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Sample records for women attending antenatal

  1. Vitamin D concentrations in pregnant women with diabetes attending for antenatal care in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hon C; de Costa, Caroline; McLean, Anna; Woods, Cindy

    2014-06-01

    Serum concentrations of vitamin D were measured in 101 pregnant women with diabetes, both pre-existing and gestational, who attended for antenatal care in Cairns Base Hospital. Eighty-two (81.2%) had sufficient concentrations of vitamin D, 12 (11.9%) had levels indicating insufficiency and 7 (6.9%) were deficient. These findings contrast with those in the general population of pregnant women in the region, among whom 93.1% have been shown to have sufficient levels. The study contributes to the ongoing debate around the need for universal antenatal vitamin D screening in Australia.

  2. Prevalence of Antenatal Depression and Associated Risk Factors among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics in Abeokuta North Local Government Area, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, IkeOluwapo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of antenatal depression (AD) and associated risk factors among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Abeokuta North Local Government Area, Nigeria, was determined. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted, interviewing 314 pregnant women selected by multistage sampling technique from among those attending antenatal clinics. Information was collected using structured questionnaire and a screening tool, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), to assess probable depression. Results. The prevalence of antenatal depression was 24.5%. There were significant associations between antenatal depression and attending public health facility (P = 0.000), young maternal age (P = 0.012), single marital status (P = 0.010), not having formal education (P = 0.022), large family size (P = 0.029), planned pregnancy (P = 0.014), coexisting medical conditions (P = 0.034), history of previous caesarian section (P = 0.032), drinking alcohol during pregnancy (P = 0.004), and gender based abuse (P = 0.001). On health seeking behaviour for antenatal depression among depressed pregnant women, most, 68.9%, consulted their husbands about their symptoms; 57.3% took the decision to get treatment from doctors, and 52% sought prayer in the church. Conclusion. Antenatal depression is prevalent in this study population. Interventions to address its risk factors should be carried out and physicians should suspect depression in pregnant women reporting alcohol use and gender abuse. PMID:27635258

  3. Pattern and outcome of antenatal care among women attending a Catholic mission hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Aluko, J O; Oluwatosin, A

    2008-09-01

    Antenatal care (ANC) services have the aim of monitoring the course of pregnancy, in order to promote favourable outcomes. In spite of the fact that its components have been found to improve pregnancy outcomes, maternal/infant morbidity and mortality still remain public health problems in most developing countries including Nigeria. These unacceptable health indicators form the basis of this study. The records of 581 women who attended ANC at the Catholic Hospital between October 2005 and September 2006 were accessed. The data collected with the aid of a checklist were processed using statistical package of social sciences (SPSS). The age range of the participants was 17-45; with the mean age of 30.3 (SD = 4.8). Three hundred and forty-seven (59.7%), sixty-nine (29.1%) of the women had tertiary and secondary education respectively. A total of 325 (55.9%) were nulliparous. Only 44 (7.6%) of the women began ANC at the first trimester. Out of 159 abortions recorded among the women, 72 (45%) were self-induced prior to marriage. Findings showed apparent low rate of first trimester booking, irregular antenatal clinic visits and initiation of ANC at the appearance of symptoms of illness among the women studied. Therefore the study recommends hospitals to adopt the WHO modified ANC with fewer visits to improve better compliance and coverage, provision of family life education especially on the benefits of early ANC booking and family planning services through available media.

  4. Sociodemographic and Obstetric Characteristics of Anaemic Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic in Bolgatanga Regional Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ahenkorah, Benjamin; Nsiah, Kwabena; Baffoe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The study determined the sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics of pregnant women which contribute to the risk of developing anaemia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit at the Bolgatanga Regional Hospital Antenatal Clinic. Anaemia was significantly associated (p < 0.05) with younger maternal age, parity, gravidity, trimester of pregnancy, and source of drinking water. Multivariate logistic regression identified the following factors with adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI): unemployment (aOR = 4.76 (CI: 2.26–11.33); p < 0.0001), rural dwelling (aOR = 3.10 (CI: 2.16–4.91); p = 0.0071), primigravida (aOR = 2.13 (CI: 1.34–3.18); p = 0.0201), nulliparity (aOR = 1.92 (CI: 1.23–2.86); p = 0.0231), first antenatal visit at second trimester (aOR = 1.71 (CI: 1.33–3.12); p = 0.0149) and first antenatal visit at third trimester (aOR = 2.73 (CI: 1.24–4.35); p = 0.0017), drinking from well and boreholes (aOR = 2.78 (CI: 2.27–5.21); p < 0.0001), and the presence of domestic livestock (aOR = 2.15 (CI: 1.33–3.68); p = 0.0019). This study has shown the various sociodemographic and obstetric factors which significantly contribute to anaemia in pregnancy. PMID:27242947

  5. Intestinal Helminth Infections in Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wekesa, A. W.; Mulambalah, C. S.; Muleke, C. I.; Odhiambo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections during pregnancy are associated with adverse outcomes including low birth weight and prenatal mortality. The infections are a major public health problem in developing countries. A hospital based survey was undertaken for six months to determine the infection prevalence, intensity, and risk factors. The study involved expectant women attending antenatal clinic. Stool samples were screened microscopically for helminth ova using Kato Katz technique. Information on risk factors was collected using semistructured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS. Epidemiological data was analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis. The overall prevalence of infection was 21 (13.8%). Ascariasis was the most prevalent 10 (6.5%), hookworm infection was 6 (3.9%), and trichuriasis was 2 (1.3%). Pregnant women aged below 29 years (OR = 3.63, CI = 0.87–11.75) and those with primary level of education (OR = 3.21, CI = 0.88–11.75) were at a higher risk of infection compared to those aged ≥ 29 years with secondary level of education. Hand washing was significantly associated with reduced likelihood of infection (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06–0.57). It was concluded that intestinal helminth infections were prevalent among pregnant women. We recommended that all expectant women visiting antenatal clinics be screened for intestinal helminth infections and positive cases be advised to seek treatment. PMID:24971167

  6. Influence of education on HIV infection among pregnant women attending their antenatal care in Sekondi-Takoradi metropolis, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Orish, Verner N; Onyeabor, Onyekachi S; Boampong, Johnson N; Afoakwah, Richmond; Nwaefuna, Ekene; Acquah, Samuel; Orish, Esther O; Sanyaolu, Adekunle O; Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the level of education on HIV infection among pregnant women attending antenatal care in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana. A cross-sectional study was conducted at four hospitals in the Sekondi-Takoradi metropolis. The study group comprised 885 consenting pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics. Questionnaires were administered and venous blood samples were screened for HIV and other parameters. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the association between the level of education attained by the pregnant women and their HIV statuses. The data showed that 9.83% (87/885) of the pregnant women were HIV seropositive while 90.17% (798/885) were HIV seronegative. There were significant differences in mean age (years) between the HIV seropositive women (27.45 ± 5.5) and their HIV seronegative (26.02 ± 5.6) counterparts (p = .026) but the inference disappeared after adjustment (p = .22). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that pregnant women with secondary/tertiary education were less likely to have HIV infection compared with those with none/primary education (adjusted OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.91; p = .022). Our data showed an association with higher level of education and HIV statuses of the pregnant women. It is imperative to encourage formal education among pregnant women in this region.

  7. Timing of First Antenatal Care Attendance and Associated Factors among Pregnant Women in Arba Minch Town and Arba Minch District, Gamo Gofa Zone, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebremeskel, Feleke; Dibaba, Yohannes; Admassu, Bitiya

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the timing of first antenatal care attendance and associated factors among pregnant women in Arba Minch Town and Arba Minch District, south Ethiopia. Method. Facility based cross-sectional study employing both quantitative and qualitative methods was conducted from February to March, 2014, in Arba Minch Town and Arba Minch District. Data were collected from 409 pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in nine public health facilities using systematic random sampling. Analysis was done using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics and binary and multiple logistic regression analysis were done. Results. The mean (SD±) age of the respondents was 26 ± 5.5 years. The mean gestational age at first antenatal care attendance was 5 ± 1.5 months. This study indicated that pregnant women with low monthly income (AOR = 4.9, CI: 1.71, 14.08), women who did not receive advise on when to start ANC (AOR = 3, CI: 1.48, 6.24), women with household food insecurity (AOR = 4.66, CI: 1.007, 21.59) and women with unplanned pregnancy (AOR = 4.49, CI: 2.16, 9.35) had higher odds of late antenatal care attendance compared with their counterparts. Conclusions. The study showed that majority of the pregnant women attended late for first antenatal care. Hence, providing health education on the timing of antenatal care is important. PMID:26543485

  8. [Needs and expectations of Tamil women attending an antenatal care department at a Swiss university hospital].

    PubMed

    Büchi, Simone; Cignacco, Eva; Lüthi, Damaris; Spirig, Rebecca

    2006-10-01

    It has been noted that immigrant women often initiate prenatal care late in their pregnancy and thus may be inadequately prepared for their birth experience. This leads to poorer maternal outcomes and higher morbidity statistics compared to Swiss women. Tamil women of Sri Lanka represent the largest group of immigrant women being seen at the antenatal care clinic of a Swiss University Hospital. To get a deeper understanding of their needs and expectations relative to their antenatal care, a qualitative study was undertaken. Problem centred interviews were conducted with seven Tamil women before and after delivery. An interpreter was consulting. Data were analyzed using content analysis methods as described by Mayring. Four main themes emerged, demonstrating the need of the women and their resulting expectation: 1) to receive esteem--to show respect and attention; 2) to consult with somebody--to ensure communication; 3) to alleviate worries and fear--to give a sense of security and be in charge; and 4) to make up for lack of experience and knowledge--to pass on experience and knowledge. The quality of the relationships to caregivers is viewed as pivotal and seems to influence Tamil women's satisfaction and their motivation to receive prenatal care.

  9. Do non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?

    PubMed

    Khogali, M; Zachariah, R; Reid, A J; Alipon, S C; Zimble, S; Gbane, M; Etienne, W; Veerman, R; Hassan, A; Harries, A D

    2014-03-21

    In a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap, a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect.

  10. Sero-Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Amongst Pregnant Women Attending an Antenatal Clinic, Volta Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Dassah, Sylvester; Lokpo, Sylvester; Ameke, Louise; Noagbe, Mark; Adatara, Peter; Hagan, Oheneba; Binka, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a global challenge, although there is currently a safe and effective vaccine available. HBV prevalence in Ghana is not well documented, but vary regionally from 4.8% to 12.3% in the general population, 10.8% to 12.7% in blood donors and about 10.6% in pregnant women. This puts Ghana among the high endemic countries in Africa. The study objective was to determine the sero-prevalence of HBs antigen (Ag) and HBeAg among pregnant women in the Ho municipality. Two hundred and eigh participants (pregnant women), attending Ho Municipal antenatal clinic were enrolled into the study. This study recorded a HBsAg sero-prevalence rate of 2.4% among the pregnant women, with primigravida pregnant women recording (0.98%) and multigravida (1.42%). The prevalence of HBsAg among the pregnant women can be classified as Low Intermediate; therefore there is still the need for routine screening of pregnant women during antenatal visits. Amongst HBsAg positives, HBeAg positivity was significantly high (40% of all HBsAg positive women), which suggests high chances of carrier and vertical transmission (mother to child) state. PMID:28299162

  11. Determinants of Antenatal Care Attendance among Pregnant Women Living in Endemic Malaria Settings: Experience from the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Manianga, Célestin; Kapanga, Serge; Mona, Esther; Pululu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Antenatal care (ANC) attendance helps pregnant women to benefit from preventive and curative services. Methods. Determinants for ANC attendance were identified through a cross-sectional survey in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Sociocultural bottlenecks were assessed via focus groups discussion of married men and women. Results. In this survey, 28 of the 500 interviewed pregnant women (5.6%) did not attend ANC services and 82.4% booked over the first trimester. The first visit is positively influenced by the reproductive age (OR: 0.52, 95% CI(0.28–0.95), p < 0.04), the educational level (OR: 0.41,95% CI(0.17–0.97), p < 0.04), the nearby health center (OR: 0.43, 95% CI(0.2–0.92), p < 0.03), and the presence of a male partner (OR: 10.48, 95% CI(2.1–52.23), p < 0.001). The barriers to early booking were (i) the cost of service; (ii) the appearance or individual income; (iii) the geographical inaccessibility or distance to health facilities; (iv) social and religious prohibitions; (v) the stigmatization from other women when conceiving in the late ages or young or while still lactating (parity); (vi) the time for waiting for services. Conclusion. The early ANC attendance is delayed among poor women with little education and living alone. PMID:27703482

  12. Determinants for refusal of HIV testing among women attending for antenatal care in Gambella Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Gambella region, inhabitants owe socio-cultural factors that might favor refusal for HIV testing service utilization among Antenatal Care attendees. Objective To assess determinants for refusal of HIV testing service utilization among ANC attendees in Gambella Region. Methods A comparative cross sectional study was conducted among ANC attendees from March 2008 to May 2008 in four selected health facilities of Gambella region. Sample size of 332 participants (83 who refused HIV testing and 249 who accepted HIV testing) were taken for the study. The study was supplemented with four focus group discussions. Multivariate binary logistic regression was employed to control for confounding factors. Results When adjusted with other factors pregnant women with 2–3 live births in the past; who claimed divorce as a perceived response of their husband following HIV positive test result; who had not sought agreement from their husband for testing; disclosure of test for husband and being from certain ethnic group (E.g. Mejenger) were independent predictors for refusal of HIV testing among ANC attendees. Conclusion and recommendation Based on the findings, the following recommendations were forwarded: Provision of innovative information and education on the pre-test session for those pregnant women having two or more children; community involvement to tackle stigma; women empowerment; designing couple friendly counseling service; and fighting harmful traditional practices related with decision of HIV testing. PMID:22834566

  13. Risk assessment and other screening options for gonorrhoea and chlamydial infections in women attending rural Tanzanian antenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Mayaud, P.; Grosskurth, H.; Changalucha, J.; Todd, J.; West, B.; Gabone, R.; Senkoro, K.; Rusizoka, M.; Laga, M.; Hayes, R.

    1995-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and may play a key role in enhancing the heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment of STDs is one of the most cost-effective of all health interventions in developing countries; however, STDs among women in rural populations have received little attention. In this study, we report that prevalences of STDs among 964 women attending antenatal clinics in a rural area of the United Republic of Tanzania. A total of 378 (39%) of these women were infected with at least one STD pathogen, 97 (10%) had syphilis, and 81 (8%) has Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and/or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection. The recommended syndromic approach to screening for NG/CT infection, based on reported genital symptoms, had a low sensitivity (43%) and failed to discriminate between infected and uninfected women. A risk score approach that we developed, based on sociodemographic and other factors associated with NG/CT infection, had a higher sensitivity and lower cost per true case treated than other approaches, although its positive predictive value was only about 20%. PMID:8846488

  14. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in Honiara Solomon Islands, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Aneley; Baekalia, Margaret; Panda, Nixon; Lee, Alice; Puiahi, Elliot; Khan, Sabiha; Tahani, Donald; Manongi, Doris

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in Honiara, Solomon Islands. METHODS This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in seven area health centers in Honiara. From March to June 2015, identification of eligible pregnant women in each site was conducted using systematic random sampling technique. A total of 243 pregnant women who gave written informed consent were enrolled. Standardized tool was used to record demographics, obstetric history and serology results. HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) were tested using point-of-care rapid diagnostic test. All HBsAg positive samples were verified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS The mean age of participants was 26 ± 6 years. The overall hepatitis HBsAg prevalence was 13.8% with higher rate (22%) reported in women between 30-34 years of age. Majority of HBsAg positive participants were Melanesians (29 out for 33). None of the pregnant women in the 15-19 years and ≥ 40 years tested positive for HBsAg. There was no statistically significant difference in HBsAg prevalence by age, ethnicity, education and residential location. The overall HBeAg seroprevalence was 36.7%. Women between 20-24 years of age had the highest rate of 54.5%. Low level of knowledge about hepatitis B vaccination was reputed. Overall, 54.6% of participants were not aware of their hepatitis B vaccination status and only 65.2% of mothers reported their child had been vaccinated. CONCLUSION Hepatitis B is a disease of public health importance in Solomon Islands and emphasize the need for integrated preventative interventions for its control. PMID:28008343

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Infections and Associated Factors among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care Clinic at Deder Hospital, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Umare, Abdi; Seyoum, Berhanu; Gobena, Tesfaye; Haile Mariyam, Tamirat

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious public health problem worldwide. Reports have shown that 68,600 people die of HBV infection and more than 300,000 deaths due to liver cancer secondary to hepatitis B every year globally. Women who are infected with HBV can vertically transmit the infection to their infants. This study aims to determine the prevalence of HBV infection and associated factors among pregnant women. Methods and Findings A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women who attended antenatal care clinic (ANC) for routine pregnancy check-up between 18 March 2015 and 15 May 2015. Data were collected by face to face interview using a pre-tested questionnaire. Serum was withdrawn for each study subject and used to test for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kit. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between explanatory variables and outcome variable. The prevalence of HBV infection was found to be 6.9%. Interestingly, the history of abortion (AOR 10.9; 95% CI: 2.2–53.9), nose piercing (AOR 9.1; 95% CI: 1.34–61.79), surgical procedure (AOR 12.8; 95% CI: 1.68–97.06) and history of multiple sexual partners (AOR 16.8; 95% CI: 3.18–89.06) were significant predictors of HBV infection. Conclusions This study determined that the prevalence of HBV infection among pregnant women was 6.9%, implying that it is high-intermediate endemic area, which is important public health issue needs to be addressed. History of abortion, nose piercing, surgical procedures and multiple sexual partners were significantly associated with this viral infection. Accordingly we advocate that health education programs on the mode of HBV transmission, high-risk behaviors and methods of preventions should be instituted at antenatal care clinics to raise the awareness of mothers and limit the spread of infection. It is also advisable to implement

  16. Nutritional Practices and Taboos Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at General Hospital in Kano, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, EA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food taboos among rural women have been identified as one of the factors contributing to maternal undernutrition in pregnancy. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore some of the taboos and nutritional practices among pregnant women attending antenatal care at a General Hospital in Dawakin Kudu LGA, Kano, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 220 pregnant women. Interviewer-administered structured questionnaire was used to interview the respondents, which showed various sociodemographic information, cultural nutritional processes, taboos of the community, and a 24 h food recall. The ages, parities, and gestational ages of the women were collated. Descriptive statistics was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software Version 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Association between sociodemographic factors and nutritional practices and taboos was determined using Chi-square test and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: At the end of the study, 200 participants (91%) gave complete information. Most of the women, 70% (140/200) were in the 20–39 years age range with mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of 23.7 (6.1) years, mostly uneducated, 70% (140/200), and unemployed, 51% (102/200). Most of the women did a child spacing of 12–24 months, 62% (124/200) with mean (SD) child spacing interval of 26.32 (10.19) months. Gestational age at booking was mostly 13–26 weeks, 48% (96/200) with an average of 26.60 (8.01). Most of the women had 1–4 children, 54.5% (109/200) with mean (SD) of 2.47 (2.50). Most of the women agreed that they had adequate intake of oil, 86% (172/200), meat/fish, 92% (194/200), fruit/vegetables 56% (112/200), and had 3 meals/day 80% (152/200), and did not practice pica 83% (166/200). All of the women, 100% (200/200) believe that women should eat more during pregnancy in order to have healthy babies. They were mostly supported by their husbands, 53% (106/200) and

  17. How Do Women Prepare for Pregnancy? Preconception Experiences of Women Attending Antenatal Services and Views of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Judith; Patel, Dilisha; Barrett, Geraldine; Howden, Beth; Copas, Andrew; Ojukwu, Obiamaka; Pandya, Pranav; Shawe, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Main objective To determine the extent to which women plan and prepare for pregnancy. Methods Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of pregnant women attending three maternity services in London about knowledge and uptake of preconception care; including a robust measure of pregnancy planning, and phone interviews with a range of health care professionals. Main results We recruited 1173/1288 (90%) women, median age of 32 years. 73% had clearly planned their pregnancy, 24% were ambivalent and only 3% of pregnancies were unplanned. 51% of all women and 63% of those with a planned pregnancy took folic acid before pregnancy. 21% of all women reported smoking and 61% reported drinking alcohol in the 3 months before pregnancy; 48% of smokers and 41% of drinkers reduced or stopped before pregnancy. The 51% of all women who reported advice from a health professional before becoming pregnant were more likely to adopt healthier behaviours before pregnancy [adjusted odds ratios for greatest health professional input compared with none were 2.34 (95% confidence interval 1.54–3.54) for taking folic acid and 2.18 (95% CI 1.42–3.36) for adopting a healthier diet before pregnancy]. Interviews with 20 health professionals indicated low awareness of preconception health issues, missed opportunities and confusion about responsibility for delivery of preconception care. Significance of the findings Despite a high level of pregnancy planning, awareness of preconception health among women and health professionals is low, and responsibility for providing preconception care is unclear. However, many women are motivated to adopt healthier behaviours in the preconception period, as indicated by halving of reported smoking rates in this study. The link between health professional input and healthy behaviour change before pregnancy is a new finding that should invigorate strategies to improve awareness and uptake of pre-pregnancy health care, and bring wider benefits for public health

  18. Mental health, pregnancy and self-rated health in antenatal women attending primary health clinics.

    PubMed

    Sonkusare, S; Adinegara; Hebbar, S

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the determinants of self rated health in the low-risk pregnant women of Melaka Tengah in Malaysia. A total of 387 subjects were analysed. The role of mental health, psychosocial stressors, support from husband, coping skills, socio-economic status and pregnancy characteristics in determining self- rated health were studied. Health items were taken from the Duke Health Profile. Bad obstetric history, poor mental health, stress from the family were found to be significantly associated with poor self - rated health whereas good support from the husband was related to good self - rated health.

  19. Utilization of folic acid and iron supplementation services by pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic at a regional referral hospital in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Maina-Gathigi, L; Omolo, J; Wanzala, P; Lindan, C; Makokha, A

    2013-09-01

    To determine utilization of iron and folic acid supplementation services among pregnant women in Kenya. A cross sectional study was conducted at Nyeri Hospital, a regional referral hospital in central Kenya. Women attending the antenatal clinic were selected through systematic sampling. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to collect information on utilization of folic acid and iron supplementation services. Women who ingested folic acid or iron supplements for >4 days in a week were considered "highly compliant". The health worker in-charge of the antenatal clinic was interviewed about the frequency of supplement stock-outs during the past year. Haemoglobin concentration was measured directly from one drop of capillary blood and measured using portable HEMOCUE B-Hb photometer. Of the 381 women interviewed, only 23.6 % obtained antenatal care in the first trimester; 69.3 and 51.2 % received folic acid and iron supplements, respectively. However, only half (45-58 %) received any information about supplementation. Most women were initiated on folic acid (80.7 %) or iron (67.7 %) after 12 and 16 weeks of gestation, respectively, well after the recommended time period. However, more than 80 % of those who received folic acid and iron were highly compliant. Stock-outs were common at the facility. Of 361 women tested for Hb level, the prevalence of anaemia (Hb levels < 11 g/dl) was 7.8 %. Health workers need to better explain the importance of supplements to pregnant women. Women who come late to antenatal clinic miss opportunities to start supplementation early in pregnancy. Problems with supply chain management exacerbate the problem.

  20. Prevalence, awareness and risk factors associated with Hepatitis B infection among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at Mbagathi District Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngaira, Jacqueline Asundula Malungu; Kimotho, James; Mirigi, Isaac; Osman, Saida; Ng’ang’a, Zipporah; Lwembe, Raphael; Ochwoto, Missiani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis B Viral Infection (HBV) remains one of the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally accounting for 38-53% of chronic liver diseases and about 686,000 deaths annually. The prevalence of HBV is 9-20% in Sub-Saharan Africa, and in Kenya it is 5-30% among the general population and 9.4% among pregnant women. This study was aimed at identifying the prevalence, awareness and risk factors associated with HBV infections among pregnant women attending Antenatal clinic (ANC) at Mbagathi District hospital, Nairobi. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 287 pregnant women enrolled for three months (September to December 2014) from Nairobi and neighbouring counties. A structured questionnaire that captured social, demographic and explanatory variables was administered to the study participants. Blood samples were also drawn from the participants and tested for HBV using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) system. Results The study established that the prevalence of HBV infections among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at Mbagathi District Hospital was 3.8% with highest infection rate among the 20-24 years age group. Seventy six (60.8 %) of the participants reported sexual encounters in less than a month before the interview of which 5 (7.6%) reported encounters involving other partners apart from their spouses. HBV awareness among the study participants was 12.2%. Before the interview, those with at least tertiary education (Mean =1.33, SD = 1.131), were more informed about HBV infection as compared to those with primary and secondary education (Mean = 0.63, SD = 0.722; (Mean =0.31, SD= 0.664). In regards to assessment of the risk factors; type of family (χ² =19.753 df2 p<0.01), parity (χ² =7.128 df2 p<0.01), History of abortions (χ²=9.094 df1 p<0.01), early age (11-15 years) at first sexual encounter (χ² =8.185 df1 p<0.01) were significantly associated with HBV positivity. Conclusion The prevalence of HBV

  1. Diagnostic Performance of Placental Growth Factor in Women With Suspected Preeclampsia Attending Antenatal Facilities in Maputo, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Ukah, U Vivian; Mbofana, Francisco; Rocha, Beatriz Manriquez; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Mudenyanga, Chishamiso; Usta, Momade; Urso, Marilena; Drebit, Sharla; Magee, Laura A; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2017-03-01

    In well-resourced settings, reduced circulating maternal-free placental growth factor (PlGF) aids in either predicting or confirming the diagnosis of preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, stillbirth, preterm birth, and delivery within 14 days of testing when preeclampsia is suspected. This blinded, prospective cohort study of maternal plasma PlGF in women with suspected preeclampsia was conducted in antenatal clinics in Maputo, Mozambique. The primary outcome was the clinic-to-delivery interval. Other outcomes included: confirmed diagnosis of preeclampsia, transfer to higher care, mode of delivery, intrauterine fetal death, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Of 696 women, 95 (13.6%) and 601 (86.4%) women had either low (<100 pg/mL) or normal (≥100 pg/mL) plasma PlGF, respectively. The clinic-to-delivery interval was shorter in low PlGF, compared with normal PlGF, women (median 24 days [interquartile range, 10-49] versus 44 [24-81], P=0.0042). Also, low PlGF was associated with a confirmed diagnosis of preeclampsia, higher blood pressure, transfer for higher care, earlier gestational age delivery, delivery within 7 and 14 days, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, lower birth weight, and perinatal loss. In urban Mozambican women with symptoms or signs suggestive of preeclampsia, low maternal plasma PlGF concentrations are associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes, whether the diagnosis of preeclampsia is confirmed. Therefore, PlGF should improve the provision of precision medicine to individual women and improve pregnancy outcomes for those with preeclampsia or related placenta-mediated complications.

  2. Prevalence and public-health significance of HIV infection and anaemia among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in south-eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Uneke, C J; Duhlinska, D D; Igbinedion, E B

    2007-09-01

    HIV infection and anaemia are major public-health problems in Africa and are important factors associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection and anaemia among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in southeastern Nigeria. To achieve this, a cross-sectional survey was conducted during July 2005-June 2006 using standard techniques. Of 815 pregnant women studied, 31 (3.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5-5.1) were HIV-positive. Maternal age and gestational age were not associated with HIV infection (p > 0.05). The prevalence of anaemia (Hb < 11.0 g/dL) was 76.9%, and 15 (1.8%, 95% CI 0.9-2.7) had severe anaemia (Hb <7.0 g/dL). A significantly higher prevalence of anaemia was observed among individuals in their second pregnancy trimester (p < 0.05) and those infected with HIV (p < 0.05). Since HIV and anaemia are preventable, antenatal care services could serve as a pivotal entry point for simultaneous delivery of interventions for the prevention and control of HIV infection and anaemia in pregnant women.

  3. Perceptions of antenatal care services by pregnant women attending government health centres in the Buea Health District, Cameroon: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Edie, Gregory Edie Halle Ekane; Obinchemti, Thomas Egbe; Tamufor, Emmanuel Njuma; Njie, Martin Mafany; Njamen, Theophile Nana; Achidi, Eric Akum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction User'sperception of quality of ANC services crucially impacts continuity of use of these services and hence pregnancy outcome. However in our community, ANC user's perceptions of quality are not known. Methods An observational analytic cross-sectional study was carried out amongst pregnant women attending selected government health centres in the Buea Health District. We recruited 385 consenting pregnant women for the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected using structured questionnaires. The data was entered into Microsoft Excel and exported toEpi-Info (Version 3.5.1) for analysis. Results Geographical accessibility and perceived quality of care were the predominant reasons for choosing or changing a site for ANC. One third of respondents (30.1%) attended a health centre out of their catchment health area with Buea Town health centre receiving the highest proportion of women out of the health area (56.8% of attendees). Knowledge about antenatal care varied and majority of respondents (96.4%) were satisfied with the antenatal services received. However, there were elements of dissatisfaction with health centre services, poor sitting facilities, amenities, few health education talks and poor nursing skills. High educational level (high school and university) (X2 = 8.714; p = 0.01) and first time pregnancy(X2= 4.217; p= 0.04) were significantly associated with poor satisfaction. Conclusion Policy makers should implement changes in the health care delivery system taking into account the users’ preferences, more so in the light of increasing female education in Cameroon. PMID:26405481

  4. Why don't some women attend antenatal and postnatal care services?: a qualitative study of community members' perspectives in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Antenatal, delivery and postnatal care services are amongst the recommended interventions aimed at preventing maternal and newborn deaths worldwide. West Java is one of the provinces of Java Island in Indonesia with a high proportion of home deliveries, a low attendance of four antenatal services and a low postnatal care uptake. This paper aims to explore community members' perspectives on antenatal and postnatal care services, including reasons for using or not using these services, the services received during antenatal and postnatal care, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java province. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from March to July 2009 in six villages in three districts of West Java province. Twenty focus group discussions (FGDs) and 165 in-depth interviews were carried out involving a total of 295 respondents. The guidelines for FGDs and in-depth interviews included the topics of community experiences with antenatal and postnatal care services, reasons for not attending the services, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods. Results Our study found that the main reason women attended antenatal and postnatal care services was to ensure the safe health of both mother and infant. Financial difficulty emerged as the major issue among women who did not fulfil the minimum requirements of four antenatal care services or two postnatal care services within the first month after delivery. This was related to the cost of health services, transportation costs, or both. In remote areas, the limited availability of health services was also a problem, especially if the village midwife frequently travelled out of the village. The distances from health facilities, in addition to poor road conditions were major concerns, particularly for those living in remote areas. Lack of community awareness about the importance of these services was also found, as some

  5. High mobile phone ownership, but low Internet and email usage among pregnant, HIV-infected women attending antenatal care in Johannesburg.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Kate; Schwartz, Sheree R; Van Rie, Annelies; Bassett, Jean; Vermund, Sten H; Pettifor, Audrey E

    2015-03-01

    We investigated mobile phone usage amongst HIV-positive pregnant women attending antenatal services in a primary care clinic in Johannesburg (n = 50). We conducted a semi-structured interview and asked them about their mobile phone, Internet and email use. The median age of the women was 28 years, 36% had moved one or more times in the past year, and most were employed or recently employed, albeit earning low wages. Nearly all women (94%) reported that they did not share their phone and 76% of the SIM cards were registered to the woman herself. The median time with the current phone was one year (range 1 month-6 years) and the median time with the current phone number was three years (range 1 month-13 years). Even though 42% of the participants were from outside South Africa, they all had mobile phone numbers local to South Africa. About one-third of respondents reported Internet use (30%) and about one-fifth reported using email (18%). Overall, 20% accessed the Internet and 10% accessed email on their mobile phone. Mobile phone interventions are feasible amongst HIV-positive pregnant women and may be useful in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Email and Internet-based interventions may not yet be appropriate.

  6. Antenatal care attendance, a surrogate for pregnancy outcome? The case of Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Asundep, Ntui N; Jolly, Pauline E; Carson, April; Turpin, Cornelius A; Zhang, Kui; Tameru, Berhanu

    2014-07-01

    Antenatal care (ANC) has been shown to influence infant and maternal outcomes. WHO recommends 4 ANC visits for uncomplicated pregnancies. However, pregnant women in Ghana are required to attend 8-13 antenatal visits. We investigated the association of ANC attendance with adverse pregnancy outcomes (defined as low infant birth weight, stillbirth, preterm delivery or small for gestational age). A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted on 629 women, age 19-48 years who presented for delivery at two selected public hospitals and 16 traditional birth attendants from July to November 2011. Socio-demographic and antenatal information were collected using a structured questionnaire. ANC attendance, medical and obstetric/gynecological history were abstracted from maternal antenatal records. Data were analyzed using Chi square and logistic regression. Twenty-two percent of the women experienced an adverse outcome. Eleven percent of the women attended <4 ANC visits. In an unadjusted model, these women had an increased likelihood of experiencing an adverse outcome (OR 2.27; 95% CI 1.30-3.94; p = 0.0038). High parity (>5 children) was also associated with adverse birth outcomes. Women screened for syphilis or use of insecticide-treated bed nets had a 40 and 36% (p = 0.0447 and p = 0.0293) reduced likelihood of experiencing an adverse pregnancy outcome respectively. After adjusting for confounders, attending <4 antenatal visits was associated with adverse pregnancy outcome compared with ≥4 ANC visits (Adjusted OR 2.55; 95% CI 1.16-5.63; p = 0.0202). Attending <4 antenatal visits and high parity were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes for uncomplicated pregnancies.

  7. Comparative Haematological Screening of Urban and Rural Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics in Lagos and Its Environs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abidoye, R. O.; Olukoya, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Compared blood screening data for 200 urban and rural pregnant women in Nigeria. Found that rural subjects had a greater incidence of moderate anemia than did urban subjects, and corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations fell with increased gestational age. No relationship was found between hemoglobin counts and nutrition habits. (HTH)

  8. Frequency and factors associated with carriage of multi-drug resistant commensal Escherichia coli among women attending antenatal clinics in Central India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Commensal Escherichia coli are a prominent reservoir of genes coding for antibiotic resistance and also responsible for endogenous infections in pregnant women. We studied the factors in pregnant women associated with carriage of multi-drug resistant (MDR) E. coli and genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in them. Methods Women attending to Obstetric and Gynaecology department outpatient clinics for routine antenatal check-up were administered a questionnaire. Peri-anal swabs were collected for culture isolation and identification of E.coil. Antibiotic sensitivity was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method as recommended by the CLSI guidelines. MICs for quinolones and third generation cephalosporins were done using the agar dilution method. Genes coding for production of beta lactamses and for the quinolone resistance determinant were screened by polymerase chain reaction. Rep-PCR was done on MDR isolates for detecting possible genetic similarity. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine the independent factors associated with carriage of MDR isolates. Results A total of 710 isolates of E. coli from 710 women (mean age 26 years) were included in the study. Resistance to at least one antibiotic tested was detected in 94% of the E. coli isolates. A total of 109 isolates were ESBL producing and 35 isolates were MDR. In the MDR isolates MIC50 and MIC90 for quinolones and third generation cephalosporins were high for those isolates that carried blaTEM gene (26 isolates) and blaCTX-M gene (24 isolates). Both blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes were detected in 19 isolates. The commonest Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) gene identified was aac(6′)-Ib-cr (n = 23/25). All isolates carrying the PMQR genes were also positive for blaCTX-M and blaTEM gene. Mutations in gyr A and par C genes were present in all 35 MDR isolates. The statistically significant risk factors for carriage of MDR E. coli were graduate or post

  9. The nutritional status of women in the first trimester of pregnancy attending an inner-city antenatal department in the UK.

    PubMed

    Rees, Gail; Brooke, Zoe; Doyle, Wendy; Costeloe, Kate

    2005-09-01

    We have previously found high rates of poor iron and folate status in women who had delivered a low birthweight baby (LBW) in an ethnically diverse inner-city area of the UK. However, little was known of the nutritional status in the local general obstetric population. We therefore investigated biochemical measures of nutritional status in the first trimester of the first pregnancy. Routine blood samples collected at the antenatal booking clinic were analysed for haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin, red cell folate (RCF) (n = 100) and erythrocyte transketolase activation coefficient (ETKAC) for thiamin status (n = 90). We found 9% of women in our sample had a low Hb level, 10% had a low serum ferritin and only one had a low RCF. This is a substantially lower number of women with biochemical deficiencies than we found previously in women three months after delivering a LBW baby. However, 34% had low thiamin status. Thiamin status was negatively correlated with gestational age at birth (r = -0.407, p < 0.001). Differences in nutritional status were observed between ethnic and socio-economic groups. Hb levels differed between ethnic (p = 0.001) and socio-economic groups (p = 0.02), with Africans and women in manual occupations/unwaged having the lowest Hb levels. RCF levels also differed between groups (p < 0.001) with Caucasians and those in non-manual occupations having highest levels. ETKAC also differed between ethnic groups (p = 0.008) with Africans having the highest level indicating a poorer status. The study highlights the need to improve nutrition particularly in ethnic minorities and low income groups who are most at risk of adverse birth outcomes such as LBW.

  10. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and misconceptions among women attending government-owned antenatal clinics in Gwagwalada Area Council of Abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Otokpa, Aboh O; Lawoyin, Taiwo O; Asuzu, Michael C

    2013-03-01

    This study assessed the level of knowledge and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention among women. Using a semi-structured pretested questionnaire we obtained relevant data from 420 respondents in five randomly selected antenatal clinics (ANCs) in Gwagwalada Area Council (GAC) of Abuja, Nigeria. Knowledge about the existence of HIV/AIDS was high (92.8%). Only 52.1% knew the cause of AIDS and 58.6% were aware that AIDS had no cure. About twenty percent of respondents believed that breast-milk could not transmit HIV and 27.9% were unaware that condom protects against HIV. Only 33.3% were aware that HIV infected persons may look and feel healthy. Mothers with at least secondary level education had significantly higher knowledge scores on HIV/AIDS transmission (X2 = 14.8, p = 0.01) than less educated mothers and less educated mothers were more likely to relate HIV infection to past misdeeds (X2 = 13.6, p = 0.01). Significant misconception concerning HIV transmission existed in the study population. More community outreach programmes to intensify HIV education and counseling in GAC is required.

  11. Male partner antenatal attendance and HIV testing in eastern Uganda: a randomized facility-based intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of a written invitation letter to the spouses of new antenatal clinic attendees on attendance by couples and on male partner acceptance of HIV testing at subsequent antenatal clinic visits. Methods The trial was conducted with 1060 new attendees from October 2009 to February 2010 in an antenatal clinic at Mbale Regional Referral Hospital, Mbale District, eastern Uganda. The intervention comprised an invitation letter delivered to the spouses of new antenatal attendees, while the control group received an information letter, a leaflet, concerning antenatal care. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of pregnant women who attended antenatal care with their male partners during a follow-up period of four weeks. Eligible pregnant women were randomly assigned to the intervention or non-intervention groups using a randomization sequence, which was computer generated utilizing a random sequence generator (RANDOM ORG) that employed a simple randomization procedure. Respondents, health workers and research assistants were masked to group assignments. Results The trial was completed with 530 women enrolled in each group. Participants were analyzed as originally assigned (intention to treat). For the primary outcome, the percentage of trial participants who attended the antenatal clinic with their partners were 16.2% (86/530) and 14.2% (75/530) in the intervention and non-intervention groups, respectively (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.8, 1.6). For the secondary outcome, most of the 161 male partners attended the antenatal clinic; 82 of 86 (95%) in the intervention group and 68 of 75 (91%) in the non-intervention group were tested for HIV (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 0.6 to 7.5). Conclusions The effect of the intervention and the control on couple antenatal attendance was similar. In addition, the trial demonstrated that a simple intervention, such as a letter to the spouse, could increase couple antenatal clinic

  12. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers towards prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV among women attending antenatal clinics in Uyam District of Zaki-Biam in Benue State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hembah-Hilekaan, Samuel K; Swende, Terlumun Z; Bito, Terkaa T

    2012-09-01

    Benue State in north central Nigeria has one of the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rates of 9.3%, among children and adults aged 13-45 years. To improve the survival of mothers and children and to identify the major challenges in scaling-up PMTCT services, a descriptive, study was conducted to assess knowledge, attitudes and barriers to the uptake of PMTCT by 384 women attending antenatal clinics (ANC) in Uyam, Zaki-Biam, a semi-urban area of Benue State. A standard questionnaire was used for data collection. A high number of subjects knew that unprotected sexual intercourse is a risk factor for transmission, with most 281 (73.2%) of them aware that an HIV infected woman could get pregnant; while 275 (71.6%) knew that infection can be transmitted from the mother to her unborn child. Only 214 (55.7%) of the study participants had done the HIV test in pregnancy because of, inadequate VCT centers, issues of stigma and absence of family support including attitudes of staff. Age, parity and socio- economic status, as well as location influenced the responses of respondents. In spite of the increasing public awareness in Nigeria about HIV/AIDS, there still exist gaps as a result of different levels of education and access to information, coupled with lack of trained personnel and adequately equipped health care facilities. To improve survival and probably eliminate HIV/AIDS, the integration of PMTCT into primary health care services in Nigerian communities should be considered.

  13. Factors Affecting Antenatal Care Attendance: Results from Qualitative Studies in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Pell, Christopher; Meñaca, Arantza; Were, Florence; Afrah, Nana A.; Chatio, Samuel; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda; Hamel, Mary J.; Hodgson, Abraham; Tagbor, Harry; Kalilani, Linda; Ouma, Peter; Pool, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Antenatal care (ANC) is a key strategy to improve maternal and infant health. However, survey data from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that women often only initiate ANC after the first trimester and do not achieve the recommended number of ANC visits. Drawing on qualitative data, this article comparatively explores the factors that influence ANC attendance across four sub-Saharan African sites in three countries (Ghana, Kenya and Malawi) with varying levels of ANC attendance. Methods Data were collected as part of a programme of qualitative research investigating the social and cultural context of malaria in pregnancy. A range of methods was employed interviews, focus groups with diverse respondents and observations in local communities and health facilities. Results Across the sites, women attended ANC at least once. However, their descriptions of ANC were often vague. General ideas about pregnancy care – checking the foetus’ position or monitoring its progress – motivated women to attend ANC; as did, especially in Kenya, obtaining the ANC card to avoid reprimands from health workers. Women’s timing of ANC initiation was influenced by reproductive concerns and pregnancy uncertainties, particularly during the first trimester, and how ANC services responded to this uncertainty; age, parity and the associated implications for pregnancy disclosure; interactions with healthcare workers, particularly messages about timing of ANC; and the cost of ANC, including charges levied for ANC procedures – in spite of policies of free ANC – combined with ideas about the compulsory nature of follow-up appointments. Conclusion In these socially and culturally diverse sites, the findings suggest that ‘supply’ side factors have an important influence on ANC attendance: the design of ANC and particularly how ANC deals with the needs and concerns of women during the first trimester has implications for timing of initiation. PMID:23335973

  14. The interrelation of HIV, cervical human papillomavirus, and neoplasia among antenatal clinic attenders in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mayaud, P.; Gill, D.; Weiss, H.; Uledi, E.; Kopwe, L.; Todd, J.; ka-Gina, G.; Grosskurth, H.; Hayes, R.; Mabey, D. C.; Lacey, C.

    2001-01-01

    * Died April 2000 Objectives: To determine the prevalence and interrelation of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), HIV, and other reproductive tract infections (RTIs) among urban antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza, Tanzania. Methods: Genital swabs were collected from 660 pregnant women and tested for a range of RTIs and for cervical cytology. Cervical HPV-DNA was detected by PCR and genotyped. HIV and syphilis serologies were performed. Results: HPV prevalence was 34% (209/612 women). Of the 144 typeable samples, 83% were high risk (HR-HPV) oncogenic strains (56% HPV 16 related types). SIL was detected in 43 women (7%), with high grade SIL in 3%. There was a high prevalence of HIV (15%), and of any RTI (83%). Genital warts were detected in 20 women (3%). HPV infection was associated with some behavioural factors (short duration of relationship, single status, not using condoms) and gonorrhoea. There was no overall association between HPV and HIV (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.6–1.6), but a non-significant trend towards a stronger association with HR-HPV in women aged 15–19 (OR=2.79, 95% CI 0.8–9.5) and women aged ≥30 (OR=3.20, 95% CI 0.7–15). SIL was associated with HPV (OR=3.66, 95% CI 1.9–7.0), but not significantly with HIV (OR=1.54, 95% CI 0.7–3.4). Prevalence of SIL was higher among women dually positive for HPV/HIV compared to HPV infection only (21% v 12%), although this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.17). Conclusions: HPV infection was highly prevalent in this young antenatal population. The association of HIV with HR-HPV types in older women may suggest that the principal HIV/HPV interaction in this population is for HIV to upregulate HPV persistence, leading to subsequent development of SIL. Key Words: human papillomavirus; squamous intraepithelial lesion; HIV/AIDS; Africa PMID:11463923

  15. Women's education level, antenatal visits and the quality of skilled antenatal care: a study of three African countries.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Stella

    2014-02-01

    Many pregnant women in Africa who access professional antenatal care do not receive all the WHO-recommended components of care. Using Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Kenya, Malawi and Nigeria, this study assesses the relationship of education level with the quality of antenatal care received and highlights how the number of antenatal visits mediates this relationship. The results show that a large proportion of the effect of education level on quality of care is direct, while only a small portion is mediated through the number of antenatal visits. Efforts to improve pregnancy outcomes for under-privileged women should focus on removing structural barriers to access, strengthening the technical and interpersonal skills of providers, and addressing providers' biases and discriminatory practices towards these women. Such efforts should also seek to empower underprivileged women to insist on quality antenatal care by explaining what to expect during an antenatal visit.

  16. Nutritional Epidemiology of Antenatal Smoking Cessation Among Japanese Women.

    PubMed

    Mak, Kwok-Kei; Watanabe, Hiroko; Nomachi, Shinobu; Suganuma, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the nutritional status before pregnancy, as well as dietary profiles and biomarkers during first trimester, between never-smokers and antenatal quitters among Japanese women. One hundred fifty pregnant women (79 never-smokers and 71 antenatal quitters) from two obstetrics and gynecology clinics were recruited in Japan. Subjects' prepregnancy nutritional status was indicated by their body mass index (BMI). In the first trimester, their dietary profiles were assessed by the Brief Diet-History Questionnaire (BDHQ) and pregnancy outcomes were screened by biomarker tests. Generalized linear regression was used to examine the differences of energy-adjusted dietary intakes and biomarker results between the two smoking groups, with adjustment of maternal age, BMI, gestation week, and parity. The results showed that antenatal quitters were more likely to have a prepregnancy underweight status than never-smokers. During the first trimester, antenatal quitters had significantly higher intakes of unsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants (vegetable lipids and isoflavone), and lower intakes of total cholesterol than never-smokers. Moreover, antenatal quitters had a significantly higher level of serum homocysteine (6.36 nmol/mL vs 4.88 nmol/mL) than never-smokers. In conclusion, antenatal quitters are more likely to have a poor nutritional status before pregnancy than never-smokers. Quitting smoking before pregnancy and having a good nutritional profile during the trimester may not sufficiently reverse the adverse effects of former smoking behaviors on pregnancy outcomes.

  17. Knowledge and attitude regarding breast-feeding, in mothers attending antenatal clinics.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Banait, N

    2000-04-01

    A hospital based study included 600 mothers who delivered at Kasturba Hospital Sevagram during 1996-97, to assess their knowledge and attitude regarding breastfeeding. The mothers were attending antenatal clinics of a Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH). The obstetric staff was trained regarding the practices following which mothers admitted to the hospital were interviewed within 24 hours of the delivery. Mothers were interrogated by a single interviewer regarding knowledge and attitude of breastfeeding within 24 hours of delivery by using a pretested semistructured open and close ended questionnaire. Three hundred and three mothers (50.5%) had attended antenatal clinics of KHS (booked), whereas 276 (46%) had antenatal check-ups at other health centres and 21 (3.5%) did not have any check-ups. Only 54.5% booked mothers and 30.3% unbooked mothers were informed regarding benefits of breastfeeding during antenatal visits. This difference was statistically significant. The booked mothers wanted to initiate breastfeeding early and did not want to give water supplementation, and were also significantly more knowledgeable as compared to unbooked mothers regarding benefits of breastfeeding, feeding of colostrum, avoiding prelacteal feeds, additional nutritional requirements during lactation and continuation of breastfeeding during maternal illnesses, child illness, pregnancy and maternal drug intake. Breast examination during antenatal check-ups was lacking in both the groups. Only 21 (6.9%) booked and 9 (3%) unbooked mothers had breast examination done during antenatal visits. The data shows that subjects receiving antenatal care at KHS had varied ideas in regard to knowledge and attitude towards breast feeding, thereby suggesting that BFHI activities are useful, at least, to some extent. However, it was disheartening that despite including the obstetricians in the training of BFHI approach, nearly half the booked cases did not get information regarding benefits of

  18. Influence of pregnancy perceptions on patterns of seeking antenatal care among women in reproductive age of Masaka District, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atekyereza, Peter R; Mubiru, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    Maternal mortality remains a challenge in Sub-Saharan Africa including Uganda. Antenatal Care (ANC) is one of the recommended measures to improve maternal and child health. However, the influence of pregnancy definition and perception on patterns of seeking regular and timely antenatal care among women in the reproductive age group (15-49 years) is not known. The objectives of this study were to: (i) understand the women's social definitions and perceptions on their pregnancy; (ii) understand the socio-cultural beliefs related to pregnancy among women of the reproductive age group; and, (iii) examine the influence of social definitions, perceptions and beliefs about pregnancy on women's antenatal care seeking behaviour patterns to inform the decentralised health care delivery system in Uganda. A total of 45 women, mothers and expectant women who were purposively selected from Kimanya sub county of Masaka district in Uganda participated in the study. Ten key informant interviews and four Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were also conducted. Key findings indicate that the women's socio-definitions and perceptions of pregnancy influence their seeking behaviour on antenatal health care. To the women with a positive orientation towards antenatal care, pregnancy provides joy, happiness, pride, promotes their social status and safe-guards their marriage. Pregnancy is rewarding with care, love, support and gifts. Women who shun antenatal care perceive pregnancy to be a source of misery, sadness, pain and suffering. It is an uncomfortable and regrettable experience. Women also hold socio-cultural beliefs on pregnancy, which are culturally constructed and rooted in taboos, rituals and practices of their communities. It is therefore important to sensitise women and those who attend to them when they are pregnant to understand these perceptions and definitions to motivate them to seek antenatal and postnatal care for better maternal and child health.

