Science.gov

Sample records for winter cold front

  1. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  2. Nitrogen and phosphorus transport between Fourleague Bay, LA, and the Gulf of Mexico: the role of winter cold fronts and Atchafalaya River discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Brian C.; Day, John W.; Justic, Dubravko; Twilley, Robert R.

    2003-08-01

    Nutrient fluxes were measured between Fourleague Bay, a shallow Louisiana estuary, and the Gulf of Mexico every 3 h between February 1 and April 30, 1994 to determine how high velocity winds associated with cold fronts and peak Atchafalaya River discharge influenced transport. Net water fluxes were ebb-dominated throughout the study because of wind forcing and high volumes of water entering the northern Bay from the Atchafalaya River. Flushing time of the Bay averaged <8 days; however, more rapid flushing occurred in response to northerly winds with approximately 56% of the volume of the Bay exported to the Gulf in 1 day during the strongest flushing event. Higher nitrate+nitrite (NO 2+NO 3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations were indicative of Atchafalaya River input and fluxes were greater when influenced by high velocity northerly winds associated with frontal passage. Net exports of NO 2+NO 3, TN, and TP were 43.5, 98.5, and 13.6 g s -1, respectively, for the 89-day study. An average of 10.6 g s -1 of ammonium (NH 4) was exported to the Gulf over the study; however, concentrations were lower when associated with riverine influence and wind-driven exports suggesting the importance of biological processes. Phosphate (PO 4) fluxes were nearly balanced over the study with fairly stable concentrations indicating a well-buffered system. The results indicate that the high energy subsidy provided by natural pulsing events such as atmospheric cold fronts and seasonal river discharge are efficient mechanisms of nutrient delivery to adjacent wetlands and nearshore coastal ecosystems and are important in maintaining coastal sustainability.

  3. Nitrogen and phosphorus transport between Fourleague Bay, LA, and the Gulf of Mexico: The role of winter cold fronts and Atchafalaya River discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez, B.C.; Day, J.W.; Justic, D.; Twilley, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrient fluxes were measured between Fourleague Bay, a shallow Louisiana estuary, and the Gulf of Mexico every 3 h between February 1 and April 30, 1994 to determine how high velocity winds associated with cold fronts and peak Atchafalaya River discharge influenced transport. Net water fluxes were ebb-dominated throughout the study because of wind forcing and high volumes of water entering the northern Bay from the Atchafalaya River. Flushing time of the Bay averaged <8 days; however, more rapid flushing occurred in response to northerly winds with approximately 56% of the volume of the Bay exported to the Gulf in 1 day during the strongest flushing event. Higher nitrate + nitrite (NO2+ NO3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations were indicative of Atchafalaya River input and fluxes were greater when influenced by high velocity northerly winds associated with frontal passage. Net exports of NO2 + NO3, TN, and TP were 43.5, 98.5, and 13.6 g s-1, respectively, for the 89-day study. An average of 10.6 g s-1 of ammonium (NH4) was exported to the Gulf over the study; however, concentrations were lower when associated with riverine influence and wind-driven exports suggesting the importance of biological processes. Phosphate (PO4) fluxes were nearly balanced over the study with fairly stable concentrations indicating a well-buffered system. The results indicate that the high energy subsidy provided by natural pulsing events such as atmospheric cold fronts and seasonal river discharge are efficient mechanisms of nutrient delivery to adjacent wetlands and nearshore coastal ecosystems and are important in maintaining coastal sustainability. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction of a cold front with a sea-breeze front Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, A.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of a front which passed the coast between the North Sea and northern Germany and thereby experienced some modifications of its mesoscale characteristics. The event was observed during the field experiment FRONTEX'89. The two-dimensional non-hydrostatic simulations presented in this paper resemble some of the observed characteristics and yield a detailed description of the evolution of the surface front. Over the sea several narrow frontal rain bands develop in the boundary layer which becomes unstable due to the increasing sea surface temperature near the coast. The rain bands move forward relative to the front due to the cross frontal circulation which is enhanced by the release of latent heat in the ascending warm air and by the cooling of the cold air below by evaporating precipitation. Over the heated land surface a sea-breeze front develops ahead of the synoptic-scale cold front. The strong frontal gradients of the sea-breeze front mask the broader frontal zone of the cold front at the ground. The sea-breeze front triggers deep convection ahead of the cold front in the afternoon and takes over all characteristics of the synoptic-scale front in the evening. The simulations show the mechanisms that caused the observed evolution and modification of the synoptic-scale cold front. They emphasize the strong influence of the surface heat fluxes on the characteristics of fronts on the mesoscale. The most important feature of the numerical model, necessary for the proper representation of the frontal characteristics on the mesoscale, is its high resolution. The simulations are restricted by the difficulties of finding an initial state and appropriate boundary conditions so that the results fit the observations for a long time period and that spin-up problems are avoided.

  5. Does cold winter weather produce depressive symptoms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Michael J.; Goodes, Mike; Furlong, Candy; Tollefson, Gary D.

    1988-06-01

    To examine whether harsh winter weather is associated with depressive symptoms, 45 healthy subjects from Minnesota were compared to 42 subjects from California near the end of the winter season. No differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms were found between the two groups.

  6. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  7. Intensification of the subpolar front in the Sea of Japan during winter cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ning; Iwasaki, Shinsuke; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Lien, Ren-Chieh; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The response of the subpolar front in the Sea of Japan (also known as the East Sea) to winter cyclones is investigated based on quantitative analyses of gridded and satellite data sets. Cyclone passages affecting the sea are detected using time series of spatially averaged surface turbulent heat fluxes. As the cyclones develop, there are strong cold-air outbreaks that produce twice the normal heat loss over the sea. After removal of sea surface temperature (SST) seasonal trends, we found that cyclone passage (hence, cooling) mainly occurred over 3 days, with maximum SST reduction of -0.4°C. The greatest reduction was found along the subpolar front, where frontal sharpness (i.e., SST gradient) increased by 0.1°C (100 km)-1. Results of a mixed-layer model were consistent with both temperature and frontal sharpness, and localized surface cooling along the subpolar front resulted from both horizontal heat advection and turbulent heat fluxes at the sea surface. Further analyses show that this localized cooling from horizontal heat advection is caused by the cross-frontal Ekman flow (vertically averaged over the mixed layer) and strong northwesterly winds associated with the cold-air outbreak during cyclone passage.

  8. Cold fronts: probes of plasma astrophysics in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhone, John A.; Roediger, E.

    2016-06-01

    > The most massive baryonic component of galaxy clusters is the `intracluster medium' (ICM), a diffuse, hot, weakly magnetized plasma that is most easily observed in the X-ray band. Despite being observed for decades, the macroscopic transport properties of the ICM are still not well constrained. A path to determine macroscopic ICM properties opened up with the discovery of `cold fronts'. These were observed as sharp discontinuities in surface brightness and temperature in the ICM, with the property that the denser side of the discontinuity is the colder one. The high spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed two puzzles about cold fronts. First, they should be subject to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, yet in many cases they appear relatively smooth and undisturbed. Second, the width of the interface between the two gas phases is typically narrower than the mean free path of the particles in the plasma, indicating negligible thermal conduction. It was thus realized that these special characteristics of cold fronts may be used to probe the properties of the cluster plasma. In this review, we will discuss the recent simulations of cold fronts in galaxy clusters, focusing on those which have attempted to use these features to constrain ICM physics. In particular, we will examine the effects of magnetic fields, viscosity, and thermal conductivity on the stability properties and long-term evolution of cold fronts. We conclude with a discussion on what important questions remain unanswered, and the future role of simulations and the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  9. Orographically-forced cold fronts — Mean structure and motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulman, C. E.; Colquhoun, J. R.; Smith, R. K.; McInnes, K.

    1985-05-01

    Shallow cold fronts with a north-west/south-east orientation sometimes experience blocking by the coastal mountain range of south-eastern Australia and greatly increase their propagation speed on the eastern (seaward) side of the range while they advance more slowly to the west of the range. The violent behaviour of some cold-frontal passages, or southerly busters, is found to be at least orographically initiated, but the phenomenon does not exhibit the characteristics of a coastally-trapped density current. The head of the front has the character of an evolving density current and its propagation is well predicted by density current theory over more than half of its lifetime. Nevertheless, it differs from steady laboratory-simulated examples in that a horizontal roll-vortex just behind the front is found to be accelerating relative to the rate of advection of cold air behind the front. This implies that its evolution will be governed by warm air entrainment, a fact which is confirmed by the observations. General agreement between extensive airborne observations over the ocean and measurements made at selected points along the coast indicates the usefulness of these basic studies for future improvement to forecasting in the near-coastal region.

  10. Fast simulations of gas sloshing and cold front formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Zuhone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter haloes directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimized way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artefacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly overpredicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artefacts.

  11. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artifacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artifacts.

  12. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artefacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artefacts.

  13. On a theory of the evolution of surface cold fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Bretherton, Christopher S.

    1987-01-01

    The governing vorticity and divergence equations in the surface layer are derived and the roles of the different terms and feedback mechanisms are investigated in semigeostrophic and nongeostrophic cold-frontal systems. A planetary boundary layer model is used to perform sensitivity tests to determine that in a cold front the ageostrophic feedback mechanism as defined by Orlanski and Ross tends to act as a positive feedback mechanism, enhancing vorticity and convergence growth. Therefore, it cannot explain the phase shift between convergence and vorticity as simulated by Orlanski and Ross. An alternative plausible, though tentative, explanation in terms of a gravity wave is offered. It is shown that when the geostrophic deformation increases, nonlinear terms in the divergence equation may become important and further destabilize the system.

  14. Early winter cold spells over the Euro-Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toreti, Andrea; Xoplaki, Elena; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2016-04-01

    In a changing climate context, temperature extremes are expected to heavily impact societies and economies. Projected changes in warm extremes have been extensively investigated, while less efforts are devoted to cold extremes. Despite the projected warming of the climate system, cold extremes could still occur and have an impact on several sectors, such as human health and agriculture. Here, we focus on cold spells that have a potential high impact, i.e. early winter cold spells occurring after a mild-to-warm autumn. Projected changes of these events over the Euro-Mediterranean region are analysed by using the latest Euro-Cordex simulations under the scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. In terms of spatial extension of cold spells, a significant reduction can be seen only at the end of the 21st century and under the RCP8.5 scenario. As for the changes in intensity in the mid-century, no consistency is found among models over large areas. At the end of the century, the north-eastern part of the domain and northern Africa are projected to be early-cold-spell free under the RCP4.5 scenario, while, almost the entire domain is projected to be early-cold-spell free under the RCP8.5 scenario.

  15. Winter Cold tongue in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B.; Tkalich, P.; Rizzoli, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) surface circulation is mainly forced by seasonally varying monsoon winds and flow through the Luzon Strait. In winter, positive wind curl (due to the northeasterly winds) in the southern half of SCS drives a cyclonic gyre. The strong western boundary current south off Vietnam on the continental slope separates the Sunda Shelf to the west and deep SCS basin to the east. The advection of cold water due to the slope current results in a unique cold tongue in Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from November to February. The inter-annual variability of this cold-tongue is investigated by analyzing the NCEP OISST version-2 dataset. Dynamics of the evolution, growth and decay of the cold tongue during the period 1982-2012 are addressed using the OISST and ERA-interim surface wind datasets. The role of water mass advection in the inter-annual variability of SCS cold-tongue is also investigated through the analysis of lateral heat fluxes estimated from NCEP-Climate Forecast System Re-analysis dataset. The vertically integrated Ekman transport (i.e., the Sverdrup transport) plays a vital role in the formation this cold tongue. The southward Sverdrup transport brings cold water from the northern parts of the SCS. Inter-annual variations in the cold tongue SST during the northeast monsoon (November to February) are strongly linked to the north-south Sverdrup and zonal Ekman transport anomalies. The positive SST anomalies over the cold-tongue region are associated with positive transport anomalies, reflecting the weakening of the southward and westward advection. The formation and termination of this cold tongue has significant correlation with the El Nino phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean.

  16. Exceptionally cold and mild winters in Europe (1951-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardosz, Robert; Kossowska-Cezak, Urszula

    2016-07-01

    Extreme thermal conditions appear to occupy an important place among research subjects at a time of climate warming. This study investigates the frequency, duration and spatial extent of thermally anomalous winters in Europe during the 60 years between 1951 and 2010. Exceptionally cold winters (ECWs) and exceptionally mild winters (EMWs) were identified using the statistical criterion of plus/minus two standard deviations from the long-term winter temperature (January-December) recorded at 60 weather stations. It was demonstrated that ECWs have occurred more frequently and covered larger territories than EMWs and that they may occur anywhere in Europe, while EMWs were limited to its southern and western parts. ECWs are characterised by greater absolute temperature anomalies, as anomalies greater than |6.0 °C| account for 35 % of ECWs, but only for 8 % of EMWs. The greatest anomalies are found in the east of the continent. The largest territory affected by an ECW included 24 stations in 1962/1963, while the equivalent among the EMWs included 11 stations in 2006/2007. The study also confirmed an expected trend whereby ECWs diminished in frequency in favour of EMWs in the second half of the 60-year study period.

  17. A HIGH FIDELITY SAMPLE OF COLD FRONT CLUSTERS FROM THE CHANDRA ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Markevitch, Maxim; Couch, Warrick J.

    2009-10-20

    This paper presents a sample of 'cold front' clusters selected from the Chandra archive. The clusters are selected based purely on the existence of surface brightness edges in their Chandra images which are modeled as density jumps. A combination of the derived density and temperature jumps across the fronts is used to select nine robust examples of cold front clusters: 1ES0657 - 558, Abell 1201, Abell 1758N, MS1455.0+2232, Abell 2069, Abell 2142, Abell 2163, RXJ1720.1+2638, and Abell 3667. This sample is the subject of an ongoing study aimed at relating cold fronts to cluster merger activity, and understanding how the merging environment affects the cluster constituents. Here, temperature maps are presented along with the Chandra X-ray images. A dichotomy is found in the sample in that there exists a subsample of cold front clusters which are clearly mergers based on their X-ray morphologies, and a second subsample of clusters which harbor cold fronts, but have surprisingly relaxed X-ray morphologies, and minimal evidence for merger activity at other wavelengths. For this second subsample, the existence of a cold front provides the sole evidence for merger activity at X-ray wavelengths. We discuss how cold fronts can provide additional information which may be used to constrain merger histories, and also the possibility of using cold fronts to distinguish major and minor mergers.

  18. Habitat suitability index models: greater white-fronted goose (wintering). [Anser albifrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    A review and synthesis of available information were used to develop models for indexing the potential suitability of agricultural and natural wetland habitats for wintering white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons). The model is scaled to produce indices of habitat suitability from 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimal habitat) primarily for wintering habitat in southwest Louisiana and southwest Texas. Habitat suitability indices are designed for use with Habitat Evaluations Procedures previously developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  19. Atmospheric Cold Fronts Affecting Cold-Water Corals in the Deep Straits of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberli, G. P.; Grasmueck, M.; Bang, I.; Mooers, C. N.; Viggiano, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Straits of Florida (SoF) are considered an ideal habitat for cold-water corals with the north flowing Florida Current (FC) providing a continuous supply of food. The FC does, however, not fill the entire Straits and deep, opposing undercurrents and coastal countercurrents occur off Florida and the Bahamas. New observational and model data document that, in addition to the well-known perturbation of upper ocean currents by atmospheric cold front passages, the near-bottom current field in the SoF is also repeatedly perturbed by atmospheric cold fronts none of which is reflected in the cold-water mound morphology. Measurements of the near-bottom flow field by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV), cruising 40 m above sea floor at five coral mound fields ranging from 14-48 km2 in 590-875 m water in December 2005, record a complicated current pattern in space and time. Near-bottom currents are bi-directional, dominated by semi- diurnal tides, on the lower slopes of the Bahamas where mounds form kilometer long ridges as high as 120 m. Near-bottom currents flow north in the middle of Straits but generally south along the Miami Terrace. The mound morphology varies widely between sites and no obvious (i.e., direct, linear) correlation exists between current strength and mound height. The 12 to 48 h AUV observational data at each site compare well with results of the quasi-operational 3D ocean circulation model EFSIS (East Florida Shelf Information System). The Model enables the analysis of the bottom currents over extended periods and confirms that the near-bottom flow field in the SoF is highly variable on time scales ranging from 6 hours to several days, with magnitudes of +/- 0.2 to 0.6 m/s, depending upon location. During the observation period of December 2005, a recurring current variability is due to a sequence of deep cyclonic eddies that originate approximately every ten days near Cay Sal Bank and move northward on the eastern side of the FC. Offshore Bimini

  20. Chandra, Cold Fronts, and ICM Physics: The Importance of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, John

    2014-11-01

    One of the most prominent features that the superb spatial resolution of Chandra has revealed in the galaxy cluster plasma is cold fronts: sharp surface brightness and temperature discontinuities formed by the motion of cold, dense gas. Cold fronts should be susceptible to disruption by fluid instabilites and smoothing out by thermal conduction, but many appear to be resilient to these effects, indicating suppression by microphysical processes. I will summarize a series of MHD simulations of sloshing cold fronts in galaxy clusters with anisotropic viscosity and thermal conduction. I will show that the power of cold front studies to provide constraints on the plasma conductivity is potentially strong, whereas the outlook for constraining the plasma viscosity is more uncertain.

  1. THE PROPERTIES OF X-RAY COLD FRONTS IN A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF SIMULATED GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Eric J.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Smith, Britton D.; Burns, Jack O.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Norman, Michael L.

    2010-12-10

    We examine the incidence of cold fronts in a large sample of galaxy clusters extracted from a (512 h {sup -1} Mpc) hydrodynamic/N-body cosmological simulation with adiabatic gas physics computed with the Enzo adaptive mesh refinement code. This simulation contains a sample of roughly 4000 galaxy clusters with M {>=}10{sup 14} M{sub sun} at z = 0. For each simulated galaxy cluster, we have created mock 0.3-8.0 keV X-ray observations and spectroscopic-like temperature maps. We have searched these maps with a new automated algorithm to identify the presence of cold fronts in projection. Using a threshold of a minimum of 10 cold front pixels in our images, corresponding to a total comoving length L{sub cf}>156 h {sup -1} kpc, we find that roughly 10%-12% of all projections in a mass-limited sample would be classified as cold front clusters. Interestingly, the fraction of clusters with extended cold front features in our synthetic maps of a mass-limited sample trends only weakly with redshift out to z = 1.0. However, when using different selection functions, including a simulated flux limit, the trending with redshift changes significantly. The likelihood of finding cold fronts in the simulated clusters in our sample is a strong function of cluster mass. In clusters with M>7.5 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun} the cold front fraction is 40%-50%. We also show that the presence of cold fronts is strongly correlated with disturbed morphology as measured by quantitative structure measures. Finally, we find that the incidence of cold fronts in the simulated cluster images is strongly dependent on baryonic physics.

  2. Winter habitat preferences for Florida manatees and vulnerability to cold.

    PubMed

    Laist, David W; Taylor, Cynthia; Reynolds, John E

    2013-01-01

    To survive cold winter periods most, if not all, Florida manatees rely on warm-water refuges in the southern two-thirds of the Florida peninsula. Most refuges are either warm-water discharges from power plant and natural springs, or passive thermal basins that temporarily trap relatively warm water for a week or more. Strong fidelity to one or more refuges has created four relatively discrete Florida manatee subpopulations. Using statewide winter counts of manatees from 1999 to 2011, we provide the first attempt to quantify the proportion of animals using the three principal refuge types (power plants, springs, and passive thermal basins) statewide and for each subpopulation. Statewide across all years, 48.5% of all manatees were counted at power plant outfalls, 17.5% at natural springs, and 34.9 % at passive thermal basins or sites with no known warm-water features. Atlantic Coast and Southwest Florida subpopulations comprised 82.2% of all manatees counted (45.6% and 36.6%, respectively) with each subpopulation relying principally on power plants (66.6% and 47.4%, respectively). The upper St. Johns River and Northwest Florida subpopulations comprised 17.8% of all manatees counted with almost all animals relying entirely on springs (99.2% and 88.6% of those subpopulations, respectively). A record high count of 5,076 manatees in January 2010 revealed minimum sizes for the four subpopulations of: 230 manatees in the upper St. Johns River; 2,548 on the Atlantic Coast; 645 in Northwest Florida; and 1,774 in Southwest Florida. Based on a comparison of carcass recovery locations for 713 manatees killed by cold stress between 1999 and 2011 and the distribution of known refuges, it appears that springs offer manatees the best protection against cold stress. Long-term survival of Florida manatees will require improved efforts to enhance and protect manatee access to and use of warm-water springs as power plant outfalls are shut down.

  3. Winter habitat preferences for Florida manatees and vulnerability to cold.

    PubMed

    Laist, David W; Taylor, Cynthia; Reynolds, John E

    2013-01-01

    To survive cold winter periods most, if not all, Florida manatees rely on warm-water refuges in the southern two-thirds of the Florida peninsula. Most refuges are either warm-water discharges from power plant and natural springs, or passive thermal basins that temporarily trap relatively warm water for a week or more. Strong fidelity to one or more refuges has created four relatively discrete Florida manatee subpopulations. Using statewide winter counts of manatees from 1999 to 2011, we provide the first attempt to quantify the proportion of animals using the three principal refuge types (power plants, springs, and passive thermal basins) statewide and for each subpopulation. Statewide across all years, 48.5% of all manatees were counted at power plant outfalls, 17.5% at natural springs, and 34.9 % at passive thermal basins or sites with no known warm-water features. Atlantic Coast and Southwest Florida subpopulations comprised 82.2% of all manatees counted (45.6% and 36.6%, respectively) with each subpopulation relying principally on power plants (66.6% and 47.4%, respectively). The upper St. Johns River and Northwest Florida subpopulations comprised 17.8% of all manatees counted with almost all animals relying entirely on springs (99.2% and 88.6% of those subpopulations, respectively). A record high count of 5,076 manatees in January 2010 revealed minimum sizes for the four subpopulations of: 230 manatees in the upper St. Johns River; 2,548 on the Atlantic Coast; 645 in Northwest Florida; and 1,774 in Southwest Florida. Based on a comparison of carcass recovery locations for 713 manatees killed by cold stress between 1999 and 2011 and the distribution of known refuges, it appears that springs offer manatees the best protection against cold stress. Long-term survival of Florida manatees will require improved efforts to enhance and protect manatee access to and use of warm-water springs as power plant outfalls are shut down. PMID:23527063

  4. Winter Habitat Preferences for Florida Manatees and Vulnerability to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Laist, David W.; Taylor, Cynthia; Reynolds, John E.

    2013-01-01

    To survive cold winter periods most, if not all, Florida manatees rely on warm-water refuges in the southern two-thirds of the Florida peninsula. Most refuges are either warm-water discharges from power plant and natural springs, or passive thermal basins that temporarily trap relatively warm water for a week or more. Strong fidelity to one or more refuges has created four relatively discrete Florida manatee subpopulations. Using statewide winter counts of manatees from 1999 to 2011, we provide the first attempt to quantify the proportion of animals using the three principal refuge types (power plants, springs, and passive thermal basins) statewide and for each subpopulation. Statewide across all years, 48.5% of all manatees were counted at power plant outfalls, 17.5% at natural springs, and 34.9 % at passive thermal basins or sites with no known warm-water features. Atlantic Coast and Southwest Florida subpopulations comprised 82.2% of all manatees counted (45.6% and 36.6%, respectively) with each subpopulation relying principally on power plants (66.6% and 47.4%, respectively). The upper St. Johns River and Northwest Florida subpopulations comprised 17.8% of all manatees counted with almost all animals relying entirely on springs (99.2% and 88.6% of those subpopulations, respectively). A record high count of 5,076 manatees in January 2010 revealed minimum sizes for the four subpopulations of: 230 manatees in the upper St. Johns River; 2,548 on the Atlantic Coast; 645 in Northwest Florida; and 1,774 in Southwest Florida. Based on a comparison of carcass recovery locations for 713 manatees killed by cold stress between 1999 and 2011 and the distribution of known refuges, it appears that springs offer manatees the best protection against cold stress. Long-term survival of Florida manatees will require improved efforts to enhance and protect manatee access to and use of warm-water springs as power plant outfalls are shut down. PMID:23527063

  5. COLD FRONTS AND GAS SLOSHING IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2013-01-10

    Cold fronts in cluster cool cores should be erased on short timescales by thermal conduction, unless protected by magnetic fields that are 'draped' parallel to the front surfaces, suppressing conduction perpendicular to the sloshing fronts. We present a series of MHD simulations of cold front formation in the core of a galaxy cluster with anisotropic thermal conduction, exploring a parameter space of conduction strengths parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. Including conduction has a strong effect on the temperature distribution of the core and the appearance of the cold fronts. Though magnetic field lines are draping parallel to the front surfaces, preventing conduction directly across them, the temperature jumps across the fronts are nevertheless reduced. The geometry of the field is such that the cold gas below the front surfaces can be connected to hotter regions outside via field lines along directions perpendicular to the plane of the sloshing motions and along sections of the front that are not perfectly draped. This results in the heating of this gas below the front on a timescale of a Gyr, but the sharpness of the density and temperature jumps may nevertheless be preserved. By modifying the gas density distribution below the front, conduction may indirectly aid in suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. If conduction along the field lines is unsuppressed, we find that the characteristic sharp jumps seen in Chandra observations of cold front clusters do not form. Therefore, the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters is in contradiction with our simulations with full Spitzer conduction. This suggests that the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters could be used to place upper limits on conduction in the bulk of the intracluster medium. Finally, the combination of sloshing and anisotropic thermal conduction can result in a larger flux of heat to the core than either process in isolation. While still not sufficient to prevent a cooling

  6. [Safe wintering and economic and ecological benefit of winter rapeseed in dry and cold areas of northern China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-qing; Sun, Wan-cang; Liu, Zi-gang; Wang, Zhi-jiang; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Jun-yan; Li, Xue-cai; Fang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to realize the security of safe wintering of winter rapeseed in dry and cold regions of northern China. Experiments were conducted with 18 winter rapeseed (Brassica campestris) varieties at 57 sites from 2008 to 2013 to statistically analyze the wintering rate variation of different varieties in dry and cold regions of northern China. The results showed that, the wintering rate varied from 70% to 90% during the study period in different regions, which had no significant difference between different years and varieties, and had high stability and remarkable economic benefit. With Tianshui as a starting point of winter rapeseed planting, the wintering-safe regions included all Gansu Province , the south of Lasa and Linzhi of Xizang, the east of Minhe of Qinghai, up to Urumqi and Baicheng, and the south of Aletai, Tacheng, the east of Kashi of Xinjiang, it also included the regions along Yellow River eastward to Ningxia, the south of Linhe of Inner Mongolia, the north of Shaanxi, the vicinage of Qixian in Shanxi, Daming in Hebei, Tianjin, Beijing, the north of Weifang of Shandong, the south of Huludao of Liaoning and Yanbian of Jilin. Longyou 6, Longyou 7, Longyou 8 and Longyou 9 were the wintering-safe B. rapa varieties.

  7. [Safe wintering and economic and ecological benefit of winter rapeseed in dry and cold areas of northern China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-qing; Sun, Wan-cang; Liu, Zi-gang; Wang, Zhi-jiang; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Jun-yan; Li, Xue-cai; Fang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to realize the security of safe wintering of winter rapeseed in dry and cold regions of northern China. Experiments were conducted with 18 winter rapeseed (Brassica campestris) varieties at 57 sites from 2008 to 2013 to statistically analyze the wintering rate variation of different varieties in dry and cold regions of northern China. The results showed that, the wintering rate varied from 70% to 90% during the study period in different regions, which had no significant difference between different years and varieties, and had high stability and remarkable economic benefit. With Tianshui as a starting point of winter rapeseed planting, the wintering-safe regions included all Gansu Province , the south of Lasa and Linzhi of Xizang, the east of Minhe of Qinghai, up to Urumqi and Baicheng, and the south of Aletai, Tacheng, the east of Kashi of Xinjiang, it also included the regions along Yellow River eastward to Ningxia, the south of Linhe of Inner Mongolia, the north of Shaanxi, the vicinage of Qixian in Shanxi, Daming in Hebei, Tianjin, Beijing, the north of Weifang of Shandong, the south of Huludao of Liaoning and Yanbian of Jilin. Longyou 6, Longyou 7, Longyou 8 and Longyou 9 were the wintering-safe B. rapa varieties. PMID:26995911

  8. Effect of winter cold duration on spring phenology of the orange tip butterfly, Anthocharis cardamines.

    PubMed

    Stålhandske, Sandra; Lehmann, Philipp; Pruisscher, Peter; Leimar, Olof

    2015-12-01

    The effect of spring temperature on spring phenology is well understood in a wide range of taxa. However, studies on how winter conditions may affect spring phenology are underrepresented. Previous work on Anthocharis cardamines (orange tip butterfly) has shown population-specific reaction norms of spring development in relation to spring temperature and a speeding up of post-winter development with longer winter durations. In this experiment, we examined the effects of a greater and ecologically relevant range of winter durations on post-winter pupal development of A. cardamines of two populations from the United Kingdom and two from Sweden. By analyzing pupal weight loss and metabolic rate, we were able to separate the overall post-winter pupal development into diapause duration and post-diapause development. We found differences in the duration of cold needed to break diapause among populations, with the southern UK population requiring a shorter duration than the other populations. We also found that the overall post-winter pupal development time, following removal from winter cold, was negatively related to cold duration, through a combined effect of cold duration on diapause duration and on post-diapause development time. Longer cold durations also lead to higher population synchrony in hatching. For current winter durations in the field, the A. cardamines population of southern UK could have a reduced development rate and lower synchrony in emergence because of short winters. With future climate change, this might become an issue also for other populations. Differences in winter conditions in the field among these four populations are large enough to have driven local adaptation of characteristics controlling spring phenology in response to winter duration. The observed phenology of these populations depends on a combination of winter and spring temperatures; thus, both must be taken into account for accurate predictions of phenology. PMID:27069602

  9. The Properties of X-ray Cold Fronts in Simulated Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Eric J.; Skillman, S.; O'Shea, B.; Smith, B.; Burns, J.; Norman, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the Chandra era, a number of galaxy clusters have been identified as hosting so-called "cold fronts", sharp edges in the X-ray surface brightness and spectral temperature. In contrast to observed shocks in the ICM of galaxy clusters, these features are seen to be pressure continuous, with the inferred density and temperature jumps in opposite directions. A number of physical scenarios have been postulated to explain these features, including subcluster mergers that strip gas out of dark matter potential wells and expand adiabatically, to "sloshing" of the central cold gas in cool core galaxy clusters in response to smaller perturbations. We examine the statistical properties of cold fronts in synthetic X-ray images generated from a large (512h-1 Mpc)3 volume simulated with the Enzo adaptive mesh refinement hydro/N-body cosmological code. We explore the correlation of the appearance of cold fronts and the merger state and history of simulated clusters with a variety of baryonic physics included. We determine the origin of the merger type cold fronts in clusters. In addition we describe the statistical properties of the cold fronts throughout the simulated cluster sample.

  10. Physical changes within a large tropical hydroelectric reservoir induced by wintertime cold front activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtarelli, M. P.; Alcântara, E. H.; Rennó, C. D.; Stech, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the influence of wintertime cold front activity on the physical processes within a large tropical reservoir located in Brazil. The period chosen for this study consisted of 49 days between 28 April 2010 and 15 July 2010. This period was defined based on information from the Brazilian Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies (CPTEC), data collected in situ and the interpretation of remotely sensed images. To better understand the governing processes that drive changes in the heat balance, differential cooling and mixing dynamics, a simulation was performed that utilized a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model enforced with in situ and remote sensing data. The results showed that during a cold front passage over the reservoir, the sensible and latent heat fluxes were enhanced by approximately 77 and 16%, respectively. The reservoir's daily averaged heat loss was up to 167% higher on the days with cold front activity than on the days without activity. The cold front passage also intensified the differential cooling process; in some cases the difference between the water temperature of the littoral and pelagic zones reached up to 8 °C. The occurrence of cold front passages impacted the diurnal mixed layer (DML), by increasing the turbulent energy input (∼54%) and the DML depth (∼41%). Our results indicate that the cold front events are one of the main meteorological disturbances driving the physical processes within hydroelectric reservoirs located in tropical South America during the wintertime. Hence, cold front activity over these aquatic systems has several implications for water quality and reservoir management in Brazil.

  11. Cold front induced changes on the Florida panhandle shelf during October 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamykowski, D.; Pridgen, K. Grabowski; Morrison, J. M.; McCulloch, A. A.; Nyadjro, E. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Sinclair, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    A significant step transition between seasonally stratified and destratified hydrographic conditions occurred during an October 2008 cruise to the Florida Panhandle Shelf along a cross-shelf transect that was sampled before and after a cold front passed through the area. Meteorological measurements from nearby ocean and land-based stations characterized the event. Cross-shelf continuous Acrobat profiles and discrete CTD stations characterized water column hydrographic patterns, while mid-shelf multicorer and box corer samples characterized sediment texture and nutrients. Water samples collected from selected depths biased toward the sediment interface were analyzed for nutrient content and phytoplankton community composition. Pre-front, the cross-shelf water column exhibited vertical stratification with complex temperature and salinity patterns. A prominent near-bottom chlorophyll a maximum of ˜1.5 μg L-1 between the 25-35 m isobaths occurred with the 1% light level at ˜18 m depth and a near-bottom nitrate+nitrite (NO3-+NO2-) maximum >3 μM between the 30-40 m isobaths. HPLC-determined phytoplankton community composition in the near-bottom chlorophyll a maximum consisted of gyroxanthin-containing dinoflagellates (Karenia brevis) and less abundant diatoms, both verified by FlowCAM analysis, mixed with detectable cryptophytes and chlorophytes. Sediment trends based on limited core replicates suggested the sediments were a potential source of nutrients to near-bottom populations of K. brevis and that shell hash could provide abundant pore space for K. brevis incursions. Between the 40-50 m isobaths, diatoms, cryptophytes and chlorophytes dominated near-bottom, gyroxanthin-containing dinoflagellates and prasinophytes occurred throughout the water column, and cyanophytes dominated near-surface. Post-front, the cross-shelf water column exhibited destratification with temperature and salinity increasing offshore. A chlorophyll a maximum of ˜0.75 μg Chl a L-1 left the

  12. Geographic variation in migration chronology and winter distribution of midcontinent greater white-fronted geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, Craig R.; Nieman, Daniel J.; Alisauskas, Ray T.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Hines, James E.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated spatial and temporal differences in migratory behavior among different breeding groups of midcontinent greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) using band-recovery data and observations of neck collared geese during migration and winter. Birds from different breeding areas were initially delineated by geographic distance into 6 banding reference areas (BRAs): 1) interior Alaska, 2) North Slope of Alaska, 3) western Northwest Territories (NWT), 4) western Nunavut, 5) central Nunavut, and 6) eastern Nunavut. The banding groups also differed by breeding habitat, with geese from interior Alaska nesting in the boreal forest (taiga), and all other groups breeding in tundra habitats. Geese from interior Alaska migrated earlier during autumn, and were more likely to winter farther south (in Mexico) than geese from other breeding areas. Geese banded in central and eastern Nunavut (Queen Maud Gulf and Inglis River) wintered farther east (in Louisiana) than geese from other breeding areas. Small-scale (within-state) geographic segregation of wintering flocks was evidenced by the recent (post-1990) nearly exclusive use of a new wintering area in north central Texas by geese from interior Alaska. Segregation among BRAs was also apparent in Mexico, where taiga geese were found predominantly in the central Highlands (states of Zacatecas and Durango), whereas tundra geese mostly used states along the Gulf Coast (primarily Tamaulipas). Interior Alaska birds initiated spring migration earlier than geese from other areas, and were more likely than others to stop in the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska, a region where cholera outbreaks periodically kill thousands of geese. Geese from interior Alaska were the first to arrive at spring staging areas in prairie Canada where BRAs exhibited spatial delineation (a longitudinal cline) in relation to breeding areas. Our results show significant geographic and temporal variation among taiga and tundra breeding cohorts during

  13. Cold truths: how winter drives responses of terrestrial organisms to climate change.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; Henry, Hugh A L; Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-02-01

    Winter is a key driver of individual performance, community composition, and ecological interactions in terrestrial habitats. Although climate change research tends to focus on performance in the growing season, climate change is also modifying winter conditions rapidly. Changes to winter temperatures, the variability of winter conditions, and winter snow cover can interact to induce cold injury, alter energy and water balance, advance or retard phenology, and modify community interactions. Species vary in their susceptibility to these winter drivers, hampering efforts to predict biological responses to climate change. Existing frameworks for predicting the impacts of climate change do not incorporate the complexity of organismal responses to winter. Here, we synthesise organismal responses to winter climate change, and use this synthesis to build a framework to predict exposure and sensitivity to negative impacts. This framework can be used to estimate the vulnerability of species to winter climate change. We describe the importance of relationships between winter conditions and performance during the growing season in determining fitness, and demonstrate how summer and winter processes are linked. Incorporating winter into current models will require concerted effort from theoreticians and empiricists, and the expansion of current growing-season studies to incorporate winter. PMID:24720862

  14. Decreasing but still significant facilitation effect of cold-season macrophytes on wetlands purification function during cold winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiangxu; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Wang, Penghe; Zhao, Dehua; An, Shuqing

    2016-06-01

    To identify the facilitation effect of a cool-season aquatic macrophyte (FEam) for use in effluent purification via constructed floating wetlands (CFWs) and to determine the possible pathways used during a winter period with an average temperature of less than 5 °C, pilot-scale CFWs were planted with the cold-season macrophyte Oenanthe clecumbens and were operated as batch systems. Although some leaves withered, the roots retained relatively high levels of activity during the winter, which had average air and water temperatures of 3.63 and 5.04 °C, respectively. The N and P removal efficiencies in CFWs decreased significantly in winter relative to those in late autumn. The presence of cool-season plants resulted in significant improvements in N and P removal, with a FEam of 15.23–25.86% in winter. Microbial N removal accounted for 71.57% of the total N removed in winter, and the decrease in plant uptake was the dominant factor in the wintertime decrease in N removal relative to that in late autumn. These results demonstrate the importance of cold-season plants in CFWs for the treatment of secondary effluent during cold winters.

  15. Decreasing but still significant facilitation effect of cold-season macrophytes on wetlands purification function during cold winter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiangxu; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Wang, Penghe; Zhao, Dehua; An, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    To identify the facilitation effect of a cool-season aquatic macrophyte (FEam) for use in effluent purification via constructed floating wetlands (CFWs) and to determine the possible pathways used during a winter period with an average temperature of less than 5 °C, pilot-scale CFWs were planted with the cold-season macrophyte Oenanthe clecumbens and were operated as batch systems. Although some leaves withered, the roots retained relatively high levels of activity during the winter, which had average air and water temperatures of 3.63 and 5.04 °C, respectively. The N and P removal efficiencies in CFWs decreased significantly in winter relative to those in late autumn. The presence of cool-season plants resulted in significant improvements in N and P removal, with a FEam of 15.23-25.86% in winter. Microbial N removal accounted for 71.57% of the total N removed in winter, and the decrease in plant uptake was the dominant factor in the wintertime decrease in N removal relative to that in late autumn. These results demonstrate the importance of cold-season plants in CFWs for the treatment of secondary effluent during cold winters. PMID:27245709

  16. Changes in Arctic warm and cold spell occurrence during winter and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, Heidrun; Rinke, Annette; Dethloff, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, climate change manifests with the strongest warming trends on the globe, especially in the cold season, associated with Arctic Amplification. However, climate change is not restricted to mean temperature but also expresses itself in changes of temperature extremes. It is under debate if climate extremes change similarly strong, and what mechanisms apply. Our study provides detailed regional information about two selected temperature extreme indices in the Arctic, namely warm and cold spells in winter and summer. Both indices detect lasting cold respectively warm periods that are based on extreme temperatures: cold nights as days where the daily minimum temperature is below the 10th percentile of minimum temperatures and warm day times where the daily maximum temperature is above the 90th percentile of maximum temperatures. We analyze the temporal evolution and variability of warm and cold spells from 1979-2013, based on daily station data and the ERA-Interim reanalysis. Calculated trends from both datasets suggest a widespread decrease of cold spells in winter and summer of up to -4 days/decade, with regional patches where trends are statistically significant throughout the Arctic. Winter trends are spatially heterogeneous, the reanalysis also shows small areas with statistically significant increases of cold spells throughout Siberia. Calculated changes in warm spells from both datasets are mostly small throughout the Arctic (below ± 1 day/decade) and statistically not significant. Remarkable exceptions are the Lena river basin in winter with a statistically significant decrease of up to 1.5 days/decade and areas in Scandinavia with statistically significant increases of up to 2.5 days/decade in winter and summer (again from both datasets). Changes in both warm and cold spells may be caused by two separate mechanisms: changes in occurrence of the underlying extremes (changes in the number of cold nights and warm daytimes) or changes in the temporal

  17. THE EFFECT OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY ON COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Biffi, V.

    2015-01-10

    Cold fronts—contact discontinuities in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters—should be disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities due to the associated shear velocity. However, many observed cold fronts appear stable. This opens the possibility of placing constraints on microphysical mechanisms that stabilize them, such as the ICM viscosity and/or magnetic fields. We performed exploratory high-resolution simulations of cold fronts arising from subsonic gas sloshing in cluster cores using the grid-based Athena MHD code, comparing the effects of isotropic Spitzer and anisotropic Braginskii viscosity (expected in a magnetized plasma). Magnetized simulations with full Braginskii viscosity or isotropic Spitzer viscosity reduced by a factor f ∼ 0.1 are both in qualitative agreement with observations in terms of suppressing K-H instabilities. The rms velocity of turbulence within the sloshing region is only modestly reduced by Braginskii viscosity. We also performed unmagnetized simulations with and without viscosity and find that magnetic fields have a substantial effect on the appearance of the cold fronts, even if the initial field is weak and the viscosity is the same. This suggests that determining the dominant suppression mechanism of a given cold front from X-ray observations (e.g., viscosity or magnetic fields) by comparison with simulations is not straightforward. Finally, we performed simulations including anisotropic thermal conduction, and find that including Braginskii viscosity in these simulations does not significantly affect the evolution of cold fronts; they are rapidly smeared out by thermal conduction, as in the inviscid case.

  18. The impact of winter cold weather on acute myocardial infarctions in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, João; Freire, Elisabete; Almendra, Ricardo; Silva, Giovani L; Santana, Paula

    2013-12-01

    Mortality due to cardiovascular diseases shows a seasonal trend that can be associated with cold weather. Portugal is the European country with the highest excess winter mortality, but nevertheless, the relationship between cold weather and health is yet to be assessed. The main aim of this study is to identify the contribution of cold weather to cardiovascular diseases within Portugal. Poisson regression analysis based on generalized additive models was applied to estimate the influence of a human-biometeorological index (PET) on daily hospitalizations for myocardial infarction. The main results revealed a negative effect of cold weather on acute myocardial infarctions in Portugal. For every degree fall in PET during winter, there was an increase of up to 2.2% (95% CI = 0.9%; 3.3%) in daily hospital admissions. This paper shows the need for public policies that will help minimize or, indeed, prevent exposure to cold.

  19. The impact of winter cold weather on acute myocardial infarctions in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, João; Freire, Elisabete; Almendra, Ricardo; Silva, Giovani L; Santana, Paula

    2013-12-01

    Mortality due to cardiovascular diseases shows a seasonal trend that can be associated with cold weather. Portugal is the European country with the highest excess winter mortality, but nevertheless, the relationship between cold weather and health is yet to be assessed. The main aim of this study is to identify the contribution of cold weather to cardiovascular diseases within Portugal. Poisson regression analysis based on generalized additive models was applied to estimate the influence of a human-biometeorological index (PET) on daily hospitalizations for myocardial infarction. The main results revealed a negative effect of cold weather on acute myocardial infarctions in Portugal. For every degree fall in PET during winter, there was an increase of up to 2.2% (95% CI = 0.9%; 3.3%) in daily hospital admissions. This paper shows the need for public policies that will help minimize or, indeed, prevent exposure to cold. PMID:23410618

  20. Observations of a cold front with strong vertical undulations during the ARM RCS-IOP

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D.N.; Melfi, S.H.

    1996-04-01

    Passage of a cold front was observed on the night of April 14-15, 1994, during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Intensive Observatios Period (IOP) at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The observations are described.

  1. A CloudSat-CALIPSO View of Cloud and Precipitation Properties Across Cold Fronts over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of cloud and precipitation properties across oceanic extratropical cyclone cold fronts is examined using four years of combined CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar retrievals. The global annual mean cloud and precipitation distributions show that low-level clouds are ubiquitous in the post frontal zone while higher-level cloud frequency and precipitation peak in the warm sector along the surface front. Increases in temperature and moisture within the cold front region are associated with larger high-level but lower mid-/low level cloud frequencies and precipitation decreases in the cold sector. This behavior seems to be related to a shift from stratiform to convective clouds and precipitation. Stronger ascent in the warm conveyor belt tends to enhance cloudiness and precipitation across the cold front. A strong temperature contrast between the warm and cold sectors also encourages greater post-cold-frontal cloud occurrence. While the seasonal contrasts in environmental temperature, moisture, and ascent strength are enough to explain most of the variations in cloud and precipitation across cold fronts in both hemispheres, they do not fully explain the differences between Northern and Southern Hemisphere cold fronts. These differences are better explained when the impact of the contrast in temperature across the cold front is also considered. In addition, these large-scale parameters do not explain the relatively large frequency in springtime post frontal precipitation.

  2. Cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and their relationship to extreme wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Otero, L. J.; Restrepo, J. C.; Ruiz, J.; Cadena, M.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme ocean waves in the Caribbean Sea are commonly related to the effects of storms and hurricanes during the months of June through November. The collapse of 200 m of the Puerto Colombia pier in March 2009 revealed the effects of meteorological phenomena other than storms and hurricanes that may be influencing the extreme wave regime in the Colombian Caribbean. The marked seasonality of these atmospheric fronts was established by analyzing the meteorological-marine reports of the Instituto de Hidrología, Meteorología y Estudios Ambientales of Colombia (IDEAM, based on its initials in Spanish) and the Centro de Investigación en Oceanografía y Meteorología of Colombia (CIOH, based on its initials in Spanish) during the last 16 yr. The highest number of cold fronts was observed during the months of January, February, and March, with 6 fronts occurring per year. An annual trend was observed and the highest number of fronts occurred in 2010 (20 in total); moreover, an annual strong relationship between the maximum average wave values and the cold fronts in the central zone of the Colombian Caribbean during the first three months of the year was established. In addition, the maximum values of the significant height produced by the passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the

  3. Premixed turbulent burning velocities derived from mixing controlled reaction models with cold front quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, C.A. ); Lindstedt, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on the Eddy Breakup model investigated in two modified forms in which the reaction rate is quenched at the cold front of the flame. One quench criterion is based on the reaction progress variable (RPVQC) and the other on temperature (TQC). Burning velocities for the RPVQC have been calculated from the steady conservation equations by the use of apparently novel numerical and analytical eigenvalue techniques. Both RPVQC and TQC criteria were also studied in numerical simulations of transient one-dimensional flame propagation. The latter study also determined essential constraints on grid and time step size required to ensure accurate predictions. For the RPVQC the eigenvalue analysis and transient computations are in good agreement, provided the quench point is not close to the cold front.

  4. The contribution of cold winter temperatures to the 2003 alewife population collapse in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlop, Erin; Riley, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    The Lake Huron ecosystem has recently undergone dramatic changes. As part of those changes, the once highly abundant non-native alewife Alosa pseudoharengus population crashed in 2003 and has yet to recover. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether temperature played a role in the population crash, because historically alewife have been subject to die-off events in response to cold temperatures in other lakes. Long-term climate data (1973–2009) showed that the winter of 2002–2003 exhibited the largest drop in degree days relative to the previous year, had the most extensive average March ice coverage, and was among the coldest years on record. However, since 2003, winter temperatures have not been overly cold, and air temperature has shown an increasing trend. Also, the relationship between temperature and alewife abundance between 1975 and 2006 was non-significant. Therefore, although we found evidence that cold winter temperatures contributed to the abrupt decline of alewife in 2003, they could not explain why the population failed to recover as it had after previous cold winters. Historically, Chinook salmon abundance contributed to long-term trends in alewife abundance, however, we found predation by Chinook to play a lesser role on the 2003 alewife collapse. In the absence of direct estimates of food availability, analyses of alewife length data suggest that a declining prey base altered the ecosystem conditions for alewife, possibly contributing to their collapse and lack of recovery.

  5. United States Historians, Cold War Rhetoric, and The Finnish Winter War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Keith W.

    The U.S. attitude toward Finland during the Cold War years reveals much about U.S. society and politics. In particular, the war between Finland and the Soviet Union during 1939 and 1940 (Finnish Winter War) and the way in which the United States reacted to it at the time and in the years following World War II has relevance for better…

  6. Formation of a katabatic induced cold front at the east Andean slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachte, K.; Nauss, T.,; Rollenbeck, R.; Bendix, J.

    2009-04-01

    Within the DFG research unit 816, climate dynamics in a tropical mountain rain forest in the national reserve of the Reserva Biósfera de San Francisco in South Ecuador are investigated. Precipitation measurements in the mountain environment of the Estación Científica de San Francisco (ECSF) with a vertical rain radar profiler have been made over the last seven years. They reveal unexpected constant early morning rainfall events. On the basis of cloud top temperatures from corresponding GOES satellite imageries, a Mesoscale Convective System could be derived. Its formation region is located south-east of the ECSF in the Peruvian Amazon basin. The generation of the MCS is assumed to results from an interaction of both local and mesoscale conditions. Nocturnal drainage air from the Andean slopes and valleys confluences in the Amazon basin due to the concave lined terrain. This cold air converges with the warm-moist air of the Amazon inducing a local cold front. This process yields to deep convection resulting in a MCS. With the numerical model ARPS the hypothesized formation of a cloud cluster due to a katabatic induced cold front is shown in an ideal case study. Therefor an ideal terrain model representing the features of the Andes in the target area has been used. The simplification of the oprography concerns a concave lined slope and a valley draining into the basin. It describes the confluence of the cold drainage air due to the shape of the terrain. Inside the basin the generation of a local cold front is shown, which triggers the formation of a cloud cluster.

  7. The climatology of East Asian winter monsoon and cold surges from 1979--1995 NCEP/NCAR reanalyses

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Zhang; Sperber, K.; Boyle, J.

    1996-04-01

    The East Asian winter monsoon, which is associated with the Siberian high and active cold surges, is one of the most energetic monsoon circulation systems. The dramatic shift of northeasterlies and the outbreak of cold surges dominate the winter weather and local climate in the East Asian region, and may exert a strong impact on the extratropical and tropical planetary-scale circulations and influence the SSTs in the tropical western Pacific. General characteristics of the winter monsoon and cold surges and their possible link with tropical disturbances are revealed in many observational studies. Little attention has been given to the climatological aspects of the winter monsoon and cold surges. The purpose of this study is to compile and document the East Asian mean winter circulation, and present the climatology of cold surges and the Siberian high based on the 1979--1995 NCEP/NCAR reanalyses. Of particular interest is the interannual variation of winter monsoon circulation and cold surge events. Given that the cold surge activity and the Indonesian convection are much reduced during the 1982--83 period, one of the goals is to determine whether there exists a statistically significant relationship between ENSO and the interannual variation of winter monsoon and cold surges.

  8. Cold Hardiness of Winter-Acclimated Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Adults.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A R; Asplen, M K; Hutchison, W D; Venette, R C

    2015-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, often called spotted wing drosophila, is an exotic vinegar fly that is native to Southeast Asia and was first detected in the continental United States in 2008. Previous modeling studies have suggested that D. suzukii might not survive in portions of the northern United States or southern Canada due to the effects of cold. As a result, we measured two aspects of insect cold tolerance, the supercooling point and lower lethal temperature, for D. suzukii summer-morph pupae and adults and winter-morph adults. Supercooling points were compared to adults of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. The lower lethal temperature of D. suzukii winter-morph adults was significantly colder than that for D. suzukii summer-morph adults, while supercooling points of D. suzukii winter-morph adults were actually warmer than that for D. suzukii summer-morph adults and pupae. D. suzukii summer-morph adult supercooling points were not significantly different than those for D. melanogaster adults. These measures indicate that D. suzukii is a chill intolerant insect, and winter-morph adults are the most cold-tolerant life stage. These results can be used to improve predictions of where D. suzukii might be able to establish overwintering populations and cause extensive damage to spring fruit crops.

  9. A novel plant defensin-like gene of winter wheat is specifically induced during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Koike, Michiya; Okamoto, Takashi; Tsuda, Sakae; Imai, Ryozo

    2002-10-18

    A novel cDNA clone, Tad1, was isolated from crown tissue of winter wheat after differential screening of cold acclimation-induced genes. The Tad1 cDNA encoded a 23kDa polypeptide with a potential N-terminal signal sequence. The putative mature sequence showed striking similarity to plant defensins or gamma-thionins, representing low molecular size antipathogenic polypeptides. High levels of Tad1 mRNA accumulation occurred within one day of cold acclimation in crown tissue and the level was maintained throughout 14 days of cold acclimation. Similar rapid induction was observed in young seedlings treated with low temperature but not with exogenous abscisic acid. In contrast to defensins from other plant species, neither salicylic acid nor methyl jasmonate induced expression of Tad1. The recombinant mature form of TAD1 polypeptide inhibited the growth of the phytopathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas cichorii; however, no antifreeze activity was detected. Collectively, these data suggested that Tad1 is induced in cold-acclimated winter wheat independent of major defense signaling(s) and is involved in low temperature-induced resistance to pathogens during winter hardening. PMID:12379218

  10. Arctic sea ice loss and recent extreme cold winter in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Masato; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2014-05-01

    Extreme cold winter over the Eurasia has occurred more frequently in recent years. Observational evidence in recent studies shows that the wintertime cold anomalies over the Eurasia are associated with decline of Arctic sea ice in preceding autumn to winter season. However, the tropical and/or mid-latitude sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies have great influence on the mid- and high-latitude atmospheric variability, it is difficult to isolate completely the impacts of sea ice change from observational data. In this study, we examine possible linkage between the Arctic sea ice loss and the extreme cold winter over the Eurasia using a state-of-the-art MIROC4 (T106L56) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) to assess the pure atmospheric responses to sea ice reduction. We perform two sets of experiments with different realistic sea ice boundary conditions calculated by composite of observed sea ice concentration; one is reduced sea ice extent case (referred to as LICE run) and another is enhanced case (HICE run). In both experiments, the model is integrated 6-month from September to February with 100-member ensemble under the climatological SST boundary condition. The difference in ensemble mean of each experiment (LICE minus HICE) shows cold anomalies over the Eurasia in winter and its spatial pattern is very similar to corresponding observation, though the magnitude is smaller than observation. This result indicates that a part of observed cold anomaly can be attributed to the Arctic sea ice loss. We would like to introduce more important results and mechanisms in detail in my presentation.

