailed wind fields of 39 historical storms at the German North Sea coast from the years 1962 to 2011. The catalogue is used by the Niedersächsisches Landesamt für Wasser-, Küsten- und Naturschutz (NLWKN) coastal research center to improve their flood alert service. The computation of wind fields and other meteorological parameters is based on the model chain of the DWD going from the global model GME via the limited-area model COSMO with 7 km mesh size down to a COSMO model with 2.2 km. To obtain an improved analysis COSMO runs are nudged against observations for the historical storms. The global model GME is initialised from the ERA reanalysis data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). As expected, we got better congruency with observations of the model for the nudging runs than the normal forecast runs for most storms. We also found during the verification process that different land use data sets could influence the results considerably.

  1. Evaluation of wind field statistics near and inside clouds using a coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottman, Brian Todd

    1998-09-01

    This work proposes advanced techniques for measuring the spatial wind field statistics near and inside clouds using a vertically pointing solid state coherent Doppler lidar on a fixed ground based platform. The coherent Doppler lidar is an ideal instrument for high spatial and temporal resolution velocity estimates. The basic parameters of lidar are discussed, including a complete statistical description of the Doppler lidar signal. This description is extended to cases with simple functional forms for aerosol backscatter and velocity. An estimate for the mean velocity over a sensing volume is produced by estimating the mean spectra. There are many traditional spectral estimators, which are useful for conditions with slowly varying velocity and backscatter. A new class of estimators (novel) is introduced that produces reliable velocity estimates for conditions with large variations in aerosol backscatter and velocity with range, such as cloud conditions. Performance of traditional and novel estimators is computed for a variety of deterministic atmospheric conditions using computer simulated data. Wind field statistics are produced for actual data for a cloud deck, and for multi- layer clouds. Unique results include detection of possible spectral signatures for rain, estimates for the structure function inside a cloud deck, reliable velocity estimation techniques near and inside thin clouds, and estimates for simple wind field statistics between cloud layers.

  2. Monitoring tropical cyclone intensity using wind fields derived from short-interval satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Gentry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 were used to derive high resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic tropical cyclones (1975-78). These wind fields were used to derive upper and lower tropospheric areal mean relative vorticity and their differences, the net relative angular momentum balance and upper tropospheric mass outflow. These kinematic parameters were shown by studies using composite rawinsonde data to be strongly related to tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. Also, the role of forced synoptic scale subsidence in tropical cyclone formation was examined. The studies showed that satellite-derived lower and upper tropospheric wind fields can be used to monitor and possibly predict tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. These kinematic analyses showed that future changes in tropical cyclone intensity are mainly related to the "spin-up" of the storms by the net horizontal transport of relative angular momentum caused by convergence of cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere and to a lesser extent the divergence of anticyclone vorticity in the upper troposphere.

  3. Predictability of dune activity in real dune fields under unidirectional wind regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of 10 dune fields to test a model-derived hypothesis of dune field activity. The hypothesis suggests that a quantifiable threshold exists for stabilization in unidirectional wind regimes: active dunes have slipface deposition rates that exceed the vegetation deposition tolerance, and stabilizing dunes have the opposite. We quantified aeolian sand flux, slipface geometry, and vegetation deposition tolerance to directly test the hypothesis at four dune fields (Bigstick, White Sands Stable, White Sands Active, and Cape Cod). We indirectly tested the hypothesis at six additional dune fields with limited vegetation data (Hanford, Año Nuevo, Skagen Odde, Salton Sea, Oceano Stable, and Oceano Active, "inverse calculation sites"). We used digital topographic data and estimates of aeolian sand flux to approximate the slipface deposition rates prior to stabilization. Results revealed a distinct, quantifiable, and consistent pattern despite diverse environmental conditions: the modal peak of prestabilization slipface deposition rates was 80% of the vegetation deposition tolerance at stabilized or stabilizing dune fields. Results from inverse calculation sites indicate deposition rates at stabilized sites were near a hypothesized maximum vegetation deposition tolerance (1 m a-1), and active sites had slipface deposition rates much higher. Overall, these results confirm the hypothesis and provide evidence of a globally applicable, simple, and previously unidentified predictor for the dynamics of vegetation cover in dune fields under unidirectional wind regimes.

  4. Combining dispersion modelling with synoptic patterns to understand the wind-borne transport into the UK of the bluetongue disease vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Laura; Ekström, Marie; Dessai, Suraje

    2017-07-01

    Bluetongue, an economically important animal disease, can be spread over long distances by carriage of insect vectors ( Culicoides biting midges) on the wind. The weather conditions which influence the midge's flight are controlled by synoptic scale atmospheric circulations. A method is proposed that links wind-borne dispersion of the insects to synoptic circulation through the use of a dispersion model in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. We illustrate how to identify the main synoptic situations present during times of midge incursions into the UK from the European continent. A PCA was conducted on high-pass-filtered mean sea-level pressure data for a domain centred over north-west Europe from 2005 to 2007. A clustering algorithm applied to the PCA scores indicated the data should be divided into five classes for which averages were calculated, providing a classification of the main synoptic types present. Midge incursion events were found to mainly occur in two synoptic categories; 64.8% were associated with a pattern displaying a pressure gradient over the North Atlantic leading to moderate south-westerly flow over the UK and 17.9% of the events occurred when high pressure dominated the region leading to south-easterly or easterly winds. The winds indicated by the pressure maps generally compared well against observations from a surface station and analysis charts. This technique could be used to assess frequency and timings of incursions of virus into new areas on seasonal and decadal timescales, currently not possible with other dispersion or biological modelling methods.