  19. A qualitative study of women's experiences of communication in antenatal care: identifying areas for action.

    PubMed

    Raine, Rosalind; Cartwright, Martin; Richens, Yana; Mahamed, Zuhura; Smith, Debbie

    2010-07-01

    To identify key features of communication across antenatal (prenatal) care that are evaluated positively or negatively by service users. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews were used to explore communication experiences of thirty pregnant women from diverse social and ethnic backgrounds affiliated to a large London hospital. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Women reported a wide diversity of experiences. From the users' perspective, constructive communication on the part of health care providers was characterised by an empathic conversational style, openness to questions, allowing sufficient time to talk through any concerns, and pro-active contact by providers (e.g. text message appointment reminders). These features created reassurance, facilitated information exchange, improved appointment attendance and fostered tolerance in stressful situations. Salient features of poor communication were a lack of information provision, especially about the overall arrangement and the purpose of antenatal care, insufficient discussion about possible problems with the pregnancy and discourteous styles of interaction. Poor communication led some women to become assertive to address their needs; others became reluctant to actively engage with providers. General Practitioners need to be better integrated into antenatal care, more information should be provided about the pattern and purpose of the care women receive during pregnancy, and new technologies should be used to facilitate interactions between women and their healthcare providers. Providers require communications training to encourage empathic interactions that promote constructive provider-user relationships and encourage women to engage effectively and access the care they need.

  20. Unintended pregnancy among antenatal women in a tertiary hospital in North Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agida, Teddy E.; Akaba, Godwin O.; Ekele, Bissalla A.; Adebayo, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unintended pregnancy is a pregnancy that is either unwanted or mistimed. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of unintended pregnancy as well as to document the determinant factors among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 300 women attending the antenatal clinic of the Teaching Hospital. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, desirability of the current pregnancy at the time of conception, and knowledge and practice of contraceptive methods were collected using a pretested questionnaire. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Chi-square test was used for tests of associations with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. Results: The average age of the respondents was 30.0 ± 4.7 years. Overall, 33.3% and 58.3% of the respondents attained secondary and tertiary levels of education, respectively. The prevalence rate of unintended pregnancy was 16%. Contraceptive awareness was quite high (259, 86.3%). However, contraceptive usage was low as 192 (61.9%) had never used any form of contraceptives. Univariate analysis using Chi-square test showed a statistically significant association between age and unwanted pregnancy (χ2 = 68.56, P < 0.001), as well as between parity and unwanted pregnancy (χ2 = 39.92, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The prevalence of unintended pregnancy among women attending antenatal clinic is high, possibly due to low contraceptive usage. Adequate information, education, and communication materials should be provided during antenatal health talks. Advocacy visits for community sensitization should also be increased. PMID:27942101

  1. Acceptability and Preferences among Men and Women for Male Involvement in Antenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Yende, Nompumelelo; Van Rie, Annelies; West, Nora S.; Bassett, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Male involvement in antenatal care (ANC) has been associated with improved prevention of mother-to-child transmission outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa; yet it remains uncommon. We assess acceptability of male involvement from the male and female perspectives and potential incentives for men to attend ANC. Methods. Adult pregnant women and men attending primary healthcare at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa, from October 2013 to January 2014, were recruited using stratified random sampling to ensure equal representation across gender and HIV status. Results. 300/332 individuals (93.8%) offered participation consented. Among the 150 women, 97% had a partner; the majority (92%) preferred partner attendance at ANC, and 14% reported partner attendance during this pregnancy. The 150 men had low knowledge of services rendered at ANC outside of pregnancy monitoring, and few (19%) had previously attended ANC. Blood pressure screening, fatherhood information, and HIV testing were identified by men as incentives for attendance. Women and men expressed high willingness to, respectively, deliver (95%) and respond (97%) to ANC letter invitations. Conclusion. Invitation letters to promote male involvement in ANC are highly acceptable to pregnant women and men. Focusing invitation messages on fatherhood and primary healthcare rather than HIV testing may provide greater motivation for male involvement. PMID:28243473

  2. Determinants of Antenatal Psychological Distress in Pakistani Women

    PubMed Central

    DIN, Zia ud; AMBREEN, Sadaf; IQBAL, Zafar; IQBAL, Mudassar; AHMAD, Summiya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of evidence has demonstrated that poor antenatal psychological health can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Studies conducted in various countries demonstrated a wide range of factors associated with psychological distress during pregnancy. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2011 and December 2012 in Peshawar, north-west Pakistan. A total of 230 women in their third trimester of pregnancy fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The antenatal psychological health status of women was measured using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Relevant data regarding health and demographic–socioeconomic status were collected through personal interviews using standardized questionnaires. Results Overall, 45% (n=104) of women exhibited symptoms for composite depression, anxiety, and stress (composite DAS). In the univariate analysis, maternal age, husband support, monthly income, family size, stressful life events, lack of confidence, domestic violence, and pregnancy-related concerns were strongly associated with antenatal composite DAS (p<0.01). The association of maternal composite DAS symptoms with age, monthly income, family size, and lack of confidence remained significant in the multivariate analysis (p<0.01). Conclusion A major proportion of women exhibited symptoms of antenatal composite DAS, and various factors were found to be related to their psychological distress. A young maternal age, low husband support, low income, large family size, adverse life events, lack of confidence, pregnancy-related concerns, and domestic violence were stronger determinants of poor antenatal psychological status. The study findings concluded that policymakers at the government level should launch special intervention programs to improve maternal perinatal mental and psychological health at the community level. PMID:28360788

  3. Practices of rural Egyptian birth attendants during the antenatal, intrapartum and early neonatal periods.

    PubMed

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Hussein, Mohamed Hassan; Winch, Peter J; Haws, Rachel A; Gipson, Reginald; Santosham, Mathuram

    2008-03-01

    Neonatal deaths account for almost two-thirds of infant mortality worldwide; most deaths are preventable. Two-thirds of neonatal deaths occur during the first week of life, usually at home. While previous Egyptian studies have identified provider practices contributing to maternal mortality, none has focused on neonatal care. A survey of reported practices of birth attendants was administered. Chi-square tests were used for measuring the statistical significance of inter-regional differences. In total, 217 recently-delivered mothers in rural areas of three governorates were interviewed about antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care they received. This study identified antenatal advice of birth attendants to mothers about neonatal care and routine intrapartum and postpartum practices. While mothers usually received antenatal care from physicians, traditional birth attendants (dayas) conducted most deliveries. Advice was rare, except for breastfeeding. Routine practices included hand-washing by attendants, sterile cord-cutting, prompt wrapping of newborns, and postnatal home visits. Suboptimal practices included lack of disinfection of delivery instruments, unhygienic cord care, lack of weighing of newborns, and lack of administration of eye prophylaxis or vitamin K. One-third of complicated deliveries occurred at home, commonly attended by relatives, and the umbilical cord was frequently pulled to hasten delivery of the placenta. In facilities, mothers reported frequent use of forceps, and asphyxiated neonates were often hung upside-down during resuscitation. Consequently, high rates of birth injuries were reported. Priority areas for behaviour change and future research to improve neonatal health outcomes were identified, specific to type of provider (physician, nurse, or daya) and regional variations in practices.

  4. Factors Affecting Attendance at and Timing of Formal Antenatal Care: Results from a Qualitative Study in Madang, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Erin V. W.; Pell, Christopher; Angwin, Angeline; Auwun, Alma; Daniels, Job; Mueller, Ivo; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Pool, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriate antenatal care (ANC) is key for the health of mother and child. However, in Papua New Guinea (PNG), only a third of women receive any ANC during pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research, this paper explores the influences on ANC attendance and timing of first visit in the Madang region of Papua New Guinea. Methods Data were collected in three sites utilizing several qualitative methods: free-listing and sorting of terms and definitions, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, observation in health care facilities and case studies of pregnant women. Respondents included pregnant women, their relatives, biomedical and traditional health providers, opinion leaders and community members. Results Although generally reported to be important, respondents’ understanding of the procedures involved in ANC was limited. Factors influencing attendance fell into three main categories: accessibility, attitudes to ANC, and interpersonal issues. Although women saw accessibility (distance and cost) as a barrier, those who lived close to health facilities and could easily afford ANC also demonstrated poor attendance. Attitudes were shaped by previous experiences of ANC, such as waiting times, quality of care, and perceptions of preventative care and medical interventions during pregnancy. Interpersonal factors included relationships with healthcare providers, pregnancy disclosure, and family conflict. A desire to avoid repeat clinic visits, ideas about the strength of the fetus and parity were particularly relevant to the timing of first ANC visit. Conclusions This long-term in-depth study (the first of its kind in Madang, PNG) shows how socio-cultural and economic factors influence ANC attendance. These factors must be addressed to encourage timely ANC visits: interventions could focus on ANC delivery in health facilities, for example, by addressing healthcare staff’s attitudes towards pregnant women. PMID:24842484

  5. Retrospective hepatitis C seroprevalence screening in the antenatal setting—should we be screening antenatal women?

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Chloe; Jeffery-Smith, Anna; Foster, Graham R; Tong, C Y William

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An unlinked anonymous seroprevalence study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in samples derived from antenatal clinic attendees at 2 East London Hospitals. An unexpectedly high HCV seroprevalence of 2.6% (1.2% viraemic) had been revealed during an unlinked study of the emergency department at 1 of these hospitals. Design 1000 stored residual samples were tested for HCV antibody (anti-HCV) and reactive samples were further tested for HCV RNA. The study was reviewed by the East Midland NRES ethics committee project ID 181154, approval number 15/WS/0125. Results The anti-HCV reactivity rate was 0.5% (5/1000) with 0.1% (1/1000) confirmed viraemic. Prevalence for the other blood-borne viruses was higher: 1% (10/1000) were hepatitis B surface antigen positive and 0.3% were HIV antigen/antibody positive (3/1000). There were no co-infections. Conclusions More data to establish the prevalence of HCV in the antenatal population is needed. The addition of anti-HCV testing to the well-established antenatal screening programme provides a unique opportunity to impact on the health of pregnant women, their children, partners and future pregnancies in this new era of treatment for hepatitis C. PMID:27231001

  6. Women as moral pioneers? Experiences of first trimester antenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clare; Sandall, Jane; Lewando-Hundt, Gillian; Heyman, Bob; Spencer, Kevin; Grellier, Rachel

    2005-11-01

    The implementation of innovative medical technologies can raise unprecedented ethical, legal and social dilemmas. This is particularly so in the area of antenatal screening, which is dominated by the language of risk and probabilities. Second trimester serum screening for Down's syndrome and neural tube defects has a well-established place in antenatal care. Increasingly, first trimester screening with biochemical and ultrasound markers is being proposed as advance on this, yielding higher detection rates of Down's syndrome at an earlier gestational age. This article explores the experiences of 14 women offered innovative first trimester screening, which takes place within the context of a detailed ultrasound scan. The study is set within the UK, where recent policy changes mean that the offer of screening for fetal anomalies, particularly Down's syndrome, will become a routine part of antenatal care and offered to all pregnant women. This paper focuses on the significance of the scan in first trimester screening, and some of the potential dilemmas for women that can result from this. It then discusses the ways in which women made their decisions about screening, in particular, their work as 'moral pioneers'. We found that the part played by the ultrasound scan in first trimester screening, particularly in relation to the higher-quality images now being obtained, has the potential to introduce new and novel ethical dilemmas for pregnant women. Although concerns have been raised about pregnant women viewing ultrasound scans as benign, many of the women reported having thought carefully through their own moral beliefs and values prior to screening. It seems that whatever other implications they may have, first trimester screening technologies will continue the tradition of pregnant women acting as 'moral pioneers' in increasingly complex settings.

  7. Determinants of first trimester attendance at antenatal care clinics in the Amazon region of Peru: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nora; Blouin, Brittany; Razuri, Hugo; Casapia, Martin; Gyorkos, Theresa W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify determinants which influence the timing of the first antenatal care (ANC) visit in pregnant women. Design Retrospective matched nested case-control study. Setting Two health centres, Belén and 6 de Octubre, in the Peruvian Amazon. Population All pregnant women who had attended ANC during the years 2010, 2011, and 2012. Methods All cases (819 women initiating ANC in their first trimester) were selected from ANC registries from 2010 to 2012. A random sample of controls (819 women initiating ANC in their second or third trimester) was matched 1:1 to cases on health centre and date of first ANC visit. Data were obtained from ANC registries. Conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Main outcome measure Case-control status of each woman determined by the gestational age at first ANC visit. Results Cases had higher odds of: 1) being married or cohabiting (aOR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.41); 2) completing secondary school or attending post-secondary school (aOR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.06); 3) living in an urban environment (aOR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.04, 3.10) and 4) having had a previous miscarriage (aOR = 1.56; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.15), compared to controls. No statistically significant difference in odds was found for parity (aOR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.85, 1.36). Conclusions This study provides empirical evidence of determinants of first ANC attendance. These findings are crucial to the planning and timing of local interventions, like deworming, aimed at pregnant women so that they can access and benefit fully from all government-provided ANC services. PMID:28207749

  8. The expectations of pregnant women regarding antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Mathibe-Neke, J M

    2008-09-01

    From a feminist perspective, research on childbirth and women's health is a means to a positive change that is conducted in partnership with women for their benefit. A patient-led National Health System (NHS) (Hillan, 1999) also calls for consultation with patients and the wider public for shaping the current and future health services. This study was aimed at exploring and describing the expectations that pregnant women have regarding antenatal care service by the midwife practitioner. In-depth interviews were conducted in an antenatal unit of an Academic Hospital in Gauteng Povince. Data saturation was reached with a sample of eighteen pregnant women who were conveniently selected. Data analysis ran concurrently with data collection. A manual content analysis as described by Tesch was used. Lincoln and Guba's method of ensuring trustworthiness was adopted (Lincoln & Guba, 1985:328) Literature was undertaken to compare the findings of this study with those of other previous studies. Women displayed several common expectations that led to the saturation of data. It also became apparent from the findings that each woman had varied expectations. There were also some commonalities within the women's expectations. Health care, as the major expectation and a basic human right, appeared to be basically fulfilled, with the exception of interactional characteristics such as the communication of information, guidance, involvement, the understanding and explanation of aspects, freedom of choice, punctuality, individualized care and continuity of care. The conclusions that were reached let to recommendations for nursing practice, education, research and the formulation of guidelines for the midwife practitioner for the implementation of effective antenatal care, based on the identified expectations.

  9. A prospective observational description of frequency and timing of antenatal care attendance and coverage of selected interventions from sites in Argentina, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Pakistan and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research is one of the largest international networks for testing and generating evidence-based recommendations for improvement of maternal-child health in resource-limited settings. Since 2009, Global Network sites in six low and middle-income countries have collected information on antenatal care practices, which are important as indicators of care and have implications for programs to improve maternal and child health. We sought to: (1) describe the quantity of antenatal care attendance over a four-year period; and (2) explore the quality of coverage for selected preventative, screening, and birth preparedness components. Methods The Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR) is a prospective, population-based birth and pregnancy outcomes registry in Global Network sites, including: Argentina, Guatemala, India (Belgaum and Nagpur), Kenya, Pakistan, and Zambia. MNHR data from these sites were prospectively collected from January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2013 and analyzed for indicators related to quantity and patterns of ANC and coverage of key elements of recommended focused antenatal care. Descriptive statistics were generated overall by global region (Africa, Asia, and Latin America), and for each individual site. Results Overall, 96% of women reported at least one antenatal care visit. Indian sites demonstrated the highest percentage of women who initiated antenatal care during the first trimester. Women from the Latin American and Indian sites reported the highest number of at least 4 visits. Overall, 88% of women received tetanus toxoid. Only about half of all women reported having been screened for syphilis (49%) or anemia (50%). Rates of HIV testing were above 95% in the Argentina, African, and Indian sites. The Pakistan site demonstrated relatively high rates for birth preparation, but for most other preventative and screening interventions, posted lower coverage rates as compared to other

  10. Women's Autonomy and Skilled Attendance During Pregnancy and Delivery in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Kc, Situ; Neupane, Subas

    2016-06-01

    Objectives This study aims to explore the association between women's autonomy and skilled attendance during pregnancy and delivery in Nepal. Methods We adopt data from the Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS, 2011). We include only married women who gave birth in the 5 years preceding the survey (N = 4148). Women's autonomy was assessed on the basis of four indicators of decision making: healthcare, visiting friends or relatives, household purchases and spending earned money. Each indicator was dichotomized (yes/no) and then summarized into a single variable to measure overall autonomy. Next, we measured health attendance (skilled vs. unskilled) during antenatal and delivery care. The association between women's autonomy and skilled attendance was analysed using a logistic regression model. Results Most women had a medium (40 %) and high (35 %) level of overall autonomy. The proportion of women accessing skilled providers during antenatal and delivery care was 51 and 36 %. Women with autonomy in healthcare, visiting friends or relatives, making household purchases and spending money earned were associated with a higher likelihood of receiving care from skilled providers during antenatal care and delivery. An elevated probability of access to skilled attendance during antenatal (aOR 1.33; 95 % CI 1.10-1.59) and delivery care (aOR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.12-1.70) was reported among women with higher levels of overall autonomy. Conclusion Women's autonomy was significantly associated with the maternal health care utilization by skilled attendants. This study will provide insights for policy makers to develop strategies in improving maternal health.

  11. Coping strategies as psychological risk factor for antenatal anxiety, worries, and depression among Greek women.

    PubMed

    Gourounti, Kleanthi; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Lykeridou, Katerina

    2013-10-01

    A range of psychosocial, medical, and demographic variables may influence pregnant women's psychological status. However the association between coping strategies, anxiety, worries, and depression during pregnancy is a relatively neglected area of research. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between coping strategies, antenatal anxiety, pregnancy worries, and depressive symptomatology after controlling for the effects of background variables. The study sample consisted of 163 pregnant women, with gestational age ranging from 11 to 26 weeks, attending antenatal screening at a Greek public hospital. Coping strategies were measured with Brief COPE, pregnancy worries were measured with Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS), anxiety was assessed using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-X version), and depression was measured with Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated among all study variables, followed by hierarchical multiple linear regression. In the univariate analysis, low annual income, unemployment, conception after an IVF treatment, and a previous history of miscarriage were associated with anxiety, depression, and worries. Additionally, almost all coping strategies (denial, behavioral disengagement, self-blame, self-distraction, substance use, acceptance, positive reframing, active coping, and seeking emotional support) were significantly associated with antenatal anxiety, worries, and depression. Linear regression analysis showed that only previous history of miscarriage, conception after IVF, as well as denial, behavioral disengagement and acceptance coping strategies were significantly related to anxiety, worries and depressive symptomatology. The risk factors found in this study could help clinicians target anxiety and depression screening to high-risk populations of pregnant women. Provision of adequate training for obstetricians and midwives in the detection and

  12. Antenatal education and the birthing experience of Brazilian women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information is still scarce on the birthing experience of women who participate in antenatal systematic education programs. The objective of the study was to report the experience of labor as described by nulliparous women who participated and who did not in a systematic Birth Preparation Program (BPP). Method A qualitative study was conducted with eleven women who participated in a BPP and ten women attending routine prenatal care selected through purposeful sampling. The BPP consisted of systematized antenatal group meetings structured to provide physical exercise and information on pain prevention during pregnancy, the role of the pelvic floor muscles, the physiology of labor, and pain relief techniques. A single, semi-structured interview was conducted with each participant. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematic analyses performed. The relevant themes were organized in the following categories of analysis: control of labor, positions adopted during labor, and satisfaction with labor. Results Women who participated in the systematic educational activities of the BPP reported they maintained self-control during labor and used breathing exercises, exercises on the ball, massage, baths and vertical positions to control pain. Also they reported satisfaction with their birthing experience. Women who did not participate in systematic educational activities referred to difficulties in maintaining control during labor and almost half of them reported lack of control. Also they were more likely to report dissatisfaction with labor. Conclusions Women who participated in the BPP reported self-control during labor and used non-pharmacological techniques to control pain and facilitate labor and expressed satisfaction with the birthing experience. PMID:24007540

  13. Why Do Women Not Use Antenatal Services in Low- and Middle-Income Countries? A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Kenneth; Downe, Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Almost 50% of women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) don't receive adequate antenatal care. Women's views can offer important insights into this problem. Qualitative studies exploring inadequate use of antenatal services have been undertaken in a range of countries, but the findings are not easily transferable. We aimed to inform the development of future antenatal care programmes through a synthesis of findings in all relevant qualitative studies. Methods and Findings Using a predetermined search strategy, we identified robust qualitative studies reporting on the views and experiences of women in LMICs who received inadequate antenatal care. We used meta-ethnographic techniques to generate themes and a line-of-argument synthesis. We derived policy-relevant hypotheses from the findings. We included 21 papers representing the views of more than 1,230 women from 15 countries. Three key themes were identified: “pregnancy as socially risky and physiologically healthy”, “resource use and survival in conditions of extreme poverty”, and “not getting it right the first time”. The line-of-argument synthesis describes a dissonance between programme design and cultural contexts that may restrict access and discourage return visits. We hypothesize that centralised, risk-focused antenatal care programmes may be at odds with the resources, beliefs, and experiences of pregnant women who underuse antenatal services. Conclusions Our findings suggest that there may be a misalignment between current antenatal care provision and the social and cultural context of some women in LMICs. Antenatal care provision that is theoretically and contextually at odds with local contextual beliefs and experiences is likely to be underused, especially when attendance generates increased personal risks of lost family resources or physical danger during travel, when the promised care is not delivered because of resource constraints, and when women experience covert or

  14. Malaria control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a survey of home treatment of children with fever, bednet use and attendance at antenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, M. J.; Odhacha, A.; Roberts, J. M.; Deming, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To lay the basis for planning an improved malaria control programme in Bungoma District, Kenya. METHODS: By means of a cluster sample household survey an investigation was conducted into the home management of febrile children, the use of bednets, and attendance at antenatal clinics. FINDINGS: Female carers provided information on 314 recently febrile children under 5 years of age, of whom 43% received care at a health facility, 47% received an antimalarial drug at home, and 25% received neither. Of the antimalarial treatments given at home, 91% were started by the second day of fever and 92% were with chloroquine, the nationally recommended antimalarial at the time. The recommended dosage of chloroquine to be administered over three days was 25 mg/kg but the median chloroquine tablet or syrup dosage given over the first three days of treatment was 15 mg/kg. The total dosages ranged from 2.5 mg/kg to 82 mg/kg, administered over one to five days. The dosages were lower when syrup was administered than when tablets were used. Only 5% of children under 5 years of age slept under a bednet. No bednets had been treated with insecticide since purchase. At least two antenatal visits were made by 91% of pregnant women. CONCLUSIONS: Carers are major and prompt providers of antimalarial treatment. Home treatment practices should be strengthened and endorsed when prompt treatment at a health facility is impossible. The administration of incorrect dosages, which proved common with chloroquine, may occur less frequently with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, as its dosage regimen is simpler. High levels of utilization of antenatal clinics afford the opportunity to achieve good coverage with presumptive intermittent malaria treatments during pregnancy, and to reach the goal of widespread bednet use by pregnant women and children by distributing nets during antenatal clinic visits. PMID:11731808

  15. Antenatal depressive symptoms associated with specific life events and sources of social support among Italian women.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Francesca; Neri, Erica; Salvatori, Paola; Dellabartola, Sara; Bozicevic, Laura; Monti, Fiorella

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to identify different kinds of stressful life events and social support associated with antenatal depressive symptoms in a sample of pregnant Italian women. We conducted the study at a primary health-care centre in an urban area (northeast Italy). Mainly recruited at antenatal classes, 404 eligible pregnant women completed a socio-demographic questionnaire that included questions about the present pregnancy, the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire to investigate the quality and nature of social support and recent negative life events. Of the 404 women, 60 (14.9 %) scored 13 or higher on the EDS. This group reported significantly lower social support from various sources-family, friends, and significant others; only in primiparous women were depressive symptoms significantly related to lower support from friends. Women with EDS scores equal or higher than 13 also reported a higher occurrence of recent stressful life events-specifically, death or a serious problem with a close friend or relative, unemployment, financial problems, and moving or housing difficulties. Regression analyses showed that women with high levels of social support or with a positive experience of pregnancy were less likely to experience antenatal depressive symptoms. Our results underscore the associations among antenatal depression, specific life stressors, and low social support from various sources. Clinical attention to these psychosocial correlates is recommended toward detecting vulnerability to antenatal depressive symptoms.

  16. Feasibility of one-stop antenatal syphilis screening in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia: women and providers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Munkhuu, Bayalag; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; McNeil, Edward; Janchiv, Radnaabazar

    2009-07-01

    Congenital syphilis can be prevented by antenatal syphilis screening, however, the complexity of delivering prenatal service can result in low screening rates, and thus lower prevention and treatment rates. One-stop antenatal syphilis screening, which includes rapid testing and treatment, is the proposed method to overcome this problem. The feasibility of this type of screening needs to be tested to dertermine its effectiveness. In this study, the opinions and level of satisfaction of women undergoing antenatal care and their health care providers regarding a one-stop syphylis screening and treatment service at two antenatal clinics in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia were assessed. The majority of the 246 women studied were satisfied with the service. The mean aggregate satisfaction score derived from 12 questions regarding specific aspects of satisfaction was 3.2. Most providers were also satisfied, not reporting any significant problems interfering with routine antenatal care. However, all providers felt the one-stop service is time consuming and leads to high staff workloads and needs good clinical management. The provider preferred instead to treat husbands presumptively to avoid the possibility of diagnosing couples with discordant syphilis, which could lead to possible violence. A one-stop syphilis diagnosis and treatment service during antenatal care is feasible in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia from both the women's and providers' perspectives.

  17. Understanding why women adopt and sustain home water treatment: insights from the Malawi antenatal care program.

    PubMed

    Wood, Siri; Foster, Jennifer; Kols, Adrienne

    2012-08-01

    In many settings in Africa, social marketing has proven more successful in generating brand recognition for chlorine water treatment products than in promoting their use. To promote household use of one such product in Malawi, WaterGuard, the Ministry of Health (MOH) and Population Services International (PSI) distributed free hygiene kits that included WaterGuard to pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2007. Follow-up surveys documented a sustained increase in WaterGuard use three years after the initial intervention. In 2010, PATH (www.path.org) conducted qualitative research on the factors motivating women to adopt, sustain, or discontinue use. To provide context, interviews were also conducted with their friends, relatives, and husbands. Interviews revealed that sustained use of WaterGuard does not necessarily imply consistent use. Most respondents reported switching back and forth between WaterGuard and stock chlorine distributed for free by the government, and many treated water seasonally rather than year-round. Qualitative findings suggest that two program strategies strongly influenced women's decisions to adopt, purchase, and continue using WaterGuard. First, positive, ongoing contacts with health care workers, especially during home visits, raised awareness of the need to treat water, encouraged trial use, and supported continuing use. Second, an extended free trial of the product overcame initial cost barriers and allowed women and their families to experience the health benefits of WaterGuard, appreciate its value and relevance to their lives, and get used to its taste. Social support-from like-minded relatives, friends, neighbors, health care workers, husbands, and children-was also a critical factor that promoted consistent, ongoing use of WaterGuard. The findings confirm the importance of interpersonal communication in prompting adoption of household water treatment and suggest that consumers assess the perceived value of a product, not

  18. Compliance with Iron-Folate Supplement and Associated Factors among Antenatal Care Attendant Mothers in Misha District, South Ethiopia: Community Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Arega Sadore, Abinet; Abebe Gebretsadik, Lakew; Aman Hussen, Mamusha

    2015-01-01

    Background. In Ethiopia, higher proportions of pregnant women are anemic. Despite the efforts to reduce iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy, only few women took an iron supplement as recommended. Thus, this study aimed to assess compliance with iron-folate supplement and associated factors among antenatal care attendant mothers in Misha district, South Ethiopia. Method. Community based cross-sectional study supported with in-depth interview was conducted from March 1 to March 30, 2015. The sample size was determined using single population proportion to 303. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were employed to identify factors associated with compliance to iron-folate supplement. Results. The compliance rate was found to be 39.2%. Mothers knowledge of anemia (AOR = 4.451, 95% CI = (2.027,9.777)), knowledge of iron-folate supplement (AOR = 3.509, 95% CI = (1.442,8.537)), and counseling on iron-folate supplement (AOR = 4.093, 95% CI = (2.002,8.368)) were significantly associated with compliance to iron-folate supplement. Conclusions. Compliance rate of iron-folate supplementation during pregnancy remains very low. This study showed that providing women with clear instructions about iron-folate tablet intake and educating them on the health benefits of the iron-folate tablets can increase compliance with iron-folate supplementation. PMID:26839573

  19. Antenatal Weight Management: Women's Experiences, Behaviours, and Expectations of Weighing in Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Swift, J. A.; Pearce, J.; Jethwa, P. H.; Taylor, M. A.; Ellis, S.; McMullen, S.

    2016-01-01

    The current emphasis on obstetric risk management helps to frame gestational weight gain as problematic and encourages intervention by healthcare professionals. However pregnant women have reported confusion, distrust, and negative effects associated with antenatal weight management interactions. The MAGIC study (MAnaging weiGht In pregnanCy) sought to examine women's self-reported experiences of usual-care antenatal weight management in early pregnancy and consider these alongside weight monitoring behaviours and future expectations. 193 women (18 yrs+) were recruited from routine antenatal clinics at the Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust. Self-reported gestation was 10–27 weeks, with 41.5% (n = 80) between 12 and 14 and 43.0% (n = 83) between 20 and 22 weeks. At recruitment 50.3% of participants (n = 97) could be classified as overweight or obese. 69.4% of highest weight women (≥30 kg/m2) did not report receiving advice about weight, although they were significantly more likely compared to women with BMI < 30 kg/m2. The majority of women (regardless of BMI) did not express any barriers to being weighed and 40.8% reported weighing themselves at home. Women across the BMI categories expressed a desire for more engagement from healthcare professionals on the issue of bodyweight. Women are clearly not being served appropriately in the current situation which simultaneously problematizes and fails to offer constructive dialogue. PMID:27843648

  20. Supporting pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to quit smoking: views of antenatal care providers and pregnant indigenous women.

    PubMed

    Passey, Megan E; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W; Stirling, Janelle M

    2014-12-01

    To assess support for 12 potential smoking cessation strategies among pregnant Australian Indigenous women and their antenatal care providers. Cross-sectional surveys of staff and women in antenatal services providing care for Indigenous women in the Northern Territory and New South Wales, Australia. Respondents were asked to indicate the extent to which each of a list of possible strategies would be helpful in supporting pregnant Indigenous women to quit smoking. Current smokers (n = 121) were less positive about the potential effectiveness of most of the 12 strategies than the providers (n = 127). For example, family support was considered helpful by 64 % of smokers and 91 % of providers; between 56 and 62 % of smokers considered advice and support from midwives, doctors or Aboriginal Health Workers likely to be helpful, compared to 85-90 % of providers. Rewards for quitting were considered helpful by 63 % of smokers and 56 % of providers, with smokers rating them more highly and providers rating them lower, than most other strategies. Quitline was least popular for both. This study is the first to explore views of pregnant Australian Indigenous women and their antenatal care providers on strategies to support smoking cessation. It has identified strategies which are acceptable to both providers and Indigenous women, and therefore have potential for implementation in routine care. Further research to explore their feasibility in real world settings, uptake by pregnant women and actual impact on smoking outcomes is urgently needed given the high prevalence of smoking among pregnant Indigenous women.

  1. The Impact of Antenatal Depression on Perinatal Outcomes in Australian Women

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, John; Ogbo, Felix A.; Hendry, Alexandra; Noble, Justine; Page, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Background In Australia, there is limited evidence on the impact of antenatal depression on perinatal outcomes. This study investigates the association between maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy and key perinatal outcomes, including birth weight, gestational age at birth, breastfeeding indicators and postnatal depressive symptoms. Method A retrospective cohort of mothers (N = 17,564) of all infants born in public health facilities within South Western Sydney Local Health District and Sydney Local Health District in 2014, in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, was enumerated from routinely collected antenatal data to investigate the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes associated with maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Antenatal depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Logistic regression models that adjusted for confounders were conducted to determine associations between antenatal depressive symptoms and low birth weight, early gestational age at birth (<37 weeks), breast feeding indicators and postnatal depressive symptoms. Results The prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy was 7.0% in the cohort, and was significantly associated with postnatal depressive symptoms [Adjusted Odd Ratios (AOR) = 6.4, 95% CI: 4.8–8.7, P<0.001]. Antenatal depressive symptoms was associated with a higher odds of low birth weight [AOR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2–2.3, P = 0.003] and a gestational age at birth of <37 weeks [AOR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1–1.7, P = 0.018] compared to women who reported lower EPDS scores in antenatal period. Antenatal depressive symptoms were not strongly associated with non-exclusive breast feeding in the early postnatal period. Conclusion Maternal depressive symptoms in the antenatal period are strongly associated with postnatal depressive symptoms and adverse perinatal outcomes in Australian infants. Early identification of antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms

  2. Antenatal and Postnatal Psychopathology Among Women with Current and Past Eating Disorders: Longitudinal Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Abigail; Solmi, Francessca; Bye, Amanda; Taborelli, Emma; Corfield, Freya; Schmidt, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet; Micali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate longitudinal patterns of psychopathology during the antenatal and postnatal periods among women with current (C-ED) and past (P-ED) eating disorders. Women were recruited to a prospective longitudinal study: C-ED (n = 31), P-ED (n = 29) and healthy control (HC; n = 57). Anxiety, depression and ED symptoms were measured at four time points: first/second trimester, third trimester, 8 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Linear mixed effects models were used to test for group differences. Women with C-ED and P-ED, in all diagnostic categories, had significantly higher levels of psychopathology at all time points. ED symptoms decreased in the C-ED group, compared with an overall increase in the other two groups but subsequently increased after pregnancy. Overall, depression and state and trait anxiety scores decreased in the C-ED group compared with the HC group throughout the antenatal and postnatal periods. High levels of psychopathology are common throughout the antenatal and postnatal periods among women with current and past ED, and despite some overall reductions, symptoms remain clinically significant. © 2014 The Authors. European Eating Disorders Review published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25345371

  3. Antenatal and postnatal psychopathology among women with current and past eating disorders: longitudinal patterns.

    PubMed

    Easter, Abigail; Solmi, Francessca; Bye, Amanda; Taborelli, Emma; Corfield, Freya; Schmidt, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet; Micali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate longitudinal patterns of psychopathology during the antenatal and postnatal periods among women with current (C-ED) and past (P-ED) eating disorders. Women were recruited to a prospective longitudinal study: C-ED (n = 31), P-ED (n = 29) and healthy control (HC; n = 57). Anxiety, depression and ED symptoms were measured at four time points: first/second trimester, third trimester, 8 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Linear mixed effects models were used to test for group differences. Women with C-ED and P-ED, in all diagnostic categories, had significantly higher levels of psychopathology at all time points. ED symptoms decreased in the C-ED group, compared with an overall increase in the other two groups but subsequently increased after pregnancy. Overall, depression and state and trait anxiety scores decreased in the C-ED group compared with the HC group throughout the antenatal and postnatal periods. High levels of psychopathology are common throughout the antenatal and postnatal periods among women with current and past ED, and despite some overall reductions, symptoms remain clinically significant. © 2014 The Authors. European Eating Disorders Review published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Determinants of anemia among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care in Dessie town health facilities, northern central Ethiopia, unmatched case -control study

    PubMed Central

    Seid, Omer; G/Mariam, Yemane; Fekadu, Abel; Wasihun, Yitbarek; Endris, Kedir; Bitew, Abebayehu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anemia affects around 38.2% and 22% of pregnant women at a global and national level respectively. In developing countries, women start pregnancy with already depleted body stores of iron and other vitamins with significant variation of anemia within and between regions. Objective To identify the determinants of anemia among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care in Dessie town health facilities, northern central Ethiopia. Methods A health facility based unmatched case control study was conducted among 112 cases and 336 controls from January to March 2016 G.C. The sample size was determined by using Epi Info version 7.1.5.2. Study subjects were selected using consecutive sampling technique. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, entered using Epi Data version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression model was used to see the determinants of anemia. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and p-value<0.05 were used to see the significant association. Results Failure to take dark green leafy vegetables per two weeks (AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 2.16, 11.71), didn’t take chicken per two weeks (AOR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.22, 5.86), 1st trimester (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.12, 3.84), 3rd trimester (AOR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.53, 5.72), HIV infection (AOR = 6.78, 95% CI: 2.28, 20.18) and medication (AOR = 3.57 95% CI: 1.60, 7.98) were positively associated with anemia. Conclusions Inadequate intake of dark green leafy vegetables, inadequate consumption of chicken, trimester of the current pregnancy, HIV infection and medication were the determinants of anemia among pregnant women. Therefore, anemia prevention strategy should include promotion of adequate intake of dark green leafy vegetables and chicken, increase meal pattern during the entire pregnancy and strengthen the prevention of mother to child HIV transmission/antenatal care programs. PMID:28288159

  5. [HIV screening and counseling in antenatal care: perception of postpartum women].

    PubMed

    Praça, Neide de Souza; Barrancos, Janaína Teixeira Gardel

    2007-03-01

    This transversal and exploratory study aimed at verifying if pregnant women were receiving antenatal counseling before and after HIV screening. The sample consisted of 161 postpartum HIV-negative women admitted to two maternity hospitals in the city of São Paulo. Interviews were carried out in 2003. Data showed that the number of postpartum women who received pre and post HIV screening counseling during pregnancy was low. The answers of women on the aim of HIV testing were statistically correlated to the average number of prenatal appointments. In conclusion, this study identified the need of a higher involvement of health staff workers in pre- and post-HIV screening counseling of pregnant women during prenatal care.

  6. HIV-infected women delivering without antenatal care in a large Bangkok hospital, 1997.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, A; Inneam, B; Krajangthong, R; Bhengsri, S; Jetsawang, B; Siriwasin, W; Simond, R J; Shaffer, N

    2000-03-01

    The aim was to estimate the proportion of HIV-infected women giving birth at a large Bangkok hospital who had not received antenatal care (ANC) and to identify predictors of not receiving ANC. At Rajavithi Hospital, Bangkok, women with ANC are routinely tested for HIV at their first antenatal visit; women without ANC are routinely tested at delivery. Hospital staff interview all HIV-infected women and record sociodemographic and HIV risk factor information in a delivery room log book. We abstracted and analyzed data recorded in this log book for all HIV-infected women who gave birth at Rajavithi Hospital in 1997. Of 303 HIV-infected women who gave birth, 75% had received ANC at Rajavithi Hospital, 10% had received ANC at other locations, and 15% had not received ANC. On multivariate analysis, HIV-infected women who had received ANC were more likely to work or have partners who worked in construction (25% vs 11%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR]; 2.6; p = 0.03) or have a history of injection drug use (4% vs 0.4%; AOR = 20.8; p = 0.02) than those who had not received ANC, but were less likely to report their current partner as a risk factor for acquiring HIV infection (22% vs. 40%; AOR = 0.4; p = 0.05). Because a substantial number of HIV-infected women give birth in this large Bangkok hospital without receiving ANC, interventions are needed to increase the number of HIV-infected women who receive ANC and to prevent perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected pregnant women who have not received ANC.

  7. Timing of the initiation of antenatal care: An exploratory qualitative study of women and service providers in East London

    PubMed Central

    Hatherall, Bethan; Morris, Joanne; Jamal, Farah; Sweeney, Lorna; Wiggins, Meg; Kaur, Inderjeet; Renton, Adrian; Harden, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Objective to explore the factors which influence the timing of the initiation of a package of publically-funded antenatal care for pregnant women living in a diverse urban setting Design a qualitative study involving thematic analysis of 21 individual interviews and six focus group discussions. Setting Newham, a culturally diverse borough in East London, UK Participants individual interviews were conducted with 21 pregnant and postnatal women and focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 26 health service staff members(midwives and bilingual health advocates) and 32 women from four community groups (Bangladeshi, Somali, Lithuanian and Polish). Findings initial care-seeking by pregnant women is influenced by the perception that the package of antenatal care offered by the National Health Service is for viable and continuing pregnancies, as well as little perceived urgency in initiating antenatal care. This is particularly true when set against competing responsibilities and commitments in women’s lives and for pregnancies with no apparent complications or disconcerting symptoms. Barriers to access to this package of antenatal care include difficulties in navigating the health service and referral system, which are compounded for women unable to speak English, and service provider delays in the processing of referrals. Accessing antenatal care was sometimes equated with relinquishing control, particularly for young women and women for whom language barriers prohibit active engagement with care. Conclusions and implications for practice if women are to be encouraged to seek antenatal care from maternity services early in pregnancy, the purpose and value to all women of doing so need to be made clear across the communities in which they live. As a woman may need time to accept her pregnancy and address other priorities in her life before seeking antenatal care, it is crucial that once she does decide to seek such care, access is quick and easy

  8. Effects of an antenatal dietary intervention on maternal anthropometric measures in pregnant women with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kannieappan, Lavern M.; Grivell, Rosalie M.; Deussen, Andrea R.; Moran, Lisa J.; Yelland, Lisa N.; Owens, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effect of providing antenatal dietary and lifestyle advice on secondary measures of maternal anthropometry was evaluated and their correlation with both gestational weight gain and infant birth weight was assessed. Methods In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial, pregnant women with BMI of ≥25 kg/m2 received either Lifestyle Advice or Standard Care. Maternal anthropometric outcomes included arm circumference, biceps, triceps, and subscapular skinfold thickness measurements (SFTM), percentage body fat (BF), gestational weight gain, and infant birth weight. The intention to treat principles were utilized by the analyses. Results The measurements were obtained from 807 (74.7%) women in the Lifestyle Advice Group and 775 (72.3%) women in the Standard Care Group. There were no statistically significant differences identified between the treatment groups with regards to arm circumference, biceps, triceps, and subscapular SFTM, or percentage BF at 36‐week gestation. Maternal anthropometric measurements were not significantly correlated with either gestational weight gain or infant birth weight. Conclusions Among pregnant women with a BMI of ≥25 kg/m2, maternal SFTM were not modified by an antenatal dietary and lifestyle intervention. Furthermore, maternal SFTM correlate poorly with both gestational weight gain and infant birth weight. PMID:26175260

  9. Antenatal corticosteroids impact the inflammatory rather than the antiangiogenic profile of women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, Unzila A; Buhimschi, Irina A; Laky, Christine A; Cross, Sarah N; Duzyj, Christina M; Ramma, Wenda; Sibai, Baha M; Funai, Edmund F; Ahmed, Asif; Buhimschi, Catalin S

    2014-06-01

    Circulating antiangiogenic factors and proinflammatory cytokines are implicated in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that steroids modify the balance of inflammatory and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors that potentially contribute to the patient's evolving clinical state. Seventy singleton women, admitted for antenatal corticosteroid treatment, were enrolled prospectively. The study group consisted of 45 hypertensive women: chronic hypertension (n=6), severe preeclampsia (n=32), and superimposed preeclampsia (n=7). Normotensive women with shortened cervix (<2.5 cm) served as controls (n=25). Maternal blood samples of preeclampsia cases were obtained before steroids and then serially up until delivery. A clinical severity score was designed to clinically monitor disease progression. Serum levels of angiogenic factors (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 [sFlt-1], placental growth factor [PlGF], soluble endoglin [sEng]), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and proinflammatory markers (IL-6, C-reactive protein [CRP]) were assessed before and after steroids. Soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and total immunoglobulins (IgG) were measured as markers of T- and B-cell activation, respectively. Steroid treatment coincided with a transient improvement in clinical manifestations of preeclampsia. A significant decrease in IL-6 and CRP was observed although levels of sIL-2R and IgG remained unchanged. Antenatal corticosteroids did not influence the levels of angiogenic factors but ET-1 levels registered a short-lived increase poststeroids. Although a reduction in specific inflammatory mediators in response to antenatal steroids may account for the transient improvement in clinical signs of preeclampsia, inflammation is unlikely to be the major contributor to severe preeclampsia or useful for therapeutic targeting.

  10. Antenatal steroids for fetal lung maturity: Time to target more frequent doses to fewer women?

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Carolyn I; Hezelgrave, Natasha L

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal corticosteroids for fetal lung maturation have become mainstay treatment in women thought to be at high-risk of premature birth. To ensure treatment efficacy before delivery, the current practice is to administer steroids early to a woman considered at risk; however, neonatal benefit is lost after the seven-day treatment-to-delivery window. Over half of women who deliver before 34 weeks’ gestation do not receive antenatal corticosteroids within this timeframe, but many still deliver prematurely; however, clinicians are reluctant to administer repeated courses of steroids due to concerns, among others, of impaired fetal growth. However, evidence is mounting regarding the optimal timing for steroids, including substantive benefits close to delivery, and the benefits of repeated courses if delivery has not occurred. Better targeted treatment is required to allow for maximum benefit; reducing unnecessary treatment in low-risk women, while targeting therapy in the high-risk cohort and offering repeat courses if the seven-day window is exceeded. Novel tools to aid prediction may help implement this strategy. PMID:27512476

  11. Shifting norms: pregnant women's perspectives on skilled birth attendance and facility-based delivery in rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Crissman, Halley P; Engmann, Cyril E; Adanu, Richard M; Nimako, Doris; Crespo, Keesha; Moyer, Cheryl A

    2013-03-01

    Skilled birth attendance (SBA) and healthcare facility (HCF) delivery are effective means of reducing maternal mortality. However, their uptake remains low in many low-income countries. The present study utilized semi-structured interviews with 85 pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic in Akwatia, Ghana (May-July 2010) to better understand the barriers to SBA and HCF delivery through the underrepresented perspective of pregnant women. Interview transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Participants described community support for and uptake of HCF delivery as increasing and becoming normalized, but barriers remain: (1) maltreatment by midwives; (2) cost associated with HCF delivery despite waived facility fees; (3) the need for a support person for HCF delivery; (4) difficulties in transportation; and (5) precipitous labor. Given the importance of community in Ghanaian health care decision-making, increasing community support for HCF delivery suggests progress toward increasing uptake of SBA and HCF delivery, however important actionable barriers remain.

  12. Role of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) in provision of antenatal and perinatal care at home amongst the urban poor in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samiksha; Chhabra, Pragti; Sujoy, Rachna

    2012-01-01

    More than 80% of deliveries amongst the urban poor are conducted at home, mostly by traditional birth attendants (TBAs). In all, 29 eligible TBAs in the study area were identified and interviewed to assess their knowledge and practices regarding antenatal and perinatal care. Their knowledge about complications in antenatal and perinatal period was inadequate. The majority provided inadequate advice to the mothers. Over seventy-nine percent (79.3%) gave injections of oxytocin. Sixteen (55.2%) did not wait or waited for less than 10 minutes for the mother to expel the placenta. Fourteen (48.3%) encountered excessive vaginal bleeding, but none knew how to manage it. Overall knowledge and care provided by the TBAs was poor.

  13. Determinants of utilization of antenatal care services among adolescent girls and young women in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Efendi, Ferry; Chen, Ching-Min; Kurniati, Anna; Berliana, Sarni Maniar

    2016-05-26

    Due to the high number of maternal deaths, provision of antenatal care services (ANC) in Indonesia is one of the key aims of the post-Millennium Development Goals agenda. This study aimed to assess the key factors determining use of ANC by adolescent girls and young women in Indonesia. Data from the Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey 2012 were used, with a focus on married adolescent girls (aged 15-19 years, n = 543) and young women (20-24 years, n = 2,916) who were mothers. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors associated with ANC use. The findings indicated that adolescents were less likely to make ANC visits than young women. Richer women were more likely to make four ANC visits in both groups compared to the poorer women. Living in urban areas, higher educational attainment, and lower birth order were also all associated with higher levels of receiving ANC among young women. The results showed that socio-economic factors were related to the use of ANC among adolescent girls and young women. Ongoing health-care interventions should thus put a priority on adolescent mothers coming from poor socio-economic backgrounds.

  14. The roles of social support in helping chinese women with antenatal depressive and anxiety symptoms cope with perceived stress.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ying; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Wang, Yuqiong; Kwong, Dennis Ho Keung; Wang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    A community-based sample of 755 pregnant Chinese women were recruited to test the direct and moderating effects of social support in mitigating perceived stress associated with antenatal depressive or anxiety symptoms. The Social Support Rating Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Edinburgh Depressive Postnatal Scale and the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale were used. Social support was found to have direct effects and moderating effects on the women's perceived stress on antenatal depressive and anxiety symptoms in multiple linear regression models. This knowledge of the separate effects of social support on behavioral health is important to psychiatric nurse in planning preventive interventions.

  15. Men's role in women's antenatal health status: evidence from rural Rajshahi, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mosiur; Islam, Mohammad Touhidul; Mostofa, Md Golam; Reza, Md Shahin

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to extend notions of men's role in women's antenatal care (ANC) status in rural Rajshahi, Bangladesh. The analyses were based on response of 480 men aged 15 to 54 years, living with at least 1 child younger than 3 years. Only 27% men accompanied their wives for ANC. Men's perception of actual roles for ANC services was low: 63% approved of women undergoing checkups; 33% discussed their wives' pregnancy with health professionals. Only 18% scored highly on the overall index of knowledge. From multivariate analysis, it was found that the number of men accompanying their wives for ANC was higher among those respondents who were married for the first time in the age-group 25 to 34 years and aged 35 years or more, had their last child at age-group 20 to 24 years or 25 to 34 years, had completed primary or secondary and higher education, and had mass media facilities.