  11. Fine-scale observations of the structure and evolution of a tornadic cold front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matt; Rosenberg, Phil; Parker, Doug

    2013-04-01

    On 29 November 2011 a strong cold front crossed the UK. An intense, narrow rain band accompanied the front over northern England, along which several small tornadoes developed. The vertical structure of the front was sampled as it approached the UK, using dropsondes and in-situ aircraft measurements, as part of the DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExTratropical storms (DIAMET) field campaign. One-minute-resolution data from the Met Office's network of automatic weather stations (AWSs) were used to investigate the structure of the surface front as it crossed the UK. 'Time-to-space' conversion of the AWS data, using a system motion vector estimated from sequences of radar data, permitted a fine-scale analysis of the surface frontal structure and its variation in the along-front direction. On the 28th, operational Unified Model output and aircraft dropsondes showed two separate fronts in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. By the morning of the 29th, dropsondes south of Ireland presented some features consistent with kata (also known as 'split') fronts, with two distinct, but overlapping dry intrusions, each overrunning saturated air below. Each dry intrusion was associated with a local maximum in the cross-front wind component, with a forward-directed, front-relative flow of ~ 5 - 10 m/s. Radar data showed the presence of multiple, narrow rain bands over Ireland and western extremities of the UK early on the 29th, as the front moved within range of the UK radar network. Over Ireland, the merger of at least two separate rain bands was observed. The merged band intensified and accelerated eastwards, leading to a single, intense, bowing line segment over northern England, along which the tornadoes occurred. In contrast, over southern England, no merger occurred, and the frontal zone was characterised by multiple rain bands for the duration of the observation period. The surface data showed markedly different structure in the temperature, wind and pressure fields

  12. Snow cover and late fall movement influence wood frog survival during an unusually cold winter.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jason H; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how organisms will respond to altered winter conditions is hampered by a paucity of information on the winter ecology for many species. Amphibians are sensitive to environmental temperature and moisture conditions and may be vulnerable to changes in winter climate. We used a combination of radio telemetry and field enclosures to monitor survival of the freeze-tolerant wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) during the unusually cold winter of 2013-2014. We experimentally manipulated snow cover to determine the effect of snow removal on winter survival. In addition, we placed a group of untracked frogs at locations used by tracked frogs prior to long-distance late fall movement to investigate whether late fall movement entailed survival consequences. Winter survival was highest (75.3 %) among frogs at post-movement locations that received natural snow cover. The odds of surviving the winter for frogs in the snow removal treatment was only 21.6 % that of frogs in the natural snow treatment. Likewise, paired frogs placed at pre-fall movement locations had only 35.1 % the odds of surviving as tracked frogs at post-fall movement locations. A comparison of a priori models that included microhabitat conditions measured at wood frog overwintering locations revealed that the minimum temperature experienced and the depth of the frog in the substrate explained additional variation in winter survival. Our results suggest that acute exposure to lethal temperature conditions is the most likely cause of mortality during this study, rather than energy exhaustion or desiccation. They also demonstrate the importance of snow cover to the winter survival of wood frogs.

  13. Snow cover and late fall movement influence wood frog survival during an unusually cold winter.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jason H; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how organisms will respond to altered winter conditions is hampered by a paucity of information on the winter ecology for many species. Amphibians are sensitive to environmental temperature and moisture conditions and may be vulnerable to changes in winter climate. We used a combination of radio telemetry and field enclosures to monitor survival of the freeze-tolerant wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) during the unusually cold winter of 2013-2014. We experimentally manipulated snow cover to determine the effect of snow removal on winter survival. In addition, we placed a group of untracked frogs at locations used by tracked frogs prior to long-distance late fall movement to investigate whether late fall movement entailed survival consequences. Winter survival was highest (75.3 %) among frogs at post-movement locations that received natural snow cover. The odds of surviving the winter for frogs in the snow removal treatment was only 21.6 % that of frogs in the natural snow treatment. Likewise, paired frogs placed at pre-fall movement locations had only 35.1 % the odds of surviving as tracked frogs at post-fall movement locations. A comparison of a priori models that included microhabitat conditions measured at wood frog overwintering locations revealed that the minimum temperature experienced and the depth of the frog in the substrate explained additional variation in winter survival. Our results suggest that acute exposure to lethal temperature conditions is the most likely cause of mortality during this study, rather than energy exhaustion or desiccation. They also demonstrate the importance of snow cover to the winter survival of wood frogs. PMID:26497126

  14. Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub.

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Kwit; Douglas J. Levey; Cathryn H. Greenberg; Scott F. Pearson; John P. McCarty; Sarah Sargent

    2004-01-10

    Kwit, C., D. J. Levey; C. H. Greenberg, S. F. Pearson, J.P. McCarty, and S. Sargent. Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub. Oecologia. 139:30-34. Abstract: We tested the hypothesis that winter removal rates of fruits of wax myrtle, Myrica cerifera, are higher in colder winters. Over a 9-year period, we monitored M. cerifera fruit crops in 13 0.1-ha study plots in South Carolina, U.S.A. Peak ripeness occurred in November, whereas peak removal occurred in the coldest months, December and January. Mean time to fruit removal within study plots was positively correlated with mean winter temperatures, thereby supporting our hypothesis. This result, combined with the generally low availability of winter arthropods, suggests that fruit abundance may play a role in determining winter survivorship and distribution of permanent resident and short-distance migrant birds. From the plant's perspective, it demonstrates inter-annual variation in the temporal component of seed dispersal, with possible consequences for post-dispersal seed and seedling ecology.

  15. Recurring Cold Winters over the Gulf Stream and Implications for Northern Hemisphere Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strey, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    As polar amplification of climate warming continues, the potential for increased blocking patterns in the Northern Hemisphere jet stream in conjunction with Arctic climate change exists. During such blocking events the Gulf Stream may be exposed to repeated Cold Air Outbreak (CAO) events, especially during winter. Hypothesizing, based upon basic physical and thermodynamic properties of seawater, one would expect increased CAO events to lead alteration of key characteristics of the Gulf Stream. As the Gulf Stream is a well-known participant in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and the Gulf Stream feeds the North Atlantic Current into the Arctic Ocean, interesting consequences to alterations of this local system into the large-scale general climate circulation are expected. This study uses CESM's POP to examine 30 years of CAO intensive winters alongside 30 years of repeated winter warm events to quantify potential subsequent changes in the AMOC and North Atlantic Arctic Ocean inflow.

  16. Heat production in cold and long scotophase acclimated and winter acclimatized rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haim, A.; Fourie, F. Le R.

    1980-09-01

    Heat production by means of oxygen consumptionVo2 (at Ta = 6° C, 25° C, 30° C, and 32° C) and non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) were studied in individuals of a diurnal rodent ( Rhabdomys pumilio) and a nocturnal rodent ( Praomys natalensis). The studied mice were acclimated to cold at Ta=8°C with a photoperiod of LD 12:12. On the otherhand specimens of these two species were acclimated at Ta=25°C with a long scotophase LD8:16. The results were compared with a control group (Ta=25° C, LD 12:12) and winter acclimatized individuals of both species.Vo2 in cold acclimated mice of both species was significantly increased when compared to the control group and was even higher than the winter acclimatized group when measured below the lower critical temperature. Long scotophase acclimated mice of both species also increased their oxygen consumption significantly when compared to the control group. NST was significantly increased in long scotophase acclimated mice from both species when compared to the control group. The results of this study indicate that the effects of acclimation to long scotophase are similar to those of cold acclimation. As changes in photoperiod are regular, it may be assumed that heat production mechanisms in acclimatization to winter will respond to changes in photoperiodicity.

  17. How predictable is the winter extremely cold days over temperate East Asia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Skillful seasonal prediction of the number of extremely cold day (NECD) has considerable benefits for climate risk management and economic planning. Yet, predictability of NECD associated with East Asia winter monsoon remains largely unexplored. The present work estimates the NECD predictability in temperate East Asia (TEA, 30°-50°N, 110°-140°E) where the current dynamical models exhibit limited prediction skill. We show that about 50 % of the total variance of the NECD in TEA region is likely predictable, which is estimated by using a physics-based empirical (P-E) model with three consequential autumn predictors, i.e., developing El Niño/La Niña, Eurasian Arctic Ocean temperature anomalies, and geopotential height anomalies over northern and eastern Asia. We find that the barotropic geopotential height anomaly over Asia can persist from autumn to winter, thereby serving as a predictor for winter NECD. Further analysis reveals that the sources of the NECD predictability and the physical basis for prediction of NECD are essentially the same as those for prediction of winter mean temperature over the same region. This finding implies that forecasting seasonal mean temperature can provide useful information for prediction of extreme cold events. Interpretation of the lead-lag linkages between the three predictors and the predictand is provided for stimulating further studies.

  18. Links between solar wind variations, the global electric circuit, and winter cyclone vorticity, and possibly to cold winters in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    There are a number of inputs to the atmosphere and the climate system that are modulated by solar activity that have their only common feature the modulation of the ionosphere-earth current density (Jz) in the global electric circuit, and to which it has now been shown there are small atmospheric responses in winter storm vorticity, surface pressure, and cloud cover. Similar responses are found to internal atmospheric inputs that modulate Jz. An inductive mechanism for initial storm electrification is described that responds to Jz and provides space charge for aerosol particles and droplets throughout the updraft region. The charge on droplets and aerosol particles, by the process of charge modulation of aerosol scavenging (CMAS), increases condensation nuclei concentrations and shifts their distributions to smaller average sizes. This produces smaller and more numerous droplets, and as shown by Rosenfeld et al (2008), delays initial precipitation and increases ice production and the vigor of the storm updraft. For baroclinic storms the additional latent heat release and updraft velocity increases storm vorticity. The result depends on both aerosol characteristics and the Jz variation. The cumulative effect of winter storm intensification, for example in the Icelandic Low cyclogenesis region, responding to Jz changes, is to increase blocking in the Atlantic Ocean. Such blocking reduces the flow of relatively warm moist ocean air onto Europe, while increasing the incidence of outbreaks of cold, dry, Arctic air. The possibility is examined that increases in cosmic ray flux and in Jz, at times of decadal and longer minima in solar activity, contributes to the changes in atmospheric circulation and the resulting unusually severe winters in the UK and Europe such as have occurred during extended solar minima in the late 17th century and early 21st century.

  19. What caused the recent ``Warm Arctic, Cold Continents'' trend pattern in winter temperatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lantao; Perlwitz, Judith; Hoerling, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of rapid Arctic warming in recent decades has coincided with unusually cold winters over Northern Hemisphere continents. It has been speculated that this "Warm Arctic, Cold Continents" trend pattern is due to sea ice loss. Here we use multiple models to examine whether such a pattern is indeed forced by sea ice loss specifically and by anthropogenic forcing in general. While we show much of Arctic amplification in surface warming to result from sea ice loss, we find that neither sea ice loss nor anthropogenic forcing overall yield trends toward colder continental temperatures. An alternate explanation of the cooling is that it represents a strong articulation of internal atmospheric variability, evidence for which is derived from model data, and physical considerations. Sea ice loss impact on weather variability over the high-latitude continents is found, however, to be characterized by reduced daily temperature variability and fewer cold extremes.

  20. Changes in winter cold surges over Southeast China: 1961 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Tinghai; Chen, Deliang; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Linderholm, Hans W.; Zhou, Tianjun

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigates the overall changes in occurrences of winter cold surges over Southeast China for the period 1961-2012, using instrumental observations, reanalysis and model simulation datasets. Based on objectively defined criteria, cold surges were classified into 3 types according to their dynamical origin as inferred from daily evolution patterns of surface pressure systems with a focus on the Siberian High (SH): type A with an amplification of a quasi-stationary SH associated with high-pressure anomalies over the Ural mountains, type B with a developing SH associated with fast traveling upper-level waves, and type C with a high-pressure originated in the Arctic. Examination of the long-term change in cold surge occurrences shows different interdecadal variations among the 3 types. During 1961-2012, type A events (37.8%) decreased, while type B events, accounting for the majority (52.5%) of total winter cold surges, increased slightly. The contribution by type C to the total occurrence of the cold surges was small (8.8%) compared to that of A and B, but it became more frequent in the latest decade, related to the tendency of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) being more in its negative phase. Overall, we found slightly increased occurrences of cold surges over Southeast China since the early 1980s, despite the weakened SH intensity and warmer mean temperature compared to previous decades. The climate model projections of the phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) suggests similar trend in the late 21st century under warmer climate.

  1. Costs of leaf reinforcement in response to winter cold in evergreen species.

    PubMed

    González-Zurdo, Patricia; Escudero, Alfonso; Babiano, Josefa; García-Ciudad, Antonia; Mediavilla, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    The competitive equilibrium between deciduous and evergreen plant species to a large extent depends on the intensity of the reduction in carbon gain undergone by evergreen leaves, associated with the leaf traits that confer resistance to stressful conditions during the unfavourable part of the year. This study explores the effects of winter harshness on the resistance traits of evergreen leaves. Leaf mass per unit area (LMA), leaf thickness and the concentrations of fibre, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), soluble protein, chlorophyll and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined in three evergreen and two deciduous species along a winter temperature gradient. In the evergreen species, LMA, thickness, and P and structural carbohydrate concentrations increased with the decrease in winter temperatures. Nitrogen and lignin concentrations did not show definite patterns in this regard. Chlorophyll, soluble proteins and Rubisco decreased with the increase in winter harshness. Our results suggest that an increase in LMA and in the concentration of structural carbohydrates would be a requirement for the leaves to cope with low winter temperatures. The evergreen habit would be associated with higher costs at cooler sites, because the cold resistance traits imply additional maintenance costs and reduced N allocation to the photosynthetic machinery, associated with structural reinforcement at colder sites.

  2. A physical analysis of the severe 2013/2014 cold winter in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Zhang, Xuebin

    2015-10-01

    The severe 2013/2014 cold winter has been examined in the context of the previous 55 winters using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data for the period 1960-2014. North America is dominated by pronounced cold anomalies over the Great Plains and Great Lakes in December 2013 and February 2014 but exhibits an east-west contrast pattern with warm anomalies over most of the North American West in January 2014. A relevant temperature index, defined as land surface temperature anomalies averaged over (40°-60°N, 105°-80°W), reveals a warming trend as well as interannual variability with a significant power peak of 6.0 years. While 2013/2014 was the second coldest winter during 1960-2014, it is the coldest one in the linearly detrended series, with a negative anomaly of 2.63 standard deviations. This indicates that the long-term warming has made the 2013/2014 winter less severe than it could have been. The temperature and circulation variability in association with the zonally symmetric variability of the polar vortex projects weakly on the corresponding anomalies in the 2013/2014 winter, whereas the variability associated with the principal mode of North American surface temperature projects strongly on the corresponding anomalies in the winter. This mode is associated with a sea surface temperature (SST) pattern of significant anomalies over the North Pacific and North Atlantic middle and high latitudes. The anomalous atmospheric circulation shows an anticyclonic anomaly over the Gulf of Alaska-Bering Sea and a cyclonic anomaly downstream over North America. It bears resemblance to the North Pacific Oscillation/Western Pacific pattern and drives the SST in the North Pacific. Over western-central Canada and the northern U.S., below-average heights are associated with above-normal precipitation, implying enhanced upward vertical motion and variation of local cloud forcing, leading to a variation of the surface energy budget dominated by

  3. Winter cold of eastern continental boundaries induced by warm ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Kaspi, Yohai; Schneider, Tapio

    2011-03-31

    In winter, northeastern North America and northeastern Asia are both colder than other regions at similar latitudes. This has been attributed to the effects of stationary weather systems set by elevated terrain (orography), and to a lack of maritime influences from the prevailing westerly winds. However, the differences in extent and orography between the two continents suggest that further mechanisms are involved. Here we show that this anomalous winter cold can result in part from westward radiation of large-scale atmospheric waves--nearly stationary Rossby waves--generated by heating of the atmosphere over warm ocean waters. We demonstrate this mechanism using simulations with an idealized general circulation model, with which we show that the extent of the cold region is controlled by properties of Rossby waves, such as their group velocity and its dependence on the planetary rotation rate. Our results show that warm ocean waters contribute to the contrast in mid-latitude winter temperatures between eastern and western continental boundaries not only by warming western boundaries, but also by cooling eastern boundaries.

  4. Extremely cold events and sudden air temperature drops during winter season in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crhová, Lenka; Valeriánová, Anna; Holtanová, Eva; Müller, Miloslav; Kašpar, Marek; Stříž, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Today a great attention is turned to analysis of extreme weather events and frequency of their occurrence under changing climate. In most cases, these studies are focused on extremely warm events in summer season. However, extremely low values of air temperature during winter can have serious impacts on many sectors as well (e.g. power engineering, transportation, industry, agriculture, human health). Therefore, in present contribution we focus on extremely and abnormally cold air temperature events in winter season in the Czech Republic. Besides the seasonal extremes of minimum air temperature determined from station data, the standardized data with removed annual cycle are used as well. Distribution of extremely cold events over the season and the temporal evolution of frequency of occurrence during the period 1961-2010 are analyzed. Furthermore, the connection of cold events with extreme sudden temperature drops is studied. The extreme air temperature events and events of extreme sudden temperature drop are assessed using the Weather Extremity Index, which evaluates the extremity (based on return periods) and spatial extent of the meteorological extreme event of interest. The generalized extreme value distribution parameters are used to estimate return periods of daily temperature values. The work has been supported by the grant P209/11/1990 funded by the Czech Science Foundation.

  5. Windowpane flounder (Scophthalmus aquosus) and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) responses to cold temperature extremes in a Northwest Atlantic estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilber, Dara H.; Clarke, Douglas G.; Alcoba, Catherine M.; Gallo, Jenine

    2016-01-01

    The effect of climate variability on flatfish includes not only the effects of warming on sensitive life history stages, but also impacts from more frequent or unseasonal extreme cold temperatures. Cold weather events can affect the overwintering capabilities of flatfish near their low temperature range limits. We examined the responses of two flatfish species, the thin-bodied windowpane (Scophthalmus aquosus) and cold-tolerant winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus), to variable winter temperatures in a Northwest Atlantic estuary using abundance and size data collected during a monitoring study, the Aquatic Biological Survey, conducted from 2002 to 2010. Winter and spring abundances of small (50 to 120 mm total length) juvenile windowpane were positively correlated with adult densities (spawning stock) and fall temperatures (thermal conditions experienced during post-settlement development for the fall-spawned cohort) of the previous year. Windowpane abundances in the estuary were significantly reduced and the smallest size class was nearly absent after several consecutive years with cold (minimum temperatures < 1 °C) winters. Interannual variation in winter flounder abundances was unrelated to the severity of winter temperatures. A Paulik diagram illustrates strong positive correlations between annual abundances of sequential winter flounder life history stages (egg, larval, Age-1 juvenile, and adult male) within the estuary, reflecting residency within the estuary through their first year of life. Temperature variables representing conditions during winter flounder larval and post-settlement development were not significant factors in multiple regression models exploring factors that affect juvenile abundances. Likewise, densities of predators known to consume winter flounder eggs and/or post-settlement juveniles were not significantly related to interannual variation in winter flounder juvenile abundances. Colder estuarine temperatures through the

  6. Persistent Volcanic Forcing of Severe Cold Winters in Ireland, 430-1650 CE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, F.; Stine, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new record of the occurrence of severe cold events from 430 to 1650 CE derived from writings of medieval Irish scribes. These sources, collectively known as the Irish Annals, represent annual chronicles of important events occurring in the vicinity of major monasteries throughout Ireland. The Irish Annals represent a uniquely homogenous historical record for climate reconstruction because, unlike almost any other European historical archive of this era, records were maintained with great continuity for a common purpose and in a common format at effectively annual resolution for over 1000 years, including the period of the "Dark Ages" after the fall of Rome when comparable sources elsewhere in Europe are scarce. We analyzed over 36,000 individual written entries from 22 major chronicle sources (and several minor sources) and identified all references to cold events, amounting to a total of 70 such events, after exclusion of 13 events deemed historically unreliable (e.g. exaggerated or fabricated). The majority of cold events are reported in the sources as occurring during the winter season. A characteristic example of a written record of severe winter cold occurrence that is considered to be fully historically reliable is the following: Abnormal ice and much snow from the Epiphany [January 6th, Julian Calendar] to Shrovetide. The Boyne and other rivers were crossed dry-footed; lakes likewise… (Source: Annals of Ulster for 818 CE). We find a strong correspondence between cold event occurrence and the record of explosive volcanism derived from sulphate deposition in the GISP2 ice core. We find that 37 of 69 or 53.6% of cold events (excluding 1 cold event at 586 CE for which no GISP2 data is available) correspond with one or more high-SO4 events in the GISP2, a correspondence which we find to be significant at the 99.7% confidence level. Explosive volcanic eruptions are generally understood to produce cooling in the northeastern Atlantic during the

  7. Dynamical and thermodynamical analysis of the South China Sea winter cold tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Bijoy; Tkalich, Pavel; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Fricot, Bastien; Mas, Juliette

    2015-12-01

    Spatial distribution of the South China Sea (SCS) surface temperature shows strong cold anomalies over the Sunda Shelf during the boreal winter season. The band of low sea surface temperature (SST) region located south/southeast of Vietnam is called as the winter cold tongue (CT) in the SCS. Using observational and re-analysis datasets a comprehensive investigation of the dynamical and thermodynamical processes associated with the evolution of SCS CT is performed in this study. The role and relative importance of wind-driven ocean transports, air-sea heat fluxes and oceanic processes are explored. The north-south Sverdrup transport demonstrates strong southward transport during the northeast monsoon period aiding the SST cooling by bringing relatively cold water from the north. The zonal and meridional Ekman transports exhibit relatively weak westward and northward transports to the CT region during this period. The study suggests that wind-driven ocean transports have a significant role in regulating the shape and spatial extent of the CT. The heat budget analysis revealed that net surface heat flux decrease during the northeast monsoon acts as the primary cooling mechanism responsible for the development of the SCS CT, while the horizontal advection of cold water by the western boundary current along the coast of Vietnam plays a secondary role. The wintertime SST anomalies over the CT region are significantly linked to the Nino3 index. Most of the warming/cooling events in the SST anomalies coincide with the El Nino/La Nina phenomena in the Pacific Ocean.

  8. Dynamical and thermodynamical analysis of the South China Sea winter cold tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Bijoy; Tkalich, Pavel; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Fricot, Bastien; Mas, Juliette

    2016-09-01

    Spatial distribution of the South China Sea (SCS) surface temperature shows strong cold anomalies over the Sunda Shelf during the boreal winter season. The band of low sea surface temperature (SST) region located south/southeast of Vietnam is called as the winter cold tongue (CT) in the SCS. Using observational and re-analysis datasets a comprehensive investigation of the dynamical and thermodynamical processes associated with the evolution of SCS CT is performed in this study. The role and relative importance of wind-driven ocean transports, air-sea heat fluxes and oceanic processes are explored. The north-south Sverdrup transport demonstrates strong southward transport during the northeast monsoon period aiding the SST cooling by bringing relatively cold water from the north. The zonal and meridional Ekman transports exhibit relatively weak westward and northward transports to the CT region during this period. The study suggests that wind-driven ocean transports have a significant role in regulating the shape and spatial extent of the CT. The heat budget analysis revealed that net surface heat flux decrease during the northeast monsoon acts as the primary cooling mechanism responsible for the development of the SCS CT, while the horizontal advection of cold water by the western boundary current along the coast of Vietnam plays a secondary role. The wintertime SST anomalies over the CT region are significantly linked to the Nino3 index. Most of the warming/cooling events in the SST anomalies coincide with the El Nino/La Nina phenomena in the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Nitrogen oxides measurements in an Amazon site and enhancements associated with a cold front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Gatti, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A.; Silva Dias, M. A. F.; Freitas, E. D.

    2004-05-01

    An intensive atmospheric chemistry study was carried out in a pristine Amazonian forest site (Balbina), Amazonas state, Brazil during the 2001 wet season, as part of the LBA/CLAIRE 2001 (The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia/Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment) field campaign. Measurements of nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) were performed simultaneously with aerosol particles and black carbon concentrations and meteorological parameters observations. Very low trace gases and aerosol concentrations are typically observed at this pristine tropical site. During the measurement period, there was a three-day episode of enhancement of NO2 and black carbon concentration. NO2 concentration reached a maximum value of 4 ppbv, which corresponds to three times the background concentration observed for this site. Black carbon concentration increased from the approximated 100 ng/m3 average value to a 200 ng/m3 maximum during the same period. Biomass burning spots were detected southward, between latitudes 15 to 10° S, 5-6 days before this episode from GOES-8 WF_ABBA (Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm). An atmospheric numerical simulation of the whole measurement period was carried out using the RAMS model coupled to a biomass burning emission and transport model. The simulation results pictured a smoke transport event from Central Brazil associated to an approach of a mid-latitude cold front, reinforcing the hypothesis of biomass burning products being long-range transported from the South by the cold front and crossing the Equator. This transport event shows how the pristine atmosphere pattern in Amazonia is impacted by biomass burning emissions from sites very far away.

  10. Research aircraft observations of the mesoscale and microscale structure of a cold front over the eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of an oceanic cold front is described on the basis of research aircraft observations taken during the Ocean Storms field experiment. Synoptic and mesoscale analyses compare the structure of an upper-level jet-front system observed slightly downstream from the wind speed maximum to its structure in the upstream entrance region. Stratospheric potential vorticity and ozone were found within the frontal zone down to about 800 mb. Microscale analyses of the front near the sea surface were carried out for a portion of the front having the signature of a 'rope' cloud in satellite imagery. A narrow (less than 1 km) zone of upward motion (about 4 m/s) and of horizontal shear (about 0.01/s) characterized the front near the surface. Significant alongfront variability was found, including lateral displacements in the frontal zone where there were weaker updrafts.

  11. Does winter warming enhance cold CO2 emission from temperate continental soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurganova, Irina; Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Khoroshaev, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    In subboreal and temperate regions, the cold season generally lasts more than 3 months of the year, influencing the carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. The permanent snow pack plays an important role in the functioning of the ecosystem, especially in temperate continental regions, preventing frost penetration into the soil. The extent and duration of the permanent snow pack are predicted to decrease markedly in transitional seasons for many boreal and subboreal regions during the next 50 years. This study focused on: (i) assessment of current winter climate trends in the Moscow region pertaining to the continental temperate region, (ii) comparison of soil temperature regimes at different snow pack depths, (iii) estimation of cold CO2 fluxes from soils under various frozen regime and vegetation cover, and (iv) the contribution of freezing-thawing events to the total cold CO2 emission from soils in the temperate continental region. An experiment with regulated snow cover was established on grassland and bare soil (Luvisols Haplic, Moscow region, 54o50'N, 37o36'E; continental temperate climate). The following winter scenarios were foreseen: (1) reference plot, designated "Ref", with natural depth of snow cover, (2) no-frost, "NoFr" (simulation of deep snow cover using artificial heat insulation material), and (3) no-snow, "NoSn" (without snow cover). We observed inverse trends as the air temperature increased and precipitation decreased, which resulted in a 1-month prolongation of the snow-free period and a decrease in the snow pack over the last 20 years. Soil freezing significantly reduced the cold CO2 fluxes from soils: by 10-70% in the bare areas and by up to double that amount in the grass plots. There were six freezing-thawing cycles (FTC; 1-7 weeks' duration) from October 2014 to early April 2015, which induced CO2 emission pulses of varying intensity. The highest peaks of CO2 emission rate (3-30-fold increase compared to the pre-thawing period) were

  12. Geographic variation in Bar-headed geese Anser indicus: connectivity of wintering and breeding grounds across a broad front

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takekawa, John Y.; Heath, Shane R.; Douglas, David C.; Perry, William M.; Javed, Salim; Newman, Scott H.; Suwal, Rajendra N.; Rahman, Asad R.; Choudhury, Binod C.; Prosser, Diann J.; Yan, Baoping; Hou, Yuansheng; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Natsagdorj, Tseveenmayadag; Bishop, Charles M.; Butler, Patrick J.; Frappell, Peter B.; Milsom, William K.; Scott, Graham R.; Hawkes, Lucy A.; Wikelski, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The connectivity and frequency of exchange between sub-populations of migratory birds is integral to understanding population dynamics over the entire species' range. True geese are highly philopatric and acquire lifetime mates during the winter, suggesting that the number of distinct sub-populations may be related to the number of distinct wintering areas. In the Bar-headed Goose Anser indicus, a species found exclusively in Central Asia, the connectivity between breeding and wintering areas is not well known. Their migration includes crossing a broad front of the Himalaya Cordillera, a significant barrier to migration for most birds. Many Bar-headed Geese fly to breeding areas on the Tibetan-Qinghai Plateau (TQP), the highest plateau in the world. From 2005-2008, 60 Bar-headed Geese were captured and marked with satellite transmitters in Nepal (n = 2), India (n = 6), China (n = 29), and Mongolia (n = 23) to examine their migration and distribution. Distinct differences were observed in their migration corridors and timing of movements, including an apparent leap-frog migration pattern for geese from Mongolia. Measurements of geese from Mongolia were larger than their counterparts from China, providing some evidence of morphological differences. Alteration of habitats in China, including the warming effects of climate change on glaciers increasing runoff to TQP wetlands, may be changing goose migration patterns and timing. With the exception of one individual, all geese from Qinghai Lake, China wintered in the southern TQP near Lhasa, and their increasing numbers in that region may be related to the effects of climate change and agricultural development. Thus, our findings document both morphological and geographical variation in sub-populations of Bar-headed Geese, but their resilience to environmental change may be lost if migratory short-stopping results in larger congregations restricted to a smaller number of wintering areas.

  13. Spatial use by wintering greater white-fronted geese relative to a decade of habitat change in California's Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, J.T.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Orthmeyer, D.L.; Fleskes, J.P.; Yee, J.L.; Kruse, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recent habitat changes in California's Central Valley on wintering Pacific greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) by comparing roost-to-feed distances, distributions, population range sizes, and habitat use during 1987-1990 and 1998-2000. These habitat changes included wetland restoration and agricultural land enhancement due to the 1990 implementation of the Central Valley Joint Venture, increased land area used for rice (Oryza sativa) production, and the practice of flooding, rather than burning, rice straw residues for decomposition because of burning restrictions enacted in 1991. Using radiotelemetry, we tracked 192 female geese and recorded 4,516 locations. Geese traveled shorter distances between roosting and feeding sites during 1998-2000 (24.2 ?? 2.2 km) than during 1987-1990 (32.5 ?? 3.4 km); distance traveled tended to decline throughout winter during both decades and varied among watershed basins. Population range size was smaller during 1998-2000 (3,367 km2) than during 1987-1990 (5,145 km2), despite a 2.2-fold increase in the size of the Pacific Flyway population of white-fronted geese during the same time period. The population range size also tended to increase throughout winter during both decades. Feeding and roosting distributions of geese also differed between decades; geese shifted into basins that had the greatest increases in the amount of area in rice production (i.e., American Basin) and out of other basins (i.e., Delta Basin). The use of rice habitat for roosting (1987-1990: 40%, 1998-2000: 54%) and feeding (1987-1990: 57%, 1998-2000: 72%) increased between decades, whereas use of wetlands declined for roosting (1987-1990: 36%, 1998-2000: 31%) and feeding (1987-1990: 22%, 1998-2000: 12%). Within postharvested rice habitats, geese roosted and fed primarily in burned rice fields during 1987-1990 (roost: 43%, feed: 34%), whereas they used flooded rice fields during 1998-2000 (roost: 78%, feed: 64

  14. Efficiency of cold hardiness induction by desiccation stress in four winter cereals.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Y; Andrews, C J

    1984-11-01

    A number of defined desiccation treatments without low temperature exposure were able to induce freezing tolerance in 20 cultivars of winter cereals. A maximal degree of freezing tolerance was induced in epicotyls at 24 degrees C in 24 hours at 40% relative humidity in rye and wheat, 7 days at 54% RH in barley, and 4 days at 70% RH in oats. Freezing tolerance was not correlated to water content of the plants after desiccation treatment but was related to the genetic capacity of the cultivars to frost harden. Levels of freezing tolerance induced by desiccation were similar to those induced by cold acclimation in rye and wheat, but considerably less in barley and oats. This is associated with a more rapid desiccation injury in barley and oats, precluding the completion of the hardening process. PMID:16663889

  15. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  16. Chemical characteristics of PM2.5 and organic aerosol source analysis during cold front episodes in Hong Kong, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Chun; Yu, Jian Zhen; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Yuan, Zibing; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Huang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of long-range transport (LRT) episodes brought in by cold front on the concentration levels of PM2.5, major aerosol constituents, organic tracers, and PM2.5 source characteristics in Hong Kong, China. PM2.5 samples were collected during January-March 2004 and January-March 2005 and analyzed for major constituents and organic tracer species. Synoptic weather conditions and characteristics of common air pollutants were used to categorize the sampling days to three groups, i.e., groups mainly affected by local emissions or regional transport (RT) or cold front LRT. Concentrations of PM2.5 mass and its major constituents during cold-front days were lower than those during RT-dominated periods but higher than those during local emissions-dominated periods. Source apportionment using chemical mass balance (CMB) indicates that vehicular exhaust was a significant primary OC source of mainly local emissions, making average contributions of 1.82, 1.50, and 2.39 μg C m- 3 to OC in the local, LRT, and RT sample groups, respectively. During cold front periods, primary OC concentrations attributable to biomass burning and coal combustion were approximately triple and double, respectively, those during periods dominated by local emissions. Suspended dust, a minor primary OC source (0.24-0.40 μg C m- 3), also showed increased contribution during cold fronts. The unexplained OC by CMB (i.e., total OC minus apportioned primary OC), an approximate indicator for secondary OC, was a significant fraction of OC (> 48%) and its mass concentration was much higher in the cold front LRT and RT sample groups (6.37 and 9.48 μg C m- 3) than in the local sample group (3.8 μg C m- 3). Source analysis as well as tracer concentration variation shows that biomass burning OC and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were correlated, suggesting biomass burning as a significant contributor to WSOC.

  17. Storms or cold fronts? What is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    On Friday, 7 March 2009, a 200 m-long section of the tourist pier in Puerto Colombia collapsed under the impact of the waves generated by a cold front in the area. The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms on extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean to determine the degree of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed and the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the wave's height; therefore, it is necessary to definitively know the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. Using Gumbel's extreme value methodology, the significant height values for the study area were calculated. The methodology was evaluated using data from the re-analysis of the spectral NOAA Wavewatch III (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombia Caribbean coast (continental and insular) of the last 15 years. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area formed by Baja Guajira, Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena, the strong influence of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. On the other hand, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast, from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá, even though extreme waves are lower than in the previous regions, extreme waves are dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from that in the continental area due to its geographic location. The wave heights in the extreme regime are

  18. Characterization and effects of cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Coast and their relationship to extreme wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Otero, L. J.; Restrepo, J. C.; Ruiz, J.; Cadena, M.

    2013-07-01

    Extreme ocean waves in the Caribbean Sea are commonly related to the effects of storms and hurricanes during the months of June through November. The collapse of 200 m of the Puerto Colombia pier in March 2009 revealed the effects of meteorological phenomena other than storms and hurricanes that may be influencing the extreme wave regime in the Colombian Caribbean. The marked seasonality of these atmospheric fronts was established by analyzing the meteorological-marine reports of Instituto de Hidrología, Meteorología y Estudios Ambientales of Colombia (IDEAM, based on its initials in Spanish) and Centro de Investigación en Oceanografía y Meteorología of Colombia (CIOH, based on its initials in Spanish). The highest occurrences were observed during the months of January, February, and March, with 6 fronts occurring per year. An annual trend was not observed, although the highest number of fronts occurred in 2010 (20 in total). An annual strong relationship between the maximum average wave values and the cold fronts, in the central zone of the Colombian Caribbean during the first three months of the year was established. In addition, the maximum values of the significant height produced by the passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that, there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the purpose of informing the design of

  19. SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY GROUPS AND THEIR PERTURBING DISK GALAXIES: AN X-RAY, OPTICAL, AND RADIO CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Di Gesu, Laura; Ghizzardi, Simona; Rossetti, Mariachiara; Giacintucci, Simona; Girardi, Marisa; Roediger, Elke; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Buote, David A.; Humphrey, Philip J.; Eckert, Dominique; Ettori, Stefano; Mathews, William G.

    2013-06-10

    We present a combined X-ray, optical, and radio analysis of the galaxy group IC 1860 using the currently available Chandra and XMM data, multi-object spectroscopy data from the literature, and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data. The Chandra and XMM imaging and spectroscopy reveal two surface brightness discontinuities at 45 and 76 kpc shown to be consistent with a pair of cold fronts. These features are interpreted as due to sloshing of the central gas induced by an off-axis minor merger with a perturber. This scenario is further supported by the presence of a peculiar velocity of the central galaxy IC 1860 and the identification of a possible perturber in the optically disturbed spiral galaxy IC 1859. The identification of the perturber is consistent with the comparison with numerical simulations of sloshing. The GMRT observation at 325 MHz shows faint, extended radio emission contained within the inner cold front, as seen in some galaxy clusters hosting diffuse radio mini-halos. However, unlike mini-halos, no particle reacceleration is needed to explain the extended radio emission, which is consistent with aged radio plasma redistributed by the sloshing. There is a strong analogy between the X-ray and optical phenomenology of the IC 1860 group and that of two other groups, NGC 5044 and NGC 5846, showing cold fronts. The evidence presented in this paper is among the strongest supporting the currently favored model of cold-front formation in relaxed objects and establishes the group scale as a chief environment for studying this phenomenon.

  20. Numerical modeling study of boundary-layer ventilation by a cold front over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí-Panareda, Anna; Gray, Suzanne L.; Methven, John

    2005-09-01

    Ventilation of the boundary layer has an important effect on regional air quality and the long-range transport of pollutants and their chemistry, as well as climate change. It is very difficult to quantify the ventilation of the polluted boundary-layer air in field experiments because sources are not well known and there are many mechanisms that can contribute to the ventilation. In frontal cyclones ventilation can occur by advection by the large-scale flow, slantwise and upright convection, and turbulent mixing. In order to quantify and partition the different mechanisms, numerical modeling experiments have been performed for a cold front that passed over Europe during the EXPORT (European Export of Precursors and Ozone by long-Range Transport) field experiment. The numerical experiments have been performed by initializing the Met Office Unified Model with passive tracers with two different lifetimes which can be used to mimic a wide range of pollutants and estimate the age of the ventilated air. The spatial distribution of the estimated age of air is consistent with Lagrangian trajectory results and observations. Budget calculations over the model domain show that 33% of the longer-lived tracer is exported from the boundary layer to the free troposphere by advection only and 68% by advection, convection and mixing. Therefore much younger air is found in and above the warm conveyor belt than would be found if advection was the only transport mechanism. The results also emphasize the importance of convection and mixing acting together, particularly for short-lived tracers.

  1. Lesser White-fronted (Anser erythropus) and Greater White-fronted (A. albifrons) Geese wintering in Greek wetlands are not threatened by Pb through shot ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aloupi, Maria; Kazantzidis, Savas; Akriotis, Triantaphyllos; Bantikou, Evangelia; Hatzidaki, Victoria-Ourania

    2015-09-15

    Fecal lead (Pb) levels were investigated in the threatened European population of the Lesser White-fronted Goose (LWfG, Anser erythropus) and of the non-threatened Greater White-fronted Goose (GWfG, Anser albifrons) wintering in two wetland areas in northern Greece in order to assess the potential risk from Pb exposure. Fecal, soil and food plant samples were analyzed. Levels of Pb were normalized using Al concentrations in order to separate the effect of possible ingestion of Pb shot from that of soil or sediment accidentally ingested with food. All concentrations are expressed on a dry weight basis. Geometric means of Pb content in the feces of LWfG were 6.24 mg/kg at Evros Delta and 7.34 mg/kg at Lake Kerkini (maximum values of 28.61 mg/kg and 36.68 mg/kg, respectively); for fecal samples of GWfG geometric means were 2.39 mg/kg at Evros Delta and 6.90 mg/kg at Kerkini (corresponding maximum values of 25.09 mg/kg and 42.26 mg/kg). Soil Pb was in the range of 5.2-60.2mg/kg (geometric mean = 22.6 mg/kg) for the Evros Delta and between 13.4 and 64.9 mg/kg (geometric mean=28.1mg/kg) for Kerkini. A general linear model fitted to the data showed that Pb levels were very closely dependent on Al levels in the feces from both species and at both sites indicating soil or sediment were the only significant source of Pb; species and site, as well as their interaction, were not statistically significant factors. For both species and at both sites exposure to Pb was evidently very mild and the observed levels of Pb were well below the proposed thresholds for lethal or sublethal effects of Pb poisoning. Soil ingestion appeared to gradually increase from October to December for LWfG at Kerkini, corresponding to a gradual depletion of their food source. PMID:25965041

  2. Warm pool/cold tongue El Niño and Indian winter Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimri, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent global changes in the hydrological, glaciological, agricultural, socio-economic studies, etc., particularly, over the northern Indian region, Indian winter (December, January, February—DJF) monsoon (IWM) has important role. Geographical positioning of the Indian subcontinent having mighty Himalayas in the north and surrounding ocean in the south makes assessment of IWM important and interesting to study. During IWM, the western Himalayas (WH) receives almost one-third of annual precipitation due to eastward moving extratropical cyclonic storms, western disturbances (WDs), embedded within the large scale subtropical westerly jet (SWJ). In addition, IWM is found to be in phase with the El Niño—Southern Oscillation (ENSO). With reference to the recent decade's finding of having different phases of El Niño- warm pool (WP) and cold tongue (CT)—it is imperative to see how these phases affect IWM. In the present study a simple mechanism between IWM with different phases of these El Niño and their relationship is studied and deliberated upon. WP and CT El Niño phase composites are prepared and their corresponding role in tandem with IWM is provided. It is found that during WP (CP) El Niño phase WH (foothill of the Indian Himalayan) region receives higher amount of winter precipitation. It is attributed to the fact that equatorial central Pacific warming makes more conducive proposition for intensification of the WDs and thus associated higher precipitation over western part of the Indian Himalayas. Northward shift of confluence over northern Atlantic region during WP El Niño phase dampens the SWJ leading to longer residence time for weather events—WDs—over the WH region. In addition, strengthening of Hadley cell leads to higher northward transport of moisture from the Indian Ocean region.

  3. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from

  4. Regional differences in major carbon emissions observed during FRAPPE (Front Range Air Pollution Photochemical Experiment) and WINTER (Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stell, M. H.; Campos, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sampling of coal powered power plant emission plumes during two NCAR airborne field campaigns using the NSF NCAR C-130, FRAPPE (Front Range Air Pollution Photochemical Experiment) and WINTER (Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity) revealed different plume composition in different areas of the continental United States. The FRAPPE campaign sampled along the Colorado Front Range and the WINTER campaign, based out of Virginia sampled along the East Coast. Analysis of the relative production of the three major carbon species, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane from power plant plumes sampled in both these campaigns will be compared to the emissions reported to the EPA by the power plants. Regional differences will be highlighted. Spatial distribution of the pollution plume will also be presented, looking at factors such as topographic barriers, and meteorological phenomena such as subsidence and wind advection. This analysis will take into account experimental condition differences such as the summer versus winter sampling and night/day.

  5. Link between anomalously cold winters in Russia and sea-ice decline in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    There were several anomalously cold winter weather regimes in Russia in the early 21st century. These regimes were usually associated with a blocking anticyclone south of the Barents Sea. Numerical simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) using prescribed sea-ice concentration (SIC) data for different periods during the last 50 years showed that a rapid sea-ice area decline in the Barents Sea in the last decade could bring about the formation of such a blocking anticyclone and cooling over northern Eurasia. The SIC reduction in the former period, from the second half of the 1960s to the first half of the 1990s, results in a weaker response of opposite sign. This suggests a nonlinear atmospheric circulation response to the SIC reduction in the Barents Sea, which has been previously found in the idealized AGCM simulations. An impact of the Barents Sea SIC reduction on the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), in particular, on the formation of the anomalously low NAO index, is found. The results indicate an important role that the Barents Sea, a region with the largest variability of the ocean-atmosphere heat exchange in the Arctic in wintertime, plays in generating anomalous weather regimes in Russia.

  6. Numerical Simulations of the Rapid Cyclogenesis Over Canada and Evolution of a Cold Front Observed on 25 -26 April 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Hann-Ming Henry

    1988-12-01

    The rapid development of a cyclone over Canada and a cold front over the United States were the major weather systems observed on 25-26 April 1979 during the period of SESAME-AVE (Severe Environment Storm and Mesoscale Experiment-Atmospheric Variability Experiment) III. The objectives of this study are two-fold; one is to investigate the mechanisms of this rapid cyclogenesis, the other is to discuss the synoptic- and meso-scale environment with the cold front. A regional scale prediction model, which is the quasi-Lagrangian nested model developed by Mathur (1983) and modified in this study, was used to achieve these objectives. FGGE (First GARP (Global Atmosphere Research Program) Global Experiment) level IIIb and IIb data were used as input and verification data for numerical simulations, and for a diagnostic study. There were two cyclones involved in the event over Canada (designated as cyclones A and B). Cyclone A was given rise as a shallow surface pressure low. As the incipient cyclone A was moving southeastward, a region of high potential vorticity in the upper- and mid-troposphere, representing the tropopause folding, closed in. As a result, horizontal advection of absolute vorticity as well as differential temperature advection increased over the center of cyclone A, making cyclone A more intense and deep in its vertical extent. On the other hand, cyclone B was born shallow and remained shallow until it merged with cyclone A. Before merging, it propagated northeastward within a zone of small Richardson number. Further, relative vorticity associated with it had its maximum at the level just above the planetary boundary layer. It is concluded that cyclone B was intensified by localized baroclinic instability. The evolution of these cyclones were well simulated even with a dry model, suggesting that condensation heating was not crucial for their development. The evolution of environments associated with the cold front was well predicted by the model in

  7. Creation and tidal advection of a cold salinity front in Storfjorden: 2. Supercooling induced by turbulent mixing of cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Skogseth, Ragnheid; Nilsen, Frank; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2013-08-01

    Measurements near the edge of fast ice in Freemansundet, Svalbard, reveal mixing processes associated with tidal advection of a sharp front in salinity, including possible supercooling induced by double diffusion in a fully turbulent water column. The front translated back and forth with the semidiurnal tide between an area of mobile (drifting) ice in Storfjorden proper, and the narrow sound covered by fast ice. Water on each side of the front was near its salinity-determined freezing temperature. Instruments deployed about 400 m into the sound from the fast ice edge measured current, temperature, conductivity, and turbulence quantities through several tidal cycles. Turbulence data illustrate that as the steep horizontal salinity (density) gradient advected past the measurement site, vertical shear near the fast-ice base induced marked flood/ebb asymmetry in turbulent mixing. As fresher water entered the sound on the flood phase, inward transport of denser water near the upper boundary was retarded, leading to statically unstable conditions and enhanced turbulence. The opposite occurred during ebb tide, as denser water underran lighter. Transient episodes of supercooling accompanied frontal passage on both flood and ebb phases. The most likely explanation for a zone of supercooled water within the strongly mixed frontal region is that during mixing of fresher, slightly warmer (but still at freezing) water from outside with saltier, colder water in the sound, the former constituent lost heat faster than gaining salt. This interpretation (differing turbulent diffusivities for heat and salt) challenges strict application of Reynolds analogy for highly turbulent shear flow.

  8. Evolution of cold-tolerant fungal symbionts permits winter fungiculture by leafcutter ants at the northern frontier of a tropical ant-fungus symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ulrich G; Mikheyev, Alexander S; Hong, Eunki; Sen, Ruchira; Warren, Dan L; Solomon, Scott E; Ishak, Heather D; Cooper, Mike; Miller, Jessica L; Shaffer, Kimberly A; Juenger, Thomas E

    2011-03-01

    The obligate mutualism between leafcutter ants and their Attamyces fungi originated 8 to 12 million years ago in the tropics, but extends today also into temperate regions in South and North America. The northernmost leafcutter ant Atta texana sustains fungiculture during winter temperatures that would harm the cold-sensitive Attamyces cultivars of tropical leafcutter ants. Cold-tolerance of Attamyces cultivars increases with winter harshness along a south-to-north temperature gradient across the range of A. texana, indicating selection for cold-tolerant Attamyces variants along the temperature cline. Ecological niche modeling corroborates winter temperature as a key range-limiting factor impeding northward expansion of A. texana. The northernmost A. texana populations are able to sustain fungiculture throughout winter because of their cold-adapted fungi and because of seasonal, vertical garden relocation (maintaining gardens deep in the ground in winter to protect them from extreme cold, then moving gardens to warmer, shallow depths in spring). Although the origin of leafcutter fungiculture was an evolutionary breakthrough that revolutionized the food niche of tropical fungus-growing ants, the original adaptations of this host-microbe symbiosis to tropical temperatures and the dependence on cold-sensitive fungal symbionts eventually constrained expansion into temperate habitats. Evolution of cold-tolerant fungi within the symbiosis relaxed constraints on winter fungiculture at the northern frontier of the leafcutter ant distribution, thereby expanding the ecological niche of an obligate host-microbe symbiosis. PMID:21368106

  9. 2009/2010 Eurasian Cold Winter and Loss of Arctic Sea-ice over Barents/Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, T.; Kim, B.; Kim, S.

    2012-12-01

    In 2009/2010 winter, a few extreme cold events and heavy snowfall occurred over central North America, north western Europe, and East Asia exerting a severe social and economic impacts. In this study, we performed modeling experiments to examine the role of substantially reduced Arctic sea-ice over Barents/Kara Sea on the 2009/2010 cold winters. Although several previous studies investigated cause of the extreme events and emphasized the large snow-covered area over Siberia in autumn 2009, we note that the area extent of Arctic sea-ice over Barents/Kara sea in autumn 2009 was anomalously low and the possible impact from Arctic for the extreme cold events has not been presented. To investigate the influence from the Arctic, we designed three model runs using Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). Each simulation differs by the prescribed surface boundary conditions: (a) CTRL - climatological seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice concentration (SIC) are prescribed everywhere, (b) EXP_65N - SST and SIC inside the Arctic circle (north of 65°N) are replaced by 2009/2010 values. Elsewhere, the climatology is used, (c) EXP_BK - Same with (b) except that SIC and SST are fixed only over Barents/Kara Sea where the sea-ice area dropped significantly in 2009/2010 winter. Model results from EXP_65N and EXP_BK commonly showed a large increase of air temperature in the lower troposphere where Arctic sea-ice showed a large reduction. Also, compared with the observation, model successfully captured thickened geopotential height in the Arctic and showed downstream wave propagation toward midlatitude. From the analysis, we reveal that this large dipolar Arctic-midlatitude teleconnection pattern in the upper troposphere easily propagate upward and played a role in the weakening of polar vortex. This is also confirmed in the observation. However, the timing of excitation of upward propagating wave in EXP_65N and EXP_BK were different and thus the timing of

  10. A cold inducible multidomain cystatin from winter wheat inhibits growth of the snow mold fungus, Microdochium nivale.

    PubMed

    Christova, Petya Koeva; Christov, Nikolai Kirilov; Imai, Ryozo

    2006-05-01

    A novel cold-induced cystatin cDNA clone (TaMDC1) was isolated from cold acclimated winter wheat crown tissue by using a macroarray-based differential screening method. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of a putative N-terminal secretory signal peptide of 37 amino acids and a mature protein (mTaMDC1) with a molecular mass of 23 kDa. The mTaMDC1 had a highly conserved N-terminal cystatin domain and a long C-terminal extension containing a second region, which exhibited partial similarity to the cystatin domain. The recombinant mTaMDC1 was purified from Escherichia coli and its cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity against papain was analyzed. The calculated Ki value of 5.8 x 10(-7) M is comparable to those reported for other phytocystatins. Northern and western blot analyses showed elevated expression of TaMDC1 mRNA and protein during cold acclimation of wheat. In addition to cold, accumulation of the TaMDC1 message was induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, salt and ABA treatment. Investigation of in vitro antifungal activity of mTaMDC1 showed strong inhibition on the mycelium growth of the snow mold fungus Microdochium nivale. Hyphae growth was totally inhibited in the presence of 50 mug/ml mTaMDC1 and morphological changes such as swelling, fragmentation and sporulation of the fungus were observed. The mechanisms of the in vitro antifungal effects and the possible involvement of TaMDC1 in cold induced snow mold resistance of winter wheat are discussed.

  11. 'Only old ladies would do that': age stigma and older people's strategies for dealing with winter cold.

    PubMed

    Day, Rosie; Hitchings, Russell

    2011-07-01

    Concerns over the welfare of older people in winter have led to interventions and advice campaigns meant to improve their ability to keep warm, but older people themselves are not always willing to follow these recommendations. In this paper we draw on an in-depth study that followed twenty one older person households in the UK over a cold winter and examined various aspects of their routine warmth-related practices at home and the rationales underpinning them. We find that although certain aspects of ageing did lead participants to feel they had changing warmth needs, their practices were also shaped by the problematic task of negotiating identities in the context of a wider stigmatisation of older age and an evident resistance to ageist discourses. After outlining the various ways in which this was manifest in our study, we conclude by drawing out the implications for future policy and research. PMID:21606000

  12. Extreme temperature contrast of the year 2012 in Greece: An exceptionally cold winter and a record breaking summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolika, Konstantia; Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Maheras, Panagiotis; Velikou, Kondylia

    2013-04-01

    During the past decade several regions all over Europe have experienced severe heat waves with serious social and environmental impacts. The year of 2003 was characterized by record breaking high temperatures for central Europe, while the year of 2007 was a remarkably warm year of the majority of the Eastern Mediterranean. During this year, three major heat waves were detected in Greece during summer and abnormally high temperatures were also observed through the cold season of 2007. It was found that the winter minimum temperatures were statistically more extreme than the summer maxima. Moreover, exceptionally high maximum and minimum temperatures occurred in November of 2010 affection the entire Greek region while September of the following year was also characterized by large departures of maximum temperatures from the long term mean values and the highest minimum temperature average in comparison to the reference period 1958-2000. The past year (2012) could also be characterized as a year of extremes. This time a temperature contrast was detected in the domain of study with a prolonged cold - season spell during winter and new record - breaking extreme maximum and minimum summer temperatures. More specifically it was found that the summer of 2012 was the warmest one since 1958. The whole season was characterized by long - lasting warm conditions with large departures from the long term (up to 4oC for Tmax) and this warming phenomenon was more intense during July and August. In contrast the winter season (December 2011 - February 2012) was found to be in the ten coldest winters of the last 55 years. The departures from the mean are lower than summer (1oC to 1.5oC negative anomalies) but most of the days were found to have lower Tmax, Tmin and Tmean values than the average daily temperatures of the period 1958-2000. Finally, it is worth mentioning that the year of 2012 was characterized by the highest annual temperature range reaching up to 26oC in several

  13. Long-term Trend of Cold Air Mass Amount below a Designated Potential Temperature in Northern and Southern Hemisphere Winters with 7 Different Reanalysis Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Y.; Abdillah, M. R.; Iwasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses that the hemispheric total cold air mass amount defined below a threshold potential temperature of 280 K is a good indicator of the long-term trend of climate change in the polar region. We demonstrate quantitative analyses of warming trend in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) winters, using 7 different reanalysis datasets (JRA-55, JRA-55C, JRA-55AMIP, ERA-interim, CFSR, JRA-25, NCEP-NCAR). Hemispheric total cold air mass amount in the NH winter exhibit a statistically significant decreasing trend in all reanalysis datasets at a rate about -1.37 to -0.77% per decade over the period 1959-2012 and at a rate about -1.57 to -0.82% per decade over 1980-2012. There is no statistically significant trend in the equatorward cold air mass flux across latitude of 45N, which is an indicator for hemispheric-scale cold air outbreak, over the period 1980-2012 except for NCEP-NCAR reanalysis dataset which shows substantial decreasing trend of about -3.28% per decade. The spatial distribution of the long-term trend of cold air mass amount in the NH winter is almost consistent among reanalysis datasets except for JRA-55AMIP over the period 1980-2012. Cold air mass amount increases over Central Siberia, Kamchatka peninsula, and Bering Sea, while it decreases over Norwegian Sea, Barents Sea, Kara Sea, Greenland, Canada, Northern part of United States, and East Asia. In the SH winter, on the other hand, there is a large discrepancy in hemispheric total cold air mass amount and equatorward cold air mass flux across latitude of 50S over the period 1980-2010 among reanalysis datasets. This result indicate that there is a large uncertainty in the long-term trend of cold air mass amount in the SH winter.