  5. A case study of effects of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence, wind speed, and stability on wind farm induced temperature changes using observations from a field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Geng; Zhou, Liming; Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Roy, Somnath Baidya; Harris, Ronald A.; Cervarich, Matthew Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that operational wind farms in west-central Texas increase local nighttime land surface temperature (LST) by 0.31-0.70 °C, but no noticeable impact is detected during daytime, and that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the magnitude of this warming are likely determined by those in the magnitude of wind speed. This paper further explores these findings by using the data from a year-long field campaign and nearby radiosonde observations to investigate how thermodynamic profiles and surface-atmosphere exchange processes work in tandem with the presence of wind farms to affect the local climate. Combined with satellite data analyses, we find that wind farm impacts on LST are predominantly determined by the relative ratio of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) induced by the wind turbines compared to the background TKE. This ratio explains not only the day-night contrast of the wind farm impact and the warming magnitude of nighttime LST over the wind farms, but also most of the seasonal variations in the nighttime LST changes. These results indicate that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the turbine-induced turbulence relative to the background TKE play an essential role in determining those in the magnitude of LST changes over the wind farms. In addition, atmospheric stability determines the sign and strength of the net downward heat transport as well as the magnitude of the background TKE. The study highlights the need for better understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and wind farm interactions, and for better parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

  6. Prediction of far-field wind turbine noise propagation with parabolic equation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongkyu; Lee, Dongjai; Honhoff, Saskia

    2016-08-01

    Sound propagation of wind farms is typically simulated by the use of engineering tools that are neglecting some atmospheric conditions and terrain effects. Wind and temperature profiles, however, can affect the propagation of sound and thus the perceived sound in the far field. A better understanding and application of those effects would allow a more optimized farm operation towards meeting noise regulations and optimizing energy yield. This paper presents the parabolic equation (PE) model development for accurate wind turbine noise propagation. The model is validated against analytic solutions for a uniform sound speed profile, benchmark problems for nonuniform sound speed profiles, and field sound test data for real environmental acoustics. It is shown that PE provides good agreement with the measured data, except upwind propagation cases in which turbulence scattering is important. Finally, the PE model uses computational fluid dynamics results as input to accurately predict sound propagation for complex flows such as wake flows. It is demonstrated that wake flows significantly modify the sound propagation characteristics.

  7. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, Joep G.S.; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M.

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  8. Field wind tunnel testing of two silt loam soils on the North American Central High Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Van Pelt, R.; Baddock, Matthew C.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Schlegel, Alan J.; Vigil, Merle F.; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica

    2013-09-01

    Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that threatens agricultural sustainability and environmental quality globally. Protecting the soil surface with cover crops and plant residues, practices common in no-till and reduced tillage cropping systems, are highly effective methods for shielding the soil surface from the erosive forces of wind and have been credited with beneficial increases of chemical and physical soil properties including soil organic matter, water holding capacity, and wet aggregate stability. Recently, advances in biofuel technology have made crop residues valuable feed stocks for ethanol production. Relatively little is known about cropping systems effects on intrinsic soil erodibility, the ability of the soil without a protective cover to resist the erosive force of wind. We tested the bare, uniformly disturbed, surface of long-term tillage and crop rotation research plots containing silt loam soils in western Kansas and eastern Colorado with a portable field wind tunnel. Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) were measured using glass fiber filters and respirable dust, PM10 and PM2.5, were measured using optical particle counters sampling the flow to the filters. The results were highly variable and TSP emission rates varied from less than 0.5 mg m-2 s-1 to greater than 16.1 mg m-2 s-1 but all the results indicated that cropping system history had no effect on intrinsic erodibility or dust emissions from the soil surfaces. We conclude that prior best management practices will not protect the soil from the erosive forces of wind if the protective mantle of crop residues is removed.