  16. High Adherence to Iron/Folic Acid Supplementation during Pregnancy Time among Antenatal and Postnatal Care Attendant Mothers in Governmental Health Centers in Akaki Kality Sub City, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Hierarchical Negative Binomial Poisson Regression

    PubMed Central

    Gebreamlak, Bisratemariam; Dadi, Abel Fekadu; Atnafu, Azeb

    2017-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency during pregnancy is a risk factor for anemia, preterm delivery, and low birth weight. Iron/Folic Acid supplementation with optimal adherence can effectively prevent anemia in pregnancy. However, studies that address this area of adherence are very limited. Therefore, the current study was conducted to assess the adherence and to identify factors associated with a number of Iron/Folic Acid uptake during pregnancy time among mothers attending antenatal and postnatal care follow up in Akaki kality sub city. Methods Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 557 pregnant women attending antenatal and postnatal care service. Systematic random sampling was used to select study subjects. The mothers were interviewed and the collected data was cleaned and entered into Epi Info 3.5.1 and analyzed by R version 3.2.0. Hierarchical Negative Binomial Poisson Regression Model was fitted to identify the factors associated with a number of Iron/Folic Acid uptake. Adjusted Incidence rate ratio (IRR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was computed to assess the strength and significance of the association. Result More than 90% of the mothers were supplemented with at least one Iron/Folic Acid supplement from pill per week during their pregnancy time. Sixty percent of the mothers adhered (took four or more tablets per week) (95%CI, 56%—64.1%). Higher IRR of Iron/Folic Acid supplementation was observed among women: who received health education; which were privately employed; who achieved secondary education; and who believed that Iron/Folic Acid supplements increase blood, whereas mothers who reported a side effect, who were from families with relatively better monthly income, and who took the supplement when sick were more likely to adhere. Conclusion Adherence to Iron/Folic Acid supplement during their pregnancy time among mothers attending antenatal and postnatal care was found to be high. Activities that would address the

  17. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Among Antenatal Women in One of the Institute of Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Mohi, Manjit Kaur; Kumar, Amith

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As per NACO publication there are an estimated 2.08 Million HIV/AIDS cases in India as of February 2014. The estimated adult HIV prevalence in India is 0.27%, with a gender spit of 0.32% males and 0.22% females. Estimating the seroprevalence of HIV in a low risk population such as pregnant women provides essential information for an effective implementation of AIDS control programmes. In spite of an estimated adult HIV prevalence rate of 0.18% in Punjab, there are no previous studies among antenatal women to assess seroprevalence. Aim To assess the prevalence of HIV infection, among otherwise healthy pregnant females. Materials and Methods This retrospective study reviewed treatment records of 3686 antenatal women who underwent HIV testing. Demographic, obstetric and laboratory data was recorded into a preset proforma. Available data was analysed using SPSS version 13. Results Total of 38 subjects tested positive for HIV infection. Seroprevalence rate was 1.03%. A 25 -30 years age group had most number of infected individuals with 22 (57.89%) subjects. Seropositivity was common among rural domicile. Only 9 (23.68%) was aware of their seropositive status. A total of 20 (52.63%) subjects were illiterate, 14 (36.84%) had received primary school education. Conclusion Seroprevalence rate of 1.03% reported in this study has been the highest among the contemporary articles published in last decade. Efficient surveillance along with proper implementation of Prevention of Parent to Child Transmission (PPTCT) is the need of the day. A prompt action at the hands of the authority will enable us to safeguard our present and future alike. PMID:27790524

  18. Neurodevelopmental outcome for offspring of women treated for antenatal depression: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Previti, Giovanni; Pawlby, Susan; Chowdhury, Sahmina; Aguglia, Eugenio; Pariante, Carmine M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to appraise existing literature on the effects of treatments for antenatal depression on the neurodevelopment outcomes of the offspring. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify studies on different kinds of treatments for antenatal depression (antidepressants and alternative therapies) and their effects on infants' neurodevelopment. After reading the title, abstract, or full text and applying exclusion criteria, a total of 22 papers were selected. Nineteen papers studied the effects of antidepressant drugs, one on docosahexanoic acid (DHA) (fish oil capsules) and two on massage therapy; however, no studies used a randomized controlled design, and in most studies, the control group comprise healthy women not exposed to depression. Comparisons between newborns exposed to antidepressants in utero with those not exposed showed significant differences in a wide range of neurobehavioral outcomes, although in many cases, these symptoms were transient. Two studies found a slight delay in psychomotor development, and one study found a delay in mental development. Alternative therapies may have some benefits on neurodevelopmental outcomes. Our review suggests that antidepressant treatment may be associated with some neurodevelopmental changes, but we cannot exclude that some of these effects may be due to depression per se.

  19. Negative Life Events and Antenatal Depression among Pregnant Women in Rural China: The Role of Negative Automatic Thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Fangnan; Jiang, Xiaoning; Xiao, Yun; Dong, Xuehan; Kong, Xianglei; Yang, Xuemei; Tian, Donghua; Qu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have looked at the relationship between psychological and the mental health status of pregnant women in rural China. The current study aims to explore the potential mediating effect of negative automatic thoughts between negative life events and antenatal depression. Methods Data were collected in June 2012 and October 2012. 495 rural pregnant women were interviewed. Depressive symptoms were measured by the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale, stresses of pregnancy were measured by the pregnancy pressure scale, negative automatic thoughts were measured by the automatic thoughts questionnaire, and negative life events were measured by the life events scale for pregnant women. We used logistic regression and path analysis to test the mediating effect. Results The prevalence of antenatal depression was 13.7%. In the logistic regression, the only socio-demographic and health behavior factor significantly related to antenatal depression was sleep quality. Negative life events were not associated with depression in the fully adjusted model. Path analysis showed that the eventual direct and general effects of negative automatic thoughts were 0.39 and 0.51, which were larger than the effects of negative life events. Conclusions This study suggested that there was a potentially significant mediating effect of negative automatic thoughts. Pregnant women who had lower scores of negative automatic thoughts were more likely to suffer less from negative life events which might lead to antenatal depression. PMID:27977715

  20. 'They just walk away' - women's perception of being silenced by antenatal health workers: a qualitative study on women survivors of domestic violence in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Rishal, Poonam; Joshi, Sunil Kumar; Lukasse, Mirjam; Schei, Berit; Swahnberg, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Background Domestic violence during pregnancy has detrimental effects on the health of the mother and the newborn. Antenatal care provides a 'window of opportunity' to identify and assist victims of domestic violence during pregnancy. Little is known about the experience, needs, and expectations from the women's perspective in relation to domestic violence in Nepal. Objective Our study aims to explore how women who have experienced domestic violence evaluate their antenatal care and their expectations and needs from health centers. Design Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted among women who had experienced domestic violence during pregnancy and utilized antenatal care. The women were recruited from two different organizations in Nepal. Results Women in our study concealed their experience of domestic violence due to fear of being insulted, discriminated, and negative attitudes of the health care providers. The women wished that the health care providers were compassionate and asked them about their experience, ensured confidentiality and privacy, and referred them to services that is free of cost. Conclusions Findings from our study may help the health care providers to change their attitudes toward women survivors of domestic violence. Identifying and assisting these women through antenatal care could result in improved services for them and their newborns.

  1. Poor Quality for Poor Women? Inequities in the Quality of Antenatal and Delivery Care in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jigyasa; Leslie, Hannah H.; Kundu, Francis; Kruk, Margaret E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Quality of healthcare is an important determinant of future progress in global health. However, the distributional aspects of quality of care have received inadequate attention. We assessed whether high quality maternal care is equitably distributed by (1) mapping the quality of maternal care in facilities located in poorer versus wealthier areas of Kenya; and (2) comparing the quality of maternal care available to Kenyans in and not in poverty. Methods We assessed three measures of maternal care quality: facility infrastructure and clinical quality of antenatal care and delivery care, using indicators from the 2010 Kenya Service Provision Assessment (SPA), a standardized facility survey with direct observation of maternal care provision. We calculated poverty of the area served by antenatal or delivery care facilities using the Multidimensional Poverty Index. We used regression analyses and non-parametric tests to assess differences in maternal care quality in facilities located in more and less impoverished areas. We estimated effective coverage with a minimum standard of care for the full population and those in poverty. Results A total of 564 facilities offering at least one maternal care service were included in this analysis. Quality of maternal care was low, particularly clinical quality of antenatal and delivery care, which averaged 0.52 and 0.58 out of 1 respectively, compared to 0.68 for structural inputs to care. Maternal healthcare quality varied by poverty level: at the facility level, all quality metrics were lowest for the most impoverished areas and increased significantly with greater wealth. Population access to a minimum standard (≥0.75 of 1.00) of quality maternal care was both low and inequitable: only 17% of all women and 8% of impoverished women had access to minimally adequate delivery care. Conclusion The quality of maternal care is low in Kenya, and care available to the impoverished is significantly worse than that for the

  2. The utilization of antenatal care among rural-to-urban migrant women in Shanghai:a hospital-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Improving utilization of antenatal care is a critical strategy for achieving China’s Millennium Development Goal of decreasing the maternal mortality ratio (MMR). While overall utilization has increased recently in China, an urban vs. rural disparity in access remains. Here we aim to assess utilization of antenatal care in rural-to-urban migrant women and identify its risk and protective factors. Methods Migrant women who had been living in Shanghai for more than six months, delivered in one of the two study hospitals between August 2009 and February 2010, and provided written consent were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results Of 767 women, 90.1% (691) made at least one antenatal care visit, while 49.7% (381) had adequately utilized antenatal care (i.e., made five or more antenatal care visits). Only 19.7% of women visited an antenatal care center during the first trimester (12 weeks). Women between the ages of 25 and 30 and women older than 30 were more likely than younger women to have adequately utilized antenatal care (AOR=2.2 and 1.9, 95%CI=1.4-3.5 and 1.1-3.2, respectively). Women whose husbands held Shanghai residency status (AOR=4.9, 95%CI=2.2-10.9) or who had more than 10 years of education (AOR=1.8, 95%CI=1.2-2.9), previously experienced a miscarriage or abortion (AOR=2.2, 95%CI=1.3-3.8), had higher household income (AOR=1.6, 95%CI=1.0-2.5) were more likely to have adequately utilized antenatal care. Women from high-income households were also more likely to receive antenatal care during the first 12 weeks (AOR=3.5, 95%CI=1.7-5.5). Conclusions Many migrant women in Shanghai did not receive adequate antenatal care and initiated antenatal care later than the optimal first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Poor antenatal care utilization was associated with low socioeconomic status, education, and certain demographic factors. Tailored health education for both migrant women and their husbands should be strengthened to improve maternal

  3. Improving knowledge of antenatal care (ANC) among pregnant women: a field trial in central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nuraini, E; Parker, E

    2005-01-01

    The need for reducing maternal mortality has become a paramount concern in developing countries including Indonesia. One of the strategies for reducing maternal mortality in Indonesia is the provision of antenatal care (ANC). Previous studies have reported the advantages and disadvantages of ANC. The purpose of this study is to ascertain if a new approach to ANC can improve pregnant women's knowledge of its benefits. An experimental design with 60 pregnant women from 10 cluster villages is used in this study. The intervention group received the new approach to ANC, while the control group received routine ANC. The findings show that the improvement of knowledge in the intervention group is significant particularly in the knowledge about healthy pregnancy (p=0.012), pregnancy complications (p=0.01), safe birth (p=0.01) and taking care of the newborn (p=0.012). The improvement of knowledge was significantly influenced by the respondents' educational back ground (p=0.002) and socio-economic status (p=0.027). This study recommends that the new approach to ANC be considered to educate pregnant women regarding safe birth and it is considered as one of the strategies that may be adopted to reduce maternal mortality.

  4. Factors influencing women's attitudes towards antenatal vaccines, group B Streptococcus and clinical trial participation in pregnancy: an online survey

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Fiona; Stevens, Zoe; Plumb, Jane; Hughes, Rhona; Voysey, Merryn; Heath, Paul T; Snape, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore factors influencing the likelihood of antenatal vaccine acceptance of both routine UK antenatal vaccines (influenza and pertussis) and a hypothetical group B Streptococcus (GBS) vaccine in order to improve understanding of how to optimise antenatal immunisation acceptance, both in routine use and clinical trials. Setting An online survey distributed to women of childbearing age in the UK. Participants 1013 women aged 18–44 years in England, Scotland and Wales. Methods Data from an online survey conducted to gauge the attitudes of 1013 women of childbearing age in England, Scotland and Wales to antenatal vaccination against GBS were further analysed to determine the influence of socioeconomic status, parity and age on attitudes to GBS immunisation, using attitudes to influenza and pertussis vaccines as reference immunisations. Factors influencing likelihood of participation in a hypothetical GBS vaccine trial were also assessed. Results Women with children were more likely to know about each of the 3 conditions surveyed (GBS: 45% vs 26%, pertussis: 79% vs 63%, influenza: 66% vs 54%), to accept vaccination (GBS: 77% vs 65%, pertussis: 79% vs 70%, influenza: 78% vs 68%) and to consider taking part in vaccine trials (37% vs 27% for a hypothetical GBS vaccine tested in 500 pregnant women). For GBS, giving information about the condition significantly increased the number of respondents who reported that they would be likely to receive the vaccine. Health professionals were the most important reported source of information. Conclusions Increasing awareness about GBS, along with other key strategies, would be required to optimise the uptake of a routine vaccine, with a specific focus on informing women without previous children. More research specifically focusing on acceptability in pregnant women is required and, given the value attached to input from healthcare professionals, this group should be included in future studies. PMID:27098824

  5. Factors Associated with Women's Antenatal Plans to Use a Baby Walker: A Cross Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Rachel; Kendrick, Denise; Collier, Jacqueline; Woods, Amanda; Wattse, Kim; Dewey, Michael; Chen, Chih-Mei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The objective of these analyses was to explore maternal antenatal decisions about baby walker use, factors associated with these decisions and the relationship between antenatal plans to use a walker and postnatal walker use. Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: Mothers-to-be (n = 1174) participating in a cluster randomised…

  6. Women's perceptions of antenatal, delivery, and postpartum services in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mahiti, Gladys Reuben; Mkoka, Dickson Ally; Kiwara, Angwara Dennis; Mbekenga, Columba Kokusiima; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Goicolea, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal health care provision remains a major challenge in developing countries. There is agreement that the provision of quality clinical services is essential if high rates of maternal death are to be reduced. However, despite efforts to improve access to these services, a high number of women in Tanzania do not access them. The aim of this study is to explore women's views about the maternal health services (pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum period) that they received at health facilities in order to identify gaps in service provision that may lead to low-quality maternal care and increased risks associated with maternal morbidity and mortality in rural Tanzania. Design We gathered qualitative data from 15 focus group discussions with women attending a health facility after child birth and transcribed it verbatim. Qualitative content analysis was used for analysis. Results ‘Three categories emerged that reflected women's perceptions of maternal health care services: “mothers perceive that maternal health services are beneficial,” “barriers to accessing maternal health services” such as availability and use of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) and the long distances between some villages, and “ambivalence regarding the quality of maternal health services” reflecting that women had both positive and negative perceptions in relation to quality of health care services offered’. Conclusions Mothers perceived that maternal health care services are beneficial during pregnancy and delivery, but their awareness of postpartum complications and the role of medical services during that stage were poor. The study revealed an ambivalence regarding the perceived quality of health care services offered, partly due to shortages of material resources. Barriers to accessing maternal health care services, such as the cost of transport and the use of TBAs, were also shown. These findings call for improvement on the services provided. Improvements

  7. Use of Herbal Medicine Among Pregnant Women on Antenatal Care at Nekemte Hospital, Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bayisa, Bodena; Tatiparthi, Ramanjireddy; Mulisa, Eshetu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Investigations across the world confirm dramatic increment in the use of complementary and alternative medicine in pregnant women. The most important aspect is lack of awareness of pregnant women about potential effects of using traditional medicine on fetus; some herbal products may be teratogenic in human and animal models. In this area, so far, no research has been conducted in Ethiopia to assess traditional medicine use in pregnant women. Objectives: Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and use of herbal drugs among pregnant women attending Nekemte Hospital to provide baseline information for future studies. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted by quantitative and qualitative approaches to identify the prevalence of using herbal medicines among pregnant women. About 50.4% of study participants used herbal drugs during their pregnancy. The proportion of herbal drug usage was gradually decreased along with the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The most and least commonly used herbs were ginger (44.36%) and tenaadam (9.15 %), respectively. The common indications of herbal remedies use during pregnancy were nausea (23.90%) and morning sickness (21.05%). Results: The result of the present study confirmed wide use of herbal drugs use during pregnancy that need to report the safety concerns of these drugs during pregnancy. Conclusions: To achieve the requirements of pregnant women, it is vital for health care workers to be familiar with the effect of herbal medicine in pregnancy. PMID:25625049

  8. Nutritional factors associated with antenatal depressive symptoms in the early stage of pregnancy among urban South Indian women.

    PubMed

    Lukose, Ammu; Ramthal, Asha; Thomas, Tinku; Bosch, Ronald; Kurpad, Anura V; Duggan, Christopher; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2014-01-01

    Many women of reproductive age from developing countries have poor nutritional status, and the prevalence of depression during pregnancy is high. The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of antenatal depressive symptoms in early pregnancy, and to identify the demographic and nutritional factors associated with these symptoms in a sample of urban South Indian pregnant women. This cross-sectional study was the baseline assessment of a prospective randomized controlled trial of vitamin B12 supplementation in urban pregnant south Indian women between the ages of 18 and 40 years ( www.clinicaltrials.gov : NCT00641862). 365 women in their first trimester of pregnancy were screened for depressive symptoms at an urban clinic in Karnataka, South India, using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K-10). Nutritional, clinical and biochemical factors were also assessed. Mean (SD) age of the cohort was 22.6 (3.7) years and mean (SD) BMI was 20.4 (3.3) kg/m(2). 121 (33 %) of the women in the 1st trimester had symptoms consistent with depression (K-10 score >6). In multivariate log binomial regression analysis, presence of antenatal depressive symptoms in the first trimester were positively associated with vomiting, prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.54 (95 % CI 1.10, 2.16) and negatively with anemia, PR = 0.67 (95 % CI 0.47, 0.96). Nutrient intakes, serum vitamin B12, methylmalonic acid, homocysteine and red cell folate levels were not associated with measures of depression. Antenatal depressive symptoms in early pregnancy are highly prevalent in urban Indian women and are more common in women with vomiting and without anemia. In this cross-sectional data, blood concentrations of vitamin B12 and folate were not associated with depressive symptoms. The relationship between nutritional status and depressive symptoms may require larger and longitudinal studies.

  9. Barriers to condom use among women attending planned parenthood clinics.

    PubMed

    Detzer, M J; Wendt, S J; Solomon, L J; Dorsch, E; Geller, B M; Friedman, J; Hauser, H; Flynn, B S; Dorwaldt, A L

    1995-01-01

    Assessed condom use, barriers to condom use, oral contraceptive use, partnership status and STD history in 457 15-30 year-old women attending four family planning clinics. Subjects were classified into three condom use groups: Non Users (37%); Current Users (33%); and Past Users (30%). Factor analysis revealed five barriers to condom use: Partner's Perception, Peer's Perception, Pleasure/Intimacy, Communication, and Low Perceived Need. Multivariate analyses revealed significant group differences on only two barrier factors: Pleasure/Intimacy and Low Perceived Need. Low Perceived Need accounted for 13.5% of the variance in condom use. Women with low perceived need to use condoms were more likely to use oral contraceptives.

  10. Pattern and Determinants of Antenatal Booking at Abakaliki Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onoh, RC; Umeora, OUJ; Agwu, UM; Ezegwui, HU; Ezeonu, PO; Onyebuchi, AK

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antenatal care is one of the pillars of SAFE Motherhood Initiative aimed at preventing adverse pregnancy outcome. Early antenatal booking is recommended for this benefit. Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the antenatal booking pattern of pregnant women and its determinants. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of pregnant women attending the antenatal booking clinic at Federal Medical Centre Abakaliki Ebonyi State between April 6, 2011 to August 5, 2011 was undertaken. Epi info 2008 version was used for analysis. Results: The mean age of the respondents was 27.46 (5.81) years and the mean gestational age at booking was 24.33 (5.52) weeks. A total of 83.1% (286/344) of the pregnant women booked after the first trimester while the remaining 16.9% (56/344) booked early. Socio-biological variables and past obstetrics history did not contribute significantly to the gestational age at booking while sickness in index pregnancy, personal wishes, and financial constraint were statistically significant reasons given for seeking antenatal care. Majority of the pregnant women 37.2% (128/344) suggested that the second trimester was the ideal gestational age for booking while 18.3% (63/344) did not know the ideal gestational age for booking. Most pregnant women 81.1% (279/344) knew the benefits of early antenatal care even though they booked late 83.1% (286/344). Conclusion: Most pregnant women access antenatal care late at Abakaliki because of misconception and poverty. Health education and subsidization of cost of medical services will help in reversing the trend of late antenatal booking. PMID:23439716

  11. The impact of Gonoshasthaya Kendra's Micro Health Insurance plan on antenatal care among poor women in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Touhidul; Igarashi, Isao; Kawabuchi, Koichi

    2012-08-01

    Low utilization of antenatal care (ANC) by pregnant women, particularly in rural areas, is an obstacle to ensuring safe motherhood in Bangladesh. Currently, Micro Health Insurance (MHI) is being considered in many developing countries as a potential method for assuring greater access to health care, especially for the poor. So far, there is only limited evidence evaluating MHI schemes. This study assesses the impact of MHI administered by Gonoshasthaya Kendra (GK) on ANC utilization by poor women in rural Bangladesh. We conducted a questionnaire survey and collected 321 valid responses from women enrolled in GK's MHI scheme and 271 from women not enrolled in any health insurance plan. We used a two-part model in which dependent variables were whether or not women utilized ANC and the number of times ANC was used. The model consisted of logistic regression analysis and ordinary least squares regression analysis. The main independent variables were dummies for socioeconomic classes according to GK, each of which represented the premiums and co-payments charged by class. The results showed that destitute, ultra-poor, and poor women enrolled in MHI used ANC significantly more than women not enrolled in health insurance. Women enrolled in MHI, except for those who were destitute or ultra-poor, utilized ANC significantly more times than women not enrolled in health insurance. We assume that GK's sliding premium and co-payment scales are key to ANC utilization by women. Expanding the MHI scheme may enhance ANC utilization among poor women in rural Bangladesh.

  12. Innovative Demand Creation for Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Targeting a High Impact Male Population: A Pilot Study Engaging Pregnant Women at Antenatal Clinics in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Semeere, Aggrey S.; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Bbaale, Denis S.; Kiragga, Agnes N.; Kigozi, Joanita; Muganzi, Alex M.; Coutinho, Alex G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Circumcision has been shown to be an effective method of HIV prevention; however, only 28% of Ugandan men aged 15–49 years are circumcised. There is a paucity of data on the role of intimate partners in generating demand for voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of a partner-focused intervention targeting males >25 years. Methods: Among pregnant women in their third trimester attending antenatal care we evaluated the impact of a pilot behavior change intervention on VMMC through a quasi-experimental approach. We observed VMMC numbers among spouses of women as per standard practice (comparison phase), and after introducing a behavioral change communication package (intervention phase). Logistic regression was used to compare the odds of VMMC uptake between comparison and intervention phases. We used qualitative methods to evaluate the casual chain using a thematic approach. Results: Of the 601 women studied, 90% articulated the health benefits of VMMC and 99% expressed interest in their spouse getting circumcised. Women's knowledge was not increased by the intervention. Four men were circumcised in the comparison and 7 in the intervention phase. The intervention was not associated with higher odds of circumcision (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI: 0.3 to 6.0, P = 0.65). We interviewed 117 individuals overall with the main enablers for VMMC being: free VMMC, transport reimbursement, and health benefits. Deterrents included misconceptions, lost wages and fear of pain. Most of the uncircumcised men interviewed reported interest in VMMC. Conclusions: Our pilot intervention had no significant impact on increasing VMMC demand. The study demonstrated the feasibility of pregnant women engaging their spouses to discuss VMMC. PMID:27404008

  13. A systematic review of issues around antenatal screening and prenatal diagnostic testing for genetic disorders: women of Asian origin in western countries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juping

    2012-07-01

    Antenatal screening has become standard practice in many countries. However, not all pregnant women choose to be tested. In the UK, the incidence of some birth defects is found to be higher in babies of Asian women than in those of women from other ethnic groups, while there is some evidence suggesting that ethnic minorities, especially Asian women, are less likely to undergo antenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis, the reasons for which are unclear. This study aims to identify and describe the literature on issues around antenatal screening and prenatal diagnostic testing for genetic disorders among women of Asian descent in western countries. The Medline, CINAHL, ASSIA and PsycInfo databases were searched for the period of 1995 and 2010. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and were therefore reviewed. In general, Asian women were found to hold favourable attitudes towards testing. However, they reported a poorer understanding of testing than white women and not being offered a test, and were less able to make informed choices. Asian women in the UK and Australia were found to be less likely than their white counterparts to have undergone prenatal diagnosis, while such differences were not found in the USA and Canada. The equity of access to quality antenatal care, alongside comprehensive well thought out antenatal screening programmes, can be assured if strategies are in place which actively involve all ethnic groups and take account of social and cultural appropriateness for the population served. An understanding of broad factors that inform women's decision-making on test uptake would help health professionals provide women and their families with more culturally sensitive information and support that they may additionally need to make more informed choices.

  14. A qualitative study exploring how Somali women exposed to female genital mutilation experience and perceive antenatal and intrapartum care in England

    PubMed Central

    Moxey, Jordan M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore how Somali women exposed to female genital mutilation experience and perceive antenatal and intrapartum care in England. We explored women's perceptions of deinfibulation, caesarean section and vaginal delivery; their experiences of care during pregnancy and labour; and factors that affect ability to access these services, in order to make recommendations about future practice. Design A descriptive, exploratory qualitative study using face-to-face semistructured interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and data were analysed using a thematic approach. An interpreter was used when required (n=3). Setting Participants recruited from 2 community centres in Birmingham, England. Participants Convenience and snowball sample of 10 Somali women resident in Birmingham, who had accessed antenatal care services in England within the past 5 years. Results 3 core themes were interpreted: (1) Experiences of female genital mutilation during life, pregnancy and labour: Female genital mutilation had a significant physical and psychological impact, influencing decisions to undergo deinfibulation or caesarean section. Women delayed deinfibulation until labour to avoid undergoing multiple operations if an episiotomy was anticipated. (2) Experience of care from midwives: Awareness of female genital mutilation from midwives led to open communication and stronger relationships with women, resulting in more positive experiences. (3) Adaptation to English life: Good language skills and social support networks enabled women to access these services, while unfavourable social factors (eg, inability to drive) impeded. Conclusions Female genital mutilation impacts Somali women's experiences of antenatal and intrapartum care. This study suggests that midwives should routinely ask Somali women about female genital mutilation to encourage open communication and facilitate more positive experiences. As antenatal deinfibulation is unpopular, we should consider

  15. Making friends at antenatal classes: a qualitative exploration of friendship across the transition to motherhood.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Mary L; Mason, Victoria; Snow, Sarah; Messenger, Wendy; Catling, Jonathon; Upton, Penney

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how friendships made at antenatal classes preserve new mothers' well-being, postnatally. Eight women from the United Kingdom who had attended antenatal classes in the third trimester were interviewed following the birth of their first baby. Transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings suggest that friendships made at antenatal classes are not only unique but also support women's mental health and enhance self-efficacy because the women give and gain reassurance that their babies are developing normally. Such friendships may reduce demands on overstretched social and health-care services. Childbirth educators, midwives, and nurses can be encouraged to capitalize on the opportunity provided by antenatal classes to facilitate the formation of friendships that can help mothers to find "a new equilibrium."

  16. Refugee and Migrant Women's Views of Antenatal Ultrasound on the Thai Burmese Border: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, May Myo; Ladda Kajeechewa, Honey Moon; Wiladphaingern, Jacher; Lwin, Khin Maung; Jones, Caroline; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2012-01-01

    Background Antenatal ultrasound suits developing countries by virtue of its versatility, relatively low cost and safety, but little is known about women’s or local provider’s perspectives of this upcoming technology in such settings. This study was undertaken to better understand how routine obstetric ultrasound is experienced in a displaced Burmese population and identify barriers to its acceptance by local patients and providers. Methodology/Principal Findings Qualitative (30 observations, 19 interviews, seven focus group discussions) and quantitative methods (questionnaire survey with 644 pregnant women) were used to provide a comprehensive understanding along four major themes: safety, emotions, information and communication, and unintended consequences of antenatal ultrasound in refugee and migrant clinics on the Thai Burmese border. One of the main concerns expressed by women was the danger of childbirth which they mainly attributed to fetal malposition. Both providers and patients recognized ultrasound as a technology improving the safety of pregnancy and delivery. A minority of patients experienced transitory shyness or anxiety before the ultrasound, but reported that these feelings could be ameliorated with improved patient information and staff communication. Unintended consequences of overuse and gender selective abortions in this population were not common. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study are being used to improve local practice and allow development of explanatory materials for this population with low literacy. We strongly encourage facilities introducing new technology in resource poor settings to assess acceptability through similar inquiry. PMID:22514615

  17. Spatial autocorrelation in uptake of antenatal care and relationship to individual, household and village-level factors: results from a community-based survey of pregnant women in six districts in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of maternal deaths, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths are concentrated in a few countries, many of which have weak health systems, poor access to health services, and low coverage of key health interventions. Early and consistent antenatal care (ANC) attendance could significantly reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Despite this, most Kenyan mothers initiate ANC care late in pregnancy and attend fewer than the recommended visits. Methods We used survey data from 6,200 pregnant women across six districts in western Kenya to understand demand-side factors related to use of ANC. Bayesian multi-level models were developed to explore the relative importance of individual, household and village-level factors in relation to ANC use. Results There is significant spatial autocorrelation of ANC attendance in three of the six districts and considerable heterogeneity in factors related to ANC use between districts. Working outside the home limited ANC attendance. Maternal age, the number of small children in the household, and ownership of livestock were important in some districts, but not all. Village proportions of pregnancy in women of child-bearing age was significantly correlated to ANC use in three of the six districts. Geographic distance to health facilities and the type of nearest facility was not correlated with ANC use. After incorporating individual, household and village-level covariates, no residual spatial autocorrelation remained in the outcome. Conclusions ANC attendance was consistently low across all the districts, but factors related to poor attendance varied. This heterogeneity is expected for an outcome that is highly influenced by socio-cultural values and local context. Interventions to improve use of ANC must be tailored to local context and should include explicit approaches to reach women who work outside the home. PMID:24314170

  18. Measuring the adequacy of antenatal health care: a national cross-sectional study in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Darney, Blair G; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To propose an antenatal care classification for measuring the continuum of health care based on the concept of adequacy: timeliness of entry into antenatal care, number of antenatal care visits and key processes of care. Methods In a cross-sectional, retrospective study we used data from the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) in 2012. This contained self-reported information about antenatal care use by 6494 women during their last pregnancy ending in live birth. Antenatal care was considered to be adequate if a woman attended her first visit during the first trimester of pregnancy, made a minimum of four antenatal care visits and underwent at least seven of the eight recommended procedures during visits. We used multivariate ordinal logistic regression to identify correlates of adequate antenatal care and predicted coverage. Findings Based on a population-weighted sample of 9 052 044, 98.4% of women received antenatal care during their last pregnancy, but only 71.5% (95% confidence interval, CI: 69.7 to 73.2) received maternal health care classified as adequate. Significant geographic differences in coverage of care were identified among states. The probability of receiving adequate antenatal care was higher among women of higher socioeconomic status, with more years of schooling and with health insurance. Conclusion While basic antenatal care coverage is high in Mexico, adequate care remains low. Efforts by health systems, governments and researchers to measure and improve antenatal care should adopt a more rigorous definition of care to include important elements of quality such as continuity and processes of care. PMID:27274597

  19. Antenatal pelvic floor exercises: a survey of both patients' and health professionals' beliefs and practice.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, K; Owen, L; Hirst, G; Emery, S

    2007-10-01

    The aim was to discover how often women perform pelvic floor exercises (PFE) in the antenatal period and how they wished to be taught. We compared this with the opinions of the health professionals looking after them. A total of 54 women attending the antenatal day assessment unit completed questionnaires. A total of 21 obstetricians, 29 midwives and 25 GPs returned similar questionnaires. Most women think they should be performing PFE daily but only 15% do so. Some 57% of the women wanted to be taught in the antenatal period. Over 50% of the women/midwives believed that PFE should be taught in an individual basis. Obstetricians/GPs favoured classes. A total of 76% of the women want midwives to teach them PFE and 57% of midwives agree. Most health professionals felt that they had not received adequate training on PFE. The midwife is felt to be the best placed person to teach PFE. Health professionals give PFE low priority.

  20. Retrospective cohort study on risk factors for development of gestational diabetes among mothers attending antenatal clinics in Nairobi County

    PubMed Central

    Adoyo, Maureen Atieno; Mbakaya, Charles; Nyambati, Venny; Kombe, Yeri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization estimates that deaths resulting from diabetes will rise above 50% by the year 2020; hence urgent action is needed to reverse the trend notably through nutrition and lifestyle intervention among populations at risks. Studies have established that nutritional environment and physiology of the mother affects neonate's health at infancy and later in life thus this study sought to investigate the risk factors for development of gestational diabetes focusing age, weight, family history and pre-existing medical condition which could be modified to improve population health. Methods A retrospective cohort study design was used. Subjects were sampled from selected maternity facilities in Nairobi and were subjected to oral glucose test to ascertain Gestational Diabetes mellitus (GDM) status. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 238 respondents. Quantitative data was then analyzed as descriptive statistic, univariate and multivariate regression. Results Average age for mothers with GDM was high with a mean of 33.06 (95% C.I: 31.59-34.52) compared to a mean of 27.9 (95% C.I: 27.01-28.78) for non-GDM mothers. Weight before pregnancy was high with mean of 74.04 (95% C.I: 70.82-77.30) among mothers with GDM compared to mean of 60.27 (95% C.I:58.59-61.96) among non-GDM mothers. Mothers with diabetic history in the family had twice the risk of developing GDM (OR= 2.27; 95% C.I: 1.23-4.17) compared to those who did not observe diabetic history in the family. Conclusion Gestational diabetes cases are relatively high. Age advancement; high weight and diabetic history in family are determining factors for development of diabetes among pregnant women. PMID:27795753

  1. Testing for the Endogenous Nature between Women's Empowerment and Antenatal Health Care Utilization: Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Study in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohamed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Women's relative lack of decision-making power and their unequal access to employment, finances, education, basic health care, and other resources are considered to be the root causes of their ill-health and that of their children. The main purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive relation between women's empowerment and the use of maternal health care. Two model specifications are tested. One assumes no correlation between empowerment and antenatal care while the second specification allows for correlation. Both the univariate and the recursive bivariate probit models are tested. The data used in this study is EDHS 2008. Factor Analysis Technique is also used to construct some of the explanatory variables such as the availability and quality of health services indicators. The findings show that women's empowerment and receiving regular antenatal care are simultaneously determined and the recursive bivariate probit is a better approximation to the relationship between them. Women's empowerment has significant and positive impact on receiving regular antenatal care. The availability and quality of health services do significantly increase the likelihood of receiving regular antenatal care. PMID:25140310

  2. Testing for the endogenous nature between women's empowerment and antenatal health care utilization: evidence from a cross-sectional study in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zaky, Hassan H M; Armanious, Dina M; Hussein, Mohamed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Women's relative lack of decision-making power and their unequal access to employment, finances, education, basic health care, and other resources are considered to be the root causes of their ill-health and that of their children. The main purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive relation between women's empowerment and the use of maternal health care. Two model specifications are tested. One assumes no correlation between empowerment and antenatal care while the second specification allows for correlation. Both the univariate and the recursive bivariate probit models are tested. The data used in this study is EDHS 2008. Factor Analysis Technique is also used to construct some of the explanatory variables such as the availability and quality of health services indicators. The findings show that women's empowerment and receiving regular antenatal care are simultaneously determined and the recursive bivariate probit is a better approximation to the relationship between them. Women's empowerment has significant and positive impact on receiving regular antenatal care. The availability and quality of health services do significantly increase the likelihood of receiving regular antenatal care.

  3. Safety and efficacy of antenatal milk expressing for women with diabetes in pregnancy: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Della A; Jacobs, Susan; Amir, Lisa H; Davis, Peter; Walker, Susan P; McEgan, Kerri; Opie, Gillian; Donath, Susan M; Moorhead, Anita M; Ford, Rachael; McNamara, Catharine; Aylward, Amanda; Gold, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many maternity providers recommend that women with diabetes in pregnancy express and store breast milk in late pregnancy so breast milk is available after birth, given (1) infants of these women are at increased risk of hypoglycaemia in the first 24 h of life; and (2) the delay in lactogenesis II compared with women without diabetes that increases their infant's risk of receiving infant formula. The Diabetes and Antenatal Milk Expressing (DAME) trial will establish whether advising women with diabetes in pregnancy (pre-existing or gestational) to express breast milk from 36 weeks gestation increases the proportion of infants who require admission to special or neonatal intensive care units (SCN/NICU) compared with infants of women receiving standard care. Secondary outcomes include birth gestation, breastfeeding outcomes and economic impact. Methods and analysis Women will be recruited from 34 weeks gestation to a multicentre, two arm, unblinded randomised controlled trial. The intervention starts at 36 weeks. Randomisation will be stratified by site, parity and diabetes type. Women allocated to the intervention will be taught expressing and encouraged to hand express twice daily for 10 min and keep an expressing diary. The sample size of 658 (329 per group) will detect a 10% difference in proportion of babies admitted to SCN/NICU (85% power, α 0.05). Data are collected at recruitment (structured questionnaire), after birth (abstracted from medical record blinded to group), and 2 and 12 weeks postpartum (telephone interview). Data analysis: the intervention group will be compared with the standard care group by intention to treat analysis, and the primary outcome compared using χ2 and ORs. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics approval will be obtained from participating sites. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented to clinicians, policymakers and study participants. Trial registration number Australian

  4. Experiences of expressing and storing colostrum antenatally: A qualitative study of mothers in regional Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Brisbane, Joanna M; Giglia, Roslyn C

    2015-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences and breastfeeding outcomes of a group of mothers who expressed colostrum in the antenatal period. In-depth interviews were conducted over the telephone with 12 women who had attended a unique antenatal lactation clinic appointment at 37 weeks' gestation. Seven main response themes were identified. Most women reflected positively upon their attendance and reported that the experience of expressing colostrum allowed them to become familiar with their breasts and gave them a sense of security by having a supply of colostrum stored for possible use after birth. The main negative emotions reported were a sense of embarrassment at expressing the colostrum, particularly in front of another person, the difficulties with expressing colostrum and in one instance, the physical pain associated with the process. Antenatal expression of colostrum may improve maternal breastfeeding confidence. Further research using long-term records will determine whether this practice improves breastfeeding outcomes.

  5. Reduction in Preterm Delivery and Neonatal Mortality after the Introduction of Antenatal Cotrimoxazole Prophylaxis among HIV-Infected Women with Low CD4 Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Jan; Mwiya, Mwiya; Scott, Nancy; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Kauchali, Shuaib; Aldrovandi, Grace M.; Thea, Donald M.; Kuhn, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Background. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis is recommended for subgroups of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults and children to reduce all-cause morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether antenatal cotrimoxazole prophylaxis begun during pregnancy for HIV-infected pregnant women with low CD4 cell counts would affect birth outcomes. Methods. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was introduced as a routine component of antenatal care for HIV-infected women with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/μL during the course of a trial of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Lusaka, Zambia. Rates of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal mortality were compared for women with low CD4 cell counts before and after its introduction. Results. Among 255 women with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/μL, the percentage of preterm births (≤34 weeks of gestation) was lower (odds ratio [OR], 0.49 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.24-0.98]) after cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was introduced than before; there was a significant decrease in neonatal mortality (9% to 0%; P = .01) and a trend toward increased birth weight (β = 114 g [95% CI, -42 to 271 g]). In contrast, there were no significant changes in these parameters over the same time interval among women with CD4 cell counts ≥200 cells/μL. Conclusion. Antenatal provision of cotrimoxazole for HIV-infected pregnant women with low CD4 cell counts may have indirect benefits for neonatal health. PMID:17083035

  6. What Influences Women with Intellectual Disabilities to Attend Breast Screening? Experiences of Women Who Have and Have Not Participated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite breast screening in Britain being free to all women within the allotted age range, uptake of this service is often poor in women with intellectual disabilities. Reasons put forward are numerous, including poor knowledge, pain and difficulty travelling to the centre. However, what influences the decision to attend is rarely…

  7. My Rock: Black Women Attending Graduate School at a Southern Predominantly White University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Quentin R.; Bodenhorn, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Participants in this phenomenological study were 11 Black women who received an undergraduate degree from a historically Black college or university and were currently attending graduate school at a southern predominantly White university. This study investigated the adjustment experiences of these women to life on a southern predominantly White…

  8. Antenatal care packages with reduced visits and perinatal mortality: a secondary analysis of the WHO Antenatal Care Trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2001, the WHO Antenatal Care Trial (WHOACT) concluded that an antenatal care package of evidence-based screening, therapeutic interventions and education across four antenatal visits for low-risk women was not inferior to standard antenatal care and may reduce cost. However, an updated Cochrane review in 2010 identified an increased risk of perinatal mortality of borderline statistical significance in three cluster-randomized trials (including the WHOACT) in developing countries. We conducted a secondary analysis of the WHOACT data to determine the relationship between the reduced visits, goal-oriented antenatal care package and perinatal mortality. Methods Exploratory analyses were conducted to assess the effect of baseline risk and timing of perinatal death. Women were stratified by baseline risk to assess differences between intervention and control groups. We used linear modeling and Poisson regression to determine the relative risk of fetal death, neonatal death and perinatal mortality by gestational age. Results 12,568 women attended the 27 intervention clinics and 11,958 women attended the 26 control clinics. 6,160 women were high risk and 18,365 women were low risk. There were 161 fetal deaths (1.4%) in the intervention group compared to 119 fetal deaths in the control group (1.1%) with an increased overall adjusted relative risk of fetal death (Adjusted RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.03, 1.58). This was attributable to an increased relative risk of fetal death between 32 and 36 weeks of gestation (Adjusted RR 2.24; 95% CI 1.42, 3.53) which was statistically significant for high and low risk groups. Conclusion It is plausible the increased risk of fetal death between 32 and 36 weeks gestation could be due to reduced number of visits, however heterogeneity in study populations or differences in quality of care and timing of visits could also be playing a role. Monitoring maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes when implementing antenatal care protocols is

  9. Maternal Pregnancy Intention and Professional Antenatal Care Utilization in Bangladesh: A Nationwide Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mosfequr; Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Tareque, Md. Ismail; Ferdos, Jannatul; Jesmin, Syeda S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between maternal pregnancy intention and professional antenatal and delivery care utilization. Methods Our data were derived from the 2011 nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey. We included antenatal and delivery care utilization data of the most recent live births for women for the previous three years (n = 4672). We used multilevel logistic regression models to assess the relationship between pregnancy intention and use of professional antenatal and delivery care, with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Results Approximately 13% and 16% of children were reported by their mothers as unwanted and mistimed at the time of conception, respectively. Among the women, 55% received at least one professional antenatal care service; 21% received four or more professional antenatal services, while 32% were attended by professionals during deliveries. Mothers of children whose pregnancies had been unwanted had a greater risk for not seeking professional antenatal and professional delivery care than those whose pregnancies had been wanted [1≥ ANC from professionals: AOR: 0.66; 95% CI:0.51–0.93; 4≥ ANC from professionals: AOR:0.56; 95% CI:0.37–0.84; and delivery care from professionals: AOR: 0.70; 95% CI:0.50–0.97]. Women who were married after age 18, had secondary or higher level of education, and were from the wealthiest households were more likely to utilize antenatal and delivery care. Conclusion Unwanted pregnancy is significantly associated with lower utilization of professional antenatal and delivery care services in Bangladesh. Reducing unwanted births and promoting access to professional antenatal and delivery care are crucial for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 3 in Bangladesh. PMID:27309727

  10. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Intimate Partner Violence Among Pregnant Women Attending Kisumu District Hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Omolo, Jared; Kamweya, Abel M.; Harder, Valarie S.; Mutai, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    To determine prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) among pregnant women seeking antenatal care. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Kisumu District Hospital, Kenya amongst randomly selected pregnant women. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Participants self-reported about their own IPV experience (lifetime, 12 months prior to and during index pregnancy) and associated risk factors. Data were analyzed using Epi-info. The mean age of the 300 participants was 23.7 years. One hundred and ten (37 %) of them experienced at least one form of IPV during pregnancy. Psychological violence was the most common (29 %), followed by sexual (12 %), and then physical (10 %). Women who experienced IPV during pregnancy were more likely to have witnessed maternal abuse in childhood (aOR 2.27, 95 % CI = 1.05–4.89), been in a polygamous union (aOR 2.48, 95 % CI = 1.06–5.8), been multiparous (aOR 1.94, 95 % CI = 1.01–3.32) or had a partner who drank alcohol (aOR 2.32, 95 % CI = 1.21–4.45). Having a partner who attained tertiary education was protective against IPV (aOR 0.37, 95 % CI = 0.16–0.83). We found no association between HIV status and IPV. IPV is common among women seeking antenatal care at Kisumu District Hospital. Health care providers should be alerted to the possibility of IPV during pregnancy in women who witnessed maternal abuse in childhood, are multiparous, polygamous, have a partner who drinks alcohol or has low level education. Screening for IPV, support and referral is urgently needed to help reduce the burden experienced by pregnant women and their unborn babies. PMID:22569943

  11. Cash Transfers to Increase Antenatal Care Utilization in Kisoro, Uganda: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Chava; Iraguha, Moses; Baganizi, Michael; Kolenic, Giselle E; Paccione, Gerald A; Tejani, Nergesh

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization recommends four antenatal visits for pregnant women in developing countries. Cash transfers have been used to incentivize participation in health services. We examined whether modest cash transfers for participation in antenatal care would increase antenatal care attendance and delivery in a health facility in Kisoro, Uganda. Twenty-three villages were randomized into four groups: 1) no cash; 2) 0.20 United States Dollars (USD) for each of four visits; 3) 0.40 USD for a single first trimester visit only; 4) 0.40 USD for each of four visits. Outcomes were three or more antenatal visits and delivery in a health facility. Chi-square, analysis of variance, and generalized estimating equation analyses were performed to detect differences in outcomes. Women in the 0.40 USD/visit group had higher odds of three or more antenatal visits than the control group (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-2.57). The odds of delivering in a health facility did not differ between groups. However, women with more antenatal visits had higher odds of delivering in a health facility (OR 1.21, 95% CI: 1.03-1.42). These findings are important in an area where maternal mortality is high, utilization of health services is low, and resources are scarce.

  12. Isolation of Chlamydia from women attending a clinic for sexually transmitted disease.

    PubMed

    Burns, D C; Darougar, S; Thin, R N; Lothian, L; Nicol, C S

    1975-10-01

    Cervical swabs for Chlamydia culture were collected from 638 unselected women attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic with a fresh complaint. Chlamydia were isolated from 76 (12 per cent.) of the women. When the results were related to the patients' diagnoses, Chlamydia were present in 44 per cent. of women with gonorrhoea and in 22 per cent. of women who were contacts of men with nonspecific urethritis (women who may be regarded as having non-specific genital infection). Chlamydia were uncommon in women with no evidence of genital infection. Significant correlations were found between the presence of Chlamydia and cervical erosion, cervical cytological inflammatory change, and absence of symptoms. Isolates were obtained more frequently from women with non-specific genital infection who were primary contacts than from women who were secondary contacts. These findings support the concept that Chlamydia are pathogens in the genital tract and are sexually transmitted.

  13. How personal experiences feature in women's accounts of use of information for decisions about antenatal diagnostic testing for foetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    France, Emma F; Wyke, Sally; Ziebland, Sue; Entwistle, Vikki A; Hunt, Kate

    2011-03-01

    There has been a striking growth in the availability of health-related information based on personal experience in recent years and internet users are often drawn towards other people's stories about their health. Accounts of other people's experiences might convey social and emotional information that is not otherwise available but little is known about how it is used or the implications of its use in practice. This paper examines how people refer to information about other people's experiences when accounting for decisions about antenatal diagnostic testing for foetal abnormality. We conducted a secondary analysis of 37 qualitative interviews undertaken across the UK with 36 women and nine of their male partners (eight couples were interviewed together) who talked about diagnostic testing for foetal abnormality in 55 pregnancies. When describing their decisions, respondents referred to examples of knowledge gleaned from their own and other individuals' experiences as well as information based on biomedical or clinical-epidemiological research (usually about the probabilities of having a child affected by health problems or the probability of diagnostic tests causing miscarriage). Both forms of knowledge were employed in people's accounts to illustrate the legitimacy and internal coherence of decisions taken. The analysis demonstrates the personally idiosyncratic ways that people reflect on and incorporate different types of information to add meaning to abstract ideas about risk, to imagine the consequences for their own lives and to help them to make sense of the decisions they faced.