  14. IRREGULAR SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN THE NEARBY MERGING GROUPS NGC 7618 AND UGC 12491: EVIDENCE FOR KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roediger, E.; Kraft, R. P.; Machacek, M. E.; Forman, W. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.

    2012-08-01

    We present results from two {approx}30 ks Chandra observations of the hot atmospheres of the merging galaxy groups centered around NGC 7618 and UGC 12491. Our images show the presence of arc-like sloshing cold fronts (CFs) wrapped around each group center and {approx}100 kpc long spiral tails in both groups. Most interestingly, the CFs are highly distorted in both groups, exhibiting 'wings' along the fronts. These features resemble the structures predicted from non-viscous hydrodynamic simulations of gas sloshing, where Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHIs) distort the CFs. This is in contrast to the structure seen in many other sloshing and merger CFs, which are smooth and featureless at the current observational resolution. Both magnetic fields and viscosity have been invoked to explain the absence of KHIs in these smooth CFs, but the NGC 7618/UGC 12491 pair are two in a growing number of both sloshing and merger CFs that appear distorted. Magnetic fields and/or viscosity may be able to suppress the growth of KHIs at the CFs in some clusters and groups, but clearly not in all. We propose that the presence or absence of KHI distortions in CFs can be used as a measure of the effective viscosity and/or magnetic field strengths in the intracluster medium.

  15. On the home front: The cold war legacy of the Hanford nuclear site

    SciTech Connect

    Stenehjem Gerber, M.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford plutonium factory in Washington State is among the oldest and largest relics of the Cold War and is also among the dirtiest. In this book, the author states that the release of radiaoactive and toxic waste without public knowledge poses fundamental questions about American democracy. No conclusive answers to the problems at Hanford are presented, although the important questions are addressed. The reviewer feels the book may be of use as a reference catalog, within its context as a piece essentially concerned with public relations.

  16. Use of ``Cold Spell'' indices to quantify excess chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) morbidity during winter (November to March 2000-2007): case study in Porto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Ana; Carvalho, Vânia; Góis, Joaquim; Sousa, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the occurrence of cold episodes and excess hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Porto, Portugal, in order to further understand the effects of cold weather on health in milder climates. Excess COPD winter morbidity was calculated from admissions for November to March (2000-2007) in the Greater Porto Metropolitan Area (GPMA). Cold spells were identified using several indices (Díaz, World Meteorological Organization, Cold Spell Duration Index, Australian Index and Ondas’ Project Index) for the same period. Excess admissions in the periods before and after the occurrence of cold spells were calculated and related to the cold spells identified. The COPD seasonal variation admission coefficient (CVSA) showed excess winter admissions of 59 %, relative to other months. The effect of cold spell on the aggravation of COPD occurs with a lag of at least 2 weeks and differs according to the index used. This study indicates the important role of the persistence of cold periods of at least 2 weeks duration in the increase in COPD admissions. The persistence of moderate temperatures (Tmin ≤5 °C) for a week can be more significant for increasing COPD admissions than very low temperatures (Tmin ≤ 1.6 °C) for just a few days. The Ondas projects’ index provides the most accurate detection of the negative impacts of cold persistency on health, while the Diaz index is better at evaluating the consequences of short extreme cold events.

  17. Comparison of subjective symptoms and cold prevention measures in winter between traffic control workers and construction workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Ryoichi; Kurokawa, Junichi; Mirbod, Seyed Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    To help making comfortable workplaces and to prevent health disorders induced by the exposure to moderate cold in two different groups of out-door workers, we conducted a survey to compare subjective symptoms and cold prevention measures in winter between traffic control workers and construction workers. The subjects of this study were 98 male traffic control workers and 149 male workers engaged in building construction. Work loads of traffic control workers and construction workers were estimated at RMR1-2 and RMR2-4, respectively. All subjects were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire covering age, occupational career, working figure, present illness, past history of diseases, individual preventive measures to the cold, subjective symptoms in the winter (43 items) and subjective symptoms occurred during daytime working in the winter (6 items). In two parts of the construction workplaces (the place where a morning assembly was held and on the 7th floor of the construction site) dry bulb, wet bulb and globe temperatures were measured in January. Windchill Index (kcal/cm,(2) x h) was calculated by the measured dry bulb temperature and wind velocity. Mean values of dry bulb temperature between 9:00 and 16:30 in the place where a morning assembly was held for three days were between 4.8 +/- 1.2 degrees C at 9:00 am and 9.3 +/- 1.1 degrees C at noon. Mean values of Windchill Index in the place where a morning assembly was held were between 490.8+/-23.9 kcal/cm(2) x h at 9:30 am and 608.2+/-47.3 kcal/cm(2) x h at 2:30 pm. Occupational career, monthly working days, daily working hours, one way commuting hours, and daily smoking numbers of the traffic control workers were significantly shorter than the construction workers (p<0.01). There were no significant differences in the prevalence of chillness in the arms and legs between the traffic control workers (5.1%) and the construction workers (0.7%). Prevalence of wearing a warm underwear, body warmer, warm

  18. Lower Stratospheric Temperature Differences Between Meteorological Analyses in two cold Arctic Winters and their Impact on Polar Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Pawson, Steven; Santee, Michelle L.; Naujokat, Barbara; Swinbank, Richard; Gelman, Melvyn E.; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative intercomparison of six meteorological analyses is presented for the cold 1999-2000 and 1995-1996 Arctic winters. The impacts of using different analyzed temperatures in calculations of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation potential, and of different winds in idealized trajectory-based temperature histories, are substantial. The area with temperatures below a PSC formation threshold commonly varies by approximately 25% among the analyses, with differences of over 50% at some times/locations. Freie University at Berlin analyses are often colder than others at T is less than or approximately 205 K. Biases between analyses vary from year to year; in January 2000. U.K. Met Office analyses were coldest and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyses warmest. while NCEP analyses were usually coldest in 1995-1996 and Met Office or NCEP[National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis (REAN) warmest. European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) temperatures agreed better with other analyses in 1999-2000, after improvements in the assimilation model. than in 1995-1996. Case-studies of temperature histories show substantial differences using Met Office, NCEP, REAN and NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) analyses. In January 2000 (when a large cold region was centered in the polar vortex), qualitatively similar results were obtained for all analyses. However, in February 2000 (a much warmer period) and in January and February 1996 (comparably cold to January 2000 but with large cold regions near the polar vortex edge), distributions of "potential PSC lifetimes" and total time spent below a PSC formation threshold varied significantly among the analyses. Largest peaks in "PSC lifetime" distributions in January 2000 were at 4-6 and 11-14 days. while in the 1996 periods, they were at 1-3 days. Thus different meteorological conditions in comparably cold winters had a large impact on expectations for PSC formation and on the

  19. The Colocation, or Lack Thereof, of Deep Convection and Cold Tropopause Temperatures in the Tropical Winter Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that dehydration near the tropical tropopause during the northern hemisphere winter is separate in place and time from the actual transfer of mass from the troposphere to the stratosphere. In fact, some work suggests that dehydration takes place in an environment where the motion is downward, with such downward motion induced either by radiative cooling over cold cloud tops or turbulent heat flux divergence due to convection. Radiative heating and cooling rates at the tropical tropopause are quite small and very sensitive to the temperature profile and underlying cloudiness. Given this, the idea of downward motion in the region of coldest temperatures and dehydration implies that coldest temperatures and underlying cloudiness are colocated. This may not necessarily be the case. This paper attempts to explore, on a preliminary basis: (1) The sensitivity of radiative heating rates at the tropical tropopause to details of the temperature profile and underlying cloudiness and (2) the relative positions of high cold clouds and cold tropopause temperatures.

  20. Effect of simulated fall heat waves on cold hardiness and winter survival of hemlock looper, Lambdina fiscellaria (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    PubMed

    Vallières, Rosemarie; Rochefort, Sophie; Berthiaume, Richard; Hébert, Christian; Bauce, Éric

    2015-02-01

    The hemlock looper (Lambdina fiscellaria) is an important pest of eastern Canadian forests. The ongoing climate warming could modify the seasonal ecology of this univoltine species that lays eggs at the end of summer and overwinters at this stage. Indeed, the increase in frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events such as fall heat waves could interfere with the winter metabolism of the hemlock looper. Moreover, the host plant quality, which influences the quantity of insect energetic reserves, the geographic origin of populations and the conditions prevailing during the cold acclimation period, could cause various responses of this pest to climate warming. The main objective of this study is to determine the impact of these factors on hemlock looper winter biology. In October 2010, hemlock looper eggs initially collected from two geographic areas in the province of Québec, and from parents reared on two host plants, were exposed to fall heat waves of different intensities during 5 consecutive days. Supercooling points and cryoprotectant levels were measured on eggs on four different dates in 2010-2011 and survival rate was measured in April 2011. Our results show that hemlock looper eggs have a very low supercooling point and high levels of trehalose, glucose and mannitol in September and November. However, there is no clear relationship between the concentration of these compounds and the decrease in supercooling points. Contents in trehalose, glucose and mannitol were significantly influenced by fall heat waves and by the origin of the population. Winter survival of eggs from the temperate population was negatively affected by strong heat waves while the boreal population was not affected. This study suggests that the metabolism and winter survival of temperate hemlock looper populations in Québec will be more affected by fall heat waves that will increase in frequency due to climate change, than boreal populations.

  1. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  2. Effect of light on the gene expression and hormonal status of winter and spring wheat plants during cold hardening.

    PubMed

    Majláth, Imre; Szalai, Gabriella; Soós, Vilmos; Sebestyén, Endre; Balázs, Ervin; Vanková, Radomíra; Dobrev, Petre I; Tari, Irma; Tandori, Júlia; Janda, Tibor

    2012-06-01

    The effect of light on gene expression and hormonal status during the development of freezing tolerance was studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Mv Emese) and in the spring wheat variety Nadro. Ten-day-old plants (3-leaf stage) were cold hardened at 5°C for 12 days under either normal (250 µmol m(-2) s(-1) ) or low (20 µmol m(-2) s(-1) ) light conditions. Comprehensive analysis was carried out to explore the background of frost tolerance and the differences between these wheat varieties. Global genome analysis was performed, enquiring about the details of the cold signaling pathways. The expression level of a large number of genes is affected by light, and this effect may differ in different wheat genotypes. Photosynthesis-related processes probably play a key role in the enhancement of freezing tolerance; however, there are several other genes whose induction is light-dependent, so either there is cross-talk between signaling of chloroplast originating and other protective mechanisms or there are other light sensors that transduce signals to the components responsible for stress tolerance. Changes in the level of both plant hormones (indole-3-acetic acid, cytokinins, nitric oxide and ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) and other stress-related protective substances (proline, phenolics) were investigated during the phases of the hardening period. Hormonal levels were also affected by light and their dynamics indicate that wheat plants try to keep growing during the cold-hardening period. The data from this experiment may provide a new insight into the cross talk between cold and light signaling in wheat.

  3. Effect of light on the gene expression and hormonal status of winter and spring wheat plants during cold hardening.

    PubMed

    Majláth, Imre; Szalai, Gabriella; Soós, Vilmos; Sebestyén, Endre; Balázs, Ervin; Vanková, Radomíra; Dobrev, Petre I; Tari, Irma; Tandori, Júlia; Janda, Tibor

    2012-06-01

    The effect of light on gene expression and hormonal status during the development of freezing tolerance was studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Mv Emese) and in the spring wheat variety Nadro. Ten-day-old plants (3-leaf stage) were cold hardened at 5°C for 12 days under either normal (250 µmol m(-2) s(-1) ) or low (20 µmol m(-2) s(-1) ) light conditions. Comprehensive analysis was carried out to explore the background of frost tolerance and the differences between these wheat varieties. Global genome analysis was performed, enquiring about the details of the cold signaling pathways. The expression level of a large number of genes is affected by light, and this effect may differ in different wheat genotypes. Photosynthesis-related processes probably play a key role in the enhancement of freezing tolerance; however, there are several other genes whose induction is light-dependent, so either there is cross-talk between signaling of chloroplast originating and other protective mechanisms or there are other light sensors that transduce signals to the components responsible for stress tolerance. Changes in the level of both plant hormones (indole-3-acetic acid, cytokinins, nitric oxide and ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) and other stress-related protective substances (proline, phenolics) were investigated during the phases of the hardening period. Hormonal levels were also affected by light and their dynamics indicate that wheat plants try to keep growing during the cold-hardening period. The data from this experiment may provide a new insight into the cross talk between cold and light signaling in wheat. PMID:22257084

  4. The concurrent variability of East Asian subtropical and polar-front jets and its implication for the winter climate anomaly in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chuliang; Zhang, Yaocun; Lofgren, Brent M.; Nie, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The variability of East Asian upper level westerly jets in winter is studied with regard to the concurrent existence of subtropical jet (East Asian subtropical jet (EASJ)) and polar-front jet (East Asian polar-front jet (EAPJ)) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis. In the distribution of jet occurrence revealed in 6-hourly data, two jet branches along 30°N and 55°N, corresponding to locations of EASJ and EAPJ, respectively, are separated over the Tibetan Plateau. The leading two modes of zonal-mean zonal wind in East Asia extracted from a mass-weighted empirical orthogonal function analysis are characterized by the intensity changes and location displacements of two jets. The key regions for EASJ and EAPJ are then defined to represent variabilities of these two jets. Correlation analysis indicates that the subseasonal variation of EAPJ precedes EASJ by around 5 days, which can be interpreted as wave-mean flow interactions via synoptic-scale transient eddy activities. Based on the pentad intensity indices of two jets, the concurrent variabilities of EASJ and EAPJ are investigated with typical temperature and precipitation anomalies in China. The results suggest that by taking account of the two jets, we are able to get a more comprehensive understanding of the winter climate.

  5. Synoptic climatological study on precipitation in the Hokuriku District of Central Japan associated with the cold air outbreak in early winter (With Comparison to that in midwinter for the 1983/1984 winter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kuranoshin; Nishimura, Nanako; Haga, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    In midwinter, heavy snowfall events are often brought in the Japan Sea side of the Japan Islands by the organized convective snowfall systems in the cold air outbreak situations. However, although the air temperature around the Japan Islands is still rather higher from November to early December ("early winter"), the "wintertime pressure pattern" often appears due to the considerable development of the Siberian high already in that season. Since the seasonal cycle in East Asia shows great variety with many rapid seasonal transitions influenced by the Asian monsoon system, detailed comparison of the daily precipitation climatology and the relating atmospheric processes in the cold air outbreak situations between early winter and midwinter would give us an interesting information for comprehending the overall aspects of such seasonal cycle there. Thus the present study firstly examined the daily precipitation climatology mainly at Takada, as an example for Hokuriku District, during the early to mid- winter of 1970/71 to 2009/10. Then the detailed analyses were made for the 1983/1984 winter (one of the coldest winters during that period) based on the operational meteorological data by JMA, including the ocean buoy data in the southern part of the Japan Sea for evaluating the sensible and the latent heat fluxes from the sea (referred to as SH and LH, respectively). The total precipitation at Takada in early winter was as large as in midwinter, although it was brought mainly not as snow but as rain. Such large climatological value was mainly reflected by the precipitation in the "wintertime pressure pattern" with large contribution of the days with more than 30 mm/day. Interestingly, mean daily precipitation in the "wintertime pressure pattern" in early winter was greater than in midwinter. It is noted that such features were generally found even in the latter half of the analysis period when the warmer winter years appeared more frequently than in the former half

  6. The "warm" Marine Isotope Stage 31 in the Labrador Sea: Low surface salinities and cold subsurface waters prevented winter convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, A. M. R.; Vernal, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2016-09-01

    Surface and subsurface conditions in the Labrador Sea during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 31 at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1305 off southwest Greenland are reconstructed based on dinocyst and foraminifer assemblages. Isotopic compositions of planktonic (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Np) and benthic (Cibicides wuellerstorfi, Cw, and Oridorsalis umbonatus, Ou) foraminifera provide further information about water properties in the mesopelagic layer as well as at the seafloor. Dinocyst proxy reconstructions indicate low salinities (32-34.5), cool winters (3-6°C), and mild summers (10-15°C) in the surface water layer during the MIS 31 "optimum". However, planktonic foraminifer assemblages largely dominated by Np suggest relatively cold subsurface conditions in winter and summer (<4°C). Lower δ13C values in Np versus Cw further suggest either a lesser-ventilated mesopelagic layer than the bottom one or high organic matter oxidation rates at Np habitat depth. The dinocyst and planktonic foraminifer records together suggest a strong stratification between the surface and subsurface water layers. Isotopic and micropaleontological data thus converge toward paleoceanographical conditions unsuitable for convection and intermediate or deep water formation in the Labrador Sea during the warm MIS 31 interglacial, a situation comparable to the one that prevailed during the warm MIS 5e.

  7. Evaluating the role of fronts in habitat overlaps between cold and warm water species in the western North Pacific: A proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugo, Robinson M.; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Takahashi, Fumihiro; Nihira, Akira; Kuroyama, Tadaaki

    2014-09-01

    Cold- and warm-water species' fishing grounds show a spatial synchrony around fronts in the western North Pacific (WNP). However, it is not yet clear whether a front (thermal, salinity or chlorophyll) acts as an absolute barrier to fish migration on either side or its structure allows interaction of species with different physiological requirements. Our objective was to assess potential areas of overlap between cold- and warm-water species using probabilities of presence derived from fishery datasets and remotely sensed environment data in the Kuroshio-Oyashio region in the WNP. Fishery data comprised skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) fishing locations and proxy presences (derived from fishing night light images) for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartrami) and Pacific saury (Cololabis saira). Monthly (August-November) satellite remotely sensed sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll-a and sea-surface height anomaly images were used as environment data. Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) models were used to determine probabilities of presence (PoP) for each set of fishery and environment data for the area 35-45°N and 140-160°E. Maps of both sets of PoPs were compared and areas of overlap identified using a combined probability map. Results indicated that areas of spatial overlap existed among the species habitats, which gradually widened from September to November. The reasons for these overlaps include the presence of strong thermal/ocean-color gradients between cold Oyashio and warm Kuroshio waters, and also the presence of the sub-arctic front. Due to the high abundance of food along frontal zones, the species use the fronts as foraging grounds while confining within physiologically tolerable waters on either side of the front. The interaction zone around the front points to areas that might be accessible to both species for foraging, which suggests intense prey-predator interaction zones.

  8. Large-scale evaluation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) germplasm for cold tolerance in the open field during winter in Qingdao.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a cool season crop, pea (Pisum sativum L.) can tolerate frost at the vegetative stage but has yield loss when freezing stress occurs at reproductive stage. Cold tolerance improvement of pea varieties is important for the stable yield and the expansion of winter pea planting area. Under the natura...

  9. Use of "Cold Spell" indices to quantify excess chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) morbidity during winter (November to March 2000-2007): case study in Porto.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana; Carvalho, Vânia; Góis, Joaquim; Sousa, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the occurrence of cold episodes and excess hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Porto, Portugal, in order to further understand the effects of cold weather on health in milder climates. Excess COPD winter morbidity was calculated from admissions for November to March (2000-2007) in the Greater Porto Metropolitan Area (GPMA). Cold spells were identified using several indices (Díaz, World Meteorological Organization, Cold Spell Duration Index, Australian Index and Ondas' Project Index) for the same period. Excess admissions in the periods before and after the occurrence of cold spells were calculated and related to the cold spells identified. The COPD seasonal variation admission coefficient (CVSA) showed excess winter admissions of 59 %, relative to other months. The effect of cold spell on the aggravation of COPD occurs with a lag of at least 2 weeks and differs according to the index used. This study indicates the important role of the persistence of cold periods of at least 2 weeks duration in the increase in COPD admissions. The persistence of moderate temperatures (Tmin ≤5 °C) for a week can be more significant for increasing COPD admissions than very low temperatures (Tmin ≤ 1.6 °C) for just a few days. The Ondas projects' index provides the most accurate detection of the negative impacts of cold persistency on health, while the Diaz index is better at evaluating the consequences of short extreme cold events.

  10. Use of "Cold Spell" indices to quantify excess chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) morbidity during winter (November to March 2000-2007): case study in Porto.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana; Carvalho, Vânia; Góis, Joaquim; Sousa, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the occurrence of cold episodes and excess hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Porto, Portugal, in order to further understand the effects of cold weather on health in milder climates. Excess COPD winter morbidity was calculated from admissions for November to March (2000-2007) in the Greater Porto Metropolitan Area (GPMA). Cold spells were identified using several indices (Díaz, World Meteorological Organization, Cold Spell Duration Index, Australian Index and Ondas' Project Index) for the same period. Excess admissions in the periods before and after the occurrence of cold spells were calculated and related to the cold spells identified. The COPD seasonal variation admission coefficient (CVSA) showed excess winter admissions of 59 %, relative to other months. The effect of cold spell on the aggravation of COPD occurs with a lag of at least 2 weeks and differs according to the index used. This study indicates the important role of the persistence of cold periods of at least 2 weeks duration in the increase in COPD admissions. The persistence of moderate temperatures (Tmin ≤5 °C) for a week can be more significant for increasing COPD admissions than very low temperatures (Tmin ≤ 1.6 °C) for just a few days. The Ondas projects' index provides the most accurate detection of the negative impacts of cold persistency on health, while the Diaz index is better at evaluating the consequences of short extreme cold events. PMID:23274835

  11. How much can we learn from a merging cold front cluster? Insights from X-ray temperature and radio maps of A3667

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Abhirup; Schenck, David E.; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.

    2014-10-01

    The galaxy cluster A3667 is an ideal laboratory to study the plasma processes in the intracluster medium. High-resolution Chandra X-ray observations show a cold front in A3667. At radio wavelengths, A3667 reveals a double radio-relic feature in the outskirts of the cluster. These suggest multiple merger events in this cluster. In this paper, we analyze the substantial archival X-ray observations of A3667 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and compare these with existing radio observations as well as state-of-the-art adaptive mesh refinement MHD cosmological simulations using Enzo. We have used two temperature map making techniques, weighted Voronoi tessellation and adaptive circular binning, to produce the high-resolution and largest field-of-view temperature maps of A3667. These high-fidelity temperature maps allow us to study the X-ray shocks in the cluster using a new two-dimensional shock-finding algorithm. We have also estimated the Mach numbers from the shocks inferred from previous ATCA radio observations. The combined shock statistics from the X-ray and radio data are in agreement with the shock statistics in a simulated MHD cluster. We have also studied the profiles of the thermodynamic properties across the cold front using ∼447 ks from the combined Chandra observations on A3667. Our results show that the stability of the cold front in A3667 can be attributed to the suppression of the thermal conduction across the cold front by a factor of ∼100-700 compared to the classical Spitzer value.

  12. The 12/13 January 1988 Narrow Cold-Frontal Rainband Observed during MFDP/FRONTS 87. Part II: Microphysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, Virginie; Hauser, Danièle; Roux, Frank

    1993-04-01

    The microphysics of a narrow cold-frontal rainband (NCFR) observed during the MFDP/FRONTS87 experiment is investigated by using a microphysical retrieval model. The equations of evolution of the water substance and of the temperature are solved using a wind field prescribed from dual-Doppler radar observations.Different runs of the model were performed to investigate the role of various microphysical processes. All of them use a two-dimensional version of the model and give a solution for the steady state corresponding to the input wind field. The validity of this approach was checked a posteriori by comparing the results obtained from vertical cross sections at two different locations and two different times. In each case, the consistency of the results was controlled through comparisons with in situ measurements (aircraft, ground stations, and radiosondes) and radar reflectivity observations.The main result obtained from this study was that the precipitation associated with the NCFR was mostly composed of graupel particles, essentially formed by riming. Rain was produced by accretion of cloud water in the condensation zone and by melting of graupel. The choice of the type of ice-precipitating particles introduced in the model appeared very important. Only rimed particles (graupel) could reproduce observed precipitation. The precipitation efficiency was rather high (73%). The zone of light precipitation in which the NCFR was embedded seemed to play no-seeder role in the growth of precipitation in the NCFR, probably due to the overturning airflow located in the prefrontal zone.Another important result concerns the role of the microphysical processes on the thermodynamics. The temperature drop observed at low levels just behind the frontal discontinuity could be explained at the time of the observations by two cooling effects of equal importance: the melting of graupel and the evaporation of precipitation.

  13. Coping with the cold: an ecological context for the abundance and distribution of rock sandpipers during winter in upper Cook Inlet, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Gill, Robert E.; Tibbitts, T. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Shorebirds are conspicuous and abundant at high northern latitudes during spring and summer, but as seasonal conditions deteriorate, few remain during winter. To the best of our knowledge, Cook Inlet, Alaska (60.6˚ N, 151.6˚ W), is the world’s coldest site that regularly supports wintering populations of shorebirds, and it is also the most northerly nonbreeding location for shorebirds in the Pacific Basin. During the winters of 1997–2012, we conducted aerial surveys of upper Cook Inlet to document the spatial and temporal distribution and number of Rock Sandpipers (Calidris ptilocnemis) using the inlet. The average survey total was 8191 ± 6143 SD birds, and the average of each winter season’s highest single-day count was 13 603 ± 4948 SD birds. We detected only Rock Sandpipers during our surveys, essentially all of which were individuals of the nominate subspecies (C. p. ptilocnemis). Survey totals in some winters closely matched the population estimate for this subspecies, demonstrating the region’s importance as a nonbreeding resource to the subspecies. Birds were most often found at only a handful of sites in upper Cook Inlet, but shifted their distribution to more southerly locations in the inlet during periods of extreme cold. Two environmental factors allow Rock Sandpipers to inhabit Cook Inlet during winter: 1) an abundant bivalve (Macoma balthica) food source and 2) current and tidal dynamics that keep foraging substrates accessible during all but extreme periods of cold and ice accretion. C. p. ptilocnemis is a subspecies of high conservation concern for which annual winter surveys may serve as a relatively inexpensive population-monitoring tool that will also provide insight into adaptations that allow these birds to exploit high-latitude environments in winter.

  14. Impacts of extraordinary warm and cold late-winter temperatures on observed and modelled plant phenology in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutishauser, This; Stöckli, Reto

    2010-05-01

    The impact of gradual change in the climate system during the second half of the 20th century left a strong imprint on the timing of seasonal events in biotic and biotic systems such as e.g. plant development stages and the greenness of the Earth's surface. Temporal trends in seasonal events largely correspond to the effects expected from the increases in temperature. The impact of extraordinary temperature and precipitation events on plant phenology in spring is less understood. For example a strong early-spring frost event in the USA in April 2007 lead to reduced greenness and freeze damage to leaves and fruits of natural and horticultural species whereas a winter warming event in northern Scandinavia in December 2007 caused considerable damage to sub-Arctic dwarf shrub vegetation and reduced vegetation activity (26% reduced maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index NDVI relative to the previous year) in the following summer. In Germany and Switzerland, the effects of the extraordinary warm temperature anomalies of autumn 2006, winter 2006/2007 and spring 2007 showed strong impacts on selected plant phenological phases back to 1951 and 1702. Common hazel and snowdrop flowered up to 35 days earlier in Germany and beech and fruits tree were two weeks earlier in Switzerland. This contribution presents empirical evidence of extraordinary warm and cold late-winter temperatures on species-specific plant phenology and modelled landscape-scale phenology in Switzerland in the period 1958-2008. Species-specific observations were extracted from the Swiss Plant Phenological Network of MeteoSwiss for 23 low-altitude stations and 12 stations that report to the Global Climate Observation System (GCOS). Observations cover all climate regions and altitudes. For each GCOS station we also estimated daily Leaf Area Index with a prognostic phenology model. The model's empirical parameter space was constrained by assimilated Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation

  15. 2012/13 abnormal cold winter in Japan associated with Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation and Local Sea Surface Temperature over the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Y.; Ogi, M.; Tachibana, Y.

    2013-12-01

    On Japan, wintertime cold wave has social, economic, psychological and political impacts because of the lack of atomic power stations in the era of post Fukushima world. The colder winter is the more electricity is needed. Wintertime weather of Japan and its prediction has come under the world spotlight. The winter of 2012/13 in Japan was abnormally cold, and such a cold winter has persisted for 3 years. Wintertime climate of Japan is governed by some dominant modes of the large-scale atmospheric circulations. Yasunaka and Hanawa (2008) demonstrated that the two dominant modes - Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) pattern - account for about 65% of the interannual variation of the wintertime mean surface air temperature of Japan. A negative AO brings about cold winter in Japan. In addition, a negative WP also brings about cold winter in Japan. Looking back to the winter of 2012/13, both the negative AO and negative WP continued from October through December. If the previous studies were correct, it would have been extremely very cold from October through December. In fact, in December, in accordance with previous studies, it was colder than normal. Contrary to the expectation, in October and November, it was, however, warmer than normal. This discrepancy signifies that an additional hidden circumstance that heats Japan overwhelms these large-scale atmospheric circulations that cool Japan. In this study, we therefore seek an additional cause of wintertime climate of Japan particularly focusing 2012 as well as the AO and WP. We found that anomalously warm oceanic temperature surrounding Japan overwhelmed influences of the AO or WP. Unlike the inland climate, the island climate can be strongly influenced by surrounding ocean temperature, suggesting that large-scale atmospheric patterns alone do not determine the climate of islands. (a) Time series of a 5-day running mean AO index (blue) as defined by Ogi et al., (2004), who called it the SVNAM index. For

  16. Gelation in protein extracts from cold acclimated and non-acclimated winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer).

    PubMed

    Lim, Ze Long; Low, Nicholas H; Moffatt, Barbara A; Gray, Gordon R

    2013-04-01

    A protein gel is a three-dimensional network consisting of molecular interactions between biopolymers that entrap a significant volume of a continuous liquid phase (water). Molecular interactions in gels occur at junction zones within and between protein molecules through electrostatic forces, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic associations (van der Waals attractions) and covalent bonding. Gels have the physicochemical properties of both solids and liquids, and are extremely important in the production and stability of a variety of foods, bioproducts and pharmaceuticals. In this study, gelation was induced in phenol extracted protein fractions from non-acclimated (NA) and cold-acclimated (CA) winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) leaf tissue after repeated freeze-thaw treatments. Gel formation only occurred at high pH (pH 12.0) and a minimum of 3-4 freeze-thaw cycles were required. The gel was thermally stable and only a specific combination of chemical treatments could disrupt the gel network. SDS-PAGE analysis identified ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) as the major protein component in the gel, although Rubisco itself did not appear to be a factor in gelation. Raman spectroscopy suggested changes in protein secondary structure during freeze-thaw cycles. Overall, the NA and CA gels were similar in composition and structure, with the exception that the CA gel appeared to be amyloidic in nature based on thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. Protein gelation, particularly in the apoplast, may confer protection against freeze-induced dehydration and potentially have a commercial application to improve frozen food quality. PMID:23348601

  17. Cold-front driven storm erosion and overwash in the central part of the Isles Dernieres, a Louisiana barrier-island arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Reiss, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tropical and extratropical storms produce significant erosion on the barrier islands of Louisiana. Over the past 100 years, such storms have produced at least 2 km of northward beach-face retreat and the loss of 63% of the surface area of the Isles Dernieres, a low-lying barrier-island arc along the central Louisiana coast. Elevations on the islands within the arc are typically less than 2 m above mean sea level. The islands typically have a washover-flat topography with occasional, poorly developed, dune-terrace topography consisting of low-lying and broken dunes. The central part of the arc consists of salt-marsh deposits overlain by washover sands along the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. Sand thicknesses range from zero behind the beach, to less than 2 m under the berm crest, and back to zero in the first nearshore trough. The sand veneer is sufficiently thin that storms can strip all the sand from the beach face, exposing the underlying marsh deposits. The geomorphic changes produced by cold fronts, a type of extratropical storm that commonly affect the Isles Dernieres between late fall and early spring are described. Between August 1986 and September 1987, repeated surveys along eleven shore-normal transects that covered 400 m of shoreline revealed the timing and extent of cold-front-produced beach change along a typical section of the central Isles Dernieres. During the study period, the beach face retreated approximately 20 m during the cold-front season but did not rebuild during the subsequent summer. Because the volume of sand deposited on the backshore (5600 m3) was less than the volume of material lost from the beach face (19,200 m3), approximately 13,600 m3 of material disappeared. Assuming that underlying marsh deposits decrease in volume in direct proportion to the amount of beach-face retreat, an estimate of the mud loss during the study period is 14,000 m3. Thus, the decrease in volume along the profiles can be accounted for without removing any sand

  18. A Winter Survival Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The article is a condensation of materials from the winter survival unit of a Canadian snow ecology course. The unit covers: cold physiology, frostbite, snowblindness, hypothermia, winter campout, and survival strategies. (SB)

  19. Winter Weather Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  20. Effect of Severe Winter Cold on the Photosynthetic Potentials of Three Co-occurring Evergreen Woody Species in a Mediterranean Forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, Dominik; Gracia, Carlos; Peñuelas, Josep; Sabaté, Santi

    2013-04-01

    Evergreen tree species in the Mediterranean region have to cope with a wide range of environmental stress conditions from summer drought to winter cold. The winter period can lead to photoinhibition due to a combination of high solar irradiances and chilling temperatures which can reduce the light saturation point. However, Mediterranean winter mildness can lead periodically to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for positive carbon balance benefitting evergreen woody species in contrast to winter deciduous species. The advantage of being able to photosynthesis all year round with a significant fraction in the winter month is compensating for the lower photosynthetic potentials during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. In this work, we investigated the physiological behaviour of three evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex, Pinus halepensis, Arbutus undeo) co-occurring in a natural and mature Mediterranean forest after a period of mild winter conditions and their response to a sudden period of intense cold weather. Therefore, we examined in each period the photosynthetic potentials by estimating the maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and the maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) through gas exchange measurements. The results indicate that all species exhibited extraordinary high photosynthetic potentials during the first period of measurement as a response to the mild conditions. However, the sudden cold period affected negatively the photosynthetic potentials of Quercus ilex and A. unedo with reduction ranging between 37 to 45 %, whereas they were observed to be only insignificantly reduced in Pinus halepensis. Our results can be explained by previous classifications into photoinhibition-avoiding (P. halpensis) and photoinhibition-tolerant (Q. ilex, A. undeo) species on the basis of their susceptibility to dynamic photoinhibition (Martinez Ferri 2000). Photoinhibition tolerant species are characterised with a more dynamic

  1. Organic and inorganic aerosol compositions in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, during the cold winter of 2007 to 2008: Dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Tsatsral, Batmunkh; Kim, Young J.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the distributions and sources of water-soluble organic acids in the Mongolian atmosphere, aerosol samples (PM2.5, n = 34) were collected at an urban site (47.92°N, 106.90°E, ˜1300 m above sea level) in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, during the cold winter. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12) and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls), as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, water-soluble OC, and inorganic ions. Distributions of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were characterized by a predominance of terephthalic acid (tPh; 130 ± 51 ng m-3, 19% of total detected organic acids) followed by oxalic (107 ± 28 ng m-3, 15%), succinic (63 ± 20 ng m-3, 9%), glyoxylic (55 ± 18 ng m-3, 8%), and phthalic (54 ± 27 ng m-3, 8%) acids. Predominance of terephthalic acid, which has not been reported previously in atmospheric aerosols, was mainly due to uncontrolled burning of plastic bottles and bags in home stoves for heating and waste incineration during the cold winter. This study demonstrated that most of the air pollutants were directly emitted from local sources such as heat and power plants, home stoves, and automobiles. Development of an inversion layer (<700 m above ground level) over the basin of Ulaanbaatar accelerated the accumulation of pollutants, causing severe haze episodes during the winter season.

  2. Abscisic acid- and cold-induced thaumatin-like protein in winter wheat has an antifungal activity against snow mould, Microdochium nivale.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Takezawa, Daisuke; Shimada, Takiko; Hamada, Tatsurou; Fujikawa, Seizo; Arakawa, Keita

    2002-05-01

    Cold acclimation of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings induces accumulation in the apoplast of taTLPs that are similar to thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs), which are pathogenesis-related proteins. We characterized a cDNA of WAS-3a encoding the major isoform of taTLPs from winter wheat cells and showed that WAS-3a transcripts were markedly increased by treatment with ABA and by treatment with elicitors (chitosan, beta-glucan and cell wall fractions of Fusarium oxysporum and Microdochium nivale) in wheat cells. To analyse the function of WAS-3a, a highly efficient expression system using wheat cells was established, and a large amount of recombinant WAS-3a protein (rWAS-3a) was obtained with near homogeneity. Antifungal assays using various fungi grown on agar plates revealed that rWAS-3a inhibits hyphal growth of pink snow mould, Microdochium nivale, at a low temperature. The results suggest that cold-induced taTLPs that accumulate in the apoplast contribute to snow mould resistance of winter wheat.

  3. Molecular characterization of sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase and sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase associated with fructan accumulation in winter wheat during cold hardening.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Akira; Yoshida, Midori

    2002-11-01

    We isolated two cDNAs of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), designated wft1 and wft2, which encoded sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) and sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST; EC 2.4.1.99), respectively, which are involved in the synthesis of fructan in wheat. wft1 and wft2 were cloned by screening of a cDNA library with probed-cDNA fragments corresponding to plant fructosyltransferase and invertase. The identity of the clones was verified by functional characterization of recombinant proteins expressed in methylotrophic yeast, Pichiapastoris. Northern blotting showed that the level of wft2 transcripts increased from autumn to early winter in the crown tissues of all field-grown wheat cultivars examined. Higher levels of wft1 and wft2 transcripts were found in leaf tissues of snow mold-resistant cultivars, which accumulated more fructan than other cultivars. Our results showed that Wft1 and Wft2 were important in fructan accumulation during cold hardening of winter wheat.

  4. Progress of snow mould infection in crowns of winter rye (Secale cereale L.) is related to photosynthetic activity during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Pociecha, E; Janowiak, F; Dubas, E; Żur, I; Tokarz, K; Kolasińska, I; Płażek, A

    2013-09-01

    Resistance to snow mould is a feature determined by multiple genes. Therefore, determining the phenotype of resistant plants is difficult as it requires an investigation over a long period of time from cold acclimation through pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was (i) to determine the characteristics of the resistant genotype and (ii) to clarify the connections between photosynthesis during cold acclimation and then pathogenesis caused by Microdochium nivale. Two inbred lines of winter rye (Secale cereale L.) differing in their susceptibility to snow mould were used in the study. After cold acclimation snow mould resistant (SMR) line was characterised by higher values of CO2 assimilation and electron transport efficiency but did not differ from snow mould susceptible (SMS) line in carboxylation rate of RuBisCO (Vcmax). Higher soluble carbohydrate accumulation, due to higher photosynthesis intensity, as well as an ABA increase at 5 days post infection (DPI) in leaves and crowns were found in SMR line during the pathogenesis period. Callose deposition was found around non-infected bundle sheets and in cortex cells at 5 DPI (at the same time point as ABA peak) only in SMR line, which probably prevented the infection of leaf initials. Early leaf initials infection in SMS line may be responsible for inhibiting leaf growth and plant regeneration after stress cessation. The results show different physiological and biochemical characteristics of the investigated lines, which can be applied in the selection of resistant genotypes and identifying genomic regions responsible for metabolic pathways increasing pathogen resistance.

  5. Plasma membrane lipid alterations associated with cold acclimation of winter rye seedlings (Secale cereale L. cv Puma)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.V.; Steponkus, P.L. )

    1987-01-01

    Highly enriched plasma membrane fractions were isolated from leaves of nonacclimated (NA) and acclimated (ACC) rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma) seedlings. Collectively, free sterols, steryl glucosides, and acylated steryl glucosides constituted > 50 mole % of the total lipid in both NA and ACC plasma membrane fractions. Glucocerebrosides containing hydroxy fatty acids constituted the major glycolipid class of the plasma membrane, accounting for 16 mole % of the total lipid. Phospholipids, primarily phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine with lesser amounts of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol, comprised only 32 mole% of the total lipid in NA samples. Following cold acclimation, free sterols increased from 33 to 44 mole %, while steryl glucosides and acylated steryl glucosides decreased from 15 to 6 mole % and 4 to 1 mole %, respectively. Sterol analyses of these lipid classes demonstrated that free {beta}-sitosterol increased from 21 to 32 mole % (accounting for the increase in free sterols as a class) at the expense of sterol derivatives containing {beta}-sitosterol. Glucocerebrosides decreased from 16 to 7 mole % of the total lipid following cold acclimation. In addition, the relative proportions of associated hydroxy fatty acids, including 22:0 (h), 24:0 (h), 22:1 (h), and 24:1 (h) were altered. The phospholipid content of the plasma membrane fraction increased to 42 mole % of the total lipid following cold acclimation. Although the relative proportions of the individual phospholipids did not change appreciably after cold acclimation, there were substantial differences in the molecular species. Di-unsaturated molecular species of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine increased following acclimation. These results demonstrate that cold acclimation results in substantial changes in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane.

  6. Thermal sensation and comfort in women exposed repeatedly to whole-body cryotherapy and winter swimming in ice-cold water.

    PubMed

    Smolander, Juhani; Mikkelsson, Marja; Oksa, Juha; Westerlund, Tarja; Leppäluoto, Juhani; Huttunen, Pirkko

    2004-09-30

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC; -110 degrees C) and winter swimming (WS) in ice-cold water are severe ambient cold exposures, which are voluntarily practiced by humans in minimal clothing. The purpose was to examine thermal sensation and thermal comfort associated with WBC and WS. Twenty women similar in body mass index, age, physical activity, and use of hormonal contraception were pairwise randomized either to the WBC group or the WS group. The duration of each WBC exposure was 2 min, which was repeated three times per week for 3 months (13 weeks). Similar exposure frequency was used for the WS group, but each exposure lasted 20 s in outdoor conditions. Thermal sensation and comfort were asked with standard scales. After WBC, 65% of the thermal sensation votes were 'neutral' or 'slightly cool.' After WS, 81% of the thermal sensation votes were 'warm,' 'neutral,' or 'slightly cool.' Majority of comfort votes immediately after exposures in WBC group (98%) and in the WS group (93%) were 'comfortable' or 'slightly uncomfortable.' Thermal sensation and comfort became habituated in both groups at an early stage of trials, but the changes were less conclusive in WS group due to variable conditions outdoors. In the WBC group, cold sensation was less intense already after the second exposure. In conclusion, repeated exposures to WBC and WS in healthy women were mostly well tolerated and comfortable. The results indicate that during repeated severe whole-body cold stress of short duration, thermal sensation and comfort become habituated during the first exposures. PMID:15327918

  7. Influence of the Eurasian snow on the negative North Atlantic Oscillation in subseasonal forecasts of the cold winter 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Senan, R.; Vitart, F.; Balsamo, G.; Weisheimer, A.; Doblas-Reyes, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    The winter 2009/2010 was remarkably cold and snowy over North America and across Eurasia, from Europe to the Far East, coinciding with a pronounced negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). While previous studies have investigated the origin and persistence of this anomalously negative NAO phase, we have re-assessed the role that the Eurasian snowpack could have played in contributing to its maintenance. Many observational and model studies have indicated that the autumn Eurasian snow cover influences circulation patterns over high northern latitudes. To investigate that role, we have performed a suite of forecasts with the coupled ocean-atmosphere ensemble prediction system from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Pairs of 2-month ensemble forecasts with either realistic or else randomized snow initial conditions are used to demonstrate how an anomalously thick snowpack leads to an initial cooling over the continental land masses of Eurasia and, within 2 weeks, to the anomalies that are characteristic of a negative NAO. It is also associated with enhanced vertical wave propagation into the stratosphere and deceleration of the polar night jet. The latter then exerts a downward influence into the troposphere maximizing in the North Atlantic region, which establishes itself within 2 weeks. We compare the forecasted NAO index in our simulations with those from several operational forecasts of the winter 2009/2010 made at the ECWMF, and highlight the importance of relatively high horizontal resolution.

  8. Cold surges and dust events: Establishing the link between the East Asian Winter Monsoon and the Chinese loess record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Wei, Junhong; Lin, Zhaohui; Shao, Yaping; He, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese loess/palaeosol succession is one of the most comprehensive and intensively studied archives of Neogene and Quaternary global palaeoclimate events. Its stratigraphic details are widely recognised to indicate close links to the history and function of the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) - one of the most active components of the Earth's climate system. But the formal meteorological links between the EAWM and dust emission, both in the present day and in the past, have not been established and with it, the veracity of the loess record as an indicator of the EAWM questioned. Here we show that present day major dust events over northern China, while largely occurring during spring, are nevertheless 'conditioned' by the strength of the preceding EAWM. We also demonstrate, for the first time, a close link between the occurrence of dust events and the strength of the EAWM. From these findings, linked to global-scale climate model simulations, we conclude that the Chinese loess succession provides a convincing proxy record of the strength of the East Asian Winter Monsoon.

  9. Identification of a homolog of Arabidopsis DSP4 (SEX4) in chestnut: its induction and accumulation in stem amyloplasts during winter or in response to the cold.

    PubMed

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Ibañez, Cristian; Acebo, Paloma; Ramos, Alberto; Perez-Solis, Estefania; Collada, Carmen; Casado, Rosa; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Allona, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    Oligosaccharide synthesis is an important cryoprotection strategy used by woody plants during winter dormancy. At the onset of autumn, starch stored in the stem and buds is broken down in response to the shorter days and lower temperatures resulting in the buildup of oligosaccharides. Given that the enzyme DSP4 is necessary for diurnal starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves, this study was designed to address the role of DSP4 in this seasonal process in Castanea sativa Mill. The expression pattern of the CsDSP4 gene in cells of the chestnut stem was found to parallel starch catabolism. In this organ, DSP4 protein levels started to rise at the start of autumn and elevated levels persisted until the onset of spring. In addition, exposure of chestnut plantlets to 4 °C induced the expression of the CsDSP4 gene. In dormant trees or cold-stressed plantlets, the CsDSP4 protein was immunolocalized both in the amyloplast stroma and nucleus of stem cells, whereas in the conditions of vegetative growth, immunofluorescence was only detected in the nucleus. The studies indicate a potential role for DSP4 in starch degradation and cold acclimation following low temperature exposure during activity-dormancy transition.

  10. The effects of a mid-winter 8-week course of sub-sunburn sunbed exposures on tanning, vitamin D status and colds.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, Frank R; Pavel, Stan

    2012-12-01

    Like UV irradiation, which generates vitamin D(3) in the skin, the hormonally active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), boosts innate immunity against viruses and bacteria. Epidemiologic studies have found high vitamin D levels to be associated with lower risk of infections of the upper respiratory tract (colds). We have therefore performed an intervention study in 105 young adults (ages 18-30 years; 91% female) over a mid-winter 8-week period (January-March 2010). The participants were randomised to 3 groups: (A) subjected to 3 times a week sub-sunburn sunbed exposure (n = 35), (B) daily vitamin D supplementation, @ 1000 IU (n = 37), and (C) a control group without any intervention (n = 33). The mean serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) dropped from 62 to 55 nmol l(-1) in group C, while these levels rose from 62 to 109 and from 58 to 93 nmol l(-1) in groups A and B, respectively (p < 0.001). The skin on the chest darkened significantly in group A (mean difference in lightness, L*, equalled -5.7, p < 0.001), correlating significantly, but weakly, with increases in 25(OH)D (3.3 nmol l(-1) per unit drop in L*, R(2) = 0.17, p = 0.014). The percentage of self-reported colds with proper signs and symptoms was only slightly and not significantly reduced in groups A and B in comparison to group C: 57 and 51 versus 67%, respectively. Hence, the sub-sunburn sunbed treatment was effective in tanning and increasing the 25(OH)D serum level, more so than 1000 IU per day, but had no appreciable effect on colds.

  11. Gravity wave characteristics in the middle atmosphere during the CESAR campaign at Palma de Mallorca in 2011/2012: Impact of extratropical cyclones and cold fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Wüst, S.; Schmidt, C.; Bittner, M.

    2015-06-01

    Based on a measuring campaign which was carried out at Mallorca (39.6°N, 2.7°E) as cooperation between Agència Estatal de Meteorologia (AEMET) and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, engl. 'German Aerospace Center' (DLR) in 2011/2012 (September-January), 143 radiosondes (day and night) providing vertical temperature and wind profiles were released. Additionally, nocturnal mesopause temperature measurements with a temporal resolution of about 1 min were conducted by the infrared (IR) - Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer (GRIPS) during the campaign period. Strongly enhanced gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere is observed which can be attributed to a hurricane-like storm (so-called Medicane) and to passing by cold fronts. Statistical features of gravity wave parameters including energy densitiy and momentum fluxes are calculated. Gravity wave momentum fluxes turned out being up to five times larger during severe weather. Moreover, gravity wave horizontal propagation characteristics are derived applying hodograph and Stokes parameter analysis. Preferred directions are of southeast and northwest due to prevailing wind directions at Mallorca.

  12. Bio-Optical Properties and Ocean Color Algorithms for Coastal Waters Influenced by the Mississippi River During a Cold Front Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Sa Eurico J.; Miller, Richard L.; DelCastillo, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    During the passage of a cold front in March 2002, bio-optical properties examined in coastal waters impacted by the Mississippi River indicated westward advective flows and increasing river discharge containing a larger nonalgal particle content contributed significantly to surface optical variability. A comparison of seasonal data from three cruises indicated spectral models of absorption and scattering to be generally consistent with other coastal environments, while their parameterization in terms of chlorophyll a concentration (Chl) showed seasonal variability. The exponential slope of the colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) averaged 0.0161 plus or minus 0.00054 per nanometer, and for nonalgal absorption it averaged 0.011 per nanometer with deviations from general trends observed due to anomalous water properties. Although the phytoplankton specific absorption coefficients varied over a wide range (0.02 to 0.1 square meters (mg Chl) sup -1)) being higher in offshore surface waters, values of phytoplankton absorption spectra at the SeaWiFS wavebands were highly correlated to modeled values. The normalized scattering spectral shapes and the mean spectrum were in agreement to observations in other coastal waters, while the backscattering ratios were on average lower in phytoplankton dominated surface waters (0.0101 plus or minus 0.002) and higher in near-bottom waters (0.0191 plus or minus 0.0045) with low Chl. Average percent differences in remote sensing reflectance R (sub rs) derived form modeled and in-eater radiometric measurements were highest in the blue wavebands (52%) and at sampling stations with a ore stratified water column. Estimates of Chl and CDOM absorption derived from SeaWiFS images generated using regional empirical algorithms were highly correlated to in situ data.

  13. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITIES AT THE SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER AS A MEASURE FOR THE EFFECTIVE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Roediger, E.; Kraft, R. P.; Forman, W. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.

    2013-02-10

    Sloshing cold fronts (CFs) arise from minor merger triggered gas sloshing. Their detailed structure depends on the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM): hydrodynamical simulations predict the CFs to be distorted by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHIs), but aligned magnetic fields, viscosity, or thermal conduction can suppress the KHIs. Thus, observing the detailed structure of sloshing CFs can be used to constrain these ICM properties. Both smooth and distorted sloshing CFs have been observed, indicating that the KHI is suppressed in some clusters, but not in all. Consequently, we need to address at least some sloshing clusters individually before drawing general conclusions about the ICM properties. We present the first detailed attempt to constrain the ICM properties in a specific cluster from the structure of its sloshing CF. Proximity and brightness make the Virgo Cluster an ideal target. We combine observations and Virgo-specific hydrodynamical sloshing simulations. Here, we focus on a Spitzer-like temperature-dependent viscosity as a mechanism to suppress the KHI, but discuss the alternative mechanisms in detail. We identify the CF at 90 kpc north and northeast of the Virgo center as the best location in the cluster to observe a possible KHI suppression. For viscosities {approx}> 10% of the Spitzer value KHIs at this CF are suppressed. We describe in detail the observable signatures at low and high viscosities, i.e., in the presence or the absence of KHIs. We find indications for a low ICM viscosity in archival XMM-Newton data and demonstrate the detectability of the predicted features in deep Chandra observations.

  14. Seasonal, synoptic and diurnal variation of atmospheric water-isotopologues in the boundary layer of Southwestern Germany caused by plant transpiration, cold-front passages and dewfall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christner, Emanuel; Dyroff, Christoph; Kohler, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Gonzales, Yenny; Schneider, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric water is an enormously crucial trace gas. It is responsible for ~70 % of the natural greenhouse effect (Schmidt et al., JGR, 2010) and carries huge amounts of latent heat. The isotopic composition of water vapor is an elegant tracer for a better understanding and quantification of the extremely complex and variable hydrological cycle in Earth's atmosphere (evaporation, cloud condensation, rainout, re-evaporation, snow), which in turn is a prerequisite to improve climate modeling and predictions. As H216O, H218O and HDO differ in vapor pressure and mass, isotope fractionation occurs due to condensation, evaporation and diffusion processes. In contrast to that, plants are able to transpire water with almost no isotope fractionation. For that reason the ratio of isotopologue concentrations in the boundary layer (BL) provides, compared to humidity measurements alone, independent and additional constraints for quantifying the strength of evaporation and transpiration. Furthermore the isotope ratios contain information about transport history of an air mass and microphysical processes, that is not accessible by humidity measurements. Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) a commercial Picarro Analyzer L2120-i is operated at Karlsruhe in Southwestern Germany, which is continuously measuring the isotopologues H216O, HDO and H218O of atmospheric water vapor since January 2012. A one year record of H216O, HDO and H218O shows clear seasonal, synoptic and diurnal characteristics and reveals the main driving processes affecting the isotopic composition of water vapor in the Middle European BL. Changes in continental plant transpiration and evaporation throughout the year lead to a slow seasonal HDO/H216O-variation, that cannot be explained by pure Rayleigh condensation. Furthermore, cold-front passages from NW lead to fast and pronounced depletion of the HDO/H216O-ratio within

  15. Ocean-Atmosphere Environments of Antarctic-Region Cold-Air Mesocyclones: Evaluation of Reanalyses for Contrasting Adjacent 10-Day Periods ("Macro-Weather") in Winter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, A. M.; Auger, J.; Birkel, S. D.; Maasch, K. A.; Mayewski, P. A.; Claud, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale cyclones in cold-air outbreaks (mesocyclones) feature in the weather and climate of the Antarctic (e.g., Ross Sea) and sub-antarctic (Drake Passage). They adversely impact field operations, and influence snowfall, the ice-sheet mass balance, and sea-air energy fluxes. Although individual mesocyclones are poorly represented on reanalyses, these datasets robustly depict the upper-ocean and troposphere environments in which multiple mesocyclones typically form. A spatial metric of mesocyclone activity—the Meso-Cyclogenesis Potential (MCP)—used ERA-40 anomaly fields of: sea surface temperature (SST) minus marine air temperature (MAT), near-surface winds, 500 hPa air temperature, and the sea-ice edge location. MCP maps composited by teleconnection phases for 1979-2001, broadly correspond to short-period satellite "climatologies" of mesocyclones. Here, we assess 3 reanalysis datasets (CFSR, ERA-I and MERRA) for their reliably to depict MCP patterns on weekly to sub-monthly periods marked by strong regional shifts in mesocyclone activity (frequencies, track densities) occurring during a La Niña winter: June 21-30, 1999 (SE Indian Ocean) and September 1-10, 1999 (Ross Sea sector). All reanalyses depict the marked variations in upper ocean and atmosphere variables between adjacent 10-day periods. Slight differences may owe to model resolution or internal components (land surface, coupled ocean models), and/or how the observations are assimilated. For June 21-30, positive SST-MAT, southerly winds, proximity to the ice edge, and negative T500, accompany increased meso-cyclogenesis. However, for September 1-10, surface forcing does not explain frequent comma cloud "polar lows" north-east of the Ross Sea. Inclusion of the upper-level diffluence (e.g., from Z300 field) in the MCP metric, better depicts the observed mesocyclone activity. MCP patterns on these "macro-weather" time scales appear relatively insensitive to the choice of reanalysis.