  9. Influence of interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind on auroral brightness in different regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. F.; Lu, J. Y.; Wang, J.-S.; Peng, Z.; Zhou, L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract<p label="1">By integrating and averaging the auroral brightness from Polar Ultraviolet Imager auroral images, which have the whole auroral ovals, and combining the observation data of interplanetary magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (IMF) and solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> from NASA Operating Missions as a Node on the Internet (OMNI), we investigate the influence of IMF and solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> on auroral activities, and analyze the separate roles of the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> dynamic pressure, density, and velocity on aurora, respectively. We statistically analyze the relations between the interplanetary conditions and the auroral brightness in dawnside, dayside, duskside, and nightside. It is found that the three components of the IMF have different effects on the auroral brightness in the different regions. Different from the nightside auroral brightness, the dawnside, dayside, and duskside auroral brightness are affected by the IMF Bx, and By components more significantly. The IMF Bx and By components have different effects on these three regional auroral brightness under the opposite polarities of the IMF Bz. As expected, the nightside aurora is mainly affected by the IMF Bz, and under southward IMF, the larger the |Bz|, the brighter the nightside aurora. The IMF Bx and By components have no visible effects. On the other hand, it is also found that the aurora is not intensified singly with the increase of the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> dynamic pressure: when only the dynamic pressure is high, but the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> velocity is not very fast, the aurora will not necessarily be intensified significantly. These results can be used to qualitatively predict the auroral activities in different regions for various interplanetary conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29047811','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29047811"><span>High-efficiency and flexible generation of <span class="hlt">vector</span> vortex optical <span class="hlt">fields</span> by a reflective phase-only spatial light modulator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cai, Meng-Qiang; Wang, Zhou-Xiang; Liang, Juan; Wang, Yan-Kun; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>The scheme for generating <span class="hlt">vector</span> optical <span class="hlt">fields</span> should have not only high efficiency but also flexibility for satisfying the requirements of various applications. However, in general, high efficiency and flexibility are not compatible. Here we present and experimentally demonstrate a solution to directly, flexibly, and efficiently generate <span class="hlt">vector</span> vortex optical <span class="hlt">fields</span> (VVOFs) with a reflective phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) based on optical birefringence of liquid crystal molecules. To generate the VVOFs, this approach needs in principle only a half-wave plate, an LC-SLM, and a quarter-wave plate. This approach has some advantages, including a simple experimental setup, good flexibility, and high efficiency, making the approach very promising in some applications when higher power is need. This approach has a generation efficiency of 44.0%, which is much higher than the 1.1% of the common path interferometric approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MS%26E..363a2017B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MS%26E..363a2017B"><span>Development of software-hardware complex for investigation of the <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> of speeds in the cyclone-separator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borisov, A.</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>The current issue of studying the <span class="hlt">vector</span> velocity <span class="hlt">field</span> in a cyclone-separator with a screw insert is considered in the article. Modeling of the velocity <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> in SolidWorks was carried out, tangential, axial and radial velocities were investigated. Also, a software and hardware complex was developed that makes it possible to obtain data on the speed inside a cyclone separator. The results of the experiment showed that on flour dusts the efficiency of the cyclone separator in question was more than 99.5%, with an air flow rate of 376 m3 / h, 472 m3 / h and 516 m3 / h, and ΔP less than 600 Pa. The velocity in the inlet branch of the screw insert was 18-20 m / s, and at the exit of the screw insert the airflow velocity is 50-70 m / s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.9064P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.9064P"><span>Modulation of wave <span class="hlt">fields</span> by current and <span class="hlt">wind</span> intensifications off the Catalan coast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pallares Lopez, Elena; Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustin; Espino, Manuel</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>The coupling between waves, ocean and atmospheric models has been one of the main topics in the physical oceanography community for the last decade. The resulting challenge is more difficult and relevant in coastal areas, where the interaction between <span class="hlt">wind</span>, waves and currents <span class="hlt">fields</span> is far from negligible, and therefore some sort of model coupling is required. However, it is important to remark that it is only during energetic "enough" events that the coupling becomes quantitatively significant. The Western Mediterranean sea is an area characterised by calm periods most of the year. However, coastal areas often present highly variable and heterogeneous <span class="hlt">wind</span>, wave and current conditions, which make the numerical prediction of meteo-oceanographic processes difficult and with large associated local errors. Specifically, the Catalan coast is frequently affected by offshore <span class="hlt">wind</span> intensifications channel by river valleys and by local current intensifications associated to coastal "bulges" (e.g. deltaic forms) that can reach up to 1 m/s in the surface. In this study we present different coupling strategies applied to both calm periods and energetic events, represented by the <span class="hlt">wind</span> jets or current intensifications mentioned before, with the objective to quantify the effect of model coupling on the resulting wave <span class="hlt">fields</span> off the Catalan coast. The SWAN wave model is used to model the wave <span class="hlt">fields</span>, together with the ROMS oceanic model and the WRF atmospheric model. Two different types of coupling are considered: the first is a one-way coupling consisting in introducing the current <span class="hlt">field</span> as an input for the SWAN wave model; the second one, consists in running in parallel the ROMS circulation model, the WRF atmospheric model and the SWAN wave model. The second methodology is more complex and should better reproduce the physics involved in the interactions, but requires an important computational capacity, not always available, so a critical comparison between the two</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730013091','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730013091"><span>Martian tidal pressure and <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span> obtained from the Mariner 9 infrared spectroscopy experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pirraglia, J. A.; Conrath, B. J.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Using temperature <span class="hlt">fields</span> derived from the Mariner 9 infrared spectroscopy experiment, the Martian atmospheric tidal pressure and <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span> are calculated. Temperature as a function of local time, latitude, and atmospheric pressure level is obtained by secular and longitudinal averaging of the data. The resulting temperature <span class="hlt">field</span> is approximated by a spherical harmonic expansion, retaining one symmetric and one asymmetric term for wavenumber zero and wavenumber one. Vertical averaging of the linearized momentum and continuity equations results in an inhomogeneous tidal equation for surface pressure fluctuations with the driving function related to the temperature <span class="hlt">field</span> through the geopotential function and the hydrostatic equation. Solutions of the tidal equation show a diurnal fractional pressure amplitude approximately equal to one half of the vertically averaged diurnal fractional temperature amplitude.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740043627&hterms=field+infrared&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DNear%2Bfield%2Binfrared','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740043627&hterms=field+infrared&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DNear%2Bfield%2Binfrared"><span>Martian tidal pressure and <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span> obtained from the Mariner 9 infrared spectroscopy experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pirraglia, J. A.; Conrath, B. J.