  14. Early Antenatal Prediction of Gestational Diabetes in Obese Women: Development of Prediction Tools for Targeted Intervention

    PubMed Central

    White, Sara L.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Briley, Annette L.; Nelson, Scott M.; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene; Sattar, Naveed; Seed, Paul T.; Welsh, Paul; Whitworth, Melissa; Poston, Lucilla; Pasupathy, Dharmintra

    2016-01-01

    All obese women are categorised as being of equally high risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) whereas the majority do not develop the disorder. Lifestyle and pharmacological interventions in unselected obese pregnant women have been unsuccessful in preventing GDM. Our aim was to develop a prediction tool for early identification of obese women at high risk of GDM to facilitate targeted interventions in those most likely to benefit. Clinical and anthropometric data and non-fasting blood samples were obtained at 15+0–18+6 weeks’ gestation in 1303 obese pregnant women from UPBEAT, a randomised controlled trial of a behavioural intervention. Twenty one candidate biomarkers associated with insulin resistance, and a targeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolome were measured. Prediction models were constructed using stepwise logistic regression. Twenty six percent of women (n = 337) developed GDM (International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria). A model based on clinical and anthropometric variables (age, previous GDM, family history of type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, sum of skinfold thicknesses, waist:height and neck:thigh ratios) provided an area under the curve of 0.71 (95%CI 0.68–0.74). This increased to 0.77 (95%CI 0.73–0.80) with addition of candidate biomarkers (random glucose, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fructosamine, adiponectin, sex hormone binding globulin, triglycerides), but was not improved by addition of NMR metabolites (0.77; 95%CI 0.74–0.81). Clinically translatable models for GDM prediction including readily measurable variables e.g. mid-arm circumference, age, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c and adiponectin are described. Using a ≥35% risk threshold, all models identified a group of high risk obese women of whom approximately 50% (positive predictive value) later developed GDM, with a negative predictive value of 80%. Tools for early pregnancy identification of obese women at risk of GDM are described

  15. Strategies for coping with labour: does antenatal education translate into practice?

    PubMed

    Spiby, H; Henderson, B; Slade, P; Escott, D; Fraser, R B

    1999-02-01

    There is little evidence to associate attendance at antenatal classes with a reduction in psychological distress or increased satisfaction with the experience of labour. There may be several reasons for this, including failure to implement coping strategies. A within-subjects research design explored the use in labour of coping strategies taught in antenatal classes and the role of practice. Women's views about using these strategies and their expectations of their midwives and birth companions were also identified. Following Ethics Committee approval and providing informed consent, 121 nulliparous women completed a questionnaire at their final antenatal class. This included questions on confidence and the amount of effort required to use coping strategies, the involvement hoped for from birth companions and midwives in using coping strategies in labour and satisfaction with the amount of practice of coping strategies. Within 72 hours of delivery, women were interviewed to obtain a narrative of the events of labour and their use of the coping strategies (sighing-out-slowly breathing, Laura Mitchell relaxation and postural change). A questionnaire obtained information on the involvement of the midwife and birth companion. Women used the three coping strategies to different extents. Midwives were not involved to the extent that women had hoped for antenatally. Birth companions achieved a level of involvement closer to women's hopes than that achieved by midwives. A significant proportion of women expressed dissatisfaction with the amount of practice of coping strategies during antenatal classes. The findings of this study of a group of well-prepared women raise questions about the correct components of antenatal classes and how midwives and birth companions can be involved optimally in this aspect of a woman's labour. Further research is required to determine how women can best be helped to cope with the experience of labour.

  16. Effective Antenatal Education: Strategies Recommended by Expectant and New Parents

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Jane; Barclay, Lesley; Cooke, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Antenatal education is a crucial component of antenatal care, yet practice and research demonstrate that women and men now seek far more than the traditional approach of a birth and parenting program attended in the final weeks of pregnancy. Indeed, women and men participating in this study recommended a range of strategies to be provided during the childbearing year, comparable to a “menu in a restaurant.” Their strategies included three program types: “Hearing Detail and Asking Questions,” “Learning and Discussing,” and “Sharing and Supporting Each Other.” The characteristics of each type of program are identified in this article. The actual learning methods the study participants recommended to be incorporated into the programs were “Time to Catch Up and Focus,” “Seeing and Hearing the Real Experience,” “Practicing,” and “Discovering.” PMID:19436529

  17. Experience of domestic violence by women attending an inner city accident and emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, D; Watts, S; Zwi, A; Watson, J; McCarthy, C

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the prevalence of domestic violence (DV) (defined as physical abuse perpetrated by intimate partners) in women attending an inner city accident and emergency department and to elicit women's response about being asked routinely about domestic violence in this setting. Methods: 22 nursing shifts were purposefully sampled to be representative of day, night, and weekends. A questionnaire was administered to 198 consenting women who were not intoxicated, confused, or critically ill. Results: The prevalence of acute trauma in women attributable to DV was 1% (95%CI 0.14 to 3.6), the prevalence of lifetime physical abuse was 34.8% (95%CI 28.2 to 41.5), of past year physical abuse was 6.1% (95%CI 3.2 to 10.3), and of lifetime life threatening physical abuse was 10.6% (95%CI 6.3 to 14.9). Seventy six per cent of women felt comfortable about being asked about DV and 60.5% of women felt that they should always or usually be asked about DV in this setting. Conclusion: This cross sectional survey adds to the body of knowledge showing that the prevalence of DV in women attending an accident and emergency department is high. Most women were in favour of being asked, and disclosure was associated with discomfort in few women. This sensitive area of history taking and referral could be undertaken by health professionals using a supportive approach. PMID:14988343

  18. A Mixed-Method Analysis of African-American Women's Attendance at an HIV Prevention Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, R. M.; McKay, M. M.

    2006-01-01

    Grounded in a model of service utilization, this study conceptualizes attendance of African-American women at an HIV prevention intervention as associated with influences across three ecological domains--individual, service (program), and social network. First, the texts of responses to semistructured, open-ended elicitation interviews were…

  19. Risk factors for incident HIV infection among antenatal mothers in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Businge, Charles Bitamazire; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Mathews, Verona

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of HIV among antenatal clients in South Africa has remained at a very high rate of about 29% despite substantial decline in several sub-Saharan countries. There is a paucity of data on risk factors for incident HIV infection among antenatal mothers and women within the reproductive age bracket in local settings in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Objective To establish the risk factors for incident HIV infection among antenatal clients aged 18–49 years attending public antenatal clinics in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa. Design This was an unmatched case–control study carried out in public health antenatal clinics of King Sabata District Municipality between January and March 2014. The cases comprised 100 clients with recent HIV infection; the controls were 200 HIV-negative antenatal clients. Socio-demographic, sexual, and behavioral data were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires adapted from the standard DHS5 women's questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify the independent risk factors for HIV infection. A p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The independent risk factors for incident HIV infection were economic dependence on the partner, having older male partners especially among women aged ≤20 years, and sex under the influence of alcohol. Conclusions Therefore, effective prevention of HIV among antenatal mothers in KSDM must target the improvement of the economic status of women, thereby reducing economic dependence on their sexual partners; address the prevalent phenomenon of cross-generation sex among women aged <20 years; and regulate the brewing, marketing, and consumption of alcohol. PMID:26800877

  20. An Augmented SMS Intervention to Improve Access to Antenatal CD4 Testing and ART Initiation in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Bennett, Kara; Hughes, Michael D.; Veres, Adrian; John, Oaitse; Pradhananga, Rosina; Boyer, Matthew; Brown, Carolyn; Sakyi, Bright; van Widenfelt, Erik; Keapoletswe, Koona; Mine, Madisa; Moyo, Sikhulile; Asmelash, Aida; Siedner, Mark; Mmalane, Mompati; Shapiro, Roger L.; Lockman, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background Less than one-third of HIV-infected pregnant women eligible for combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally initiate treatment prior to delivery, with lack of access to timely CD4 results being a principal barrier. We evaluated the effectiveness of an SMS-based intervention to improve access to timely antenatal ART. Methods We conducted a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial of a low-cost programmatic intervention in 20 antenatal clinics in Gaborone, Botswana. From July 2011-April 2012, 2 clinics were randomly selected every 4 weeks to receive an ongoing clinic-based educational intervention to improve CD4 collection and to receive CD4 results via an automated SMS platform with active patient tracing. CD4 testing before 26 weeks gestation and ART initiation before 30 weeks gestation were assessed. Results Three-hundred-sixty-six ART-naïve women were included, 189 registering for antenatal care under Intervention and 177 under Usual Care periods. Of CD4-eligible women, 100 (59.2%) women under Intervention and 79 (50.6%) women under Usual Care completed CD4 phlebotomy before 26 weeks gestation, adjusted odds ratio (aOR, adjusted for time that a clinic initiated Intervention) 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]0.47–1.63, P = 0.67). The SMS-based platform reduced time to clinic receipt of CD4 test result from median of 16 to 6 days (P<0.001), was appreciated by clinic staff, and was associated with reduced operational cost. However, rates of ART initiation remained low, with 56 (36.4%) women registering under Intervention versus 37 (24.2%) women under Usual Care initiating ART prior to 30 weeks gestation, aOR 1.06 (95%CI 0.53–2.13, P = 0.87). Conclusions The augmented SMS-based intervention delivered CD4 results more rapidly and efficiently, and this type of SMS-based results delivery platform may be useful for a variety of tests and settings. However, the intervention did not appear to improve access to timely antenatal CD4 testing or ART

  1. Syrian Women’s Perceptions and Experiences of Ultrasound Screening in Pregnancy: Implications for Antenatal Policy

    PubMed Central

    Bashour, Hyam; Hafez, Raghda; Abdulsalam, Asmaa

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound scanning is firmly embedded in antenatal maternity care around the world. This paper reports on a qualitative study carried out in 2003 of 30 Syrian women’s perceptions and experiences of routine ultrasound in pregnancy. It was part of a larger study of the experiences of pregnancy and childbirth of 500 women from Damascus and its suburbs who had recently given birth to healthy newborns. The women had had multiple scans during pregnancy and accepted its use uncritically nearly all the time. The scans gave them reassurance that the baby was healthy, the pregnancy was progressing well and allowed them to learn the sex of the baby. The women also reacted positively to the antenatal educational messages that were conveyed using scans. However, we found the excessive use of this technology worrying. We believe private doctors, who attend 80% of pregnant women, use ultrasound primarily to attract women to their clinics and increase their income. We recommend that maternity care in Syria should be better regulated; that women and their doctors should be made aware of the essential components of antenatal care; that national guidelines for antenatal care should be developed and that Syrian women should be empowered to ask questions about pregnancy and childbirth and the care they receive. PMID:16035608

  2. Antenatal Care as a Means of Increasing Birth in the Health Facility and Reducing Maternal Mortality: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Berhan, Yifru; Berhan, Asres

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is a general agreement on the importance of antenatal care to improve the maternal and perinatal health, little is known about its importance to improve health facility delivery in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the association of antenatal care with birth in health facility. Methods A systematic review with meta-analysis of Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios was conducted by including seventeen small scale studies that compared antenatal care and health facility delivery between 2003 and 2013. Additionally, national survey data of African countries which included antenatal care, health facility delivery and maternal mortality in their report were included. Data were accessed via a computer based search from MEDLINE, African Journals Online, HINARI and Google Scholar databases. Results The regression analysis of antenatal care with health facility delivery revealed a positive correlation. The pooled analysis also demonstrated that woman attending antenatal care had more than 7 times increased chance of delivering in a health facility. The comparative descriptive analysis, however, demonstrated a big gap between the proportion of antenatal care and health facility delivery by the same individuals (27%–95% vs 4%–45%). Antenatal care and health facility delivery had negative correlation with maternal mortality. Conclusion The present regression and meta-analysis has identified the relative advantage of having antenatal care to give birth in health facilities. However, the majority of women who had antenatal care did not show up to a health facility for delivery. Therefore, future research needs to give emphasis to identifying barriers to health facility delivery despite having antenatal care follow up. PMID:25489186

  3. How effective is antenatal education?

    PubMed

    Hancock, A

    1994-05-01

    Ideal opportunities exist to offer women information during routine antenatal and postnatal care. Within the present antenatal system the midwife may not be using her teaching skills, or those skills may be out of date with modern developments. Education about childbirth could begin in schools. The midwife could also fulfil another valuable role, as mediator, providing parents with links with each other. Midwives should remember that parents have a lot to offer them as a resource.

  4. Obese women's reasons for not attending a weight management service during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olander, Ellinor K; Atkinson, Lou

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of services targeting obese women's gestational weight gain often report low uptake. Thus it is important to elicit the reasons why obese pregnant women decline to participate in these services and to identify their barriers to participation. Sixteen obese pregnant and postnatal women were interviewed regarding their reasons for declining a group-based service targeting their gestational weight gain. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically. Both pragmatic and motivational barriers were identified. The most common practical reasons for not attending the service were its inconvenient location and time, and feeling unable to attend due to work commitments. Pregnancy-specific barriers included decreased mobility and feeling unwell. Motivational barriers included lack of interest and not wanting to focus on one's weight in pregnancy. These findings highlight issues that need to be taken into consideration when designing group-based weight management services for this population.

  5. Prevalence of gall stones in a group of antenatal women in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akute, O O; Marinho, A O; Kalejaiye, A O; Sogo, K

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of gall stones in Africa is low even though this varies from one part of the continent to another. The few studies were hospital based and excluded majority of silent stones. Abdominal ultrasounds were carried out prospectively on 4,214 consecutive patients referred to an ultrasound centre which cares primarily for pregnant women--a well known vulnerable group for gall stones. An overall prevalence rate of 2.1% was found. This represents a 300-fold increase over previous figures in Ibadan albeit from a different study group. A further study of the disease in the general population is necessary, though it is suggested that the figure in the general population may be less. When this figure is compared with the 10 to 20% in Europe and North America, it confirms the low incidence of the disease in our environment. Majority of the stones were asymptomatic (95%). This needs to be confirmed in the general population. The average stone former in our environment as in previous study does not conform to the classical caucassian description.

  6. ‘They just walk away’ – women’s perception of being silenced by antenatal health workers: a qualitative study on women survivors of domestic violence in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Rishal, Poonam; Joshi, Sunil Kumar; Lukasse, Mirjam; Schei, Berit; Swahnberg, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Background Domestic violence during pregnancy has detrimental effects on the health of the mother and the newborn. Antenatal care provides a ‘window of opportunity’ to identify and assist victims of domestic violence during pregnancy. Little is known about the experience, needs, and expectations from the women's perspective in relation to domestic violence in Nepal. Objective Our study aims to explore how women who have experienced domestic violence evaluate their antenatal care and their expectations and needs from health centers. Design Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted among women who had experienced domestic violence during pregnancy and utilized antenatal care. The women were recruited from two different organizations in Nepal. Results Women in our study concealed their experience of domestic violence due to fear of being insulted, discriminated, and negative attitudes of the health care providers. The women wished that the health care providers were compassionate and asked them about their experience, ensured confidentiality and privacy, and referred them to services that is free of cost. Conclusions Findings from our study may help the health care providers to change their attitudes toward women survivors of domestic violence. Identifying and assisting these women through antenatal care could result in improved services for them and their newborns. PMID:27978940

  7. Human papillomavirus infection in women attended at a cervical cancer screening service in Natal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo; de Vasconcellos Meissner, Rosely; Bezerra, Laelson Freire; de Azevedo, Paulo Roberto Medeiros; Fernandes, José Veríssimo

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed cervical specimens of 202 women, aged 15 to 64 years, attended at Luis Antonio Hospital, Natal, Brazil, to determine the prevalence of HPV and identify the more frequent genotypes and risk factors for HPV infection in women attended at a cervical cancer screening service. Two specimens were collected from each patient: one for cytological examination and the other to detect HPV DNA by PCR, and typing by dot blot hybridization. A total of 54.5% of the sample had normal cytology and 45.5% had cytological alterations. HPV was detected in 24.5% of the cytologically normal women and in 59.8% of those with altered cytology. Both single and double HPV infection increased the likelihood of cytological alterations. Thirteen types of HPV were identified, most of which were high risk. HPV 16 was the most prevalent single-type infection, followed by HPV 58. The most frequent double infection was the association between HPV 56 and 57. The prevalence of HPV in cytologically normal women was greater than that reported for countries on all the continents except Africa. The inverse was observed in women with cytological alterations. The distribution of HPV types was similar to that described for the Americas, with some differences. Multiple sexual partners was the only risk factor showing an association with the presence of HPV infection. PMID:24031268

  8. Factors Associated with Four or More Antenatal Care Visits and Its Decline among Pregnant Women in Tanzania between 1999 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivam; Yamada, Goro; Mpembeni, Rose; Frumence, Gasto; Callaghan-Koru, Jennifer A.; Stevenson, Raz; Brandes, Neal; Baqui, Abdullah H.

    2014-01-01

    In Tanzania, the coverage of four or more antenatal care (ANC 4) visits among pregnant women has declined over time. We conducted an exploratory analysis to identify factors associated with utilization of ANC 4 and ANC 4 decline among pregnant women over time. We used data from 8035 women who delivered within two years preceding Tanzania Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 1999, 2004/05 and 2010. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the association between all potential factors and utilization of ANC 4; and decline in ANC 4 over time. Factors positively associated with ANC 4 utilization were higher quality of services, testing and counseling for HIV during ANC, receiving two or more doses of SP (Sulphadoxine Pyrimethamine)/Fansidar for preventing malaria during ANC and higher educational status of the woman. Negatively associated factors were residing in a zone other than Eastern zone, never married woman, reported long distance to health facility, first ANC visit after four months of pregnancy and woman's desire to avoid pregnancy. The factors significantly associated with decline in utilization of ANC 4 were: geographic zone and age of the woman at delivery. Strategies to increase ANC 4 utilization should focus on improvement in quality of care, geographic accessibility, early ANC initiation, and services that allow women to avoid pregnancy. The interconnected nature of the Tanzanian Health System is reflected in ANC 4 decline over time where introduction of new programs might have had unintended effects on existing programs. An in-depth assessment of the recent policy change towards Focused Antenatal Care and its implementation across different geographic zones, including its effect on the perception and understanding among women and performance and counseling by health providers can help explain the decline in ANC 4. PMID:25036291

  9. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program1

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Everton Faccini; dos Santos, Larissa Silva; Oliveira, Ledy do Horto dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. Method we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. Results virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the samples. Among the 21 different genotypes identified in this study, 14 were high risk for cervical cancer, and the type 16 was the most prevalent type. The infection was associated with women who had non-stable sexual partners. Low risk types were associated with younger women, while the high risk group was linked to altered cytology. Conclusion in this sample attended a Family Health Program, we found a low rate of papillomavirus infection. Virus frequency was associated to sexual behavior. However, the broad range of genotypes detected deserves attention regarding the vaccine coverage, which includes only HPV prevalent types. PMID:24553709

  10. Sexual violence against adult women primary care attenders in east London.

    PubMed Central

    Coid, Jeremy; Petruckevitch, Ann; Chung, Wai-Shan; Richardson, Jo; Moorey, Stirling; Cotter, Sarah; Feder, Gene S

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual violence against women is common. The prevalence appears to be higher in north America than Europe. However, not all surveys have differentiated the experience of forced sex by a current or former partner. Few women are thought to report these experiences to their general practitioner (GP). AIM: To measure the prevalence of rape, sexual assault, and forced sexual intercourse by a partner among women attending general practices, to test the association between these experiences of sexual violence and demographic factors, and to assess the acceptability to women of screening for sexual violence by GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional survey. METHOD: A self-administered questionnaire survey of 1207 women aged over 15 years was carried out in 13 general practices in Hackney, east London. RESULTS: Eight per cent (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.2 to 9.6) of women have experienced rape, 9% (95% CI = 7.0 to 10.6) another type of sexual assault, and 16% (95% CI = 13.6 to 18.1) forced sex by a partner in adulthood: 24% (95% CI = 21.2 to 26.5) have experienced one or more of these types of sexual violence. Experiences of sexual violence demonstrated high levels of lifetime co-occurrence. Women forced to have sex by partners experienced the most severe forms of domestic violence. One in five women would object to routine questioning about being raped and/or sexually assaulted, and one in nine about being forced to have sex by a partner. CONCLUSION: Experiences of sexual violence are common in the lives of adult women in east London, and they represent a significant public health problem. Those women who have one experience appear to be at risk of being victims again. A substantial minority object to routine questions about sexual violence. PMID:14702905

  11. Pregnant and Postpartum Women's Experiences and Perspectives on the Acceptability and Feasibility of Copackaged Medicine for Antenatal Care and PMTCT in Lesotho

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michelle M.; Hoffman, Heather J.; Tiam, Appolinaire; Mohai, Florence M.; Mokone, Majoalane; Isavwa, Anthony; Mohale, Sesomo; Makhohlisa, Matela; Ankrah, Victor; Luo, Chewe; Guay, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To improve PMTCT and antenatal care-related service delivery, a pack with centrally prepackaged medicine was rolled out to all pregnant women in Lesotho in 2011. This study assessed acceptability and feasibility of this copackaging mechanism for drug delivery among pregnant and postpartum women. Methods. Acceptability and feasibility were assessed in a mixed method, cross-sectional study through structured interviews (SI) and semistructured interviews (SSI) conducted in 2012 and 2013. Results. 290 HIV-negative women and 437 HIV-positive women (n = 727) participated. Nearly all SI participants found prepackaged medicines acceptable, though modifications such as size reduction of the pack were suggested. Positive experiences included that the pack helped women take pills as instructed and contents promoted healthy pregnancies. Negative experiences included inadvertent pregnancy disclosure and discomfort carrying the pack in communities. Implementation was also feasible; 85.2% of SI participants reported adequate counseling time, though 37.8% felt pack use caused clinic delays. SSI participants reported improvement in service quality following pack introduction, due to more comprehensive counseling. Conclusions. A prepackaged drug delivery mechanism for ANC/PMTCT medicines was acceptable and feasible. Findings support continued use of this approach in Lesotho with improved design modifications to reflect the current PMTCT program of lifelong treatment for all HIV-positive pregnant women. PMID:26649193

  12. A Study on Gender Preference and Awareness Regarding Prenatal Sex Determination among Antenatal Women in a Rural Area of Darjeeling District, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Archak

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sex ratio is one of the major indicators to find the gender preferences in the community. Change in sex ratio reflects underlying socioeconomic, cultural patterns of a society. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to find out the knowledge of antenatal women regarding the prenatal sex determination and the Pre Natal Diagnostic Techniques (PNDT) Act in a rural area along with assessing the gender preference in family among the study population. Materials and Methods A community based, descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken in the villages of Matigara Block of Darjeeling district of West Bengal, which serves as a field practice area of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital for two months. A total of 116 pregnant women were included and a pre designed pre tested questionnaire was used to collect the socio demographic details. The data were analysed by SPSS 20.0 software for proportions with chi-square tests. Results Knowledge of sex determination and the PNDT Act were found to be 44.82% and 18.10% among antenatal women. Knowledge regarding assessment of gender preference showed 52.58% expect a boy in this pregnancy. It was found that the determinants for gender preference were caste, sex of the last pregnancy and current gender composition. It was found that the determinants for knowledge of sex determination are age of the mother and the gravida of the mother. It was also found that the factor for the knowledge regarding the PNDT Act is age of the mother. These associations are statistically significant. Conclusion This situation calls for a strategy which includes community based awareness campaigns, women employment, education, and empowerment and by ensuring effective implementation of PNDT Act by the government so that families find it difficult to undertake sex determination. PMID:28384893

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis in women attending a gynaecological outpatient clinic with lower genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Svensson, L; Weström, L; Mårdh, P A

    1981-08-01

    In a study of 3794 consecutive women attending a gynaecological outpatient clinic with symptoms of lower genital tract infection (LGTI) 350 (9.2%) harboured Chlamydia trachomatis and 83 (2.2%) Neisseria gonorrhoeae. One hundred and ninety-five patients who were later found to have acute salpingitis and 109 other women in whom the chlamydial cultures were spoiled were excluded from the series. Of the remaining 3490 women, 281 were infected with C trachomatis, 42 with N gonorrhoeae, and 17 with both. Of the 3150 women who were infected with neither organism, 146 were randomly selected as controls. The chlamydia-positive patients were younger (P less than 0.001), did not complain of pelvic discomfort or pain (P less than 0.01), and used oral contraceptives (P less than 0.001) more frequently than did the controls; intrauterine devices were used more often (P less than 0.01) by the controls. Increased vaginal discharge was reported significantly more often in chlamydia-positive patients than in the controls (P less than 0.05). Of 266 women harbouring C trachomatis the organism was still present in 22 (8.3%) when they were followed up from two to more than eight weeks after finishing treatment with doxycycline. Of 91 male consorts of chlamydia-positive women, 53 (58.2%) were infected with C trachomatis.

  14. Assessment of urinary infection management during prenatal care in pregnant women attending public health care units in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vettore, Marcelo Vianna; Dias, Marcos; Vettore, Mario Vianna; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the sociodemographic risk factors for urinary tract infection and the inadequacy of antenatal care, according to the Kotelchuck index, in pregnant women in the city of Rio de Janeiro. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,091 pregnant women, 501 with urinary tract infection, in the public health antenatal care units in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2007-2008. Demographic and socioeconomic data, obstetric history and adequacy of antenatal care were collected by interviews and antenatal care card. Inadequacy management of urinary tract infection was evaluated by professional performance, health services and women dimensions. Chi-square and multivariate logistic regression were used to compare groups and to identify associated factors with management of urinary tract infection. Pregnant teenagers, anemic and diabetic pregnant women and quality of prenatal partially adequate or inadequate were those with higher odds of urinary tract infection. In the overall assessment, 72% had inadequate management of urinary tract infection. Inadequate management of urinary tract infection was associated with brown skin color compared to white skin color. In the assessment of health professional performance, inadequacy management of urinary tract infection was more common in pregnant women with low weight and overweight and obesity. According to pregnant women evaluation, primiparous women have lower odds of inadequacy management of urinary tract infection compared to those with one or more children.

  15. Increasing institutional deliveries among antenatal clients: effect of birth preparedness counselling

    PubMed Central

    Soubeiga, Dieudonné; Sia, Drissa; Gauvin, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends birth and emergency preparedness (BEP) as essential components of the Focused Antenatal Care model. The purpose of providing BEP messages to women during their antenatal visits is to increase the use of skilled attendance at childbirth. However, the effectiveness of this component has not yet been clearly established in routine contexts. This retrospective cohort study examined the association between exposing women to BEP messages during antenatal visits and the use of the skilled attendance at childbirth in two rural districts of Burkina Faso (Koupela and Dori). The study included 456 antenatal care users in 30 rural health centres in these two districts. Data were collected using modified questionnaires from the Johns Hopkins Program for International Education in Gynecology and Obstetrics and from demographic and health surveys. Logistic regression was performed with a model of generalized estimating equation to adjust for clustered effects. In the Koupela district, where the rate of institutional deliveries (80%) was relatively high, the use of BEP messages was not associated with an increase in institutional deliveries. In contrast, in the district of Dori, where the rate of institutional deliveries (47%) was lower, messages regarding danger signs [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 1.93; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.07, 3.49] and cost of care (AOR = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.09, 4.22) were associated with an increased probability of institutional births. Based on these results, it appears that birth and emergency preparedness messages provided during antenatal visits may increase the use of skilled attendance (increase the rate of institutional births) in areas where institutional births are low. Therefore, it is important to adapt the content of the messages to meet the particular needs of the users in each locality. Furthermore, BEP counselling should be implemented in health facilities. PMID:24270519

  16. Antenatal Diagnosis and Down's Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The pamphlet, written for physicians and other health professionals who counsel parents, explain five factors which put women at high risk of giving birth to a child with Down's Syndrome and three antenatal diagnostic techniques. Five factors identified as indicating high risk are advanced maternal age (over 40 years old), a previous child with…

  17. Efficacy of selective antenatal screening for hepatitis B among pregnant women in Denmark: is selective screening still an acceptable strategy in a low-endemicity country?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lise; Heilmann, Carsten; Smith, Else; Wantzin, Per; Peitersen, Birgit; Weber, Tom; Krogsgaard, Kim

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriage in Denmark is unknown, but expected to be low (0.1%). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of selective antenatal screening for HBV infection and the epidemiology of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among pregnant women. 4098 women were included in the study. Blood tests were examined for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) and anti-HCV. Case records were studied to evaluate whether patients at risk for HBV infection had been tested. Among the 4098 women, 18 10.4%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.3-0.71 were HBsAg positive. All had a risk factor for HBV infection. Only 13 (72%) were identified as HBsAg positive in the selective screening programme. 115 women (2.8%, 95% CI 2.3-3.4) were anti-HBc positive only. 95 (83%) were at risk for HBV. Only 72 of these (63%) were tested for HBsAg. The screening programme in this area of Denmark did not pick up one-third of pregnant women at risk of HBV.

  18. Integrating qualitative methods into occupational health research: a study of women flight attendants

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, T; Corradi, L; Lauria, L; Mazzanti, C; Scaravelli, G; Sgorbissa, F; Romito, P; Verdecchia, A

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To identify possible work related sources of psychosocial stress in order to develop pertinent questionnaire items for a cross-sectional health survey of 3000 Italian women flight attendants, and to solicit suggestions on improving survey participation. Methods: Qualitative study in which 26 current and former women flight attendants participated: three focus groups of 6–7 participants each and six in-depth individual interviews. The session themes included positive and negative aspects of the job; relationships with colleagues, superiors, and passengers; perception of occupational risk for serious diseases; compatibility of work and family; and experiences of work related sources of stress and their effect on health. A transcript based analysis of the focus groups and interviews was used to identify emerging themes related to risk factors for mental health problems. Results: The participants indicated that mental health was a major concern. Several work related risk factors possibly related to adverse outcomes, such as depression and anxiety, were highlighted. These included isolation and solitude, fears of being inadequate partners and mothers due to job demands, passenger relationships, and lack of protection by employers with respect to workplace exposures and violent passengers. The information gained was used to develop a mental health module for inclusion in the health survey questionnaire which included questions on history of severe depression or anxiety, suicidal ideation or attempt, substance abuse, workplace sexual harassment, social support, leisure time activities, relationship with a partner, and role as mother. Conclusions: Employing qualitative methods to identify work related sources of psychosocial stress enabled development of pertinent questionnaire items for a cross-sectional epidemiological study of women flight attendants. Follow up qualitative research may be necessary in order to put the cross-sectional study findings into context

  19. The impact of including husbands in antenatal health education services on maternal health practices in urban Nepal: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Britta C; Becker, S; Hindin, M J

    2007-04-01

    Observational studies suggest that including men in reproductive health interventions can enhance positive health outcomes. A randomized controlled trial was designed to test the impact of involving male partners in antenatal health education on maternal health care utilization and birth preparedness in urban Nepal. In total, 442 women seeking antenatal services during second trimester of pregnancy were randomized into three groups: women who received education with their husbands, women who received education alone and women who received no education. The education intervention consisted of two 35-min health education sessions. Women were followed until after delivery. Women who received education with husbands were more likely to attend a post-partum visit than women who received education alone [RR = 1.25, 95% CI = (1.01, 1.54)] or no education [RR = 1.29, 95% CI = (1.04, 1.60)]. Women who received education with their husbands were also nearly twice as likely as control group women to report making >3 birth preparations [RR = 1.99, 95% CI = (1.10, 3.59)]. Study groups were similar with respect to attending the recommended number of antenatal care checkups, delivering in a health institution or having a skilled provider at birth. These data provide evidence that educating pregnant women and their male partners yields a greater net impact on maternal health behaviors compared with educating women alone.

  20. Should HIV testing for all pregnant women continue? Cost-effectiveness of universal antenatal testing compared to focused approaches across high to very low HIV prevalence settings

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Naoko; Dalal, Shona; Johnson, Cheryl; Hogan, Daniel R; Shimbo, Takuro; Shaffer, Nathan; Pendse, Razia N; Lo, Ying-Ru; Ghidinelli, Massimo N; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV testing is the entry point for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Decreasing external funding for the HIV response in some low- and middle-income countries has triggered the question of whether a focused approach to HIV testing targeting pregnant women in high-burden areas should be considered. This study aimed at determining and comparing the cost-effectiveness of universal and focused HIV testing approaches for pregnant women across high to very low HIV prevalence settings. Methods We conducted a modelling analysis on health and cost outcomes of HIV testing for pregnant women using four country-based case scenarios (Namibia, Kenya, Haiti and Viet Nam) to illustrate high, intermediate, low and very low HIV prevalence settings. We used subnational prevalence data to divide each country into high-, medium- and low-burden areas, and modelled different antenatal and testing coverage in each. Results When HIV testing services were only focused in high-burden areas within a country, mother-to-child transmission rates remained high ranging from 18 to 23%, resulting in a 25 to 69% increase in new paediatric HIV infections and increased future treatment costs for children. Universal HIV testing was found to be dominant (i.e. more QALYs gained with less cost) compared to focused approaches in the Namibia, Kenya and Haiti scenarios. The universal approach was also very cost-effective compared to focused approaches, with $ 125 per quality-adjusted life years gained in the Viet Nam-based scenario of very low HIV prevalence. Sensitivity analysis further supported the findings. Conclusions Universal approach to antenatal HIV testing achieves the best health outcomes and is cost-saving or cost-effective in the long term across the range of HIV prevalence settings. It is further a prerequisite for quality maternal and child healthcare and for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. PMID:27978939

  1. Women's Health Decision-Making Autonomy and Skilled Birth Attendance in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Tanle, Augustine; Kissah-Korsah, Kwaku; Amo-Adjei, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Delivering in health facility under the supervision of skilled birth attendant is an important way of mitigating impacts of delivery complications. Empirical evidence suggests that decision-making autonomy is aligned with holistic wellbeing especially in the aspect of maternal and child health. The objective of this paper was to examine the relationship between women's health decision-making autonomy and place of delivery in Ghana. We extracted data from the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey. Descriptive and logistic regression techniques were applied. The results indicated that women with health decision-making autonomy have higher tendency of health facility delivery as compared to those who are not autonomous [OR = 1.27, CI = 1.09–1.48]. However, those who have final say on household large purchases [OR = 0.71, CI = 0.59–0.84] and those having final say on visits [OR = 0.86, CI = 0.73–1.01] were less probable to deliver in health facility than those without such decision-making autonomy. Consistent with existing evidence, wealthier, urban, and highly educated women had higher inclination of health facility delivery. This study has stressed the need for interventions aimed at enhancing health facility delivery to target women without health decision-making autonomy and women with low education and wealth status, as this can play essential role in enhancing health facility delivery. PMID:28116348

  2. Predictors of consistent condom use among Portuguese women attending family planning clinics.

    PubMed

    Costa, Eleonora C V; Oliveira, Rosa; Ferreira, Domingos; Pereira, M Graça

    2016-01-01

    Women account for 30% of all AIDS cases reported to the Health Ministry in Portugal and most infections are acquired through unprotected heterosexual sex with infected partners. This study analyzed socio-demographic and psychosocial predictors of consistent condom use and the role of education as a moderator variable among Portuguese women attending family planning clinics. A cross-sectional study using interviewer-administered fully structured questionnaires was conducted among 767 sexually active women (ages 18-65). Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the association between consistent condom use and the predictor variables. Overall, 78.7% of the women were inconsistent condom users. The results showed that consistent condom use was predicted by marital status (being not married), having greater perceptions of condom negotiation self-efficacy, having preparatory safer sexual behaviors, and not using condoms only when practicing abstinence. Living with a partner and having lack of risk perception significantly predicted inconsistent condom use. Less educated women were less likely to use condoms even when they perceive being at risk. The full model explained 53% of the variance in consistent condom use. This study emphasizes the need for implementing effective prevention interventions in this population showing the importance of taking education into consideration.

  3. Women's Health Decision-Making Autonomy and Skilled Birth Attendance in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ameyaw, Edward Kwabena; Tanle, Augustine; Kissah-Korsah, Kwaku; Amo-Adjei, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Delivering in health facility under the supervision of skilled birth attendant is an important way of mitigating impacts of delivery complications. Empirical evidence suggests that decision-making autonomy is aligned with holistic wellbeing especially in the aspect of maternal and child health. The objective of this paper was to examine the relationship between women's health decision-making autonomy and place of delivery in Ghana. We extracted data from the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey. Descriptive and logistic regression techniques were applied. The results indicated that women with health decision-making autonomy have higher tendency of health facility delivery as compared to those who are not autonomous [OR = 1.27, CI = 1.09-1.48]. However, those who have final say on household large purchases [OR = 0.71, CI = 0.59-0.84] and those having final say on visits [OR = 0.86, CI = 0.73-1.01] were less probable to deliver in health facility than those without such decision-making autonomy. Consistent with existing evidence, wealthier, urban, and highly educated women had higher inclination of health facility delivery. This study has stressed the need for interventions aimed at enhancing health facility delivery to target women without health decision-making autonomy and women with low education and wealth status, as this can play essential role in enhancing health facility delivery.

  4. Motivations and reasons for women attending a Breast Self-Examination training program: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is a major threat to Taiwanese women's health. Despite the controversy surrounding the effectiveness of breast self-examination (BSE) in reducing mortality, BSE is still advocated by some health departments. The aim of the study is to provide information about how women decide to practice BSE and their experiences through the training process. Sixty-six women aged 27-50 were recruited. Methods A descriptive study was conducted using small group and individual in-depth interviews to collect data, and using thematic analysis and constant comparison techniques for data analysis. Results It was found that a sense of self-security became an important motivator for entering BSE training. The satisfaction in obtaining a sense of self-security emerged as the central theme. Furthermore, a ladder motivation model was developed to explain the participants' motivations for entering BSE training. The patterns of motivation include opportunity taking, clarifying confusion, maintaining health, and illness monitoring, which were connected with the risk perception for breast cancer. Conclusions We recognize that the way women decide to attend BSE training is influenced by personal and social factors. Understanding the different risk assessments women rely on in making their health decisions is essential. This study will assist researchers and health professionals to gain a better understanding of alternative ways to deal with breast health, and not to be limited by the recommendations of the health authorities. PMID:20618986

  5. Internet: a new concept of antenatal education.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Gergana

    2015-02-01

    Historically antenatal education has been seen as an important part of antenatal care and a mechanism to provide women with close to realistic interpretations of childbirth and motherhood. Through the years, the main themes and emphases of parenting education have changed, sometimes to reflect the new socio-economic structure and sometimes forced by the women themselves seeking specific information and knowledge. Yet again, this time the invasion of online information and social media is about to change the perception and the philosophy of antenatal education from an informative opportunity to a powerful and effective intervention.

  6. [Customer satisfaction analysis in women attending an organized mammographic screening. Pilot study at Trento].

    PubMed

    Della Sala, W; Tognotti, F; Pellegrini, M; Bernardi, D; Gentilini, M; Piffer, S

    2005-01-01

    Present paper reports on the results of a pilot customer satisfaction study carried out on 1.720 consecutive women (18.7 with spontaneous access) attended senology department (Trento and Borgo) in the context of a organized mammography screening programme, started in October 2000. Data were collected by a questionnarie filled by the women after mammography. 4.3% of the invited women reported the receiving the letter late, 0.9% considered it inaccurate, 7.2% had some problems for getting a new date for test, 1.8% of the whole sample reported some problems for external access and 2.2% for internal access to health facilities; 1.9% perceived waiting room as not friendly. The welcoming by the personnel is judged quite well, only 0.6% complained about it. Trento centre, is more efficient than Borgo. In 21.7% of the cases the mammography has been performed within next 30 minutes of the fixed time and in 7.9% besides that. 36.8% of the whole sample perceived mammography as tiresome and 4.1% as painful. The percentage of women reporting mammography disconforting increase, in Trento sample, according the education level as previously reported. The data about perceived quality are satisfactory, on the whole. Anyway it would be opportune to contain the waiting time.

  7. Genital mycoplasmas in women attending the Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Njunda, Anna L.; Nsagha, Dickson S.; Assob, Jules C.N.; Palle, John N.; Kamga, Henri L.; Nde, Peter F.; Ntube, Mengang N.C.; Weledji, Patrick E.

    2011-01-01

    Genital mycoplasmas are implicated in pelvic inflammatory diseases, puerperal infection, septic abortions, low birth weight, nongonococcal urethritis and prostatitis as well as spontaneous abortion and infertility in women. There is paucity of data on colonisation of genital mycoplasma in women and their drug sensitivity patterns. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of genital mycoplasmas (Ureaplasma urealiticum and Mycoplasma hominis) infection and their drug sensitivity patterns in women. A mycofast kit was used for biochemical determination of mycoplasma infection in 100 randomly selected female patients aged 19–57 years, attending the University of Yaoundé Teaching Hospital (UYTH) from March to June 2010. Informed consent was sought and gained before samples were collected. Genital mycoplasmas were found in 65 patients (65%) [95% CI=55.7–74.3%] and distributed as 41 (41%) [95% CI=31.4–50.6%] for U. urealiticum and 4 (4%) [95% CI=0.20– 7.8%] for M. hominis while there was co-infection in 20 women (20%) [95% CI=12.16–27.84%]. In our study, 57 (57%) [95% CI=47.3–67%] had other organisms, which included C. albicans (19 [19%]), G. vaginalis (35 [35%]) and T. vaginalis (3 [3%]). Among the 65 women with genital mycoplasma, the highest co-infection was with G. vaginalis (33.8%). Pristinamycine was the most effective antibiotic (92%) and sulfamethoxazole the most resistant (8%) antibiotic to genital mycoplasmas. We conclude that genital mycoplasma is a problem in Cameroon and infected women should be treated together with their partners. PMID:28299057

  8. Effect of aerobic exercise during pregnancy on antenatal depression

    PubMed Central

    El-Rafie, Mervat M; Khafagy, Ghada M; Gamal, Marwa G

    2016-01-01

    Background Antenatal depression is not uncommon and is associated with a greater risk of negative pregnancy outcomes. Aim Exploring the effect of exercise in preventing and treating antenatal depression. Methods This was a prospective interventional controlled study carried out in 100 pregnant women treated at the Ain-Shams Family Medicine Center and Maadi Outpatient Clinic, Cairo, Egypt. The participants were divided into two groups (n=50 in the exercise group and n=50 in the control group). The exercise group regularly attended supervised sessions for 12 weeks. The activities in each session included walking, aerobic exercise, stretching, and relaxation. The control group completed their usual antenatal care. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to assess depression symptoms at the first interview and immediately after the 12-week intervention. Results Compared to the control group, the exercise group showed significantly improved depressive symptoms as measured with the CES-D after the 12-week intervention on the CES-D (P=0.001). Within groups, the exercise group demonstrated a significant improvement of depressive symptoms from baseline to intervention completion, while the control group demonstrated no significant changes over time. Conclusion Exercise during pregnancy was positively associated with reduced depressive symptoms. PMID:26955293

  9. Barriers to Care for Antenatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kopelman, Robin Cook; Moel, Joy; Mertens, Carol; Stuart, Scott; Arndt, Stephan; O’Hara, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the individual-level factors impacting pregnant women’s access to mental health treatment for depression. Methods A total of 1,416 pregnant women receiving prenatal care completed measures of depressive symptomatology, willingness to seek treatment for depression or anxiety, and perceived barriers to seeking such care. Results Women with Beck Depression Inventory scores {greater than or equal to; ≥}16 (indicating possible depression) (N=183) were more likely than women with lower scores (N=1,233) to identify the following barriers: cost, lack of insurance, lack of transportation, long waits for treatment, previous bad experience with mental health care, and not knowing where to go for treatment. Lower income was correlated with increased endorsement of cost and transportation as barriers. Conclusions Results suggest that addressing financial and logistical barriers through changes in mental health services and policy will improve access to care for antenatal depression. However, attending to these issues alone will not address additional important barriers to care such as lack of trust. PMID:18378843

  10. [Positive impact of a video and TV documentary on attendance of women to catch-up collective vaccinations and reasons for non-attendance].

    PubMed

    Painvin, C; Schlumberger, M; Chhem, Dy Bun; Savannarom, Dim; Phong, Phing; Gilberg, S

    2011-02-01

    The impact of medical documentaries on attendance to immunization sessions is not documented in developing countries. The impact of a video and TV medical documentary on women's vaccination during a catch-up tetanus collective immunization was studied in Cambodia (2002-2004). A medical video documentary produced locally was publicly shown in 10 villages chosen at random among 63 villages to be covered by collective tetanus immunization. In each village where the video was shown, 33 women, older than age 11, were selected at random and questioned about their tetanus vaccination records, to assess if they attended the video and to evaluate their knowledge about tetanus. A second interview was conducted after the first collective vaccination to check their attendance and to record reasons for non-attendance. The same interview was conducted 10 months later, after the documentary was shown on a local TV channel and a second collective tetanus vaccination conducted. Data were collected from 323 (98%) women. Seventy-eight (24%) women saw the video documentary and only eight (2.4%) saw it on TV. Compared to farmers, shopkeepers saw significantly less the documentary (χ² of Yates: 5.77,P = 0.016; 95% CI: 0.10 < RR = 0.29 < 0.88) and no home keeper or civil servant attended it. Women of childbearing age with no school education were significantly more attracted by the video documentary (χ² of Yates: 5.99,P = 0.01; 95% CI: 1.10 < RR = 1.57 < 2.22) than other childbearing-aged women, although their final immunization coverage was not better. The documentary did not increase the knowledge that contamination for tetanus may come from earth and tools, but not from air and water, and that all ages are at-risk for tetanus, but it increased significantly the knowledge that vaccination can prevent the disease (χ² of Yates: 13.98;P = 0.0001; 95% CI: 1.28 < RR = 1.57 < 1.93). Women who saw the video documentary attended the first collective session more often than those who did

  11. Sex-Related Alcohol Expectancies among African American Women Attending an Urban STI Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Heidi E.; McCaul, Mary E.; Norris, Jeanette; Valliant, Julia D.; Abrefa-Gyan, Tina; Chander, Geetanjali

    2014-01-01

    African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for HIV/STI acquisition. Sex related alcohol expectancies (SRAE) may partially account for alcohol related risky sexual behaviors. Using qualitative interviews we explored the link between alcohol use and risky sex among 20 African American women attending an STI clinic who had consumed ≥4 alcoholic drinks per drinking day (binge drinking) and/or reported vaginal or anal sex while under the influence of alcohol. Four SRAE emerged which we named: drink for sexual desire, drink for sexual power, drink for sexual excuse, and drink for anal sex. While the desire SRAE has been documented, this study identified three additional SRAEs not currently assessed by expectancy questionnaires. These SRAEs may contribute to high-risk sex when under the influence of alcohol, and suggests the importance of developing integrated alcohol-sexual risk reduction interventions for high-risk women. PMID:25110958

  12. Exploring group composition among young, urban women of color in prenatal care: Implications for satisfaction, engagement, and group attendance

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Rosenthal, Lisa; Cunningham, Shayna D.; Kershaw, Trace; Lewis, Jessica; Rising, Sharon; Stasko, Emily; Tobin, Jonathan; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Group models of prenatal care continue to grow in popularity. Yet, little is known about how group composition (similarity or diversity between members of groups) relates to care-related outcomes. The current investigation aimed to explore associations between prenatal care group composition with patient satisfaction, engagement, and group attendance among young, urban women of color. Methods Data were drawn from two studies conducted in New Haven and Atlanta (2001–2004; n=557) and New York City (2008–2011; n=375), designed to evaluate group prenatal care among young, urban women of color. Women aged 14–25 were assigned to group prenatal care and completed surveys during their second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Group attendance was recorded. Data were merged and analyzed guided by the Group Actor-Partner Interdependence Model using multilevel regression. Analyses explored composition in terms of age, race, ethnicity, and language. Main findings Women in groups with others more diverse in age reported greater patient engagement and, in turn, attended more group sessions [b(se)= −0.01(0.01), p=0.04]. Conclusion The composition of prenatal care groups appears to be associated with young women’s engagement in care, ultimately relating to the number of group prenatal care sessions they attend. Creating groups diverse in age may be particularly beneficial for young, urban women of color, who have unique pregnancy needs and experiences. Future research is needed to test the generalizability of these exploratory findings. PMID:26542382

  13. Women's need for information before attending genetic counselling for familial breast or ovarian cancer: a questionnaire, interview, and observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Hallowell, N.; Murton, F.; Statham, H.; Green, J. M.; Richards, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe women's information needs prior to genetic counselling for familial breast or ovarian cancer. DESIGN: Prospective study including semistructured telephone interviews before genetic counselling, observations of consultations, completion of postal questionnaires, and face-to face interviews within two months of counselling. SUBJECTS: 46 women attending genetic counselling for familial breast or ovarian cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjects' understanding of process and content of genetic counselling before attending and attitudes about their preparation for the counselling session. RESULTS: Although all women interviewed before the clinic expected to discuss their risk of developing cancer and risk management options, there was evidence of a lack of knowledge about the process and content of genetic counselling, 17 (37%) women said they did not know what else would happen. Most women interviewed after counselling viewed it positively, but 26 (65%) felt they had been inadequately prepared and 11 (28%) felt that their lack of preparation meant that they could not be given an accurate estimation of their risk of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Some women felt that they did not obtain optimum benefit from genetic counselling because they were inadequately prepared for it. We suggest that cancer family history clinics should provide women with written information about the process and content of genetic counselling before their clinic attendance. PMID:9022494

  14. Determinants of life satisfaction among Japanese elderly women attending health care and welfare service facilities.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Chiemi; Yuasa, Kyoko; Sei, Masako; Ewis, Ashraf A; Nakano, Takuro; Munakata, Hokuma; Nakahori, Yutaka

    2010-02-01

    Prolonged life expectancy must be recognized as an excellent achievement of modern medicine, but not all the elderly people are satisfied with their lives. Life satisfaction is a multi-dimensional issue that depends on many objective and subjective characteristics. In this study, we aimed at investigating the factors affecting life satisfaction of 314 elderly Japanese women attending in 28 elderly-care and welfare facilities at Tokushima Prefecture, Japan. Our results indicated that elderly subjects with depression tendencies always show significantly lower degrees of life satisfaction than others who are not depressed (p<0.001) regardless of their cognitive status. Furthermore, elderly women who shared decision for their living place and whose opinions were considered for daily life decisions reported significantly more life satisfaction levels than others. We conclude that elderly life satisfaction is affected by various determinants however, with different influencing weight. Life satisfaction of elderly people, with or without dementia, is greatly affected by their mood status and share in decision making. Avoiding elderly people depressive mood, sharing them in various daily decisions, considering their opinions, and allowing them to decide their elderly-care facility placement are crucial determinants for their life satisfaction and essential for their coping, adaptation, well-being and successful aging.