  16. Effects of molybdenum on expression of cold-responsive genes in abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent and ABA-independent pathways in winter wheat under low-temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qilin; Liu, Jinshan; Liu, Hongen

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential trace element for higher plants. It has been shown that application of Mo enhances the cold resistance of winter wheat. In order to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cold resistance arising from application of Mo in winter wheat, investigations were made regarding the transcription of cold-responsive (COR) genes in abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent and ABA-independent pathways in winter wheat regulated by Mo application under low-temperature stress. Methods Two cultivars of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), Mo-efficient cultivar ‘97003’ and Mo-inefficient cultivar ‘97014’, were grown in control (−Mo) and Mo fertilizer (+Mo) treatments for 40 d at 15/12 °C (day/night), and the temperature was then reduced to 5/2 °C (day/night) to create low-temperature stress. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) activities, ABA contents, the transcripts of basic leucine zipper (bZIP)-type transcription factor (TF) genes, ABA-dependent COR genes, CBF/DREB transcription factor genes and ABA-independent COR genes were investigated at 0, 3, 6 and 48 h post cold stress. Key Results Mo application significantly increased AO activity, ABA levels, and expression of bZIP-type TF genes (Wlip19 and Wabi5) and ABA-dependent COR genes (Wrab15, Wrab17, Wrab18 and Wrab19). Mo application increased expression levels of CBF/DREB transcription factor genes (TaCBF and Wcbf2-1) and ABA-independent COR genes (Wcs120, Wcs19, Wcor14 and Wcor15) after 3 and 6 h exposure to low temperature. Conclusions Mo might regulate the expression of ABA-dependent COR genes through the pathway: Mo → AO → ABA → bZIP → ABA-dependent COR genes in winter wheat. The response of the ABA-dependent pathway to Mo was prior to that of the ABA-independent pathway. Similarities and differences between the Mo-efficient and Mo-inefficient wheat cultivars in response to Mo under cold stress are discussed. PMID:19491090

  17. Study of a Winter Monsoon Front over the South China Sea by Multi-Sensor Satellite and Weather Radar Data, and a Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Wong, Wai Kin; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Chan, Pak Wai

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric frontal system over the South China Sea (SCS) arising from the replenishment of the northeast monsoon is investigated by using multi-sensor satellite data, weather radar data, and a numerical model. The replenishment or freshening of the northeast monsoon results from the merging of high pressure areas over the Chinese Continent. The near-sea surface wind field associated with this event was measured by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard the European MetOp satellite and the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the European Envisat satellite. The high resolution ASAR image reveals that the frontal line separating this wind field from the synoptic-scale ambient wind field is as sharp as in the case of a cold air outbreak and contains embedded rain cells. Furthermore, it shows that this replenishment was associated with northeasterly winds with speeds of up to 13 ms-1 over the SCS at offshore distances larger than 60 km, but only with speeds of around 6 ms-1 near the coast. The comparison of the observational data with model results of the pre-operational version of the AIR (Atmospheric Integrated Rapid-cycle) forecast model of the Hong Kong Observatory shows that the AIR model can successfully simulate the time evolution of the frontal system and the wind field over the open ocean, but fails to simulate the wind field near the coast.

  18. Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... and weight. Heavier oils congeal more at low temperatures and do not lubricate as well. Thermostat - ensure ... and become slippery. Wind Chill - Windchill is the temperature it “feels like” when you are outside. The ...

  19. Cold comfort in NHS winter.

    PubMed

    1987-11-21

    No matter how smoothly Goverment may insist that all that can be I done is being done in funding I health care and supporting the NHS, no matter what percentages are circulated to prove that financial allocation and commitment is rising - services continue to be curtailed.

  20. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. The sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.

  1. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  2. Mammals in Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wapner, Suzanne

    1985-01-01

    Mammals that tolerate the winter cold and stay active all year exploit the harsh northern climate to their advantage. By simple experiments and observation you can better understand their adaptations which include furry bodies, snowshoe feet, extra blubber, light coloration, and strategically distributed food caches. (JHZ)

  3. Fronts and frontogenesis as revealed by high time resolution data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. E.; Barber, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Upper air sounding are used to examine a cold front of average intensity. Vertical cross sections of potential temperature and wind, and horizontal analyses were compared and adjusted for consistency. These analyses were then used to study the evolution of the front, found to consist of a complex system of fronts occurring at all levels of the troposphere. Low level fronts were strongest at the surface and rapidly weakened with height. Fronts in the midddle troposphere were much more intense. The warm air ahead of the fronts was nearly barotropic, while the cold air behind was baroclinic through deep layers. A deep mixed layer was observed to grow in this cold air.

  4. Annual soil CO2 efflux in a cold temperate forest in northeastern China: effects of winter snowpack and artificial nitrogen deposition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boqi; Mou, Changcheng; Yan, Guoyong; Xu, Lijian; Jiang, Siling; Xing, Yajuan; Han, Shijie; Yu, Jinghua; Wang, Qinggui

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a snow depth 0 cm (non-snowpack), 10 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and natural depth) gradient experiment under four quantities of nitrogen addition (control, no added N; low-N, 5 g N m−2 yr−1; medium-N, 10 g N m−2 yr−1; and high-N, 15 g N m−2 yr−1) and took an-entire-year measurements of soil respiration (Rs) in Korean pine forests in northeastern China during 2013–2014. No evidence for effects of N on Rs could be found during the growing season. On the other hand, reduction of snowpack decreased winter soil respiration due to accompanied relatively lower soil temperature. We found that winter temperature sensitivities (Q10) of Rs were significantly higher than the growing season Q10 under all the N addition treatments. Moderate quantities of N addition (low-N and medium-N) significantly increased temperature sensitivities (Q10) of Rs, but excessive (high-N) addition decreased it during winter. The Gamma empirical model predicted that winter Rs under the four N addition treatments contributed 4.8. ± 0.3% (control), 3.6 ± 0.6% (low-N), 4.3 ± 0.4% (medium-N) and 6.4 ± 0.5% (high-N) to the whole year Rs. Our results demonstrate that N deposition will alter Q10 of winter Rs. Moreover, winter Rs may contribute very few to annual Rs budget. PMID:26732991

  5. Decadal variability of the North Pacific Polar Front: Subsurface warming versus surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor; Krishfield, Richard; Honjo, Susumu

    2002-05-01

    Over 200 hydrographic sections are used to trace the Polar Front defined as the southern boundary of the ``pure'' subarctic stratification with a pronounced, extremely cold, subsurface temperature minimum underlain by a temperature maximum. The front extends from 40°N off Japan to 57°N in the Gulf of Alaska where it retroflects and continues WSW with the Alaskan Stream. The front's decadal variability from 1977-1999 is examined along 150°E, 170°E, 175.5°E, and 180°E. At these longitudes the front is relatively stable, except for 170°E, where it shifts north-south by 400 km every 6 years. Most time series reveal a subsurface warming of ~1°C per decade, and a surface cooling, of the front. Since the subsurface temperature minimum is a remnant of winter convection, the subsurface warming signals an amelioration of the winter climate, whereas the summer climate becomes colder.

  6. Weather fronts and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kveton, Vit

    1991-03-01

    Some methodological aspects are discussed of the investigation of acute infarct myocarditis (AIM) in relation to weather fronts. Results of a new method of analysis are given. Data were analysed from about the hour of the onset of symptoms, and led to the diagnosis of AIM either immediately or within a few hours or days (3019 cases observed over 4.5 years during 1982 1986 in Plzen, Czechoslovakia). Weather classification was based on three factors (the type of the foregoing front, the type of the subsequent front, the time section of the time interval demarcated by the passage of the surfaces of the fronts). AIM occurrence increased in particular types of weather fronts: (i) by 30% during 7 12 h after a warm front, if the time span between fronts exceeded 24 h; (ii) by 10% in time at least 36 h distant from the foregoing cold or occlusion front and from the succeeding warm or occlusion front; (iii) by 20% during 0 2 h before the passage of the front, provided the foregoing front was not warm and the interval between fronts exceeded 5 h. AIM occurrence decreased by 15% 20% for time span between fronts > 24 h at times 6 11, 6 23 and 6 35 h before a coming warm or occlusion front (for interfrontal intervals 25 48, 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), and also at 12 23 and possibly 12 35 h before a cold front (for intervals 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), if the foregoing front was cold or an occlusion front.

  7. Wintertime sea surface temperature fronts in the Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi; Shimada, Teruhisa; Lee, Ming-An; Lu, Hsueh-Jung; Sakaida, Futoki; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-12-01

    We present wintertime variations and distributions of sea surface temperature (SST) fronts in the Taiwan Strait by applying an entropy-based edge detection method to 10-year (1996-2005) satellite SST images with grid size of 0.01°. From climatological monthly mean maps of SST gradient magnitude in winter, we identify four significant SST fronts in the Taiwan Strait. The Mainland China Coastal Front is a long frontal band along the 50-m isobath near the Chinese coast. The sharp Peng-Chang Front appears along the Peng-Hu Channel and extends northward around the Chang-Yuen Ridge. The Taiwan Bank Front evolves in early winter. As the winter progresses, the front becomes broad and moves toward the Chinese coast, connecting to the Mainland China Coastal Front. The Kuroshio Front extends northeastward from the northeastern tip of Taiwan with a semicircle-shape curving along the 100-m isobath.

  8. PM10 modeling of Beijing in the winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Zhang, Minsi; Cai, Xuhui

    The megacity of Beijing, China, has had an air pollution problem since the 1990s. The concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) in Beijing in the winter of 2000 were high; the average value of 188 μg m -3 was nearly four times the first grade national standard of 50 μg m -3. The CALPUFF modeling system was used to simulate PM10 dispersion from 1 January 2000 to 29 February 2000. We used near real-time landcover data from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS). Statistical evaluation indicated that the model agreed well with the observations. The fluctuations of 24-h PM10 concentrations followed the winter synoptic winds. Cold air from the northwest or north intruded over Beijing for average periods of 4 days in winter, accompanied by high wind speeds. PM10 was swept out of Beijing after the cold fronts and accumulated again once the winds stopped, until the next cold air intrusion. Capital Steel Corporation Limited contributed 46% of the PM10 mass concentrations observed in the Shijingshan industrial area, and had little effect on the eastern part or the center of Beijing. The other industrial regions distributed in southeastern Beijing accounted for an average of 18% of the PM10 in Beijing. Boilers associated with coal consumption mostly for winter heating contributed 31%. Motor vehicles and road dust contributed 5% and 13%, respectively. The total of residential heating in old houses and restaurants contributed approximately 7%. The primary PM10 emissions from electrical generating units were relatively low. Some suggestions are proposed for reducing PM10 pollution in Beijing.

  9. Leap Day 2012 Severe Storm Front

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie was created using GOES-13 visible and infrared satellite imagery from Feb. 28 at 1245 UTC (7:45 a.m. EST) through March 1, and shows the progression of the cold front and associated low ...

  10. Nutrition for winter sports.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nanna L; Manore, Melinda M; Helle, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Winter sports are played in cold conditions on ice or snow and often at moderate to high altitude. The most important nutritional challenges for winter sport athletes exposed to environmental extremes include increased energy expenditure, accelerated muscle and liver glycogen utilization, exacerbated fluid loss, and increased iron turnover. Winter sports, however, vary greatly regarding their nutritional requirements due to variable physiological and physique characteristics, energy and substrate demands, and environmental training and competition conditions. What most winter sport athletes have in common is a relatively lean physique and high-intensity training periods, thus they require greater energy and nutrient intakes, along with adequate food and fluid before, during, and after training. Event fuelling is most challenging for cross-country skiers competing in long events, ski jumpers aiming to reduce their body weight, and those winter sport athletes incurring repeated qualification rounds and heats. These athletes need to ensure carbohydrate availability throughout competition. Finally, winter sport athletes may benefit from dietary and sport supplements; however, attention should be paid to safety and efficacy if supplementation is considered.

  11. The Barents Sea polar front and water masses variability (1980-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, L.; Sirven, J.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2015-03-01

    The polar front separates the warm and saline Atlantic Waters encountered in the western part of the Barents Sea from the cold and fresh Arctic Waters situated in the northern part. These water masses can mix together, mainly in the eastern part of the Barents Sea, generating dense waters in winter which can cascade into the Arctic Ocean to form the Artic Intermediate Waters. To study the interannual variability and evolution of these water masses and the fronts, we have merged data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and have built a new database which covers the period 1980-2011. The summer data is interpolated on a regular grid and a "Probability Density Function" method is used to show that the polar front splits into two branches east of 32° E where the topographic constraint weakens. Two fronts can then be defined: the "Northern Polar Front" is associated with strong salinity gradients and the "Southern Polar Front" with temperature gradients. They enclose the dense Barents Sea Water. The interannual variability of the water masses is apparent in the observed data and is linked to that of the ice cover. In contrast, the link with the Arctic Oscillation is not clear. However, results from a general circulation model suggest that such a link could be found if winter data were taken into account. A strong trend, which amplifies during the last decade, is also found: the Atlantic Water occupies a larger volume of the Barents Sea. This "Atlantification" could be accompanied by a northwards displacement of the southern polar front in the eastern part of the Barents Sea (which is suggested by a model based study) and a decrease of the volume occupied by the Arctic Waters.

  12. Fronts in Large Marine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Cornillon, Peter C.; Sherman, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    Oceanic fronts shape marine ecosystems; therefore front mapping and characterization are among the most important aspects of physical oceanography. Here we report on the first global remote sensing survey of fronts in the Large Marine Ecosystems (LME). This survey is based on a unique frontal data archive assembled at the University of Rhode Island. Thermal fronts were automatically derived with the edge detection algorithm of Cayula and Cornillon (1992, 1995, 1996) from 12 years of twice-daily, global, 9-km resolution satellite sea surface temperature (SST) fields to produce synoptic (nearly instantaneous) frontal maps, and to compute the long-term mean frequency of occurrence of SST fronts and their gradients. These synoptic and long-term maps were used to identify major quasi-stationary fronts and to derive provisional frontal distribution maps for all LMEs. Since SST fronts are typically collocated with fronts in other water properties such as salinity, density and chlorophyll, digital frontal paths from SST frontal maps can be used in studies of physical-biological correlations at fronts. Frontal patterns in several exemplary LMEs are described and compared, including those for: the East and West Bering Sea LMEs, Sea of Okhotsk LME, East China Sea LME, Yellow Sea LME, North Sea LME, East and West Greenland Shelf LMEs, Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf LME, Northeast and Southeast US Continental Shelf LMEs, Gulf of Mexico LME, and Patagonian Shelf LME. Seasonal evolution of frontal patterns in major upwelling zones reveals an order-of-magnitude growth of frontal scales from summer to winter. A classification of LMEs with regard to the origin and physics of their respective dominant fronts is presented. The proposed classification lends itself to comparative studies of frontal ecosystems.

  13. Winter Weeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Lois

    1981-01-01

    Try to learn all you can about a plant in the winter. As the season changes, you can see what the dried seed pod is like in bloom. You are a convert if you notice a spectacular show of summer wildflowers and wonder what sort of winter weed will result. (Author/CM)

  14. Winter mortality and its causes.

    PubMed

    Keatinge, W R

    2002-11-01

    In the 1970s scientific research focussed for the first time on dramatic rises in mortality every winter, and on smaller rises in unusually hot weather. Following the recent decline in influenza epidemics, approximately half of excess winter deaths are due to coronary thrombosis. These peak about two days after the peak of a cold spell. Approximately half the remaining winter deaths are caused by respiratory disease, and these peak about 12 days after peak cold. The rapid coronary deaths are due mainly to haemoconcentration resulting from fluid shifts during cold exposure; some later coronary deaths are secondary to respiratory disease. Heat related deaths often result from haemoconcentration resulting from loss of salt and water in sweat. With the possible exception of some tropical countries, global warming can be expected to reduce cold related deaths more than it increases the rarer heat related deaths, but statistics on populations in different climates suggest that, given time, people will adjust to global warming with little change in either mortality. Some measures may be needed to control insect borne diseases during global warming, but current indications are that cold will remain the main environmental cause of illness and death. Air pollution in cities may also still be causing some deaths, but these are hard to differentiate from the more numerous deaths due to associated cold weather, and clear identification of pollution deaths may need more extensive data than is currently available.

  15. Physical characteristics of Eurasian winter temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Son, Seok-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Despite the on-going global warming, recent winters in Eurasian mid-latitudes were much colder than average. In an attempt to better understand the physical characteristics for cold Eurasian winters, major sources of variability in surface air temperature (SAT) are investigated based on cyclostationary EOF analysis. The two leading modes of SAT variability represent the effect of Arctic amplification (AA) and the Arctic oscillation (AO), respectively. These two modes are distinct in terms of the physical characteristics, including surface energy fluxes and tropospheric circulations, and result in significantly different winter SAT patterns over the Eurasian continent. The AA-related SAT anomalies are dipolar with warm Arctic, centered at the Barents–Kara Seas, and cold East Asia. In contrast, the negative AO-related SAT anomalies are characterized by widespread cold anomalies in Northern Eurasia. Relative importance of the AA and the negative AO contributions to cold Eurasian winters is sensitive to the region of interest.

  16. Lateral mixing across ice meltwater fronts of the Chukchi Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K.; Weingartner, T.; Danielson, S.; Winsor, P.; Dobbins, E.; Martini, K.; Statscewich, H.

    2015-08-01

    Summer and fall hydrographic sections in the northeastern Chukchi Sea frequently capture 5-20 m thick intrapycnocline lenses or horizontal plumes of warm, moderately salty summer Bering Sea Water flowing northward from Bering Strait. These features occur within the shallow (~20 m depth) pycnocline separating cold, dilute, surface meltwater from near-freezing, salty, winter-formed waters beneath the pycnocline. An idealized numerical model suggests that the features arise from eddies and meanders generated by instability of the surface front separating meltwater from Bering Sea Water. Warm Bering Sea Water is transported across the front and into the pycnocline by the cross-frontal velocities associated with the instabilities. The accompanying lateral eddy heat fluxes may be important both in summer for promoting ice melt and in fall by delaying the onset of ice formation over portions of this shelf. Lateral heat flux magnitudes depend upon the stratification of the Bering Sea Water.

  17. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  18. On a front line.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L.

    1995-01-01

    Like the patients, doctors in Sarajevo depend largely on humanitarian aid; everyone in the public sector has worked without pay for almost three years. The hospital is on a front line; yet the psychiatric department continues to function, even conducting large scale studies of psychosocial aspects of war in Bosnia-Hercegovina. The type of inpatient morbidity and treatment patterns have changed. A plethora of psychosocial rehabilitation programmes has emerged, including counselling, drop in centres, and attending to special needs of elderly people, schoolchildren, and women. The most prominent psychological symptoms were exhaustion at the prospect of a third winter of war and bewilderment at the Western stereotype of Bosnians as Muslim fundamentalists. Images p1052-a p1053-a PMID:7728062

  19. Radiative magnetized thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of plane-parallel magnetized thermal conduction fronts in the interstellar medium (ISM) was studied. Separating the coronal ISM phase and interstellar clouds, these fronts have been thought to be the site of the intermediate-temperature regions whose presence was inferred from O VI absorption-line studies. The front evolution was followed numerically, starting from the initial discontinuous temperature distribution between the hot and cold medium, and ending in the final cooling stage of the hot medium. It was found that, for the typical ISM pressure of 4000 K/cu cm and the hot medium temperature of 10 to the 6th K, the transition from evaporation to condensation in a nonmagnetized front occurs when the front thickness is 15 pc. This thickness is a factor of 5 smaller than previously estimated. The O VI column densities in both evaporative and condensation stages agree with observations if the initial hot medium temperature Th exceeds 750,000 K. Condensing conduction fronts give better agreement with observed O VI line profiles because of lower gas temperatures.

  20. Relating Global Precipitation to Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, J. L.; Jakob, C.; Nicholls, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric fronts are important for the day-to-day variability of weather in the midlatitudes, particularly during winter when extratropical storm-tracks are at their maximum intensity. Fronts are often associated with heavy rain, and strongly affect the local space-time distribution of rainfall. Although global climate models should be expected to represent the baroclinic systems within which the fronts are embedded, the fronts themselves and precipitation processes within them are of much smaller scale. As a consequence, models with the typical horizontal resolution of contemporary climate models do not necessarily accurately capture these features. A recently developed objective front identification method applied to reanalysis data is combined with global rainfall data to investigate how precipitation and extremes of precipitation around the globe are associated with atmospheric fronts. Having established the observed distribution of fronts and their role in producing precipitation and extremes, the occurrence of fronts and the associated precipitation can then be evaluated in state-of-the-art climate models. This provides a process-oriented method of model evaluation where the errors in the model can be decomposed into contributions from errors in front frequency and errors in frontal and non-frontal precipitation intensity. Finally, how fronts and their associated precipitation, may change in the future, especially the extremes, can be investigated.

  1. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Winter Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Outdoor Educators of Quebec, Montreal.

    Materials on 11 topics presented at a winter workshop for Quebec outdoor educators have been compiled into this booklet. Action story, instant replay, shoe factory, sound and action, and find an object to fit the description are described and recommended as group dynamic activities. Directions for five games (Superlative Selection; Data…

  3. Winter Wonderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Listening to people complain about the hardships of winter and the dreariness of the nearly constant gray sky prompted the author to help her sixth graders recognize and appreciate the beauty that surrounds them for nearly five months of the year in western New York. The author opines that if students could see things more artistically, the winter…

  4. Winter Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarbuth, Lawson, Comp.

    Educators may find activities for indoor and outdoor winter programs in the games of the traditional Eskimo. These games are dominated by few-step operations and low level structural organization. For the most part they are quickly organized, begun, terminated, and ready to be recommenced. All types of games can be found, including quiet ones,…

  5. Annual and interannual variability of the Barents Sea water masses and polar front: 1980-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, Laurent; Sirven, Jerome; Gascard, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The Barents Sea (BS) is a transition area between the warm and saline Atlantic Waters (AW) and the cold and fresh Arctic Waters (ArW). The BS is characterized by a polar front structure separating AW from ArW. The mixing and cooling of these two water mass generates dense waters in winter. Dense waters are of prior importance because they cascade into the Arctic Ocean to form the Artic Intermediate Waters. This study will use a new hydrographic data set fulfilled by recent stations in the Russian area and a 3D model coupled with atmosphere and ice as a back up to investigate the link between fronts and water masses, as well as their variability over the last 30 years. This study suggests that the polar front structure is composed of two branches and that the dense waters are found in between. The BS, especially in the East, is experiencing an "Atlantification" accompanied with a drastic sea ice decline. These changes, amplified during the last decade, shift the southern branch of the polar front structure in the Norh-East direction and affect negatively the dense water formation. This could have major impacts on the Arctic Ocean ventilation and primary production.

  6. Winter Blast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Beverley

    1999-01-01

    Describes an art lesson for fifth- and sixth-grade students where they learn about the cold colors on the color wheel and apply that knowledge as they create a picture of a snowstorm. Explains that the students depict a snowstorm by layering the colors and drawings of snowflakes to make a three-dimensional effect. (CMK)

  7. Extreme Cold: A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/ hen winter temperatures drop significantly below normal, staying warm and safe can become a chal- lenge. Extremely cold temperatures often accompany a winter storm, so you may ...

  8. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  9. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  10. Distribution of alewives in southeastern Lake Ontario in autumn and winter: a clue to winter mortalities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; O'Gorman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Alewives Alosa pseudoharengus in the Great Lakes are thought to avoid extreme cold in winter by moving to deep water where the temperature is usually highest because of inverse thermal stratification. Information collected in Lake Ontario during autumn and winter 1981–1984 with an echo sounder and bottom and midwater trawls indicated that many alewives remained at depths above 110 m, regardless of water temperature. Alewives in the Great Lakes that did not descend to greater depths would be exposed to potentially lethal temperatures during cold winters.inters.

  11. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  12. Documentary evidence of climate variability during cold seasons in Lesotho, southern Africa, 1833-1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, S. W.; Nash, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    This study presents the first 19th century cold season climate chronology for the Kingdom of Lesotho in southern Africa. The chronology is constructed using a variety of documentary sources including letters, diaries, reports, monographs and newspaper articles obtained from southern African and British archives. Information relating to cold season weather phenomena during the austral autumn, winter and early spring months were recorded verbatim. Each of the cold seasons from 1833 to 1900 was then classified as ‘very severe', ‘severe' or ‘normal/mild', with a confidence rating ranging from low (1) to high (3) awarded against each annual classification. The accuracy of the document-derived chronology was verified against temperature data for Maseru for the period 1893-1900. Excellent correspondence of the document-derived chronology with the Maseru instrumental data and also with other global proxy temperature records for the 19th century is achieved. The results indicate 12 (18% of the total) very severe, 16 (23%) severe and 40 (59%) normal/mild cold seasons between 1833 and 1900. The overall trend is for more severe and snow-rich cold seasons during the early part of the study period (1833-1854) compared with the latter half of the 19th century (with the exception of the 1880s). A reduction in the duration of the frost season by over 20 days during the 19th century is also tentatively identified. Several severe to very severe cold seasons in Lesotho follow after major tropical and SH volcanic eruptions; such years are usually characterized by early frosts, and frequent and heavy snowfalls. The blocking of solar radiation and the enhanced northward displacement of polar fronts that are directly or indirectly associated with volcanic events, may account for many of the most severe Lesotho winters during the 19th century. Keywords: Cold season chronology, 19th century, Lesotho, volcanic forcing

  13. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  14. Halting Hypothermia: Cold Can Be Dangerous

    MedlinePlus

    ... who spends much time outdoors in very cold weather can get hypothermia. But hypothermia can happen anywhere— ... just outside and not just in bitter winter weather. It can strike when temperatures are cool—for ...

  15. Winter thunderstorms in central Europe in the past and the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzar, Jan; Franc, Marek

    Thunderstorms in the territories of the Czech Republic and neighbouring countries are almost exclusively the only phenomena occurring in the warm season. In the cold half of the year, from October to March, an average incidence of thunderstorms is only 2%, with the least occurrence being recorded in January. Yet, winter thunderstorms are dangerous particularly for air traffic because during them, the cloud base is rapidly falling down and visibility is suddenly worsening due to heavy snowfall. Notwithstanding these facts, the issue of their occurrence in the central European space has been paid little attention so far. Long years of study into historical weather extremes in the territory of the Czech Republic revealed over 10 chronicle entries on the occurrence of winter thunderstorms in the period between November and February from the 16th to the beginning of the 20th centuries. The irregular phenomenon was even devoted three occasional prints in central Europe in the second half of the 16th century, two of which were issued in Germany. Fires caused by winter thunderstorms were no sporadic cases. The occurrence of thunderstorms in winter was apparently associated with the passage of pronounced cold fronts. This can be documented on cases from the end of December 1555 when heavy thunderstorms and consequent fires were recorded within a short period of time in Holland, Germany and in Czech lands. It is assumed that the situation in 1627 was similar when a winter thunderstorm was recorded in Prague and in Holešov, southeastern Moravia on 28 December. In February 1581, a thunderstorm in Prague became one of three unusual events publicized by the local occasional newspaper. The beginning of modern studies into winter thunderstorms dates back to the 1960s with the use of lightning flash counters and later also with the use of systems for large-scale lightning flash detection and localization. However, more comprehensive meteorological and climatological assessments of

  16. Cold sea survival.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veghte, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two prototype three-man life rafts were evaluated during the winter months in Arctic waters off Kodiak Island, Alaska, to assess potential survival problems and determine tolerance limits. Each raft incorporated thermal characteristics specifically designed for cold water. Water and air temperatures varied from 0 to +2 C and -5 to +4 C respectively. All subjects were removed upon reaching subjective tolerance. The results showed that none of the clothing assemblies was adequate to maintain a person in comfort even with dry boarding. No significant biochemical shifts in the blood or urine were found. The TUL raft was found to be superior in its thermal characteristics and afforded better subject protection. General tolerance for cold water immersion, wet and dry, and cold water raft exposures are depicted graphically, based on previously reported data.

  17. Novel psychrotolerant picocyanobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay in the winter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongle; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Picocyanobacteria are major primary producers in the ocean, especially in the tropical or subtropical oceans or during warm seasons. Many "warm" picocyanobacterial species have been isolated and characterized. However, picocyanobacteria in cold environments or cold seasons are much less studied. In general, little is known about the taxonomy and ecophysiology of picocyanobacteria living in the winter. In this study, 17 strains of picocyanobacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay, a temperate estuarine ecosystem, during the winter months. These winter isolates belong to five distinct phylogenetic lineages, and are distinct from the picocyanobacteria previously isolated from the warm seasons. The vast majority of the winter isolates were closely related to picocyanobacteria isolated from other cold environments like Arctic or subalpine waters. The winter picocyanobacterial isolates were able to maintain slow growth or prolonged dormancy at 4°C. Interestingly, the phycoerythrin-rich strains outperformed the phycocyanin-rich strains at cold temperature. In addition, winter picocyanobacteria changed their morphology when cultivated at 4°C. The close phylogenetic relationship between the winter picocyanobacteria and the picocyanobacteria living in high latitude cold regions indicates that low temperature locations select specific ecotypes of picocyanobacteria. PMID:26986796

  18. Novel psychrotolerant picocyanobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay in the winter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongle; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Picocyanobacteria are major primary producers in the ocean, especially in the tropical or subtropical oceans or during warm seasons. Many "warm" picocyanobacterial species have been isolated and characterized. However, picocyanobacteria in cold environments or cold seasons are much less studied. In general, little is known about the taxonomy and ecophysiology of picocyanobacteria living in the winter. In this study, 17 strains of picocyanobacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay, a temperate estuarine ecosystem, during the winter months. These winter isolates belong to five distinct phylogenetic lineages, and are distinct from the picocyanobacteria previously isolated from the warm seasons. The vast majority of the winter isolates were closely related to picocyanobacteria isolated from other cold environments like Arctic or subalpine waters. The winter picocyanobacterial isolates were able to maintain slow growth or prolonged dormancy at 4°C. Interestingly, the phycoerythrin-rich strains outperformed the phycocyanin-rich strains at cold temperature. In addition, winter picocyanobacteria changed their morphology when cultivated at 4°C. The close phylogenetic relationship between the winter picocyanobacteria and the picocyanobacteria living in high latitude cold regions indicates that low temperature locations select specific ecotypes of picocyanobacteria.

  19. Documentary evidence of climate variability during cold seasons in Lesotho, southern Africa, 1833-1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Stefan W.; Nash, David J.

    2010-03-01

    This study presents the first 19th century cold season climate chronology for the Kingdom of Lesotho in southern Africa. The chronology is constructed using a variety of documentary sources including letters, diaries, reports, monographs and newspaper articles obtained from southern African and British archives. Information relating to cold season weather phenomena during the austral autumn, winter and early spring months were recorded verbatim. Each of the cold seasons from 1833 to 1900 was then classified as “very severe”, “severe” or “normal/mild”, with a confidence rating ranging from low (1) to high (3) awarded against each annual classification. The accuracy of the document-derived chronology was verified against temperature data for Maseru for the period 1893-1900. Excellent correspondence of the document-derived chronology with the Maseru instrumental data and also with other global proxy temperature records for the 19th century is achieved. The results indicate 12 (18% of the total) very severe, 16 (23%) severe and 40 (59%) normal/mild cold seasons between 1833 and 1900. The overall trend is for more severe and snow-rich cold seasons during the early part of the study period (1833-1854) compared with the latter half of the 19th century (with the exception of the 1880s). A reduction in the duration of the frost season by over 20 days during the 19th century is also tentatively identified. Several severe to very severe cold seasons in Lesotho follow after major tropical and SH volcanic eruptions; such years are usually characterized by early frosts, and frequent and heavy snowfalls. The blocking of solar radiation and the enhanced northward displacement of polar fronts that are directly or indirectly associated with volcanic events, may account for many of the most severe Lesotho winters during the 19th century.

  20. Measurements of Chlorine Partitioning in the Winter Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachnik, R.; Salawitch, R.; Engel, A.; Schmidt, U.

    1999-01-01

    Under the extremely cold conditions in the polar winter stratosphere, heterogeneous reactions involving HCl and CIONO(sub 2) on the surfaces of polar stratospheric cloud particles can release large amounts of reactive chlorine from these reservoirs leading to rapid chemical loss of ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during late winter and early spring.

  1. Worrying about weird winters.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Winter is a key determinant of biological processes in temperate, alpine, and polar environments. Winters are changing, yet we currently lack the knowledge to adequately predict the impacts of climate change on winter biology, or to link winter conditions to the growing-season performance of most organisms. PMID:27580991

  2. Front Matter: Volume 8454

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SPIE, Proceedings of

    2012-05-01

    This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 8454, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, Introduction, and Conference Committee listing.

  3. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... been tried for colds, such as vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea. Talk to your health care ... nih.gov/pubmed/22962927 . Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database of Systematic ...

  4. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  5. Fronts, fish, and predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Hunt, George L.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Zamon, Jeannette E.; Schick, Robert S.; Prieto, Rui; Brodziak, Jon; Teo, Steven L. H.; Thorne, Lesley; Bailey, Helen; Itoh, Sachihiko; Munk, Peter; Musyl, Michael K.; Willis, Jay K.; Zhang, Wuchang

    2014-09-01

    Ocean fronts play a key role in marine ecosystems. Fronts shape oceanic landscapes and affect every trophic level across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, from meters to thousands of kilometers, and from days to millions of years. At some fronts, there is an elevated rate of primary production, whereas at others, plankton is aggregated by advection and by the behavior of organisms moving against gradients in temperature, salinity, light irradiance, hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical and biological factors. Lower trophic level organisms - phytoplankton and zooplankton - that are aggregated in sufficient densities, attract organisms from higher trophic levels, from planktivorous schooling fish to squid, large piscivorous fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Many species have critical portions of their life stages or behaviors closely associated with fronts, including spawning, feeding, ontogenetic development, migrations, and other activities cued to frontal dynamics. At different life stages, an individual species or population might be linked to different fronts. The nature and strength of associations between fronts and biota depend on numerous factors such as the physical nature and spatio-temporal scales of the front and the species and their life stages in question. In other words, fronts support many different niches and micro/macro-habitats over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  6. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  7. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  8. Sources of frontogenesis in the Equatorial Atlantic Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordani, Hervé; Caniaux, Guy

    2014-05-01

    The Equatorial Atlantic front is located along 1°N in the eastern equatorial Atlantic basin, at the northern boundary of the cold tongue. It separates the cold waters of the southern cold tongue from the warmest, tropical waters circulating in the Gulf of Guinea. This seasonal front appears every year from May to August, and is characterized by meridional SST gradients up to 2 to 3°C/20 km. It is thought to play an important role for the circulation in the marine atmospheric boundary layer and influence the coastal precipitation and the western African monsoon onset. In this presentation the processes at the origin of the equatorial front were investigated. For that, diagnosis of the frontogenesis forcings were applied on a realistic high-resolution simulation of the equatorial Atlantic in 2006. It is found that the turbulent forcing term associated with the mixed layer turbulent heat fluxes is frontolitic (meaning a destruction of the front). However, a splitting of the turbulent forcing into its low and high-frequency (wavy) components, indicates that the low-frequency forcing may initiate the equatorial front, a forcing that is finally amplified and fully maintained by dynamical effects. Finally, the dynamic forcing has a leading frontogenetic role (meaning a reinforcement of the front) and is fully driven by the meridional convergence between the Guinea Current and the South Equatorial Current.

  9. Physiological processes during winter dormancy and their ecological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Havranek, W.M.; Tranquillini, W.

    1995-07-01

    Lengthy and severe winters require that trees in the forests of boreal and mountain zones undergo winter dormancy. Physiologically, a high resistance to subfreezing temperatures and concomitant dehydration are necessary. To accomplish this dormancy, both physiological and structural changes are needed at the cellular level that require induction by endogenous and photoperiodic control early in autumn. Endogenous rhythmicity promotes cold hardening in early autumn and the persistence of hardiness throughout the winter. Numerous physiological functions are maintained at a reduced level, or become completely inhibited during true winter dormancy. Winter hardiness also includes the capability to minimize water loss effectively when water uptake is severely impeded or impossible. Anatomical features such as tracheids act to minimize xylem embolism during frequent freeze-thaw cycles, and {open_quotes}crown{close_quotes} tissues enable buds to stay in a dehydrated and, thus, more resistant state during winter. Both these structural features are adaptations that contribute to the dominance of conifers in cold climates. Interestingly, deciduous tree species rather than evergreen conifers dominate in the most severe winter climates, although it is not clear whether limitations during winter, during the summer growth period, or during both are most limiting to conifer tree ecology. Additional work that evaluates the importance of winter and summer growth restriction, and their interaction, is needed before a comprehensive understanding of conifer tree ecophysiology will be possible.

  10. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  11. Cold Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Eileen; Salazar, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Discusses ways of preparing school-building roofs for the winter season by paying attention to common problem areas. Also highlights the use of white elastomeric roof coatings, their benefits, and considerations when applying them. (GR)

  12. Dehydration in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Jensen, Eric; Podolske, James; Selkirk, Henry; Anderson, Bruce; Avery, Melody; Diskin. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Recent work has shown that limited amounts of tropospheric air can penetrate as much as 1 km into the middleworld stratosphere during the arctic winter. This, coupled with temperatures that are cold enough to produce saturation mixing ratios of less than 5 ppmv at the tropopause, results in stratospheric cloud formation and upper tropospheric dehydration. Even though these "cold outbreaks" occupy only a small portion of the area in the arctic (1-2%), their importance is magnified by an order of magnitude because of the air flow through them. This is reinforced by evidence of progressive drying through the winter measured during SOLVE-1. The significance of this process lies in its effect on the upper tropospheric water content of the middle and high latitude tropopause region, which plays an important role in regulating the earth's radiative balance. There appears to be significant year-to-year variability in the incidence of the cold outbreaks. This work has two parts. First, we describe case studies of dehydration taken from the SOLVE and SOLVE2 aircraft sampling missions during the Arctic winters of 2000 and 2003 respectively. Trajectory based microphysical modeling is employed to examine the sensitivity of the dehydration to microphysical parameters and the nature of sub-grid scale temperature fluctuations. We then examine the year-to-year variations in potential dehydration using a trajectory climatology.

  13. Laboratory experiments on fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, F.; Griffiths, R. W.; Linden, P. F.

    We describe a laboratory model of an upwelling front in a two-layer stratification. In the model the interface between the two layers slopes upwards toward a vertical boundary (or coastline) and can intersect the free surface to produce a front. Fluid motion in each layer is density driven and, in the undisturbed state, is in quasi-geostrophic balance. The front is observed to be unstable to (ageostrophic) disturbances with an along-front wavelength proportional to the Rossby radius of deformation. At very large amplitudes these unstable waves form closed circulations. However, in contrast to the behaviour of fronts far from vertical boundaries, where cyclone-anticyclone vortex pairs are formed, the presence of the coastline inhibits formation of anticyclonic eddies in the upper layer and enhances cyclonic rings of upper layer fluid which lie above cyclonic eddies in the lower layer. The cyclones move away from the vertical boundary and (as is also the case when no vertical boundary is present) they appear at the surface as eddies containing lower layer fluid on the seaward side of the mean frontal position.

  14. Synoptic climatological analysis of persistent cold air pools over the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabóné André, Karolina; Bartholy, Judit; Pongrácz, Rita

    2016-04-01

    A persistent cold air pool (PCAP) is a winter-time, anticyclone-related weather event over a relatively large basin. During this time the air is colder near the surface than aloft. This inversion near the surface can last even for weeks. As the cold air cools down, relative humidity increases and fog forms. The entire life cycle of a PCAP depends on the large scale circulation pattern. PCAP usually appears when an anticyclone builds up after a cold front passed over the examined basin, and it is usually destructed by a coming strong cold front of another midlatitude cyclone. Moreover, the intensity of the anticyclone affects the intensity of the PCAP. PCAP may result in different hazards for the population: (1) Temperature inversion in the surface layers together with weak wind may lead to severe air pollution causing health problems for many people, especially, elderly and children. (2) The fog and/or smog during chilly weather conditions often results in freezing rain. Both fog and freezing rain can distract transportation and electricity supply. Unfortunately, the numerical weather prediction models have difficulties to predict PCAP formation and destruction. One of the reasons is that PCAP is not defined objectively with a simple formula, which could be easily applied to the numerical output data. However, according to some recommendations from the synoptic literature, the shallow convective potential energy (SCPE) can be used to mathematically describe PCAP. In this study, we used the ERA-Interim reanalysis datasets to examine this very specific weather event (i.e., PCAP) over the Carpathian Basin. The connection between the mean sea level pressure and some PCAP measures (e.g., SCPE, energy deficit, etc.) is evaluated. For instance, we used logistic regression to identify PCAP periods over the Carpathian Basin. Then, further statistical analysis includes the evaluation of the length and intensity of these PCAP periods.

  15. Winters fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-27

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter`s pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter`s, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year`s STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories.

  16. Interannual salinity variability of the Northern Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Yu, Fei; Diao, Xinyuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses the interannual variability of the Northern Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (NYSCWM) and the factors that influence it, based on survey data from the 1976-2006 national standard section and the Korea Oceanographic Data Center, monthly E-P flux data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, and meridional wind speed data from the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set. The results show that: 1) the mean salinity of the NYSCWM center has a slightly decreasing trend, which is not consistent with the high salinity center; 2) both the southern salinity front and the halocline of the NYSCWM display a weakening trend, which indicates that the difference between the NYSCWM and coastal water decreases; 3) the Yellow Sea Warm Current intrusion, the E-P flux of the northern Yellow Sea, and the strength of the winter monsoon will affect the NYSCWM salinity during the following summer.

  17. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  18. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  19. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  20. Condensation during Titan's Polar Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kok, Remco; Irwin, P. G.; Teanby, N. A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Howett, C. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Bowles, N. E.; Taylor, F. W.

    2007-10-01

    Titan is currently experiencing winter in its northern hemisphere and the lower atmosphere of its north polar region has been in prolonged darkness since the solstice in October 2002. As a result, the north polar region is currently characterised by cold stratospheric temperatures and there is enrichment of trace gases due to downward atmospheric motion (e.g. Teanby et al., Icarus 181 pp. 243-255, 2006). These conditions make the polar winter very suitable for cloud formation in the stratosphere. A simple transport and condensation model has been made to explore condensation processes in Titan's northern stratosphere. In the model, the atmosphere is advected downwards and clouds are formed as the saturation pressure of various gases is reached. Upper limits of the gases C4N2 and propionitrile (C2H5CN) were determined from Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer data to assess scenarios of chemical disequilibrium where the gas phase is far less abundant than the solid phase. The upper limit for C4N2 is 9e-9, which discounts the massive C4N2 build-up in the polar winter proposed by Samuelson et al. (PSS 45, pp. 941-948, 1997) to explain the observed C4N2 cloud at the Voyager epoch. The propionitrile upper limit is 8e-9, which is several orders of magnitude less than needed to create the condensate feature at 220 cm-1 of Khanna (Icarus 177, pp. 116-121) and de Kok et al. (Icarus, in press), assuming it is propionitrile ice, under the steady-state conditions explored by the aformentioned model. HCN ice seems to play an important role in the formation of a massive polar cloud (Haze B in de Kok et al., Icarus, in press), because of the unavailability of sufficient condensable gas other than HCN (and possibly HC3N) to produce the condensate features seen in far-infrared spectra at 220 cm-1.

  1. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  2. Nuclear winter: the implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    It is generally believed possible for some range of heavy nuclear attacks directed against cities that significant but not lethal climate alteration will ensue for at least a few weeks. Three-dimensional global circulation models being developed and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research for a reasonable attack size seem to be converging on a temperature depression of the order of 10 to 15/degree/C, averaged over all land areas of the temperate region of the northern hemisphere. Temperature depressions as large as 25/degree/C are predicted in the interiors of continents for attacks in the summertime. Winter wars produce temperature depressions of only a few degrees. The authors have drawn the following implications for civil defense of the possibility of nuclear winter: (1) Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival. (2) The principal threat of nuclear winter is to agriculture. (3) Nuclear winter does not present an entirely new threat from nuclear war to the United States or the Soviet Union. (4) The consequences of nuclear winter would fall more heavily on the Soviet Union.

  3. When hot water freezes before cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is due to freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. The solutes are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reducing the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reducing the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the freezing front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  4. 9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY (LEFT) AND BLANK WALL (CENTER) CORRESPONDING TO LOCATION OF INTERIOR VAULTS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  5. 35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front of powerhouse and car barn. 'Annex' is right end of building. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 4. BARRACKS, WITH PARKING LOT IN FRONT, FRONT AND RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BARRACKS, WITH PARKING LOT IN FRONT, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Barracks No. 2, North end of base, southeast of Barracks No. 1 & northeast of Mess Hall, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  7. 1. BARRACKS, WITH PARKING LOT IN FRONT, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BARRACKS, WITH PARKING LOT IN FRONT, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Barracks No. 2, North end of base, southeast of Barracks No. 1 & northeast of Mess Hall, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  8. 3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side elevation. Note gasoline sign post added. Flush store window not altered, 1900 clapboard siding and panelling remaining. - 510 Central Avenue (Commercial Building), Ridgely, Caroline County, MD

  9. The role of Xylella fastidiosa cold shock proteins in Pierce’s disease of grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pierce’s disease of grapevine, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is limited to warmer climates, and plant infection can be eliminated by cold winter conditions. Milder winters can increase the likelihood of pathogen persistence from one growing season to the next. Cold adaptat...

  10. Genes critical for the induction of cold acclimation in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenotypic studies have shown that cold acclimation in wheat and its relatives start at different temperatures. To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms that regulate the induction of cold-acclimation process in cereals we compared the expression of genes in winter-habit (winter Norstar and w...

  11. Subtropical Shelf Front off eastern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piola, Alberto R.; Campos, Edmo J. D.; MöLler, Osmar O.; Charo, Marcela; Martinez, Carlos

    2000-03-01

    Historical hydrographic data from the continental shelf off eastern South America are used to examine the thermohaline properties of the water masses in the region between 20°S and 40°S. The continental shelf water masses are originated by dilution of open ocean waters of the western boundary currents of the South Atlantic Ocean. On the basis of temperature-salinity relation, two distinct water masses are identified, namely, the Subantarctic Shelf Water and the Subtropical Shelf Water. Subantarctic Shelf Water originates by dilution of Subantarctic Water, primarily in the southeast Pacific, due to excess precipitation and continental runoff and enters the continental shelf near 55°S. The Subtropical Shelf Water is modified South Atlantic Central Water diluted by continental runoff from the coast of Brazil. In addition, substantial dilution of the upper shelf waters takes place at the mouth of Río de la Plata (approximately located at 36°S) and, in a lesser extent, at the Patos-Mirim Lagoon (at 32°S). The Río de la Plata and the Patos outflows form a low-salinity tongue that caps the shelf water leading to a salinity decrease to values <30. The low-salinity tongue extends northward over the shelf penetrating farther north in winter than in summer. The extent of the low-salinity water has a strong impact on the vertical stratification and acts to limit winter convection to the layer above the halocline. There is little or no indication of mixing between Subantarctic Shelf Water and Subtropical Shelf Water. An intense temperature, salinity, and nutrient front separates these water masses. The front is oriented along the north-south direction, located on average near the 50 m isobath at 32°S and extends southward toward the shelf break near 36°S. Between 32° and 34°S the Subtropical Shelf Front follows the 100 to 200 m isobaths and separates Subantarctic Shelf Water from the oceanic South Atlantic Central Water. On the basis of the temperature and salinity

  12. Impact of declining Arctic sea ice on winter snowfall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiping; Curry, Judith A; Wang, Huijun; Song, Mirong; Horton, Radley M

    2012-03-13

    While the Arctic region has been warming strongly in recent decades, anomalously large snowfall in recent winters has affected large parts of North America, Europe, and east Asia. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in autumn Arctic sea ice area is linked to changes in the winter Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation that have some resemblance to the negative phase of the winter Arctic oscillation. However, the atmospheric circulation change linked to the reduction of sea ice shows much broader meridional meanders in midlatitudes and clearly different interannual variability than the classical Arctic oscillation. This circulation change results in more frequent episodes of blocking patterns that lead to increased cold surges over large parts of northern continents. Moreover, the increase in atmospheric water vapor content in the Arctic region during late autumn and winter driven locally by the reduction of sea ice provides enhanced moisture sources, supporting increased heavy snowfall in Europe during early winter and the northeastern and midwestern United States during winter. We conclude that the recent decline of Arctic sea ice has played a critical role in recent cold and snowy winters.

  13. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  14. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  15. ARIEL front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Baartman, R. A.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF will greatly expand the variety and availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) (Laxdal, Nucl Inst Methods Phys Res B 204:400-409, 2003). The ARIEL front end connects the two ARIEL target stations to the existing ISAC facility to expand delivery to two and eventually three simultaneous RIB beams with up to two simultaneous accelerated beams (Laxdal et al. 2008). The low-energy beam transport lines and mass separators are designed for maximum flexibility to allow a variety of operational modes in order to optimize the radioactive ion beam delivery. A new accelerator path is conceived for high mass delivery from an EBIS charge state breeder. The front-end design utilizes the experience gained in 15 years of ISAC beam delivery.

  16. Theory of pinned fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of a front between two different phases in the presence of a smoothly inhomogeneous external field that takes its critical value at the crossing point is analyzed. Two generic scenarios are studied. In the first, the system admits a bistable solution and the external field governs the rate in which one phase invades the other. The second mechanism corresponds to a continuous transition that, in the case of reactive systems, takes the form of a transcritical bifurcation at the crossing point. We solve for the front shape and for the response of competitive fronts to external noise, showing that static properties and also some of the dynamical features cannot discriminate between the two scenarios. A reliable indicator turns out to be the fluctuation statistics. These take a Gaussian form in the bifurcation case and a double-peaked shape in a bistable system. Our results are discussed in the context of biological processes, such as species and communities dynamics in the presence of a resource gradient.

  17. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  18. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  19. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  20. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  1. The Winter Is Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    1985-01-01

    Teacher, writer, and naturalist Phyllis S. Busch takes the reader on an early evening woodland walk in March, describing the many changes in plants and animals that are perceptible by sight, smell, and sound as nature awakens from winter. (NEC)

  2. Link between warm conveyor belts and fronts and the impact on extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, Jennifer; Madonna, Erica; Joos, Hanna; Wernli, Heini; Rudeva, Irina; Simmonds, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The various dynamical features within extratropical cyclones have been shown to be very important for the precipitation produced by these systems. Warm conveyor belts (WCBs) and fronts are both strongly associated with total and extreme precipitation in the midlatitudes. Here we have brought together two automated feature detection methods to answer questions on the frequency of matching of fronts and WCBs, whether this depends on frontal type or height of WCB, and the impact this matching has on extreme precipitation events. We find that WCBs and fronts are strongly related in the midlatitudes - annually 60% of WCBs are associated with cold fronts and around 50% associated with warm fronts, and a fairly large proportion associated with both together. The frequency of linked WCBs and fronts shows a strong seasonal cycle. In some regions warm fronts are more strongly linked to WCBs than cold fronts. To the east of Australia in particular, there are often WCBs not associated with fronts at all. Fronts that co-occur with a WCB are much more likely to produce an extreme precipitation event.

  3. Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

  4. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  5. Factors affecting the distribution of mallards wintering in the Mississippi alluvial valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Reinecke, K.J.; Hines, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) is the principal wintering area for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos ) in the Mississippi Flyway. Here the authors consider it a distinct habitat, i.e., fitness is relatively homogeneous among ducks within the MAV but different from that of ducks in other such habitats. They analyzed recovery distributions of mallards banded preseason (July-September 1950-1980) to test hypotheses concerning the effects of winter temperatures, precipitation, and population levels on mallard winter distribution. When two groups of years that comprised extremes of warm and cold winter weather were compared, recovery distributions of all four age and sex classes (adult males and females, young males and females) differed significantly; recoveries were located farther south in cold years. The authors concluded that temperature, water conditions, and population size affect the habitat suitability of mallard wintering areas and that mallards exhibit considerable flexibility in winter distribution associated with these factors.

  6. Logistic Regression Analysis of Freezing Tolerance in Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four winter wheat cultivars, Eltan, Froid, Kestrel, and Tiber, were cold-acclimated for five weeks and then tested for freezing tolerance in a programmable freezer. The temperature of the soil was recorded every two minutes and the freezing episode was described as five parameters: the minimum temp...

  7. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  8. Simple front tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J.W.; Li, X.; Zhao, N.

    1999-04-01

    A new and simplified front tracking algorithm has been developed as an aspect of the extension of this algorithm to three dimensions. Here the authors emphasize two main results: (1) a simplified description of the microtopology of the interface, based on interface crossings with cell block edges, and (2) an improved algorithm for the interaction of a tracked contact discontinuity with an untracked shock wave. For the latter question, they focus on the post interaction jump at the contact, which is a purely 1D issue. Comparisons to other methods, including the level set method, are included.

  9. Membrane stability of winter wheat plants exposed to subzero temperatures for variable lengths of time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to survive episodes of subfreezing temperature is essential to winter wheat. Fully cold-acclimated plants of six lines of winter wheat were exposed to -12, -14, -16 or -18° C, four 1-5 hours. Electrolyte leakage and plant survival were used to assess damage to the plants. Plants exposed ...

  10. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  11. Structure and Propagation of Fronts East of the Rocky Mountains and Their Relationship to Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jonathan Edward

    1992-01-01

    The role of frontogenetic processes in generating and distributing precipitation east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States is examined using data collected during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE). A set of mid-tropospheric, frontogenetic, precipitation -producing features are discussed. A recurrent, non-classical, synoptic scale structure characterized these cases. Based on observations from four cases, a conceptual model is proposed for these structures; the cold frontogenesis aloft (CFA) model. In one case study, the secondary circulation about an upper-level front, in a region of conditional symmetric instability (CSI), produced a rainband of moderate intensity. The potential influence of upper-level frontogenesis processes on the evolution of the CSI is explored through Lagrangian, adiabatic changes in the equivalent potential vorticity. The interactions between a surface cold front and an upper-level front that resulted in the production of a deep, precipitating frontal structure is examined. An increase in the vigor of the frontal convection is attributed to favorable vertical superposition of the surface cold front and the upper-level front. Mid-level latent heat release was likely responsible for the diabatic steepening of the dynamic tropopause. This steepening contributed to the subsequent rapid development of a surface cyclone on the East Coast. The mesoscale structure and distribution of precipitation along a surface cold front is investigated. The precipitation cores in a narrow cold-frontal rainband (NCFR) showed some differences, as well as similarities, to previously observed NCFRs. A correspondence between precipitation intensity and the slope of the frontal surface was observed for a wide cold-frontal rainband (WCFR) associated with this cold front. The nature of this correspondence is investigated and some possible mechanisms for changing the slope of the frontal topography are examined.