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Using temperature <span class="hlt">fields</span> derived from the Mariner 9 infrared spectroscopy experiment, the Martian atmospheric tidal pressure and <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span> are calculated. Temperature as a function of local time, latitude, and atmospheric pressure level is obtained by secular and longitudinal averaging of the data. The resulting temperature <span class="hlt">field</span> is approximated by a spherical harmonic expansion, retaining one symmetric and one asymmetric term each for wavenumber zero and wavenumber one. Vertical averaging of the linearized momentum and continuity equations results in an inhomogeneous tidal equation for surface pressure fluctuations with the driving function related to the temperature <span class="hlt">field</span> through the geopotential function and the hydrostatic equation. Solutions of the tidal equation show a diurnal fractional pressure amplitude approximately equal to one-half the vertically averaged diurnal fractional temperature amplitude.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA523063','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA523063"><span>A Study of the 3-D Reconstruction of Heliospheric <span class="hlt">Vector</span> Magnetic <span class="hlt">Fields</span> From Faraday-Rotation Inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-12-30</p> <p>FA9550-06-1-0107 for “A Study of the 3-D Reconstruction of Heliospheric <span class="hlt">Vector</span> Magnetic <span class="hlt">Fields</span> from Faraday-Rotation Inversion” for work performed...from 2005 – 2009 by the University of California at San Diego. There are three aspects to this research: 1) The inversion of simple synthetic Faraday...rotation measurements that can be used to demonstrate the feasibility of performing this inversion when and if Faraday-rotation observations become</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IJBC...2750224L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IJBC...2750224L"><span>Unique Normal Form and the Associated Coefficients for a Class of Three-Dimensional Nilpotent <span class="hlt">Vector</span> <span class="hlt">Fields</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Jing; Kou, Liying; Wang, Duo; Zhang, Wei</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>In this paper, we mainly focus on the unique normal form for a class of three-dimensional <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span> via the method of transformation with parameters. A general explicit recursive formula is derived to compute the higher order normal form and the associated coefficients, which can be achieved easily by symbolic calculations. To illustrate the efficiency of the approach, a comparison of our result with others is also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7979E..0LL','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7979E..0LL"><span>Full-<span class="hlt">field</span> inspection of a <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbine blade using three-dimensional digital image correlation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>LeBlanc, Bruce; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Chen, Julie; Sherwood, James; Hughes, Scott</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Increasing demand and deployment of <span class="hlt">wind</span> power has led to a significant increase in the number of <span class="hlt">wind</span>-turbine blades manufactured globally. As the physical size and number of turbines deployed grows, the probability of manufacturing defects being present in composite turbine blade fleets also increases. As both capital blade costs, and operational and maintenance costs, increase for larger turbine systems the need for large-scale inspection and monitoring of the state of structural health of turbine blades during manufacturing and operation critically increase. One method for locating and quantifying manufacturing defects, while also allowing for the in-situ measurement of the structural health of blades, is through the observation of the full-<span class="hlt">field</span> state of deformation and strain of the blade. Static tests were performed on a nine-meter CX-100 composite turbine blade to extract full-<span class="hlt">field</span> displacement and strain measurements using threedimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC). Measurements were taken at several angles near the blade root, including along the high-pressure surface, low-pressure surface, and along the trailing edge of the blade. The overall results indicate that the measurement approach can clearly identify failure locations and discontinuities in the blade curvature under load. Post-processing of the data using a stitching technique enables the shape and curvature of the entire blade to be observed for a large-scale <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbine blade for the first time. The experiment demonstrates the feasibility of the approach and reveals that the technique readily can be scaled up to accommodate utility-scale blades. As long as a trackable pattern is applied to the surface of the blade, measurements can be made in-situ when a blade is on a manufacturing floor, installed in a test fixture, or installed on a rotating turbine. The results demonstrate the great potential of the optical measurement technique and its capability for use in the <span class="hlt">wind</span> industry for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9437E..1OB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9437E..1OB"><span>Extracting full-<span class="hlt">field</span> dynamic strain response of a rotating <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbine using photogrammetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baqersad, Javad; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Health monitoring of <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbines is typically performed using conventional sensors (e.g. strain-gages and accelerometers) that are usually mounted to the nacelle or gearbox. Although many <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbines stop operating due to blade failures, there are typically few to no sensor mounted on the blades. Placing sensors on the rotating parts of the structure is a challenge due to the wiring and data transmission constraints. Within the current work, an approach to monitor full-<span class="hlt">field</span> dynamic response of rotating structures (e.g. <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbine blades or helicopter rotors) is developed and experimentally verified. A <span class="hlt">wind</span> turbine rotor was used as the test structure and was mounted to a block and horizontally placed on the ground. A pair of bearings connected to the rotor shaft allowed the turbine to freely spin along the shaft. Several optical targets were mounted to the blades and a pair of high-speed cameras was used to monitor the dynamics of the spinning turbine. Displacements of the targets during rotation were measured using three-dimensional point tracking. The point tracking technique measured both rigid body displacement and flexible deformation of the blades at target locations. While the structure is rotating, only flap displacements of optical targets (displacements out of the rotation plane) were used in strain prediction process. The measured displacements were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the turbine to extract full-<span class="hlt">field</span> dynamic strain on the structure. The proposed approach enabled the prediction of dynamic response on the outer surface as well as within the inner points of the structure where no other sensor could be easily mounted. In order to validate the proposed approach, the predicted strain was compared to strain measured at four locations on the spinning blades using a wireless strain-gage system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010059240','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010059240"><span>Development of Dynamic Flow <span class="hlt">Field</span> Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic <span class="hlt">Wind</span> Tunnels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Porro, A. Robert</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>A series of dynamic flow <span class="hlt">field</span> pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow <span class="hlt">field</span> probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow <span class="hlt">field</span> pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic <span class="hlt">Wind</span> Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow <span class="hlt">field</span> pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..SES.HA006F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..SES.HA006F"><span>Effects of AC/DC magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span>, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene <span class="hlt">vectors</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene <span class="hlt">vectors</span> to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 <span class="hlt">vectors</span>. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span>. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC <span class="hlt">field</span> and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC <span class="hlt">field</span> and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1304818-influences-solar-wind-pressure-interplanetary-magnetic-field-global-magnetic-field-outer-radiation-belt-electrons','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1304818-influences-solar-wind-pressure-interplanetary-magnetic-field-global-magnetic-field-outer-radiation-belt-electrons"><span>The influences of solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> pressure and interplanetary magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> on global magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and outer radiation belt electrons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...</p> <p>2016-07-28</p> <p>Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and electron data, we examine the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (IMF) effects on global magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> increase and the nightside magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (B z-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. In the dayside increased magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainlymore » pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1304818','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1304818"><span>The influences of solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> pressure and interplanetary magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> on global magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and outer radiation belt electrons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.</p> <p></p> <p>Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and electron data, we examine the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (IMF) effects on global magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> increase and the nightside magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (B z-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. In the dayside increased magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainlymore » pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AGUFMSH11B2453R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AGUFMSH11B2453R"><span>Global solar magetic <span class="hlt">field</span> organization in the extended corona: influence on the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed and density over the cycle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Réville, V.; Velli, M.; Brun, S.</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>The dynamics of the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> depends intrinsically on the structure of the global solar magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>, which undergoes fundamental changes over the 11yr solar cycle. For instance, the <span class="hlt">wind</span> terminal velocity is thought to be anti-correlated with the expansion factor, a measure of how the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> varies with height in the solar corona, usually computed at a fixed height (≈ 2.5 Rȯ, the source surface radius which approximates the distance at which all magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> lines become open). However, the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> expansion affects the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> in a more detailed way, its influence on the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> properties remaining significant well beyond the source surface: we demonstrate this using 3D global MHD simulations of the solar corona, constrained by surface magnetograms over half a solar cycle (1989-2001). For models to comply with the constraints provided by observed characteristics of the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span>, namely, that the radial magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> intensity becomes latitude independent at some distance from the Sun (Ulysses observations beyond 1 AU), and that the terminal <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed is anti-correlated with the mass flux, they must accurately describe expansion beyond the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> critical point (even up to 10Rȯ and higher in our model). We also show that near activity minimum, expansion in the higher corona beyond 2.5 Rȯ is actually the dominant process affecting the <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed. We discuss the consequences of this result on the necessary acceleration profile of the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span>, the location of the sonic point and of the energy deposition by Alfvén waves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023053','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023053"><span>Forest impact estimated with NOAA AVHRR and landsat TM data related to an empirical hurricane <span class="hlt">wind-field</span> distribution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Ramsey, Elijah W.; Hodgson, M.E.; Sapkota, S.K.; Nelson, G.A.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>An empirical model was used to relate forest type and hurricane-impact distribution with <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed and duration to explain the variation of hurricane damage among forest types along the Atchafalaya River basin of coastal Louisiana. Forest-type distribution was derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper image data, hurricane-impact distribution from a suite of transformed advanced very high resolution radiometer images, and <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed and duration from a <span class="hlt">wind-field</span> model. The empirical model explained 73%, 84%, and 87% of the impact variances for open, hardwood, and cypress-tupelo forests, respectively. These results showed that the estimated impact for each forest type was highly related to the duration and speed of extreme <span class="hlt">winds</span> associated with Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The <span class="hlt">wind-field</span> model projected that the highest <span class="hlt">wind</span> speeds were in the southern basin, dominated by cypress-tupelo and open forests, while lower <span class="hlt">wind</span> speeds were in the northern basin, dominated by hardwood forests. This evidence could explain why, on average, the impact to cypress-tupelos was more severe than to hardwoods, even though cypress-tupelos are less susceptible to <span class="hlt">wind</span> damage. Further, examination of the relative importance of <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed in explaining the impact severity to each forest type showed that the impact to hardwood forests was mainly related to tropical-depression to tropical-storm force <span class="hlt">wind</span> speeds. Impacts to cypress-tupelo and open forests (a mixture of willows and cypress-tupelo) were broadly related to tropical-storm force <span class="hlt">wind</span> speeds and by <span class="hlt">wind</span> speeds near and somewhat in excess of hurricane force. Decoupling the importance of duration from speed in explaining the impact severity to the forests could not be fully realized. Most evidence, however, hinted that impact severity was positively related to higher durations at critical <span class="hlt">wind</span> speeds. <span class="hlt">Wind</span>-speed intervals, which were important in explaining the impact severity on hardwoods, showed that higher durations, but not the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JHEP...05..072Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JHEP...05..072Z"><span>Localization of U(1) gauge <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> on flat branes with five-dimension (asymptotic) AdS5 spacetime</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Xie, Qun-Ying</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>In order to localize U(1) gauge <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> on Randall-Sundrum-like braneworld model with infinite extra dimension, we propose a new kind of non-minimal coupling between the U(1) gauge <span class="hlt">field</span> and the gravity. We propose three kinds of coupling methods and they all support the localization of zero mode. In addition, one of them can support the localization of massive modes. Moreover, the massive tachyonic modes can be excluded. And our method can be used not only in the thin braneword models but also in the thick ones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=281614','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=281614"><span>Laboratory and <span class="hlt">field</span> evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against filarial <span class="hlt">vector</span>, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>In this study, chemical extracts of Jatropha curcas, Hyptis suaveolens, Abutilon indicum, and Leucas aspera were tested for toxicity to larvae of the filariasis <span class="hlt">vector</span> Culex quinquefasciatus. Respective median lethal concentrations (LC50) for hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20062578-wind-tunnel-measuring-selenium-volatilization-under-field-like-conditions','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20062578-wind-tunnel-measuring-selenium-volatilization-under-field-like-conditions"><span>A <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnel for measuring selenium volatilization under <span class="hlt">field</span>-like conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dungan, R.S.; Stork, A.