  15. Correlation between clinical presentation and urodynamic findings in women attending urogynecology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Deeksha; Anna, Gasser; Hana, Ottenschlaeger; Christian, Fuenfgeld

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Urodynamic studies objectively observe lower urinary tract function and dysfunction so that an appropriate treatment can be planned. In the present study, we tried to evaluate the role of urodynamic studies in the final diagnosis and management plan in patients attending an urogynecology clinic. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in an urogynecology clinic. 202 women were included. After detailed history, pelvic examination and introital sonography these women were subjected to urodynamic study. During the filling cystometry detrusor activity, first desire to void and bladder capacity was recorded. This was followed by urethral pressure measurements, when functional urethral length, maximum urethral closure pressure and stress urethral pressure profile was recorded. Results: Most prevalent complaint was mixed urinary incontinence (33.17%), followed by stress incontinence (31.68%) and urge incontinence (13.37%). According to the standard urodynamic definition 66.33% were normal in the population studied. None of the urodynamic parameters individually or in combination were found to be very useful for establishing a diagnosis. Conclusion: Establishment of the final diagnosis of urinary incontinence and planning of management should be based on detailed history, physical examination, bladder diaries, and careful interpretation of urodynamic data. Urodynamic study; however, doesn’t seem to be imperative to establish a diagnosis in uncomplicated cases where symptoms and signs are reliable and correlating. PMID:24672187

  16. Diversity and uncommon HPV types in HIV seropositive and seronegative women attending an STI clinic

    PubMed Central

    de Mattos, Adriana Tonani; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Lima, Bettina Moulin Coelho; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Spano, Liliana Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Given the causal relationship between specific types of HPV with cervical cancer and precursor lesions, it is important to identify the viral type involved. The aim of this study is to access the prevalence of HPV types in HIV seropositive and seronegative women. Accordingly, 77 HPV positive cervical samples were obtained from 284 women (seropositive (n=112) and seronegative (n=172) for HIV) who attended a Sexually Transmitted Infection clinic, in Vitoria, Southeastern Brazil. Viral DNA was amplified by PCR using MY09/MY11 degenerated primers and the genotyping was performed by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. Seventy five out of the 77 HPV samples were genotyped: 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, 26, 31, 31b, 32, 33, 34, 35, 52, 53, 55, 56, 58, 59, 61, 62, 64, 66, 71, 81, 83, 84. The most prevalent type was HPV16 followed by HPV types 6, 11 and 53. Fifty five percent and 45% belonged to high and low risk types, respectively. High risk types corresponded to 59% and 54.5% of the HPV detected in HIV seronegative and seropositive women, respectively. The uncommon HPV 13 type in cervical samples was also observed in this study. The oncogenic types were more common in the HIV seronegative samples and the number of cases with multiple infections was similar for the two groups. HPV typing is not only important clinically for the establishment of monitoring and treatment of a patient, it also provides knowledge of the viral types circulating in a population, which is of interest in the development of prevention and treatment programs for this disease. PMID:24031694

  17. Inequality in access to health care in Cambodia: socioeconomically disadvantaged women giving birth at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Rathavuth; Them, Rathnita

    2015-03-01

    Cambodia faces major challenges in its effort to provide access to health care for all. Although there is a sharp improvement in health and health care in Cambodia, 6 in 10 women still deliver at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants. This practice is associated with higher maternal and infant deaths. This article analyzes the 2005 Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey data to examine the relationship between socioeconomic inequality and deliveries at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants. It is evident that babies in poorer households are significantly more likely to be delivered at home by an unskilled birth attendant than those in wealthier households. Moreover, delivery at home by an unskilled attendant is associated with mothers who have no education, live in a rural residence, and are farmers, and with higher birth order children. Results from this analysis demonstrate that socioeconomic inequality is still a major factor contributing to ill health in Cambodia.

  18. Audit of antenatal screening for syphilis and HIV in migrant and refugee women on the Thai-Myanmar border: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    McGready, Rose; Kang, Joy; Watts, Isabella; Tyrosvoutis, Mary Ellen G; Torchinsky, Miriam B.; Htut, Aung Myo; Tun, Nay Win; Keereecharoen, Lily; Wangsing, Chirapat; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Nosten, François H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The antenatal prevalence of syphilis and HIV/AIDS in migrants and refugees is poorly documented. The aim of this study was to audit the first year of routine syphilis screening in the same population and reassess the trends in HIV rates. Methods: From August 2012 to July 2013, 3600 pregnant women were screened for HIV (ELISA) and syphilis (VDRL with TPHA confirmation) at clinics along the Thai-Myanmar border. Results: Seroprevalence for HIV 0.47% (95% CI 0.30-0.76) (17/3,599), and syphilis 0.39% (95% CI 0.23-0.65) (14/3,592), were low. Syphilis was significantly lower in refugees (0.07% 95% CI 0.01-0.38) (1/1,469), than in migrants (0.61% 95% CI 0.36-1.04) (13/2,123). The three active (VDRL≥1:8 and TPHA reactive) syphilis cases with VDRL titres of 1:32 were easy to counsel and treat. Women with low VDRL titres (>75% were < 1:8) and TPHA reactive results, in the absence of symptoms and both the woman and her husband having only one sexual partner in their lifetime, and the inability to determine the true cause of the positive results presented ethical difficulties for counsellors. Conclusion: As HIV and syphilis testing becomes available in more and more settings, the potential impact of false positive results should be considered, especially in populations with low prevalence for these diseases. This uncertainty must be considered in order to counsel patients and partners accurately and safely about the results of these tests, without exposing women to increased risk for abuse or abandonment. Our findings highlight the complexities of counselling patients about these tests and the global need for more conclusive syphilis testing strategies. PMID:26664698

  19. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital renal malformations using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, K P; Merchant, R H; Gondhalekar, A; Lulla, C P; Mehta, A A; Mehta, K P

    1998-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine the accuracy of antenatal sonography for the detection of congenital renal malformations and to characterize the type of malformations, seen in a 3-year prospective study at a university-affiliated maternity hospital. Participants were 31,217 pregnant women, during the study period, and subjects were 65 fetuses in whom renal malformations were detected on antenatal ultrasound. Pelvic ultrasound scans were performed at least once between 20 and 37 weeks' gestation on all pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the hospital for the detection of renal malformations. Fetal urinary sampling, diversion procedures, or termination of pregnancy were carried out as required in those detected to have renal anomalies. Postnatal diagnosis was confirmed by sonography or autopsy. Diagnostic procedures and renal surgery were performed postnatally if indicated. Sixty-five fetuses (0.2 per cent) were diagnosed to have congenital renal malformation antenatally at a mean gestational age of 28.4 weeks. A dilated urinary system was seen in 39, cystic renal disease in 15, agenesis/hypoplasia in six, combined lesions in four, and a horseshoe kidney in one. Oligohydramnios was noted in 20 (31 per cent) pregnancies. Multiple congenital malformations associated with renal anomalies were detected in 12 pregnancies. Termination was carried out at 20 weeks in two pregnancies for lethal malformations; fetal urinary sampling was done in two fetuses with obstructed uropathy, and a vesicoamniotic shunt inserted in one. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed a dilated urinary system in 32, cystic renal dysplasia in 15, renal aplasia/hypoplasia in five, combined lesions in six, and a horseshoe and an ectopic kidney in one each. Five infants were found to be normal. There were seven stillbirths and seven neonatal deaths. Radionuclide scans showed obstruction in nine, decreased renal function in six, and absent renal functions in 10 infants. Micturating

  20. Psychosocial factors and attendance at a population-based mammography screening program in a cohort of Swedish women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the factors that influence mammography screening attendance is needed to improve the effectiveness of these screening programs. The objective of the study was to examine whether psychosocial factors predicted attendance at a population-based invitational mammography screening program. Methods Data on cohabitation, social network/support, sense of control, and stress were obtained from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort Study and linked to the Malmö mammography register in Sweden. We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44 to 72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry (1992 to 1996). Mammography attendance was followed from cohort entry to December 31, 2009. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to account for repeated measures within subjects. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Results Among 69,746 screening opportunities there were 5,552 (8%) cases of non-attendance. Higher odds of non-attendance were found among women who lived alone (OR = 1.47 (1.33-1.63)) or with children only (OR = 1.52 (1.29-1.81)), had one childbirth (OR = 1.12 (1.01-1.24)) or three or more childbirths (OR = 1.34 (1.21-1.48)), had low social participation (OR= 1.21 (1.10-1.31)), low sense of control (OR = 1.12 (1.02-1.23)), and experienced greater stress (OR = 1.24 (1.13-1.36)). Conclusions Public health campaigns designed to optimize mammography screening attendance may benefit from giving more consideration of how to engage with women who are less socially involved. PMID:24565263

  1. Cardiovascular risk in African American women attending historically Black colleges and universities: the role of dietary patterns and food preferences.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sandra Chaisson; Geiselman, Paula J; Broussard, Tracy

    2010-11-01

    There is a lack of data on the dietary patterns and food preferences of African American women attending historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). African American women have higher death rates from cardiovascular disease than White women, and the initiating events of cardiovascular disease often begin in young adulthood. The purpose of this study was to identify the dietary patterns and food preferences of African American college women, which may act as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A convenience sample of 100 African American women, ages 18 to 40 years, was administered two surveys assessing food preferences and dietary patterns. The majority of the participants (65%) preferred high-fat foods, and most of the participants (87%) consumed more than 30% of their daily caloric intake from fat. There is a definite need for dietary education regarding the impact of dietary fat on cardiovascular health among college students.

  2. When Life Got in the Way: How Danish and Norwegian Immigrant Women in Sweden Reason about Cervical Screening and Why They Postpone Attendance

    PubMed Central

    Azerkan, Fatima; Widmark, Catarina; Sparén, Pär; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tillgren, Per; Faxelid, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Danish and Norwegian immigrant women in Sweden have an increased risk of cervical cancer compared to Swedish-born women. In addition, Danish and Norwegian immigrant women follow the national recommendations for attendance at cervical screening to much lesser extent than Swedish-born women. The aim of this study was to explore how Danish and Norwegian immigrant women in Sweden reason about attending cervical screening, focusing on women’s perceptions as to why they and their compatriots do not attend. Methods Eight focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with Danish and Norwegian immigrant women living in Stockholm. The women were between 26 and 66 years of age at the time of the FGDs, and were aged between <1 and 48 years old when they immigrated to Sweden. A FGD guide was used, which included questions related to cervical screening, and obstacles and motivators to attend cervical screening. The FGDs were tape recorded and transcribed, and the results analysed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. Results The main theme was “Women have a comprehensive rationale for postponing cervical screening, yet do not view themselves as non-attenders”. Investigation of women’s rationale for non-attendance after being invited to cervical screening revealed some complex reasons related to immigration itself, including competing needs, organisational and structural factors and differences in mentality, but also reasons stemming from other factors. Postponing attendance at cervical screening was the category that linked all these factors as the reasons to why women did not attend to cervical screening according to the recommendations of the authorities. Conclusions The rationale used to postpone cervical screening, in combination with the fact that women do not consider themselves to be non-attenders, indicates that they have not actively taken a stance against cervical screening, and reveals an opportunity to motivate these women

  3. Popular Contraceptive Methods in Women Aged 35 Years and Older Attending Health Centers of 4 Cities in Khuzestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nouhjah, Sedighe; Amiri, Elham; Khodai, Azim; Yazdanpanah, Azar; Nadi Baghu, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of unintended pregnancy and associated risks are higher in late reproductive years. Limited studies have focused on contraceptive choices in these women. The aim of the study was to identify contraceptive choices and their related factors in women 35 years or older attending health centers of Khuzestan province. Objectives Additionally, several line of evidence indicated relationship between increasing maternal age and poor pregnancy outcomes (1, 2). Pregnancies above the age of 35 are accompanied with more risks for complication related to pregnancy as compared to younger women (3-5). Risk of spontaneous abortion is 74.4% in mothers aged 45 years or more. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study 1584 women aged 35 years and older attending public health centers of four cities of Khuzestan were studied. We used an interviewer-administered questionnaire for data collection. Women investigators were recruited for interview and filling the questionnaire. Participants were assured of the confidentiality of their responses. Results The mean age of women was 39.8 ± 4.2 years. The most popular contraceptive methods used in this age group were oral contraceptive pills (31.4%), condom (28.1%), and tubal ligation (14.8%). Less effective contraceptive methods were used in 41.5% of women. Significant associations were found between the use of effective methods and literacy of husband (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.91), city of residence (OR = 0, 92, 95%CI: 0.87-0.97), women age (OR = 0.97, 95% CI; 0.94-0.99), and women education (OR = 0.87, 95%CI: 0.76-0.99) (P < 0.01). Conclusions In spite of risk of pregnancy and unintended pregnancy in this age group, about a half of them used less effective contraceptive methods, hence family planning education, and counseling to older women should be a priority in health centers. PMID:24693364

  4. [Antenatal care and source of care during pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blondel, B; Kaminski, M; Du Mazaubrun, C; Rumeau-Rouquette, C

    1982-01-01

    The influence of the source of care on the unequalities in the number of antenatal visits was studied in a representative sample of births in France in 1976. The sources of care during pregnancy were divided into five groups according to number and qualification of the medical staff involved: hospital antenatal clinic, gynaecologist or obstetrician, general practitioner, hospital antenatal clinic and other practitioners, several practitioners outside hospital. The number of antenatal visits was related to the source of care. The inequalities in antenatal care according to maternal characteristics originated from inequal access to the most specialized sources of care and disparities in the number of visits within each source of care. Living in a big conurbation was a positive factor for consulting an obstetrician, going to hospital antenatal clinic and having a large number of visits; but even after allowing for this factor, there remained inequalities among women according to their socio-demographic characteristics or the source of care.

  5. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis in women attending a family planning clinic in the Metropolitan Region of Chile].

    PubMed

    Lillo G, Eduardo; Lizama I, Sandra; Medel C, Jorge; Martínez T, M Angélica

    2010-06-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women attending a family health Center and to evaluate the accuracy of Amsel's diagnostic procedure relative to Nugent scoring for diagnosing this condition, we obtained vaginal specimens from 100 women under 50 years attending a FPC from April to November of 2006. Women were enrolled consecutively on a schedule basis and were not selected by symptoms of genital infection. VB was diagnosed in 32% women, without significant differences by age (p=0,114). 87.5% women declared one sexual partner in the last 6 months. The Amsel's method had a sensitivity of 62.1%, and a specificity of 92.3%, with positive and negative predictive values of 81.8% and 83.3% respectively, being the presence of clue cells the most accurate parameter. Nevertheless, the lack of microscopes in the clinical practice limits the use of the Amsel's criteria. In conclusion, VB is a prevalent infection in the study population, being not associated with age or sexual activity. Diagnosis should be performed by the Nugent method.

  6. Infant Feeding among Women Attending an Immunisation Clinic at a Tertiary Health Institution in Ibadan, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatiregun, A. A.; Abegunde, V. O.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal characteristics can affect a mother's decision to breastfeed. This study used a cross-sectional design to assess maternal variables and infant feeding patterns among nursing mothers attending an immunisation clinic in Ibadan, Nigeria. A total of 264 mothers who consecutively attended the immunisation clinic and met certain inclusion…

  7. Cost-benefit analysis of selective screening criteria for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women attending Colorado family planning clinics.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, J T; Henneberry, J F; Rickard, R S; Beebe, J L

    1992-01-01

    Women attending family planning clinics in Colorado during 1988 were screened for Chlamydia trachomatis infection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA, Chlamydiazyme, Abbott Laboratories; Abbott Park, IL). Cervical specimens from 11,793 women attending 22 family planning clinics were analyzed. Patient history and physical exams were used to assess risk factors for infection. A total of 913 individuals (7.7%) had positive culture results for C. trachomatis. Multivariate analysis showed that infection was significantly related to endocervical bleeding, cervical mucopurulent discharge, a new sexual partner in the last 3 months or multiple previous sexual partners (greater than 3) in the last year, pregnancy, the use of oral contraceptives, and age. Increased odd ratios were observed for the combination of endocervical bleeding and mucopurulent discharge and sexual history that included partners over the previous year as well as the most recent 3 months. A combination of these criteria was used to selectively screen women attending Colorado family planning clinics on an ongoing basis. A cost-benefit analysis employing a model reported previously showed a significant financial benefit associated with universal screening over either selective screening or no screening for C. trachomatis in this population.

  8. A survey describing the use of complementary therapies and medicines by women attending a family planning clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complementary medicines (CMs) are widely used by women. Although, women in Australia are frequent users of CM, few studies have examined their utilisation by women attending a family planning service. The aim of this study was to examine (i) the extent of and type of CM, (ii) women’s views about safety and efficacy, and (iii) the factors influencing women’s decision-making. Methods A cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of 221women aged greater than 18 years attending a family planning (FP) service was undertaken over a two week period in Sydney, Australia. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was designed to examine women’s current and previous use of CMs, their attitudes towards safety and effectiveness, the factors influencing their decision-making, and their disclosure of CM use to a FP health professional. Demographic questions were designed to describe the diversity of the participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between CM use and demographics. Results Sixty-seven percent of women surveyed were currently using CMs, and 83% reported use during the previous 12 months. Most respondents utilised CMs to maintain their general health or for prevention of ill health. Over 30% of women lacked information to make an informed response to questions examining their views about the safety of CMs. Forty-four percent of participants stated they discussed their use of CMs with their FP providers. The main reason why women did not mention CMs was they did not see the relevance to their consultation (43%). Lower rates of CM use were found for younger women (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.61), and those not completing high school (OR 0.44, 95% 0.20-1.00). Conclusion The use of CM is very common among women attending an Australian FP clinic, however our findings may not be generalisable to all women. We identified a notable gap in women’s awareness of the potential for interactions between CM and prescribed

  9. Intimate partner violence among pregnant women in Rwanda, its associated risk factors and relationship to ANC services attendance: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Rurangirwa, Akashi Andrew; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Krantz, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prevalence of four forms of intimate partner violence during pregnancy in Rwandan women, associated sociodemographic and psychosocial factors and relationship to antenatal care service usage. Design This was a cross-sectional population-based study conducted in the Northern province of Rwanda and in Kigali city. Participants and settings A total of 921 women who gave birth within the past 13 months were included. Villages in the study area were selected using a multistage random sampling technique and community health workers helped in identifying eligible participants. Clinical psychologists, nurses or midwives carried out face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess associations. Results The prevalence rates of physical, sexual, psychological violence and controlling behaviour during pregnancy were 10.2% (95% CI 8.3 to 12.2), 9.7% (95% CI 7.8 to 11.6), 17.0% (95% CI 14.6 to 19.4) and 20.0% (95% CI 17.4 to 22.6), respectively. Usage of antenatal care services was less common among women who reported controlling behaviour (OR) 1.93 (95% CI 1.34 to 2.79). No statistically significant associations between physical, psychological and sexual violence and antenatal care usage were found. Low socioeconomic status was associated with physical violence exposure (OR) 2.27 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.98). Also, young age, living in urban areas and poor social support were statistically significant in their associations with violence exposure during pregnancy. Conclusions Intimate partner violence inquiry should be included in the standard antenatal care services package and professionals should be trained in giving support, advice and care to those exposed. Gender-based violence is criminalised behaviour in Rwanda; existing policies and laws must be followed and awareness raised in society for preventive purposes.

  10. A cross-sectional study of migrant women with reference to their antenatal care services utilization and delivery practices in an urban slum of Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Badge, Vijay Loknath; Pandey, Minal; Solanki, Mridula J.; Shinde, Ratnendra Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Migrant is a vulnerable population. They face several barriers in accessing health services. The immigration status presents various challenges for maternity services utilization. So this study was conducted (1) to estimate proportion of women utilizing full ANC package and to find out reasons for its nonutilization (2) to estimate the proportion of institutional deliveries and reasons for home deliveries. Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted among migrant women in reproductive age group in an urban slum. The sample size was 120. Multistage simple random sampling was done. Results: Maximum numbers of migrants (71.7%) were from Uttar Pradesh. Sixty two percent married before the age of 18 years. Full ANC package was received by only 18% migrants. Proportion of home deliveries was 12%, and all were conducted by Untrained Dai. Lack of transport facility and availability of Dai (local birth attendant) were the reasons mentioned for home delivery. For nonutilization of full ANC package, far location of health center (30%); it is not necessary (25.8%); and family did not allow them to visit health center (21.8%) were the reasons mentioned. Religion and type of family were significantly associated with nonutilization of full ANC package. Conclusion: The present study revealed low utilization of ANC services and high proportion of home deliveries among the migrant women even after availability of health facilities for providing ANC care and to conduct deliveries in urban area. PMID:28348986

  11. Socio-economic and ethnic group inequities in antenatal care quality in the public and private sector in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Victora, CG; Matijasevich, A; Silveira, MF; Santos, IS; Barros, AJD; Barros, FC

    2010-01-01

    Background Socio-economic inequalities in maternal and child health are ubiquitous, but limited information is available on how much the quality of care varies according to wealth or ethnicity in low- and middle-income countries. Also, little information exists on quality differences between public and private providers. Methods Quality of care for women giving birth in 2004 in Pelotas, Brazil, was assessed by measuring how many of 11 procedures recommended by the Ministry of Health were performed. Information on family income, self-assessed skin colour, parity and type of provider were collected. Results Antenatal care was used by 98% of the 4244 women studied (mean number of visits 8.3), but the number of consultations was higher among better-off and white women, who were also more likely to start antenatal care in the first trimester. The quality of antenatal care score ranged from 0 to 11, with an overall mean of 8.3 (SD 1.7). Mean scores were 8.9 (SD 1.5) in the wealthiest and 7.9 (SD 1.8) in the poorest quintiles (P < 0.001), 8.4 (SD 1.6) in white and 8.1 (SD 1.9) in black women (P < 0.001). Adjusted analyses showed that these differences seemed to be due to attendance patterns rather than discrimination. Mean quality scores were higher in the private 9.3 (SD 1.3) than in the public sector 8.1 (SD 1.6) (P < 0.001); these differences were not explained by maternal characteristics or by attendance patterns. Conclusions Special efforts must be made to improve quality of care in the public sector. Poor and black women should be actively encouraged to start antenatal care early in pregnancy so that they can fully benefit from it. There is a need for regular monitoring of antenatal attendances and quality of care with an equity lens, in order to assess how different social groups are benefiting from progress in health care. PMID:20123940

  12. Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Medley, Nancy; Darzi, Andrea J; Richardson, Marty; Habiba Garga, Kesso; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least four antenatal care (ANC) visits for all pregnant women. Almost half of pregnant women worldwide, and especially in developing countries do not receive this amount of care. Poor attendance of ANC is associated with delivery of low birthweight babies and more neonatal deaths. ANC may include education on nutrition, potential problems with pregnancy or childbirth, child care and prevention or detection of disease during pregnancy. This review focused on community-based interventions and health systems-related interventions. Objectives To assess the effects of health system and community interventions for improving coverage of antenatal care and other perinatal health outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials and cluster-randomised trials. Trials of any interventions to improve ANC coverage were eligible for inclusion. Trials were also eligible if they targeted specific and related outcomes, such as maternal or perinatal death, but also reported ANC coverage. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Main results We included 34 trials involving approximately 400,000 women. Some trials tested community-based interventions to improve uptake of antenatal care (media campaigns, education or financial incentives for pregnant women), while other trials looked at health systems interventions (home visits for pregnant women or equipment for clinics). Most trials took place in low- and middle-income countries, and 29 of the 34 trials used a cluster-randomised design. We assessed 30 of the 34 trials as of low or unclear overall risk of bias. Comparison 1: One intervention versus no intervention We

  13. Translating formative research findings into a behaviour change strategy to promote antenatal calcium and iron and folic acid supplementation in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephanie L; Seim, Gretchen L; Wawire, Salome; Chapleau, Gina M; Young, Sera L; Dickin, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization now recommends integrating calcium supplements into antenatal micronutrient supplementation programmes to prevent pre-eclampsia, a leading cause of maternal mortality. As countries consider integrating calcium supplementation into antenatal care (ANC), it is important to identify context-specific barriers and facilitators to delivery and adherence. Such insights can be gained from women's and health workers' experiences with iron and folic acid (IFA) supplements. We conducted in-depth interviews with 22 pregnant and post-partum women and 20 community-based and facility-based health workers in Kenya to inform a calcium and IFA supplementation programme. Interviews assessed awareness of anaemia, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia; ANC attendance; and barriers and facilitators to IFA supplement delivery and adherence. We analyzed interviews inductively using the constant comparative method. Women and health workers identified poor diet quality in pregnancy as a major health concern. Neither women nor health workers identified pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, anaemia or related symptoms as serious health threats. Women and community-based health workers were unfamiliar with pre-eclampsia and eclampsia and considered anaemia symptoms normal. Most women had not received IFA supplements, and those who had received insufficient amounts and little information about supplement benefits. We then developed a multi-level (health facility, community, household and individual) behaviour change strategy to promote antenatal calcium and IFA supplementation. Formative research is an essential first step in guiding implementation of antenatal calcium supplementation programmes to reduce pre-eclampsia. Because evidence on how to implement successful calcium supplementation programmes is limited, experiences with antenatal IFA supplementation can be used to guide programme development.

  14. "Knowledge, attitude, behavior and practice (KABP) regarding HIV/AIDS among pregnant women attending PPTCT programme in New Delhi".

    PubMed

    Rahbar, T; Garg, S; Tripathi, R; Gupta, V K; Singh, M M

    2007-09-01

    In India, several thousand HIV-infected babies are expected to be born every year. Despite effective intervention, the identification of HIV infected pregnant women prior to delivery is a major problem. KABP and acceptance of rapid screening of women for HIV among pregnant women attending ANC clinic and availing Voluntary Counselling and Confidential Testing services was assessed. The study was done among 90 pregnant women. There was no significant difference between one's husbands's job and income with respect to pregnant women's awareness of risk factors except that of tattooing. Education level had significant bearing on awareness level. Attitude about PLWHA indicates that 29% of the participants believed individuals with HIV shouldn't be allowed to get married, while 31% saying that they should not be allowed to have children. Participants supported compulsory HIV testing for pregnant women (39%) and couples before marriage. Almost 96% of participants had unprotected sex, though 41% casually used condom. All denied herself or her husband indulging in extramarital sex. The country is about to embark on its prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programme. This study throws some light on the level of knowledge acceptability and adoption of VCT and other PMTCT strategies among potential beneficiaries.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus infection, hepatitis B virus infection, and sexual behaviour of women attending a genitourinary medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Evans, B A; McCormack, S M; Bond, R A; MacRae, K D; Thorp, R W

    1988-02-13

    During the six months immediately after a public information campaign about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome 1115 women who attended a genitourinary medicine clinic in west London were tested for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Three women (0.27%) were positive, and all three were regular sexual partners of men with high risk lifestyles--two intravenous drug users and one bisexual. A consecutive series of 647 women from the cohort was tested for antibodies for hepatitis B core antigen: 27 were positive, of whom six had been born in the United Kingdom and were not known to have been at risk. The two women who were seropositive for HIV who completed a questionnaire on their sexual behaviour before they were tested reported both anal and oral receipt of semen and were in the upper fifth percentile for lifetime sexual partners. More than half (53%) of 424 women who reported that they had non-regular sexual partners never used a condom. It is concluded that heterosexual women in London are at a low risk of becoming infected with HIV.

  16. The Meaning of African American College Women's Experiences Attending a Predominantly White Institution: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Christine R.; Woodside, Marianne; Pollard, Brittany L.; Roman, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Because both race and gender are important to the development of African American women, student affairs professionals need to understand the unique experiences of African American women within the context of the college environment. In this phenomenological study, we examined African American women's lived experiences as college students at a…

  17. Racial origin, sexual lifestyle, and genital infection among women attending a genitourinary medicine clinic in London (1992)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, B. A.; Kell, P. D.; Bond, R. A.; MacRae, K. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare variables of sexual behaviour and incidence of genital infections among women of different racial origins and lifestyles. DESIGN: A prospective cross sectional study of sexual behaviour reported by a standardised self administered questionnaire in new patients who presented for screening and diagnosis. SETTING: A genitourinary medicine clinic in west London. SUBJECTS: 1084 consecutive women newly attending in 1992. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Variables relating to sociodemographic status, sexual lifestyle, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and other genital infections stratified by racial origin. RESULTS: There were 948 evaluable women, of whom 932 (98.3%) were heterosexual and 16 (1.7%) were lesbian. Previous heterosexual intercourse was reported by 69% of lesbian women and their most frequent diagnosis was bacterial vaginosis (38%). The majority of heterosexual women were white (78%) and 16% were black. The black women were more likely to be teenagers (18% cf 8%; p = 0.0004) or students (28% cf 15%; p = 0.0008), and to have had an earlier coitarche (48% cf 38% before aged 17; p < 0.004). They also had a higher proportion of pregnancies (58% cf 38%; p < 0.00001) and births (38% cf 20%; p < 0.00001). The white women showed significantly more sexual partners during the preceding year (p = 0.004) and in total (p < 0.00001) and more reported non-regular partners (48% cf 35%; p = 0.004) with whom they were more likely to use condoms (p = 0.009). However, the black women were more likely to have gonorrhoea (7% cf 2% p < 0.0003), chlamydial infection (12% cf 5% p < 0.002), trichomoniasis (10% cf 2% p < 0.00001), or to sexual contacts of men with non-gonococcal urethritis (19% cf 12% p < 0.02). They were less likely to have genital warts (3% cf 12% p = 0.002). Logistic regression showed that all these variables were independently associated with the black women. The Asian women (2%), none of whom had a sexually transmitted disease, had commenced

  18. Safe motherhood perspectives and social support for primigravidae women in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Maimbolwa, Margaret; Ahmed, Yusuf; Diwan, Vinod; Arvidson, Anna-Berit Ransjö

    2003-12-01

    The safe motherhood goals of being attended by a skilled attendant at birth have not been met in Zambia. Almost all (93%) of Zambian pregnant women attend antenatal care, though only 43% deliver in maternity units. This study was conducted to explore low-risk Zambian primigravidae's preparation for pregnancy including contraceptive use, content of antenatal care, preparation for childbirth and the extent of social support. Two hundred and ninety nine healthy primigravidae, who attended the antenatal clinic at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH), Lusaka, Zambia, were interviewed using a structured interview guide. The women's mean age was 20.7 years; 41% were adolescents. The adolescent group had significantly less years of education (p < 0.0000). In total, 78% had never used any contraceptive method. The main source of information on sexual issues was friends and the mass media. Only 2% of the women had received information on sexual and reproductive health matters from health staff. Nearly half did not want the pregnancy. Sixty three per cent of the women had made their first antenatal visit during the second trimester. There had been no antenatal preparation of the women for parturition and their parenting role. Eighty five per cent of the pregnant women had identified a social support person to assist them during pregnancy and after childbirth. The results suggest that preparation for parenthood had a low priority as part of the antenatal care. We recommend that as part of the integrated reproductive health approach, parenthood classes should be organised and social support network should be utilised and involved in the care.

  19. Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale (MAAS): adaptation to Spanish and proposal for a brief version of 12 items.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Aresti, Lucía; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Iriarte, Leire; Martínez-Pampliega, Ana

    2016-02-01

    The psychometric properties of the adapted Spanish version of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale were examined. The main goal was to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the conceptual structure of Condon's proposal. Five hundred twenty-five pregnant women, attending maternal education classes in Bizkaia (Spain), answered the translated and back-translated version of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale. This scale comprises 19 items with five answer choices divided into two subscales: quality of attachment and intensity of attachment. Participants also answered a questionnaire about the reproductive history that was developed ad hoc for the present study. The Spanish adaptation of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale final version comprises 12 items: seven items have been removed due to their inadequate psychometric properties. Internal consistency of the inventory is moderate-high (.73) and it ranges from .68 (intensity of attachment) to .75 (quality of attachment) for the dimensions. Three alternative structural models were proven using a confirmatory factor analysis. Lastly, the two-related-factor model was chosen, as it obtained suitable fit indexes (χ (2) = 102.28; p < .001; goodness-of-fit index (GFI) = .92; comparative fit index (CFI) = .95; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = .042, 90 % CI [.030-.054]). Due to its adequate psychometric properties, the Spanish version of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale can be proposed as a suitable instrument for the purpose of measuring antenatal attachment. The study of antenatal attachment helps to detect possible difficulties for the mother in establishing an affective relationship with the foetus. This may affect the foetus growth, delivery and the future mother-child relationship.

  20. Design and process of the EMA Cohort Study: the value of antenatal education in childbirth and breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Pascual, Carmen; Pinedo, Isabel Artieta; Grandes, Gonzalo; de Gamboa, Gurutze Remiro Fernandez; Hermosilla, Itziar Odriozola; de la Hera, Amaia Bacigalupe; Gordon, Janire Payo; Garcia, Guadalupe Manzano; de Pedro, Magdalena Ureta

    2008-01-01

    Background Antenatal education (AE) started more than 30 years ago with the purpose of decreasing pain during childbirth. Epidural anaesthesia has achieved this objective, and the value of AE is therefore currently questioned. This article describes the protocol and process of a study designed to assess AE results today. Methods/Design A prospective study was designed in which a cohort of 616 nulliparous pregnant women attending midwife offices of the Basque Health Service were followed for 13 months. Three exposure groups were considered based on the number of AE sessions attended: (a) women attending no session, (b) women attending 1 to 4, and (c) women attending 5 or more sessions. Sociodemographic, personality, and outcome variables related to childbirth and breastfeeding were measured. It was expected 40% of pregnant women not to have participated in any AE session. However, 93% had attended at least one session. This low exposure variability decreased statistical power of the study as compared to the initially planned power. Despite this, there was a greater than 80% power for detecting as significant differences between exposure groups of, for instance, 10% in continuation of breastfeeding at one and a half months and in visits for false labour. Women attending more sessions were seen to have a mean higher age and educational level, and to belong to a higher socioeconomic group (p < 0.01). Follow-up was completed in 99% of participants. Discussion Adequate prior estimation of variability in the exposure under study is essential for designing cohort studies. Sociodemographic characteristics may play a confounding role in studies assessing AE and should be controlled in design and analyses. Quality control during the study process and continued collaboration from both public system midwives and eligible pregnant women resulted in a negligible loss rate. PMID:18435856

  1. HIV risk behaviours of current sex workers attending syringe exchange: the experiences of women in five US cities.

    PubMed

    Paone, D; Cooper, H; Alperen, J; Shi, Q; Des Jarlais, D C

    1999-06-01

    Existing research indicates that sex workers who inject drugs are vulnerable to HIV infection through both risky sexual and drug use practices. This study is the first attempt to learn whether this increased risk persists among current sex workers who participate in syringe exchange programmes (SEPs). With data from interviews with randomly selected participants in five US cities, we compared the demographic characteristics, sexual risk behaviours, drug use practices, emotional and physical health, and SEP utilization patterns of currently active female sex workers who attend SEPs with female SEP participants who do not engage in sex work. Data indicate that women enrolled in SEPs who were currently trading sex typically reported greater HIV risk than women non-sex workers. Current sex workers reported higher levels of risk for every drug risk variable examined in bivariate analysis. They were more likely than other women to inject with a syringe previously used by someone else, to inject daily and to attend shooting galleries; they were less likely to use a condom with their primary partners and to report higher levels of psychological distress than their counterparts. The relationship between sex work status and risky injection practices persisted when potential confounders were controlled for in multivariate analysis. SEPs can serve a pivotal role in providing sex workers with services and referrals which would help them reduce risk behaviours.

  2. Obstetric predictors of hypertension: A cross-sectional study of women attending the postnatal clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Agbo, Hadiza A.; Okeahialam, Basil N.; Daru, Patrick H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disease in pregnancy (HDP) accounts for high mother and child morbi-mortality and predict future cardiometabolic diseases. This study aimed to identify obstetric predictors of HDP needing preventive action to reduce its consequences; when women present to antenatal clinic (ANC). Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive this was an Interviewer-administered semi-structured questionnaire-based study of the anthropometric, and blood pressure measurementsin attendees at the postnatal clinic (PNC) of Jos University with ANC records. Setting: Six weeks postnatal clinic (PNC) of Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Results: The following indices proved predictive of HDP and subsequent hypertension: weight (P = 0.009), hip circumference (P = 0.018), parity (P = 0.043), waist circumference (P = 0.00), abdominal height (P = 0.040), waist/height (P = 0.020), history of developing hypertension in previous pregnancy (P = 0.000), birth weight of baby (P = 0.02), and mode of delivery (P = 0.05). Conclusion: To initiate preventive action on ANC registration in mitigating effects of or outrightly preventing HDP, careful check on anthropometry as well as history of hypertension or operative/preterm delivery in a previous pregnancy is necessary PMID:27942098

  3. Women's preference for traditional birth attendants and modern health care practitioners in Akpabuyo community of Cross River State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpabio, Idongesit I; Edet, Olaide B; Etifit, Rita E; Robinson-Bassey, Grace C

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of women who patronized traditional birth attendants (TBAs) or modern health care practitioners (MHCPs) was compared, including reasons for their choices. A comparative design was adopted to study 300 respondents selected through a multistage systematic random sampling technique. The instrument for data collection was a validated 21-item structured questionnaire. We observed that 75 (25%) patronized and 80 (27%) preferred TBAs, and 206 (69%) patronized and 220 (75%) preferred MHCPs, while 19 (6%) patronized both. The view that TBAs prayed before conducting deliveries was supported by a majority 75 (94%) of the respondents who preferred them. Factors associated with preference for TBAs should be addressed.

  4. Violence against women: prevalence and associated factors in patients attending a public healthcare service in the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Arleide da; Falbo Neto, Gilliatt Hanois; Figueiroa, José Natal; Cabral Filho, José Eulálio

    2010-02-01

    The prevalence of and factors associated with violence against women attended as outpatients between October 2005 and January 2006 by the Instituto Materno Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil, were investigated using a cross-sectional type study. 619 women over the age of 18 were included in a systematic probabilistic sample. The modified Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS) was applied and the data were evaluated statistically by way of univariate and bivariate analyses, using the chi2 or Fischer's exact test and an adjusted multivariate logistic regression model. The prevalence of violence against women was 27.5% (95%CI: 24.0%-31.2%) in the twelve-month period prior to the consultation. The associated factors were low level of schooling (OR = 2.34), a history of domestic violence (OR = 2.21) the woman being mentally disturbed (OR = 2.35), and the partner's consumption of alcohol (OR = 1.77). The prevalence of violence was high in the group of women studied, indicating the need to broaden preventive measures and all-round health care for women.

  5. The Academic Experiences of Women Post 9/11 Veterans Attending Post-Secondary Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunden, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the perspectives of women Post 9/11 veterans on their experiences in the military and subsequently in higher education. Using feminist research methodology, I interviewed three women veterans about their decisions to join the military, their gendered experiences in the military, their decisions to enroll in college, and their…

  6. Adverse health effects of spousal violence among women attending Saudi Arabian primary health-care clinics.

    PubMed

    Eldoseri, H M; Tufts, K A; Zhang, Q; Fish, J N

    2014-12-17

    This study aimed to investigate the frequency of spousal violence among Saudi women and document the related health effects and injuries, as well as their attitudes to gender and violence. Structured interviews were conducted with 200 ever-married women recruited from primary-care centres in Jeddah. Nearly half of the surveyed women (44.5%) reported ever experiencing physical violence from their spouse. Although 37 women (18.5%) had received violence-related injuries, only 6.5% had reported these injuries to a health-care provider. Victims of spousal violence had poor perceptions of their overall health, and reported pain or discomfort, antidepressant use and suicidal thoughts. Women mostly disagreed with the presented justifications for wife-beating. However, the association between gender attitudes and spousal violence was not significant. The results of this study support calls for integration of education about partner violence into health-care curricula to enhance the access and quality of services.

  7. Managing Mental Health Problems Among Immigrant Women Attending Primary Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Straiton, Melanie L; Powell, Kathryn; Reneflot, Anne; Diaz, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in Norway explore treatment options in primary care for immigrant women with mental health problems compared with nonimmigrant women. Three national registers were linked together for 2008. Immigrant women from Sweden, Poland, the Philippines, Thailand, Pakistan, and Russia were selected for analysis and compared with Norwegian women. Using logistic regression, we investigated whether treatment type varied by country of origin. Rates of sickness leave and psychiatric referrals were similar across all groups. Conversational therapy and use of antidepressants and anxiolytics were lower among Filipina, Thai, Pakistani, and Russian women than among Norwegians. Using the broad term "immigrants" masks important differences in treatment and health service use. By closely examining mental health treatment differences by country of origin, gaps in service provision and treatment uptake may be identified and addressed with more success.

  8. Stillbirth history and Toxoplasma gondii infection in women attending public health centers in a northern Mexican City.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, C; Pacheco-Vega, S J; Salcedo-Jaquez, M; Sánchez-Anguiano, L F; Hernández-Tinoco, J; Rábago-Sánchez, E; Centeno-Tinoco, M M; Flores-Garcia, I D; Ramos-Nevarez, A; Cerrillo-Soto, S M; Guido-Arreola, C A; Beristain-García, I; Liesenfeld, O; Berumen-Segovia, L O; Saenz-Soto, L; Sifuentes-Álvarez, A

    2015-06-01

    Through a cross-sectional study design, 150 women attending public health centers with a history of stillbirths were examined for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies in Durango City, Mexico. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of T. gondii seropositivity with the characteristics of the women with stillbirth history. Of the 150 women (mean age: 32.09 ± 9.16 years) studied, 14 (9.3%) had anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies and six (42.9%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii seropositivity was associated with high frequency (4-7 days a week) of eating meat (OR = 5.52; 95% CI: 1.48-20.59; P = 0.01), history of lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.52; 95% CI: 1.14-17.82; P = 0.03), and history of surgery (OR = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.04-72.15; P = 0.04). This is the first study on the seroepidemiology of T. gondii infection in women with a history of stillbirths in Mexico. The association of T. gondii exposure with a history of surgery warrants for further research. Risk factors for T. gondii infection found in the present survey may help to design optimal educational programs to avoid T. gondii infection.

  9. Stillbirth history and Toxoplasma gondii infection in women attending public health centers in a northern Mexican City

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, C.; Pacheco-Vega, S. J.; Salcedo-Jaquez, M.; Sánchez-Anguiano, L. F.; Hernández-Tinoco, J.; Rábago-Sánchez, E.; Centeno-Tinoco, M. M.; Flores-Garcia, I. D.; Ramos-Nevarez, A.; Cerrillo-Soto, S. M.; Guido-Arreola, C. A.; Beristain-García, I.; Liesenfeld, O.; Berumen-Segovia, L. O.; Saenz-Soto, L.; Sifuentes-Álvarez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Through a cross-sectional study design, 150 women attending public health centers with a history of stillbirths were examined for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies in Durango City, Mexico. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of T. gondii seropositivity with the characteristics of the women with stillbirth history. Of the 150 women (mean age: 32.09 ± 9.16 years) studied, 14 (9.3%) had anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies and six (42.9%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii seropositivity was associated with high frequency (4–7 days a week) of eating meat (OR = 5.52; 95% CI: 1.48–20.59; P = 0.01), history of lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.52; 95% CI: 1.14–17.82; P = 0.03), and history of surgery (OR = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.04–72.15; P = 0.04). This is the first study on the seroepidemiology of T. gondii infection in women with a history of stillbirths in Mexico. The association of T. gondii exposure with a history of surgery warrants for further research. Risk factors for T. gondii infection found in the present survey may help to design optimal educational programs to avoid T. gondii infection. PMID:26185685

  10. Mediators of the Relation Between Partner Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Women Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mona; Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with a wide range of negative outcomes, including sexual risk behavior. This cross-sectional study explored mediators of the relationship between IPV and risky sexual behavior in 717 women recruited from an STD clinic. Methods Participants were recruited from a public STD clinic in upstate New York as part of a randomized control trial (RCT) that was designed to evaluate several sexual risk reduction interventions. They completed an Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview in a private room. Results Among these women, 18% reported IPV in the past 3 months and 57% reported lifetime experience of IPV. Recent IPV was associated with greater sexual risk as measured by more episodes of unprotected sex (overall and with a steady partner). Although IPV was associated with depressive symptoms and drug use before sex, these variables did not mediate the relationship between IPV and sexual risk behavior. Conclusions The results indicate that IPV is common among women who attend an STD clinic and warrants increased attention. Research is needed to better understand the pathways linking IPV and HIV risk in women to optimize the design of effective interventions. PMID:21258269

  11. Hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus type-1, and syphilis among women attending prenatal clinics in Belize, Central America.

    PubMed

    Scott-Wright, A; Hakre, S; Bryan, J P; Jaramillo, R; Reyes, L G; Cruess, D; Macarthy, P O; Gaydos, J C

    1997-03-01

    Women and their infants may benefit from therapeutic interventions when hepatitis B, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or syphilis are detected during the prenatal period. We initiated hepatitis B and HIV screening of women attending prenatal clinics in Belize. Risk factor assessment information for hepatitis B infection and demographic data were determined by interview. Of 543 evaluable women, 81 (14.9%) were seropositive for hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc); one woman had asymptomatic hepatitis B surface antigenemia. Antibodies to HIV-1 were detected in one woman. Reactive syphilis serologies were detected in 15 (2.8%) women. Anti-HBc seroprevalence varied by district (range 3.1-43.5%) and by ethnicity (range 0.0-40.9%). Significant identified risks for anti-HBc seropositivity from univariate analyses included being of the Garifuna ethnic group, residence or birth in the Stann Creek or Toledo districts, a reactive syphilis serology, a household size of eight or greater, and five or more lifetime sexual partners. Multivariate analyses identified ethnicity and a reactive rapid plasma reagin as the best predictors of anti-HBc seropositivity. Highly variable differences in anti-HBc prevalence by district may permit the targeting of limited public health resources for education, screening, and prevention programs.

  12. High Prevalence of Rectal Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Infection in Women Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Patricia Carr; Esber, Allahna; Lahey, Samantha; Ervin, Melissa; Davis, John A.; Fields, Karen; Turner, Abigail Norris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Testing women for urogenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is common in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics. However, women may not be routinely tested for rectal GC/CT. This may lead to missed infections in women reporting anal intercourse (AI). Methods: This was a retrospective review of all women who underwent rectal GC/CT testing from August 2012 to June 2013 at an STD clinic in Columbus, Ohio. All women who reported AI in the last year had a rectal swab collected for GC/CT nucleic acid amplification testing (n=331). Using log-binomial regression models, we computed unadjusted and adjusted associations for demographic and behavioral factors associated with rectal GC/CT infection. Results: Participants (n=331) were 47% African-American, with median age of 29 years. Prevalence of rectal GC was 6%, rectal CT was 13%, and either rectal infection was 19%. Prevalence of urogenital GC and CT was 7% and 13% respectively. Among women with rectal GC, 14% tested negative for urogenital GC. Similarly, 14% of women with rectal CT tested negative for urogenital CT. In unadjusted analyses, there was increased rectal GC prevalence among women reporting sex in the last year with an injection drug user, with a person exchanging sex for drugs or money, with anonymous partners, and while intoxicated/high on alcohol or illicit drugs. After multivariable adjustment, no significant associations persisted, but a trend of increased rectal GC prevalence was observed for women <26 years of age (p=0.06) and those reporting sex while intoxicated/high on alcohol or drugs (p=0.05). For rectal CT, only age <26 years was associated with prevalent infection in unadjusted models; this association strengthened after multivariable adjustment (prevalence ratio: 6.03; 95% confidence interval: 2.29–15.90). Conclusion: Nearly one in five women who reported AI in the last year had rectal GC or CT infection. Urogenital testing alone would have

  13. Assessment of menopausal symptoms among women attending various outreach clinics in South Canara District of India

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nitin; Nagaraj, Kondagunta; Saralaya, Vittal; Nelliyanil, Maria; Rao, PP Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Menopausal symptoms experienced by women are known to affect their quality-of-life. The symptoms experienced at menopause are quite variable and their etiology is found to be multifactorial. This study was hence done to assess the pattern and severity of menopausal symptoms and to find out the factors associated with these symptoms. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in various outreach clinics of Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. Women in the age group of 40-65 years were included in the study by convenient sampling method. Data regarding menopausal symptom was obtained by interviewing each participant using the menopause rating scale questionnaire. Results: Mean age of the participants were 54.2 ± 7.2 years and mean age of attainment of menopause was 48.4 ± 4.5 years. Mean duration of menopause was found to be 7.5 ± 5.3 years. Commonest symptom reported was joint and muscular discomfort and physical and mental exhaustion seen in 94 (85.4%) participants. The mean number of symptoms reported by participants was 7.6 ± 2.8. Educated women reported significantly more symptoms (F = 2.218, P = 0.047). Somatic and urogenital symptoms were more among perimenopausal women and somatic symptoms were more among postmenopausal women. Fifty-eight (52.7%) participants had one or more severe symptoms. Severe symptoms were most among premenopausal women. Conclusion: The high proportion and severity of menopausal symptoms observed in this study group proves that menopausal symptoms are common and cannot be ignored. More of menopausal clinics are needed for awareness generation, early recognition and treatment of related morbidities. PMID:24970987

  14. Introducing and negotiating the use of female condoms in sexual relationships: qualitative interviews with women attending a family planning clinic.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Wojcicki, Janet; Valencia-Garcia, Dellanira

    2004-09-01

    Safe sex skills training often teach women to be assertive in condom use negotiations. However, it has been suggested that assertiveness training may be inappropriate for women who lack power in their sexual relationship. Our qualitative study of 62 women attending a family planning clinic explored various communication styles they used to introduce and negotiate female condom use in their sexual relationships. We further examined how different introduction and negotiation styles were related to actual use of the device. The device was introduced using a direct, semidirect, indirect, or nonverbal communication approach. Use of the female condom was negotiated by avoiding sex, using humor, discussing the possibility of using the condom, or being argumentative with partners. The outcome of introducing and negotiating female condom use was often mediated by other factors including partner characteristics, relationship power dynamics, situational context, and use of additional discourse strategies (e.g., describing the female condom as a sexual toy or taking the opportunity to educated partners about the female condom). Less direct approaches appeared to be as effective in facilitating use of the female condom as more direct approaches. Female condom introduction and negotiation styles that continued to engage their partners by using additional discourse strategies led to more frequent use of the device. Implications of our findings for HIV risk reduction program development are discussed.