  12. Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159805.html Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold Healthy body temperature boosts ability of immune system ... proving Mom right: Your odds of avoiding a cold get better if you bundle up and stay ...

  13. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  14. New Front End Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D; Jovanovic, I; Comaskey, B J

    2001-02-01

    The next generation of Petawatt class lasers will require the development of new laser technology. Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) holds a potential to increase the peak power level to >10 PW with existing grating technology through ultrashort pulses. Furthermore, by utilizing a new type of front-end system based on optical parametric amplification, pulses can be produced with substantially higher contrast than with Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier technology. We performed extensive study of OPCPA using a single crystal-based OPA. We developed a replacement for Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier for high peak power lasers based on OPCPA, with an output of 30 mJ, at 10 Hz repetition rate and 16.5 nm spectral bandwidth. We developed a 3D numerical model for OPCPA and we performed a theoretical study of influences of pump laser beam quality on optical parametric amplification. Our results indicate that OPCPA represents a valid replacement for Ti:sapphire in the front end of high energy short pulse lasers.

  15. From the front

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The causes of recent dynamic thinning of Greenland's outlet glaciers have been debated. Realistic simulations suggest that changes at the marine fronts of these glaciers are to blame, implying that dynamic thinning will cease once the glaciers retreat to higher ground. For the last decade, many outlet glaciers in Greenland that terminate in the ocean have accelerated, thinned, and retreated. To explain these dynamic changes, two hypotheses have been discussed. Atmospheric warming has increased surface melting and may also have increased the amount of meltwater reaching the glacier bed, increasing lubrication at the base and hence the rate of glacier sliding. Alternatively, a change in the delicate balance of forces where the glacier fronts meet the ocean could trigger the changes. Faezeh Nick and colleagues5 present ice-sheet modeling experiments that mimic the observations on Helheim glacier, East Greenland, and suggest that the dynamic behaviour of outlet glaciers follows from perturbations at their marine fronts. Greenland's ice sheet loses mass partly through surface melting and partly through fast flowing outlet glaciers that connect the vast plateau of inland ice with the ocean. Earlier ice sheet models have failed to reproduce the dynamic variability exhibited by ice sheets over time. It has therefore not been possible to distinguish with confidence between basal lubrication from surface meltwater and changes at the glaciers' marine fronts as causes for the observed changes on Greenland's outlet glaciers. But this distinction bears directly on future sea-level rise, the raison d'etre of much of modern-day glaciology: If the recent dynamic mass loss Greenland's outlet glaciers is linked to changing atmospheric temperatures, it may continue for as long as temperatures continue to increase. On the other hand, if the source of the dynamic mass loss is a perturbation at the ice-ocean boundary, these glaciers will lose contact with that perturbation after a finite

  16. Winter precipitation change in South China in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jingning

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation change is one of important climate researches in China, but winter precipitation variation in South China has not been studied so frequently. In China, it is rainy when hot; so summer precipitation is usually one focus in research, esp. in South China. However, winter precipitation and its change influence people profoundly in South China, also. The most recent example is what happened over South China in winter 2008. In this winter, millions of people suffered from the unusual cold and snowy winter. It led to huge loss in economy and traffic as well. Roads closed and railway stations were jammed and crowded with people; many planes were grounded for heavy snow and bad weather. Transmission lines faulted in the mountains. The ommunication signals were affected. Everyday food supply including vegetables and meats had to be delayed or interrupted. In some city even water supply was interrupted. And garbage in the city was piled up. Just in this winter the snow depth and coverage area in many places in South China broke or equaled the historical records. In fact, it isn't the only one unusual winter precipitation event in South China. Since 1950s, several freezing and snowy winters struck the South in China. In this research, winter precipitation change in recent years in South China has been discussed based on the precipitation observations. The associated large scale atmospheric circulation change is also analyzed. It is found that snowy winter in South China hardly comes in most periods of 2000s, but in recent decades this heavy snow in winter has appeared several times as observations shows. This phenomenon could be related to the large scale atmospheric circulation change.

  17. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  18. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  19. Strong Costs and Benefits of Winter Acclimatization in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Schou, Mads Fristrup; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies on thermal acclimation in insects are often performed on animals acclimated in the laboratory under conditions that are not ecologically relevant. Costs and benefits of acclimation responses under such conditions may not reflect costs and benefits in natural populations subjected to daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations. Here we estimated costs and benefits in thermal tolerance limits in relation to winter acclimatization of Drosophila melanogaster. We sampled flies from a natural habitat during winter in Denmark (field flies) and compared heat and cold tolerance of these to that of flies collected from the same natural population, but acclimated to 25 °C or 13 °C in the laboratory (laboratory flies). We further obtained thermal performance curves for egg-to-adult viability of field and laboratory (25 °C) flies, to estimate possible cross-generational effects of acclimation. We found much higher cold tolerance and a lowered heat tolerance in field flies compared to laboratory flies reared at 25 °C. Flies reared in the laboratory at 13 °C exhibited the same thermal cost-benefit relations as the winter acclimatized flies. We also found a cost of winter acclimatization in terms of decreased egg-to-adult viability at high temperatures of eggs laid by winter acclimatized flies. Based on our findings we suggest that winter acclimatization in nature can induce strong benefits in terms of increased cold tolerance. These benefits can be reproduced in the laboratory under ecologically relevant rearing and testing conditions, and should be incorporated in species distribution modelling. Winter acclimatization also leads to decreased heat tolerance. This may create a mismatch between acclimation responses and the thermal environment, e.g. if temperatures suddenly increase during spring, under current and expected more variable future climatic conditions.

  20. Strong Costs and Benefits of Winter Acclimatization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Mads Fristrup; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies on thermal acclimation in insects are often performed on animals acclimated in the laboratory under conditions that are not ecologically relevant. Costs and benefits of acclimation responses under such conditions may not reflect costs and benefits in natural populations subjected to daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations. Here we estimated costs and benefits in thermal tolerance limits in relation to winter acclimatization of Drosophila melanogaster. We sampled flies from a natural habitat during winter in Denmark (field flies) and compared heat and cold tolerance of these to that of flies collected from the same natural population, but acclimated to 25 °C or 13 °C in the laboratory (laboratory flies). We further obtained thermal performance curves for egg-to-adult viability of field and laboratory (25 °C) flies, to estimate possible cross-generational effects of acclimation. We found much higher cold tolerance and a lowered heat tolerance in field flies compared to laboratory flies reared at 25 °C. Flies reared in the laboratory at 13 °C exhibited the same thermal cost-benefit relations as the winter acclimatized flies. We also found a cost of winter acclimatization in terms of decreased egg-to-adult viability at high temperatures of eggs laid by winter acclimatized flies. Based on our findings we suggest that winter acclimatization in nature can induce strong benefits in terms of increased cold tolerance. These benefits can be reproduced in the laboratory under ecologically relevant rearing and testing conditions, and should be incorporated in species distribution modelling. Winter acclimatization also leads to decreased heat tolerance. This may create a mismatch between acclimation responses and the thermal environment, e.g. if temperatures suddenly increase during spring, under current and expected more variable future climatic conditions. PMID:26075607

  1. Logistic Regression Analysis of the Response of Winter Wheat to Components of Artificial Freezing Episodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of cold tolerance of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) through breeding methods has been problematic. A better understanding of how individual wheat cultivars respond to components of the freezing process may provide new information that can be used to develop more cold tolerance culti...

  2. Logistic regression analysis of the response of winter wheat to components of artificial freezing episodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of cold tolerance of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) through breeding methods has been problematic. A better understanding of how individual wheat cultivars respond to components of the freezing process may provide new information that can be used to develop more cold tolerance culti...

  3. Winter depression and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Christine R

    2012-12-01

    Depression is a common and often harmful disorder, which is frequently associated with the winter season. Research has shown a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus and depression. Furthermore, diabetics with depression have a higher rate of adverse outcomes. Little has been published regarding the seasonality of depression in diabetics. The case report described in this article concerns a 65-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes and a history of winter depression. Current evidence-based management options are reviewed. PMID:23089656

  4. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  5. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  6. FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Junior Officers' Quarters Type, 9-10 Hale Alii Avenue, 1-2 Eighth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Role of surface heat fluxes underneath cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, Pierre; Garelli, Alix; Park, Seung-Bu; Nie, Ji; Torri, Giuseppe; Kuang, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes underneath cold pools is investigated using cloud-resolving simulations with either interactive or horizontally homogenous surface heat fluxes over an ocean and a simplified land surface. Over the ocean, there are limited changes in the distribution of the cold pool temperature, humidity, and gust front velocity, yet interactive heat fluxes induce more cold pools, which are smaller, and convection is then less organized. Correspondingly, the updraft mass flux and lateral entrainment are modified. Over the land surface, the heat fluxes underneath cold pools drastically impact the cold pool characteristics with more numerous and smaller pools, which are warmer and more humid and accompanied by smaller gust front velocities. The interactive fluxes also modify the updraft mass flux and reduce convective organization. These results emphasize the importance of interactive surface fluxes instead of prescribed flux boundary conditions, as well as the formulation of surface heat fluxes, when studying convection.

  8. Role of surface heat fluxes underneath cold pools

    PubMed Central

    Garelli, Alix; Park, Seung‐Bu; Nie, Ji; Torri, Giuseppe; Kuang, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of surface heat fluxes underneath cold pools is investigated using cloud‐resolving simulations with either interactive or horizontally homogenous surface heat fluxes over an ocean and a simplified land surface. Over the ocean, there are limited changes in the distribution of the cold pool temperature, humidity, and gust front velocity, yet interactive heat fluxes induce more cold pools, which are smaller, and convection is then less organized. Correspondingly, the updraft mass flux and lateral entrainment are modified. Over the land surface, the heat fluxes underneath cold pools drastically impact the cold pool characteristics with more numerous and smaller pools, which are warmer and more humid and accompanied by smaller gust front velocities. The interactive fluxes also modify the updraft mass flux and reduce convective organization. These results emphasize the importance of interactive surface fluxes instead of prescribed flux boundary conditions, as well as the formulation of surface heat fluxes, when studying convection. PMID:27134320

  9. The News. Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This Winter 2007 quarterly newsletter from the Community College League of California includes: (1) Incumbents: Some Win, Some Lose in November Trustee Elections; (2) Voters Approve $2 Billion in Bonds; (3) Photos from the "Together We Can" conference; (4) Report, Media Criticize Transfer, Completion Rates and Colleges; (5) District Leader…

  10. Teaching Ecology in Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching ecology in the winter. Suggested topic areas or units include snow insulation and density, snowflakes and snow crystals, goldenrod galls, bird behavior, survival techniques, bacteriology and decomposition, trees and keying, biomass and productivity, pollution, and soil organisms. A sample student activity sheet is…

  11. Winter Playscape Dreaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2006-01-01

    Winter, like all seasons, adds a new sense of mystery and discovery to the world of young children. It is the time when they can study snowflakes, find icicles, or observe the birds that share their yards. This article presents ideas and suggestions on how to plan a playscape. A playscape is a man-made seasonal playground for young children. It…

  12. Titan's Emergence from Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard; Jennings, Donald; Schinder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the changes in Titans thermal structure derived from Cassini CIRS and radio-occultation data during the transition from winter to early spring. Titan's surface, and middle atmosphere show noticeable seasonal change, whereas that in most of the troposphere is mated. This can be understood in terms of the relatively small radiative relaxation time in the middle atmosphere and much larger time scale in the troposphere. The surface exhibits seasonal change because the heat capacity in an annual skin depth is much smaller than that in the lowest scale height of the troposphere. Surface temperatures rise 1 K at raid and high latitudes in the winter northern hemisphere and cool in the southern hemisphere. Changes in in the middle atmosphere are more complicated. Temperatures in the middle stratosphere (approximately 1 mbar) increase by a few kelvin at mid northern latitudes, but those at high latitudes first increase as that region moves out of winter shadow, and then decrease. This probably results from the combined effect of increased solar heating as the suit moves higher in the sky and the decreased adiabatic warming as the sinking motions associated with the cross-equatorial meridional cell weaken. Consistent with this interpretation, the warm temperatures observed higher up at the winter polar stratopause cool significantly.

  13. Winter Here and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Joy

    This book contains a wide variety of winter-oriented ideas and activities that can be adapted to all elementary grade levels and can also be integrated into existing mathematics, science, social studies, and/or art programs. The activities aim to help students develop the skills of observation, appreciation, and problem solving as well as…

  14. Cold injury in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I J

    1977-04-01

    Sixteen cases of neonatal cold injury, five of them fatal, were seen in the winter of 1974-75. The affected infants, who weighed from 2.5 to 3 kg. had developed symptoms when the ambient termperature was below 10 C. Few of them were referred as cases of hypothermia. Refusal to eat was the most common complaint and less often edema and/or apathy. No correlation was found between death and ethnic origin, sex, duration of illness or minimum temperature. Admission weight, however, tended to be lower in the infants who died. The consistent finding of thrombocytopenia and the suspected bleeding phenomena suggested that disseminated intravascular coagulation may have been a factor in the unfavorable outcome of some of the cases. Evidence supporting such a hypothesis and proposals for the prevention. Diagnosis and treatment of neonatal cold injury are presented. PMID:326724

  15. Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Jokelainen, Jari; Rintamäki, Hannu; Ruuhela, Reija; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

    2006-09-01

    The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study ( n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),<1 h/week (2 h men, 0 h women) at work, 4 h/week (5 h men, 4 h women) during leisure time and 1 h/week (1 h men, 1.5 h women) while commuting to work. Factors associated with increased occupational cold exposure among men were: being employed in agriculture, forestry and industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being less educated and being aged 55-64 years. Factors associated with increased leisure-time cold exposure among men were: employment in industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being a pensioner or unemployed, reporting at least average health, being physically active and having college or vocational education. Among women, being a housewife, pensioner or unemployed and engaged in physical activity increased leisure-time cold exposure, and young women were more exposed than older ones. Self-rated health was positively associated with leisure time cold exposure in men and only to a minor extent in women. In conclusion, the subjects reported spending 4% of their total time under cold exposure, most of it (71%) during leisure time. Both occupational and leisure-time cold exposure is greater among men than women.

  16. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  17. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    PubMed

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  18. Neandertal cold adaptation: physiological and energetic factors.

    PubMed

    Steegmann, A Theodore; Cerny, Frank J; Holliday, Trenton W

    2002-01-01

    European Neandertals employed a complex set of physiological cold defenses, homologous to those seen in contemporary humans and nonhuman primates. While Neandertal morphological patterns, such as foreshortened extremities and low relative surface-area, may have explained some of the variance in cold resistance, it is suggested the adaptive package was strongly dependent on a rich array of physiological defenses. A summary of the environmental cold conditions in which the Neandertals lived is presented, and a comparative ethnographic model from Tierra del Fuego is used. Muscle and subcutaneous fat are excellent "passive" insulators. Neandertals were quite muscular, but it is unlikely that they could maintain enough superficial body fat to offer much cold protection. A major, high-energy metabolic adaptation facilitated by modest amounts of highly thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT) is proposed. In addition, Neandertals would have been protected by general mammalian cold defenses based on systemic vasoconstriction and intensified by acclimatization, aerobic fitness, and localized cold--induced vasodilation. However, these defenses are energetically expensive. Based on contemporary data from circumpolar peoples, it is estimated that Neandertals required 3,360 to 4,480 kcal per day to support strenuous winter foraging and cold resistance costs. Several specific genetic cold adaptations are also proposed--heat shock protein (actually, stress shock protein), an ACP*1 locus somatic growth factor, and a specialized calcium metabolism not as yet understood. PMID:12203812

  19. Study of a Wind Front over the Northern South China Sea Generated by the Freshening of the North-East Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Wong, Wai Kin; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Chan, Pak Wai

    2015-10-01

    Wind fronts associated with cold-air outbreaks from the Chinese continent in the winter are often observed over the northern South China Sea and are well studied. However, wind fronts caused by another type of synoptic setting, the sudden increase or freshening of the north-east monsoon, which is caused by the merging of two anticyclonic regions over the Chinese continent, are also frequently encountered over the northern South China Sea. For the first time, such an event is investigated using multi-sensor satellite data, weather radar images, and a high-resolution atmospheric numerical model. It is shown that the wind front generated by the freshening of the north-east monsoon is quite similar to wind fronts generated by cold-air outbreaks. Furthermore, we investigate fine-scale features of the wind front that are visible on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images through variations of the small-scale sea-surface roughness. The SAR image was acquired by the Advanced SAR of the European Envisat satellite over the South China Sea off the coast of Hong Kong and has a resolution of 150 m. It shows notches (dents) in the frontal line and also radar signatures of embedded rain cells. This (rare) SAR image, together with a quasi-simultaneously acquired weather radar image, provide excellent data with which to test the performance of the pre-operational version of the Atmospheric Integrated Rapid-cycle (AIR) forecast model system of the Hong Kong Observatory with respect to modelling rain cells at frontal boundaries. The calculations using a horizontal resolution with 3-km resolution show that the model reproduces quite well the position of the notches where rain cells are generated. The model shows further that at the position of the notches the vorticity of the airflow is increased leading to the uplift of warmer, moister air from the sea-surface to higher levels. With respect to the 10-km resolution model, the comparison of model data with the near-surface wind field

  20. Farmers’ Market Expands to Offer Products in Winter | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The 2013 National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick Farmers’ Market regular season may have closed, but that doesn’t mean customers who want fresh produce, handmade crafts, and other homemade goodies from local vendors are out of luck. Winter Markets, which began Jan. 7, will be held every other Tuesday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in front of Building 549 or in the Café Room, depending on the weather.

  1. Winter- and summertime continental influences on tropospheric O3 and CO observed by TES over the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.

    2010-04-01

    The distributions of tropospheric ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO), and the synoptic factors regulating these distributions over the western North Atlantic Ocean during winter and summer were investigated using profile retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for 2004-2006. Seasonal composites of TES retrievals, reprocessed to remove the influence of the a priori on geographical and seasonal structure, exhibited strong seasonal differences. At the 681 hPa level during winter months of December, January and February (DJF) the composite O3 mixing ratios were uniformly low (~45 ppbv), but continental export was evident in a channel of enhanced CO (100-110 ppbv) flowing eastward from the US coast. In summer months June, July, and August (JJA) O3 mixing ratios were variable (45-65 ppbv) and generally higher due to increased photochemical production. The summer distribution also featured a channel of enhanced CO (95-105 ppbv) flowing northeastward around an anticyclone and exiting the continent over the Canadian Maritimes around 50° N. Offshore O3-CO slopes were generally 0.15-0.20 mol mol-1 in JJA, indicative of photochemical O3 production. Composites for 4 predominant synoptic patterns or map types in DJF suggested that export to the lower free troposphere (681 hPa level) was enhanced by the warm conveyor belt airstream of mid-latitude cyclones while stratospheric intrusions increased TES O3 levels at 316 hPa. A major finding in the DJF data was that offshore 681 hPa CO mixing ratios behind cold fronts could be enhanced up to >150 ppbv likely by lofting from the surface via shallow convection resulting from rapid destabilization of cold air flowing over much warmer ocean waters. In JJA composites for 3 map types showed that the general export pattern of the seasonal composites was associated with a synoptic pattern featuring the Bermuda High. However, weak cyclones and frontal troughs could enhance offshore 681 hPa CO mixing ratios to >110 ppbv

  2. Surface properties of ocean fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, P. M.; Hubert, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Background information on oceanic fronts is presented and the results of several models which were developed to study the dynamics of oceanic fronts and their effects on various surface properties are described. The details of the four numerical models used in these studies are given in separate appendices which contain all of the physical equations, program documentation and running instructions for the models.

  3. Active learning of Pareto fronts.

    PubMed

    Campigotto, Paolo; Passerini, Andrea; Battiti, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces the active learning of Pareto fronts (ALP) algorithm, a novel approach to recover the Pareto front of a multiobjective optimization problem. ALP casts the identification of the Pareto front into a supervised machine learning task. This approach enables an analytical model of the Pareto front to be built. The computational effort in generating the supervised information is reduced by an active learning strategy. In particular, the model is learned from a set of informative training objective vectors. The training objective vectors are approximated Pareto-optimal vectors obtained by solving different scalarized problem instances. The experimental results show that ALP achieves an accurate Pareto front approximation with a lower computational effort than state-of-the-art estimation of distribution algorithms and widely known genetic techniques.

  4. Identifying Lagrangian fronts with favourable fishery conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2014-08-01

    Lagrangian fronts (LFs) in the ocean are defined as boundaries between surface waters with strongly different Lagrangian properties. They can be accurately detected in a given velocity field by computing synoptic maps for displacements of synthetic tracers and other Lagrangian indicators. We use Pacific saury catch and location data for a number of commercial fishery seasons in the region of the northwest Pacific with one of the richest fishery in the world. It is shown statistically that the saury fishing grounds with maximal catches are not randomly distributed over the region but located mainly along the sharp LFs where productive cold waters of the Oyashio Current, warmer waters of the southern branch of the Soya Current, and waters of warm-core Kuroshio rings converge. Computation of those fronts in altimetric geostrophic velocity fields both in the years with the First and Second Oyashio Intrusions shows that in spite of different oceanographic conditions LF locations may serve as good indicators of potential fishing grounds. Possible biophysical reasons for saury aggregation near sharp LFs are discussed. We propose a mechanism for effective export of nutrient rich waters based on stretching of material lines in the vicinity of hyperbolic objects in the ocean. The developed method, based on identifying LFs in any velocity fields, is quite general and may be applied to find potential fishing grounds for the other pelagic fish.

  5. Deciduous Plant Twigs in Winter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eloise

    1977-01-01

    Describing, via illustration and narrative, the winter twigs found in the U.S., this article presents a sophisticated discussion of: beech, white ash, aspen, sycamore, red oak, butternut, and other winter twigs. (JC)

  6. Observations of gravity waves at atmospheric fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusamah, Azizan B. Hj

    1990-09-01

    An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s(exp -1). Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behavior in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope.

  7. Feeding ecology of mallards wintering in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorde, D.G.; Krapu, G.L.; Crawford, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Food use by mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) wintering on the Platte River in south central Nebraska was determined from mid-December to early March 1978-80. Mallards foraged in river channels, irrigation drainage canals, and agricultural areas. Plant matter formed 97% of the diet (dry weight) and diets did not vary between sexes (P > 0.05). Waste corn was the principal food consumed and formed 46 and 62% of the diets of males and females, respectively. Milo, common duckweed (Lemna minor), smartweed (Polygonum spp.), and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa muricata) composed most of the remaining plant matter ingested. Mallards fed intensively in riparian wetland habitat to obtain invertebrates, but few were consumed because of limited abundance. Dietary protein was lower than reported among mallards wintering in Louisiana. Field feeding occurred primarily in grazed corn stubble and cattle feedlots. The distances traveled to feed, and the duration and timing of feeding varied with snow cover and season phenology. Competition for food was markedly higher during the cold winter of 1979 when heavy snow cover was present.

  8. Climatological characteristics of fronts in the western North Pacific based on surface weather charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Hyungjun; Seto, Shinta; Kanae, Shinjiro; Oki, Taikan

    2014-08-01

    Composite front climatology in the western North Pacific is determined using a newly developed 1.0° gridded data set. Here we propose a research strategy for determining the spatiotemporal distribution of fronts using weather chart images published by the Japan Meteorological Agency, one of the major data providers in the region. A preliminarily investigation of the internal data characteristics for the period of 2000-2010 is undertaken, and the final 4 years of data are used for an analysis of front climatology to avoid the effect of any spurious trends. This enables in-depth analyses to be conducted, which have not previously been possible in the region, including the composites of cross-sectional patterns for the thermal fields and precipitation near fronts, front length seasonality, and the significance of the thermal gradient near the fronts, in addition to determining the frontal frequency and spatial distribution of frontal precipitation. Pixel-wise analysis reveals that 56% of the local precipitation maximum is located on the warm side of a cold front caused by less tilted upward motion on the warm side, with the intrusion of the upper level cold dry air into the warm side. This new data set also enables a further analysis of the occluded fronts, which are not correctly distinguished in the existing objective detection method.

  9. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  10. Assessment of cold stress in outdoor work.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of cold stress in working life was done in 13, mainly outdoor, occupations and 143 workers using local temperatures, body cooling and thermal sensations. The subjects in the study were young, healthy men and they wore the type of winter clothing generally used in those ambient temperatures (+6...-29 degrees C), for in a work load of from 112 to 480 W. Local temperatures on finger skin indicated that manual dexterity was often reduced in outdoor work. A risk of frostbite was frequently found on the cheek and the wind chill index predicted the risk quite well. Body cooling was often temporarily too high when measured by heat debt and mean skin temperature. Thermal sensations were cool or cold occasionally in 28% of the workers interviewed. The insulation of clothing worn was often lower than the IREQmin-value recommends. The results showed that in outdoor work in winter time cold stress frequently reduced (70%) working ability at least for a short period. Mean skin temperature seems to be, in practice, a useful indicator for body cooling and the IREQmin-value was suitable, especially in light work, to indicate body cooling. A very sensitive factor for the expression of cold stress was finger temperature, at least as an indicator of finger dexterity. Due to the adverse health effects found the cold stress should also be evaluated more systematically in occupational health and safety with health examinations, with protective clothing and technical preventive means. PMID:8049001

  11. Assessment of cold stress in outdoor work.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of cold stress in working life was done in 13, mainly outdoor, occupations and 143 workers using local temperatures, body cooling and thermal sensations. The subjects in the study were young, healthy men and they wore the type of winter clothing generally used in those ambient temperatures (+6...-29 degrees C), for in a work load of from 112 to 480 W. Local temperatures on finger skin indicated that manual dexterity was often reduced in outdoor work. A risk of frostbite was frequently found on the cheek and the wind chill index predicted the risk quite well. Body cooling was often temporarily too high when measured by heat debt and mean skin temperature. Thermal sensations were cool or cold occasionally in 28% of the workers interviewed. The insulation of clothing worn was often lower than the IREQmin-value recommends. The results showed that in outdoor work in winter time cold stress frequently reduced (70%) working ability at least for a short period. Mean skin temperature seems to be, in practice, a useful indicator for body cooling and the IREQmin-value was suitable, especially in light work, to indicate body cooling. A very sensitive factor for the expression of cold stress was finger temperature, at least as an indicator of finger dexterity. Due to the adverse health effects found the cold stress should also be evaluated more systematically in occupational health and safety with health examinations, with protective clothing and technical preventive means.

  12. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  13. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  14. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts. They do not protect against getting a ...

  15. Instability of Magnetized Ionization Fronts Surrounding H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2014-12-01

    An ionization front (IF) surrounding an H II region is a sharp interface where a cold neutral gas makes the transition to a warm ionized phase by absorbing UV photons from central stars. We investigate the instability of a plane-parallel D-type IF threaded by parallel magnetic fields, by neglecting the effects of recombination within the ionized gas. We find that weak D-type IFs always have the post-IF magnetosonic Mach number {M}_M2 ≤ 1. For such fronts, magnetic fields increase the maximum propagation speed of the IFs, while reducing the expansion factor α by a factor of 1 + 1/(2β1) compared to the unmagnetized case, with β1 denoting the plasma beta in the pre-IF region. IFs become unstable to distortional perturbations owing to gas expansion across the fronts, exactly analogous to the Darrieus-Landau instability of ablation fronts in terrestrial flames. The growth rate of the IF instability is proportional linearly to the perturbation wavenumber, as well as the upstream flow speed, and approximately to α1/2. The IF instability is stabilized by gas compressibility and becomes completely quenched when the front is D-critical. The instability is also stabilized by magnetic pressure when the perturbations propagate in the direction perpendicular to the fields. When the perturbations propagate in the direction parallel to the fields, on the other hand, it is magnetic tension that reduces the growth rate, completely suppressing the instability when {M}_M22 < 2/(2β 1 - 1). When the front experiences an acceleration, the IF instability cooperates with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to make the front more unstable.

  16. Instability of Magnetized Ionization Fronts Surrounding H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    An ionization front (IF) surrounding an H II region is a sharp interface through which a cold neutral gas makes transition to a warm ionized phase by absorbing UV photons from central massive stars. We investigate the structure and stability of a plane-parallel D-type IF threaded by parallel magnetic fields. We find that weak D-type IFs always have the post-IF magnetosonic Mach number M_{M2} ≤ 1. For such fronts, magnetic fields increase the maximum propagation speed of the IFs, while reducing the expansion factor by a factor of 1+1/(2β_1) compared to the unmagnetized case, with β_1 denoting the plasma beta in the pre-IF region. IFs become unstable to distortional perturbations due to gas expansion across the fronts, exactly analogous to the Darrieus-Landau instability of ablation fronts in terrestrial flames. The growth rate of the IF instability is proportional linearly to the perturbation wavenumber as well as the upstream flow speed. The IF instability is stabilized by gas compressibility and becomes completely quenched when the front is D-critical. The instability is also stabilized by magnetic pressure when the perturbations propagate in the direction perpendicular to the fields. When the perturbations propagate in the direction parallel to the fields, on the other hand, it is magnetic tension that reduces the growth rate, completely suppressing the instability when M_{M2}^2 < 2/(β_1 - 1). When the front experiences an acceleration, the IF instability cooperates with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to make the front more unstable.

  17. Lagrangian sources of frontogenesis in the equatorial Atlantic front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordani, Hervé; Caniaux, Guy

    2014-12-01

    Estimating the processes that control the north equatorial sea surface temperature (SST)-front on the northern edge of the cold tongue in the tropical Atlantic is a key issue for understanding the dynamics of the oceanic equatorial Atlantic and the West African Monsoon. Diagnosis of the frontogenetic forcings on a realistic high-resolution simulation was used to identify the processes involved in the formation and evolution of the equatorial SST-front. The turbulent forcing associated with the mixed-layer turbulent heat flux was found to be systematically frontolytic while the dynamic forcing associated with currents was found to be frontogenetic for the equatorial SST-front. Nevertheless, the low-frequency component of the turbulent forcing was frontogenetic and initiated the SST-front which was then amplified and maintained by the leading dynamic forcing. This forcing was mainly driven by the meridional convergence of the northern South Equatorial Current (nSEC) and the Guinea Current, which points out the essential role played by the circulation in the equatorial SST-front evolution. The quasi-biweekly variability of the equatorial SST-front and its forcings were found to be more strongly coupled to the wind energy flux ( WEF) than to the surface wind stress. In fact the WEF controlled the convergence/divergence of the nSEC and Guinea Current and thus the meridional component of the leading dynamic forcing. The WEF explains the equatorial SST-front development better than the wind does because it is a coupled ocean-atmosphere process.

  18. Model and observational analysis of the Northeast's regional winter climate and its relationship to the PNA pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, Michael

    A study was performed of the winter climate in the Northeast United States and its relationship to the large-scale circulation. Temperature, radiation, precipitation, and circulation features of the La Nina winter of 1998--1999 were analyzed through observations, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis, and model simulations by SUNYA regional climate model (RCM). The relationship between the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern and regional winter climate of the Northeast was also investigated. Ten Decembers during the 1980s and 1990s were simulated, five with the most positive and five with the most negative PNA index. RCM reproduced the key climate features of the Northeast during the winter of 1998--1999. The model's circulation closely agreed with the reanalysis, particularly in the mid- and upper-troposphere, and with surface wind observations. Spatial and temporal patterns of temperature and precipitation agreed well with observations, despite a cold bias in the boundary layer (2--3°C) and dry bias in precipitation. The use of six-hourly, rather than twelve-hourly, reanalysis boundary conditions improved the diurnal cycle and increased the success at capturing fast-moving systems, such as fronts, and reproducing hourly weather variations. The relationship of the PNA pattern, and other teleconnection patterns, to the Northeast winter climate was investigated. Positive PNA pattern was associated with a stronger, southeastward shifted jet and colder, drier conditions in the Northeast, while mild surface southerlies were more frequent with negative PNA pattern. In the positive PNA simulations, there was a large air-water thermal gradient over the Great Lakes, enhancing evaporation and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. Precipitation and clouds during positive PNA pattern were less abundant across the domain, although lake-effect maxima were well defined. The PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation), PNA, and ENSO (El Nino/Southern Oscillation) teleconnections significantly influenced

  19. Front-line ownership: imagine.

    PubMed

    Matlow, Anne

    2013-01-01

    When used in a military context, the term front line refers to the interface between enemies in action on the battlefield. In a non-military context, the front line is the site where the core activity defining a particular industry takes place, and those working there are key to successful operations. In healthcare, the need to improve patient safety has become a global imperative, and an armamentarium of strategies, tools and technological approaches have been adapted or developed for this context. Often neglected, however, have been strategies to engage the healthcare workers, those at the front line, in the cause.In order for healthcare to function error free, we must assume the characteristics of high-reliability organizations. In particular, the ability to bounce back, to be resilient in the face of a catastrophe, is of paramount importance. Those working at the front line may have the answers. We need to create an opportunity for them to be heard.`

  20. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Karimov, A. R.; Yu, M. Y.; Stenflo, L.

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  1. Restless rays, steady wave fronts.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2007-12-01

    Observations of underwater acoustic fields with vertical line arrays and numerical simulations of long-range sound propagation in an ocean perturbed by internal gravity waves indicate that acoustic wave fronts are much more stable than the rays comprising these wave fronts. This paper provides a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon of wave front stability in a medium with weak sound-speed perturbations. It is shown analytically that at propagation ranges that are large compared to the correlation length of the sound-speed perturbations but smaller than ranges at which ray chaos develops, end points of rays launched from a point source and having a given travel time are scattered primarily along the wave front corresponding to the same travel time in the unperturbed environment. The ratio of root mean square displacements of the ray end points along and across the unperturbed wave front increases with range as the ratio of ray length to correlation length of environmental perturbations. An intuitive physical explanation of the theoretical results is proposed. The relative stability of wave fronts compared to rays is shown to follow from Fermat's principle and dimensional considerations. PMID:18247745

  2. Cover Crop Biomass and Corn Yield Following 13 Rye, Wheat, and Triticale Cultivars Used as Winter Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops have the potential to reduce nitrate leaching and erosion in corn-soybean rotations in the upper Midwest. The cover crop growing season between harvest and planting of corn and soybean, however, is short and cold. Additionally, previous studies in Iowa have indicated that winter r...

  3. Winter Frost and Fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This somewhat oblique blue wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 174 km (108 mi) diameter crater, Terby, and its vicinity in December 2004. Located north of Hellas, this region can be covered with seasonal frost and ground-hugging fog, even in the afternoon, despite being north of 30oS. The subtle, wavy pattern is a manifestation of fog.

    Location near: 28oS, 286oW Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  4. Evolution of a physical and biological front from upwelling to relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwu; Bellingham, James G.; Ryan, John P.; Godin, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Fronts influence the structure and function of coastal marine ecosystems. Due to the complexity and dynamic nature of coastal environments and the small scales of frontal gradient zones, frontal research is difficult. To advance this challenging research we developed a method enabling an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect and track fronts, thereby providing high-resolution observations in the moving reference frame of the front itself. This novel method was applied to studying the evolution of a frontal zone in the coastal upwelling environment of Monterey Bay, California, through a period of variability in upwelling intensity. Through 23 frontal crossings in four days, the AUV detected the front using real-time analysis of vertical thermal stratification to identify water types and the front between them, and the vehicle tracked the front as it moved more than 10 km offshore. The physical front coincided with a biological front between strongly stratified phytoplankton-enriched water inshore of the front, and weakly stratified phytoplankton-poor water offshore of the front. While stratification remained a consistent identifier, conditions on both sides of the front changed rapidly as regional circulation responded to relaxation of upwelling winds. The offshore water type transitioned from relatively cold and saline upwelled water to relatively warm and fresh coastal transition zone water. The inshore water type exhibited an order of magnitude increase in chlorophyll concentrations and an associated increase in oxygen and decrease in nitrate. It also warmed and freshened near the front, consistent with the cross-frontal exchange that was detected in the high-resolution AUV data. AUV-observed cross-frontal exchanges beneath the surface manifestation of the front emphasize the importance of AUV synoptic water column surveys in the frontal zone.

  5. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  6. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  7. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  8. Spirit's Winter Work Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    This portion of an image acquired by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera shows the Spirit rover's winter campaign site. Spirit was parked on a slope tilted 11 degrees to the north to maximize sunlight during the southern winter season. 'Tyrone' is an area where the rover's wheels disturbed light-toned soils. Remote sensing and in-situ analyses found the light-toned soil at Tyrone to be sulfate rich and hydrated. The original picture is catalogued as PSP_001513_1655_red and was taken on Sept. 29, 2006.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  9. a Climatology of Extreme Minimum Winter Temperatures in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Dennis Joe

    The Extreme Minimum Winter Temperature (EMWT) is the coldest temperature recorded each winter at a given weather station. This variable is a measure of winter temperature stress. Extreme cold influences the geographic distribution of plants, and is a prime control for the production of some valuable fruit crops grown in Ohio. EMWT values are often used to map plant hardiness zones, however the magnitude of EMWT and the date that it occurs has varied widely from year to year. Climatic variables rarely remain constant over time, and the plant hardiness zones could shift significantly if the climate changes and there is a trend towards warmer EMWTs. Plants that have their present geographic ranges limited by cold winter temperatures could increase their spatial extent. Furthermore, EMWT has impacts on human health and has applications for architecture. EMWTs at eighty-nine weather stations in Ohio were analyzed. Summary statistics and return period intervals for critical EMWTs are tabulated and mapped. Return period maps may be more useful for environmental planning than plant hardiness zone maps based on average EMWT, especially in a variable climate. Graphical methods, curve fitting and a probability model for the mean were utilized to examine the long term trend. The EMWT has not warmed during the known climatic record of this variable in Ohio. This study demonstrates the need for more applied climatological studies based on the observed climate record, not obscured by the assumptions of the global warming paradigm.

  10. Is the OJIP Test a Reliable Indicator of Winter Hardiness and Freezing Tolerance of Common Wheat and Triticale under Variable Winter Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Rapacz, Marcin; Sasal, Monika; Kalaji, Hazem M.; Kościelniak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    OJIP analysis, which explores changes in photosystem II (PSII) photochemical performance, has been used as a measure of plant susceptibility to stress. However, in the case of freezing tolerance and winter hardiness, which are highly environmentally variable, the use of this method can give ambiguous results depending on the species as well as the sampling year and time. To clarify this issue, we performed chlorophyll fluorescence measurements over three subsequent winters (2010/11, 2011/12 and 2012/13) on 220 accessions of common winter wheat and 139 accessions of winter triticale. After freezing, leaves were collected from cold-acclimated plants in the laboratory and field-grown plants. Observations of field survival in seven locations across Poland and measurements of freezing tolerance of the studied plants were also recorded. Our results confirm that the OJIP test is a reliable indicator of winter hardiness and freezing tolerance of common wheat and triticale under unstable winter environments. Regardless of species, the testing conditions giving the most reliable results were identical, and the reliability of the test could be easily checked by analysis of some relationships between OJIP-test parameters. We also found that triticale is more winter hardy and freezing tolerant than wheat. In addition, the two species were characterized by different patterns of photosynthetic apparatus acclimation to cold. PMID:26230839

  11. Is the OJIP Test a Reliable Indicator of Winter Hardiness and Freezing Tolerance of Common Wheat and Triticale under Variable Winter Environments?

    PubMed

    Rapacz, Marcin; Sasal, Monika; Kalaji, Hazem M; Kościelniak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    OJIP analysis, which explores changes in photosystem II (PSII) photochemical performance, has been used as a measure of plant susceptibility to stress. However, in the case of freezing tolerance and winter hardiness, which are highly environmentally variable, the use of this method can give ambiguous results depending on the species as well as the sampling year and time. To clarify this issue, we performed chlorophyll fluorescence measurements over three subsequent winters (2010/11, 2011/12 and 2012/13) on 220 accessions of common winter wheat and 139 accessions of winter triticale. After freezing, leaves were collected from cold-acclimated plants in the laboratory and field-grown plants. Observations of field survival in seven locations across Poland and measurements of freezing tolerance of the studied plants were also recorded. Our results confirm that the OJIP test is a reliable indicator of winter hardiness and freezing tolerance of common wheat and triticale under unstable winter environments. Regardless of species, the testing conditions giving the most reliable results were identical, and the reliability of the test could be easily checked by analysis of some relationships between OJIP-test parameters. We also found that triticale is more winter hardy and freezing tolerant than wheat. In addition, the two species were characterized by different patterns of photosynthetic apparatus acclimation to cold.

  12. Predictability of winter temperature in China from previous autumn Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Jinqing; Ren, Hong-Li; Wu, Bingyi; Li, Weijing

    2016-10-01

    The potential predictability of winter temperature in China from autumn Arctic sea ice anomalies is studied by examining and statistically modeling the large-scale interannual covariability between them on the basis of singular value decomposition analysis. It is demonstrated that an intimate relationship exists between September and October sea ice anomalies in the Eurasian Arctic and following winter temperature anomalies in China, except in the Tibetan Plateau. When the autumn sea ice anomalies decline in the Eurasian Arctic, above-normal pressure anomalies appear to prevail over the region from the Eurasian Arctic to Eastern Europe and Mongolia, and below-normal anomalies prevail over the mid-latitudes of Asia and Northwestern Pacific in the following winter. Consequently, the winter Siberian High and East Asian trough are both strengthened, favoring the southward invasion of high-latitude cold air masses and thus cold temperature anomalies in China. It is found that the Siberian High plays a crucial role in delivering effects of the autumn Arctic sea ice anomalies on winter temperature variability in China. Based on this evidence, a statistical model is established to examine the potential predictability of winter temperature anomalies in China by taking the autumn Arctic sea ice signals as a predictor. Validation shows considerable skill in predicting winter temperature anomalies over a large part of China, indicating a significant potential for improving winter climate prediction in China.

  13. Holocene winter climate variability in mid-latitude western North America.

    PubMed

    Ersek, Vasile; Clark, Peter U; Mix, Alan C; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Water resources in western North America depend on winter precipitation, yet our knowledge of its sensitivity to climate change remains limited. Similarly, understanding the potential for future loss of winter snow pack requires a longer perspective on natural climate variability. Here we use stable isotopes from a speleothem in southwestern Oregon to reconstruct winter climate change for much of the past 13,000 years. We find that on millennial time scales there were abrupt transitions between warm-dry and cold-wet regimes. Temperature and precipitation changes on multi-decadal to century timescales are consistent with ocean-atmosphere interactions that arise from mechanisms similar to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Extreme cold-wet and warm-dry events that punctuated the Holocene appear to be sensitive to solar forcing, possibly through the influence of the equatorial Pacific on the winter storm tracks reaching the US Pacific Northwest region. PMID:23187619

  14. Beyond arctic and alpine: the influence of winter climate on temperate ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Laura M; Ratajczak, Zak R; Ocheltree, Troy W; Hafich, Katya A; Churchill, Amber C; Frey, Sarah J K; Fuss, Colin B; Kazanski, Clare E; Muñoz, Juan D; Petrie, Matthew D; Reinmann, Andrew B; Smith, Jane G

    2016-02-01

    Winter climate is expected to change under future climate scenarios, yet the majority of winter ecology research is focused in cold-climate ecosystems. In many temperate systems, it is unclear how winter climate relates to biotic responses during the growing season. The objective of this study was to examine how winter weather relates to plant and animal communities in a variety of terrestrial ecosystems ranging from warm deserts to alpine tundra. Specifically, we examined the association between winter weather and plant phenology, plant species richness, consumer abundance, and consumer richness in 11 terrestrial ecosystems associated with the U.S. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network. To varying degrees, winter precipitation and temperature were correlated with all biotic response variables. Bud break was tightly aligned with end of winter temperatures. For half the sites, winter weather was a better predictor of plant species richness than growing season weather. Warmer winters were correlated with lower consumer abundances in both temperate and alpine systems. Our findings suggest winter weather may have a strong influence on biotic activity during the growing season and should be considered in future studies investigating the effects of climate change on both alpine and temperate systems.

  15. Beyond arctic and alpine: the influence of winter climate on temperate ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Laura M; Ratajczak, Zak R; Ocheltree, Troy W; Hafich, Katya A; Churchill, Amber C; Frey, Sarah J K; Fuss, Colin B; Kazanski, Clare E; Muñoz, Juan D; Petrie, Matthew D; Reinmann, Andrew B; Smith, Jane G

    2016-02-01

    Winter climate is expected to change under future climate scenarios, yet the majority of winter ecology research is focused in cold-climate ecosystems. In many temperate systems, it is unclear how winter climate relates to biotic responses during the growing season. The objective of this study was to examine how winter weather relates to plant and animal communities in a variety of terrestrial ecosystems ranging from warm deserts to alpine tundra. Specifically, we examined the association between winter weather and plant phenology, plant species richness, consumer abundance, and consumer richness in 11 terrestrial ecosystems associated with the U.S. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network. To varying degrees, winter precipitation and temperature were correlated with all biotic response variables. Bud break was tightly aligned with end of winter temperatures. For half the sites, winter weather was a better predictor of plant species richness than growing season weather. Warmer winters were correlated with lower consumer abundances in both temperate and alpine systems. Our findings suggest winter weather may have a strong influence on biotic activity during the growing season and should be considered in future studies investigating the effects of climate change on both alpine and temperate systems. PMID:27145612

  16. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

  17. Winter Clouds Over Mie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 March 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red wide angle image shows late winter clouds over the 104 km (65 mi) diameter crater, Mie. Cellular clouds occur in the lower martian atmosphere, surrounding Mie Crater. Their cloudtops are at an altitude that is below the crater rim. Higher than the crater rim occurs a series of lee wave clouds, indicating air circulation moving from west/northwest (left) toward the east/southeast (right). Mie Crater is located in Utopia Planitia, not too far from the Viking 2 landing site, near 48.5 N, 220.4 W. Sunlight illuminates this January 2004 scene from the lower left.

  18. Winter Survival: A Consumer's Guide to Winter Preparedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet discusses a variety of topics to help consumers prepare for winter. Tips for the home include: winterizing the home, dealing with a loss of heat or power failure, and what you need to have on hand. Another section gives driving tips and what to do in a storm. Health factors include suggestions for keeping warm, signs and treatment for…

  19. The Front-End System For MARE In Milano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, Claudio; Pessina, Gianluigi

    2009-12-01

    The first phase of MARE consists of 72 μ-bolometers composed each of a crystal of AgReO4 readout by Si thermistors. The spread in the thermistor characteristics and bolometer thermal coupling leads to different energy conversion gains and optimum operating points of the detectors. Detector biasing levels and voltage gains are completely remote-adjustable by the front end system developed, the subject of this paper, achieving the same signal range at the input of the DAQ system. The front end consists of a cold buffer stage, a second pseudo differential stage followed by a gain stage, an antialiasing filter, and a battery powered detector biasing set up. The DAQ system can be used to set all necessary parameters of the electronics remotely, by writing to a μ-controller located on each board. Fiber optics are used for the serial communication between the DAQ and the front end. To suppress interference noise during normal operation, the clocked devices of the front end are maintained in sleep-mode, except during the set-up phase of the experiment. An automatic DC detector characterization procedure is used to establish the optimum operating point of every detector of the array. A very low noise level has been achieved: about 3nV/□Hz at 1 Hz and 1 nV/□Hz for the white component, high frequencies.

  20. Eddy overturning of the Antarctic Slope Front controls glacial melting in the Eastern Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NøSt, O. A.; Biuw, M.; Tverberg, V.; Lydersen, C.; Hattermann, T.; Zhou, Q.; Smedsrud, L. H.; Kovacs, K. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Eastern Weddell Sea is characterized by narrow continental shelves and Warm Deep Water (WDW) is located in close proximity to the ice shelves in this region. The exchange of WDW across the Antarctic Slope Front (ASF) determines the rate of basal ice shelf melting. Here, we present a unique data set consisting of 2351 vertical profiles of temperature and salinity collected by southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) and a profile beneath the Fimbul Ice Shelf (FIS), obtained via drilling through 395 m of ice. This data set reveals variations in salinity and temperature through winter, and using a conceptual model of the coastal salt budget we quantify the main exchange processes. Our data show that modified WDW, with temperatures below -1.5°C, is advected onto the shelf and into the ice shelf cavities by an eddy overturning of the ASF. The onshore Ekman flux of surface waters during summer is the main source of freshwater that leads to the formation of low salinity shelf waters in the region. The modified WDW that reaches beneath the ice shelves is too cold for basal ice shelf melting to create such low salinity water. A high-resolution model of an idealized ASF-continental shelf-ice shelf system supports the conclusions from the data analysis. The inflow of WDW onto the continental shelf and into the ice shelf cavity occurs within a bottom boundary layer where the eddy advection in the model is particularly strong, in close agreement with the observed vertical profile of temperature beneath the FIS.

  1. Shifts of the Subtropical Shelf Front controlled by atmospheric variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    In the western South Atlantic, off the coast of South America, a band of cold, fresh, nutrient-rich Sub-Antarctic Shelf Water (SASW) meets warm, salty, nutrient-poor Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW) to form the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF). This front is the shallow-water expression of the major Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and has moved northward and southward during the Holocene (the past ~12,000 years). Bender et al. reconstruct the latitudinal shifts of the STSF over the past 11,000 calendar-equivalent years using records of oxygen and carbon stable isotope compositions of benthic foraminifera and total organic carbon and calcium carbonate content from a sediment record collected off Uruguay. These measurements serve as proxies for ocean water temperature and nutrient content, which can be used to distinguish the SASW and STSW.

  2. Lagrangian fronts in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    We introduce the concept of Lagrangian fronts (LFs) in the ocean and describe their importance for analyzing water mixing and transport and the specific features and differences from hydrological fronts. A method of calculating LFs in a given velocity field is proposed. Based on altimeter velocity fields from AVISO data in the northwestern Pacific, we calculate the Lagrangian synoptic maps and identify LFs of different spatial and temporal scales. Using statistical analysis of saury catches in different years according to the Goskomrybolovstvo (State Fisheries Committee of the Russian Federation), we show that LFs can serve as good indicators of places that are favorable for fishing.

  3. Front tracking for gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, I.L.; Glimm, J.; McBryan, O.; Plohr, B.; Yaniv, S.

    1984-05-01

    Front tracking is an adaptive computational method in which a lower dimensional moving grid is fitted to and follows the dynamical evolution of distinguished waves in a fluid flow. The method takes advantage of known analytic solutions, derived from the Rankine-Hugoniot relations, for idealized discontinuities. In this paper the method is applied to the Euler equations describing compressible gas dynamics. The main thrust here is validation of the front tracking method: we present results on a series of test problems for which comparison answers can be obtained by independent methods.

  4. Front tracking for gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, I.; Glimm, J.; McBryan, O.; Plohr, B.; Yaniv, S.

    1986-01-01

    Front tracking is an adaptive computational method in which a lower dimensional moving grid is fitted to and follows the dynamical evolution of distinguished waves in a fluid flow. The method takes advantage of known analytic solutions, derived from the Rankine-Hugoniot relations, for idealized discontinuities. In this paper the method is applied to the Euler equations describing compressible gas dynamics. The main thrust here is validation of the front tracking method: we present results on a series of test problems for which comparison answers can be obtained by independent methods.

  5. Spatial and temporal variation in daily temperature indices in summer and winter seasons over India (1969-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Jaswal, A. K.; Mohapatra, M.; Kore, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in summer and winter extreme temperature indices are studied by using daily maximum and minimum temperatures data from 227 surface meteorological stations well distributed over India for the period 1969-2012. For this purpose, time series for six extreme temperature indices namely, hot days (HD), very hot days (VHD), extremely hot days (EHD), cold nights (CN), very cold nights (VCN), and extremely cold nights (ECN) are calculated for all the stations. In addition, time series for mean extreme temperature indices of summer and winter seasons are also analyzed. Study reveals high variability in spatial distribution of threshold temperatures of extreme temperature indices over the country. In general, increasing trends are observed in summer hot days indices and decreasing trends in winter cold night indices over most parts of the country. The results obtained in this study indicate warming in summer maximum and winter minimum temperatures over India. Averaged over India, trends in summer hot days indices HD, VHD, and EHD are significantly increasing (+1.0, +0.64, and +0.32 days/decade, respectively) and winter cold night indices CN, VCN, and ECN are significantly decreasing (-0.93, -0.47, and -0.15 days/decade, respectively). Also, it is observed that the impact of extreme temperature is higher along the west coast for summer and east coast for winter.

  6. The Anomalous Winter of 1783-1784: Was the Laki Eruption or an Analog of the 2009-2010 Winter to Blame?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Seager, Richard; Smerdon, Jason E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Cook, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The multi ]stage eruption of the Icelandic volcano Laki beginning in June, 1783 is speculated to have caused unusual dry fog and heat in western Europe and cold in North America during the 1783 summer, and record cold and snow the subsequent winter across the circum-North Atlantic. Despite the many indisputable impacts of the Laki eruption, however, its effect on climate, particularly during the 1783.1784 winter, may be the most poorly constrained. Here we test an alternative explanation for the unusual conditions during this time: that they were caused primarily by a combined negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and an El Nino ]Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm event. A similar combination of NAO ]ENSO phases was identified as the cause of record cold and snowy conditions during the 2009.2010 winter in Europe and eastern North America. 600-year tree-ring reconstructions of NAO and ENSO indices reveal values in the 1783.1784 winter second only to their combined severity in 2009.2010. Data sources and model simulations support our hypothesis that a combined, negative NAO ]ENSO warm phase was the dominant cause of the anomalous winter of 1783.1784, and that these events likely resulted from natural variability unconnected to Laki.

  7. The structure of mountain fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vann, I. R.; Graham, R. H.; Hayward, A. B.

    Commonly the part of a mountain front which is visible at the surface consists of foreland-dipping thrust belt rocks elevated above their regional structural position and overlain more or less conformably by molasse. Several explanations for their geometry are possible. (1) Major detachments exist within or beneath the molasse resulting in transport of the foreland basin. Examples of this geometry come from the Swiss Molasse Plain, the Southern Pyrenees and the Mackenzie Mountains of Canada. (2) Displacement is lost on major backthrusts beneath the frontal monocline. Examples cited here are the Rockies of Alberta, the Sulaiman Ranges of Pakistan, the Mackenzies, and the Andes in Peru. (3) Thrust sheets travelled over an old land surface and syntectonic molasse contemporaneously offlaps the topographic high of the thrust front. This phenomenon occurs along the Alpine thrust front in Haute Provence. (4) The frontal fold represents deformation above a large-scale thrust tip. No unequivocal example of tip line strain at this scale has been recorded although this type of deformation may occur in the Brooks Range of Alaska. In many areas mountain fronts show a combination of these idealized geometries.