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr.</p> <p>2000-04-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnel was developed to measure the loss of volatile selenium (Se) from soil under <span class="hlt">field</span>-like conditions. The <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnel consisted of a volatilization chamber made of Plexiglas (2.4 m long x 0.8 m wide x 1.2 m high), which was set above a stainless steel lysimeter (0.5 m{sup 2} surface area x 0.8 m deep). High air exchange rates (avg. 700 air changes h{sup {minus}1}) were used to simulate <span class="hlt">field</span>-like environmental conditions inside the <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnel. To monitor the fate and transport of the Se, radiolabeled {sup 75}Se as sodium selenite (Na{sub 2}{sup 75}SeO{sub 3}) was incorporated intomore » the top 5 cm of soil. Volatile Se was trapped on activated carbon filters and measured directly using gamma counting. A 135-d bare-soil experiment was carried out, during which 2.7% of the Se was released through volatilization without added C. The average flux rate of gaseous Se was 17 mg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}, with a high of 72 mg m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} occurring on Day 6. After 135 d, 59 and 43% of the {sup 75}Se was located in the 0 to 5 and 5 to 10 cm soil layers, respectively. A total of 84.5% of all applied {sup 75}Se was recovered. The purpose of this study was to improve estimates on Se volatilization from seleniferous soils and help close the gap between previous laboratory and <span class="hlt">field</span> experiments.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..DPPN11182M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..DPPN11182M"><span>Experimental Simulation of Solar <span class="hlt">Wind</span> Interactions with Magnetic Dipole <span class="hlt">Fields</span> above Insulating Surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Munsat, Tobin; Deca, Jan; Han, Jia; Horanyi, Mihaly; Wang, Xu; Werner, Greg; Yeo, Li Hsia; Fuentes, Dominic</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>Magnetic anomalies on the surfaces of airless bodies such as the Moon interact with the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span>, resulting in both magnetic and electrostatic deflection of the charged particles and thus localized surface charging. This interaction is studied in the Colorado Solar <span class="hlt">Wind</span> Experiment with large-cross-section ( 300 cm2) high-energy flowing plasmas (100-800 eV beam ions) that are incident upon a magnetic dipole embedded under various insulating surfaces. Measured 2D plasma potential profiles indicate that in the dipole lobe regions, the surfaces are charged to high positive potentials due to the collection of unmagnetized ions, while the electrons are magnetically shielded. At low ion beam energies, the surface potential follows the beam energy in eV. However, at high energies, the surface potentials in the electron-shielded regions are significantly lower than the beam energies. A series of studies indicate that secondary electrons are likely to play a dominant role in determining the surface potential. Early results will also be presented from a second experiment, in which a strong permanent magnet with large dipole moment (0.55 T, 275 A*m2) is inserted into the flowing plasma beam to replicate aspects of the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span> interaction with the earth's magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. This work is supported by the NASA SSERVI program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050169382&hterms=kellogg&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dkellogg','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050169382&hterms=kellogg&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dkellogg"><span>Design and Near-<span class="hlt">Field</span> Measurement Performance Evaluation of the Sea <span class="hlt">Winds</span> Dual- Beam Reflector Antenna</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hussein, Z.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Kellogg, K.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents the design and performance evaluation of a lightweight, composite material, elliptical-aperture, parabolic-reflector antenna. The performance characterization is obtained using the cylindrical near-<span class="hlt">field</span> measurement facility at JPL as shown. The reflector has been designed and calibrated for the Sea<span class="hlt">Winds</span> spaceborne scatterometer instrument. The instrument operates at Ku-band and is designed to accurately measure <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed and direction over Earth's ocean surface. The Sea<span class="hlt">Winds</span> antenna design requires two linearly polarized independent beams pointed at 40 deg.and 46 deg. from nadir as shown. The inner beam, pointed at 40 deg. from nadir, is horizontally polarized with 1.6 in x 1.8 in required beamwidths in the elevation and azimuth planes, respectively. The outer beam, pointed at 46 deg. from nadir, is vertically polarized with 1.4 in x 1.7 in required beamwidths. Noteworthy, the reflector boresight axis is pointed at 43 deg. from nadir. Both beams are required to have the first sidelobe level below -15 dB relative to the peak of the beam.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AIPC..679..409Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AIPC..679..409Z"><span>Magnetic Turbulence, Fast Magnetic <span class="hlt">Field</span> line Diffusion and Small Magnetic Structures in the Solar <span class="hlt">Wind</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zimbardo, G.; Pommois, P.; Veltri, P.</p> <p>2003-09-01</p> <p>The influence of magnetic turbulence on magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> line diffusion has been known since the early days of space and plasma physics. However, the importance of ``stochastic diffusion'' for energetic particles has been challenged on the basis of the fact that sharp gradients of either energetic particles or ion composition are often observed in the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span>. Here we show that fast transverse <span class="hlt">field</span> line and particle diffusion can coexist with small magnetic structures, sharp gradients, and with long lived magnetic flux tubes. We show, by means of a numerical realization of three dimensional magnetic turbulence and by use of the concepts of deterministic chaos and turbulent transport, that turbulent diffusion is different from Gaussian diffusion, and that transport can be inhomogeneous even if turbulence homogeneously fills the heliosphere. Several diagnostics of <span class="hlt">field</span> line transport and flux tube evolution are shown, and the size of small magnetic structures in the solar <span class="hlt">wind</span>, like gradient scales and flux tube thickness, are estimated and compared to the observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFMSH41A2520W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFMSH41A2520W"><span>Spectral Anisotropy of Magnetic <span class="hlt">Field</span> Fluctuations around Ion Scales in the Fast Solar <span class="hlt">Wind</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, X.; Tu, C.; He, J.; Marsch, E.; Wang, L.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The power spectra of magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> at ion scales are significantly influenced by waves and structures. In this work, we study the ΘRB angle dependence of the contribution of waves on the spectral index of the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Wavelet technique is applied to the high time-resolution magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> data from <span class="hlt">WIND</span> spacecraft measurements in the fast solar <span class="hlt">wind</span>. It is found that around ion scales, the parallel spectrum has a slope of -4.6±0.1 originally. When we remove the waves, which correspond to the data points with relatively larger value of magnetic helicity, the parallel spectrum gets shallower gradually to -3.2±0.2. However, the perpendicular spectrum does not change significantly during the wave-removal process, and its slope remains -3.1±0.1. It means that when the waves are removed from the original data, the spectral anisotropy gets weaker. This result may help us understand the physical nature of the spectral anisotropy around the ion scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980236418','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980236418"><span>A Search for <span class="hlt">Vector</span> Magnetic <span class="hlt">Field</span> Variations Associated with the M-Class Flares of 1991 June 10 in AR 6659</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hagyard, Mona J.; Stark, B. A.; Venkatakrishnan, P.