  15. Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Academic Adjustment among African American Women Attending Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Deneia M.; Love, Keisha M.; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Tyler, Keneth M.; Brown, Carrie Lynn; Garriott, Patton O.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore,…

  16. Contraceptive Needs and Practices among Women Attending an Inner-City STD Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Dawn; And Others

    1987-01-01

    To assess the need, interest in, and benefits of contraception services, 516 women at high risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were surveyed. Forty-six percent were not using contraception, but 62 percent expressed interest in contraception. Provision of the services may address the dual need for preventing unwanted pregnancies and STDs.…

  17. [Accidents and violence among women attended in Sentinel Emergency Services--Brazil, 2009].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Celeste de Souza; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Godinho, Tatau; Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; da Silva, Marta Maria Alves; Silva, Rurany Ester

    2012-09-01

    Accidents from external causes affect the human population in different ways. This article seeks to analyze emergency care for women who are victims of accidents and violence. Data from the Surveillance System for Violence and Accidents were analyzed. This study was carried out in 74 emergency units of 23 state capitals and the Federal District in 2009 and included 6,965 women aged from 20-59 years. The age groups of 20-39 and 40-59 years were compared for the occurrence of accidents and violence. Accidents were more frequent among young black women (20-39 years) with more than nine years of schooling. The occurrence of violence was also prevalent in young black women but with less schooling. Falls were the most frequent accidents (38.6%), followed by traffic accidents. The occurrence of violence was more frequent in the home (p <0.000) and the mention of alcohol abuse among victims of violence was predominant. The most frequent type of violence was aggression (84.6%), in which the aggressor was male (79.1%) and identified as an intimate partner (44.1%). It is increasingly important that services are able to provide comprehensive and humanized care to the victims of this important public health problem.

  18. Antenatal memories and psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, Roger

    1981-01-01

    A case is described of suicidal impulses apparently stemming from the patient's experience before and during his birth. By using a technique of `rebirthing', antenatal memories were relived and their traumatic effects resolved. Theoretical and practical accounts of rebirthing are given, and its significance for general practitioners is discussed. PMID:7338871

  19. A review of longitudinal studies on antenatal and postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Lisa; Waldie, Karen; D'Souza, Stephanie; Peterson, Elizabeth R; Morton, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Antenatal depression is a known risk factor for postnatal depression; both are common disorders associated with negative impacts on child development. Few studies have followed up women from pregnancy and through the postnatal period to explore how rates of depression change. This review evaluates recent evidence on depression during pregnancy and after childbirth. A search of Embase, PsychINFO, MEDLINE and Cochrane Reviews was carried out to identify longitudinal studies on antenatal and postnatal depression. Studies that measured depression during pregnancy and up to 1 year after childbirth were evaluated against a set of criteria (e.g. less than 50 % attrition). Of the initial 523 studies identified, 16 studies met the final inclusion criteria with a total of 35,419 women. The average rate of antenatal depression across these studies was 17 and 13 % postnatal depression. The longitudinal nature of the studies revealed that on average 39 % of those who experienced antenatal depression went on to have postnatal depression. Similarly, on average, 47 % of those with postnatal depression had also experienced antenatal depression. On average, almost 7 % of women reported significant depressive symptoms in pregnancy that persisted after childbirth. The review provided evidence that rates of depression tend to be higher during pregnancy than in the first year following childbirth. Furthermore, the longitudinal data show that there is much movement between the groups categorised as depressed or not depressed. There is evidence that postnatal depression is often a continuation of existing antenatal depression.

  20. Sexuality of women attended in family health program: a social poetic production.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Elidiana Araújo; Silveira, Lia Carneiro; Petit, Sandra Haydeé; Brasileiro, Georgia Maria Viana; Almeida, Arisa Nara Saldanha de

    2008-01-01

    The concept of promotion of health is one of the main axes of current health policies in Brazil. The adoption of this concept implies a change in the care model involving valuing a greater autonomy of subjects to work improving their conditions of life. From this perspective, several elements of health practices have to be reviewed, sexuality among them. Thus, we aimed at producing sexuality concepts as of the knowledge of women cared for in a health unity. This is a qualitative study adopting a social poetic approach. The results pointed out several affections that involve the concept of sexuality going beyond the biological aspect. We understand that this study may help professionals caring for women in a health unity because it broadens the concept of sexuality allowing for reflection on the nursing practice in collective health.

  1. Relationship between reported motives for exercise and age of women attending a community fitness facility.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J

    2002-04-01

    38 new, women exercisers completed the 1989 Personal Incentives for Exercise Questionnaire-Version 4 by Duda and Tappe to estimate the correlation between age and various motives for exercise. No statistically significant relationship was found between age and scores on the subscales of Health Benefits, Appearance, and Affiliation. A significant negative relationship was found between age and scores on the Mental Benefits subscale (r=-.51, p<.01). After replication, findings may help tailor exercise promotion methods.

  2. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and

  3. Trends of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual infection in women attending outpatient clinics in Senegal, 1990–2009

    PubMed Central

    Heitzinger, K; Sow, P S; Badiane, N M Dia; Gottlieb, G S; N’Doye, I; Toure, M; Kiviat, N B; Hawes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Summary We assessed trends in the relative prevalences of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection in 10,321 women attending outpatient clinics in Senegal between 1990 and 2009. The relative prevalence of HIV-1 (defined as the proportion of seropositive subjects having HIV-1) rose sharply from 38% in 1990 until 1993 (P < 0.001), whereupon it continued to rise, but at a slower rate, reaching 72% of HIV infections in 2009. As compared with HIV-1, the relative prevalence of HIV-2 decreased sharply from 54% in 1990 until 1993 (P < 0.001) and continued to decrease at a slower rate through 2009. The relative prevalence of dual infection, as compared with HIV-1, was stable from 1990 to 1993, but decreased slightly thereafter (P < 0.001). These study findings indicate that during the early 1990s, the relative prevalence of HIV-1 increased markedly, while the relative prevalence of HIV-2 decreased and the relative prevalence of dual infection remained stable in Senegal. From 1993 to 2009, the relative prevalence of HIV-1 increased at a slower rate, while the relative prevalences of HIV-2 and dual infection decreased. These results confirm trends in HIV prevalence observed in other West African populations and provide a critical update on HIV transmission risk among women in Senegal. PMID:23104745

  4. Antenatal breastfeeding education for increasing breastfeeding duration

    PubMed Central

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Martis, Ruth; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Festin, Mario R; Ho, Jacqueline J; Hakimi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding (BF) is well recognised as the best food for infants. The impact of antenatal BF education on the duration of BF has not been evaluated. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal BF education for increasing BF initiation and duration. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (21 April 2010), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2010) and SCOPUS (January 1985 to April 2010). We contacted experts and searched reference lists of retrieved articles. We updated the search of the Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register on 28 September 2011 and added the results to the awaiting classification section of the review. Selection criteria All identified published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of formal antenatal BF education or comparing two different methods of formal antenatal BF education, on duration of BF. We excluded RCTs that also included intrapartum or postpartum BF education. Data collection and analysis We assessed all potential studies identified as a result of the search strategy. Two review authors extracted data from each included study using the agreed form and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies through discussion. Main results We included 17 studies with 7131 women in the review and 14 studies involving 6932 women contributed data to the analyses. We did not do any meta-analysis because there was only one study for each comparison. Five studies compared a single method of BF education with routine care. Peer counselling significantly increased BF initiation. Three studies compared one form of BF education versus another. No intervention was significantly more effective than another intervention in increasing initiation or duration of BF. Seven studies compared multiple methods versus a single method of BF education. Combined BF educational interventions were not

  5. Antenatal foetal heart monitoring.

    PubMed

    Murray, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Antenatal foetal heart rate assessment was introduced into clinical medicine before clear evidence of any benefits had been reported. Ad hoc definitions were used to define normal and abnormal recordings resulting in a high false-positive rate for foetal compromise. The understanding of the foetal states resulted in an improved physiologically based assessment of the antenatal tracings and allowed their classification as (i) reactive - 2 accelerations in 10 min within a recording period of 120 min, (ii) unreactive - no accelerations seen in 120 min of tracing and (iii) decelerative - the presence of repetitive decelerations on an otherwise unreactive trace. This classification reduces the high rate of false-positive traces associated with recording times of less than 40 min. Traces performed on pregnancies before 32 weeks predict clinical outcome, but need to be interpreted in light of the fact the many foetuses will not show a mature reactive pattern.

  6. An assessment of serum prolactin levels among infertile women with galactorrhea attending a gynecological clinic North-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, Emmanuel Ajuluchukwu; Ashimi, Adewale Olufemi; Abubakar, Mohammed Yusuf; Takai, Idris Usman; Lukman, Okunade Taiwo; Lawal, Hamzah Abdurrahman; Also, Muhammed Abubakar; Gift, Amadi Ngozi; Kiri, Halimat Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galactorrhea is a common manifestation of hyperprolactinemia but may not always be present in women with hyperprolactinemia. This study was, therefore, undertaken to assess the serum prolactin levels of infertile women presenting with galactorrhea and to determine the prevalence of hyperprolactinemia among them. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of serum prolactin levels of 63 female partners of infertile couples attending the gynecological clinic of Federal Medical Centre, Birnin Kudu, Jigawa State, Nigeria, who were found to have galactorrhea from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. Ethical clearance was obtained. Solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure serum prolactin. Sociodemographic characteristics were determined. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 statistical software. Absolute numbers and simple percentages were used to describe categorical variables. Similarly, quantitative variables were described using measures of central tendency (mean, median) and measures of dispersion (range, standard deviation) as appropriate. Results: The average age of the women was 27.9 ± 5.6 years. In half of the cases (50%), galactorrhea was associated with menstrual disturbances, mainly amenorrhea (23.3%). Although most (63.3%) of the clients had normal serum prolactin level despite being galactorrheic, averagely there was a marked elevation in serum prolactin of as high as 40.3 ± 52.3 ng/mL. Conclusion: We conclude, therefore, that the prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in this study was low when compared with other studies and that galactorrhea does not always indicate raised serum prolactin levels. PMID:27397959

  7. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-01-01

    Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program [1]. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors

  8. Game-based online antenatal breastfeeding education: A pilot

    PubMed Central

    Grassley, Jane S.; Connor, Kelley C.; Bond, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Healthy Moms intervention on antenatal breastfeeding self efficacy and intention and to determine the feasibility of using an online game based learning platform to deliver antenatal breastfeeding education. Background The Internet has potential for improving breastfeeding rates through improving women’s access to antenatal breastfeeding education. Methods Twelve computer based breastfeeding education modules were developed using an online learning platform. Changes in participants’ breastfeeding self efficacy and intention pre and post intervention were measured using descriptive statistics and a one way ANOVA. Results Of the 25 women submitting the pretest, four completed zero quests; seven, orientation only; eight, one to six breastfeeding quests; and six, 10 to 12 breastfeeding quests. No significant differences in breastfeeding self efficacy and intention were found among the groups. Conclusions Online antenatal breastfeeding education is feasible; however, further research is warranted to determine if it can affect breastfeeding outcomes. PMID:28096030

  9. Digital divide: variation in internet and cellular phone use among women attending an urban sexually transmitted infections clinic.

    PubMed

    Samal, Lipika; Hutton, Heidi E; Erbelding, Emily J; Brandon, Elizabeth S; Finkelstein, Joseph; Chander, Geetanjali

    2010-01-01

    We sought to describe: (1) the prevalence of internet, cellular phone, and text message use among women attending an urban sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic, (2) the acceptability of health advice by each mode of information and communication technology (ICT), and (3) demographic characteristics associated with ICT use. This study is a cross-sectional survey of 200 English-speaking women presenting to a Baltimore City STI clinic with STI complaints. Participants completed a self-administered survey querying ICT use and demographic characteristics. Three separate questions asked about interest in receiving health advice delivered by the three modalities: internet, cellular phone, and text message. We performed logistic regression to examine how demographic factors (age, race, and education) are associated with likelihood of using each modality. The median age of respondents was 27 years; 87% were African American, and 71% had a high school diploma. The rate of any internet use was 80%; 31% reported daily use; 16% reported weekly use; and 32% reported less frequent use. Almost all respondents (93%) reported cellular phone use, and 79% used text messaging. Acceptability of health advice by each of the three modalities was about 60%. In multivariate analysis, higher education and younger age were associated with internet use, text messaging, and cellular phone use. Overall rate of internet use was high, but there was an educational disparity in internet use. Cellular phone use was almost universal in this sample. All three modalities were equally acceptable forms of health communication. Describing baseline ICT access and the acceptability of health advice via ICT, as we have done, is one step toward determining the feasibility of ICT-delivered health interventions in urban populations.

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis infection among young pregnant women in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Angelica E; Pinto, Valdir M; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and its associated risk factors in parturient women aged 15-24 years attending Brazilian public maternity units. Participants answered a demographic, behavioral, and clinical data questionnaire. A sample of urine was screened for T. vaginalis. A total 299 women participated in this study. The prevalence rate of T. vaginalis was 7.7% (95% CI: 4.7-10.7%). The factors associated with T. vaginalis were use of illicit drugs [OR=4.70 (95% CI: 1.63-13.56, p=0.004)] and not attending antenatal care [OR=5.15 (95% CI: 1.15-23.25, p=0.032)]. These data demonstrate that it is important to discuss how to include routine screening for T. vaginalis during antenatal care in Brazil.

  11. Church Attendance as a Predictor of Number of Sexual Health Topics Discussed Among High-Risk HIV-Negative Black Women.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrinieka T; Pichon, Latrice C; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa; Latkin, Carl A

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests that sexual health communication is associated with safer sex practices. In this study, we examined the relationship between church attendance and sexual health topics discussed with both friends and sexual partners among a sample of urban Black women. Participants were 434 HIV-negative Black women who were at high risk for contracting HIV through heterosexual sex. They were recruited from Baltimore, Maryland using a network-based sampling approach. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and Audio-Computer-Assisted Self-Interviews. Fifty-four percent of the participants attended church once a month or more (regular attendees). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that regular church attendance among high-risk HIV-negative Black women was a significant predictor of the number of sexual health topics discussed with both friends (AOR = 1.85, p = .003) and sexual partners (AOR = 1.68, p = .014). Future efforts to reduce HIV incidence among high-risk Black women may benefit from partnerships with churches that equip faith leaders and congregants with the tools to discuss sexual health topics with both their sexual partners and friends.

  12. Disparities in HIV Screening among Pregnant Women – El Salvador, 2011

    PubMed Central

    El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Nieto Gómez, Ana I.; Dubón Abrego, María A.; Gagnier, Marielle C.; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Mokdad, Ali H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide an accurate estimate of antenatal HIV screening and its determinants among pregnant women in El Salvador and help local authorities make informed decisions for targeted interventions around mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Methods A total sample of 4,730 women aged 15-49 years were interviewed from a random sample of 3,625 households. We collected data on antenatal care services, including HIV screening, during last pregnancy through a pre-established questionnaire. We used a backward elimination multivariate logistic regression model to examine the association between HIV screening and sociodemographic and health care-related factors. Results A total of 2,929 women were included in this analysis. About 98% of participants reported receiving antenatal care, but only 83% of these reported being screened for HIV. Screening was lower in geographic areas with higher HIV incidence and ranged from 69.1% among women who were not seen by a physician during antenatal care, to 93.7% among those who attended or completed college. Odds for screening varied also by age, employment status, household economic expenditure, possession of health care coverage, health care settings, and number of antenatal care visits. Conclusions We found disparities in HIV screening during antenatal care at the environmental, social, demographic, and structural levels despite a high uptake of antenatal care in El Salvador. Our findings should urge health authorities to tailor and enhance current strategies implemented to eliminate MTCT and reduce inequities and HIV morbidity among women in El Salvador. PMID:24349356

  13. Antenatal steroids: can we optimize the dose?

    PubMed Central

    Romejko-Wolniewicz, Ewa; Teliga-Czajkowska, Justyna; Czajkowski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The beneficial effects of antenatal steroids in women at risk of preterm birth are evident. A dose of 24 mg appears sufficient, but there are insufficient data to recommend betamethasone or dexamethasone, a single steroid dose, the optimal interval between doses and repeated courses, the gestational age at which treatment is beneficial and the long-term effects of steroid treatment. This review addresses these aspects of antenatal steroid treatment. Recent findings Although the 12-h and 24-h dosing intervals are equivalent with respect to prevention of respiratory distress syndrome, the former enables the completion of treatment in 50% more neonates delivered prematurely. Reducing the single steroid dose in patients at risk for premature birth reduces the associated maternal side effects. An inverse relationship has been demonstrated between the number of corticosteroid courses and foetal growth. The reduced size of exposed foetuses has been attributed to birth at earlier gestational ages and decreased foetal growth. Evidence suggests that antenatal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids in term-born children has long-lasting effects, which may have important implications in the recommendation of steroids before elective caesarean at term. Summary The short-term and long-term effects of the dosage regimen on the pregnant mother and foetus remain unclear. PMID:24463225

  14. Awareness of critical danger signs of pregnancy and delivery, preparations for delivery, and utilization of skilled birth attendants in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Henry V; Findley, Sally E; Cometto, Giorgio; Afenyadu, Godwin Y

    2013-02-01

    Maternal mortality in northern Nigeria is among the highest in the world. To understand better the pathways through which the socio-demographic environment affects awareness of obstetric danger signs (i.e., potential problems associated with pregnancy), preparations for delivery, and skilled birth attendance, we conducted a survey of 5,083 women with recent pregnancies in three northern Nigerian states. Only 25% attended antenatal care (ANC), and 91% of all births took place at home. Less than one-third knew three or more danger signs of pregnancy or labor and delivery. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with knowledge of danger signs, but not with knowledge of life-threatening, critical danger signs. Antenatal care visits did not increase knowledge of critical danger signs, but they were associated with skilled birth attendance. Knowledge of critical pregnancy danger signs also was associated with skilled birth attendance. Improving the quality and coverage of ANC will ensure greater awareness of the critical danger signs. Future research is needed to identify creative and innovative ways to strengthen strategies for educating pregnant women about danger signs and in facilitating uptake of delivery services.

  15. Why do some women still prefer traditional birth attendants and home delivery?: a qualitative study on delivery care services in West Java Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Trained birth attendants at delivery are important for preventing both maternal and newborn deaths. West Java is one of the provinces on Java Island, Indonesia, where many women still deliver at home and without the assistance of trained birth attendants. This study aims to explore the perspectives of community members and health workers about the use of delivery care services in six villages of West Java Province. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews was conducted in six villages of three districts in West Java Province from March to July 2009. Twenty FGDs and 165 in-depth interviews were conducted involving a total of 295 participants representing mothers, fathers, health care providers, traditional birth attendants and community leaders. The FGD and in-depth interview guidelines included reasons for using a trained or a traditional birth attendant and reasons for having a home or an institutional delivery. Results The use of traditional birth attendants and home delivery were preferable for some community members despite the availability of the village midwife in the village. Physical distance and financial limitations were two major constraints that prevented community members from accessing and using trained attendants and institutional deliveries. A number of respondents reported that trained delivery attendants or an institutional delivery were only aimed at women who experienced obstetric complications. The limited availability of health care providers was reported by residents in remote areas. In these settings the village midwife, who was sometimes the only health care provider, frequently travelled out of the village. The community perceived the role of both village midwives and traditional birth attendants as essential for providing maternal and health care services. Conclusions A comprehensive strategy to increase the availability, accessibility, and affordability of delivery care services

  16. National health insurance, social influence and antenatal care use in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Owoo, Nkechi S; Lambon-Quayefio, Monica P

    2013-08-06

    The study explores the importance of social influence and the availability of health insurance on maternal care utilization in Ghana through the use of antenatal care services. A number of studies have found that access to health insurance plays a critical role in women's decision to utilize antenatal care services. However, little is known about the role that social forces play in this decision. This study uses village-level data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey to investigate the effects of health insurance and social influences on the intensity of antenatal care utilization by Ghanaian women. Using GIS information at the village level, we employ a spatial lag regression model in this study. Results indicate that, controlling for a host of socioeconomic and geographical factors, women who have health insurance appear to use more antenatal services than women who do not. In addition, the intensity of antenatal visits appears to be spatially correlated among the survey villages, implying that there may be some social influences that affect a woman's decision to utilize antenatal care. A reason for this may be that women who benefit from antenatal care through positive pregnancy outcomes may pass this information along to their peers who also increase their use of these services in response. Traditional/Cultural leaders as "gate-keepers" may be useful in the dissemination of maternal health care information. Public health officials may also explore the possibility of disseminating information relating to maternal care services via the mass media.

  17. Unhappiness with the Fetal Gender is associated with Depression in Adult Pregnant Women Attending Prenatal Care in a Public Hospital in Durango, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Depression during pregnancy has been scantily studied in Mexican women. We aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of depression in adult pregnant women attending a public hospital in the northern Mexican city of Durango, Mexico. Through a cross-sectional study design, we assessed depression in 270 adult pregnant women attended for prenatal care in a public hospital using a validated Mexican version of the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale in pregnancy and further confirmation by a psychiatric evaluation using the DSM-IV criteria for depression. Prevalence association with socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics of the pregnant women was also investigated. Of the 270 pregnant women studied, 101 (37.4%) had EPDS scores equal to or higher than nine. Depression was confirmed in 56 (20.7%) women. Of them, 42 suffered from minor depression and 14 from major depression. Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics of the women showed that depression was associated with depression before pregnancy (OR = 3.36; 95% CI: 1.20-9.40; P=0.02), anxiety during pregnancy (OR = 9.38; 95% CI: 1.87-46.96; P=0.006), smoking (OR = 25.05; 95% CI: 1.77-353.07; P=0.01), unhappy with the fetal sex (OR = 8.53; 95% CI: 2.46-29.48; P<0.001), and unintended pregnancy (OR = 2.90; 95% CI: 1.07-7.86; P=0.03). Results indicate that about one fifth of the pregnant women studied had confirmed depression. This is the first report of an association of prenatal depression with unhappiness with the fetal sex. Factors associated with prenatal depression found in this study may help for the optimal design of preventive measures against prenatal depression. PMID:27127452

  18. The Impact of Antenatal Psychological Group Interventions on Psychological Well-Being: A Systematic Review of the Qualitative and Quantitative Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wadephul, Franziska; Jones, Catriona; Jomeen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Depression, anxiety and stress in the perinatal period can have serious, long-term consequences for women, their babies and their families. Over the last two decades, an increasing number of group interventions with a psychological approach have been developed to improve the psychological well-being of pregnant women. This systematic review examines interventions targeting women with elevated symptoms of, or at risk of developing, perinatal mental health problems, with the aim of understanding the successful and unsuccessful features of these interventions. We systematically searched online databases to retrieve qualitative and quantitative studies on psychological antenatal group interventions. A total number of 19 papers describing 15 studies were identified; these included interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy, interpersonal therapy and mindfulness. Quantitative findings suggested beneficial effects in some studies, particularly for women with high baseline symptoms. However, overall there is insufficient quantitative evidence to make a general recommendation for antenatal group interventions. Qualitative findings suggest that women and their partners experience these interventions positively in terms of psychological wellbeing and providing reassurance of their ‘normality’. This review suggests that there are some benefits to attending group interventions, but further research is required to fully understand their successful and unsuccessful features. PMID:27417620

  19. Alternative versus standard packages of antenatal care for low-risk pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Carroli, Guillermo; Duley, Lelia; Gates, Simon; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Khan-Neelofur, Dina; Piaggio, Gilda GP

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of visits for antenatal (prenatal) care developed without evidence of how many visits are necessary. The content of each visit also needs evaluation. Objectives To compare the effects of antenatal care programmes with reduced visits for low-risk women with standard care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2010), reference lists of articles and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing a reduced number of antenatal visits, with or without goal-oriented care, with standard care. Data collection and analysis Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results We included seven trials (more than 60,000 women): four in high-income countries with individual randomisation; three in low- and middle-income countries with cluster randomisation (clinics as the unit of randomisation). The number of visits for standard care varied, with fewer visits in low- and middle- income country trials. In studies in high-income countries, women in the reduced visits groups, on average, attended between 8.2 and 12 times. In low- and middle- income country trials, many women in the reduced visits group attended on fewer than five occasions, although in these trials the content as well as the number of visits was changed, so as to be more ‘goal oriented’. Perinatal mortality was increased for those randomised to reduced visits rather than standard care, and this difference was borderline for statistical significance (five trials; risk ratio (RR) 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.31). In the subgroup analysis, for high-income countries the number of deaths was small (32/5108), and there was no clear difference between the groups (2 trials; RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.45 to 1.80); for low- and middle-income countries perinatal mortality was significantly higher in the reduced visits group (3 trials RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.01 to 1

  20. Applying the theory of planned behaviour to explain HIV testing in antenatal settings in Addis Ababa - a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To facilitate access to the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) services, HIV counselling and testing are offered routinely in antenatal care settings. Focusing a cohort of pregnant women attending public and private antenatal care facilities, this study applied an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to explain intended- and actual HIV testing. Methods A sequential exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in Addis Ababa in 2009. The study involved first time antenatal attendees from public- and private health care facilities. Three Focus Group Discussions were conducted to inform the TPB questionnaire. A total of 3033 women completed the baseline TPB interviews, including attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intention with respect to HIV testing, whereas 2928 completed actual HIV testing at follow up. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square tests, Fisher's Exact tests, Internal consistency reliability, Pearson's correlation, Linear regression, Logistic regression and using Epidemiological indices. P-values < 0.05 was considered significant and 95% Confidence Interval (CI) was used for the odds ratio. Results The TPB explained 9.2% and 16.4% of the variance in intention among public- and private health facility attendees. Intention and perceived barriers explained 2.4% and external variables explained 7% of the total variance in HIV testing. Positive and negative predictive values of intention were 96% and 6% respectively. Across both groups, subjective norm explained a substantial amount of variance in intention, followed by attitudes. Women intended to test for HIV if they perceived social support and anticipated positive consequences following test performance. Type of counselling did not modify the link between intended and actual HIV testing. Conclusion The TPB explained substantial amount of variance in intention to test but was less sufficient in explaining

  1. Structural and Behavioral Correlates of HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in a Country with a Highly Generalized HIV Epidemic: A Cross-Sectional Study with a Probability Sample of Antenatal Care Facilities in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Suguimoto, S. Pilar; Musumari, Patou Masika; El-saaidi, Christina; Haumba, Samson; Tagutanazvo, Oslinah Buru; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV disproportionately affects women in Sub-Saharan Africa. Swaziland bears the highest HIV prevalence of 41% among pregnant women in this region. This heightened HIV-epidemic reflects the importance of context-specific interventions. Apart from routine HIV surveillance, studies that examine structural and behavioral factors associated with HIV infection among women may facilitate the revitalization of existing programs and provide insights to inform context-specific HIV prevention interventions. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study employed a two-stage random cluster sampling in ten antenatal health care facilities in the Hhohho region of Swaziland in August and September 2015. Participants were eligible for the study if they were 18 years or older and had tested for HIV. Self-administered tablet-based questionnaires were used to assess HIV risk factors. Of all eligible pregnant women, 827 (92.4%) participated, out of which 297 (35.9%) were self-reportedly HIV positive. Among structural factors, family function was not significantly associated with self-reported HIV positive status, while lower than high school educational attainment (AOR, 1.65; CI, 1.14–3.38; P = 0.008), and income below minimum wage (AOR, 1.81; CI, 1.09–3.01; P = 0.021) were significantly associated with self-reported HIV positive status. Behavioral factors significantly associated with reporting a positive HIV status included; ≥2 lifetime sexual partners (AOR, 3.16; CI, 2.00–5.00; P<0.001), and ever cohabited (AOR, 2.39; CI, 1.66–3.43; P = 0.00). The most cited reason for having multiple sexual partners was financial gain. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge level was high but not associated to self-reported HIV status (P = 0.319). Conclusions Structural and behavioral factors showed significant association with self-reported HIV infection among pregnant women in Swaziland while HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and family function did not. This suggests that HIV interventions

  2. Group versus Individual Professional Antenatal Breastfeeding Education for Extending Breastfeeding Duration and Exclusivity: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka Lun; Tarrant, Marie; Lok, Kris Yuet Wan

    2015-08-01

    Although breastfeeding initiation rates have increased substantially in many developed countries over the past several decades, breastfeeding duration and exclusivity remain suboptimal. In the antenatal period, both group and individual education interventions have been implemented to improve breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to compare the effectiveness of group and individual antenatal professional education on breastfeeding exclusivity and duration. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using Medline (1946-June 2014), PubMed (1883-June 2014), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1947-June 2014), EMBASE (1947-June 2014), British Nursing Index (1994-June 2014), Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library. Included studies were limited to health care professional-conducted education delivered to pregnant women only. Only studies reporting breastfeeding duration or exclusivity were included. Nineteen studies were included, of which 13 evaluated antenatal group education, 5 evaluated individual antenatal education, and 1 evaluated both a group and an individual antenatal education. When compared with standard care, 4 out of 12 studies supported the effectiveness of antenatal group education on breastfeeding duration or exclusivity, whereas 4 out of 6 studies supported the effectiveness of antenatal individual education. Two studies compared antenatal group education with peer-led education and neither study showed a significant difference in breastfeeding outcomes. The methodological heterogeneity and the small number of high quality studies limited our ability to draw firm conclusions about the effectiveness of either mode of antenatal education.

  3. Birth attendants trained in "Prevention of Mother-To-Child HIV Transmission" provide care in rural Cameroon, Africa.

    PubMed

    Wanyu, Benjamin; Diom, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Patricia; Tih, Pius M; Meyer, Dorothy J

    2007-01-01

    Since 1984, Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board's Life Abundant Primary health care program has established primary health centers in remote villages and trained literate women in these villages as birth attendants to offer antenatal care, low-risk delivery, and triage of high-risk mothers to larger health facilities. In 2002, the birth attendants were trained to provide Prevention of Maternal-to-Child HIV Transmission (PMTCT) services, including counseling, voluntary testing, performing oral rapid HIV tests (OraQuick; OraSure Technologies, Inc., Bethlehem, PA), posttest counseling, and administering single-dose nevirapine to HIV-positive women, to be taken in labor, and to their newborns. Ongoing supervision is provided by nurse supervisors. Between July 2002 and June 2005, 30 PMTCT-trained birth attendants in 20 villages counseled 2331 pregnant women and tested 2310 (99.1%) for HIV. Eighty-two women had a positive OraQuick HIV test (3.5%). Forty-two of these mothers were delivered by the trained birth attendants, with 88.1% of mothers and 85.7% of newborns receiving single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis. Nevirapine-treated babies were tested after 15 months of age, and two of 13 HIV-exposed infants had a positive rapid HIV antibody test (15.3% transmission rate with treatment). Program challenges include: maintaining adequate supplies of HIV tests kits and medications, supervising and supporting the PMCT-trained birth attendants on a regular basis, and achieving exclusive breastfeeding and early weaning.

  4. Understanding delayed access to antenatal care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed access to antenatal care ('late booking’) has been linked to increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand why some women are late to access antenatal care. Methods 27 women presenting after 19 completed weeks gestation for their first hospital booking appointment were interviewed, using a semi-structured format, in community and maternity hospital settings in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered onto NVivo 8 software. An interdisciplinary, iterative, thematic analysis was undertaken. Results The late booking women were diverse in terms of: age (15–37 years); parity (0–4); socioeconomic status; educational attainment and ethnicity. Three key themes relating to late booking were identified from our data: 1) 'not knowing’: realisation (absence of classic symptoms, misinterpretation); belief (age, subfertility, using contraception, lay hindrance); 2) 'knowing’: avoidance (ambivalence, fear, self-care); postponement (fear, location, not valuing care, self-care); and 3) 'delayed’ (professional and system failures, knowledge/empowerment issues). Conclusions Whilst vulnerable groups are strongly represented in this study, women do not always fit a socio-cultural stereotype of a 'late booker’. We report a new taxonomy of more complex reasons for late antenatal booking than the prevalent concepts of denial, concealment and disadvantage. Explanatory sub-themes are also discussed, which relate to psychological, empowerment and socio-cultural factors. These include poor reproductive health knowledge and delayed recognition of pregnancy, the influence of a pregnancy 'mindset’ and previous pregnancy experience, and the perceived value of antenatal care. The study also highlights deficiencies in early pregnancy diagnosis and service organisation. These issues should be considered by practitioners and service commissioners in order to promote

  5. Quality of Antenatal Care Provided by Nurse Midwives in an Urban Health Centre with Regard to Low-Risk Antenatal Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Siva, Rajeswari; Vimala, T. Jeni Christal; Rahman, Sajitha Parveen MF; Angeline, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Background: India contributes to 19% of the global maternal deaths. Good quality antenatal care can prevent maternal deaths by early detection of complications and maintaining maternal health. There are few studies documenting quality of antenatal care in India. This study aimed to document the antenatal services provided by nurse midwives to low-risk pregnant mothers from an urban population. Aims: The primary objective was to describe the quality of the antenatal care provided by nurse midwives of an urban health centre with regard to low-risk mothers. The secondary objective was to document the maternal and early neonatal outcomes of the enrolled mothers during the period of study. Methods: This prospective cohort study was done on 200 pregnant women who had antenatal care by nurse midwives between April 2014 and November 2014. The quality of care was assessed by a checklist adapted from World Health Organization (WHO). Results: We report that the quality of antenatal care for all domains was above 90% except for the health education domain, which was poor with regard to breastfeeding and family planning in the enrolled 200 pregnant women. Conclusion: Our study concluded that trained nurse midwives when regularly monitored, audited and linked with reliable referral facilities can deliver good quality antenatal care. PMID:28331252

  6. Complementary therapies for labour and birth study: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal integrative medicine for pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Levett, Kate M; Smith, C A; Bensoussan, A; Dahlen, H G

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of an antenatal integrative medicine education programme in addition to usual care for nulliparous women on intrapartum epidural use. Design Open-label, assessor blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting 2 public hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Population 176 nulliparous women with low-risk pregnancies, attending hospital-based antenatal clinics. Methods and intervention The Complementary Therapies for Labour and Birth protocol, based on the She Births and acupressure for labour and birth courses, incorporated 6 evidence-based complementary medicine techniques: acupressure, visualisation and relaxation, breathing, massage, yoga techniques, and facilitated partner support. Randomisation occurred at 24–36 weeks’ gestation, and participants attended a 2-day antenatal education programme plus standard care, or standard care alone. Main outcome measures Rate of analgesic epidural use. Secondary: onset of labour, augmentation, mode of birth, newborn outcomes. Results There was a significant difference in epidural use between the 2 groups: study group (23.9%) standard care (68.7%; risk ratio (RR) 0.37 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.55), p≤0.001). The study group participants reported a reduced rate of augmentation (RR=0.54 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.77), p<0.0001); caesarean section (RR=0.52 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.87), p=0.017); length of second stage (mean difference=−0.32 (95% CI −0.64 to 0.002), p=0.05); any perineal trauma (0.88 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.98), p=0.02) and resuscitation of the newborn (RR=0.47 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.87), p≤0.015). There were no statistically significant differences found in spontaneous onset of labour, pethidine use, rate of postpartum haemorrhage, major perineal trauma (third and fourth degree tears/episiotomy), or admission to special care nursery/neonatal intensive care unit (p=0.25). Conclusions The Complementary Therapies for Labour and Birth study protocol significantly reduced epidural use and caesarean section. This

  7. Toxoplasmosis-related knowledge among pregnant and postpartum women attended in public health units in Niterói, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Millar, Patricia Riddell; Moura, Fernanda Loureiro de; Bastos, Otílio Machado Pereira; Mattos, Danuza Pinheiro Bastos Garcia de; Fonseca, Ana Beatriz Monteiro; Sudré, Adriana Pittella; Leles, Daniela; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2014-01-01

    The present study conducted a toxoplasmosis-related knowledge level survey with 400 pregnant and puerperal women attended in public health units in the municipality of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro. Only 111 (27.8%) women claimed to know about the disease. Most of them (n = 289; 72.2%) had never heard about toxoplasmosis nor knew how to prevent the infection by Toxoplasma gondii. A significant difference (p = 0.013) regarding the presence of anti-T. gondii IgG was observed between women who claimed to know about the disease and those who had never heard about it. These results highlight the importance of a systematic serological screening process for toxoplasmosis, as well as the importance of primary prevention by accurate information during prenatal care, an important Public Health action to be implemented.

  8. TOXOPLASMOSIS-RELATED KNOWLEDGE AMONG PREGNANT AND POSTPARTUM WOMEN ATTENDED IN PUBLIC HEALTH UNITS IN NITERÓI, RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Patricia Riddell; de Moura, Fernanda Loureiro; Bastos, Otílio Machado Pereira; de Mattos, Danuza Pinheiro Bastos Garcia; Fonseca, Ana Beatriz Monteiro; Sudré, Adriana Pittella; Leles, Daniela; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2014-01-01

    The present study conducted a toxoplasmosis-related knowledge level survey with 400 pregnant and puerperal women attended in public health units in the municipality of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro. Only 111 (27.8%) women claimed to know about the disease. Most of them (n = 289; 72.2%) had never heard about toxoplasmosis nor knew how to prevent the infection by Toxoplasma gondii. A significant difference (p = 0.013) regarding the presence of anti-T. gondii IgG was observed between women who claimed to know about the disease and those who had never heard about it. These results highlight the importance of a systematic serological screening process for toxoplasmosis, as well as the importance of primary prevention by accurate information during prenatal care, an important Public Health action to be implemented. PMID:25229225

  9. Time-Site Survey of Substance Use, Sexual Behaviours and Hiv-Testing Practices Among Women Attending Social Venues in Prague

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, M. Susan; Hall, Timothy M.; Prokopík, Petr; Shoptaw, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim The rates of HIV acquired through heterosexual contact are increasing in the Czech Republic. This study explored potential HIV risk associations with alcohol, illicit drugs and sexual behaviours among adults from a community-based sample attending gay- and non-gay venues in Prague. Methods Women attending bars, cafes and beer gardens in central Prague responded to the self-administered, time-site survey. Alcohol use was measured by the AUDIT-C and CAGE questionnaires. Sexual network structuring identified number, gender and coital frequency with current and recent sexual partners. Statistical analysis included central tendency, chi-square and logistic regression. Female participants (n = 124) ranged from 18 to 67 years of age (mean 29 years); 25% self-identified as non-heterosexual. Results We found alcohol to be the preferred drug of choice. Younger heterosexual women with new and casual sexual partners were more likely to use alcohol excessively. Women with children reported the least alcohol use. Sixty percent of the sample had never used condoms; condom-use was associated with longer relationship duration and discussions about HIV status with a sexual partner; non-use tended to occur among unmarried women with multiple male partners in short, serial sexual relationships. Women who sought HIV testing tended to be younger and more self-identified as non-heterosexual. Protective practices were rarely reported even when HIV transmission increases via heterosexual sexual partnering. Conclusion Further research is recommended regarding cultural and contextual influences on HIV risk behaviours among Czech women. PMID:26851424

  10. The Views of Student-Teachers Attending a Turkish University on Discrimination Related to the Education of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murat, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to highlight how Turkish students perceive important issues such as discrimination against women, violence that surfaced as a result of discrimination, alienation, inequality between men and women and isolation of women from work life. A total of 50 students participated in the study. Individual interviews were conducted.…

  11. Travelling Careers: Overseas Migration Patterns in the Professional Lives of Women Attending Girton and Newnham before 1939

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joyce; Jacobs, Andrea; Kisby, Fiona; Loader, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the migration patterns of women who studied at Girton and Newnham prior to 1939 through whom dissemination of knowledge and values flowed from Cambridge overseas. It also considers organisations that fostered women's mobility in empire, particularly the Colonial Intelligence League for Educated Women and the International…

  12. Transition to skilled birth attendance: is there a future role for trained traditional birth attendants?

    PubMed

    Sibley, Lynn M; Sipe, Theresa Ann

    2006-12-01

    A brief history of training of traditional birth attendants (TBAs), summary of evidence for effectiveness of TBA training, and consideration of the future role of trained TBAs in an environment that emphasizes transition to skilled birth attendance are provided. Evidence of the effectiveness of TBA training, based on 60 studies and standard meta-analytic procedures, includes moderate-to-large improvements in behaviours of TBAs relating to selected intrapartum and postnatal care practices, small significant increases in women's use of antenatal care and emergency obstetric care, and small significant decreases in perinatal mortality and neonatal mortality due to birth asphyxia and pneumonia. Such findings are consistent with the historical focus of TBA training on extending the reach of primary healthcare and a few programmes that have included home-based management of complications of births and the newborns, such as birth asphyxia and pneumonia. Evidence suggests that, in settings characterized by high mortality and weak health systems, trained TBAs can contribute to the Millennium Development Goal 4--a two-thirds reduction in the rate of mortality of children aged less than 14 years by 2015--through participation in key evidence-based interventions.

  13. No Association between Antenatal Common Mental Disorders in Low-Obstetric Risk Women and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Their Offspring: Results from the CDS Study in Ghana and Côte D'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Bonle, Marguerite Te; Appiah-Poku, John; Hinz, Rebecca; Barthel, Dana; Schoppen, Stefanie; Feldt, Torsten; Barkmann, Claus; Koffi, Mathurin; Loag, Wibke; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Eberhardt, Kirsten A.; Tagbor, Harry; N’Goran, Eliezer; Ehrhardt, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence linking common mental disorders (CMD) in pregnant women to adverse birth outcomes is inconsistent, and studies often failed to control for pregnancy complications. This study aimed to explore the association between antenatal depression and anxiety symptoms and birth outcomes in a low-obstetric risk sample of mother/child dyads in Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire. Methods In 2010-2011, a prospective cohort of 1030 women in their third trimester in Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire was enrolled. Depression and anxiety were assessed in the third trimester using the Patient Health Questionnaire depression module and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale. 719 mother/child dyads were included in the analysis. We constructed multivariate regression models to estimate the association between CMD and low birth weight (LBW), and preterm birth (PTB) to control for potential confounders. Results The prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms were 28.9% and 14.2% respectively. The mean birth weight was 3172.1g (SD 440.6) and the prevalence of LBW was 1.7%. The mean gestational age was 39.6 weeks and the proportion of PTB was 4%. Multivariate linear regression revealed no significant association between maternal depression (B=52.2, 95% CI -18.2 122.6, p=0.15) or anxiety (B=17.1, 95% CI -74.6 108.7, p=0.72) and birth weight. Yet, low socio-economic status, female sex of the child, and younger maternal age were associated with lower birth weight. Multivariate logistic regression suggested no significant association between maternal depression (OR: 2.1, 95% CI 0.8 5.6, p=0.15) or anxiety (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 0.6 5.5, p=0.29) with PTB. Conclusions Our data suggests that depression and/or anxiety in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy are not independent predictors of adverse birth outcomes in low obstetric risk women. The role of pregnancy complications as confounders or effect modifiers in studies of maternal CMD and their impact on birth outcomes should be investigated

  14. Is antenatal care preparing mothers to care for their newborns? A community-based cross-sectional study among lactating women in Masindi, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal mortality has remained resistant to change in the wake of declining child mortality. Suboptimal newborn care practices are predisposing factors to neonatal mortality. Adherence to four ANC consultations is associated with improved newborn care practices. There is limited documentation of this evidence in sub-Saharan Africa where suboptimal newborn care practices has been widely reported. Methods Structured interviews were held with 928 women having children under-five months old at their homes in Masindi, Uganda, from October-December 2011. Four/more ANC consultations (sufficient ANC) was considered the exposure variable. Three composite variables (complete cord care, complete thermal care and complete newborn vaccination status) were derived by combining related practices from a list of recommended newborn care practices. Logistic regression models were used to assess for associations. Results One in five women 220(23.7%) were assessed to practice complete cord care. Less than ten percent 57(6.1%) were considered to practice complete thermal care and 611(65.8%) were assessed to have complete newborn vaccination status. Application of substance on the cord 744 (71.6%) and early bathing 816 (87.9%) were main drivers of sub-optimal newborn care practices. Multivariable logistic models did not demonstrate significant association between four/more ANC consultations and complete cord care, complete thermal care or complete newborn vaccination status. Secondary or higher education was associated with complete cord care [adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR): 2.72; 95% CI: 1.63-4.54] and complete newborn vaccination [aOR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.04-1.82]. Women who reported health facility delivery were more likely to report complete thermal care [aOR: 3.63; 95% CI: 2.21-5.95] and newborn vaccination [aOR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.23-2.75], but not complete cord care. Having the first baby was associated with complete thermal care [aOR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.24-3.23]. Conclusion Results

  15. Rural Indonesia women’s traditional beliefs about antenatal care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Indonesia Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) of 420/100.00 live births remains among the highest in East Asia while coverage of births assisted by skilled providers is still low. Traditional beliefs have been a key factor associated with the choice between midwives or traditional birth attendants (TBA) and the low number of antenatal care visits in rural West Sumatra. Methods We conducted three focus groups with 16 women from rural West Java to describe their perception regarding issues related to traditional beliefs. Focus group discussions provided data for the content analysis. Results The majority of the 16 women interviewed was from Village Dago, West Java and had only an elementary school education. Their ages ranged from 19 to 40 years. Most were multiparous housewives with an income of IDR 918.750 per month, which was lower than the monthly income in West Java (IDR. 1.172.060). Emerging from the focus group discussion were four main themes regarding their pregnancy and traditional beliefs: 1) pregnancy was a normal cycle in women’s life (pregnancy is a natural phenomena, not a sickness; no recognition of danger signs during pregnancy and death of baby or mother during pregnancy was brought about by God’s will); 2) women followed the traditional beliefs (positive motivation to follow the traditional beliefs and fear of not following the traditional beliefs); 3) relying on TBA called paraji rather than midwife (parajis are kind, tolerant and patient and have more experience than midwives; more accessibility than midwives and encouragement of natural birth) and 4) midwives are more secure than paraji; (they use a medical standard of care). Conclusions Women’s beliefs grounded in religion and tradition permeated the village culture making it difficult to counter their long held health practices with practices based on recent advances in health care. Use of TBA in this village was still dominant and women believed that following traditional

  16. Integrating prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission into routine antenatal care: the key to program expansion in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Welty, Thomas K; Bulterys, Marc; Welty, Edith R; Tih, Pius M; Ndikintum, George; Nkuoh, Godlove; Nkfusai, Joseph; Kayita, Janet; Nkengasong, John N; Wilfert, Catherine M

    2005-12-01

    With funds from Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board implemented a program to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 (PMTCT) as part of its routine antenatal care, with single-dose maternal and infant peripartum nevirapine (NVP) prophylaxis of HIV-positive mothers and their babies. Nurses, midwives, nurse aides, and trained birth attendants counseled pregnant women, obtained risk factor data, and offered free HIV testing with same-day results. From February 2000 through December 2004, this program rapidly expanded to 115 facilities in 6 of Cameroon's 10 provinces, not only to large hospitals but to remote health centers staffed by trained birth attendants. We trained 690 health workers in PMTCT and counseled 68,635 women, 91.9% of whom accepted HIV testing. Of 63,094 women tested, 8.7% were HIV-1-positive. Independent risk factors for HIV-1 infection included young age at first sexual intercourse, multiple sex partners, and positive syphilis serology (P < 0.001 for each). We counseled 98.7% of positive and negative mothers on a posttest basis. Of 5550 HIV-positive mothers, we counseled 5433 (97.9%) on single-dose NVP prophylaxis. Consistent training and programmatic support contributed to rapid upscaling and high uptake and counseling rates.

  17. The association between fecal incontinence and sexual activity and function in women attending a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B.; Komesu, Yuko M.; Dunivan, Gena C.; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis To determine whether fecal incontinence (FI) is associated with sexual activity and to compare sexual function in women with and without FI. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of all new patients seen in an academic urogynecology clinic. Women who reported fecal incontinence, as defined by loss of fecal material on the Wexner scale, were compared with those without fecal incontinence. We compared sexual activity and Pelvic Organ Prolapse Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) scores between groups. Results In our population of women with pelvic floor disorder, 588 women reported FI compared with 527 who did not. On multivariate analysis, FI was not associated with sexual activity status, but was associated with worsened PISQ-12 scores (p<0.001). PISQ-12 item analysis found that women with FI reported more dyspareunia, fear, and avoidance of sexual activity with greater partner problems (all p <0.05) than women without FI. Conclusions Women with FI were as likely to engage in sexual relations as women without FI; however, sexually active women with FI had poorer sexual function than those without FI. PMID:23389640

  18. Understanding Factors Associated with Postpartum Visit Attendance and Contraception Choices: Listening to Low-Income Postpartum Women and Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Vida; Stumbras, Katrina; Caskey, Rachel; Haider, Sadia; Rankin, Kristin; Handler, Arden

    2016-11-01

    Background While there is considerable variability with respect to attendance at the postpartum visit, not much is known about women's preferences with respect to postpartum care. Likewise, there is also limited information on providers' practices regarding the postpartum visit and care including the delivery of contraception. To understand and address deficits in the delivery and utilization of postpartum care, we examined the perceptions of low-income postpartum women with respect to barriers to and preferences for the timing and location of the postpartum visit and receipt of contraception. We also examined providers' current prenatal and postnatal care practices for promoting the use of postpartum care and their attitudes toward alternative approaches for delivering contraceptive services in the postpartum period. Methods Qualitative face-to-face interviews were completed with 20 postpartum women and in-depth qualitative phone interviews were completed with 12 health care providers who had regular contact with postpartum women. Interviews were coded using Atlas.ti software and themes were identified. Results Women believed that receiving care during the postpartum period was an important resource for monitoring physical and mental health and also strongly supported the provision of contraception earlier than the 6-week postpartum visit. Providers reported barriers to women's use of postpartum care on the patient, provider, and system levels. However, providers were receptive to exploring new clinical practices that may widen the reach of postpartum care and increase access to postpartum contraception. Conclusion Approaches that increase the flexibility and convenience of postpartum care and the delivery of postpartum contraception may increase the likelihood that women will take advantage of essential postpartum services.