  8. Advanced RF Front End Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M. I.; Valas, S.; Katehi, L. P. B.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to achieve low-mass low-cost micro/nanospacecraft for Deep Space exploration requires extensive miniaturization of all subsystems. The front end of the Telecommunication subsystem is an area in which major mass (factor of 10) and volume (factor of 100) reduction can be achieved via the development of new silicon based micromachined technology and devices. Major components that make up the front end include single-pole and double-throw switches, diplexer, and solid state power amplifier. JPL's Center For Space Microsystems - System On A Chip (SOAC) Program has addressed the challenges of front end miniaturization (switches and diplexers). Our objectives were to develop the main components that comprise a communication front end and enable integration in a single module that we refer to as a 'cube'. In this paper we will provide the latest status of our Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches and surface micromachined filter development. Based on the significant progress achieved we can begin to provide guidelines of the proper system insertion for these emerging technologies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Align the Front End First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of management styles and front-end analysis focuses on a review of Douglas McGregor's theories. Topics include Theories X, Y, and Z; leadership skills; motivational needs of employees; intrinsic and extrinsic rewards; and faulty implementation of instructional systems design processes. (LRW)

  10. Front instability in stratified media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Preferential flow in unsaturated soil may due to local heterogeneities like worm burrows but also to front instability leading to unstable finger flow (fingered pattern) in sandy textured soils. This last spontaneous preferential flow cannot be described by the standard Richards equation. Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes proposed recently a phase field model in order to take into account a macroscopic surface tension effect at the front [1]. Their model simulates successfully the interface instability of an advancing front. We aim at simulating and understanding front instability passing a textural soil discontinuity for which the finger flow is particularly visible. We consider sand layers with different characteristics such as granulometry. Moreover, the wettability is taken into account by adding a hydrophobic term in the free energy of the phase field model. The hydrophobicity part is not only relevant for repellent soil but also to model the ultra-thin films [2]. Therefore, in our framework, this may have an influence at the front because the water saturation is nearly zero. Such a wettability influence on infiltration in porous media has recently been measured in [3]. The governing equation is analogous to the lubrication equation for which we pointed out the specific numerical difficulties [4]. A numerical code to perform time integration and bifurcation analysis was developed in [4] allowing to determine the onset of instability and its resulting dynamics in the parameter space [5]. We compute the parameter range for which the front stops when reaching the layers interface. As in [4], there is two main mechanisms that allow water to cross over the discontinuity. A first mechanism, called «depinning», leads to an intermittent flow and the second one, to a front instability and then to a finger flow. There is a parameter domain where both instabilities are present leading to a complex spatio-temporal dynamics. Finally, it is noteworthy that the wettability

  11. Ocean properties, ice-ocean interactions, and calving front morphology at two major west Greenland glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauché, N.; Hubbard, A.; Gascard, J.-C.; Box, J. E.; Bates, R.; Koppes, M.; Sole, A.; Patton, H.

    2013-11-01

    Warm sub-polar mode water (SPMW) has been identified as a primary driver of mass loss of marine terminating glaciers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) yet, the specific mechanisms by which SPMW interacts with these tidewater termini remain uncertain. We present oceanographic data from Rink Glacier (RG) and Store Glacier (SG) fjords, two major marine outlets draining the western sector of the GrIS into Baffin Bay over the contrasting melt-seasons of 2009 and 2010. Submarine melting occurs wherever ice is in direct contact with warmer water and the consistent presence of 2.8 °C SPMW adjacent to both ice fronts below 400 m throughout all surveys indicates that melting is maintained by a combination of molecular diffusion and large scale, weak convection, diffusional (hereafter called ubiquitous) melting. At shallower depths (50-200 m), cold, brine-enriched water (BEW) formed over winter appears to persist into the summer thereby buffering this melt by thermal insulation. Our surveys reveal four main modes of glacier-ocean interaction, governed by water depth and the rate of glacier runoff water (GRW) injected into the fjord. Deeper than 200 m, submarine melt is the only process observed, regardless of the intensity of GRW or the depth of injection. However, between the surface and 200 m depth, three further distinct modes are observed governed by the GRW discharge. When GRW is weak (≲1000 m3 s-1), upward motion of the water adjacent to the glacier front is subdued, weak forced or free convection plus diffusional submarine melting dominates at depth, and seaward outflow of melt water occurs from the glacier toe to the base of the insulating BEW. During medium intensity GRW (∼1500 m3 s-1), mixing with SPMW yields deep mixed runoff water (DMRW), which rises as a buoyant plume and intensifies local submarine melting (enhanced buoyancy-driven melting). In this case, DMRW typically attains hydrostatic equilibrium and flows seaward at an intermediate depth of

  12. Projected changes to winter temperature characteristics over Canada based on an RCM ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Dae Il; Sushama, Laxmi; Diro, Gulilat Tefera; Khaliq, M. Naveed

    2016-09-01

    Cold temperature and associated extremes often impact adversely human health and environment and bring disruptions in economic activities during winter over Canada. This study investigates projected changes in winter (December to March) period cold extreme days (i.e., cold nights, cold days, frost days, and ice days) and cold spells over Canada based on 11 regional climate model (RCM) simulations for the future 2040-2069 period with respect to the current 1970-1999 period. These simulations, available from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program, were obtained with six different RCMs, when driven by four different Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models, under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A2 scenario. Based on the reanalysis boundary conditions, the RCM simulations reproduce spatial patterns of observed mean values of the daily minimum and maximum temperatures and inter-annual variability of the number of cold nights over different Canadian climatic regions considered in the study. A comparison of current and future period simulations suggests decreases in the frequency of cold extreme events (i.e., cold nights, cold days and cold spells) and in selected return levels of maximum duration of cold spells over the entire study domain. Important regional differences are noticed as the simulations generally indicate smaller decreases in the characteristics of extreme cold events over western Canada compared to the other regions. The analysis also suggests an increase in the frequency of midwinter freeze-thaw events, due mainly to a decrease in the number of frost days and ice days for all Canadian regions. Especially, densely populated southern and coastal Canadian regions will require in depth studies to facilitate appropriate adaptation strategies as these regions are clearly expected to experience large increases in the frequency of freeze-thaw events.

  13. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-04

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

  14. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-27

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysis, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  15. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  16. Temperature characteristics of winter roost-sites for birds and mammals: tree cavities and anthropogenic alternatives.

    PubMed

    Grüebler, Martin U; Widmer, Silv; Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

    2014-07-01

    The microclimate of potential roost-sites is likely to be a crucial determinant in the optimal roost-site selection of endotherms, in particular during the winter season of temperate zones. Available roost-sites for birds and mammals in European high trunk orchards are mainly tree cavities, wood stacks and artificial nest boxes. However, little is known about the microclimatic patterns inside cavities and thermal advantages of using these winter roost-sites. Here, we simultaneously investigate the thermal patterns of winter roost-sites in relation to winter ambient temperature and their insulation capacity. While tree cavities and wood stacks strongly buffered the daily cycle of temperature changes, nest boxes showed low buffering capacity. The buffering effect of tree cavities was stronger at extreme ambient temperatures compared to temperatures around zero. Heat sources inside roosts amplified Δ T (i.e., the difference between inside and outside temperatures), particularly in the closed roosts of nest boxes and tree cavities, and less in the open wood stacks with stronger circulation of air. Positive Δ T due to the installation of a heat source increased in cold ambient temperatures. These results suggest that orchard habitats in winter show a spatiotemporal mosaic of sites providing different thermal benefits varying over time and in relation to ambient temperatures. At cold temperatures tree cavities provide significantly higher thermal benefits than nest boxes or wood stacks. Thus, in winter ecology of hole-using endotherms, the availability of tree cavities may be an important characteristic of winter habitat quality.

  17. Temperature characteristics of winter roost-sites for birds and mammals: tree cavities and anthropogenic alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüebler, Martin U.; Widmer, Silv; Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

    2014-07-01

    The microclimate of potential roost-sites is likely to be a crucial determinant in the optimal roost-site selection of endotherms, in particular during the winter season of temperate zones. Available roost-sites for birds and mammals in European high trunk orchards are mainly tree cavities, wood stacks and artificial nest boxes. However, little is known about the microclimatic patterns inside cavities and thermal advantages of using these winter roost-sites. Here, we simultaneously investigate the thermal patterns of winter roost-sites in relation to winter ambient temperature and their insulation capacity. While tree cavities and wood stacks strongly buffered the daily cycle of temperature changes, nest boxes showed low buffering capacity. The buffering effect of tree cavities was stronger at extreme ambient temperatures compared to temperatures around zero. Heat sources inside roosts amplified Δ T (i.e., the difference between inside and outside temperatures), particularly in the closed roosts of nest boxes and tree cavities, and less in the open wood stacks with stronger circulation of air. Positive Δ T due to the installation of a heat source increased in cold ambient temperatures. These results suggest that orchard habitats in winter show a spatiotemporal mosaic of sites providing different thermal benefits varying over time and in relation to ambient temperatures. At cold temperatures tree cavities provide significantly higher thermal benefits than nest boxes or wood stacks. Thus, in winter ecology of hole-using endotherms, the availability of tree cavities may be an important characteristic of winter habitat quality.

  18. Staying cold through dinner: cold-climate bats rewarm with conspecifics but not sunset during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Czenze, Zenon J; Park, Andrew D; Willis, Craig K R

    2013-08-01

    For temperate endotherms (i.e., mammals and birds) energy costs are highest during winter but food availability is lowest and many mammals depend on hibernation as a result. Hibernation is made up of energy-saving torpor bouts [periods of controlled reduction in body temperature (T b)], which are interrupted by brief periodic arousals to normothermic T b. What triggers these arousals in free-ranging hibernators is not well understood. Some temperate bats with intermittent access to flying insects during winter synchronize arousals with sunset, which suggests that, in some species, feeding opportunities influence arousal timing. We tested whether hibernating bats from a cold climate without access to food during winter also maintain a circadian rhythm for arousals or whether cues from conspecifics in the same cluster are more important. We used temperature telemetry to monitor skin temperature (T sk) of free-ranging little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) hibernating in central Manitoba, Canada, where temperatures from 22 October to 22 March were too cold for flying insects. We found no evidence bats synchronized arousals with photoperiod but they did arouse synchronously with other bats in the same cluster. Thus, in the northern part of their range where flying insects are almost never available during winter, little brown bats exhibit no circadian pattern to arousals. Warming synchronously with others could reduce the energetic costs of arousal for individuals or could reflect disturbance of torpid bats by cluster-mates. PMID:23539327

  19. Staying cold through dinner: cold-climate bats rewarm with conspecifics but not sunset during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Czenze, Zenon J; Park, Andrew D; Willis, Craig K R

    2013-08-01

    For temperate endotherms (i.e., mammals and birds) energy costs are highest during winter but food availability is lowest and many mammals depend on hibernation as a result. Hibernation is made up of energy-saving torpor bouts [periods of controlled reduction in body temperature (T b)], which are interrupted by brief periodic arousals to normothermic T b. What triggers these arousals in free-ranging hibernators is not well understood. Some temperate bats with intermittent access to flying insects during winter synchronize arousals with sunset, which suggests that, in some species, feeding opportunities influence arousal timing. We tested whether hibernating bats from a cold climate without access to food during winter also maintain a circadian rhythm for arousals or whether cues from conspecifics in the same cluster are more important. We used temperature telemetry to monitor skin temperature (T sk) of free-ranging little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) hibernating in central Manitoba, Canada, where temperatures from 22 October to 22 March were too cold for flying insects. We found no evidence bats synchronized arousals with photoperiod but they did arouse synchronously with other bats in the same cluster. Thus, in the northern part of their range where flying insects are almost never available during winter, little brown bats exhibit no circadian pattern to arousals. Warming synchronously with others could reduce the energetic costs of arousal for individuals or could reflect disturbance of torpid bats by cluster-mates.

  20. Glycogen, not dehydration or lipids, limits winter survival of side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana).

    PubMed

    Zani, Peter A; Irwin, Jason T; Rollyson, Mary E; Counihan, Jessica L; Healas, Sara D; Lloyd, Emily K; Kojanis, Lee C; Fried, Bernard; Sherma, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Climate change is causing winters to become milder (less cold and shorter). Recent studies of overwintering ectotherms have suggested that warmer winters increase metabolism and decrease winter survival and subsequent fecundity. Energetic constraints (insufficient energy stores) have been hypothesized as the cause of winter mortality but have not been tested explicitly. Thus, alternative sources of mortality, such as winter dehydration, cannot be ruled out. By employing an experimental design that compared the energetics and water content of lizards that died naturally during laboratory winter with those that survived up to the same point but were then sacrificed, we attempt to distinguish among multiple possible causes of mortality. We test the hypothesis that mortality is caused by insufficient energy stores in the liver, abdominal fat bodies, tail or carcass or through excessive water loss. We found that lizards that died naturally had marginally greater mass loss, lower water content, and less liver glycogen remaining than living animals sampled at the same time. Periodically moistening air during winter reduced water loss, but this did not affect survival, calling into question dehydration as a cause of death. Rather, our results implicate energy limitations in the form of liver glycogen, but not lipids, as the primary cause of mortality in overwintering lizards. When viewed through a lens of changing climates, our results suggest that if milder winters increase the metabolic rate of overwintering ectotherms, individuals may experience greater energetic demands. Increased energy use during winter may subsequently limit individual survival and possibly even impact population persistence. PMID:22875774

  1. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  2. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  3. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  4. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura B.; Winstanley, Henry F.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Fowler, Andrew C.; Sander, Graham C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  5. Winter Anomaly 1982/83 in Comparison with Earlier Winters (1960-82)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-01-01

    The winter anomaly in the winter of 1982/83 is compared with the winter anomalies of earlier winters (1960-82) from the point of view of amplitude and timing of the winter anomaly, and geomagnetic and dynamic activity influences. Some evidence of a negative influence of sudden stratospheric warnings on the winter anomaly is given.

  6. Modeling cold tolerance in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

    PubMed

    Régnière, Jacques; Bentz, Barbara

    2007-06-01

    Cold-induced mortality is a key factor driving mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, population dynamics. In this species, the supercooling point (SCP) is representative of mortality induced by acute cold exposure. Mountain pine beetle SCP and associated cold-induced mortality fluctuate throughout a generation, with the highest SCPs prior to and following winter. Using observed SCPs of field-collected D. ponderosae larvae throughout the developmental season and associated phloem temperatures, we developed a mechanistic model that describes the SCP distribution of a population as a function of daily changes in the temperature-dependent processes leading to gain and loss of cold tolerance. It is based on the changing proportion of individuals in three states: (1) a non cold-hardened, feeding state, (2) an intermediate state in which insects have ceased feeding, voided their gut content and eliminated as many ice-nucleating agents as possible from the body, and (3) a fully cold-hardened state where insects have accumulated a maximum concentration of cryoprotectants (e.g. glycerol). Shifts in the proportion of individuals in each state occur in response to the driving variables influencing the opposite rates of gain and loss of cold hardening. The level of cold-induced mortality predicted by the model and its relation to extreme winter temperature is in good agreement with a range of field and laboratory observations. Our model predicts that cold tolerance of D. ponderosae varies within a season, among seasons, and among geographic locations depending on local climate. This variability is an emergent property of the model, and has important implications for understanding the insect's response to seasonal fluctuations in temperature, as well as population response to climate change. Because cold-induced mortality is but one of several major influences of climate on D. ponderosae population dynamics, we suggest that this model be integrated with others

  7. Observations of Gravity Waves at Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Samah, Azizan B. Hj.

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s ^{-1}. Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behaviour in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope. This model however predicts a clockwise rotation of the direction of propagation as the wave propagates toward the SCF. This rotation is the opposite

  8. Winter performance of an urban stormwater pond in southern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semadeni-Davies, Annette

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from cold regions in North America has shown that the performance of stormwater ponds differs between winter and summer. The pond hydraulics change seasonally, and winters have lowered removal efficiency due to a combination of an ice cover, cold water and de-icing salts. This study examines the function of the Bäckaslov stormwater pond under the more mild conditions of southern Sweden, where there are several snow and melt cycles per year.Event sampling in the summer of 1997 showed good removal efficiencies for nutrients, total suspended solids (TSS) and a selection of metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn), but winter grab-tests taken in 1995-96 and 1997-98 suggest that the pond acts as a pollutant source under cold conditions. To better assess winter and spring pond performance, water at the inflow and outflow was sampled from January to April 2003. The low intensity of runoff delivery and slow inflow velocities meant that time- rather than flow-weighted sampling was used. Five consecutive events were sampled and analysed for TSS, chloride and the metals As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn. YSI probes were in place at both the inlet (pH, temperature) and outlet (pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen) to determine the timing of pollution flows. In addition, profiles of the same quality indicators allowed snapshots of pond processes.De-icing salt has a major effect on pond hydraulics. Strong stratification occurred after each snowmelt-generated flow event and up to 80% of chloride could be retained by the pond. However, continuous conductivity measurements show that chloride is flushed between events. Ice changes retention times and causes oxygen depletion, but bed scour was not observed. Pond performance decreased during the winter and spring, albeit not as badly as the grab tests suggest. A seasonal comparison of the removal efficiencies showed that removal of Cd (75%) and Cu (49%) was about the same for summer and winter-spring, but removal of Pb, Zn and TSS

  9. Red spruce decline---Winter injury and air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.M. )

    1989-10-01

    There has been a widespread decline in growth of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) since 1960 in the eastern United States. There is evidence that this decline is at least partly attributable to age- and density-related growth patterns, particularly at lower elevations. Mortality has been severe at high elevation sites where similar episodes have occasionally occurred in the last 100 years. At these sites, periods of low growth preceding 1960 were related to periods with warm late summers and cold early winters. Since 1960, this relationship no longer holds, although there is an association with unusual deviations from mean temperatures. There are field reports that one of the main causes of reduced growth and mortality is apical dieback induced by severe winter conditions. Preliminary observations suggest that high elevation red spruce may not be sufficiently hardened to tolerate low autumn temperatures. However, appearance of injury in the spring, association of injury with wind exposure and correlation of provenance susceptibility with cuticular transpiration rates, including the importance of desiccation injury. Sensitivity to both types of winter injury may be increased by air pollutants (particularly ozone and less probably, acid mist or excess nitrogen deposition). Nutrient deficiency (particularly magnesium and to a lesser extent potassium) may also increase cold sensitivity. The nature and extent of these interactions are being actively researched for red spruce. 48 refs.

  10. Learners in Action, Winter 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movement for Canadian Literacy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This Winter 2005 issue of "Learners in Action" contains the following: (1) Proud Dad Turns Family Life Around (Nick Prince); (2) Learners Make a Great Impression at Conference; (3) The Story behind the Story; and (4) Learner Resources.

  11. The Challenge of Winter Backpacking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Michael; Mapes, Alan

    1981-01-01

    Tips and techniques for safe and enjoyable winter backpacking are offered. Topics covered include cross county skis, snowshoes, clothing, footwear, shelter, sleeping bags, food, hypothermia prevention, as well as general rules and requirements. (CO)

  12. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  13. Multi Front-End Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botterweck, Goetz

    Multi Front-End Engineering (MFE) deals with the design of multiple consistent user interfaces (UI) for one application. One of the main challenges is the conflict between commonality (all front-ends access the same application core) and variability (multiple front-ends on different platforms). This can be overcome by extending techniques from model-driven user interface engineering.We present the MANTRA approach, where the common structure of all interfaces of an application is modelled in an abstract UI model (AUI) annotated with temporal constraints on interaction tasks. Based on these constraints we adapt the AUI, e.g., to tailor presentation units and dialogue structures for a particular platform. We use model transformations to derive concrete, platform-specific UI models (CUI) and implementation code. The presented approach generates working prototypes for three platforms (GUI, web, mobile) integrated with an application core via web service protocols. In addition to static evaluation, such prototypes facilitate early functional evaluations by practical use cases.

  14. Change in abundance of pacific brant wintering in alaska: evidence of a climate warming effect?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, D.H.; Dau, C.P.; Lee, T.; Sedinger, J.S.; Anderson, B.A.; Hines, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Winter distribution of Pacific Flyway brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) has shifted northward from lowtemperate areas to sub-Arctic areas over the last 42 years. We assessed the winter abundance and distribution of brant in Alaska to evaluate whether climate warming may be contributing to positive trends in the most northern of the wintering populations. Mean surface air temperatures during winter at the end of the Alaska Peninsula increased about 1??C between 1963 and 2004, resulting in a 23% reduction in freezing degree days and a 34% decline in the number of days when ice cover prevents birds from accessing food resources. Trends in the wintering population fluctuated with states of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, increasing during positive (warm) phases and decreasing during negative (cold) phases, and this correlation provides support for the hypothesis that growth in the wintering population of brant in Alaska is linked to climate warming. The size of the wintering population was negatively correlated with the number of days of strong northwesterly winds in November, which suggests that the occurrence of tailwinds favorable for migration before the onset of winter was a key factor in whether brant migrated from Alaska or remained there during winter. Winter distribution of brant on the Alaska Peninsula was highly variable and influenced by ice cover, particularly at the heavily used Izembek Lagoon. Observations of previously marked brant indicated that the Alaska wintering population was composed primarily of birds originating from Arctic breeding colonies that appear to be growing. Numbers of brant in Alaska during winter will likely increase as temperatures rise and ice cover decreases at high latitudes in response to climate warming. ?? The Arctic Institute of North America.

  15. Changes in hematological profiles during winter field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Reed, L.; D'Alesandro, M. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown that there are changes in hematological profiles during experimental cold acclimation. They now report on hematological changes in 9 military volunteers during a 12 week winter field operation and show results similar to those observed during experimental cold acclimation. Blood was collected before and after completion of winter field operations and analyzed in a paired fashion. Hematocrit (HCT) and erythrocyte counts (RBC) were decreased; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and plasma volume (PV), which was calculated from hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and HCT, were increased. In addition, the reticulocyte count was increased from 1.37 {plus minus} 0.10% to 2.62 {plus minus} 0.24% after completion of field operations. There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between HCT and reticulocyte count, indicating the need for an enhanced rate of red cell production. Hemoglobin concentration, leukocyte count, and mean corpuscular volume were unchanged. The RBC population, to remain at steady state during periods of chronic cold exposure, shows alterations in the number of circulating cells, Hb concentration per cell and possibly cell turnover.

  16. Habitat Suitability Index Models: American black duck (wintering)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, James C.; Garrison, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The American black duck, commonly known as the black duck, is migratory and has a wide geographic range. American black ducks breed from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, west to the Mississippi River and north through the eastern Canadian boreal forest (Bellrose 1976). The winter range extends from the Rio Grande River on the Texas coast, northeast to Lake Michigan, east to Nova Scotia, south to Florida, and west to Texas (Wright 1954). American black ducks arrive on their wintering habitats between September and early December and remain there until February to April (Bellrose 1976). Their preferred habitat varies considerably through the wintering range. Habitat use appears related to food availability, freedom from disturbance, weather, and often upon the presence of large bodies of open water. These interrelated elements are essential for meeting the energy demands and other nutritional requirements of black ducks in response to the rigors of cold weather and migration. In the Atlantic Flyway, winter populations of American black ducks concentrate in marine and estuarine wetlands (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1979). They use salt marshes and small tidal bays for feeding and loafing areas. In wintering areas north of Chesapeake Bay, American black ducks frequently feed on tidal flats and rest in emergent wetlands or on ice-free bays, rivers, and coastal reservoirs. In the Chesapeake bay area, migrant and wintering American black ducks occupy a wide variety of habitats (Stewart 1962). They strongly favor brackish bays with extensive adjacent agricultural lands. Estuarine bays, coastal salt marshes, tidal fresh marshes, and adjacent impoundments receive high usage. American black ducks also concentrate in forested wetlands in and adjacent to estuaries in the South Atlantic Flyway, especially in Virginia and North Carolina.

  17. Grapevine winter survival and prospects in an age of changing climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vines transition from active growth to dormancy by processes controlled by genes, but are greatly influenced by variation in weather conditions - even in the coldest part of the winter. My research program, known as the USDA Cold Hardiness Genetics Research Program, seeks to understand how a vine's...

  18. A NEW MODEL TO ESTIMATE DAILY ENERGY EXPENDITURE FOR WINTERING WATERFOWL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activity budgets of wintering waterfowl have been widely used to assess habitat quality. However, when factors such as prey abundance or protection from exposure to cold or wind determine quality, measures of daily energy expenditure (DEE) may be more appropriate for this purpos...

  19. Instability of evaporation fronts in the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-12-10

    The neutral component of the interstellar medium is segregated into the cold neutral medium (CNM) and warm neutral medium (WNM) as a result of thermal instability. It was found that a plane-parallel CNM-WNM evaporation interface, across which the CNM undergoes thermal expansion, is linearly unstable to corrugational disturbances, in complete analogy with the Darrieus-Landau instability (DLI) of terrestrial flames. We perform a full linear stability analysis as well as nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations of the DLI of such evaporation fronts in the presence of thermal conduction. We find that the DLI is suppressed at short length scales by conduction. The length and time scales of the fastest growing mode are inversely proportional to the evaporation flow speed of the CNM and its square, respectively. In the nonlinear stage, the DLI saturates to a steady state where the front deforms to a finger-like shape protruding toward the WNM, without generating turbulence. The evaporation rate at nonlinear saturation is larger than the initial plane-parallel value by a factor of ∼2.4 when the equilibrium thermal pressure is 1800 k {sub B} cm{sup –3} K. The degrees of front deformation and evaporation-rate enhancement at nonlinear saturation are determined primarily by the density ratio between the CNM and WNM. We demonstrate that the Field length in the thermally unstable medium should be resolved by at least four grid points to obtain reliable numerical outcomes involving thermal instability.

  20. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  1. Seasonal thermal fronts on the northern South China Sea shelf: Satellite measurements and three repeated field surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhiyou; Qi, Yiquan; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Du, Yan; Lian, Shumin

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal thermal fronts associated with wind-driven coastal downwelling/upwelling in the northern South China Sea are investigated using satellite measurements and three repeated fine-resolution mapping surveys in winter, spring, and summer. The results show that vigorous thermal fronts develop over the broad shelf with variable widths and intensities in different seasons, which tend to be approximately aligned with the 20-100 m isobaths. Driven by the prevailing winter/summer monsoon, the band-shaped fronts were observed with a magnitude exceeding 0.1°C/km in the subsurface, and accompanied by energetic coastal downwelling/upwelling due to shoreward/offshore Ekman transport. The downward/upward tilting of seasonal thermoclines across the shelf exceeds 20 m, significantly contributing to the development of thermal fronts over the shelf. In addition, the diagnostic analysis of Potential Vorticity (PV) suggests that the summer frontal activities induced by the coastal upwelling are more stable to convection and symmetric instabilities in comparison to the winter fronts associated with downwelling-favorable monsoon forcing. This is primarily due to their essential differences in the upper ocean stratification and horizontal buoyancy gradients arising from wind forcing. At the same time, the coastal currents are substantially regulated by the seasonal winds. An expected lag correlation between the velocity from mooring measurements and alongshore wind stress is detected near the frontal region. These results indicate that seasonal wind forcing plays an important role in the frontal activities and coastal water transport over the shelf.

  2. Winter wren populations show adaptation to local climate.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Catriona A; Robinson, Robert A; Pearce-Higgins, James W

    2016-06-01

    Most studies of evolutionary responses to climate change have focused on phenological responses to warming, and provide only weak evidence for evolutionary adaptation. This could be because phenological changes are more weakly linked to fitness than more direct mechanisms of climate change impacts, such as selective mortality during extreme weather events which have immediate fitness consequences for the individuals involved. Studies examining these other mechanisms may be more likely to show evidence for evolutionary adaptation. To test this, we quantify regional population responses of a small resident passerine (winter wren Troglodytes troglodytes) to a measure of winter severity (number of frost days). Annual population growth rate was consistently negatively correlated with this measure, but the point at which different populations achieved stability (λ = 1) varied across regions and was closely correlated with the historic average number of frost days, providing strong evidence for local adaptation. Despite this, regional variation in abundance remained negatively related to the regional mean number of winter frost days, potentially as a result of a time-lag in the rate of evolutionary response to climate change. As expected from Bergmann's rule, individual wrens were heavier in colder regions, suggesting that local adaptation may be mediated through body size. However, there was no evidence for selective mortality of small individuals in cold years, with annual variation in mean body size uncorrelated with the number of winter frost days, so the extent to which local adaptation occurs through changes in body size, or another mechanism remains uncertain. PMID:27429782

  3. Winter wren populations show adaptation to local climate.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Catriona A; Robinson, Robert A; Pearce-Higgins, James W

    2016-06-01

    Most studies of evolutionary responses to climate change have focused on phenological responses to warming, and provide only weak evidence for evolutionary adaptation. This could be because phenological changes are more weakly linked to fitness than more direct mechanisms of climate change impacts, such as selective mortality during extreme weather events which have immediate fitness consequences for the individuals involved. Studies examining these other mechanisms may be more likely to show evidence for evolutionary adaptation. To test this, we quantify regional population responses of a small resident passerine (winter wren Troglodytes troglodytes) to a measure of winter severity (number of frost days). Annual population growth rate was consistently negatively correlated with this measure, but the point at which different populations achieved stability (λ = 1) varied across regions and was closely correlated with the historic average number of frost days, providing strong evidence for local adaptation. Despite this, regional variation in abundance remained negatively related to the regional mean number of winter frost days, potentially as a result of a time-lag in the rate of evolutionary response to climate change. As expected from Bergmann's rule, individual wrens were heavier in colder regions, suggesting that local adaptation may be mediated through body size. However, there was no evidence for selective mortality of small individuals in cold years, with annual variation in mean body size uncorrelated with the number of winter frost days, so the extent to which local adaptation occurs through changes in body size, or another mechanism remains uncertain.

  4. Winter wren populations show adaptation to local climate

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Catriona A.; Robinson, Robert A.; Pearce-Higgins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of evolutionary responses to climate change have focused on phenological responses to warming, and provide only weak evidence for evolutionary adaptation. This could be because phenological changes are more weakly linked to fitness than more direct mechanisms of climate change impacts, such as selective mortality during extreme weather events which have immediate fitness consequences for the individuals involved. Studies examining these other mechanisms may be more likely to show evidence for evolutionary adaptation. To test this, we quantify regional population responses of a small resident passerine (winter wren Troglodytes troglodytes) to a measure of winter severity (number of frost days). Annual population growth rate was consistently negatively correlated with this measure, but the point at which different populations achieved stability (λ = 1) varied across regions and was closely correlated with the historic average number of frost days, providing strong evidence for local adaptation. Despite this, regional variation in abundance remained negatively related to the regional mean number of winter frost days, potentially as a result of a time-lag in the rate of evolutionary response to climate change. As expected from Bergmann's rule, individual wrens were heavier in colder regions, suggesting that local adaptation may be mediated through body size. However, there was no evidence for selective mortality of small individuals in cold years, with annual variation in mean body size uncorrelated with the number of winter frost days, so the extent to which local adaptation occurs through changes in body size, or another mechanism remains uncertain. PMID:27429782

  5. Raising of Operating a Motor Vehicle Effects on Environment in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertman, S. A.; Ertman, J. A.; Zakharov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    Severe low-temperature conditions, in which considerable part of Russian Motor Park is operated, affect vehicles negatively. Cold weather causes higher fuel consumption and C02 emissions always. It is because of temperature profile changing of automobile motors, other systems and materials. For enhancement of car operation efficiency in severe winter environment the dependency of engine warm-up and cooling time on ambient air temperature and wind speed described by multifactorial mathematical models is established. -On the basis of experimental research it was proved that the coolant temperature constitutes the engine representative temperature and may be used as representative temperature of engine at large. The model of generation of integrated index for vehicle adaptability to winter operating conditions by temperature profile of engines was developed. the method for evaluation of vehicle adaptability to winter operating conditions by temperature profile of engines allows to decrease higher fuel consumption in cold climate.

  6. Fossils tell of mild winters in an ancient hothouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1993-08-06

    Fossil evidence from the Eocene points to a warmer winter climate in the continental interior (e.g. North Dakota) than that predicted by computer models. Paleobotanists have been able to quantify approximate winter mean temperatures by using leaf characteristics. As one example, leaves from colder climates have toothed edges. Leaf structure was correlated with modern climate regimes, and these relations were then applied to Eocene fossils. They found cold-month mean temperatures of 1-8[degrees]C in Wyoming and Montana, well above model predictions. Climate models can be manipulated to reproduce these temperatures, but not without overheating the entire globe. The problem could be that the Eocene atmospheric circulation was different from today, something not accounted for well by climate models.

  7. Impacts of extreme winter warming events on plant physiology in a sub-Arctic heath community.

    PubMed

    Bokhorst, Stef; Bjerke, Jarle W; Davey, Matthew P; Taulavuori, Kari; Taulavuori, Erja; Laine, Kari; Callaghan, Terry V; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2010-10-01

    Insulation provided by snow cover and tolerance of freezing by physiological acclimation allows Arctic plants to survive cold winter temperatures. However, both the protection mechanisms may be lost with winter climate change, especially during extreme winter warming events where loss of snow cover from snow melt results in exposure of plants to warm temperatures and then returning extreme cold in the absence of insulating snow. These events cause considerable damage to Arctic plants, but physiological responses behind such damage remain unknown. Here, we report simulations of extreme winter warming events using infrared heating lamps and soil warming cables in a sub-Arctic heathland. During these events, we measured maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII), photosynthesis, respiration, bud swelling and associated bud carbohydrate changes and lipid peroxidation to identify physiological responses during and after the winter warming events in three dwarf shrub species: Empetrum hermaphroditum, Vaccinium vitis-idaea and Vaccinium myrtillus. Winter warming increased maximum quantum yield of PSII, and photosynthesis was initiated for E. hermaphroditum and V. vitis-idaea. Bud swelling, bud carbohydrate decreases and lipid peroxidation were largest for E. hermaphroditum, whereas V. myrtillus and V. vitis-idaea showed no or less strong responses. Increased physiological activity and bud swelling suggest that sub-Arctic plants can initiate spring-like development in response to a short winter warming event. Lipid peroxidation suggests that plants experience increased winter stress. The observed differences between species in physiological responses are broadly consistent with interspecific differences in damage seen in previous studies, with E. hermaphroditum and V. myrtillus tending to be most sensitive. This suggests that initiation of spring-like development may be a major driver in the damage caused by winter warming events that are predicted to become more

  8. Sex-specific winter distribution in a sexually dimorphic shorebird is explained by resource partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Duijns, Sjoerd; van Gils, Jan A; Spaans, Bernard; ten Horn, Job; Brugge, Maarten; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-01-01

    Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) implies correlated differences in energetic requirements and feeding opportunities, such that sexes will face different trade-offs in habitat selection. In seasonal migrants, this could result in a differential spatial distribution across the wintering range. To identify the ecological causes of sexual spatial segregation, we studied a sexually dimorphic shorebird, the bar-tailed godwit Limosa lapponica, in which females have a larger body and a longer bill than males. With respect to the trade-offs that these migratory shorebirds experience in their choice of wintering area, northern and colder wintering sites have the benefit of being closer to the Arctic breeding grounds. According to Bergmann's rule, the larger females should incur lower energetic costs per unit of body mass over males, helping them to winter in the cold. However, as the sexes have rather different bill lengths, differences in sex-specific wintering sites could also be due to the vertical distribution of their buried prey, that is, resource partitioning. Here, in a comparison between six main intertidal wintering areas across the entire winter range of the lapponica subspecies in northwest Europe, we show that the percentage of females between sites was not correlated with the cost of wintering, but was positively correlated with the biomass in the bottom layer and negatively with the biomass in the top layer. We conclude that resource partitioning, rather than relative expenditure advantages, best explains the differential spatial distribution of male and female bar-tailed godwits across northwest Europe. PMID:25505527

  9. Cold climate wetlands: design and performance.

    PubMed

    Wallace, S; Parkin, G; Cross, C

    2001-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are gaining widespread use as a simple, low cost means of wastewater treatment. Introduction of constructed wetlands technology into the northern United States has been limited by the ability of conventional wetland systems to operate without freezing during the winter. A design approach using subsurface-flow constructed wetlands covered with an insulating mulch layer has been demonstrated to prevent freezing. However, introduction of a mulch layer will affect oxygen transfer rates, pollutant removal performance, and plant establishment. These factors must be addressed for successful application of constructed wetlands technology in cold climates.

  10. Subjective musculoskeletal symptoms in winter and summer among indoor working construction electricians.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Ryoichi; Mirbod, Seyed Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of cold exposure on the musculoskeletal system, two surveys on the subjective musculoskeletal symptoms among male electricians working in the buildings under construction were performed in winter (N=74) and summer seasons (N=83). A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on age, occupational career, working habit, present illness, and subjective musculoskeletal symptoms. Mean age, occupational career and daily smoking of the supervisors were significantly higher than those of the other subjects. In general, prevalence rates of stiffness, numbness, pain and Raynaud's phenomenon in the fingers, finger cold sensation, dull movement of the fingers, pain in the wrist, knee joint pain, pain and numbness in the foot and foot cold sensation in winter were significantly higher than those in summer. These results were marked especially in the workers except supervisors. In winter, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of subjective musculoskeletal complaints between the supervisors and the other workers. On the other hand, in summer, prevalence of stiffness and pain in the shoulder, stiffness and pain in the neck, dullness and pain in the arm, finger cold sensation, low back dullness and low back pain in the supervisors were significantly higher than those in the other workers. These results suggest that effects of cold on the musculoskeletal symptoms markedly appeared in the workers except supervisors. PMID:20160405

  11. Winter storm-induced hydrodynamics and morphological response of a shallow transgressive shoal complex: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadatmousavi, S. Mostafa; Jose, Felix

    2015-03-01

    before and after the deployment in spring 2009 consisted of more than 80% shell and shell hash, which again confirmed a stable bottom as predicted from the PCADP data. However, the fine sand and mud dominated bed at Trinity Shoal was highly dynamic and experienced a few cm of ephemeral sediment deposition during the passage of each cold front, as revealed from the analysis of acoustic backscatter data from the PCADP. Suspended sediment concentration estimated from Optical Backscatterance Sensors (OBS) and PCADP were in good agreement during low river discharge events in December 2008; but significantly diverged during the spring 2009 deployment, when a high suspended sediment load was discharged into the shelf from the Atchafalaya River, and subsequently pushed farther offshore into the deployment sites by wind-induced strong currents during the passage of cold fronts.

  12. Winter- and summertime continental influences on tropospheric O3 and CO observed by TES over the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.

    2009-11-01

    The distribution of tropospheric O3 and CO and the regulating factors over the western North Atlantic Ocean during winter (December, January, and February, DJF) and summer (June, July, August, JJA) were investigated using retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for 2004-2006. Seasonal composites of TES retrievals, reprocessed to remove the artificial geographic and seasonal structure added from the a priori, exhibited strong seasonal differences. At the 681 hPa level during winter composite O3 levels were uniformly low (~45 ppbv), but continental export was evident in a channel of enhanced CO (100-110 ppbv) flowing eastward from the US coast. In summer O3 levels were variable (45-65 ppbv) and generally higher due to increased photochemical production. The main export pathway featured a channel of enhanced CO (95-105 ppbv) flowing northeastward around an anticyclone and exiting the continent over the Canadian Maritimes around 50° N. Offshore O3-CO slopes were generally 0.15-0.20 mol mol-1 in JJA, indicative of photochemical O3 production. Composites for 4 predominant circulation patterns or map types in DJF revealed that export to the lower free troposphere (681 hPa level) was enhanced by the warm conveyor belt (WCB) airstream of cyclones while stratospheric intrusions increased TES O3 levels at 316 hPa. A major finding in the DJF data was that offshore 681 hPa CO levels behind cold fronts could be enhanced up to >150 ppbv likely by lofting from the surface via shallow convection resulting from rapid destabilization of cold air flowing over much warmer ocean waters. In JJA composites for 5 map types showed that the main export pattern of seasonal composites contained the Bermuda High as the dominate feature. However, weak cyclones and frontal troughs could enhance offshore 681 hPa CO levels to greater than 110 ppbv with O3-CO slopes >0.50 mol mol-1 south of 45° N. Intense cyclones, which were not as common in the summer, enhanced export by

  13. Nesting habitat of the Tule Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons elgasi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, R.V.; Ely, C.R.; Bollinger, K.S.; Kratzer, S.; Udevitz, M.S.; Fehringer, D.J.; Rothe, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the first information on the availability and use of nesting habitat by the rare Tule Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons elgasi. The breeding range was sampled by marking geese with radio transmitters on wintering and moulting areas, and tracking them to nest sites in Alaska. Nesting habitat was described at the scales of ecoregion, wetland ecosystem (National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) maps), vegetation type within wetland (Alaska Vegetation Classification (AVC) maps based on satellite imagery), and nest site. Tule Greater White-fronted Goose nests were located in boreal forest wetlands in the upper Cook Inlet Basin ecoregion. Nesting Tule Greater White-fronted Geese selected NWT Palustrine Seasonally Flooded wetlands and used NWI Palustrine Saturated wetlands in proportion to availability. Within these wetlands, Tule Greater White-fronted Geese used Needleleaf Forest, Low Shrub and Herbaceous (mostly graminoid) AVC classes for nest sites in proportion to availability Most (93%) Tule Greater White-fronted Geese nested > 75 m from open water ponds or lakes, and many nested in wetlands with little or no open water. Tule Greater White-fronted Geese nest only in a small breeding area near the most human-impacted area of the state, and continued development may limit the use of suitable nesting habitat.

  14. A Pan-arctic Survey about the Meaning of Winter Respiration in Northern High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbmann, A. K.; Natali, S.

    2015-12-01

    The arctic is warming at twice the rate of the rest of the planet, with the greatest warming occurring during the winter months. Despite the cold temperatures during the winter, microbial activity continues and leads to a release of soil carbon during a criticial period when plant uptake has ceased. Due to the warming climate, huge pools of carbon stored in permafrost soils are expected to be released to the atmosphere. To identify the annual carbon balance of arctic ecosystems and potential impacts caused by a rise in temperatures, understanding the magnitude of winter respiration is essential. In order to refine current and future estimates of carbon loss from permafrost ecosystems, we conducted a pan-arctic synthesis of winter respiration from northern high latitude regions. We examined differences in cumulative winter respiration among permafrost zones, biomes, ecosystem types, and effects of measurement method on winter respiration estimates. We also examined effect of air temperature and precipitation (Worldclim database) on rates of winter respiration. The database contained 169 measurement points from 46 study sites located throughout the permafrost zones. We found that 21.6 % of annual respiration is happening during non-growing season, which can shift ecosystems from annual sinks during the growing season to net sources of carbon on an annual basis. Across studies, the average carbon loss during the winter was 66 g CO2-C. There was a strong relationship between mean annual air temperature and winter respiration, and lower respiration in continuous compared to discontinuous permafrost zones and northern areas without permafrost. The present results clarify the contribution of winter respiration to annual carbon balance and show the sensitivity of carbon release to rising temperatures in northern high latitudes. These results suggest that permafrost degradation and increased temperature will lead to a higher release of carbon from the Arctic in wintertime

  15. Thermohaline fine structure in an oceanographic front from seismic reflection profiling.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, W Steven; Páramo, Pedro; Pearse, Scott; Schmitt, Raymond W

    2003-08-01

    We present acoustic images of oceanic thermohaline structure created from marine seismic reflection profiles across the major oceanographic front between the Labrador Current and the North Atlantic Current. The images show that distinct water masses can be mapped, and their internal structure imaged, using low-frequency acoustic reflections from sound speed contrasts at interfaces across which temperature changes. The warm/cold front is characterized by east-dipping reflections generated by thermohaline intrusions in the uppermost 1000 meters of the ocean. Our results imply that marine seismic reflection techniques can provide excellent spatial resolution of important oceanic phenomena, including thermohaline intrusions, internal waves, and eddies.

  16. The History of Winter: teachers as scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, L.; Courville, Z.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Gow, T.; Bender, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The History of Winter (HOW) is a NASA Goddard Space Flight Center-funded teacher enrichment program that was started by Dr. Peter Wasilewski (NASA), Dr. Robert Gabrys (NASA) and Dr. Tony Gow (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, or CRREL) in 2001 and continues with support and involvement of scientists from both the NASA Cryospheric Sciences Laboratory and CREEL. The program brings educators mostly from middle and high schools but also from state parks, community colleges and other institutions from across the US to the Northwood School (a small, private boarding school) in Lake Placid, NY for one week to learn about several facets of winter, polar, and snow research, including the science and history of polar ice core research, lake ice formation and structure, snow pack science, winter ecology, and remote sensing including current and future NASA cryospheric missions. The program receives support from the Northwood School staff to facilitate the program. The goal of the program is to create 'teachers as scientists' which is achieved through several hands-on field experiences in which the teachers have the opportunity to work with polar researchers from NASA, CRREL and partner Universities to dig and sample snow pits, make ice thin sections from lake ice, make snow shelters, and observe under-ice lake ecology. The hands-on work allows the teachers to use the same tools and techniques used in polar research while simultaneously introducing science concepts and activities to support their classroom work. The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the classroom teachers with the opportunity to learn about current and timely cryospheric research as well as to engage in real fieldwork experiences. The enthusiasm generated during the week-long program is translated into classroom activities with guidance from scientists, teachers and educational professionals. The opportunity to engage with polar researchers, both young investigators and renowned

  17. Enzymatic activity of rodents acclimated to cold and long scotophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, F. Le R.; Haim, A.

    1980-09-01

    Rodents representative of a diurnal species ( Rhabdomys pumilio) as well as a nocturnal species ( Praomys natalensis) were acclimated to cold (Ta = 8°C) at a photoperiod of LD 12:12 and a long scotophase (LD 8; 16) at a temperature of 25° C(Ta). Control groups were kept for both species at Ta = 25° C and LD 12:12 and winter acclimated individuals were obtained during July and August to serve as further reference. Blood samples obtained from the tail were analysed for enzymes representative of three major biochemical pathways. The enzymatic activity of LDH (glycolytic pathway), MDH (Krebs cycle) and G6PDH (hexose monophosphate shunt, as an indicator of gonadal activity) were monitored to represent metabolic activity of the respective cycles. Cold acclimated as well as winter acclimatized mice revealed similar enzymatic patterns for both species and significant increases in LDH and MDH were recorded with a concurrent decrease in G6PDH activity. Specimens exposed to long scotophase exhibited similar enzymatic patterns for both species studied, but enzymatic activity was higher than those of cold acclimated individuals. From these results it is concluded that cold as well as long scotophase induce metabolic adaptations through biochemical activity in the experimental animals. The effect of long scotophase is assumed to be an important factor in the induction of winter acclimatization.

  18. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... All What is hypothermia? When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than ... The result is hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. Body temperature that is too low affects the ...

  19. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  20. Individual inconsistencies in basal and summit metabolic rate highlight flexibility of metabolic performance in a wintering passerine.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Pablo Andrés; Petit, Magali; Lewden, Agnès; Milbergue, Myriam; Vézina, François

    2015-03-01

    Resident passerines inhabiting high latitude environments are faced with strong seasonal changes in thermal conditions and energy availability. Summit metabolic rate (maximal metabolic rate elicited by shivering during cold exposure: M(sum)) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) vary in parallel among seasons and increase in winter due to cold acclimatization, and these adjustments are thought to be critical for survival. Wintering individuals expressing consistently higher M(sum) and BMR could therefore be seen as better performers with higher chances of winter survival than those exhibiting lower metabolic performance. In this study, we calculated repeatability to evaluate temporal consistency of body mass, BMR and M(sum) within and across three consecutives winters in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). We found that body mass was significantly repeatable both within and across winters (R 0.51-0.90). BMR (R 0.29-0.47) was only repeatable within winter while M(sum) was repeatable both among (R 0.33-0.49) and within winters (R 0.33-0.49) with the magnitude and significance of repeatability in both variables depending on the year and whether they were corrected for body mass or body size. The patterns of repeatability observed among years also differed between the two variables. Our findings suggest that the relative ranking of individuals in winter metabolic performance is affected by local ecological conditions and can change within relatively short periods of time. PMID:25690265

  1. Individual inconsistencies in basal and summit metabolic rate highlight flexibility of metabolic performance in a wintering passerine.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Pablo Andrés; Petit, Magali; Lewden, Agnès; Milbergue, Myriam; Vézina, François

    2015-03-01

    Resident passerines inhabiting high latitude environments are faced with strong seasonal changes in thermal conditions and energy availability. Summit metabolic rate (maximal metabolic rate elicited by shivering during cold exposure: M(sum)) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) vary in parallel among seasons and increase in winter due to cold acclimatization, and these adjustments are thought to be critical for survival. Wintering individuals expressing consistently higher M(sum) and BMR could therefore be seen as better performers with higher chances of winter survival than those exhibiting lower metabolic performance. In this study, we calculated repeatability to evaluate temporal consistency of body mass, BMR and M(sum) within and across three consecutives winters in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). We found that body mass was significantly repeatable both within and across winters (R 0.51-0.90). BMR (R 0.29-0.47) was only repeatable within winter while M(sum) was repeatable both among (R 0.33-0.49) and within winters (R 0.33-0.49) with the magnitude and significance of repeatability in both variables depending on the year and whether they were corrected for body mass or body size. The patterns of repeatability observed among years also differed between the two variables. Our findings suggest that the relative ranking of individuals in winter metabolic performance is affected by local ecological conditions and can change within relatively short periods of time.

  2. Nuclear winter attracts additional scrutiny

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.

    1984-07-06

    Prodded by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Congress has asked the Pentagon to provide what amounts to an environmental impact statement on the potential for nuclear weapons explosions to create enough soot and dust to cause a nuclear winter. The request has implications for arms control and civil defense as well as for weapons procurement and deployment. Little attention was given to the atmospheric and climatic effects of nuclear war until the nuclear winter concept was introduced in October of 1983. Only the Navy and the DOE took steps to follow up until pressure was put on Congress and the Pentagon for further study. Pentagon criticism of the nuclear winter presentation argues that the scenario assumptions that cities will be targeted and that a conflict will involve 5000-6500 megatons are incorrect.

  3. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  4. Is "Warm Arctic, Cold Continent" A Fingerprint Pattern of Climate Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerling, M. P.; Sun, L.; Perlwitz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cold winters and cold waves have recently occurred in Europe, central Asia and the Midwest to eastern United States, even as global mean temperatures set record highs and Arctic amplification of surface warming continued. Since 1979, Central Asia winter temperatures have in fact declined. Conjecture has it that more cold extremes over the mid-latitude continents should occur due to global warming and the impacts of Arctic sea ice loss. A Northern Hemisphere temperature signal termed the "Warm Arctic, Cold Continent" pattern has thus been surmised. Here we use a multi-model approach to test the hypothesis that such a pattern is indeed symptomatic of climate change. Diagnosis of a large model ensemble of historical climate simulations shows some individual realizations to yield cooling trends over Central Asia, but importantly the vast majority show warming. The observed cooling has thus likely been a low probability state of internal variability, not a fingerprint of forced climate change. We show that daily temperature variations over continents decline in winter due to global warming, and cold waves become less likely. This is partly related to diminution of Arctic cold air reservoirs due to warming-induced sea ice loss. Nonetheless, we find some evidence and present a physical basis that Arctic sea ice loss alone can induce a winter cooling over Central Asia, though with a magnitude that is appreciably smaller than the overall radiative-forced warming signal. Our results support the argument that recent cooling trends over central Asia, and cold extreme events over the winter continents, have principally resulted from atmospheric internal variability and have been neither a forced response to Arctic seas ice loss nor a symptom of global warming. The paradigm of climate change is thus better expressed as "Warm Arctic, Warm Continent" for the NH winter.

  5. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. The Winter 2010 and 2011 FRONT/NIRSS In-Flight Icing Hazard Detection Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serke, David; Hubbert, John; Reehorst, Andrew; Kennedy, Patrick; Politovich, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Icing Remote Sensing System (NIRSS) deploys a vertically-pointing K-band radar, a lidar ceiliometer, and a profiling microwave radiometer to obtain measurements for diagnosing local inflight icing conditions. RAL is working with NASA GRC to develop algorithms and data ingest and display software for the system. NASA has an ongoing activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. As part of that effort NASA teamed with NCAR to develop software that fuses data from multiple instruments into a single detected icing condition product. The multiple instrument approach, which is the current emphasis of this activity, utilizes a K-band vertical staring radar, a microwave radiometer that detects twelve frequencies between 22 and 59 GHz, and a lidar ceilometer. The radar data determine cloud boundaries, the radiometer determines the sub-freezing temperature heights and total liquid water content, and the ceilometer refines the lower cloud boundary. Data is post-processed in C++ program with a Java-based web display of resultant supercooled LWC profile and aircraft hazard identification. In 2010, a multi-channel scanning radiometer, designed and built by Radiometrics, Inc. under a SBIR grant,,was added to the system to assess its utility in improving icing diagnoses.

  7. Winter Outdoor Education Activities: Snowshoes and Exploring the Winter Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Bruce E.; And Others

    Designed as a resource base upon which elementary school educators can build outdoor learning experiences, this resource packet contains a basic, multidisciplinary snowshoeing lesson plan, pre- and post-trip suggestions, and suggestions for further winter outdoor study on snowshoes. Specifically, there are narratives and illustrations addressed at…

  8. Deadly Cold: Health Hazards Due to Cold Weather. An Information Paper by the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session (February 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This paper, on the health hazards of cold weather for elderly persons, presents information from various sources on the death rates in winter throughout the United States. After reviewing the scope of the problem, specific health hazards associated with cold weather are discussed, i.e., hypothermia, fires, carbon monoxide poisoning, and influenza…

  9. Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The relation between the hadronic short-distance constituent quark and gluon particle limit and the long-range confining domain is yet one of the most challenging aspects of particle physics due to the strong coupling nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, the fundamental theory of the strong interactions. The central question is how one can compute hadronic properties from first principles; i.e., directly from the QCD Lagrangian. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time. Lattice numerical results follow from computation of frame-dependent moments of distributions in Euclidean space and dynamical observables in Minkowski spacetime, such as the time-like hadronic form factors, are not amenable to Euclidean lattice computations. The Dyson-Schwinger methods have led to many important insights, such as the infrared fixed point behavior of the strong coupling constant, but in practice, the analyses are limited to ladder approximation in Landau gauge. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. New theoretical tools are thus of primary interest for the interpretation of the results expected at the new mass scale and kinematic regions accessible to the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gravity or string theory on a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and conformal field theories in physical space-time has led to a semiclassical approximation for strongly-coupled QCD, which provides physical insights into its nonperturbative dynamics. The correspondence is holographic in the sense that it determines a duality between theories in different number of space-time dimensions. This geometric approach leads in fact to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front

  10. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  11. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Ford, R. Glenn; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April–September) and summer (October–March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group

  12. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: Putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Glenn Ford, R.; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2011-07-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April-September) and summer (October-March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins ( Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group dominated

  13. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Ford, R. Glenn; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April–September) and summer (October–March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group

  14. Winter Snowfall Turns an Emerald White

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Ireland's climate is normally mild due to the nearby Gulf Stream, but the waning days of 2000 saw the Emerald Isle's green fields swathed in an uncommon blanket of white. The contrast between summer and winter is apparent in this pair of images of southwestern Ireland acquired by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on August 23, 2000 (left) and December 29, 2000 (right). The corresponding Terra orbit numbers are 3628 and 5492, respectively.

    The year 2000 brought record-breaking weather to the British Isles. England and Wales experienced the wettest spring and autumn months since 1766. Despite being one of the warmest years in recent history, a cold snap arrived between Christmas and New Year's Day. According to the UK Meteorological Office, the 18 centimeters (7 inches) of snow recorded at Aldergrove, Northern Ireland, on December 27-28 was the deepest daily fall since 1930.