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>A careful analysis of a 6-hour time sequence of <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetograms of AR 6659, observed on 1991 June 10 with the MSFC <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetograph, has revealed only minor changes in the <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> azimuths in the vicinity of two M-class flares, and the association of these changes with the flares is not unambiguous. In this paper we present our analysis of the data which includes comparison of <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetograms prior to and during the flares, calculation of distributions of the rms variation of the azimuth at each pixel in the <span class="hlt">field</span> of view of the active region, and examination of the variation with time of the azimuths at every pixel covered by the main flare emissions as observed with the H-alpha telescope coaligned with the <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetograph. We also present results of an analysis of evolutionary changes in the azimuth over the <span class="hlt">field</span> of view of the active region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.3549B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.3549B"><span>The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) <span class="hlt">Vector</span> Magnetic <span class="hlt">Field</span> Pipeline: SHARPs - Space-Weather HMI Active Region Patches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Turmon, M.; Liu, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>A new data product from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) called Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches ( SHARPs) is now available. SDO/HMI is the first space-based instrument to map the full-disk photospheric <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> with high cadence and continuity. The SHARP data series provide maps in patches that encompass automatically tracked magnetic concentrations for their entire lifetime; map quantities include the photospheric <span class="hlt">vector</span> magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and its uncertainty, along with Doppler velocity, continuum intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Furthermore, keywords in the SHARP data series provide several parameters that concisely characterize the magnetic-<span class="hlt">field</span> distribution and its deviation from a potential-<span class="hlt">field</span> configuration. These indices may be useful for active-region event forecasting and for identifying regions of interest. The indices are calculated per patch and are available on a twelve-minute cadence. Quick-look data are available within approximately three hours of observation; definitive science products are produced approximately five weeks later. SHARP data are available at jsoc.stanford.edu and maps are available in either of two different coordinate systems. This article describes the SHARP data products and presents examples of SHARP data and parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1483..277R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1483..277R"><span>The Maxwell and Navier-Stokes equations that follow from Einstein equation in a spacetime containing a Killing <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rodrigues, Fabio Grangeiro; Rodrigues, Waldyr Alves, Jr.; da Rocha, Roldão</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>In this paper we are concerned to reveal that any spacetime structure <M, g, D, τg, ↑>, which is a model of a gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span> in General Relativity generated by an energy-momentum tensor T - and which contains at least one nontrivial Killing <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> A - is such that the 2-form <span class="hlt">field</span> F = dA (where A = g(A,)) satisfies a Maxwell like equation - with a well determined current that contains a term of the superconducting type- which follows directly from Einstein equation. Moreover, we show that the resulting Maxwell like equations, under an additional condition imposed to the Killing <span class="hlt">vector</span> <span class="hlt">field</span>, may be written as a Navier-Stokes like equation as well. As a result, we have a set consisting of Einstein, Maxwell and Navier-Stokes equations, that follows sequentially from the first one under precise mathematical conditions and once some identifications about <span class="hlt">field</span> variables are evinced, as explained in details throughout the text. We compare and emulate our results with others on the same subject appearing in the literature. In Appendix A we fix our notation and recall some necessary material concerning the theory of differential forms, Lie derivatives and the Clifford bundle formalism used in this paper. Moreover, we comment in Appendix B on some analogies (and main differences) between our results to the ones obtained long ago by Bergmann and Kommar which are reviewed and briefly criticized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IAUS..327...67P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IAUS..327...67P"><span>Photospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> of an eroded-by-solar-<span class="hlt">wind</span> coronal mass ejection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast <span class="hlt">wind</span> of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA190128','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA190128"><span>Unsteady Aerodynamics of a Wortmann FX-63-137 Wing in a Fluctuating <span class="hlt">Wind</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1987-11-01</p> <p>FX -63-137 Wing in a Fluctuating <span class="hlt">Wind</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span> 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) % H.-T. Liu 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month...on the performance of a full-scale Wortmann FX -63-137 wing. Experiments were conducted in the atmospheric boundary layer by directing the elevated...effects of atmospheric un- steadiness on the performance of a full-scale Wortmann FX -63-137 wing. The status of the knowledge of aerodynamics for low</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780056223&hterms=orbiting+wind&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dorbiting%2Bwind','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780056223&hterms=orbiting+wind&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dorbiting%2Bwind"><span>Moisture convergence from a combined mesoscale moisture analysis and <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> for 24 April 1975</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Negri, A. J.; Hillger, D. W.; Vonder Haar, T. H.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Precipitable water values inferred from the Vertical Temperature Profile Radiometer data of the polar orbiting NOAA-4 satellite are used in conjunction with <span class="hlt">wind-field</span> analyses obtained from Synchronous Meteorological Satellite visible-channel data to study the moisture convergence in the boundary layer immediately preceding a storm. This combination of data simulates the information that will be available from the Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer on board the GOES-D satellite, which is scheduled to begin operation in the 1980s. Serviceable representations of boundary layer flow are developed through analysis of the satellite infrared cumulus velocities, although the flow representations are not exactly located in the vertical.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22518562-adjoint-based-method-inversion-juno-cassini-gravity-measurements-wind-fields','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22518562-adjoint-based-method-inversion-juno-cassini-gravity-measurements-wind-fields"><span>AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO <span class="hlt">WIND</span> <span class="hlt">FIELDS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the <span class="hlt">winds</span> to the gravity <span class="hlt">field</span>, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity <span class="hlt">field</span> from given <span class="hlt">wind</span> models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity <span class="hlt">field</span>. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed tomore » relate the expected measurable gravity <span class="hlt">field</span>, to perturbations of the density and <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span>, and therefore to the observed cloud-level <span class="hlt">winds</span>. In order to invert the gravity <span class="hlt">field</span> into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the <span class="hlt">wind</span> depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the <span class="hlt">winds</span>, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the <span class="hlt">wind</span> depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep <span class="hlt">winds</span> exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ESASP.676E...2L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ESASP.676E...2L"><span>TerraSAR-X Measurements of <span class="hlt">Wind</span> <span class="hlt">Fields</span>, Ocean Waves and Currents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lehner, S.