  19. HIV testing men in the antenatal setting: understanding male non-disclosure

    PubMed Central

    Katz, David A.; Kiarie, James N.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John, Francis N.; Farquhar, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Summary Prevention of infant HIV is a powerful incentive for maternal HIV diagnosis and an opportunity to increase male HIV testing and disclosure of HIV status within couples. We examined male HIV disclosure in couples who attended a Nairobi antenatal clinic (ANC), had individual HIV testing, and were counseled to disclose to their partner. At 2-week follow-up, males and females independently reported HIV disclosure. Of 2,104 women, 1,993 requested partner attendance; 313 male partners came, of whom 183 chose individual HIV testing. Of 106 couples who followed-up, 93% of both partners reported disclosure by females vs. 71% by males (p<0.0001); 27% of men reported disclosure while their female partner reported not knowing partner HIV status. In these couples, male ANC HIV testing did not result in shared knowledge of HIV status. Couple counseling models that incorporate disclosure may yield greater HIV prevention benefits than offering individual partner HIV testing services at ANC. PMID:19833691

  20. Antenatal psychosocial risk factors associated with adverse postpartum family outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, L M; Reid, A J; Midmer, D K; Biringer, A; Carroll, J C; Stewart, D E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the strength of the association between antenatal psychosocial risk factors and adverse postpartum outcomes in the family, such as assault of women by their partner, child abuse, postpartum depression, marital dysfunction and physical illness. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cinahl, Famli, Psych Abstracts and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials were searched from relevant articles published from Jan. 1, 1980, to Dec. 31, 1993, with the use of MeSH terms "depression, involutional," "child abuse," "child neglect," "domestic violence," "family," "marital adjustment," "family health," "newborn health," "child health," "physical illness," "social support," "psychosocial risk," "prediction," "risk factors," "obstetrics" and "prenatal care." Further articles were identified from bibliographies. STUDY SELECTION: Of the 370 articles identified through the search, 118 were included for review. Studies were included if they examined the association between psychosocial risk factors and the outcomes of interest. Articles were excluded if they were reviews of poor quality or they had one or more of the following features: insufficient description of the sample, a high attrition rate, a lack of standardized outcome measures, outcomes other than the ones of interest or results that had already been reported in a previous study. DATA EXTRACTION: The strength of evidence of each study was evaluated. On the basis of the evidence, each risk factor was assigned a rating of the strength of its association with each of the postpartum outcomes. The ratings were class A (good evidence of association), class B (fair evidence) and class C (no clear evidence). Of the 129 antenatal psychosocial risk factors studied, 15 were found to have a class A association with at least one of the postpartum outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Child abuse and abuse of the mother by her partner were most strongly correlated (class A evidence) with a history of lack of social support, recent life

  1. Predictors of Poor Pregnancy Outcomes Among Antenatal Care Attendees in Primary Health Care Facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria: A Multilevel Model.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Soter; Adeleye, Omokhoa A; Kabiru, Caroline W; Agan, Thomas; Duke, Roseline; Mkpanam, Nkese; Nwoha, Doris

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Pregnancy carries a high risk for millions of women and varies by urban-rural location in Nigeria, a country with the second highest maternal deaths in the world. Addressing multilevel predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among antenatal care (ANC) attendees in primary health care (PHC) facilities could reduce the high maternal mortality rate in Nigeria. This study utilised the "Risk Approach" strategy to (1) compare the risks of poor pregnancy outcomes among ANC attendees by urban-rural location; and (2) determine predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among ANC attendees in urban-rural PHC facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 among 400 ANC attendees aged 15-49 years recruited through multistage sampling. Data on risk factors of poor pregnancy outcomes were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires and clinic records. Respondents were categorised into low, medium or high risk of poor pregnancy outcomes, based on their overall risk scores. Predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes were determined by multilevel ordinal logistic regression. Results A greater proportion of the women in the rural areas were below the middle socio-economic quintile (75 vs. 4 %, p < 0.001), had no education (12 vs. 2 %, p < 0.001), and were in the 15-24 age group (58 vs. 35 %, p < 0.001) whereas women in the urban areas were older than 35 years (10 vs. 5 %, p < 0.001). The women attending antenatal care in the urban PHC facilities had a low overall risk of poor pregnancy outcomes than those in the rural facilities (64 vs. 50 %, p = 0.034). Pregnant women in the urban areas had decreased odds of being at high risk of poor pregnancy outcomes versus the combined medium and low risks compared with those in the rural areas (OR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.09-0.65). Conclusions for Practice Pregnant women attending antenatal care in rural PHC facilities are more at risk of poor pregnancy outcomes than those

  2. Study of the prevalence and association of ocular chlamydial conjunctivitis in women with genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans attending outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between chlamydial conjunctivitis and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans, in addition to the possible relationship between cultured bacterial pathogens and oculogenital chlamydial infection. METHODS This study was performed on 100 (50 symptomatic and 50 asymptomatic) women attending the Gynecological and Obstetric outpatient clinic of Alzahra hospital, Alazhar University. Simultaneously a conjunctival swab was taken from these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done on DNA extracted from both vaginal and conjunctival swab samples. Culture for both vaginal and conjunctival swabs was also done. RESULTS Candida albicans was the predominant organism isolated by culture in 20% and 40% of conjunctival and vaginal swabs respectively. By the PCR method, ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 60% of symptomatic women, while genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was present in 30% of symptomatic women. The results of this method also indicated that 25/50 (50%) vaginal swabs were positive with PCR for Candida albicans versus 15/50 (30%) were PCR positive in conjunctival swab. Mycoplasma genitalium was present in only 10% of vaginal swabs. Concomitant oculogenital PCR positive results for Chlamydia trachomatis and Candida albicans were 30% and 28% respectively. CONCLUSION Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was associated with genital Chlamydia trachomatis in a high percentage of women followed by Candida albicans. Cultured bacterial organisms do not play a role in enhancement of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. PMID:27588273

  3. Predicting Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis infection using risk scores, physical examination, microscopy, and leukocyte esterase urine dipsticks among asymptomatic women attending a family planning clinic in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, M W; Kidula, N; Sande, J; Ombette, J; Temmerman, M

    1999-09-01

    This cross sectional study presents a risk scoring system that would identify women at highest risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). 1058 randomly selected women participated in the study in Nairobi, Kenya; of these, 1048 participants were included in the analysis. The study was conducted from May 1994 to July 1995 at a clinic sponsored by the Family Planning Association of Kenya. Information pertaining to the demographic, behavioral and social characteristics of the participants was gathered. In addition, a clinical algorithm, which includes physical examination, microscopy, and leukocyte esterase (LE) urine dipsticks, was employed to detect gonorrhea and chlamydia infections among asymptomatic women. The results revealed that the prevalence of STIs, including HIV-1, was high among women attending this urban family planning clinic. Standard demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics were only weakly associated with infection, resulting in poor sensitivity and specificity calculations in the risk scores. Detection of cervical infections gave a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 30%. A positive LE urine dipstick had a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 47%. Although the addition of physical examination and LE dipstick to the work-up improved the sensitivity of case detection, it did not improve the overall validity of the scoring system.

  4. Influence of Birth Preparedness, Decision-Making on Location of Birth and Assistance by Skilled Birth Attendants among Women in South-Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kabakyenga, Jerome K.; Östergren, Per-Olof; Turyakira, Eleanor; Pettersson, Karen Odberg

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Assistance by skilled birth attendants (SBAs) during childbirth is one of the strategies aimed at reducing maternal morbidity and mortality in low-income countries. However, the relationship between birth preparedness and decision-making on location of birth and assistance by skilled birth attendants in this context is not well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of birth preparedness practices and decision-making and assistance by SBAs among women in south-western Uganda. Methods Community survey methods were used to identify 759 recently delivered women from 120 villages in rural Mbarara district. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to collect data. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between birth preparedness, decision-making on location of birth and assistance by SBAs. Results 35% of the women had been prepared for childbirth and the prevalence of assistance by SBAs in the sample was 68%. The final decision regarding location of birth was made by the woman herself (36%), the woman with spouse (56%) and the woman with relative/friend (8%). The relationships between birth preparedness and women decision-making on location of birth in consultation with spouse/friends/relatives and choosing assistance by SBAs showed statistical significance which persisted after adjusting for possible confounders (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.4) and (OR 4.4, 95% CI: 3.0–6.7) respectively. Education, household assets and birth preparedness showed clear synergistic effect on the relationship between decision-maker on location of birth and assistance by SBAs. Other factors which showed statistical significant relationships with assistance by SBAs were ANC attendance, parity and residence. Conclusion Women’s decision-making on location of birth in consultation with spouse/friends/relatives and birth preparedness showed significant effect on choosing assistance by SBAs at birth. Education and household

  5. [Voluntary abortion and domestic violence among women attended at a public maternity hospital of Salvador-BA].

    PubMed

    Diniz, Normélia Maria Freire; Gesteira, Solange Maria Dos Anjos; Lopes, Regina Lúcia Mendonça; Santos Mota, Rosana; Pérez, Bárbara Angélica Gómez; Gomes, Nadirlene Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative study in order to study domestic violence in women with induced abortion. Interviews were conducted with 147 women hospitalized for induced abortion in a public maternity hospital in Salvador, Bahia. The subjects are characterized by mostly women, black, poorly educated, economically dependent on spouses, experienced psychological abuse, physical and sexual abuse committed by their spouses. Almost half of the women were victims of domestic violence during the current pregnancy, and that was the reason for inducing abortion for 67% of them. The study reveals an association between experience of domestic violence and induced abortion. As mental health consequences, they developed symptoms of post trauma stress disorder. It is necessary that the health professionals consider the cues to identify domestic violence as a health problem associated with induced abortion, which requires a transformation on the training model, including domestic violence as a health issue.

  6. [Risk factors for cervico-uterine cancer associated to HPV: p53 codon 72 polymorphism in women attending hospital care].

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Alvarez, A; Reyes Romero, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    In codon 72 of the p53 antioncogene there are two alleles, arginine and proline; the arg/arg genotype has recently been identified as a risk factor for developing of cervicouterine cancer (CuCa) associated to human papillomavirus (HVP) infection. The aim of this work was to determine in a sample of women the frequency of proline-arginine alleles and genotypes of p53 codon 72. The study was conducted in a sample of inpatient women at the hospital. p53 codon 72 alleles were determined in genomic ADN by amplification of specific sequences by chi 2 test. From 102 analyzed samples, p53-arginine allele corresponded to 67.64% and p53-proline allele corresponded to 32.36%; 47 women (46.10%) were arg/arg homocygotes, 11 women (10.77%) were pro/pro homocygotes, 44 women (43.13%) were arg/pro heterocigotes; the genotype distribution was within the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The detection of a high percentage of arginine homocygotes suggests that this genotype, considered as a risk factor for cancer associated to oncogenic HPV, has a high prevalence in the north of Mexico. The determination of this kind of polymorphisms is important as preventive action with regard to identification of risk factors for CaCu associated to HPV infection.

  7. Effect of removing user fees on attendance for curative and preventive primary health care services in rural South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, D.; Gouws, E.; Sach, M.; Karim, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    User fees are used to recover costs and discourage unnecessary attendance at primary care clinics in many developing countries. In South Africa, user fees for children aged under 6 years and pregnant women were removed in 1994, and in 1997 all user fees at all primary health care clinics were abolished. The intention of these policy changes was to improve access to health services for previously disadvantaged communities. We investigated the impact of these changes on clinic attendance patterns in Hlabisa health district. Average quarterly new registrations and total attendances for preventive services (antenatal care, immunization, growth monitoring) and curative services (treatment of ailments) at a mobile primary health care unit were studied from 1992 to 1998. Regression analysis was undertaken to assess whether trends were statistically significant. There was a sustained increase in new registrations (P = 0.0001) and total attendances (P = 0.0001) for curative services, and a fall in new registrations (P = 0.01) and total attendances for immunization and growth monitoring (P = 0.0002) over the study period. The upturn in demand for curative services started at the time of the first policy change. The decreases in antenatal registrations (P = 0.07) and attendances (P = 0.09) were not statistically significant. The number of new registrations for immunization and growth monitoring increased following the first policy change but declined thereafter. We found no evidence that the second policy change influenced underlying trends. The removal of user fees improved access to curative services but this may have happened at the expense of some preventive services. Governments should remain vigilant about the effects of new health policies in order to ensure that objectives are being met. PMID:11477970

  8. The risks of partner violence following HIV status disclosure, and health service responses: narratives of women attending reproductive health services in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Colombini, Manuela; James, Courtney; Ndwiga, Charity; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For many women living with HIV (WLWH), the disclosure of positive status can lead to either an extension of former violence or new conflict specifically associated with HIV status disclosure. This study aims to explore the following about WLWH: 1. the women's experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) risks following disclosure to their partners; 2. an analysis of the women's views on the role of health providers in preventing and addressing IPV, especially following HIV disclosure. Methods Thirty qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively selected WLWH attending clinics in Kenya. Data were coded using NVivo 9 and analyzed thematically. Results Nearly one third of the respondents reported experiencing physical and/or emotional violence inflicted by their partners following the sero-disclosure, suggesting that HIV status disclosure can be a period of heightened risk for partner stigma and abuse, and financial withdrawal, and thus should be handled with caution. Sero-concordance was protective for emotional and verbal abuse once the partner knew his positive status, or knew the woman knew his status. Our results show acceptance of the role of the health services in helping prevent and reduce anticipated fear of partner stigma and violence as barriers to HIV disclosure. Some of the approaches suggested by our respondents included couple counselling, separate counselling sessions for men, and facilitated disclosure. The women's narratives illustrate the importance of integrating discussions on risks for partner violence and fear of disclosure into HIV counselling and testing, helping women develop communication skills in how to disclose their status, and reducing fear about marital separation and break-up. Women in our study also confirmed the key role of preventive health services in reducing blame for HIV transmission and raising awareness on HIV as a chronic disease. However, several women reported receiving no counselling on safe

  9. Birth Preparedness and Its Association with Skilled Birth Attendance and Postpartum Checkups among Mothers in Gibe Wereda, Hadiya Zone, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Fasil; Hailu, Chernet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Birth preparedness program was designed to enhance skilled birth attendance and postpartum checkups of women in a developing country to reduce the three delays that lead women and neonates to death and disability. However, the relationship between birth preparedness with skilled birth attendance and postpartum checkups among mothers is not well studied. Therefore this study is intended to assess the association between birth preparedness and skilled birth attendance and postpartum checkups. Methods. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April 2014. Eight out of 22 Kebeles were selected using probability proportional to size sampling method. Seven hundred and forty-five mothers were selected randomly from the sampling frame, generated from family folders obtained from health posts. Data was collected using pretested questionnaire by face-to-face interview. Data was entered into EpiData version 3.1 database and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Result. Out of 745 sampled mothers 728 (97.7%) participated in the study. One hundred and twelve (15.4%) and 128 (17.6%) mothers got skilled birth attendance and received postpartum checkups for their last child, respectively. Birth preparedness, educational status of women and their husbands, and antenatal care visits of mothers were found to be predictor of skilled birth attendance and postpartum checkups. Mothers well prepared for child birth were 6.7 times more likely to attend skilled birth attendance [AOR = 6.7 (2.7–16.4)] and 3 times more likely to follow postpartum checkups [AOR = 3.0 (1.5–5.9)] than poorly prepared mothers, respectively. Travel time to reach the nearest health facility was found as predictor for postpartum checkups of mothers; mothers who travel ≤ 2 hours were three times more likely to follow postpartum checkups than mothers who travel > 2 hours (AOR (95% CI) = 3.4 (1.5–7.9)). Conclusion and Recommendation. Skilled birth attendance and postpartum checkups

  10. The burden of antenatal heart disease in South Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality in South Africa is rising, and heart conditions currently account for 41 per cent of indirect causes of deaths. Little is known about the burden of heart disease in pregnant South Africans. Methods We systematically reviewed the contemporary epidemiology and peripartum outcomes of heart disease in South African women attending antenatal care. Searches were performed in PubMed, ISI Web of Science, the EBSCO Africa-Wide database, the South African Union Catalogue, and the Current and Completed Research database (South Africa). References of included articles were also hand-searched. Studies reporting epidemiologic data on antenatal heart disease in South Africa were included. Data on morbidity and mortality were also collected. Results Seven studies were included in the systematic review. The prevalence of heart disease ranged from 123 to 943 per 100,000 deliveries, with a median prevalence of 616 per 100,000. Rheumatic valvular lesions were the commonest abnormalities, although cardiomyopathies were disproportionately high in comparison with other developing countries. Peripartum case-fatality rates were as high as 9.5 per cent in areas with limited access to care. The most frequent complications were pulmonary oedema, thromboembolism, and major bleeding with warfarin use. Perinatal mortality ranged from 8.9 to 23.8 per cent, whilst mitral lesions were associated with low birth weight. Meta-analysis could not be performed due to clinical and statistical heterogeneity of the included studies. Conclusion Approximately 0.6 per cent of pregnant South Africans have pre-existing cardiac abnormalities, with rheumatic lesions being the commonest. Maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality continue to be very high. We conclude this review by summarising limitations of the current literature and recommending standard reporting criteria for future reports. PMID:22463484

  11. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels among a Sample of Pregnant Women Attending Health Centers in Erbil-Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khazal, Suhad Ali; Zangana, Jwan M. Sabir

    2016-01-01

    There are so many significant hematological changes occurring in pregnancy, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is one of them. The objectives of this study were to determine the range of erythrocyte sedimentation rate values obtained in healthy pregnant women and to examine the effect of gestational age and hemoglobin concentration on…

  12. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Sexual Risk Behavior among Men and Women Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.; Vanable, Peter A.; Coury-Doniger, Patricia; Urban, Marguerite A.

    2006-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with a wide range of negative outcomes. The authors investigated the relation between CSA and sexual risk behavior in 827 patients recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic. Overall, CSA was reported by 53% of women and 49% of men and was associated with greater sexual risk behavior,…

  13. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis Infection among Women of Reproductive Age Attending the Gynecology Clinic of Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Endale; Teshome, Million; Amsalu, Anteneh; Shimelis, Techalew

    2016-01-01

    Background Urogenital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis(CT) is one of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) world-wide, especially in developing nations where routine laboratory diagnosis is unavailable. Little is known about the epidemiology of this infection in Ethiopia where other STIs are prevalent. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and associated factors of CT infection among women of reproductive age. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 322 consecutive women aged between 15–49 years at Hawassa University Referral Hospital from November 2014 to April 2015. Data on socio-demography and potential risk factors for genital infection were collected using structured questionnaires. Moreover, endocervical swabs were collected from all participants, screened for CT antigen using rapid immunochromatography assay, and cultured following the standard bacteriological method to isolate Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Result In this study, the overall prevalence of CT antigen and N. gonorrhoeae infection was 61(18.9%) and 1(0.31%), respectively. Women aged 15–24 years had the highest prevalence of CT infection (24.2%), followed by those aged 25–34 years (16.8%) and those aged 35–49 years (9.6%). CTinfection was associated with women who had unprotected sex within the last six months (aOR = 3.459; 95% CI = 1.459–8.222) and were sexually active for 6–10 years (aOR = 3.076; 95% CI = 1.152–8.209). None of the clinical symptoms and diagnoses was significantly associated with CT antigen positivity. Conclusions The high prevalence of genital CT infection in this study highlights the need for further large-scale studies on the general population. Thus, screening of women regardless of their symptoms should be in place. PMID:28006003

  14. Estimating gonorrhoea prevalence in young heterosexual men and women attending community-based sexual health services to inform decisions on gonorrhoea testing.

    PubMed

    Town, K; Furegato, M; Field, N; Hughes, G

    2017-03-03

    In England, dual tests detecting chlamydia and gonorrhoea are used in specialist and community-based sexual health services (SHSs). Test performance is poor when prevalence is low, therefore UK national guidelines recommend against opportunistic gonorrhoea screening unless there is a clear local public health need. While surveillance data on gonorrhoea prevalence is comprehensive in specialist SHSs, it is sparse in community SHSs. We aimed to estimate gonorrhoea prevalence in heterosexual men and women aged 15-24 attending community SHSs to inform testing care pathways. We used linear and quadratic regression to model the relationship between prevalence in community and specialist SHSs in local authorities (LAs) with available surveillance data. We applied best-fitting models to predict prevalence in community SHSs in remaining LAs. Data from community SHSs were available for 102/326 LAs. There was a weak positive association between gonorrhoea prevalence in community and specialist SHSs in corresponding LAs within (R 2 = 0·13, P = 0·058) and outside (R 2 = 0·07, P = 0·02) London. Applying best-fitting models, we estimated a median gonorrhoea prevalence of 0·5% (mean 0·6%; range 0·2%-2·7%) in heterosexuals attending community SHSs. Despite some unexplained variation, our analyses suggest gonorrhoea prevalence in young heterosexuals attending community SHSs is below 1% in most English LAs. Our findings re-inforce the current national guidelines that recommend care pathways for gonorrhoea testing in community SHSs include confirmatory testing to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and inappropriate management.

  15. Stigma and Attitudes towards Antenatal Depression and Antidepressant Use during Pregnancy in Healthcare Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawley, Laura; Einarson, Adrienne; Bowen, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Depression in pregnancy or antenatal depression (AD) occurs in approximately one in five women, with potentially deleterious effects to the mother and fetus. People are encouraged to get treatment for depression; however, pregnant women can experience stigma when they reach out for help with depression. Research indicates that healthcare…

  16. Family Planning Practices Prior to the Acceptance of Tubectomy: A Study Among Women Attending a Maternity Home in Bangalore,India

    PubMed Central

    V, Srividya; Kumar, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The extent of acceptance of contraceptive methods still varies within societies. Reliance on sterilisation is appearing earlier in marriage and among ever-younger ages and lower parities. Aim and Objective: To study the family planning practices adopted by women who undergo tubectomy before the acceptance of tubectomy. Material and Methods: Cross–sectional study of tubectomy acceptors who attended a corporation referral maternity home in Bangalore, India by interview method using a pre–designed a pre–tested structured questionnaire. Results: Majority 295(73.9%) of the study subjects had not practised any method of contraception before they underwent sterilisation. Increase in the education levels of the study subjects was associated with an increase in the contraceptive use (temporary methods) before they accepted tubectomy; this association was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001). PMID:24086862

  17. Physical Activity Levels in Women Attending Breast Screening, Receiving Chemotherapy and Post-Breast Cancer Treatment; A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lahart, Ian M.; Metsios, George S.; Nevill, Alan M.; Carmichael, Amtul R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A lack of physical activity (PA) is a well-recognised risk factor in the development of breast cancer (BC) and evidence-base research on the impact of PA on BC survival is consolidating. However, evidence reveals that BC survivors have low levels of PA, suggesting the need of targeted interventions to enhance the PA behaviour of BC survivors. Unfortunately, there is lack of data from the UK about the PA behaviours of women at various stages of diagnosis and treatment of BC. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess PA levels in women at different stages of BC pathway. Patients and Methods: A convenient sample of patients was selected at various stages of presentation and treatment of BC. Patients attending for breast screening for NHSBSP (n = 188), post-operative patients attending for chemotherapy (n = 41) and BC patients within one year’s post-treatment (n = 80) were invited to take part in this cross-sectional study. Results: Based on the odds ratio, the likelihood of a chemotherapy participant not meeting PA guidelines (i.e., being in the low activity category) were three times higher than the odds of a NHSBPS attendee not meeting PA guidelines, and compared to post-treatment participants, the chemotherapy patient’s odds of not meeting PA guidelines was four times higher. The odds of NHSBPS attendees being in the high activity category compared to the moderate category were three times higher than that of a post-treatment participant. Conclusions: The current study suggests the need to establish robust PA interventions to enhance the PA behaviour of breast cancer survivors. PMID:24852599

  18. A Pilot Test of the Everyday Stressors Index–Spanish Version in a Sample of Hispanic Women Attending Prenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, María L.; Ashford, Kristin; Linares, Ana M.; Hall, Lynne A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prenatal and postpartum psychosocial stress are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Hispanic women experience higher levels of stress during pregnancy. This pilot study assessed the psychometric characteristics of the Everyday Stressors Index-Spanish (ESI-S) version. Methods Secondary analysis in a convenience sample, n = 51 women. Results The ESI-S showed adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = .86). Two factors accounted for 40% of the item variance. The greatest sources of stress were “having too many responsibilities” and “not enough money for basics”. Higher levels of stressors were associated with older age, living without a partner, and working part or full time. The ESI-S was positively correlated with measures of perinatal depression. Conclusions Findings support the reliability and validity of the newly translated ESI-S. PMID:26673774

  19. Mycoplasma genitalium infection in women attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic: diagnostic specimen type, coinfections, and predictors.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Victoria L; Hobbs, Marcia M; Lau, Karen; Weinbaum, Barbara S; Getman, Damon K; Seña, Arlene C

    2012-09-01

    In female sexually transmitted infection clinic attendees, Mycoplasma genitalium was more frequently detected using vaginal (53/73) versus endocervical (43/73) specimens. In women without other sexually transmitted infections, M. genitalium detection (N = 44) was associated with age ≤22 years (odds ratio, 2.53; P = 0.006) and clinical evidence of cervicitis (odds ratio, 2.11; P = 0.03).

  20. Risk factors for postpartum depression in women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Yator, Obadia; Mathai, Muthoni; Vander Stoep, Ann; Rao, Deepa; Kumar, Manasi

    2016-07-01

    Mothers with HIV are at high risk of a range of psychosocial issues that may impact HIV disease progression for themselves and their children. Stigma has also become a substantial barrier to accessing HIV/AIDS care and prevention services. The study objective was to determine the prevalence and severity of postpartum depression (PPD) among women living with HIV and to further understand the impact of stigma and other psychosocial factors in 123 women living with HIV attending prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital located in Nairobi, Kenya. We used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and HIV/AIDS Stigma Instrument - PLWHA (HASI - P). Forty-eight percent (N = 59) of women screened positive for elevated depressive symptoms. Eleven (9%) of the participants reported high levels of stigma. Multivariate analyses showed that lower education (OR = 0.14, 95% CI [0.04-0.46], p = .001) and lack of family support (OR = 2.49, 95% CI [1.14-5.42], p = .02) were associated with the presence of elevated depressive symptoms. The presence of stigma implied more than ninefold risk of development of PPD (OR = 9.44, 95% CI [1.132-78.79], p = .04). Stigma was positively correlated with an increase in PPD. PMTCT is an ideal context to reach out to women to address mental health problems especially depression screening and offering psychosocial treatments bolstering quality of life of the mother-baby dyad.

  1. The prevalence of urogenital micro-organisms detected by a multiplex PCR-reverse line blot assay in women attending three sexual health clinics in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Michelle L; Hillman, Richard J; Jones, Rachel; Lowe, Penelope C; Couldwell, Deborah L; Davies, Stephen C; King, Fiona; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2011-07-01

    This study used a previously described multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) assay to assess the prevalence and distribution of 14 urogenital pathogens or putative pathogens, namely Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Gardnerella vaginalis, Ureaplasma parvum, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, and human adenovirus. First-voided urine specimens and endocervical and self-collected vaginal swabs from each of 216 women attending three sexual health clinics in Sydney, Australia, were tested and the results were compared with those of reference methods for each organism. One hundred and sixty-eight women (77.7 %) had at least one and 105 (48.6 %) had more than one target organism, most commonly G. vaginalis and Ureaplasma spp. The prevalence of each of the four known sexually transmissible pathogens was <5 %. Of the 216 women, 111 (51.4 %) reported at least one symptom consistent with genital or urethral infection, including discharge, pain or discomfort. Only G. vaginalis was detected more frequently in women with symptoms (P = 0.05). The specificity of the mPCR/RLB assay compared with that of the reference methods for each organism and for all specimen types was 100 %. The mean sensitivities of the mPCR/RLB assay compared with those of the reference methods for self-collected vaginal swabs, cervical swabs and first-voided urine specimens for all organisms were 99.3, 98.1 and 84.6 %, respectively; however, these differences were not significant. There were no differences in sensitivities between specimen types for C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, T. vaginalis and H. influenzae, although all were found infrequently. Overall, the mPCR/RLB platform was found to be an accurate testing platform in a sexual health clinic setting.

  2. Antenatal diagnosis of subependymal heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, L A; Simon, E M; Filly, R A; Barkovich, A J

    2000-02-01

    Subependymal heterotopia consist of gray matter nodules along the lateral ventricular walls and are associated with epilepsy and other cerebral malformations. Some cases have an X-linked inheritance, and early antenatal diagnosis of affected fetuses is important for appropriate management. We present a case of heterotopia diagnosed by sonography and MR imaging at 23 weeks' gestation and discuss the differential diagnosis, reviewing the evolution and imaging appearances of the germinal matrix and its implications for detection of heterotopia.

  3. Miscarriage Among Flight Attendants

    PubMed Central

    Grajewski, Barbara; Whelan, Elizabeth A.; Lawson, Christina C.; Hein, Misty J.; Waters, Martha A.; Anderson, Jeri L.; MacDonald, Leslie A.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Cassinelli, Rick T.; Luo, Lian

    2015-01-01

    Background Cosmic radiation and circadian disruption are potential reproductive hazards for flight attendants. Methods Flight attendants from 3 US airlines in 3 cities were interviewed for pregnancy histories and lifestyle, medical, and occupational covariates. We assessed cosmic radiation and circadian disruption from company records of 2 million individual flights. Using Cox regression models, we compared respondents (1) by levels of flight exposures and (2) to teachers from the same cities, to evaluate whether these exposures were associated with miscarriage. Results Of 2654 women interviewed (2273 flight attendants and 381 teachers), 958 pregnancies among 764 women met study criteria. A hypothetical pregnant flight attendant with median firsttrimester exposures flew 130 hours in 53 flight segments, crossed 34 time zones, and flew 15 hours during her home-base sleep hours (10 pm–8 am), incurring 0.13 mGy absorbed dose (0.36 mSv effective dose) of cosmic radiation. About 2% of flight attendant pregnancies were likely exposed to a solar particle event, but doses varied widely. Analyses suggested that cosmic radiation exposure of 0.1 mGy or more may be associated with increased risk of miscarriage in weeks 9–13 (odds ratio = 1.7 [95% confidence interval = 0.95–3.2]). Risk of a first-trimester miscarriage with 15 hours or more of flying during home-base sleep hours was increased (1.5 [1.1–2.2]), as was risk with high physical job demands (2.5 [1.5–4.2]). Miscarriage risk was not increased among flight attendants compared with teachers. Conclusions Miscarriage was associated with flight attendant work during sleep hours and high physical job demands and may be associated with cosmic radiation exposure. PMID:25563432

  4. From research to practice: the example of antenatal care in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Winiyakul, Narong; Chongsomchai, Chompilas; Chaisiri, Kamron

    2004-01-01

    The rationale for providing antenatal care is to screen predominantly healthy pregnant women to detect early signs of, or risk factors for, abnormal conditions or diseases and to follow this detection with effective and timely intervention. The recommended antenatal care programme in most developing countries is often the same as the programmes used in developed countries. However, in developing countries there is wide variation in the proportion of women who receive antenatal care. The WHO randomized trial of antenatal care and the WHO systematic review indicated that a model of care that provided fewer antenatal visits could be introduced into clinical practice without causing adverse consequences to the woman or the fetus. This new model of antenatal care is being implemented in Thailand. Action has been required at all levels of the health-care system, from consumers through to health professionals, the Ministry of Public Health and international organizations. The Thai experience is a good example of moving research findings into practice, and it should be replicated elsewhere to effectively manage other health problems. PMID:15643795

  5. Antenatal care and maternal demographic and social characteristics. Evolution in France between 1972 and 1976.

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, B; Kaminski, M; Breart, G

    1980-01-01

    A study was carried out on representative samples of 11 254 births in France in 1972 and 4685 births in 1976. Women were interviewed after delivery to obtain information about the medical care they had received during pregnancy. Inadequate antenatal care was defined as: first antenatal visit after the first trimester of pregnancy, or total number of visits fewer than the required minimum, or no visit to an obstetrician or the hospital maternity team. In 1972, the problem of inadequate care occurred mainly in very young women, or in those of high parity or with short birth intervals when the father's social class had been taken into account. Social status was also an important factor independently of a woman's demographic characteristics. These inequalities persisted in 1976 despite the policy adopted in 1972 to improve antenatal care for high-risk women. PMID:7441133

  6. Maternal Antenatal Depression and Infant Disorganized Attachment at 12 months

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Lisa J.; Goodman, Sherryl H.; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Although high rates of attachment disorganization have been observed in infants of depressed mothers, little is known about the role of antenatal depression as a precursor to infant attachment disorganization. The primary aim of this study was to examine associations between maternal antenatal depression and infant disorganization at 12 months in a sample of women (N = 79) at risk for perinatal depression. A secondary aim was to test the roles of maternal postpartum depression and maternal parenting quality as potential moderators of this predicted association. Among women with histories of major depressive episodes, maternal depressive symptoms were assessed at multiple times during pregnancy and the first year postpartum, maternal parenting quality was measured at 3 months postpartum, and attachment disorganization was assessed at 12 months postpartum. Results revealed that infants classified as disorganized had mothers with higher levels of depressive symptoms during pregnancy compared to infants classified as organized. Maternal parenting quality moderated this association, as exposure to higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy was only associated with higher rates of infant disorganized attachment when maternal parenting at 3 months was less optimal. These findings suggest that enhancing maternal parenting behaviors during this early period in development has the potential to alter pathways to disorganized attachment among infants exposed to antenatal maternal depressive symptoms, which could have enduring consequences for child wellbeing. PMID:23216358

  7. Associations of maternal and paternal antenatal mood with offspring anxiety disorder at age 18 years

    PubMed Central

    Capron, Lauren E.; Glover, Vivette; Pearson, Rebecca M.; Evans, Jonathan; O’Connor, Thomas G.; Stein, Alan; Murphy, Susannah E.; Ramchandani, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Maternal antenatal depression and anxiety are associated with increased risk of childhood behavioural and emotional problems in offspring; it remains unclear to what extent this is due to a maternal biological impact on foetal development. Here, we compare associations between maternal and paternal antenatal depression and anxiety with offspring anxiety disorders, thus controlling for some genetic and shared environmental factors. Methods We used data from the ALSPAC population cohort including measures of antenatal parental depression and anxiety. At 18 years, offspring completed the CIS-R interview, yielding diagnoses for anxiety disorders. Results were adjusted for confounding variables including parental postnatal depression and anxiety. Results Children of women with antenatal depression (18 weeks gestation), had an increased risk of anxiety disorders at 18 years of age (11.1% vs. 6.2%; adj. OR 1.75 (1.19, 2.58); p=0.01). Children of women with antenatal anxiety had increased risk of co-morbid anxiety and depression (adj. OR 1.39 (1.06, 1.82); p=0.02). No such associations were found with paternal antenatal depression or anxiety. Limitations There was a high attrition rate from the original cohort to the CIS-R completion at 18 years postpartum. Parental mood was only assessed together at one time point during the antenatal period. Conclusions The differences in the association between maternal and paternal mood during pregnancy and child outcomes supports the hypothesis that foetal programming may account, at least in part, for this association. We highlight the potential opportunity for preventative intervention by optimising antenatal mental health. PMID:26301478

  8. Sexual behaviors and condom use of HIV-infected men and women of color attending a treatment and care clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Absalon, Judith; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Limited data are available regarding high-risk sexual behaviors among HIV-infected African Americans and Latinos who receive ongoing care in clinical settings. OBJECTIVES: To identify high-risk sexual behaviors and risk factors for consistent condom use and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection. METHODS: Cross-sectional study data from interviewer-administered surveys and CT tests. RESULTS: Of 179 sexually active adults in the study, 35% had multiple sex partners, 37% had a partner with unknown HIV status and 49% used condoms consistently. Compared with men, women had fewer partners and were less likely to use condoms with partners of unknown HIV status. Men who have sex with men (MSM) had more partners and more partners with unknown HIV status compared with non-MSM. On multivariate analysis, drug use and having an HIV-infected partner were associated with less consistent condom use. CT prevalence was low (2%). CONCLUSION: This study identified ongoing high-risk sexual behaviors among a clinic-based group of African-American and Latino HIV-infected men and women. The clinical setting may be an ideal place for implementation of secondary prevention interventions. PMID:16080454

  9. A prefilled injection device for outreach tetanus immunization by Bolivian traditional birth attendants.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, R; Halkyer, P; Gil, F; Nelson, C; Kristensen, D

    1998-07-01

    This study evaluated the performance, acceptability, and appropriateness of a new, single-use, prefilled injection device called UniJect for an outreach immunization application. Between April and June 1995, UniJect devices were used by 36 traditional birth attendants to administer tetanus toxoid injections to 2,240 pregnant women during routine, antenatal home visits in the Northern, Ichilos, and Warnes Districts of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Because tetanus toxoid is relatively heat stable, the traditional birth attendants were able to keep the tetanus toxoid-filled UniJect devices in their homes for up to one month without refrigeration. The devices were stored, transported, and disposed of in an outreach carrier designed to reduce the risks of improper handling and disposal. Data were collected from injection recipients, traditional birth attendants, and supervisors via observation, questionnaires, and post-study interviews. The performance of the UniJect device and its acceptability among all groups was very high. The traditional birth attendants used UniJect properly and safely; there were no reports or observations of device misuse, reuse, or needle-stick. Advantages cited included the fact that the device required no assembly, offered assured sterility, and reduced vaccine wastage sometimes associated with multi-dose vials. The ability to store and transport the vaccine-filled devices without ice also greatly simplified logistics.

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding human papillomavirus vaccination among young women attending a tertiary institution in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Qing Yuan; Wong, Ru Xin; Chen, Wei Ming Darren; Guo, Xiao Xuan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of young women regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. METHODS We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study among female students at a tertiary institute in Singapore. RESULTS A total of 255 questionnaires were completed and formed the basis of the analysis. 244 (95.7%) of the total participants were of the age group 15–22 years. 252 (98.8%) participants were unmarried and 240 (94.1%) had never had sexual intercourse. Only 25 (9.8%) women had received vaccination. Among the unvaccinated participants, 96 (41.7%) had no intention to receive HPV vaccination and 62 of them cited lack of information as a major barrier to HPV vaccination. Knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was also assessed and graded via a point system, with a maximum score of 14. Knowledge was found to be low, with a median score of 7. There was a significant association between HPV vaccination uptake and the source from which they first heard about the vaccine (p = 0.007). Vaccinated respondents tended to first hear about it from their relatives and friends, as compared to unvaccinated respondents (60.0% vs. 27.0%) CONCLUSION There is poor uptake of HPV vaccination amongst Singapore’s susceptible youth as well as poor knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV vaccination. Public health education regarding cervical cancer and HPV vaccination is still needed and has to be targeted at not only respondents, but also their family and friends. PMID:27353611

  11. The incidence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection in women attending nine sexually transmitted diseases clinics in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Maria L; Feaster, Daniel J; Duan, Rui; Cohen, Stephanie; Diaz, Chanelle; Castro, Jose G; Golden, Matthew R; Henn, Sarah; Colfax, Grant N; Metsch, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Trichomoniasis (TV) is associated with an increased risk of acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and HIV. The purpose of this study is to evaluate factors associated with incidence TV among female STD clinic attendees in the USA. Methods Data were collected from women participating in a randomised controlled trial evaluating brief risk reduction counselling at the time of HIV testing to reduce sexually transmitted infections (STIs) incidence in STD clinics. Participants recruited from STD clinics underwent STI testing at baseline and 6-month follow-up. TV testing was performed using Nucleic Acid Amplification Test. Results 1704 participants completed study assessments. Prevalence of TV was 14.6%, chlamydia 8.6%, gonorrhoea 3.0%, herpes simplex virus 2 44.7% and HIV 0.4%. Cumulative 6-month incidence of TV was 7.5%. Almost 50% of the incident TV cases had TV at baseline and had received treatment. Factors associated with incidence of TV were having chlamydia, TV and HIV at baseline: TV relative risk (RR)=3.37 (95% CI 2.35 to 4.83, p<0.001); chlamydia RR=1.92 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.99, p=0.04); and HIV=1.59 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.50, p=0.047). Conclusions Prevalent and incident TV is common among STD clinic attendees; and baseline TV is the main risk factor for incident TV, suggesting high rates of reinfection or treatment failures. This supports the importance of rescreening women after treatment for TV, evaluating current treatment regimens and programmes to ensure treatment of sexual partners. Clinical trial number NCT01154296. PMID:26071390

  12. Perceptions of pregnant teenagers with regard to the antenatal care clinic environment.

    PubMed

    James, Sindiwe; Rall, Nadine; Strümpher, Juanita

    2012-10-12

    Pregnancy in teenagers seems to be a challenge that might contribute to a struggle to fulfil the objectives of the Millennium Development Goals directly related to women's reproductive health and neonatal care. The challenge becomes worse as midwives and nurses find it difficult to fully supervise all these pregnancies, because teenagers stay away or default from clinic attendance. The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the perceptions of pregnant teenagers of the antenatal care (ANC) clinic environment and to recommend guidelines to midwifery operational managers for strategies to create teenager-friendly ANC clinic environments. The study applied a qualitative research design with explorative, descriptive and contextual research approaches. The ethical principles that guided this study were respect for the person, beneficence and justice. Semi-structured interviews utilising a predetermined interview schedule with a central open-ended question to address the study objectives were used. Data were collected from pregnant teenagers attending ANC clinics in Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality. Participants were unanimous in that they perceived the clinic environment as causing discomfort to them. Different reasons attributed to this experience were related to their young age. The age difference between themselves and other women attending the clinic made participants perceive themselves as inferior and as being treated as such at the clinic. They found this embarrassing and recommended having their own waiting area and additional midwives at the clinic so that they would not be subjected to humiliating scrutiny and disapproval from older pregnant women. Pregnant teenagers' recall of their experiences of the ANC clinic environment suggests that they perceive themselves as not being adequately cared for, as judged, and as forced to be in an environment that is insensitive to their needs. As a result some of their peers stayed away from the clinic and

  13. Comparison of the BPLab® sphygmomanometer for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring with mercury sphygmomanometry in pregnant women: validation study according to the British Hypertension Society protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dorogova, Inna V; Panina, Elena S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the automated BPLab® sphygmomanometer for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in pregnant women according to Part II of the 1993 British Hypertension Society protocol. Pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic were randomly asked to participate (n=30). The BPLab sphygmomanometer was tested on pregnant women in this study and achieved A/A ratings according to the BHS protocol when compared with the “gold” standard of mercury sphygmomanometry. The device can therefore be recommended for use in pregnancy. PMID:25926739

  14. Rate of Utilization of Skilled Birth Attendant and the Influencing Factors in an Urban Myanmar Population.

    PubMed

    Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Soe, Malar; Charupoonphol, Phitaya; Srisorrachatr, Suwat

    2015-07-01

    A survey study aimed at identifying rates and predictive factors on utilization of skilled birth attendant (SBA) among pregnant women. A stratified random sampling technique was used to select 200 Myanmar women aged 18 to 49 years in Kalay Township. Data were collected by interview questionnaire from March 1 to 15, 2012, and data were analyzed by frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation, χ(2) test, and multiple logistic regression analysis. The utilization rate of SBA was 74%. Factors significantly predicting utilization of SBA (P < .05) were level of maternal and child health (MCH) knowledge, attitude toward SBA, and accessibility to MCH services. The women who had a moderate to good level of knowledge utilized SBA 2.7 times more than those who had a poor level of knowledge (odds ratio = 2.705, 95% confidence interval = 1.31-5.57). The women who had a positive attitude toward SBA utilized SBA 7.7 times more than those who had a negative attitude (odds ratio = 7.708, 95% confidence interval = 3.71-15.98). The women who had high accessibility to MCH services utilized SBA 1.4 times more than those who had low accessibility (odds ratio = 1.477, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-2.21). These factors were able to correctly predict utilization of SBA at 74.9%. MCH knowledge and information on utilization of SBA should be strengthened during every antenatal care visit to enhance positive attitude on utilization of SBA and to increase accessibility to MCH services by providing community antenatal care or home visits.

  15. Anxiety levels in women attending a colposcopy clinic: a randomised trial of an educational intervention using video colposcopy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jane C; Curtis, Ruth; Mylotte, Michael

    2004-11-01

    A video colposcopy allows the real-time images viewed by the doctor performing the examination to be viewed by patients on a television monitor during the consultation. Eighty-one women (requiring either laser treatment or a normal recheck) were randomly assigned to either the video intervention group or the control group. A significant decrease in state anxiety was observed from one visit to the next in all patients (P = 0.000). This decrease in anxiety was significantly greater in the laser patients in the video colposcopy condition than patients in the control group for both groups of patients. Patients in the experimental groups also reported less pain than patients in the control conditions (P < 0.05). This benefit associated with video colposcopy was not observed on the second (treatment) visit. In conclusion, video colposcopy is a useful and time-efficient method that reduces patient anxiety and pain during examination visits, but not necessarily during visits where laser treatment is required.

  16. Evaluation of clinical performance of a novel urine-based HPV detection assay among women attending a colposcopy clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Dunn, S. Terence; Robbins, David; Brown, David; Allen, Richard A.; Eby, Yolanda J.; Smith, Katie M.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Zhang, Roy R.; Gold, Michael A.; Schiffman, Mark; Walker, Joan L.; Castle, Philip E.; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in urine offers a convenient approach for cervical cancer screening but has previously suffered from limited clinical sensitivity. Objectives We evaluated clinical performance of the prototype Trovagene HPV test, a novel polymerase chain reaction assay that targets the E1 region of the HPV genome and detects and amplifies short fragments of cell-free HPV DNA in urine. Study design We conducted a pilot study among seventy two women referred to colposcopy following abnormal screening. Participants provided a urine sample prior to clinician-collected cervical sampling and colposcopically-directed punch biopsy. Trovagene HPV test results on urine samples were compared with cervical and urine testing by Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (LA-HPV) for detection of histologically-confirmed cervical precancerous lesions. Results There was high concordance between urine samples tested by the Trovagene HPV test and corresponding cervical (87.5%) and urine (81.9%) samples tested by LA-HPV. The Trovagene HPV test had high sensitivity (92.3% for detecting CIN2/3, and 100% for CIN3), comparable to LA-HPV testing on cervical samples (96.0% and 100%, respectively), and higher than LA-HPV testing on urine samples (80.8% and 90.0%, respectively). In this referral population, the specificity of the Trovagene urine HPV test was non-significantly lower (29% f CIN2/3 and 25% for CIN3) than corresponding estimates of LA-HPV testing on cervical (36% and 28%, respectively) and urine (42% and 38%, respectively) samples. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that the Trovagene HPV test has high sensitivity for urine-based detection of cervical precancer and merits evaluation in larger studies. PMID:24881489

  17. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment of the growth-restricted fetus: benefit or cost?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Janna L; Orgeig, Sandra

    2009-06-01

    Women at risk of preterm labor are commonly treated with antenatal glucocorticoids to reduce neonatal complications, including respiratory distress syndrome. Despite the benefits of antenatal glucocorticoid for neonatal lung function, they are associated with negative cardiovascular outcomes. Among this population, there is a group of intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses in which substrate supply is reduced and these fetuses must undergo a range of cardiovascular adaptations to survive. Interestingly, the cardiovascular changes caused by antenatal glucocorticoid in normally grown fetuses are contrary to the cardiovascular adaptations that the intrauterine growth-restricted fetus must make to survive. Hence, the possibility exists that antenatal glucocorticoid in intrauterine growth-restricted infants may compromise cardiovascular development. This review first provides an overview of general antenatal glucocorticoid effects, before outlining the effects on cardiorespiratory development in normally grown fetuses, the cardiovascular adaptations that occur in the intrauterine growth-restricted fetus and finally integrating this with the very limited evidence for the effect of antenatal glucocorticoid in intrauterine growth-restricted infants.

  18. Cohort analysis of antenatal care and delivery outcomes in pregnancy: a basis for improving maternal health.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Jahn, A; Ben-Smith, A; Gadabu, O J; Douglas, G P; Seita, A; Khader, A; Zachariah, R

    2014-06-21

    Cohort analysis has been the cornerstone of tuberculosis (TB) monitoring and evaluation for nearly two decades; these principles have been adapted for patients with the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome on antiretroviral treatment and patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We now make the case for using cohort analyses for monitoring pregnant women during antenatal care, up to and including childbirth. We believe that this approach would strengthen the current monitoring and evaluation systems used in antenatal care by providing more precise information at regular time intervals. Accurate real-time data on how many pregnant women are enrolled in antenatal care, their characteristics, the interventions they are receiving and the outcomes for mother and child should provide a solid basis for action to reduce maternal mortality.

  19. Early infant male circumcision for human immunodeficiency virus prevention: knowledge and attitudes of women attending a rural hospital in Swaziland, Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Prudence; Kliner, Merav; Walley, John

    2014-01-01

    Swaziland has the highest prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the world at 26% of the adult population. Medical male circumcision (MMC) has been shown to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV from heterosexual sex by up to 60% and the Government of Swaziland has been promoting adult male circumcision. Infant circumcision commenced in 2013 so it is important to understand the knowledge and views of women as potential mothers, around infant circumcision for medical purposes to inform the development of the service. This study interviewed 14 women of reproductive age attending the outpatient department of Good Shepherd Mission Hospital (GSMH), a rural district hospital, on their knowledge of and attitudes to early infant male circumcision (EIMC). Participants were highly knowledgeable about the health benefits of medical circumcision, although knowledge of the comparative risks and benefits of EIMC to adult circumcision was poor. All participants would have a son circumcised; the preferred age varied from early infancy to adolescence. Complications and pain were the main barriers whilst religious and cultural reasons were mentioned both for and against circumcision. A variety of family members are important in the decision to circumcise a young boy. Acceptability of medical circumcision was high in this study, but concerns about safety, pain, autonomy and cultural factors reduce the acceptability of infant circumcision more specifically. It will be important to provide accurate, culturally sensitive information about infant circumcision to mothers, fathers and grandparents using existing hospital and community services provided at GSMH and throughout Swaziland. Where possible services for MMC should be available to males of all ages so that families and young men may choose the most favourable age for circumcision.