    Prominent geographical features visible in the MISR images include Galway Bay near the top left. Further south, the mouth of the River Shannon, the largest river in the British Isles, meets the Atlantic Ocean. In the lower portions of the images are the counties of Limerick, Kerry and Cork.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology

  15. Nitrate sequestration by corticolous macrolichens during winter precipitation events.

    PubMed

    Levia, Delphis F

    2002-05-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in the biogeochemistry of forested ecosystems. The influence of canopy lichens on the winter biogeochemistry of nitrate in broadleaved deciduous forests is examined and it is hypothesized that nitrate sequestration will not differ between winter precipitation events. Rejection of this hypothesis would mean that meteorological conditions of winter precipitation events have a detectable influence on nitrate sequestration by canopy lichens and nitrate input to the forest floor. Canopy lichens of the genus Parmelia were found to influence winter nitrate stemflow inputs to forest soils differentially. Epiphytic lichens on an individual Carya glabra Mill. (pignut hickory) canopy tree, centrally located within the stand of an open deciduous forest, actively sequestered nitrate leached from the tree's woody frame, lowering aqueous stemflow inputs at the tree base. The quantities of nitrate sequestered by corticolous lichens during the 2 February 1999 mixed-precipitation event were significantly greater than those during all other precipitation events examined. Greater rates of nitrate uptake during the 2 February 1999 event may be attributed to (1) its intermediate rain intensity, which would have soaked the lichen thalli in a nutrient-rich bath, and (2) an air temperature range between -2 degrees C and 8 degrees C that would have increased viscosity and surface tension of stemflow drainage, thereby decreasing stemflow velocity and increasing the contact time of stemflow water on the lichen thalli. Other precipitation events were either too cold to promote metabolic activity by canopy lichens or too warm and intense for an optimal contact time of stemflow with lichen thalli, resulting in lower quantities of nitrate sequestered. Meteorological conditions of winter precipitation events have been documented to influence sequestration of nitrate by corticolous lichens and decrease aqueous stemflow inputs to the forest floor of broadleaved

  16. Distribution patterns during winter and fidelity to wintering areas of American black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution patterns during winter of American black ducks were compared among age-sex classes using band recivery data. In addition, fidelity to wintering areas was compared between sexes and between coastal and inland wintering sites.

  17. How cold pool triggers deep convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2014-05-01

    The cold pool in the boundary layer is often considered a major triggering mechanism of convection. Here, presented are basic theoretical considerations on this issue. Observations suggest that cold pool-generated convective cells is available for shallow maritime convection (Warner et al. 1979; Zuidema et al. 2012), maritime deep convection (Barnes and Garstang 1982; Addis et al. 1984; Young et al. 1995) and continental deep convection (e.g., Lima and Wilson 2008; Flamant 2009; Lothon et al. 2011; Dione et al. 2013). Moreover, numerical studies appear to suggest that cold pools promote the organization of clouds into larger structures and thereby aid the transition from shallow to deep convection (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2006, Boing et al. 2012, Schlemmer and Hohenegger, 2014). Even a cold--pool parameterization coupled with convection is already proposed (Grandpeix and Lafore 2010: but see also Yano 2012). However, the suggested link between the cold pool and deep convection so far is phenomenological at the best. A specific process that the cold pool leads to a trigger of deep convection must still to be pinned down. Naively, one may imagine that a cold pool lifts up the air at the front as it propagates. Such an uplifting leads to a trigger of convection. However, one must realize that a shift of air along with its propagation does not necessarily lead to an uplifting, and even if it may happen, it would not far exceed a depth of the cold pool itself. Thus, the uplifting can never be anything vigorous. Its thermodynamic characteristics do help much either for inducing convection. The cold-pool air is rather under rapid recovering process before it can induce convection under a simple parcel-lifting argument. The most likely reason that the cold pool may induce convection is its gust winds that may encounter an air mass from an opposite direction. This induces a strong convergence, also leading to a strong uplifting. This is an argument essentially developed

  18. Front propagation and rejuvenation in flipping processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, P I; Antal, T; Ben - Avrahm, D

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess {Delta}{sub k} increases logarithmically, {Delta}{sub k} {approx_equal}ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing -- young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations.

  19. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  20. Ice conditions on the Chesapeake Bay as observed from LANDSAT during the winters of 1977, 1978 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The LANDSAT observations during the winters of 1977, 1978 and 1979, which were unusually cold in the northeastern U.S. and in the Chesapeake Bay area, were evaluated. Abnormal atmospheric circulation patterns displaced cold polar air to the south, and as a result, the Chesapeake Bay experienced much greater than normal icing conditions during these 3 years. The LANDSAT observations of the Chesapeake Bay area during these winters demonstrate the satellite's capabilities to monitor ice growth and melt, to detect ice motions, and to measure ice extent.

  1. Progress in front propagation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  2. The upgraded Tevatron front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, M.; Zagel, J.; Smith, P.; Marsh, W.; Smolucha, J.

    1990-08-01

    We are replacing the computers which support the CAMAC crates in the Fermilab accelerator control system. We want a significant performance increase, but we still want to be able to service scores of different varieties of CAMAC cards in a manner essentially transparent to console applications software. Our new architecture is based on symmetric multiprocessing. Several processors on the same bus, each running identical software, work simultaneously at satisfying different pieces of a console's request for data. We dynamically adjust the load between the processors. We can obtain more processing power by simply plugging in more processors cards and rebooting. We describe in this paper what we believe to be the interesting architectural features of the new front-end computers. We also note how we use some of the advanced features of the Multibus™ II bus and the Intel 80386 processor design to achieve reliability and expandability of both hardware and software.

  3. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  4. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  5. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  6. Cold Weather Entomology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests instructional strategies and student activities related to the study of insects during the winter. Includes possible collecting sites and classroom activities once the insects have been collected. (JN)

  7. Learning through a Winter's Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidotto, Kristie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience during the final semester of Year 11 Theatre Studies when she performed a monologue about Hermione from "The Winter's Tale". This experience was extremely significant to her because it nearly made her lose faith in one of the most important parts of her life, drama. She believes this experience,…

  8. Reducing winter injury in blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the combination of primocane training and cane positioning techniques using a rotatable cross-arm (RCA) trellis system and covering plants in winter to protect buds and canes from freezing temperatures in ‘Apache’, ‘Boysenberry’, ‘Siskiyou’, and ‘Triple Crown’ blackberry. After tying p...

  9. Trends of cold and heat waves in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkašević, Miroslava; Tošić, Ivana

    2014-05-01

    The series of the daily minimum and maximum temperatures at fifteen stations in Serbia were used to calculate the cold and warm spell duration indicators, from which the duration and severity of the cold and heat waves were estimated. The trend analysis for all seasons was presented using the data from 1949 to 2012. The most important result of this study is the significant decreasing trends in the frequency of cold waves and increasing trends of heat waves in Serbia. An analysis of the daily minimum temperatures almost at all meteorological stations revealed that the longest and most severe cold waves were observed in winter of 1956, spring of 1987, summer of 1962 and 1996, and during the autumn 1983 and 1988. The longest and most severe heat waves, based on the analysis of the daily maximum temperatures, were recorded in winter of 2007, spring of 2003, summer of 2012, and after 1989 during the autumn. The longest heat waves observed in 2012 did not reach the severity of the heat waves in 2007 at ten of fifteen stations. The obtained results indicated that the warming in Serbia was more related to increase in frequency of heat waves than to reduction in cold waves.

  10. The Cold Surface Layer of Kahiltna Glacier, Central Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. D.; Gusmeroli, A.; Arendt, A. A.; Atwood, D. K.; Kampes, B.; Sanford, M.; Young, J. C.; Aschwanden, A.; Truffer, M.; Herreid, S. J.; Hock, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    In Arctic, sub-Arctic and high-Alpine settings the ablation area of many mountain glaciers is rarely entirely temperate, and a cold near-surface layer of variable thickness, whose temperature remains below freezing throughout the year, can be found. This occurs when summer ablation rates do not melt the near-surface ice enough to remove the cold layer from the previous winter. A cold near-surface layer is a useful climatological parameter because, for example, its thinning over time can be related to climatic warming. In April 2011 we conducted several 100 MHz ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys in the upper ablation area (˜1200 m a.s.l.) of the Kahiltna glacier, in the central Alaska Range. Surface ice temperatures, measured continuously during the preceding winter remained at ˜-4°C for 6 months. The GPR data showed the presence of a spatially variable, ˜20 m thick, transparent layer which we interpret to be the cold surface layer. A layer of similar thickness was retrieved by airborne IFSAR P-band radar surveys on several Alaskan glaciers. We use these observations to discuss the occurrence of a cold-surface layer in the Alaska Range and its usefulness for glacier monitoring studies.

  11. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  12. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. T.; Stratakis, D.; Prior, G.; Gilardoni, S.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Alekou, A.; Pasternak, J.

    2013-04-01

    In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  13. Passive thermal refugia provided warm water for Florida manatees during the severe winter of 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stith, B.M.; Slone, D.H.; de Wit, M.; Edwards, H.H.; Langtimm, C.A.; Swain, E.D.; Soderqvist, L.E.; Reid, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Haloclines induced by freshwater inflow over tidal water have been identified as an important mechanism for maintaining warm water in passive thermal refugia (PTR) used by Florida manatees Trichechus manatus latirostris during winter in extreme southwestern Florida. Record-setting cold during winter 2009–2010 resulted in an unprecedented number of manatee deaths, adding to concerns that PTR may provide inadequate thermal protection during severe cold periods. Hydrological data from 2009–2010 indicate that 2 canal systems in the Ten Thousand Islands (TTI) region acted as PTR and maintained warm bottom-water temperatures, even during severe and prolonged cold periods. Aerial survey counts of live and dead manatees in TTI during the winter of 2009–2010 suggest that these PTR were effective at preventing mass mortality from hypothermia, in contrast to the nearby Everglades region, which lacks similar artificial PTR and showed high manatee carcass counts. Hydrological data from winter 2008–2009 confirmed earlier findings that without haloclines these artificial PTR may become ineffective as warm-water sites. Tidal pumping of groundwater appears to provide additional heat to bottom water during low tide cycles, but the associated thermal inversion is not observed unless salinity stratification is present. The finding that halocline-driven PTR can maintain warm water even under extreme winter conditions suggests that they may have significant potential as warm-water sites. However, availability and conflicting uses of freshwater and other management issues may make halocline-driven PTR unreliable or difficult to manage during winter.

  14. Observations of seasonal subduction at the Iceland-Faroe Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaird, N. L.; Rhines, P. B.; Eriksen, C. C.

    2016-06-01

    The polar front in the North Atlantic is bound to the ridge between Iceland and the Faroe Islands, where about one-half of the northward transport of warm Atlantic Water into the Nordic Seas occurs, as well as about one sixth of the equatorward dense overflow. We find a low salinity water mass at the surface of the Iceland-Faroe Front (IFF), which in wintertime subducts along outcropping isopycnals and is found in much modified form on the Atlantic side of the Iceland-Faroe Ridge (IFR) crest. The features found on the Atlantic side of the crest at depth have temperature and salinity characteristics which are clearly traceable to the surface outcrop of the IFF. The presence of coherent low salinity layers on the Atlantic side of the IFR crest has not been previously reported. Warm waters above the IFR primarily feed the Faroe Current, and injection of a low salinity water mass may play an early role in the water mass transformation taking place in the Nordic Seas. The seasonality of the intrusive features suggests a link between winter convection, mixed layer instability and deep frontal subduction. These low salinity anomalies (as well as a low oxygen water mass from the Iceland Basin) can be used as tracers of the intermediate circulation over the IFR.

  15. Divergence of the diapause transcriptome in apple maggot flies: winter regulation and post-winter transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Peter J; Powell, Thomas H Q; Walden, Kimberly K O; Schieferecke, Adam J; Feder, Jeffrey L; Hahn, Daniel A; Robertson, Hugh M; Berlocher, Stewart H; Ragland, Gregory J

    2016-09-01

    The duration of dormancy regulates seasonal timing in many organisms and may be modulated by day length and temperature. Though photoperiodic modulation has been well studied, temperature modulation of dormancy has received less attention. Here, we leverage genetic variation in diapause in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, to test whether gene expression during winter or following spring warming regulates diapause duration. We used RNAseq to compare transcript abundance during and after simulated winter between an apple-infesting population and a hawthorn-infesting population where the apple population ends pupal diapause earlier than the hawthorn-infesting population. Marked differences in transcription between the two populations during winter suggests that the 'early' apple population is developmentally advanced compared with the 'late' hawthorn population prior to spring warming, with transcripts participating in growth and developmental processes relatively up-regulated in apple pupae during the winter cold period. Thus, regulatory differences during winter ultimately drive phenological differences that manifest themselves in the following summer. Expression and polymorphism analysis identify candidate genes in the Wnt and insulin signaling pathways that contribute to population differences in seasonality. Both populations remained in diapause and displayed a pattern of up- and then down-regulation (or vice versa) of growth-related transcripts following warming, consistent with transcriptional repression. The ability to repress growth stimulated by permissive temperatures is likely critical to avoid mismatched phenology and excessive metabolic demand. Compared with diapause studies in other insects, our results suggest some overlap in candidate genes/pathways, though the timing and direction of changes in transcription are likely species specific. PMID:27312473

  16. Front blind spot crashes in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuk Ki; Wong, Koon Hung; Tao, Chi Hang; Tam, Cheok Ning; Tam, Yiu Yan; Tsang, Cheuk Nam

    2016-09-01

    In 2012-2014, our laboratory had investigated a total of 9 suspected front blind spot crashes, in which the medium and heavy goods vehicles pulled away from rest and rolled over the pedestrians, who were crossing immediately in front of the vehicles. The drivers alleged that they did not see any pedestrians through the windscreens or the front blind spot mirrors. Forensic assessment of the goods vehicles revealed the existence of front blind spot zones in 3 out of these 9 accident vehicles, which were attributed to the poor mirror adjustments or even the absence of a front blind spot mirror altogether. In view of this, a small survey was devised involving 20 randomly selected volunteers and their goods vehicles and 5 out of these vehicles had blind spots at the front. Additionally, a short questionnaire was conducted on these 20 professional lorry drivers and it was shown that most of them were not aware of the hazards of blind spots immediately in front of their vehicles, and many did not use the front blind spot mirrors properly. A simple procedure for quick measurements of the coverage of front blind spot mirrors using a coloured plastic mat with dimensional grids was also introduced and described in this paper.

  17. Helices in the wake of precipitation fronts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shibi; Lagzi, István; Molnár, Ferenc; Rácz, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    A theoretical study of the emergence of helices in the wake of precipitation fronts is presented. The precipitation dynamics is described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the fronts are obtained by quenching the system into a linearly unstable state. Confining the process onto the surface of a cylinder and using the pulled-front formalism, our analytical calculations show that there are front solutions that propagate into the unstable state and leave behind a helical structure. We find that helical patterns emerge only if the radius of the cylinder R is larger than a critical value R>R(c), in agreement with recent experiments. PMID:24032809

  18. Nonlinear effects of climate on boreal rodent dynamics: mild winters do not negate high-amplitude cycles.

    PubMed

    Korpela, Katri; Delgado, Maria; Henttonen, Heikki; Korpimäki, Erkki; Koskela, Esa; Ovaskainen, Otso; Pietiäinen, Hannu; Sundell, Janne; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Huitu, Otso

    2013-03-01

    Small rodents are key species in many ecosystems. In boreal and subarctic environments, their importance is heightened by pronounced multiannual population cycles. Alarmingly, the previously regular rodent cycles appear to be collapsing simultaneously in many areas. Climate change, particularly decreasing snow quality or quantity in winter, is hypothesized as a causal factor, but the evidence is contradictory. Reliable analysis of population dynamics and the influence of climate thereon necessitate spatially and temporally extensive data. We combined data on vole abundances and climate, collected at 33 locations throughout Finland from 1970 to 2011, to test the hypothesis that warming winters are causing a disappearance of multiannual vole cycles. We predicted that vole population dynamics exhibit geographic and temporal variation associated with variation in climate; reduced cyclicity should be observed when and where winter weather has become milder. We found that the temporal patterns in cyclicity varied between climatically different regions: a transient reduction in cycle amplitude in the coldest region, low-amplitude cycles or irregular dynamics in the climatically intermediate regions, and strengthening cyclicity in the warmest region. Our results did not support the hypothesis that mild winters are uniformly leading to irregular dynamics in boreal vole populations. Long and cold winters were neither a prerequisite for high-amplitude multiannual cycles, nor were mild winters with reduced snow cover associated with reduced winter growth rates. Population dynamics correlated more strongly with growing season than with winter conditions. Cyclicity was weakened by increasing growing season temperatures in the cold, but strengthened in the warm regions. High-amplitude multiannual vole cycles emerge in two climatic regimes: a winter-driven cycle in cold, and a summer-driven cycle in warm climates. Finally, we show that geographic climatic gradients alone may not

  19. Impact of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the Western Pacific (WP) pattern in the following winter through Arctic sea ice and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Oshika, Miki; Nakamura, Tetsu

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that Asian weather and climate in a given winter can be predicted 1 year in advance. On the basis of a 51-year statistical analysis of reanalysis data, we propose for the first time that the positive phase of the Western Pacific (WP) pattern in the winter is linked to the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the previous winter, and vice versa. We show that there are two possible mechanisms responsible for this interannual remote linkage. One is an Arctic mechanism. Extensive Arctic sea ice in the summer after a negative NAO acts as a bridge to the positive phase of the WP in the next winter. The negative (positive) phase of the winter NAO changes oceanic currents in the North Atlantic and weakens (strengthens) oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. This weakened (strengthened) heat transport also slows down (speeds up) the reduction of sea ice in the spring. A condition of more (less) ice than normal then persists until the season of ice freezing in autumn. In winter, all of the Arctic Ocean is covered by sea ice, regardless of the autumn ice area. Less (more) ice production during the freezing season reduces (increases) the heat released from the ocean to the atmosphere in the Arctic. An anomalously small (large) heat flux excites stationary Rossby wave propagation, which induces warm (cold) advection to Japan. The other mechanism involves the tropics. An El Niño occurrence after a negative winter NAO acts as another bridge to the positive phase of the WP in the following winter. The timescale of the Arctic route is nearly decadal, whereas that of the tropical route is about 3-5 years. The tropical mechanism indicates that the NAO remotely excites an El Niño in the second half of the following year. A process perhaps responsible for the El Niño occurrence was investigated statistically. A negative NAO in the winter increases Eurasian snow cover. This anomalous snow cover then intensifies the cold air

  20. Xanthophyll cycle pigment and antioxidant profiles of winter-red (anthocyanic) and winter-green (acyanic) angiosperm evergreen species.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicole M; Burkey, Kent O; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Smith, William K

    2012-03-01

    Leaves of many angiosperm evergreen species change colour from green to red during winter, corresponding with the synthesis of anthocyanin pigments. The ecophysiological function of winter colour change (if any), and why it occurs in some species and not others, are not yet understood. It was hypothesized that anthocyanins play a compensatory photoprotective role in species with limited capacity for energy dissipation. Seasonal xanthophyll pigment content, chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf nitrogen, and low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWA) of five winter-red and five winter-green angiosperm evergreen species were compared. Our results showed no difference in seasonal xanthophyll pigment content (V+A+Z g(-1) leaf dry mass) or LMWA between winter-red and winter-green species, indicating red-leafed species are not deficient in their capacity for non-photochemical energy dissipation via these mechanisms. Winter-red and winter-green species also did not differ in percentage leaf nitrogen, corroborating previous studies showing no difference in seasonal photosynthesis under saturating irradiance. Consistent with a photoprotective function of anthocyanin, winter-red species had significantly lower xanthophyll content per unit chlorophyll and less sustained photoinhibition than winter-green species (i.e. higher pre-dawn F(v)/F(m) and a lower proportion of de-epoxidized xanthophylls retained overnight). Red-leafed species also maintained a higher maximum quantum yield efficiency of PSII at midday (F'(v)/F'(m)) during winter, and showed characteristics of shade acclimation (positive correlation between anthocyanin and chlorophyll content, and negative correlation with chlorophyll a/b). These results suggest that the capacity for photon energy dissipation (photochemical and non-photochemical) is not limited in red-leafed species, and that anthocyanins more likely function as an alternative photoprotective strategy to increased VAZ/Chl during winter.

  1. Wintering ecology of adult North American ospreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Brian E.; Martell, Mark S.; Bierregaard, Richard O.; Henny, Charles J.; Dorr, Brian S.; Olexa, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    North American Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) typically migrate long distances to their wintering grounds in the tropics. Beyond the general distribution of their wintering range (i.e., the Caribbean, South America, and Central America), very little is known about the wintering ecology of these birds. We used satellite telemetry to determine the duration of wintering period, to examine the characteristics of wintering areas used by Ospreys, and to quantify space use and activity patterns of wintering Ospreys. Adult Ospreys migrated to wintering sites and exhibited high wintering site fidelity among years. Overall, Ospreys wintered on river systems (50.6%) more than on lakes (19.0%), and use of coastal areas was (30.4%) intermediate. Ospreys remained on their wintering grounds for an average of 154 d for males and 167 d for females. Locations of wintering Ospreys obtained via GPS-capable satellite telemetry suggest these birds move infrequently and their movements are very localized (i.e., 2 and 1.4 km2, respectively. Overall, our findings suggest wintering adult North American Ospreys are very sedentary, demonstrating a pattern of limited daily movements and high fidelity to a few select locations (presumably roosts). We suggest this wintering strategy might be effective for reducing the risk of mortality and maximizing energy conservation.

  2. Winter movement dynamics of Black Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindberg, Mark S.; Ward, David H.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Roser, John

    2007-01-01

    Although North American geese are managed based on their breeding distributions, the dynamics of those breeding populations may be affected by events that occur during the winter. Birth rates of capital breeding geese may be influenced by wintering conditions, mortality may be influenced by timing of migration and wintering distribution, and immigration and emigration among breeding populations may depend on winter movement and timing of pair formation. We examined factors affecting movements of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) among their primary wintering sites in Mexico and southern California, USA, (Mar 1998-Mar 2000) using capture-recapture models. Although brant exhibited high probability (>0.85) of monthly and annual fidelity to the wintering sites we sampled, we observed movements among all wintering sites. Movement probabilities both within and among winters were negatively related to distance between sites. We observed a higher probability both of southward movement between winters (Mar to Dec) and northward movement between months within winters. Between-winter movements were probably most strongly affected by spatial and temporal variation in habitat quality as we saw movement patterns consistent with contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., La Niña and El Niño southern oscillation cycles). Month-to-month movements were related to migration patterns and may also have been affected by differences in habitat conditions among sites. Patterns of winter movements indicate that a network of wintering sites may be necessary for effective conservation of brant.

  3. Could behaviour and not physiological thermal tolerance determine winter survival of aphids in cereal fields?

    PubMed

    Alford, Lucy; Andrade, Thiago Oliveira; Georges, Romain; Burel, Françoise; van Baaren, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Traits of physiological thermotolerance are commonly measured in the laboratory as predictors of the field success of ectotherms at unfavourable temperatures (e.g. during harsh winters, heatwaves, or under conditions of predicted global warming). Due to being more complicated to measure, behavioural thermoregulation is less commonly studied, although both physiology and behaviour interact to explain the survival of ectotherms. The aphids Metopolophium dirhodum, Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae are commercially important pests of temperate cereal crops. Although coexisting, these species markedly differ in winter success, with R. padi being the most abundant species during cold winters, followed by S. avenae and lastly M. dirhodum. To better understand the thermal physiology and behavioural factors contributing to differential winter success, the lethal temperature (physiological thermotolerance) and the behaviour of aphids in a declining temperature regime (behavioural thermotolerance) of these three species were investigated. Physiological thermotolerance significantly differed between the three species, with R. padi consistently the least cold tolerant and S. avenae the most cold tolerant. However, although the least cold tolerant of the study species, significantly more R. padi remained attached to the host plant at extreme sub-zero temperatures than S. avenae and M. dirhodum. Given the success of anholocyclic R. padi in harsh winters compared to its anholocyclic counterparts, this study illustrates that behavioural differences could be more important than physiological thermotolerance in explaining resistance to extreme temperatures. Furthermore it highlights that there is a danger to studying physiological thermotolerance in isolation when ascertaining risks of ectotherm invasions, the establishment potential of exotic species in glasshouses, or predicting species impacts under climate change scenarios.

  4. Overwintering Strategy and Mechanisms of Cold Tolerance in the Codling Moth (Cydia pomonella)

    PubMed Central

    Rozsypal, Jan; Koštál, Vladimír; Zahradníčková, Helena; Šimek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background The codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is a major insect pest of apples worldwide. Fully grown last instar larvae overwinter in diapause state. Their overwintering strategies and physiological principles of cold tolerance have been insufficiently studied. No elaborate analysis of overwintering physiology is available for European populations. Principal Findings We observed that codling moth larvae of a Central European population prefer to overwinter in the microhabitat of litter layer near the base of trees. Reliance on extensive supercooling, or freeze-avoidance, appears as their major strategy for survival of the winter cold. The supercooling point decreases from approximately −15.3°C during summer to −26.3°C during winter. Seasonal extension of supercooling capacity is assisted by partial dehydration, increasing osmolality of body fluids, and the accumulation of a complex mixture of winter specific metabolites. Glycogen and glutamine reserves are depleted, while fructose, alanine and some other sugars, polyols and free amino acids are accumulated during winter. The concentrations of trehalose and proline remain high and relatively constant throughout the season, and may contribute to the stabilization of proteins and membranes at subzero temperatures. In addition to supercooling, overwintering larvae acquire considerable capacity to survive at subzero temperatures, down to −15°C, even in partially frozen state. Conclusion Our detailed laboratory analysis of cold tolerance, and whole-winter survival assays in semi-natural conditions, suggest that the average winter cold does not represent a major threat for codling moth populations. More than 83% of larvae survived over winter in the field and pupated in spring irrespective of the overwintering microhabitat (cold-exposed tree trunk or temperature-buffered litter layer). PMID:23613923

  5. Effects of weather on habitat selection and behavior of mallards wintering in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorde, D.G.; Krapu, G.L.; Crawford, R.D.; Hay, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Sex and age ratios, habitat selection, spatial characteristics, and time budgets of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) wintering on the Platte River in south central Nebraska were studied from mid-December to early April 1978-1980. The proportion of females and subadults in the population increased substantially from a cold to a mild winter. Radio-tagged Mallards shifted from riverine to canal roost sites during the coldest periods of the winter, seemingly because of more favorable microclimatic conditions there. Subadults ranged over larger areas during winter than did adults. Activity patterns varied with weather conditions, time of day, and habitat type. During cold periods, energetically costly activities such as aggression and courtship decreased at roost sites and the intensity of foraging activities in fields increased. Mallards were more active at riverine than canal sites during both years. High energy requirements and intense competition for scarce food appear to be primary factors limiting the northernmost distribution of Mallards in winter and causing their skewed sex and age ratios.

  6. Deep Thermal Front (southeastern Brazilian coast) see through acoustics: a preliminary study from an operational oceanography perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsoni, L.; Hermand, J.-P.; da Silveira, I. C. A.

    2012-04-01

    The continental shelf region off the southeastern Brazilian coast (between 20°S and 28°S) is characterized by intrusions of the relatively cold and fertile South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) from the open ocean. Prediction and monitoring of this water mass are topics of great interest given its importance, for example, on climate, carbon cycle, fishing, mariculture, nutrients and pollutants dispersion, and for the oil industry. The intersection of the 18°C isotherm with the seafloor is appointed in the literature as a good tracer for SACW presence on the continental shelf and also to characterize the Deep Thermal Front (DTF) [Castro, 1996]. Among different factors that drive the SACW penetration on the continental shelf, one prominent mechanism is the water transport driven by the conditions of NE-E wind forcing. These winds varies seasonally, and they are prevalent during the spring and summer months. During these months, the water column is generally stratified due the combined effects of solar heating and DTF presence. In contrast, the reverse effect is characteristic in winter, when the water column is nearly homogeneous, relatively colder on the surface and relatively warm close to the bottom. Consequently, the sound speed field changes and thus the acoustic rays are propagated with different characteristics depending on presence, absence or DTF position. Considering this information, acoustics may provide an additional source of data that supplements the other conventional methods (e.g., hydrographic moorings and cruises, buoys, gliders, and others) for tracking and monitoring the front movement. In addition, it is worth emphasizing that acoustic methods present one interesting advantage in that they are able to sample the water column over large three-dimensional distances on an effectively synoptic scale. In this paper, a preliminary study of acoustic propagation modelling through one vertical section off the Brazilian southeastern coast at Canan

  7. Asymmetry in the response of central Eurasian winter temperature to AMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xin; He, Shengping; Wang, Huijun

    2016-10-01

    The asymmetry in the teleconnection of the central Eurasian winter surface air temperature (SAT) with the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) is discussed using observations and model simulations. Observations indicate that the winter SAT over central Eurasia (30°-70°E, 30°-50°N) shows significant positive anomalies during the warm AMO period but weak and insignificant anomalies in the cold AMO period. In general, the warm winters in central Eurasia are associated with large-scale negative sea level pressure anomalies in Europe, anomalous southwesterly winds at 850 hPa over Europe, the "+ - +" geopotential height anomalies at 500 hPa in the south of Greenland, northern Europe, western Asia, and the slant north-south "+ -" pattern jet stream anomalies at 200 hPa in the north and south of the Caspian Sea. Reverse patterns occur during cold winters. These statistically significant features are observed in the warm phase of AMO. Reversed circulation anomalies are observed during the cold phase of AMO; however, these anomalies are weak and not statistically significant. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the atmospheric response to AMO is well supported by simulations with a suite of GFDL atmospheric model idealized experiments and four CMIP5 models historical experiments. Both observations and simulations indicate that Rossby waves propagating from the North Atlantic eastward to Eurasia emerge in the warm AMO and disappear in the cold AMO. Thus, the different propagations of Rossby waves, induced by the different surface thermal conditions of the warm and cold AMO, are the potential connection between the North Atlantic Ocean and central Eurasian climate, and may explain the asymmetry.

  8. Asymmetry in the response of central Eurasian winter temperature to AMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xin; He, Shengping; Wang, Huijun

    2015-12-01

    The asymmetry in the teleconnection of the central Eurasian winter surface air temperature (SAT) with the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) is discussed using observations and model simulations. Observations indicate that the winter SAT over central Eurasia (30°-70°E, 30°-50°N) shows significant positive anomalies during the warm AMO period but weak and insignificant anomalies in the cold AMO period. In general, the warm winters in central Eurasia are associated with large-scale negative sea level pressure anomalies in Europe, anomalous southwesterly winds at 850 hPa over Europe, the "+ - +" geopotential height anomalies at 500 hPa in the south of Greenland, northern Europe, western Asia, and the slant north-south "+ -" pattern jet stream anomalies at 200 hPa in the north and south of the Caspian Sea. Reverse patterns occur during cold winters. These statistically significant features are observed in the warm phase of AMO. Reversed circulation anomalies are observed during the cold phase of AMO; however, these anomalies are weak and not statistically significant. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the atmospheric response to AMO is well supported by simulations with a suite of GFDL atmospheric model idealized experiments and four CMIP5 models historical experiments. Both observations and simulations indicate that Rossby waves propagating from the North Atlantic eastward to Eurasia emerge in the warm AMO and disappear in the cold AMO. Thus, the different propagations of Rossby waves, induced by the different surface thermal conditions of the warm and cold AMO, are the potential connection between the North Atlantic Ocean and central Eurasian climate, and may explain the asymmetry.

  9. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  10. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing, tobogganing and similar winter sports are prohibited on Presidio Trust roads and in parking areas open...

  11. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing, tobogganing and similar winter sports are prohibited on Presidio Trust roads and in parking areas open...

  12. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing, tobogganing and similar winter sports are prohibited on Presidio Trust roads and in parking areas open...

  13. PBF Cooling Tower under construction. Cold water basin is five ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower under construction. Cold water basin is five feet deep. Foundation and basin walls are reinforced concrete. Camera facing west. Pipe openings through wall in front are outlets for return flow of cool water to reactor building. Photographer: John Capek. Date: September 4, 1968. INEEL negative no. 68-3473 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

    2011-11-11

    There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

  15. Dehumidification to reduce cold weather swine housing energy demand

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.D.; Brusewitz, G.H.; Huhnke, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Dehumidificaiton is proposed as an alternative to the use of heated cold outside air for controlling the environment of winter swine building. Algorithms were develped to estimate the heat-moisture balance and the economics of an alternative system. The effect of changes in fuel cost, temperature, air flow, and equipment cost on the break even time between the conventional and alternative system was determined. 17 refs.

  16. Attribution of UK Winter Floods to Anthropogenic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, N.; Alison, K.; Sparrow, S. N.; Otto, F. E. L.; Massey, N.; Vautard, R.; Yiou, P.; van Oldenborgh, G. J.; van Haren, R.; Lamb, R.; Huntingford, C.; Crooks, S.; Legg, T.; Weisheimer, A.; Bowery, A.; Miller, J.; Jones, R.; Stott, P.; Allen, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Many regions of southern UK experienced severe flooding during the 2013/2014 winter. Simultaneously, large areas in the USA and Canada were struck by prolonged cold weather. At the time, the media and public asked whether the general rainy conditions over northern Europe and the cold weather over North America were caused by climate change. Providing an answer to this question is not trivial, but recent studies show that probabilistic event attribution is feasible. Using the citizen science project weather@home, we ran over 40'000 perturbed initial condition simulations of the 2013/2014 winter. These simulations fall into two categories: one set aims at simulating the world with climate change using observed sea surface temperatures while the second set is run with sea surface temperatures corresponding to a world that might have been without climate change. The relevant modelled variables are then downscaled by a hydrological model to obtain river flows. First results show that anthropogenic climate change led to a small but significant increase in the fractional attributable risk for 30-days peak flows for the river Thames. A single number can summarize the final result from probabilistic attribution studies indicating, for example, an increase, decrease or no change to the risk of the event occurring. However, communicating this to the public, media and other scientists remains challenging. The assumptions made in the chain of models used need to be explained. In addition, extreme events, like the UK floods of the 2013/2014 winter, are usually caused by a range of factors. While heavy precipitation events can be caused by dynamic and/or thermodynamic processes, floods occur only partly as a response to heavy precipitation. Depending on the catchment, they can be largely due to soil properties and conditions of the previous months. Probabilistic attribution studies are multidisciplinary and therefore all aspects need to be communicated properly.

  17. The APS beamline front end vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, R.W.

    1993-10-15

    This report discusses the design of the vacuum system for the advanced photon source beamline front ends. Included in this report are discussions on: vacuum calculations, the differential pump; front end vacuum set points; cleaning methods and agents; and continuing and completed research and development.

  18. Effects of fluctuations on propagating fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    Propagating fronts are seen in varieties of nonequilibrium pattern forming systems in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In the last two decades, many researchers have contributed to the understanding of the underlying dynamics of the propagating fronts. Of these, the deterministic and mean-field dynamics of the fronts were mostly understood in late 1980s and 1990s. On the other hand, although the earliest work on the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts dates back to early 1980s, the subject of fluctuating fronts did not reach its adolescence until the mid 1990s. From there onwards the last few years witnessed a surge in activities in the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts. Scores of papers have been written on this subject since then, contributing to a significant maturity of our understanding, and only recently a full picture of fluctuating fronts has started to emerge. This review is an attempt to collect all the works on fluctuating (propagating) fronts in a coherent and cogent manner in proper perspective. It is based on the idea of making our knowledge in this field available to a broader audience, and it is also expected to help to collect bits and pieces of loose thread-ends together for possible further investigation.

  19. Front end for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess Brooks (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The front end in GPS receivers has the functions of amplifying, down-converting, filtering and sampling the received signals. In the preferred embodiment, only two operations, A/D conversion and a sum, bring the signal from RF to filtered quadrature baseband samples. After amplification and filtering at RF, the L1 and L2 signals are each sampled at RF at a high selected subharmonic rate. The subharmonic sample rates are approximately 900 MHz for L1 and 982 MHz for L2. With the selected subharmonic sampling, the A/D conversion effectively down-converts the signal from RF to quadrature components at baseband. The resulting sample streams for L1 and L2 are each reduced to a lower rate with a digital filter, which becomes a straight sum in the simplest embodiment. The frequency subsystem can be very simple, only requiring the generation of a single reference frequency (e.g. 20.46 MHz minus a small offset) and the simple multiplication of this reference up to the subharmonic sample rates for L1 and L2. The small offset in the reference frequency serves the dual purpose of providing an advantageous offset in the down-converted carrier frequency and in the final baseband sample rate.

  20. Winter cover crops influence Amaranthus palmeri establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops were evaluated for their effect on Palmer amaranth (PA) suppression in cotton production. Cover crops examined included rye and four winter legumes: narrow-leaf lupine, crimson clover, Austrian winter pea, and cahaba vetch. Each legume was evaluated alone and in a mixture with rye...

  1. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  2. Coherent structures for front propagation in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Kevin; Mahoney, John

    2014-03-01

    Our goal is to characterize the nature of reacting flows by identifying important ``coherent'' structures. We follow the recent work by Haller, Beron-Vera, and Farazmand which formalized the notion of lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in fluid flows. In this theory, LCSs were derived from the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. We adapt this perspective to analogously define coherent structures in reacting flows. By this we mean a fluid flow with a reaction front propagating through it such that the propagation does not affect the underlying flow. A reaction front might be chemical (Belousov-Zhabotinsky, flame front, etc.) or some other type of front (electromagnetic, acoustic, etc.). While the recently developed theory of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) describes barriers to front propagation in time-periodic flows, this current work provides an important complement by extending to the aperiodic setting. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1201236.

  3. Thin front propagation in random shear flows.

    PubMed

    Chinappi, M; Cencini, M; Vulpiani, A

    2006-01-01

    Front propagation in time-dependent laminar flows is investigated in the limit of very fast reaction and very thin fronts--i.e., the so-called geometrical optics limit. In particular, we consider fronts stirred by random shear flows, whose time evolution is modeled in terms of Ornstein-Uhlembeck processes. We show that the ratio between the time correlation of the flow and an intrinsic time scale of the reaction dynamics (the wrinkling time tw) is crucial in determining both the front propagation speed and the front spatial patterns. The relevance of time correlation in realistic flows is briefly discussed in light of the bending phenomenon--i.e., the decrease of propagation speed observed at high flow intensities.

  4. People who live in a cold climate: thermal adaptation differences based on availability of heating.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Cao, G; Cui, W; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y

    2013-08-01

    Are there differences in thermal adaptation to cold indoor environments between people who are used to living in heating and non-heating regions in China? To answer this question, we measured thermal perceptions and physiological responses of young men from Beijing (where there are indoor space heating facilities in winter) and Shanghai (where there are not indoor space heating facilities in winter) during exposures to cold. Subjects were exposed to 12°C, 14°C, 16°C, 18°C, 20°C for 1 h. Subjects from Beijing complained of greater cold discomfort and demonstrated poorer physiological acclimatization to cold indoor environments than those from Shanghai. These findings indicate that people's chronic indoor thermal experience might be an important determinant of thermal adaptation.

  5. Improving the health forecasting alert system for cold weather and heat-waves in England: a case-study approach using temperature-mortality relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masato, Giacomo; Cavany, Sean; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; Dacre, Helen; Bone, Angie; Carmicheal, Katie; Murray, Virginia; Danker, Rutger; Neal, Rob; Sarran, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The health forecasting alert system for cold weather and heatwaves currently in use in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans for England is based on 5 alert levels, with levels 2 and 3 dependent on a forecast or actual single temperature action trigger. Epidemiological evidence indicates that for both heat and cold, the impact on human health is gradual, with worsening impact for more extreme temperatures. The 60% risk of heat and cold forecasts used by the alerts is a rather crude probabilistic measure, which could be substantially improved thanks to the state-of-the-art forecast techniques. In this study a prototype of a new health forecasting alert system is developed, which is aligned to the approach used in the Met Office's (MO) National Severe Weather Warning Service (NSWWS). This is in order to improve information available to responders in the health and social care system by linking temperatures more directly to risks of mortality, and developing a system more coherent with other weather alerts. The prototype is compared to the current system in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans via a case-study approach to verify its potential advantages and shortcomings. The prototype health forecasting alert system introduces an "impact vs likelihood matrix" for the health impacts of hot and cold temperatures which is similar to those used operationally for other weather hazards as part of the NSWWS. The impact axis of this matrix is based on existing epidemiological evidence, which shows an increasing relative risk of death at extremes of outdoor temperature beyond a threshold which can be identified epidemiologically. The likelihood axis is based on a probability measure associated with the temperature forecast. The new method is tested for two case studies (one during summer 2013, one during winter 2013), and compared to the performance of the current alert system. The prototype shows some clear improvements over the current alert system. It allows for a much greater

  6. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  7. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Thioglycolate poisoning ... Below are symptoms of cold wave lotion poisoning in different parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Mouth irritation Burning and redness of the eyes Possibly serious damage to ...

  8. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  9. Investigation of cold colored smoke production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, T.

    1985-08-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop a nonfading colored cold smoke composition for use in a signal cartridge for practice bombs. The primary constraint is that the substance must not require any form of heat to produce the smoke; hence the term cold smoke. The principal use of the colored cold smoke charge is to mark the point of impact of practice bombs used by the Canadian Forces (CF). In summertime, white smoke produced by titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) is satisfactory; however, colored smoke is required during winter because of the white snow background. Different methods for producing large colored smoke clouds for use as spotting charges are evaluated. The problem of the disappearance, or bleaching, of the orange color from vanadium oxytrichloride (VOCl3) clouds during times of high relative humidity is considered. It is postulated that this is caused by the absorption of large quantities of atmospheric moisture by the smoke. A model has been developed to study the process. This model makes the key predictions concerning the absorption of very large amounts of atmospheric moisture by VOCl3 type smokes above a relative humidity of 80% and the very small importance of temperature as a parameter. These predictions are, in general, corroborated very well by experiment. Possible solutions to this color bleaching problem are discussed, including one that calls for the synthesis of hydrolyzable vanadium compounds with nonhygroscopic leaving groups.

  10. Connections Between Cold Air Pools and Mountain Valley Fog Events in Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the connection between cold air pools and fog events in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. Statistical analyses are conducted using soundings and reported automated surface observing system data from Salt Lake International Airport for the last eighteen cold seasons (October to March, during 1997-2015). A Chi-square test of independence is performed on identified cold air pool, and fog events to determine whether the two events are correlated. Conditional probabilities are then computed to investigate the occurrence of fog, given the presence of a cold pool. These probabilities are compared against that of random fog generation in the mid-winter. It is concluded that the dependence between cold air pools and fog events is statistically significant. The presence of a cold pool makes the formation of fog more likely than random generation.

  11. Interactions between cold ambient temperature and older age on haptic acuity and manual performance.

    PubMed

    Tajmir, Panteha; Grierson, Lawrence E M; Carnahan, Heather

    2013-06-01

    The impact of exposure to cold on individuals' motor skills demands a deeper understanding of the ways in which cold weather influences psychomotor and haptic performance. In this study, various facets of psychomotor performance were evaluated in order to determine the impacts of ambient cold exposure on older persons. Healthy younger and older persons performed a battery of haptic psychomotor tests at room (23° C) and cold (1° C) ambient temperatures. The results indicate that older individuals do not perform as well as younger persons across the battery of tests, with cold temperature further degrading their performance in dexterity tasks (in, for example, Minnesota Manual Dexterity test placing: F [1, 16] = 10.23, p < .01) and peak precision grip force generation (F [1, 16] = 18.97, p < .01). The results suggest that cold weather may have an impact on the occupations older persons are able to perform during the winter months.

  12. Connections Between Cold Air Pools and Mountain Valley Fog Events in Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the connection between cold air pools and fog events in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. Statistical analyses are conducted using soundings and reported automated surface observing system data from Salt Lake International Airport for the last eighteen cold seasons (October to March, during 1997-2015). A Chi-square test of independence is performed on identified cold air pool, and fog events to determine whether the two events are correlated. Conditional probabilities are then computed to investigate the occurrence of fog, given the presence of a cold pool. These probabilities are compared against that of random fog generation in the mid-winter. It is concluded that the dependence between cold air pools and fog events is statistically significant. The presence of a cold pool makes the formation of fog more likely than random generation.

  13. Seasonal variation in nutritional characteristics of the diet of greater white-fronted geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, Craig R.; Raveling, Dennis G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied diet and habitat use of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) from autumn through spring on their primary staging and wintering areas in the Pacific Flyway, 1979-1982. There have been few previous studies of resource use and forage quality of wintering greater white-fronted geese in North America, and as a consequence there has been little empirical support for management practices pertaining to habitat conservation of this broadly distributed species. Observations of >2,500 flocks of geese and collections of foraging birds revealed seasonal and geographic variation in resource use reflective of changes in habitat availability, selection, and fluctuating physiological demands. Autumn migrants from Alaska arrived first in the Klamath Basin of California and southern Oregon, where they fed on barley, oats, wheat, and potatoes. Geese migrated from the Klamath Basin into the Central Valley of California in late autumn where they exploited agricultural crops rich in soluble carbohydrates, with geese in the Sacramento Valley feeding almost exclusively on rice and birds on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta primarily utilizing corn. White-fronted geese began their northward migration in late winter, and by early spring most had returned to the Klamath Basin where 37% of flocks were found in fields of new growth cultivated and wild grasses. Cereal grains and potatoes ingested by geese were low in protein (7-14%) and high in soluble nutrients (17-47% neutral detergent fiber [NDF]), whereas grasses were low in available energy (47-49% NDF) but high in protein (26-42%). Greater white-fronted geese are generalist herbivores and can exploit a variety of carbohydrate-rich cultivated crops, likely making these geese less susceptible to winter food shortages than prior to the agriculturalization of the North American landscape. However, agricultural landscapes can be extremely dynamic and may be less predictable in the long-term than the historic environments to

  14. Seasonal variation in nutritional characteristics of the diet of greater white-fronted geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, C.R.; Raveling, D.G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied diet and habitat use of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) from autumn through spring on their primary staging and wintering areas in the Pacific Flyway, 1979-1982. There have been few previous studies of resource use and forage quality of wintering greater white-fronted geese in North America, and as a consequence there has been little empirical support for management practices pertaining to habitat conservation of this broadly distributed species. Observations of >2,500 flocks of geese and collections of foraging birds revealed seasonal and geographic variation in resource use reflective of changes in habitat availability, selection, and fluctuating physiological demands. Autumn migrants from Alaska arrived first in the Klamath Basin of California and southern Oregon, where they fed on barley, oats, wheat, and potatoes. Geese migrated from the Klamath Basin into the Central Valley of California in late autumn where they exploited agricultural crops rich in soluble carbohydrates, with geese in the Sacramento Valley feeding almost exclusively on rice and birds on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta primarily utilizing corn. White-fronted geese began their northward migration in late winter, and by early spring most had returned to the Klamath Basin where 37% of flocks were found in fields of new growth cultivated and wild grasses. Cereal grains and potatoes ingested by geese were low in protein (7-14%) and high in soluble nutrients (17-47% neutral detergent fiber [NDF]), whereas grasses were low in available energy (47-49% NDF) but high in protein (26-42%). Greater white-fronted geese are generalist herbivores and can exploit a variety of carbohydrate-rich cultivated crops, likely making these geese less susceptible to winter food shortages than prior to the agriculturalization of the North American landscape. However, agricultural landscapes can be extremely dynamic and may be less predictable in the long-term than the historic environments to

  15. Interannual variation of East Asian Winter Monsoon and ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Sperber, Kenneth R.; Boyle, James S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper examines the interannual variation of the East Asian winter monsoon and its relationship with EJSO based on the 1979-1995 NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Two stratifications of cold surges are used. The first one, described as the conventional cold surges, indicates that the surge frequency reaches a urn one year after El Nino events. The second one, originated from the same region as the first, is defined as the maximum wind events near the South China Sea. The variation of this stratification of surges is found to be in good agreement with the South Oscillation Index (SOI). Low SOI (high SOI) events coincide with years of low (high) surge frequency. The interannual variation of averaged meridional wind near the South China Sea and western Pacific is dominated by the South China Sea cold surges, and is also well correlated (R--O.82) with the SOI. Strong wind seasons are associated with La Nina and high SOI events; likewise, weak wind years are linked with El Nino and low SOI cases. This pattern is restricted north of the equator within the region of (OON-20 N, 11OOE-1300E), and is confined to the near surface layer. The surface Siberian high, 500 hPa trough and 200 hPa jetstream, all representing the large-scale monsoon flow, are found to be weaker than normal during El Nino years. In particular, the interannual variation of the Siberian high is in general agreement with the SOL.

  16. The impact of the 2008 cold spell on mortality in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenjuan; Yang, Chunxue; Chu, Chen; Li, Tiantian; Tan, Jianguo; Kan, Haidong

    2013-01-01

    No prior studies in China have investigated the health impact of cold spell. In Shanghai, we defined the cold spell as a period of at least seven consecutive days with daily temperature below the third percentile during the study period (2001-2009). Between January 2001 and December 2009, we identified a cold spell between January 27 and February 3, 2008 in Shanghai. We investigated the impact of cold spell on mortality of the residents living in the nine urban districts of Shanghai. We calculated the excess deaths and rate ratios (RRs) during the cold spell and compared these data with a winter reference period (January 6-9, and February 28 to March 2). The number of excess deaths during the cold spell period was 153 in our study population. The cold spell caused a short-term increase in total mortality of 13 % (95 % CI: 7-19 %). The impact was statistically significant for cardiovascular mortality (RR = 1.21, 95 % CI: 1.12-1.31), but not for respiratory mortality (RR = 1.14, 95 % CI: 0.98-1.32). For total mortality, gender did not make a statistically significant difference for the cold spell impact. Cold spell had a significant impact on mortality in elderly people (over 65 years), but not in other age groups. Conclusively, our analysis showed that the 2008 cold spell had a substantial effect on mortality in Shanghai. Public health programs should be tailored to prevent cold-spell-related health problems in the city.

  17. Mitochondria of cold hardy insects: responses to cold and hypoxia assessed at enzymatic, mRNA and DNA levels.

    PubMed

    McMullen, David C; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-03-01

    Winter survival for larvae of goldenrod gall insects, the freeze-avoiding Epiblema scudderiana, and the freeze tolerant, Eurosta solidaginis, includes entry into diapause (a torpid state of arrested development) and expression of a variety of cryoprotective adaptations. Diapause and cold winter temperatures, as well as freezing in E. solidaginis, all strongly reduce the need for mitochondrial activity. To evaluate the responses of mitochondria to these conditions, we assessed the maximal activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), transcript levels of COX subunit 1 (encoded on the mitochondrial genome), mitochondrial 12S rRNA levels and mitochondrial DNA content. COX activity decreased over the winter months in both species to levels that were about one-third of September values. COX activity also dropped significantly in E. scudderiana in response to cold acclimation (4,-4,-20 degrees C) or hypoxia exposure. COX activity was less sensitive to these stresses in E. solidaginis but rose by approximately 50% when larvae were thawed after freezing. COX 1 mRNA transcripts and 12S rRNA levels were unchanged over the winter months in E. scudderiana, as was COX 1 DNA content; this indicates that changes in COX enzymatic activity are likely mediated mainly by post-translational modification. However, both COX transcript and 12S rRNA levels decreased in response to hypoxia exposure in both species, whereas COX DNA did not, which indicates that transcription of the mitochondrial genome is sensitive to oxygen levels.

  18. Dipolarization front and current disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    The modification of current density on the dawn-dusk cross section of the magnetotail with the earthward approach of a dipolarization front (DF) is examined through the recently published results of a three-dimensional (3-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the current density intensifies by 37% abruptly within 1.5 ion gyrotime as the DF approaches and shows localized regions with north-south extrusions. After reaching its peak value, it undergoes a drastic current reduction (DCR) by 65% within 2 ion gyrotime. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurs in the neutral sheet region in association with DCR, demonstrating the non-MHD behavior of the phenomenon. The evolution of current density from this 3-D PIC simulation bears several similarities to those observed for the current disruption (CD) phenomenon, such as explosive growth and disruption of the current density leading to a breakdown of the frozen-in condition. The evolution is also similar to those from a previous two-dimensional (2-D) PIC simulation specially designed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the cross-field current instability for CD. One interpretation of these findings is that CD and substorm triggering can be associated with earthward intrusion of a DF into the near-Earth plasma sheet as indicated by previous Cluster and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. An alternative interpretation is that both DF and CD are consequences of a global evolution from an ion-tearing-like instability of the magnetotail.

  19. Life on the front lines.

    PubMed

    Hern, W M

    1994-01-01

    Warren Hern's reminiscences about his experiences as medical director of the Boulder (Colorado) Abortion Clinic and as an abortion provider in private practice provide support for his statement, "Every doctor in America who does abortions lives under a death threat." Shortly after the clinic was opened, a group of anti-abortion physicians pressured the Boulder County Medical Society to pass a resolution declaring the clinic a "clear and present danger" that should be shut down by local health boards. As the only freestanding abortion clinic in the state in the mid-1970's, the Boulder center was targeted by the Right-to-Life Committee picketers and Dr. Hern was harassed in his home and in public. When Dr. Hern left the clinic a year later to establish a private practice specializing in pregnancy termination, the picketers followed. After release of a textbook he prepared on abortion practice, the publisher was deluged with hate mail and threats of boycott, leading them to withdraw the text from its list. Violent attacks on abortion clinics accelerated after Reagan's election and bullets were fired into Hern's waiting room. Randall Terry, national head of Operation Rescue, prayed for Hern's death at a rally in front of his clinic. By the time Dr. David Gunn was assassinated by an anti-abortionist in March 1993, there had been over 1285 acts of violence against abortion facilities and more than 100 facilities had been completely destroyed. The transgression for which Dr. Gunn was murdered was that he sought to save the lives and futures of countless women and support their right to become full participants in society.

  20. Io in Front of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.

    Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.

    This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.

    The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  1. The effect of ocean fronts on acoustic wave propagation in the Celtic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, G.; Chen, F.; Thain, R.

    2014-11-01

    Underwater noise is now classed as pollution in accordance with the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. Noise from shipping is a major contributor to the ambient noise levels in ocean, particularly at low (< 300 Hz) frequencies. This paper studies patterns and seasonal variations of underwater noise in the Celtic Sea by using a coupled ocean model (POLCOMS) and an acoustic model (HARCAM) in the year 2010. Two sources of sound are considered: (i) representing a typical large cargo ship and (ii) noise from pile-driving activity. In summer, when the source of sound is on the onshore side of the front, the sound energy is mostly concentrated in the near-bottom layer. In winter, the sound from the same source is distributed more evenly in the vertical. The difference between the sound level in summer and winter at 10 m depth is as high as 20 dB at a distance of 40 km. When the source of sound is on the seaward side of the front, the sound level is nearly uniform in the vertical. The transmission loss is also greater (~ 16 dB) in the summer than in the winter for shallow source while it is up to ~ 20 dB for deep source at 30 km.