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Brusch, S.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>TerraSAR-X is a new german X-band radar satellite launched on June 15, 2007. In this mission an operational spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system with very high spatial resolution is set up producing remote sensing products for commercial and scientific use. TerraSAR-X is a scientific and technological continuation of the successful Space Shuttle missions SIR-C/X and SRTM.The spacecraft is equipped with a phased array X-band SAR, which can operate in different polarisations and has furthermore beam stearing capabilities. In addition the system has a split antenna mode, which is able to provide along track interferometric information. The instrument is designed for multiple imaging modes like Stripmap, Spotlight and ScanSAR.Due to its polarimetric and interferometric capabilities as well as the high spatial resolution of up to 1 m, the TerraSAR-X sensor is a very interesting tool for oceanography. The presentation will give an overview of several applications, which are of both scientific and commercial interest, like e.g. current and ocean wave measurements, monitoring of morphodynamical processes or high resolution <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> retrieval. The potential as well as limitations of the instrument will be summarized and compared with existing sensors. Necessary steps to translate existing C-band SAR inversion algorithms for <span class="hlt">wind</span> and wave measurements to X-band will be discussed. A strategy will be outlined to achieve this by a combination of theoretical investigations and the use of existing experimental data acquired by both airborne and groundbased X-band radar. First results on the adaption of existing C-band <span class="hlt">wind</span> retrieval algorithms will be presented. <span class="hlt">Wind</span> and ocean wave parameter retrievals will be presented, e.g., based on TerraSAR-X scenes taken over the English channel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014WRR....50.8571D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014WRR....50.8571D"><span>Exploration of discrepancy between radar and gauge rainfall estimates driven by <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">fields</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dai, Qiang; Han, Dawei</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Due to the fact that weather radar is prone to several sources of errors, it is acknowledged that adjustment against ground observations such as rain gauges is crucial for radar measurement. Spatial matching of precipitation patterns between radar and rain gauge is a significant premise in radar bias corrections. It is a conventional way to construct radar-gauge pairs based on their vertical locations. However, due to the <span class="hlt">wind</span> effects, the raindrops observed by the radar do not always fall vertically to the ground, and the raindrops arriving at the ground may not all be caught by the rain gauge. This study proposes a fully formulated scheme to numerically simulate the movement of raindrops in a three-dimensional <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> in order to adjust the <span class="hlt">wind</span>-induced errors. The Brue catchment (135 km2) in Southwest England covering 28 radar pixels and 49 rain gauges is an experimental catchment, where the radar central beam height varies between 500 and 700 m. The 20 typical events (with durations of 6-36 h) are chosen to assess the correlation between hourly radar and gauge rainfall surfaces. It is found that for most events, the improved rates of correlation coefficients are greater than 10%, and nearly half of the events increase by 20%. With the proposed method, except four events, all the event-averaged correlation values are greater than 0.5. This work is the first study to tackle both <span class="hlt">wind</span> effects on radar and rain gauges, which could be considered as one of the essential components in processing radar observational data in its hydrometeorological applications.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19443852','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19443852"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> and <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnel comparison of four aerosol samplers using agricultural dusts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reynolds, Stephen J; Nakatsu, Jason; Tillery, Marvin; Keefe, Thomas; Mehaffy, John; Thorne, Peter S; Donham, Kelley; Nonnenmann, Matthew; Golla, Vijay; O'shaughnessy, Patrick</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Occupational lung disease is a significant problem among agricultural workers exposed to organic dusts. Measurements of exposure in agricultural environments in the USA have traditionally been conducted using 37-mm closed-face cassettes (CFCs) and respirable Cyclones. Inhalable aerosol samplers offer significant improvement for dose estimation studies to reduce respiratory disease. The goals of this study were to determine correction factors between the inhalable samplers (IOM and Button) and the CFC and Cyclone for dusts sampled in livestock buildings and to determine whether these factors vary among livestock types. Determination of these correction factors will allow comparison between inhalable measurements and historical measurements. Ten sets of samples were collected in swine, chicken, turkey, and dairy facilities in both Colorado and Iowa. Pairs of each sampling device were attached to the front and back of a rotating mannequin. Laboratory studies using a still-air chamber and a <span class="hlt">wind</span> tunnel provided information regarding the effect of <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed on sampler performance. Overall, the IOM had the lowest coefficient of variation (best precision) and was least affected by changes in <span class="hlt">wind</span> speed. The performance of the Button was negatively impacted in poultry environments where larger (feather) particulates clogged the holes in the initial screen. The CFC/IOM ratios are important for comparisons between newer and older studies. <span class="hlt">Wind</span> speed and dust type were both important factors affecting ratios. Based on the <span class="hlt">field</span> studies (Table 6), a ratio of 0.56 is suggested as a conversion factor for the CFC/IOM (average for all environments because of no statistical difference). Suggested conversion factors for the Button/IOM are swine (0.57), chicken (0.80), turkey (0.53), and dairy (0.67). Any attempt to apply a conversion factor between the Cyclone and inhalable samplers is not recommended.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740019964','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740019964"><span>Investigation of the turbulent <span class="hlt">wind</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> below 500 feet altitude at the Eastern Test Range, Florida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Blackadar, A. K.; Panofsky, H. A.; Fiedler, F.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A detailed analysis of <span class="hlt">wind</span> profiles and turbulence at the 150 m Cape Kennedy Meteorological Tower is presented. Various methods are explored for the estimation of <span class="hlt">wind</span> profiles, <span class="hlt">wind</span> variances, high-frequency spectra, and coherences between various levels, given roughness length and either low-level <span class="hlt">wind</span> and temperature data, or geostrophic <span class="hlt">wind</span> and insolation. The relationship between planetary Richardson number, insolation, and geostrophic <span class="hlt">wind</span> is explored empirically. Techniques were devised which resulted in surface stresses reasonably well correlated with the surface stresses obtained from low-level data. Finally, practical methods are suggested for the estimation of <span class="hlt">wind</span> profiles and <span class="hlt">wind</span> statistics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2543042','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2543042"><span>Establishment of a large semi-<span class="hlt">field</span> system for experimental study of African malaria <span class="hlt">vector</span> ecology and control in Tanzania</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ferguson, Heather M; Ng'habi, Kija R; Walder, Thomas; Kadungula, Demetrius; Moore, Sarah J; Lyimo, Issa; Russell, Tanya L; Urassa, Honorathy; Mshinda, Hassan; Killeen, Gerry F; Knols, Bart GJ</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Medical entomologists increasingly recognize that the ability to make inferences between laboratory experiments of <span class="hlt">vector</span> biology and epidemiological trends observed in the <span class="hlt">field</span> is hindered by a conceptual and methodological gap occurring between these approaches which prevents hypothesis-driven empirical research from being conducted on relatively large and environmentally realistic scales. The development of Semi-<span class="hlt">Field</