  2. Cold Hardening in Citrus Stems

    PubMed Central

    Yelenosky, George

    1975-01-01

    Stem cold hardening developed to different levels in citrus types tested in controlled environments. Exotherms indicated ice spread was more uniform and rapid in unhardened than in cold-hardened stems. All attempts to inhibit the functioning of citrus leaves resulted in less cold hardening in the stems. Citrus leaves contribute a major portion of cold hardening in the wood. PMID:16659340

  3. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  4. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  5. Cosmic Pressure Fronts Mapped by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    A colossal cosmic "weather system" produced by the collision of two giant clusters of galaxies has been imaged by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. For the first time, the pressure fronts in the system can be traced in detail, and they show a bright, but relatively cool 50 million degree Celsius central region embedded in large elongated cloud of 70 million degree Celsius gas, all of which is roiling in a faint "atmosphere"of 100 million degree Celsius gas. "We can compare this to an intergalactic cold front," said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass. and leader of the international team involved in the analysis of the observations. "A major difference is that in this case, cold means 70 million degree Celsius." The gas clouds are in the core of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 2142. The cluster is six million light years across and contains hundreds of galaxies and enough gas to make a thousand more. It is one of the most massive objects in the universe. Galaxy clusters grow to vast sizes as smaller clusters are pulled inward under the influence of gravity. They collide and merge over the course of billions of years, releasing tremendous amounts of energy that heats the cluster gas to 100 million degrees Celsius. The Chandra data provides the first detailed look at the late stages of this merger process. Previously, scientists had used the German-US Roentgensatellite to produce a broad brush picture of the cluster. The elongated shape of the bright cloud suggested that two clouds were in the process of coalescing into one, but the details remained unclear. Chandra is able to measure variations of temperature, density, and pressure with unprecedented resolution. "Now we can begin to understand the physics of these mergers, which are among the most energetic events in the universe," said Markevitch. "The pressure and density maps of the cluster show a sharp boundary that can only exist in the moving environment of a

  6. CHEMTAX-derived phytoplankton community structure associated with temperature fronts in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajdeep; Chitari, Rajath; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Krishna, M. S.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Anil, A. C.

    2015-04-01

    Remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll associated with fronts and filaments are used in India to generate potential fishing zone (PFZ) advisories in the north eastern Arabian Sea (NEAS). However, biological response to this potential nutrient enhancement has not been investigated. Here we present phytoplankton pigment signatures and nutrient distribution from a section that sampled across a filament and front in the NEAS. We show that nutrient concentrations were high within the filament and front compared to the surrounding waters and had a unique phytoplankton assemblage. Even though there was difference in the physical properties between the filament and front, chemical taxonomy (CHEMTAX) showed dominance of similar phytoplankton groups (prymnesiophytes and prasinophytes). In contrast, Prochlorococcus sp. contributed more than 50% to the total phytoplankton biomass in the surrounding waters and below the oxycline. In general, prymnesiophytes were ubiquitous, covarying with high nutrients and cold temperature, and contributed 60-70% to the total phytoplankton biomass. This study demonstrates that phytoplankton groups respond strongly to nutrient enhancement that is often encountered within the vicinity of the SST fronts that characterize the PFZs.

  7. Tolerance to multiple climate stressors: A case study of Douglas-fir drought and cold hardiness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A; St. Clair, John Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Summary: 1. Drought and freeze events are two of the most common forms of climate extremes which result in tree damage or death, and the frequency and intensity of both stressors may increase with climate change. Few studies have examined natural covariation in stress tolerance traits to cope with multiple stressors among wild plant populations. 2. We assessed the capacity of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), an ecologically and economically important species in the northwestern USA, to tolerate both drought and cold stress on 35 populations grown in common gardens. We used principal components analysis to combine drought and cold hardiness trait data into generalized stress hardiness traits to model geographic variation in hardiness as a function of climate across the Douglas-fir range. 3. Drought and cold hardiness converged among populations along winter temperature gradients and diverged along summer precipitation gradients. Populations originating in regions with cold winters had relatively high tolerance to both drought and cold stress, which is likely due to overlapping adaptations for coping with winter desiccation. Populations from regions with dry summers had increased drought hardiness but reduced cold hardiness, suggesting a trade-off in tolerance mechanisms. 4. Our findings highlight the necessity to look beyond bivariate trait–climate relationships and instead consider multiple traits and climate variables to effectively model and manage for the impacts of climate change on widespread species.

  8. Differential expression of proteins in response to molybdenum deficiency in winter wheat leaves under low-temperature stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient for plants. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cold resistance enhanced by molybdenum application in winter wheat, we applied a proteomic approach to investigate the differential expression of proteins in response to molybden...

  9. Snow-mold-induced apoplastic proteins in winter rye leaves lack antifreeze activity

    PubMed

    Hiilovaara-Teijo; Hannukkala; Griffith; Yu; Pihakaski-Maunsbach

    1999-10-01

    During cold acclimation, winter rye (Secale cereale L.) plants secrete antifreeze proteins that are similar to pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. In this experiment, the secretion of PR proteins was induced at warm temperatures by infection with pink snow mold (Microdochium nivale), a pathogen of overwintering cereals. A comparison of cold-induced and pathogen-induced proteins showed that PR proteins accumulated in the leaf apoplast to a greater level in response to cold. The PR proteins induced by cold and by snow mold were similar when separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examined by immunoblotting. Both groups of PR proteins contained glucanase-like, chitinase-like, and thaumatin-like proteins, and both groups exhibited similar levels of glucanase and chitinase activities. However, only the PR proteins induced by cold exhibited antifreeze activity. Our findings suggest that the cold-induced PR proteins may be isoforms that function as antifreeze proteins to modify the growth of ice during freezing while also providing resistance to the growth of low-temperature pathogens in advance of infection. Both functions of the cold-induced PR proteins may improve the survival of overwintering cereals.

  10. Anomalous Cold Water Detected along Mid-Atlantic Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Donglian; Liu, Zhong; Chiu, Long; Yang, Ruixin; Singh, Ramesh P.; Kafatos, Menas

    2004-04-01

    In July 2003, anomalous cold water along the mid-Atlantic coast affected local tourism and fishing. The cold water interfered with tuna fishing, and for 2 to 3 weeks, rockfish generally found during the fall were present in the area. Satellite data, buoy observations, and weather maps were analyzed to investigate the cause of this cold water event. The results show that the increasing westerly and southerly winds that resulted from approaching cold fronts may have induced upwelling away from and along the mid-Atlantic coast. This, combined with the southward advection of cold sea water from the North Atlantic Ocean, might have caused the anomalous cold water along the coast. The sea surface temperature (SST) observations made by buoy 44014 (0.6 m below sea level) (http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/) near Virginia Beach (36.61°N, 74.84° W) for the month of July 2003 show a 4°C decrease in SST from 3 to 5 July 2003. A smaller drop of 2-3°C is also found for 24-25 July 2003 (Figure 1a). The east-west (u) and south-north (v) wind components (Figure 1a) observed by buoy 44014 shows a relationship with the observed SST. In general, wind speeds during July 2003 were found to be stronger than those of July 2002.

  11. Problems and solutions for drawing fronts objectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Donald W.; Whistler, James P.

    2001-06-01

    A recent requirement charged to the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) is to produce significant weather charts for aviation users with, among other forecast products, forecast locations of significant fronts. To increase forecaster productivity, the AWC decided to evaluate the possibility that fronts should be first drawn objectively. Hewson (1998) describes the basic technique which uses a variation on the Renard & Clarke (1965) frontal locator function to find the fronts. The AWC had to overcome many problems in implementing Hewson's techniques. This paper illuminates the problems and describes the AWC solutions. As a result of the AWC's success, objective frontal analyses and forecasts are now a reality, and the productivity of forecasters increased.

  12. Collisionless ion dynamics in the shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In the vicinity of the shock front the dynamics of ions is governed by the macroscopic regular electric and magnetic field of the shock. Upon crossing the shock the thermal ions form a non-gyrotropic distribution. The pressure of these non-gyrotropic ions shapes the downstream magnetic field. High-energy ions behave in the shock front as test particles under the influence on the macroscopic fields. The reflection and transmission coefficients of high-energy ions at an oblique shock front is not sensitive to the shock structure and depends only on the global magnetic field change at the shock.

  13. The Remarkable 2003-2004 Winter and Other Recent Warm Winters in the Arctic Stratosphere Since the Late 1990s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Krueger, Kirstin; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Sena, Sara Amina; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The 2003-2004 Arctic winter was remarkable in the 40-year record of meteorological analyses. A major warming beginning in early January 2004 led to nearly two months of vortex disruption with high-latitude easterlies in the middle to lower stratosphere. The upper stratospheric vortex broke up in late December, but began to recover by early January, and in February and March was the strongest since regular observations began in 1979. The lower stratospheric vortex broke up in late January. Comparison with two previous years, 1984-1985 and 1986-1987, with prolonged mid-winter warming periods shows unique characteristics of the 2003-2004 warming period: The length of the vortex disruption, the strong and rapid recovery in the upper stratosphere, and the slow progression of the warming from upper to lower stratosphere. January 2004 zonal mean winds in the middle and lower stratosphere were over two standard deviations below average. Examination of past variability shows that the recent frequency of major stratospheric warmings (seven in the past six years) is unprecedented. Lower stratospheric temperatures were unusually high during six of the past seven years, with five having much lower than usual potential for PSC formation and ozone loss (nearly none in 1998-1999, 2001-2002 and 2003-2004, and very little in 1997-1998 and 2000-2001). Middle and upper stratospheric temperatures, however, were unusually low during and after February. The pattern of five of the last seven years with very low PSC potential would be expected to occur randomly once every approximately 850 years. This cluster of warm winters, immediately following a period of unusually cold winters, may have important implications for possible changes in interannual variability and for determination and attribution of trends in stratospheric temperatures and ozone.

  14. Winter diversity and expression of proteorhodopsin genes in a polar ocean

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dan; Maranger, Roxane; Balagué, Vanessa; Coll-Lladó, Montserrat; Lovejoy, Connie; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mixotrophy is a valuable functional trait used by microbes when environmental conditions vary broadly or resources are limited. In the sunlit waters of the ocean, photoheterotrophy, a form of mixotrophy, is often mediated by proteorhodopsin (PR), a seven helices transmembrane protein binding the retinal chromophore. Altogether, they allow bacteria to capture photic energy for sensory and proton gradient formation cell functions. The seasonal occurrence and diversity of the gene coding for PR in cold oligotrophic polar oceans is not known and PR expression has not yet been reported. Here we show that PR is widely distributed among bacterial taxa, and that PR expression decreased markedly during the winter months in the Arctic Ocean. Gammaproteobacteria-like PR sequences were always dominant. However, within the second most common affiliation, there was a transition from Flavobacteria-like PR in early winter to Alphaproteobacteria-like PR in late winter. The phylogenetic shifts followed carbon dynamics, where patterns in expression were consistent with community succession, as identified by DNA community fingerprinting. Although genes for PR were always present, the trend in decreasing transcripts from January to February suggested reduced functional utility of PR during winter. Under winter darkness, sustained expression suggests that PR may continue to be useful for non-ATP forming functions, such as environmental sensing or small solute transport. The persistence of PR expression in winter among some bacterial groups may offer a competitive advantage, where its multifunctionality enhances microbial survival under harsh polar conditions. PMID:25700336

  15. Interannual variability of winter eddy patterns in the eastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yinghui; Xie, Jieshuo; Cai, Shuqun

    2016-05-01

    Merged altimetry data collected over 21 years are analyzed to study the interannual variability of winter eddy activities in the eastern South China Sea (SCS) associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Composite analyses of eddy probability reveal that a Luzon cold eddy (LCE) northwest of the Luzon Island, an anticyclonic eddy northwest of the Mindoro Island (referred as MAE) and a cyclonic eddy west of the Mindoro Island (referred as MCE) are common for winter. Further studies indicate that LCE and MAE weaken and MCE strengthens in El Niño winters, whereas data show the opposite behavior for La Niña winters. In addition, the geographical pattern of MAE and MCE in an El Niño winter is different from that in a La Niña winter. The interannual wind curl anomalies west of the Luzon and Mindoro Islands and the outflow from the SCS via the Mindoro Strait may be responsible for the interannual eddy variability.

  16. The Argentine ant persists through unfavorable winters via a mutualism facilitated by a native tree.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, Robert J; Silverman, Jules

    2011-10-01

    Mutualisms and facilitations can fundamentally change the relationship between an organism's realized and fundamental niche. Invasive species may prove particularly suitable models for investigating this relationship as many are dependent on finding new partners for successful establishment. We conducted field-based experiments testing whether a native tree facilitates the successful survival of the invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), through unfavorable winter conditions in the southeastern United States. We found Argentine ant nests aggregated around the native loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., during the winter months. The bark of this tree absorbed enough radiant solar energy to reach temperatures suitable for Argentine ant foraging even when ambient temperatures should have curtailed all foraging. Conversely, foraging ceased when the trunk was shaded. The sun-warmed bark of this tree gave the Argentine ant access to a stable honeydew resource. Argentine ants were not found on or near deciduous trees even though bark temperatures were warm enough to permit Argentine ant foraging on cold winter days. Augmenting deciduous trees with sucrose water through the winter months lead to Argentine ant nests remaining at their base and Argentine ants foraging on the tree. The Argentine ant requires both foraging opportunity and a reliable winter food source to survive through unfavorable winter conditions in the southeastern United States. The loblolly pine provided both of these requirements extending the realized niche of Argentine ants beyond its fundamental niche.

  17. Communicating Certainty About Nuclear Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2013-12-01

    I have been spending much of my time in the past several years trying to warn the world about the continuing danger of nuclear weapons, and that the solution is a rapid reduction in the nuclear arsenal. I feel that a scientist who discovers dangers to society has an ethical duty to issue a warning, even if the danger is so scary that it is hard for people to deal with. The debate about nuclear winter in the 1980s helped to end the nuclear arms race, but the planet still has enough nuclear weapons, even after reductions planned for 2017 under the New START treaty, to produce nuclear winter, with temperatures plunging below freezing in the summer in major agricultural regions, threatening the food supply for most of the planet. New research by myself, Brian Toon, Mike Mills, and colleagues over the past six years has found that a nuclear war between any two countries, such as India and Pakistan, using 50 atom bombs each of the size dropped on Hiroshima could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history, and a world food crisis because of the agricultural effects. This is much less than 1% of the current global arsenal. Communicating certainty - what we know for sure - has been much more effective than communicating uncertainty. The limited success I have had has come from persistence and serendipity. The first step was to do the science. We have published peer-reviewed articles in major journals, including Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Physics Today, and Climatic Change. But policymakers do not read these journals. Through fairly convoluted circumstances, which will be described in this talk, we were able to get papers published in Scientific American and the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. I have also published several encyclopedia articles on the subject. As a Lead Author of Chapter 8 (Radiative Forcing) of the recently published Fifth Assessment

  18. Marine fronts at the continental shelves of austral South America - Physical and ecological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acha, Eduardo M.; Mianzan, Hermes W.; Guerrero, Raúl A.; Favero, Marco; Bava, José

    2004-01-01

    Neritic fronts are very abundant in austral South America, covering several scales of space and time. However, this region is poorly studied from a systemic point of view. Our main goal is to develop a holistic view of physical and ecological patterns and processes at austral South America, regarding frontal arrangements. Satellite information (sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentration), and historical hydrographic data were employed to show fronts. We compiled all existing evidence (physical and biological) about fronts to identify regions defined by similar types of coastal fronts and to characterize them. Fronts in austral South America can be arranged in six zones according to their location, main forcing, key physical variables, seasonality, and enrichment mechanisms. Four zones, the Atlantic upwelling zone; the temperate estuarine zone; the Patagonian tidal zone and the Argentine shelf-break zone, occupy most of the Atlantic side. The Chile-Peru upwelling zone, on the Pacific, is the largest and best-known region. The Patagonian cold estuarine zone encompasses the tip of South America, connecting the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and remains poorly studied. When observed at a continental scale, the Pacific coast dominated by two large frontal zones appears simplest than the Atlantic coast in terms of frontal richness. The extension of the continental shelf in the Atlantic coast allows for the development of a great diversity of mesoscale fronts. Though frontal zones we defined are extensive areas of the continental shelves, fronts inside the zones are comparatively small areas. Even so, they play a paramount role in ecological processes, allowing for high biological production; offering feeding and/or reproductive habitats for fishes, squids, and birds; acting as retention areas for larvae of benthic species; and promoting establishment of benthic invertebrates that benefit from the organic production in the frontal area.

  19. Automatic detection of low altitude wind shear due to gust fronts in the terminal Doppler weather radar operational demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingle-Wilson, Diana

    1990-01-01

    A gust front is the leading edge of the cold air outflow from a thunderstorm. Wind shears and turbulence along the gust front may produce potentially hazardous conditions for an aircraft on takeoff or landing such that runway operations are significantly impacted. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has therefore determined that the detection of gust fronts in the terminal environment be an integral part of the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system. Detection of these shears by the Gust Front Algorithm permits the generation of warnings that can be issued to pilots on approach and departure. In addition to the detection capability, the algorithm provides an estimate of the wind speed and direction following the gust front (termed wind shift) and the forecasted location of the gust front up to 20 minutes before it impacts terminal operations. This has shown utility as a runway management tool, alerting runway supervisors to approaching wind shifts and the possible need to change runway configurations. The formation and characteristics of gust fronts and their signatures in Doppler radar data are discussed. A brief description of the algorithm and its products for use by Air Traffic Control (ATC), along with an assessment of the algorithm's performance during the 1988 Operational Test and Evaluation, is presented.

  20. Progress toward cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Estrada, J.; Peil, S.; Roach, T.; Tan, J. N.; Yesley, P.

    1999-12-10

    The production and study of cold antihydrogen will require the manipulation of dense and cold, single component plasmas of antiprotons and positrons. The undertaking will build upon the experience of the nonneutral plasma physics community. Annihilations of the antimatter particles in the plasmas can be imaged, offering unique diagnostic opportunities not available to this community when electrons and protons are used. The techniques developed by our TRAP collaboration to capture and cool antiprotons will certainly be used by our expanded ATRAP collaboration, and by the competing ATHENA Collaboration, both working at the nearly completed AD facility of CERN. We recently demonstrated a new techniques for accumulating cold positrons directly into a cryogenic vacuum system. The closest we have come to low energy antihydrogen so far is to confine cold positrons and cold antiprotons within the same trap structure and vacuum container. Finally, we mention that stored electrons have been cooled to 70 mK, the first time that elementary particles have been cooled below 4 K. In such an apparatus it should be possible to study highly magnetized plasmas of electrons or positrons at this new low temperature.

  1. Seasonal changes in the cold hardiness of the two-spotted spider mite females (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Khodayari, S; Colinet, H; Moharramipour, S; Renault, D

    2013-12-01

    The twospotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) is an important agricultural pest. Population dynamics and pest outbreaks highly depend on the overwintering success of the mite specimens; therefore, it is necessary to assess winter survival dynamics of this pest. Seasonal changes in supercooling point (SCP) and acute cold tolerance (2-h exposure at -5, -10, -15, -20, -23, or -25°C) were assessed in field-collected females during the winter in 2010-2011 in Iran. The SCP values varied from a minimum of -30.5°C (January 2011) to a maximum of -12.6°C (April 2011). Significant differences were recorded in the SCP distribution patterns between autumn- and winter-sampled females, depicting the acquisition of cold hardiness over the winter. The mean ambient air temperature was the lowest in January (4°C), when the females showed the highest supercooling ability. Correlated patterns between monthly temperatures and acute cold tolerance also were found. At -20°C, the survival of the mites was very low (10%) when they were sampled in October 2010; whereas it was high (97.5%) in January 2011, before decreasing to 5% in April 2011. The present data show that T. urticae females are chill tolerant and capable of adjusting their cold tolerance over the winter season. Acute cold tolerance (-15 and -20°C) and SCP represent valuable metrics that can be used for predicting the seasonal changes of the cold hardiness of T. urticae females.

  2. Nutrient dynamics in the winter thermohaline frontal zone of the northern shelf region of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Su Mei; Guo, Xinyu; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Bi, Yan Feng; Luo, Xin; Li, Jian Bing

    2010-11-01

    As the first attempt to estimate the nutrient transport across the winter thermohaline frontal zone on the northern shelf of the South China Sea, the nutrient dynamics around the front and the effects of cross-frontal water exchange on nutrient transport were investigated using wintertime field observations. Both water temperature and salinity increased from coastal to oceanic waters, showing the presence of a thermohaline front. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients decreased oceanward, especially across the thermohaline front, while those of dissolved organic nutrients (i.e., dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved organic phosphorus) showed patchy distributions. Ammonium was the major constituent of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, and DON was the main component of total dissolved nitrogen. Molar ratios of PO43-/total dissolved phosphorus decreased from coastal to oceanic waters, indicating that PO43- was rapidly removed and/or consumed from the water column and that organic matter degradation increased offshore, replenishing PO43-. Molar ratios of NO3-/(NH4+ + DON) were 0.01-0.6, indicating dominance of regenerated nitrogen. Surface water convergence and bottom water divergence were identified in the across-shore velocity field, and the calculated across-shore nutrient fluxes suggest that the presence of the winter thermohaline front promotes the offshore transport of nutrients from coastal waters. The transport path begins with convergence of surface coastal waters toward the front, followed by the sinking in the frontal region and the oceanward movement through the bottom layer of the front offshore side. With an assumption of 500 km as the length of thermohaline front on the northern shelf of the South China Sea, the calculated offshore fluxes of nutrients across the entire front are larger than those from the Zhujiang (Pearl River) and the Changjiang (Yangtze River).

  3. Intensity, frequency and spatial configuration of winter temperature inversions in the closed La Brevine valley, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitasse, Yann; Klein, Geoffrey; Kirchner, James W.; Rebetez, Martine

    2016-09-01

    Some of the world's valleys are famous for having particularly cold microclimates. The La Brevine valley, in the Swiss Jura Mountains, holds the record for the lowest temperature ever measured in an inhabited location in Switzerland. We studied cold air pools (CAPs) in this valley during the winter of 2014-2015 using 44 temperature data loggers distributed between 1033 and 1293 m asl. Our goals were to (i) describe the climatic conditions under which CAPs form in the valley, (ii) examine the spatial configuration and the temperature structure of the CAPs and (iii) quantify how often temperature inversions occur in winter using long-term series of temperature from the valley floor. Our results show that CAPs occurred every second night, on average, during the winter of 2014-2015 and were typically formed under cloudless, windless and high-pressure conditions. Strong temperature inversions up to 28 °C were detected between the valley floor and the surrounding hills. The spatial temperature structure of the CAPs varies among the different inversion days, with the upper boundary of the cold pool generally situated at about 1150 m asl. Although mean temperatures have increased in this area over the period 1960-2015 in connection with climate change, the occurrences of extreme cold temperatures did not decrease in winter and are highly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation and the East Atlantic indices. This suggests that CAPs in sheltered valleys are largely decoupled from the free atmosphere temperature and will likely continue to occur in the next decades under warmer conditions.

  4. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part II: minimum temperatures in winter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of minimum temperatures during winter is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, winter minimum temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent cold-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict cold-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that low temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily minimum temperatures during winter over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the winter forecast period from 1 December 2007 - 31 March 2008. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated minimum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme cold episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia

  5. Polar Stratospheric Cloud formation and denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Urban, Joachim; Pitts, Michael C.; Kirner, Oliver; Braesicke, Peter; Santee, Michelle L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Murtagh, Donal

    2015-04-01

    The sedimentation of HNO3 containing polar stratospheric cloud particles leads to a permanent removal of HNO3 from the stratosphere. The so-called denitrification is an effect that plays an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion. The Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were both quite unique. The Arctic winter 2010/2011 was one of the coldest winters on record leading to the strongest depletion of ozone measured in the Arctic. Though the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was rather warm in the climatological sense it was distinguished by an exceptionally cold stratosphere from mid December 2009 to mid January 2010 leading to prolonged PSC formation and significant denitrification. Model simulations and space-borne observations are used to investigate PSC formation and denitrification during these two winters. Model simulations were performed with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) and compared to observations by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Satellite (CALIPSO) and the Odin Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR) as well as with observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on Aura (Aura/MLS). While PSCs were present during the Arctic winter 2010/2011 over nearly four months, from mid December to end of March, they were not as persistent as the ones that occurred during the shorter (one month) cold period during the Arctic winter 2009/2010. Although the PSC season during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was much shorter than in 2010/2011, denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was similar in magnitude than during 2010/2011.

  6. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  7. Optimizing emergency department front-end operations.

    PubMed

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Gentle, Christopher; Halfpenny, James M; Heins, Alan; Mehrotra, Abhi; Mikhail, Michael G; Fite, Diana

    2010-02-01

    As administrators evaluate potential approaches to improve cost, quality, and throughput efficiencies in the emergency department (ED), "front-end" operations become an important area of focus. Interventions such as immediate bedding, bedside registration, advanced triage (triage-based care) protocols, physician/practitioner at triage, dedicated "fast track" service line, tracking systems and whiteboards, wireless communication devices, kiosk self check-in, and personal health record technology ("smart cards") have been offered as potential solutions to streamline the front-end processing of ED patients, which becomes crucial during periods of full capacity, crowding, and surges. Although each of these operational improvement strategies has been described in the lay literature, various reports exist in the academic literature about their effect on front-end operations. In this report, we present a review of the current body of academic literature, with the goal of identifying select high-impact front-end operational improvement solutions. PMID:19556030

  8. Front-End Analysis Cornerstone of Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nager, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    The presentation provides an overview of Front-End Logistics Support Analysis (FELSA), when it should be performed, benefits of performing FELSA and why it should be performed, how it is conducted, and examples.

  9. Nonperturbative light-front Hamiltonian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the current state-of-the-art in nonperturbative calculations done with Hamiltonians constructed in light-front quantization of various field theories. The language of light-front quantization is introduced, and important (numerical) techniques, such as Pauli-Villars regularization, discrete light-cone quantization, basis light-front quantization, the light-front coupled-cluster method, the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, sector-dependent renormalization, and the Lanczos diagonalization method, are surveyed. Specific applications are discussed for quenched scalar Yukawa theory, ϕ4 theory, ordinary Yukawa theory, supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, quantum electrodynamics, and quantum chromodynamics. The content should serve as an introduction to these methods for anyone interested in doing such calculations and as a rallying point for those who wish to solve quantum chromodynamics in terms of wave functions rather than random samplings of Euclidean field configurations.

  10. On the stability of subsonic thermal fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.; Shchekinov, Yuri; Bessega L, Maria C.

    2005-08-15

    The stability of subsonic thermal fronts against corrugation is analyzed and an exact dispersion relation is obtained taking into account the compressibility of the gas. For heat fronts, this dispersion equation has an unstable root ({omega}{sub ex}) corresponding to the Landau-Darrieus unstable mode ({omega}{sub 0}) modified by the compressional effects. In particular, the exact solution shows a conspicuous maximum very close to the value of the intake Mach number M{sub 1} at which a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration wave behind the heat front is formed. Cooling fronts are stable for corrugation-like disturbances. A maximum damping as well as a maximum in the frequency occur at a value of M{sub 1} depending on the value of the normalized cooling q.

  11. Urban drainage and highway runoff in cold climates: conference overview.

    PubMed

    Viklander, M; Marsalek, J; Malmquist, P A; Watt, W E

    2003-01-01

    This overview of research findings presented at the conference on urban drainage and highway runoff in cold climates starts with generation of urban runoff and snowmelt, followed by snowmelt and winter runoff quality, best management practices for urban snowmelt and winter runoff, and snow management in urban areas. Research on the urban hydrological cycle is lagging behind the needs in this field, particularly in terms of data availability. The current studies of winter urban runoff quality focus on road salts in the urban environment and their environmental effects. The needs for better source controls in salt applications, improved management of chloride-laden runoff, and selective adoption of environmentally safer alternative de-icers were reported. Adaptation of the conventional stormwater best management practices (BMPs) for winter operation remains a challenge. The first step in refining the existing BMPs for winter operation is to advance the understanding of their operation, as reported for some cases at the conference. Finally, snow management in urban areas may require local storage of fresh (unpolluted) snow and disposal of more polluted snow at central snow disposal sites.

  12. Speed of pulled fronts with a cutoff.

    PubMed

    Benguria, R D; Depassier, M C

    2007-05-01

    We study the effect of a small cutoff epsilon on the velocity of a pulled front in one dimension by means of a variational principle. We obtain a lower bound on the speed dependent on the cutoff, for which the two leading order terms correspond to the Brunet-Derrida expression. To do so we cast a known variational principle for the speed of propagation of fronts in different variables which makes it more suitable for applications. PMID:17677021

  13. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money. PMID:26399028

  14. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money.

  15. Assessing the Geomorphic Evolution and Hydrographic Changes Induced by Winter Storms along the Louisiana Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzel, W. Paul; Moeller, Christopher, C; Huh, Oscar K.; Roberts, Harry H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence that cold front passages have on Louisiana coastal environments, including land loss and land building processes, has been the primary topic of this multidisciplinary research. This research has combined meteorological, remote sensing, and coastal expertise from the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Louisiana State University (LSU). Analyzed data sets include remotely sensed radiometric data (AVHRR on NOAA-12,13,14, Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) and MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) on NASA ER-2), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) water level data, water quality data from the Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) at LSU, USACE river discharge data, National Weather Service (NWS) and CSI wind in sitzi measurements, geomorphic measurements from aerial photography (NASA ER-2 and Learjet), and CSI ground based sediment burial pipes (for monitoring topographic change along the Louisiana coast) and sediment cores. The work reported here-in is a continuation of an initial investigation into coastal Louisiana landform modification by cold front systems. That initial effort demonstrated the importance of cold front winds in the Atchafalaya Bay sediment plume distribution (Moeller et al.), documented the sediment transport and deposition process of the western Louisiana coast (Huh et al.) and developed tools (e.g. water types identification, suspended solids estimation) from multispectral radiometric data for application to the current study. This study has extended that work, developing a Geomorphic Impact Index (GI(sup 2)) for relating atmospheric forcing to coastal response and new tools to measure water motion and sediment transport.

  16. Assessment of cold stress.

    PubMed

    Holmér, I

    1991-01-01

    Cold stress may be present in terms of a risk for skin surface cooling (wind chill), extremity cooling and whole body cooling. Measures of cold stress differ for the various situations. The most common approach, however, has been to apply more or less complex formulas for heat balance calculations. The combined effect of several climatic factors (air temperature, mean radiant temperature, humidity and air velocity) and the activity level determines the cooling power of the environment. The cooling power can be easily converted into a required insulation value, that applies both to parts of the body and to the body as a whole. The value provides information about cold stress in two ways; (a) by specifying necessary behavioural adjustments in terms of required activity level and clothing insulation level, and (b) by quantifying the thermal imbalance and tolerance time, when protection worn does not provide sufficient insulation.

  17. Cold asymmetrical fermion superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Caldas, Heron

    2003-12-19

    The recent experimental advances in cold atomic traps have induced a great amount of interest in fields from condensed matter to particle physics, including approaches and prospects from the theoretical point of view. In this work we investigate the general properties and the ground state of an asymmetrical dilute gas of cold fermionic atoms, formed by two particle species having different densities. We have show in a recent paper, that a mixed phase composed of normal and superfluid components is the energetically favored ground state of such a cold fermionic system. Here we extend the analysis and verify that in fact, the mixed phase is the preferred ground state of an asymmetrical superfluid in various situations. We predict that the mixed phase can serve as a way of detecting superfluidity and estimating the magnitude of the gap parameter in asymmetrical fermionic systems.

  18. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Semenchuk, Philipp R; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J

    2013-08-01

    The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth are projected to increase and melt out dates change accordingly. Also, snow cover and depth will play an important role in protecting plant canopy from increasingly more frequent extreme winter warming events. Flower production of many Arctic plants is dependent on melt out timing, since season length determines resource availability for flower preformation. We erected snow fences to increase snow depth and shorten growing season, and counted flowers of six species over 5 years, during which we experienced two extreme winter warming events. Most species were resistant to snow cover increase, but two species reduced flower abundance due to shortened growing seasons. Cassiope tetragona responded strongly with fewer flowers in deep snow regimes during years without extreme events, while Stellaria crassipes responded partly. Snow pack thickness determined whether winter warming events had an effect on flower abundance of some species. Warming events clearly reduced flower abundance in shallow but not in deep snow regimes of Cassiope tetragona, but only marginally for Dryas octopetala. However, the affected species were resilient and individuals did not experience any long term effects. In the case of short or cold summers, a subset of species suffered reduced reproductive success, which may affect future plant composition through possible cascading competition effects. Extreme winter warming events were shown to expose the canopy to cold winter air. The following summer most of the overwintering flower buds could not produce flowers. Thus reproductive success is reduced if this occurs in subsequent years. We conclude that snow depth influences flower abundance by altering season length and by protecting or exposing flower buds to cold winter air, but most species studied are resistant to changes. Winter warming events, often occurring

  19. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard

    PubMed Central

    Semenchuk, Philipp R; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth are projected to increase and melt out dates change accordingly. Also, snow cover and depth will play an important role in protecting plant canopy from increasingly more frequent extreme winter warming events. Flower production of many Arctic plants is dependent on melt out timing, since season length determines resource availability for flower preformation. We erected snow fences to increase snow depth and shorten growing season, and counted flowers of six species over 5 years, during which we experienced two extreme winter warming events. Most species were resistant to snow cover increase, but two species reduced flower abundance due to shortened growing seasons. Cassiope tetragona responded strongly with fewer flowers in deep snow regimes during years without extreme events, while Stellaria crassipes responded partly. Snow pack thickness determined whether winter warming events had an effect on flower abundance of some species. Warming events clearly reduced flower abundance in shallow but not in deep snow regimes of Cassiope tetragona, but only marginally for Dryas octopetala. However, the affected species were resilient and individuals did not experience any long term effects. In the case of short or cold summers, a subset of species suffered reduced reproductive success, which may affect future plant composition through possible cascading competition effects. Extreme winter warming events were shown to expose the canopy to cold winter air. The following summer most of the overwintering flower buds could not produce flowers. Thus reproductive success is reduced if this occurs in subsequent years. We conclude that snow depth influences flower abundance by altering season length and by protecting or exposing flower buds to cold winter air, but most species studied are resistant to changes. Winter warming events, often

  20. Distribution and diurnal behavior of Steller's Eiders wintering on the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Metzner, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the distribution and activities of adult Steller's Eiders (Polysticta stelleri) during winter and spring on a deep-water embayment and a shallow lagoon along the Alaska Peninsula from September 1980 to May 1981. During the remigial molt, eiders were observed on Izembek Lagoon but not on Cold Bay. Following the flightless period, Izembek Lagoon continued to support 63-100% of eiders encountered during surveys. As ice cover on Izembek Lagoon increased, the number of birds decreased on Izembek Lagoon but increased on Cold Bay, suggesting that some eiders disperse to nearshore, deep-water habitats in close proximity to Izembek Lagoon during severe weather. Diurnal activity budgets indicated that the amount of time resting or engaged in aggression and alert activities was similar among locations, seasons, tidal stages, and sexes. In contrast, time spent foraging differed among seasons and locations but did not differ among tidal stages or sexes. Although time spent foraging was similar during winter and spring on Izembek Lagoon, eiders on Cold Bay foraged more during winter compared to spring. Synchronous diving was the dominant foraging strategy.

  1. Turbulent transport model of wind shear in thunderstorm gust fronts and warm fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, W. S.; Teske, M. E.; Segur, H. C. O.

    1978-01-01

    A model of turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer was used to simulate the low-level wind and turbulence profiles associated with both local thunderstorm gust fronts and synoptic-scale warm fronts. Dimensional analyses of both type fronts provided the physical scaling necessary to permit normalized simulations to represent fronts for any temperature jump. The sensitivity of the thunderstorm gust front to five different dimensionless parameters as well as a change from axisymmetric to planar geometry was examined. The sensitivity of the warm front to variations in the Rossby number was examined. Results of the simulations are discussed in terms of the conditions which lead to wind shears which are likely to be most hazardous for aircraft operations.

  2. Life on the front lines.

    PubMed

    Hern, W M

    1993-01-01

    honor those who advanced the cause of women's rights. They honored the physician who had to shout over hecklers to make his remarks heard. After a year of operation, the physician encountered differences with the Board of Directors of the clinic. Soon after that, he resigned and opened his own clinic with a bank loan of $7000. Within 4 years, his clinic had expanded, and he purchased its building. The harassment from antiabortion protesters continued, with broken windows, pickets, and, in February 1988, bullets fired through the front windows of the waiting room. This necessitated the installation of bullet-proof glass and a security system which cost $17,000. As of March 1, 1993, there had been 1285 acts of violence towards abortion clinics, which led to the destruction of more than 100. On March 10 of that year, a physician who performed abortions in Florida was gunned down by an anti-abortion protestor. People who provide abortions hope for legal protection and respect for their civil liberties, but they will continue to provide this service even if conditions do not improve.

  3. Arctic winter 2010/2011 at the brink of an ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Stiller, G.; Ruhnke, R.; von Clarmann, T.; Kellmann, S.; Aschmann, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic stratospheric winter of 2010/2011 was one of the coldest on record with a large loss of stratospheric ozone. Observations of temperature, ozone, nitric acid, water vapor, nitrous oxide, chlorine nitrate and chlorine monoxide from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) onboard ENVISAT are compared to calculations with a chemical transport model (CTM). There is overall excellent agreement between the model calculations and MIPAS observations, indicating that the processes of denitrification, chlorine activation and catalytic ozone depletion are sufficiently well represented. Polar vortex integrated ozone loss reaches 120 Dobson Units (DU) by early April 2011. Sensitivity calculations with the CTM give an additional ozone loss of about 25 DU at the end of the winter for a further cooling of the stratosphere by 1 K, showing locally near-complete ozone depletion (remaining ozone <200 ppbv) over a large vertical extent from 16 to 19 km altitude. In the CTM a 1 K cooling approximately counteracts a 10% reduction in stratospheric halogen loading, a halogen reduction that is expected to occur in about 13 years from now. These results indicate that severe ozone depletion like in 2010/2011 or even worse could appear for cold Arctic winters over the next decades if the observed tendency for cold Arctic winters to become colder continues into the future.

  4. The hard winter of 1880-1881: Climatological context and communication via a Laura Ingalls Wilder narrative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustead, Barbara E.

    The Hard Winter of 1880-1881 was featured in the Laura Ingalls Wilder historical fiction account, The Long Winter, as well as in several town histories across the region. Both meteorological records and historical accounts indicate that the winter was particularly long, snowy, and cold. The question of how "hard" a winter is for a given location depends on the climatological context, which relies on an objective characterization of winter severity. The Accumulated Winter Season Severity Index (AWSSI) allows comparison of the winter of 1880-1881 among sites across the region, as well as in the context of the period of record, to quantify its severity. Additionally, investigating the impacts of both the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the central United States provides context for the influence of both a strongly negative NAO and an El Nino event during the winter of 1880-1881. With an understanding of the climatological factors influencing the Hard Winter, along with the context for its severity, a more thorough analysis then was conducted to quantify and describe its severity. The connection of the winter of 1880-1881 to a popular book written by an author who is a cultural icon provides a natural vehicle with which to communicate weather and climate concepts to multiple non-technical audiences. The communication of complex weather and climate concepts is a well-documented challenge. One method to bridge between science concepts and public understanding is to relate those concepts to familiar subjects and stories, including Laura Ingalls Wilder's books. A narrative constructed around the books, particularly The Long Winter, provides a means of audience engagement and interest in weather- and climate-related topics, which was at least partially quantified by surveying audiences of the narrative. Overall, the scientific background, combined with a familiar narrative voice, provides a means to transmit weather and

  5. Climate Change Affects Winter Chill for Temperate Fruit and Nut Trees

    PubMed Central

    Luedeling, Eike; Girvetz, Evan H.; Semenov, Mikhail A.; Brown, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Temperate fruit and nut trees require adequate winter chill to produce economically viable yields. Global warming has the potential to reduce available winter chill and greatly impact crop yields. Methodology/Principal Findings We estimated winter chill for two past (1975 and 2000) and 18 future scenarios (mid and end 21st century; 3 Global Climate Models [GCMs]; 3 greenhouse gas emissions [GHG] scenarios). For 4,293 weather stations around the world and GCM projections, Safe Winter Chill (SWC), the amount of winter chill that is exceeded in 90% of all years, was estimated for all scenarios using the “Dynamic Model” and interpolated globally. We found that SWC ranged between 0 and about 170 Chill Portions (CP) for all climate scenarios, but that the global distribution varied across scenarios. Warm regions are likely to experience severe reductions in available winter chill, potentially threatening production there. In contrast, SWC in most temperate growing regions is likely to remain relatively unchanged, and cold regions may even see an increase in SWC. Climate change impacts on SWC differed quantitatively among GCMs and GHG scenarios, with the highest GHG leading to losses up to 40 CP in warm regions, compared to 20 CP for the lowest GHG. Conclusions/Significance The extent of projected changes in winter chill in many major growing regions of fruits and nuts indicates that growers of these commodities will likely experience problems in the future. Mitigation of climate change through reductions in greenhouse gas emissions can help reduce the impacts, however, adaption to changes will have to occur. To better prepare for likely impacts of climate change, efforts should be undertaken to breed tree cultivars for lower chilling requirements, to develop tools to cope with insufficient winter chill, and to better understand the temperature responses of tree crops. PMID:21629649

  6. Coherent Forward Broadening in Cold Atom Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, R. T.; Robicheaux, Francis

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that homogeneous line-broadening in a diffuse cold atom cloud is proportional to the resonant optical depth of the cloud. Further, it is demonstrated how the strong directionality of the coherent interactions causes the cloud's spectra to depend strongly on its shape, even when the cloud is held at constant densities. These two numerical observations can be predicted analytically by extending the single photon wavefunction model. Lastly, elongating a cloud along the line of laser propagation causes the excitation probability distribution to deviate from the exponential decay predicted by the Beer-Lambert law to the extent where the atoms in the back of the cloud are more excited than the atoms in the front. These calculations are conducted at low densities relevant to recent experiments. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1404419-PHY.

  7. Coherent forward broadening in cold atom clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, R. T.; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that homogeneous line-broadening in a diffuse cold atom cloud is proportional to the resonant optical depth of the cloud. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how the strong directionality of the coherent interactions causes the cloud's spectra to depend strongly on its shape, even when the cloud is held at constant densities. These two numerical observations can be predicted analytically by extending the single-photon wave-function model. Lastly, elongating a cloud along the line of laser propagation causes the excitation probability distribution to deviate from the exponential decay predicted by the Beer-Lambert law to the extent where the atoms at the back of the cloud are more excited than the atoms at the front. These calculations are conducted at the low densities relevant to recent experiments.

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of the Pineapple under Low Temperature to Facilitate Its Breeding for Cold Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chengjie; Zhang, Yafeng; Xu, Zhiqiang; Luan, Aiping; Mao, Qi; Feng, Junting; Xie, Tao; Gong, Xue; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Hao; He, Yehua

    2016-01-01

    The pineapple (Ananas comosus) is cold sensitive. Most cultivars are injured during winter periods, especially in sub-tropical regions. There is a lack of molecular information on the pineapple’s response to cold stress. In this study, high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and gene expression analysis were performed on plantlets of a cold-tolerant genotype of the pineapple cultivar ‘Shenwan’ before and after cold treatment. A total of 1,186 candidate cold responsive genes were identified, and their credibility was confirmed by RT-qPCR. Gene set functional enrichment analysis indicated that genes related to cell wall properties, stomatal closure and ABA and ROS signal transduction play important roles in pineapple cold tolerance. In addition, a protein association network of CORs (cold responsive genes) was predicted, which could serve as an entry point to dissect the complex cold response network. Our study found a series of candidate genes and their association network, which will be helpful to cold stress response studies and pineapple breeding for cold tolerance. PMID:27656892

  9. Oligosaccharin and ABA synergistically affect the acquisition of freezing tolerance in winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Zabotin, Alexey I; Barisheva, Tatyana S; Trofimova, Oksana I; Toroschina, Tatyana E; Larskaya, Irina A; Zabotina, Olga A

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we continue our studies of the previously discovered [O.A. Zabotina, D.A. Ayupova, O.N. Larskaya, O.N. Nikolaeva, G.I. Petrovicheva, A.I. Zabotin, Physiologically active oligosaccharides, accumulating in the roots of winter wheat during adaptation to low temperature, Russian Journal of Plant Physiology 45 (1998) 262] oligosaccharin (physiologically active oligosaccharide) GXAG, which stimulates the acquisition of freezing tolerance in winter varieties of Triticum aestivum L. The transient accumulation of GXAG in the tissues of winter wheat correlates with the temporal activation of cell wall glycosidases during the first hours of cold acclimation (2 degrees C). This finding suggests that the oligosaccharin is liberated as a result of the intensification of hemicellulose turnover. At low concentrations, GXAG initiates the acquisition of freezing tolerance in winter plants, in a manner similar to ABA, even at room temperature. The resultant effect of ABA and GXAG on the freezing tolerance of winter wheat depends on the sequence of pre-treatments with these two factors. When seedlings are pre-treated with GXAG a few hours before treatment with ABA, the effect is synergistic, and its impact depends on the duration of pre-treatment with GXAG. When ABA is applied first, the resultant effect on freezing tolerance is additive. The results obtained here lead to the conclusion that oligosaccharin, accumulating during the first hours of cold acclimation, functions as a partner of ABA during the initiation of freezing tolerance acquisition in winter plants. We hypothesize that GXAG increases cell receptivity to ABA signaling. PMID:19467881

  10. Could human cold adaptation decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Kralova Lesna, I; Rychlikova, J; Vavrova, L; Vybiral, S

    2015-08-01

    The impact of repeated exposure to cold and cold adaptation on human cardiovascular health is not fully understood. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of cold adaptation on cardiovascular risk factors, thyroid hormones and the capacity of humans to reset the damaging effect of oxidative stress. Ten well cold-adapted winter swimmers (CA) and 16 non-adapted controls (CON) were enroled in this experiment to test whether cold adaptation could influence the parameters of lipoprotein metabolism, cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC), homocysteine, thyroid hormones, antioxidant defence markers (reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1)) and oxidative stress markers (concentration of conjugated dienes (CD)). A decreased apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 (ApoB/ApoA1) ratio was found in the CA group (p<0.05), but other lipoprotein parameters, including CEC, did not differ significantly. Plasma homocysteine was lower in CA subjects in comparison with controls (p<0.05). Higher triiodothyronine (T3) values were observed in the CA compared to the CON (p<0.05) group, but TSH and other thyroid hormones did not differ between both groups. CA subjects had lower activity of GPX1 (p<0.05), lower concentrations of CD (p<0.05) and increased activities of PON1 (p<0.001) compared to CON subjects. A trend for decreased activity of CAT (p=0.06) in CA compared to CON groups was also observed, but GSH levels did not differ significantly. Zn concentration was higher in the CA group than in the CON group (p<0.001). Human cold adaptation can influence oxidative stress markers. Trends towards the improvement of cardiovascular risk factors in cold-adapted subjects also indicate the positive effect of cold adaptation on cardio-protective mechanisms. PMID:26267514

  11. Estimating and projecting the effect of cold waves on mortality in 209 US cities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Shi, Liuhua; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    The frequency, duration, and intensity of cold waves are expected to decrease in the near future under the changing climate. However, there is a lack of understanding on future mortality related to cold waves. The present study conducted a large-scale national projection to estimate future mortality attributable to cold waves during 1960-2050 in 209 US cities. Cold waves were defined as two, three, or at least four consecutive days with daily temperature lower than the 5th percentile of temperatures in each city. The lingering period of a cold wave was defined as the non-cold wave days within seven days following that cold wave period. First, with 168million residents in 209 US cities during 1962-2006, we fitted over-dispersed Poisson regressions to estimate the immediate and lingering effects of cold waves on mortality and tested if the associations were modified by the duration of cold waves, the intensity of cold waves, and mean winter temperature (MWT). Then we projected future mortality related to cold waves using 20 downscaled climate models. Here we show that the cold waves (both immediate and lingering) were associated with an increased but small risk of mortality. The associations varied substantially across climate regions. The risk increased with the duration and intensity of cold waves but decreased with MWT. The projected mortality related to cold waves would decrease from 1960 to 2050. Such a decrease, however, is small and may not be able to offset the potential increase in heat-related deaths if the adaptation to heat is not adequate. PMID:27248660

  12. Estimating and projecting the effect of cold waves on mortality in 209 US cities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Shi, Liuhua; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    The frequency, duration, and intensity of cold waves are expected to decrease in the near future under the changing climate. However, there is a lack of understanding on future mortality related to cold waves. The present study conducted a large-scale national projection to estimate future mortality attributable to cold waves during 1960-2050 in 209 US cities. Cold waves were defined as two, three, or at least four consecutive days with daily temperature lower than the 5th percentile of temperatures in each city. The lingering period of a cold wave was defined as the non-cold wave days within seven days following that cold wave period. First, with 168million residents in 209 US cities during 1962-2006, we fitted over-dispersed Poisson regressions to estimate the immediate and lingering effects of cold waves on mortality and tested if the associations were modified by the duration of cold waves, the intensity of cold waves, and mean winter temperature (MWT). Then we projected future mortality related to cold waves using 20 downscaled climate models. Here we show that the cold waves (both immediate and lingering) were associated with an increased but small risk of mortality. The associations varied substantially across climate regions. The risk increased with the duration and intensity of cold waves but decreased with MWT. The projected mortality related to cold waves would decrease from 1960 to 2050. Such a decrease, however, is small and may not be able to offset the potential increase in heat-related deaths if the adaptation to heat is not adequate.

  13. Foliar applied abscisic acid increases 'Chardonnay' grapevines (Vitis vinifera) bud freezing tolerance during Autumn cold acclimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic loss due to cold weather events is a major constraint to winegrape-related industries where extreme and/or fluctuating winter temperatures induce injury and required remedial retraining and replanting increases production costs and lowers yield and fruit quality. The purpose of this study ...

  14. Engineering carpel-specific cold stress tolerance: a case study in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing temperatures during winter generally do not injure floral buds of horticulturally important crops. Entry into dormancy coupled with cold acclimation provides adequate protection unless the temperatures are exceptionally low. This measure of protection is lost in spring when the floral bud...

  15. Practical considerations for ventilating calf barns in winter.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Kenneth V

    2008-03-01

    The use of air sampling devices to measure the concentrations of airborne bacteria in clinical investigations and research trials in calf barns has indicated that traditional systems of ventilation are problematic in cold weather. Individual pen designs should have two solid sides, but the front and rear should be as open as possible. Thermal stress should be managed by providing deep bedding and not by enclosing the pen. Air hygiene can be improved by reducing stocking density and using supplemental positive-pressure ventilation systems to deliver small amounts of air to each pen. Implementation of these recommendations can produce calf barns that seem to equal calf hutches in minimizing disease and provide better working conditions for the caregivers.

  16. A winter survey of domestic heating among elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; Blair, A; King, D

    1996-02-01

    Elderly people have a greater need for domestic heating given the time they spend at home and the decline in the body thermoregulation that occurs with ageing. The use of domestic heating by 200 mentally competent newly admitted elderly in patients was evaluated by means of a questionnaire survey. Most patients (69%) were aware of the addition of value added tax (VAT) to their fuel bill and 31% said they had reduced the amount of heating they use because of this. A third of patients (29.5%) said they had difficulty keeping warm prior to this admission. The majority of patients said they could not manage to keep warm in the winter without financial hardship. In addition, 29% said they had reduced the amount spent on food in order to pay for fuel bills. This study suggests that cold may contribute to hospital admissions in elderly patients. This should have implications for government spending and taxation policy on domestic heating. PMID:8683507

  17. Winter warming from large volcanic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, A.; Mao, J.

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95 percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  18. Winter leaf reddening in 'evergreen' species.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicole M

    2011-05-01

    Leaf reddening during autumn in senescing, deciduous tree species has received widespread attention from the public and in the scientific literature, whereas leaf reddening in evergreen species during winter remains largely ignored. Winter reddening can be observed in evergreen herbs, shrubs, vines and trees in Mediterranean, temperate, alpine, and arctic regions, and can persist for several months before dissipating with springtime warming. Yet, little is known about the functional significance of this colour change, or why it occurs in some species but not others. Here, the biochemistry, physiology and ecology associated with winter leaf reddening are reviewed, with special focus on its possible adaptive function. Photoprotection is currently the favoured hypothesis for winter reddening, but alternative explanations have scarcely been explored. Intraspecific reddening generally increases with sunlight incidence, and may also accompany photosynthetic inferiority in photosynthetically 'weak' (e.g. low-nitrogen) individuals. Red leaves tend to show symptoms of shade acclimation relative to green, consistent with a photoprotective function. However, winter-red and winter-green species often cohabitate the same high-light environments, and exhibit similar photosynthetic capacities. The factors dictating interspecific winter leaf colouration therefore remain unclear. Additional outstanding questions and future directions are also highlighted, and possible alternative functions of winter reddening discussed.

  19. Southern elephant seal trajectories, fronts and eddies in the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Claudio; Piola, Alberto R.; Rosa Marin, Maria; Lewis, Mirtha; Fernández, Teresita

    2006-12-01

    This study describes the association between transient, mesoscale hydrographic features along the axis of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence, in the SW Atlantic, and the foraging behavior of 2-3-year-old (focal) juvenile southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, from Península Valdés, Argentina. Departing from the dominant pattern of foraging on predictable bathymetric fronts on the Patagonian shelf and slope, three females out of 12 satellite-tracked juveniles remained at the edge of young warm-core eddies and near the outer core of cold-core eddies, coinciding with the most productive areas of these temperature fronts. Seal trajectories along high-temperature gradients were always consistent with the speed and direction of surface currents inferred from the temperature distribution and confirmed by surface drifters. Movements of foraging seals were compared with those of surface drifters, coinciding in time and space and yielding independent and consistent data on regional water circulation parameters. The diving pattern recorded for one focal seal yielded shallower dives and a loose diel pattern in the eddy, and a marked diurnal cycle compatible with foraging on vertically migrating prey in the cold waters of the Malvinas Current. Pre-reproductive females that use the mesoscale fronts of the Argentine Basin as an alternative foraging area would benefit from lower competition with more experienced seals and with other top predators that reproduce along the coast of Patagonia.

  20. Role of CBFs as Integrators of Chloroplast Redox, Phytochrome and Plant Hormone Signaling during Cold Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Kurepin, Leonid V.; Dahal, Keshav P.; Savitch, Leonid V.; Singh, Jas; Bode, Rainer; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation of winter cereals and other winter hardy species is a prerequisite to increase subsequent freezing tolerance. Low temperatures upregulate the expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) which in turn induce the expression of COLD-REGULATED (COR) genes. We summarize evidence which indicates that the integration of these interactions is responsible for the dwarf phenotype and enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with cold-acclimated and CBF-overexpressing plants. Plants overexpressing CBFs but grown at warm temperatures mimic the cold-tolerant, dwarf, compact phenotype; increased photosynthetic performance; and biomass accumulation typically associated with cold-acclimated plants. In this review, we propose a model whereby the cold acclimation signal is perceived by plants through an integration of low temperature and changes in light intensity, as well as changes in light quality. Such integration leads to the activation of the CBF-regulon and subsequent upregulation of COR gene and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox) expression which results in a dwarf phenotype coupled with increased freezing tolerance and enhanced photosynthetic performance. We conclude that, due to their photoautotrophic nature, plants do not rely on a single low temperature sensor, but integrate changes in light intensity, light quality, and membrane viscosity in order to establish the cold-acclimated state. CBFs appear to act as master regulators of these interconnecting sensing/signaling pathways. PMID:23778089