  20. Differences in timely antenatal care between first and second-generation migrants in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Choté, Anushka A; Koopmans, Gerrit T; de Groot, Christianne J M; Hoefman, Renske J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Steegers, Eric A P; Mackenbach, Johan P; Trappenburg, Margo; Foets, Marleen

    2014-08-01

    To assess whether there are differences in the timing of first antenatal care visit between 1st and 2nd-generation migrants, and if so, how such differences could be explained. The study has been conducted in the framework of Generation R Study, a multi-ethnic population-based study conducted in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The study population consists of 845 women of the six largest ethnic groups. Data were derived from the electronic antenatal charts of the participating midwives and from written questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses have been carried out to investigate whether difference could be explained by need, predisposing and enabling factors. More first than second generation women enter antenatal care after 14 weeks of pregnancy (28.1 vs. 18.7 %). Women who were not likely to adopt healthy behaviour regarding pregnancy--such as timely taking folic acid--equally were not inclined to enter antenatal care early in pregnancy. The role of Dutch language mastery was limited. Given our results, first generation women are less likely to receive timely health educational advice or to benefit from screening opportunities than second generation women. Future studies should pay more attention to adequate assessment of proficiency of the host language.

  1. Health insurance for the poor decreases access to HIV testing in antenatal care: evidence of an unintended effect of health insurance reform in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ettenger, Allison; Bärnighausen, Till; Castro, Arachu

    2014-05-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV was added to standard antenatal care (ANC) in 2000 for Colombians enrolled in the two national health insurance schemes, the 'subsidized regime' (covering poor citizens) and the 'contributory regime' (covering salaried citizens with incomes above the poverty threshold), which jointly covered 80% of the total Colombian population as of 2007. This article examines integration of HIV testing in ANC through the relationship between ordering an HIV test with the type of health insurance, including lack of health insurance, using data from the nationally representative 2005 Colombia Demographic and Health Survey. Overall, health-care providers ordered an HIV test for only 35% of the women attending ANC. We regressed the order of an HIV test during ANC on health systems characteristics (type of insurance and type of ANC provider), women's characteristics (age, wealth, educational attainment, month of pregnancy at first antenatal visit, HIV knowledge, urban vs. rural residence and sub-region of residence) and children's characteristics (birth order and birth year). Women enrolled in the subsidized regime were significantly less likely to be offered and receive an HIV test in ANC than women without any health insurance (adjusted odds ratio = 0.820, P < 0.001), when controlling for the other independent variables. Wealth, urban residence, birth year of the child and the type of health-care provider seen during the ANC visit were significantly associated with providers ordering an HIV test for a woman (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that enrolment in the subsidized regime reduced access to HIV testing in ANC. Additional research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms through which the potential effect of health insurance coverage on HIV testing in ANC occurs and to examine whether enrolment in the subsidized regime has affected access to other essential health services.

  2. Using the community-based health planning and services program to promote skilled delivery in rural Ghana: socio-demographic factors that influence women utilization of skilled attendants at birth in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa is enormous. In Ghana the maternal mortality ratio was 350 per 100,000 live births in 2010. Skilled birth attendance has been shown to reduce maternal deaths and disabilities, yet in 2010 only 68% of mothers in Ghana gave birth with skilled birth attendants. In 2005, the Ghana Health Service piloted an enhancement of its Community-Based Health Planning and Services (CHPS) program, training Community Health Officers (CHOs) as midwives, to address the gap in skilled attendance in rural Upper East Region (UER). The study determined the extent to which CHO-midwives skilled delivery program achieved its desired outcomes in UER among birthing women. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional household survey with women who had ever given birth in the three years prior to the survey. We employed a two stage sampling techniques: In the first stage we proportionally selected enumeration areas, and the second stage involved random selection of households. In each household, where there is more than one woman with a child within the age limit, we interviewed the woman with the youngest child. We collected data on awareness of the program, use of the services and factors that are associated with skilled attendants at birth. Results A total of 407 households/women were interviewed. Eighty three percent of respondents knew that CHO-midwives provided delivery services in CHPS zones. Seventy nine percent of the deliveries were with skilled attendants; and over half of these skilled births (42% of total) were by CHO-midwives. Multivariate analyses showed that women of the Nankana ethnic group and those with uneducated husbands were less likely to access skilled attendants at birth in rural settings. Conclusions The implementation of the CHO-midwife program in UER appeared to have contributed to expanded skilled delivery care access and utilization for rural women. However, women of the Nankana ethnic group and uneducated

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus in women attending Pap cervical screening camp at a peripheral hospital of North-Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Agarwal, Manisha; Chatterjee, Soumya; Gogoi, Hemanta Kumar; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cervical cancer is the leading cause of deaths in India. However, cytological/HPV screening may result in early detection of cervical cancer, resulting in early treatment and reduced mortality. Although reports related to general population is available, data on HPV prevalence among women attending AFMS health care facilities is scarce. Cervical samples were collected for cytological staining by Pap test and molecular detection by PCR, genotyping by HPV specific primers and sequencing. Apart from finding of atypical cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) in one subject, no evidence of malignancy was observed. A high prevalence of HPV was found in this study group, which was intermediate between previous reports from general population and cervical cancer patients. All the subjects had infection of high risk HPV type16. HPV prevalence was found similar between different age groups. Although, none of the study subjects had malignant changes, but due to high prevalence of high risk HPV infection and other associated risk factors, these subjects might be at an elevated risk of developing cervical cancer. Regular follow-up of these patients who were detected HPV positive are required to screen for cervical malignancy. PMID:25859083

  4. Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality. PMID:24885103

  5. Evaluation of the impact of current antismoking advice in the UK on women with planned pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Acharya, G; Jauniaux, E; Sathia, Leena; Griffin, M; Morgan, H

    2002-09-01

    Smoking during pregnancy (active or passive) is associated with increased health risks to the unborn child. Current policy on antismoking advice for pregnant women in the United Kingdom is based essentially on written information by means of leaflets given to them at the first antenatal visit. We evaluated the impact of this policy on the smoking habits of pregnant women. A sample of 180 women with planned pregnancies attending antenatal clinics at two teaching hospitals in North London was recruited over a 6-month period. All women were provided with the current antismoking counselling at their first visit at the end of the first trimester and asked to fill in a questionnaire around mid-gestation. The study population included 117 (65%) women who did not currently smoke (non-smokers) and 63 (35%) who were active smokers at the beginning of their pregnancy. Thirty-nine non-smokers were found to be passive smokers. Three women took up smoking during pregnancy. Among the smokers, 53 (84.1%) women made no change in their smoking behaviour during pregnancy, seven (11.1%) reduced their cigarette consumption and only three (4.8%) gave up smoking during the first half of pregnancy. None of the partners changed their smoking habits. All women were aware that smoking in pregnancy could be deleterious to their health and that of their fetus. Despite awareness of dangers of smoking, the prevalence of smoking among pregnant women remains very high after the first antenatal visit and the current antismoking policy based essentially on leaflets is not effective. Health-care professionals should spend more time to inform women adequately about the dangers of smoking and help them to quit before pregnancy.

  6. The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Åkerud, Helena; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Kaihola, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2015-01-01

    The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy on both mother and child are vigorously studied, but the underlying biology for these effects is largely unknown. The placenta plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the fetus. We performed a gene expression study on the fetal side of the placenta to investigate gene expression patterns in mothers with antenatal depression and in mothers using antidepressant treatment during pregnancy. Placental samples from mothers with normal pregnancies, from mothers with antenatal depression, and from mothers using antidepressants were collected. We performed a pilot microarray study to investigate alterations in the gene expression and selected several genes from the microarray for biological validation with qPCR in a larger sample. In mothers with antenatal depression 108 genes were differentially expressed, whereas 109 genes were differentially expressed in those using antidepressants. Validation of the microarray revealed more robust gene expression differences in the seven genes picked for confirmation in antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women. Among the genes that were validated ROCK2 and C12orf39 were differentially expressed in both depressed and antidepressant-treated women, whereas ROCK1, GCC2, KTN1, and DNM1L were only differentially expressed in the antidepressant-treated women. In conclusion, antenatal depression and antidepressant exposure during pregnancy are associated with altered gene expression in the placenta. Findings on those genes picked for validation were more robust among antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women, possibly due to the fact that depression is a multifactorial condition with varying degrees of endocrine disruption. It remains to be established whether the alterations found in the gene expression of the placenta are found in the fetus as well. PMID:25628539

  7. The cause and consequence of domestic violence on pregnant women in India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and elucidate the impact of domestic violence on the health and pregnancy outcomes of women. Data were extracted from literature through the MEDLINE database for years 2000-2011. Domestic violence occurs in every society, irrespective of class, creed, religion and country. Women attending antenatal clinics in Delhi reported experience of 26.9% physical, 29% mental and 6.2% sexual abuse, irrespective of their age. The spouse was the perpetrator of abuse in 47% cases and his family members were responsible for 31%. Pregnant women were hit by their husbands on the back and abdomen, sometimes repeatedly, besides psychological abuse. Incidence of domestic violence was more when the male spouse was less educated or in the habit of consuming alcohol, opium or tobacco. Illiteracy, poverty, family status and uncaring attitude of community about spousal violence were the causes of domestic violence. Women having experience of violence were less likely to receive antenatal care or home visits by health workers and had a risk of perinatal and neonatal mortality of 2.59 and 2.37 times higher, respectively, than women having no violence during pregnancy. The survey indicated that 4.5% of abused women required hospitalisation and 3.8% needed medical care. Women's education, economic autonomy and empowerment may reduce the incidence of domestic violence among Indian women.

  8. Alcohol brief interventions in Scottish antenatal care: a qualitative study of midwives’ attitudes and practices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants exposed to alcohol in the womb are at increased risk of experiencing health problems. However, mixed messages about the consequences of prenatal alcohol consumption have resulted in inconsistent attitudes and practices amongst some healthcare practitioners. Screening and alcohol brief interventions (ABIs) can reduce risky drinking in various clinical settings. Recently, a program of screening and ABIs have been implemented in antenatal care settings in Scotland. However, current evidence suggests that midwives’ involvement in alcohol brief interventions activities is patchy. This study explored midwives’ attitudes and practices regarding alcohol screening and ABIs in order to understand why they are relatively underutilized in antenatal care settings compared to other clinical settings. Methods This was a qualitative study, involving semi-structured interviews with 15 midwives and a focus group with a further six midwifery team leaders (21 participants in total) in Scotland. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Midwives were positive about their involvement in the screening and ABI program. However, they were not completely convinced about the purpose and value of the screening and ABIs in antenatal care. In the midst of competing priorities, the program was seen as having a low priority in their workload. Midwives felt that the rapport between them and pregnant women was not sufficiently established at the first antenatal appointment to allow them to discuss alcohol issues appropriately. They reported that many women had already given up drinking or were drinking minimal amounts prior to the first antenatal appointment. Conclusions Midwives recognised the important role they could play in alcohol intervention activities in antenatal care. As the majority of women stop consuming alcohol in pregnancy, many will not need an ABI. Those who have not stopped are likely to need an ABI, but midwives were concerned

  9. The Association of Ethnic Minority Density with Late Entry into Antenatal Care in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Posthumus, Anke G.; Schölmerich, Vera L. N.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Denktaş, Semiha

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, non-Western ethnic minority women make their first antenatal visit later than native Dutch women. Timely entry into antenatal care is important as it provides the opportunity for prenatal screening and the detection of risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this study we explored whether women's timely entry is influenced by their neighborhood. Moreover, we assessed whether ethnic minority density (the proportion of ethnic minorities in a neighborhood) influences Western and non-Western ethnic minority women's chances of timely entry into care differently. We hypothesized that ethnic minority density has a protective effect against non-Western women's late entry into care. Data on time of entry into care and other individual-level characteristics were obtained from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (2000-2008; 97% of all pregnancies). We derived neighborhood-level data from three other national databases. We included 1,137,741 pregnancies of women who started care under supervision of a community midwife in 3422 neighborhoods. Multi-level logistic regression was used to assess the associations of individual and neighborhood-level determinants with entry into antenatal care before and after 14 weeks of gestation. We found that neighborhood characteristics influence timely entry above and beyond individual characteristics. Ethnic minority density was associated with a higher risk of late entry into antenatal care. However, our analysis showed that for non-Western women, living in high ethnic minority density areas is less detrimental to their risk of late entry than for Western women. This means that a higher proportion of ethnic minority residents has a protective effect on non-Western women's chances of timely entry into care. Our results suggest that strategies to improve timely entry into care could seek to create change at the neighborhood level in order to target individuals likely of entering care too late. PMID:25856150

  10. The association of ethnic minority density with late entry into antenatal care in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Posthumus, Anke G; Schölmerich, Vera L N; Steegers, Eric A P; Kawachi, Ichiro; Denktaş, Semiha

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, non-Western ethnic minority women make their first antenatal visit later than native Dutch women. Timely entry into antenatal care is important as it provides the opportunity for prenatal screening and the detection of risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this study we explored whether women's timely entry is influenced by their neighborhood. Moreover, we assessed whether ethnic minority density (the proportion of ethnic minorities in a neighborhood) influences Western and non-Western ethnic minority women's chances of timely entry into care differently. We hypothesized that ethnic minority density has a protective effect against non-Western women's late entry into care. Data on time of entry into care and other individual-level characteristics were obtained from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (2000-2008; 97% of all pregnancies). We derived neighborhood-level data from three other national databases. We included 1,137,741 pregnancies of women who started care under supervision of a community midwife in 3422 neighborhoods. Multi-level logistic regression was used to assess the associations of individual and neighborhood-level determinants with entry into antenatal care before and after 14 weeks of gestation. We found that neighborhood characteristics influence timely entry above and beyond individual characteristics. Ethnic minority density was associated with a higher risk of late entry into antenatal care. However, our analysis showed that for non-Western women, living in high ethnic minority density areas is less detrimental to their risk of late entry than for Western women. This means that a higher proportion of ethnic minority residents has a protective effect on non-Western women's chances of timely entry into care. Our results suggest that strategies to improve timely entry into care could seek to create change at the neighborhood level in order to target individuals likely of entering care too late.

  11. Learning effect of a conditional cash transfer programme on poor rural women's selection of delivery care in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G; Walker, Dilys; Serván, Edson; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND The Mexican programme Oportunidades/Progresa conditionally transfers money to beneficiary families. Over the past 10 years, poor rural women have been obliged to attend antenatal care (ANC) visits and reproductive health talks. We propose that the length of time in the programme influences women's preferences, thus increasing their use not only of services directly linked to the cash transfers, but also of other services, such as clinic-based delivery, whose utilization is not obligatory. OBJECTIVE To analyse the long-term effect of Oportunidades on women's use of antenatal and delivery care. METHODOLOGY 5051 women aged between 15 and 49 years old with at least one child aged less than 24 months living in rural localities were analysed. Multilevel probit and logit models were used to analyse ANC visits and physician/nurse attended delivery, respectively. Models were adjusted with individual and socio-economic variables and the locality's exposure time to Oportunidades. Findings On average women living in localities with longer exposure to Oportunidades report 2.1% more ANC visits than women living in localities with less exposure. Young women aged 15-19 and 20-24 years and living in localities with longer exposure to Oportunidades (since 1998) have 88% and 41% greater likelihood of choosing a physician/nurse vs. traditional midwife for childbirth, respectively. Women of indigenous origin are 68.9% less likely to choose a physician/nurse for delivery care than non-indigenous women. CONCLUSIONS An increase in the average number of ANC visits has been achieved among Oportunidades beneficiaries. An indirect effect is the increased selection of a physician/nurse for delivery care among young women living in localities with greater exposure time to Oportunidades. Disadvantaged women in Mexico (indigenous women) continue to have less access to skilled delivery care. Developing countries must develop strategies to increase access and use of skilled obstetric

  12. Breastfeeding intention among pregnant Hong Kong Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ying

    2010-09-01

    This study set out to (1) estimate the prevalence of three forms of feeding intention among 2,178 pregnant women in six of Hong Kong's regional hospitals and (2) identify the associated demographic, socioeconomic, obstetric and relational correlates. The research design was exploratory, cross-sectional, and quantitative. The Chinese version of a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the demographic, socio-economic, and obstetric characteristics of the women. Couples' relationships were investigated using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. All women in the second trimester of their pregnancies who attended the target antenatal clinics within the data collection period of December 2004 to December 2006 were recruited. The prevalence rates of breastfeeding, mixed feeding and artificial feeding were 53.9%, 14.8%, and 31.3%, respectively. Women who had been born in Hong Kong, lived in accommodation that was > or = 300 feet(2) (approximately 30 m(2)), had made an early antenatal booking, had a planned pregnancy, were experiencing their first pregnancy, and had a lower level of conflict with their partners were significantly more likely to opt for breastfeeding. Women who had been born in Hong Kong and already had children were significantly more likely to choose mixed feeding, compared with the artificial group in a multinomial logistic regression model. These findings suggest that effective promotion of breastfeeding during the prenatal period must target the correlates of feeding intention.

  13. Health insurance for the poor decreases access to HIV testing in antenatal care: evidence of an unintended effect of health insurance reform in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ettenger, Allison; Bärnighausen, Till; Castro, Arachu

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV was added to standard antenatal care (ANC) in 2000 for Colombians enrolled in the two national health insurance schemes, the ‘subsidized regime’ (covering poor citizens) and the ‘contributory regime’ (covering salaried citizens with incomes above the poverty threshold), which jointly covered 80% of the total Colombian population as of 2007. This article examines integration of HIV testing in ANC through the relationship between ordering an HIV test with the type of health insurance, including lack of health insurance, using data from the nationally representative 2005 Colombia Demographic and Health Survey. Overall, health-care providers ordered an HIV test for only 35% of the women attending ANC. We regressed the order of an HIV test during ANC on health systems characteristics (type of insurance and type of ANC provider), women’s characteristics (age, wealth, educational attainment, month of pregnancy at first antenatal visit, HIV knowledge, urban vs. rural residence and sub-region of residence) and children’s characteristics (birth order and birth year). Women enrolled in the subsidized regime were significantly less likely to be offered and receive an HIV test in ANC than women without any health insurance (adjusted odds ratio = 0.820, P < 0.001), when controlling for the other independent variables. Wealth, urban residence, birth year of the child and the type of health-care provider seen during the ANC visit were significantly associated with providers ordering an HIV test for a woman (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that enrolment in the subsidized regime reduced access to HIV testing in ANC. Additional research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms through which the potential effect of health insurance coverage on HIV testing in ANC occurs and to examine whether enrolment in the subsidized regime has affected access to other essential health services. PMID:23598426

  14. The impact of newspaper advertising on a regional antenatal health campaign.

    PubMed

    Berry, J M

    1984-01-01

    In 1981 the West Midlands Health services undertook a publicity campaign aimed at helping women to understand more about keeping healthy during pregnancy and encouraging them to seek early ante-natal care. A series of full page advertisements on ante-natal care were placed in local newspapers in the Region. Set out here are the findings of two studies of the impact of the publicity campaign. The first shows how far people's knowledge of what to do during pregnancy was altered by the publicity, and the second shows what people thought of the advertisements themselves and the further information sent to them on request.

  15. Wealth and antenatal care use: implications for maternal health care utilisation in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the effect of wealth on maternal health care utilization in Ghana via its effect on Antenatal care use. Antenatal care serves as the initial point of contact of expectant mothers to maternal health care providers before delivery. The study is pivoted on the introduction of the free maternal health care policy in April 2005 in Ghana with the aim of reducing the financial barrier to the use of maternal health care services, to help reduce the high rate of maternal deaths. Prior to the introduction of the policy, studies found wealth to have a positive and significant influence on the use of Antenatal care. It is thus expected that with the policy, wealth should not influence the use of maternal health care significantly. Using secondary data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health survey, the results have revealed that wealth still has a significant influence on adequate use of Antenatal care. Education, age, number of living children, transportation and health insurance are other factors that were found to influence the use of Antenatal care in Ghana. There also exist considerable variations in the use of Antenatal care in the geographical regions and between the rural and urban dwellers. It is recommended that to improve the use of Antenatal care and hence maternal health care utilization, some means of support is provided especially to women within the lowest wealth quintiles, like the provision and availability of recommended medication at the health center; secondly, women should be encouraged to pursue education to at least the secondary level since this improves their use of maternal health services. Policy should also target mothers who have had the experience of child birth on the need to use adequate Antenatal care for each pregnancy, since these mothers tend to use less antenatal care for subsequent pregnancies. The regional disparities found may be due to inaccessibility and unavailability of health facilities and services in the

  16. Optimism and other psychosocial influences on antenatal depression: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emily C; Bullock, Linda F C

    2012-09-01

    Antenatal depression is a debilitating experience for many women with significant personal and familial sequelae. Low-income pregnant women living in rural settings are especially vulnerable because of isolation, decreased resources, and stressful living environments. This systematic review summarizes what is known about antenatal depression and synthesizes the evidence regarding the role psychosocial variables could play in the development of safe, effective, and culturally-acceptable non-pharmacological interventions. Searches of the CINAHL, MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and ERIC databases, as well as the Cochrane Library, were conducted in September 2010 to identify articles relevant to our topic of study. Psychosocial variables have a significant association with antenatal depression. Optimism has been shown to be inversely correlated with depression, and directly correlated with improved birth outcomes. Optimism is a potentially modifiable variable that could be used to design antenatal prevention and treatment programs. As depression continues to increase in prevalence, and treatment options for pregnant women remain limited, effective interventions must be developed that address the psychosocial variables examined in this review.

  17. Sociodemographic factors associated with anaemia in pregnancy at booking for antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Adanikin, A I; Awoleke, J O

    2016-01-01

    Late patronage of antenatal care by women in low-resource areas makes timely intervention at correcting anaemia difficult. This study aimed to identify modifiable sociodemographic factors that predict anaemia before commencing antenatal care and make appropriate recommendation. A survey of sociodemographic features and haemoglobin concentrations of 232 women booking for antenatal care was conducted. Anaemia was diagnosed in 119 (51.3%), of which 87 (37.5%) had mild anaemia and 32 (13.8%) were moderately anaemic. There was no severe anaemia. Anaemia was highest among respondents who were 35 years of age, Muslims, of Igbo ethnicity (64.3%), single (55.0%), student/unemployed (58.8%), nulliparous (57.3%) and those who registered at 21 weeks' gestation (54.2%). Only occupation of the woman showed association with anaemia before antenatal care (p 0.007). A personal source of income may reduce anaemia in pregnancy; and it is advisable to have a social welfare package for unemployed pregnant women.

  18. Sero-prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus infection among pregnant women in Bahir Dar city, Northwest Ethiopia: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zenebe, Yohannes; Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Abera, Bayeh

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis during pregnancy is associated with high risk of maternal complications and has become a leading cause of fetal death. So the main objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infections among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic in Bahir Dar health institutions, Ethiopia. This was institutional based cross-sectional study that included 318 pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinic in Bahir Dar health institutions from January 2013 to June 2013. Appropriate data was gathered from study participants. Sero-prevalence of hepatitis C virus was determined by detecting immunoglobulin of HCV using ELISA kit. Data was entered and analyzed with SPSS version 16 statistical software. The overall prevalence of hepatitis C virus among pregnant women was 0.6%. None of the expected risk factors had significant outcome. In conclusion, prevalence of the Hepatitis C virus among pregnant women attending in Bahir Dar health institutions was low and expected variables were not statistically significant. PMID:26327995

  19. Models of antenatal care to reduce and prevent preterm birth: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Turienzo, Cristina; Sandall, Jane; Peacock, Janet L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of models of antenatal care designed to prevent and reduce preterm birth (PTB) in pregnant women. Methods We conducted a search of seven electronic databases and reference lists of retrieved studies to identify trials from inception up to July 2014 where pregnant women, regardless of risk factors for pregnancy complications, were randomly allocated to receive an alternative model of antenatal care or routine care. We pooled risks of PTB to determine the effect of alternative care models in all pregnant women. We also assessed secondary maternal and infant outcomes, women's satisfaction and economic outcomes. Results 15 trials involving 22 437 women were included. Pregnant women in alternative care models were less likely to experience PTB (risk ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.96). The subgroup of women randomised to midwife-led continuity models of antenatal care were less likely to experience PTB (0.78, 0.66 to 0.91) but there was no significant difference between this group and women allocated to specialised care (0.92, 0.76 to 1.12) (interaction test for subgroup differences p=0.20). Overall low-risk women in alternative care models were less likely to have PTB (0.74, 0.59 to 0.93), but this effect was not significantly different from that in mixed-risk populations (0.91, 0.79 to 1.05) (subgroup p=0.13). Conclusions Alternative models of antenatal care for all pregnant women are effective in reducing PTB compared with routine care, but no firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the relative benefits of the two models. Future research should evaluate the impact of antenatal care models which include more recent interventions and predictive tests, and which also offer continuity of care by midwives throughout pregnancy. PROSPERO registration number CRD42014007116. PMID:26758257

  20. Women’s views and experiences of antenatal care in Iraq: a Q methodology study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding women’s experiences and perspectives of antenatal care services is particularly critical for enhancing effectiveness of services delivery and addressing women’s needs and expectations. As part of a comprehensive assessment of the maternity care services in Iraq, this study aimed to explore the views and experiences of antenatal care in a sample of women. Methods This explorative study was conducted in Erbil governorate, Iraq. Data were collected using Q methodology, a technique for eliciting subjective views and identifying shared patterns among individuals. A sample of 38 women of different educational and socioeconomic statuses were invited to sort a set of 39 statements reflecting different aspects of the available antenatal care services and issues related to their last pregnancies into a distribution on a scale of nine from “disagree most” to “agree most”. By-person factor analysis was used to derive latent views through centroid factor extraction and varimax rotation of factors. Results Analysis of the participants’ Q sorts resulted in identifying four distinct views and experiences of pregnancy and antenatal care services: (i) public maternity services second best: preference for, and ability to afford, private care, (ii) dissatisfaction with public maternity services: poor information sharing and lack of health promotion, (iii) satisfaction with public maternity service but information gaps perceived and (iv) public maternity services second best: preference for private care but unaffordable. The typical characterizations that were associated with each view were highlighted. Conclusions This study revealed different patterns of views and experiences of women of pregnancy and antenatal care services and recognized the particular issues related to each pattern. Different patterns and types of problems and concerns related mainly to inadequate provision of information and poor interpersonal communication, poor utilization

  1. Antenatal corticosteroids beyond 34 weeks gestation: What do we do now?

    PubMed

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Rozance, Paul J; Goldenberg, Robert L; Jobe, Alan H

    2016-10-01

    The practice of antenatal corticosteroid administration in pregnancies of 24-34 weeks of gestation that are at risk of preterm delivery was adopted over 20 years after the first randomized clinical trial in humans. It is biologically plausible that antenatal corticosteroid in pregnancies beyond 34 weeks of gestation would reduce rates of respiratory morbidity and neonatal intensive care admission. Mostly guided by the results of a large multicenter randomized trial of antenatal corticosteroid in late preterm infants, the Antenatal Late Preterm Steroids Trial, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has released a practice advisory that the "administration of betamethasone may be considered in women with a singleton pregnancy between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation at imminent risk of preterm birth within 7 days." However, many unanswered questions about the risks and benefits of antenatal corticosteroids in this population remain and should be considered with the adoption of this treatment recommendation. This review of the literature indicates that the greatest effect is in the reduction of transient tachypnea of the newborn infant, which is a mostly self-limited condition. This benefit must be weighed against unanticipated outcomes, such as neonatal hypoglycemia, and unknowns about long-term neurodevelopmental follow up and metabolic risks. Amelioration of respiratory morbidity in late preterm infants does not preclude these infants from having other complications that are related to prematurity that require intensive care. Other possible morbidities of prematurity may be magnified if these babies no longer have respiratory symptoms. Conversely, if these late preterm babies no longer exhibit respiratory symptoms and "look good," they may be discharged before other morbidities of prematurity have resolved and be at risk for readmission. Furthermore, it is also important to ensure that unintended consequences are avoided to achieve a minor

  2. Community mobilisation and health management committee strengthening to increase birth attendance by trained health workers in rural Makwanpur, Nepal: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Birth attendance by trained health workers is low in rural Nepal. Local participation in improving health services and increased interaction between health systems and communities may stimulate demand for health services. Significant increases in birth attendance by trained health workers may be affected through community mobilisation by local women's groups and health management committee strengthening. We will test the effect of community mobilisation through women's groups, and health management committee strengthening, on institutional deliveries and home deliveries attended by trained health workers in Makwanpur District. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial involving 43 village development committee clusters. 21 clusters will receive the intervention and 22 clusters will serve as control areas. In intervention areas, Female Community Health Volunteers are supported in convening monthly women's groups. The groups work through an action research cycle in which they consider barriers to institutional delivery, plan and implement strategies to address these barriers with their communities, and evaluate their progress. Health management committees participate in three-day workshops that use appreciative inquiry methods to explore and plan ways to improve maternal and newborn health services. Follow-up meetings are conducted every three months to review progress. Primary outcomes are institutional deliveries and home deliveries conducted by trained health workers. Secondary outcome measures include uptake of antenatal and postnatal care, neonatal mortality and stillbirth rates, and maternal morbidity. Trial registration number ISRCTN99834806 PMID:21595902

  3. Who attends family planning clinics?

    PubMed

    Chick, P; Nixon, J

    1984-08-01

    Data were obtained from 1,810 consecutive women who attended a central metropolitan (Brisbane) Family Planning Clinic during a 5 week period in 1982. Young women in particular formed the major client group with 32% being under 20 years of age. The client population was skewed towards women of upper socioeconomic status (SES). There was no SES disproportion in the use of oral contraceptives or IUD's. However, diaphragm use occurred disproportionately in women of upper SES groups; postcoital contraception was sought by and limited to, women of SES classes A and B only. The clinic satisfied a need for women with a history of failed or absent contraception and 15% had already had a termination of pregnancy by the time they first presented at the clinic.

  4. Effectiveness of Antenatal Clinics to Deliver Intermittent Preventive Treatment and Insecticide Treated Nets for the Control of Malaria in Pregnancy in Mali: A Household Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jenny; Kayentao, Kassoum; Touré, Mahamoudou; Diarwara, Sory; Bruce, Jane; Smedley, James; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Kuile, Feiko O. ter.; Webster, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Background WHO recommends intermittent-preventive-treatment (IPTp) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and insecticide-treated-nets (ITNs) to prevent malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa, however uptake remains unacceptably low. We evaluated the effectiveness of antenatal clinics (ANC) to deliver two doses of IPTp and ITNs to pregnant women in Segou district, Mali. Methods We used household data to assess the systems effectiveness of ANC to deliver IPTp and ITNs to pregnant women and used logistic regression to identify predictors of ANC attendance, receipt of IPTp and ITN use during pregnancy, and the impact on community effectiveness. Results Of 81% of recently pregnant women who made at least one ANC visit, 59% of these attended during the eligible gestational age for IPTp. Of these, 82% reported receiving one dose of SP and 91% attended ANC again, of whom 66% received a second dose, resulting in a cumulative effectiveness for 2-dose IPTp of 29%, most of whom used an ITN (90%). Cumulative effectiveness of 2-dose SP by directly observed therapy (DOT) was very low (6%). ITN use was 92%, and ANC was the main source (81%). Reported and ANC-card data showed some doses of SP are given to women in their first trimester. Women were less likely to receive two doses by DOT if they were married (OR 0.10; CI 0.03, 0.40), or lived <5 km from the health facility (OR 0.34; CI 0.14, 0.83). A high household person-LLIN ratio predicted low ITN use in pregnant women (OR 0.16; CI 0.04, 0.55). Conclusion Our findings suggest poor adherence by health workers to provision of IPTp by eligible gestational age and DOT, contributing to low effectiveness of this strategy in this setting. ITN delivery and use among women was substantially higher. Efforts to improve health worker adherence to IPTp guidelines are needed to improve service delivery of IPTp. PMID:24651078

  5. Assessing the efficacy of a voluntary HIV counseling and testing intervention for pregnant women and male partners in Urumqi City, China.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Kaveh; Wilson, Katherine S; Filardo, Giovanni; Liu, Zhendong; Keung, Ng Hon; Wu, Zunyou

    2006-11-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) in an educated cohort of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Urumqi, China. VCT was given to women and their partners (experimental group) or women alone (control group). Both groups were given pre- and post-intervention questionnaires to assess HIV knowledge and willingness to get HIV testing. Multivariate analysis showed that all women improved significantly in HIV knowledge between baseline and follow-up. Moreover, HIV knowledge was significantly associated with HIV testing willingness. At follow-up, women in the control and experimental groups were 6.8 and 7.9 times more willing to receive HIV testing than at baseline, respectively. VCT seems effective in this cohort of educated pregnant women.

  6. Factors associated with different types of birth attendants for home deliveries: an analysis of the cross-sectional 2010 South Sudan household survey

    PubMed Central

    Mugo, Ngatho S.; Agho, Kingsley E.; Zwi, Anthony B.; Dibley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In South Sudan, birth deliveries attended by unskilled birth attendants put the mothers and their newborns at increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with delivery by unskilled birth attendants or by unassisted delivery. Design We examined data for 2,767 (weighted total) women aged 15–49 years who delivered at home 2 years prior to the South Sudan Household Health Survey 2010. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with delivery by unskilled birth attendants or by unassisted delivery. Results The prevalence of delivery by unskilled birth attendants was 19% [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.0, 20.5], by skilled birth attendants (SBAs) was 45% (95% CI 42.4, 47.0), and by unassisted delivery was 36% (95% CI 34.2, 38.6). After adjusting for potential confounders, the following factors were associated with the increased odds for unassisted delivery or delivery by an unskilled birth attendant: mothers with no schooling, who did not attend antenatal care (ANC) during pregnancy, who had lower quality of ANC services, from poor households, or who had no prior knowledge about obstetric danger signs. Conclusions We found that non-utilization of maternal health care services, such as ANC, was significantly associated with unattended birth delivery or delivery by unskilled health providers. The increased uptake of SBAs at delivery will require easier access to ANC services, health promotion on the importance and benefits of SBAs for delivery, targeting both mothers and their families, and the training and deployment of more SBAs across the country. PMID:27473675

  7. Antenatal characteristics of Roma female population in Virovitica-Podravina County, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Šegregur, Domagoj

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This study reports about antenatal characteristics of Roma minority population. The study was designed to investigate data about health behaviours known to be associated with reproductive outcomes of Roma women that have very good living conditions and relatively high resource availability. Methods A retrospective study included 204 Roma and 408 non-Roma hospitalised singleton births that occurred in the Maternity Ward of the General Hospital Virovitica in the period from 1991 to 2010. Data about women’s age, marital status, smoking, reproductive health (abortions, delivery), antenatal care, perinatal complications and gestational age were taken from hospital records and analysed. Results Roma women were averagely more than three years younger than non-Roma women, only 10.8% were married. Smoking was more frequent. The average number of births of Roma and non-Roma women was similar, averagely two children per woman. The rate of induced abortions in the Roma women was higher, while the frequency of spontaneous abortions was equal. Inadequate antenatal care of Roma women was associated with two times higher incidence of perinatal complications. A higher frequency of deliveries at home without professional assistance in Roma pregnancy resulted in lower perinatal outcomes. It was confirmed that Roma mothers give birth earlier (38+6 vs. 39+4 weeks) and have a higher incidence of premature births (9.3% vs. 2.2%). Conclusions In the comparison of antenatal parameters between the two researched groups, poorer prenatal outcomes in the Roma population were found, despite full integration and considerable improvement in living standards of this ethnic Roma population. PMID:28289463

  8. The effect of a behaviour change intervention on the diets and physical activity levels of women attending Sure Start Children’s Centres: results from a complex public health intervention

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Janis; Jarman, Megan; Lawrence, Wendy; Black, Christina; Davies, Jenny; Tinati, Tannaze; Begum, Rufia; Mortimore, Andrew; Robinson, Sian; Margetts, Barrie; Cooper, Cyrus; Barker, Mary; Inskip, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The UK government's response to the obesity epidemic calls for action in communities to improve people's health behaviour. This study evaluated the effects of a community intervention on dietary quality and levels of physical activity of women from disadvantaged backgrounds. Design Non-randomised controlled evaluation of a complex public health intervention. Participants 527 women attending Sure Start Children's Centres (SSCC) in Southampton (intervention) and 495 women attending SSCCs in Gosport and Havant (control). Intervention Training SSCC staff in behaviour change skills that would empower women to change their health behaviours. Outcomes Main outcomes dietary quality and physical activity. Intermediate outcomes self-efficacy and sense of control. Results 1-year post-training, intervention staff used skills to support behaviour change significantly more than control staff. There were statistically significant reductions of 0.1 SD in the dietary quality of all women between baseline and follow-up and reductions in self-efficacy and sense of control. The decline in self-efficacy and control was significantly smaller in women in the intervention group than in women in the control group (adjusted differences in self-efficacy and control, respectively, 0.26 (95% CI 0.001 to 0.50) and 0.35 (0.05 to 0.65)). A lower decline in control was associated with higher levels of exposure in women in the intervention group. There was a statistically significant improvement in physical activity in the intervention group, with 22.9% of women reporting the highest level of physical activity compared with 12.4% at baseline, and a smaller improvement in the control group. The difference in change in physical activity level between the groups was not statistically significant (adjusted difference 1.02 (0.74 to 1.41)). Conclusions While the intervention did not improve women's diets and physical activity levels, it had a protective effect on intermediate factors

  9. Impact on Infants’ Cognitive Development of Antenatal Exposure to Iron Deficiency Disorder and Common Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thach Duc; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Tran, Tuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Hanieh, Sarah; Dwyer, Terence; Fisher, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and common mental disorders (CMD) on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. Methods A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12–20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb <11 g/dL and serum ferritin <15 ng/mL. CMD symptoms were assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale-Vietnam validation. Infant cognitive development was assessed by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd Ed. Path analyses were performed to determine the direct and indirect, partly or fully mediated, causal effects of the antenatal exposures. Results A total of 497 pregnant women were recruited, of those 378 women provided complete data which were included in the analyses. Statistically significant direct adverse effects of persistent antenatal IDA (estimated difference of −11.62 points; 95% CI −23.01 to −0.22) and antenatal CMD (−4.80 points; 95% CI: −9.40 to −0.20) on infant Bayley cognitive scores at six months were found. Higher birthweight, household wealth, and self-rated sufficient supply of breastmilk were associated with higher cognitive scores. Maternal age >30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants’ Bayley cognitive scores. Conclusions These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries. PMID:24086390

  10. Do assisted-reproduction twin pregnancies require additional antenatal care?

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, E; Ben-Ami, I; Maymon, R

    2013-02-01

    Iatrogenic twinning has become the main side-effect assisted reproduction treatment. We have evaluated the evidence for additional care that assisted-reproduction twins may require compared with spontaneous twins. Misacarriages are increased in women with tubal problems and after specific treatments. Assisted-reproduction twin pregnancies complicated by a vanishing twin after 8 weeks have an increased risk of preterm delivery and of low and very low birthweight compared with singleton assisted-reproduction pregnancies. Monozygotic twin pregnancies occur at a higher rate after assisted reproduction treatment and are associated with a higher risk of perinatal complications. The incidence of placenta praevia and vasa praevia is increased in assisted-reproduction twin pregnancies. Large cohort studies do not indicate a higher rate of fetal congenital malformations in assisted-reproduction twins. Overall, assisted-reproduction twins in healthy women <45 years of age are not associated with a notable increase in antenatal complication rates and thus do not require additional antenatal care compared with spontaneous twins. The risks of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality associated with assisted-reproduction twins is only increased in women with a pre-existing medical condition such as hypertensive disorders and diabetes and most of these risks can be avoided with single-embryo transfer. Following the birth of the first IVF baby, rumours started to spread in both the medical literature and the media about the long-term health effects for children born following assisted reproduction treatment. However, after more than 30 years, the most common complications associated with IVF treatment remain indirect and technical such as the failure of treatment and ovarian hyperstimulation. Iatrogenic twinning has become the main side-effect of assisted reproduction treatment and the increasing number of twin pregnancies, in particular in older women, has generated numerous

  11. Training traditional birth attendants in southern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Haarsager, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Traditional birth attendants are currently the principal service providers to pregnant women in southern Sudan. A training program provides education to promote maternal and newborn health as well as birth preparedness and establishes mechanisms for supportive supervision.

  12. Quality of Antenatal care services in eastern Uganda: implications for interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tetui, Moses; Ekirapa, Elizabeth Kiracho; Bua, John; Mutebi, Aloysius; Tweheyo, Raymond; Waiswa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction More efforts need to be directed to improving the quality of maternal health in developing countries if we are to keep on track with meeting the fifth millennium development goal. The World Health Organization says developing countries account for over 90% of maternal deaths of which three fifths occur in Sub-Saharan African countries like Uganda. Abortion, obstetric complications such as hemorrhage, dystocia, eclampsia, and sepsis are major causes of maternal deaths here. Good quality Antenatal Care (ANC) provides opportunity to detect and respond to risky maternal conditions. This study assessed quality of ANC services in eastern Uganda with a goal of benchmarking implications for interventions. Methods Data was collected from 15 health facilities in Eastern Uganda to establish capacity of delivering ANC services. Observation checklists were used to assess structural components and completeness of the ANC consultation process among 291 women attending it. Lastly, structured exit-interviews were conducted to assess satisfaction of patients. Data analysis was done in STATA Version 10. Results There was an overall staffing gap of over 40%, while infection control facilities, drugs and supplies were inadequate. However, there was good existence of physical infrastructure and diagnostic equipment for ANC services. It was observed that counseling for risk factors and birth preparedness was poorly done; in addition essential tests were not done for the majority of clients. Conclusion To improve the quality of ANC, interventions need to improve staffing, infection control facilities and drug-supplies. In addition to better counseling for risk factor-recognition and birth preparedness. PMID:23308332

  13. Patterns of prescription drugs use among pregnant women at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital and Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Family and Community Medicine Clinic, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamimi, J. Z.; Al Balushi, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates the patterns of prescription drugs use among women attending antenatal clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) and SQUH Family and Community Medicine clinic (FAMCO), Oman. Methods: The study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study on pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinic at SQUH and FAMCO from February to April 2014 and received a prescription containing at least one drug. Patients’ information was extracted from SQUH electronic records. Results: A total of 105 pregnant women were included in the study. Among the recruited pregnant women, 35 (33.3%) had at least one chronic disease. The average number of drugs prescribed per patient per prescription during the period of pregnancy was 2.33 ± 1.43. Vitamins and minerals were the most frequently prescribed class of drugs (30.60%) followed by analgesics (11.19%) and antidiabetic drugs (10.13%). According to the Food and Drug Administration risk classification, most of the prescribed drugs were from category B (30.0%) and C (27.14%). No drug was prescribed from category X. There was a significant decrease in prescribing category A drugs over the three trimesters (20.7%, 12.7%, and 9.3%, respectively) (P < 0.047). Conclusion: The study gives an overview of the extent of drug prescription during pregnancy and increases the awareness of health-care providers and women about the potential risks of drug use during pregnancy. PMID:28216955

  14. [Antenatal diagnosis: the revolution of new technologies].

    PubMed

    Fokstuen, Siv; Sloan-Béna, Frédérique; lrion, Olivier

    2014-01-15

    Since ten years, the number of amniocenteses or chorionic villous sampling for maternal anxiety has decreased thanks to the first trimester screening of trisomy 21 by ultrasound and maternal serum analysis. Two new tools have recently revolutionized antenatal screening and diagnosis: Analysing fetal DNA in maternal blood for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13 in order to avoid invasive fetal sampling and genomic comparative hybridization in order to diagnose deletions or duplications not detected by conventional caryotyping. These new technologies are dedicated to high-risk pregnancies, and have limitations. They do not replace ultrasound or first trimester screening. Information and ethics are central in antenatal screening and diagnosis.

  15. A newborn with antenatal testis tortion

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Fatma Çakmak; Aygün, Canan; Ayçiçek, Tuğba; Aykanat, Mustafa Alper; Ayyıldız, Suat

    2014-01-01

    Testis tortion in the newborn (especially antenatal testis tortion) is observed very rarely and constitutes 10-12% of childhood testis tortions. In testis tortion, firm and painless testicular tissue is palpated on physical examination. Doppler ultrasonography is a sensitive method in the diagnosis. In cases of neonatal testis tortion, the testis can be saved with appropriate surgical exploration in only 0–5% of the cases. Here, a newborn with antenatal testis tortion who underwent orchiectomy in the first day of life was presented. PMID:26078672

  16. Factors associated with late antenatal care booking: population based observations from the 2007 Zambia demographic and health survey

    PubMed Central

    Sinyange, Nyambe; Sitali, Lungowe; Jacobs, Choolwe; Musonda, Patrick; Michelo, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In spite of the extreme importance of an early antenatal care visit, more than 50% of Zambian pregnant women book for antenatal care late. We aimed to determine factors associated with late antenatal care booking in Zambia. Methods Data stem from the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey where information on socio-demographic, social-economic, obstetrical characteristics and timing of the first antenatal visit were extracted on all women aged 15 to 49 years. A weighted survey analysis using STATA version 12 was applied. Firstly, we explored proportions of ANC booking at 0-3 months, 4-5 month and 6-9 months. Secondly, we investigated the association between predictor variables and late antenatal care booking using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall (n= 3979), the proportion of late ANC booking (booking between 4th to 9th month) was 81% disaggregated as 56% and 19% at 4 to 5 months and 6 to 9 months respectively. Women who wanted their last child later were more likely to book late than those with wanted pregnancies then (AOR: 1.35 95% CI 1.10-1.66). Women with higher education were 55% less likely to book for ANC late compared to women with no education (AOR: 0.45 95%CI: 0.27-0.74). Women aged 20-34 years were 30% more likely to book earlier than women younger than 20 years (AOR: 0.69 95% CI 0.50-0.97). Conclusion We found high proportion of late ANC booking associated with presence of unplanned or unwanted pregnancies in this population. The concentration of this problem in lower or no education groups may be an illustration of existing inequalities which might further explain limitations in health promotion messages meant to mitigate this challenge. There is thus urgent need to re-pack health promotion message to specifically target this and related poor groups. PMID:28292072

  17. Prevalence of anaemia, syphilis and hepatitis B in pregnant women in Nausori, Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Tayler-Smith, K.; Khogali, M.; Marks, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: An antenatal clinic serving a population of 47 604 in Nausori, Fiji. Objective: 1) To estimate the prevalence of anaemia, syphilis and hepatitis B in pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit; and 2) to estimate the uptake of treatment for syphilis and for the prevention of hepatitis B transmission in affected individuals. Design: Retrospective review of the clinic register and patient records for the year 2011. Results: The prevalence of anaemia, hepatitis B and syphilis were respectively 22%, 2% and 5%. Among women with syphilis, 78% of those for whom data were available received a complete course of three doses of penicillin during their pregnancy, and 83% of babies born to women with hepatitis B received hepatitis B immunoglobulin. Conclusion: The prevalence of anaemia in pregnant women has declined but remains high, and further research is required to identify the major causes of this condition in Fiji. The prevalence of syphilis has remained static, while hepatitis B has decreased over the past decade. There are some gaps in the implementation of effective interventions to manage these conditions in pregnant women. PMID:26393000

  18. Use of antenatal corticosteroids for preterm birth in Latin America: providers knowledge, attitudes and practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antenatal corticosteroids administered to women at risk of preterm birth is an intervention which has been proved to reduce the risk of respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, and neonatal mortality. There is a significant gap in the literature regarding the prevalence of the use of antenatal corticosteroids in Latin American countries and the attitudes and opinions of providers regarding this practice. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care providers regarding the use of antenatal corticosteroids in women at risk of preterm birth in Latin America. Methods This was a multicenter, prospective, descriptive study conducted in maternity hospitals in Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico and Uruguay. Physicians and midwives who provide prenatal care or intrapartum care for women delivering in the selected hospitals were approached using a self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics was used. Results The percentage of use of ACT in threatened preterm labour (TPL) reported by providers varies from 70% in Mexico to 97% in Ecuador. However, 60% to 20% of the providers mentioned that they would not use this medication in women at risk and would limit its use when there was a threatened preterm labour. In only one country recommended regimens of antenatal corticosteroids are followed by around 90% of providers whereas in the other three countries recommended regimens are followed by only 21%, 61%, 69% of providers. Around 40% of providers mentioned that they would administer a new dose of corticosteroids again, regardless the patient already receiving an entire regimen. Between 11% and 35% of providers, according to the countries, mentioned that they do not have adequate information on the correct use of this medication. Conclusions This study shows that the use of this intervention could be improved by increasing the knowledge of Latin American providers on its indications, benefits, and

  19. The Attendance Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John A., Jr.

    This paper describes a program intended to increase student attendance in a Savannah, Georgia, inner city high school. The author maintains that shifting the accountability for attendance to the students through peer pressure was perhaps the most significant reason for gains in attendance. He believes that a successful attendance increase program…

  20. "It's better for me to drink, at least the stress is going away": perspectives on alcohol use during pregnancy among South African women attending drinking establishments.

    PubMed

    Watt, Melissa H; Eaton, Lisa A; Choi, Karmel W; Velloza, Jennifer; Kalichman, Seth C; Skinner, Donald; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2014-09-01

    The Western Cape of South Africa has one of the highest rates of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) globally. Reducing alcohol use during pregnancy is a pressing public health priority for this region, but insight into the experiences of women who drink during pregnancy is lacking. Convenience sampling in alcohol-serving venues was used to identify women who were currently pregnant (n = 12) or recently post-partum (n = 12) and reported drinking during the pregnancy period. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted between April and August 2013. Interviews explored drinking narratives, with textual data analyzed for themes related to factors that contributed to drinking during pregnancy. All but one woman reported her pregnancy as unplanned. The majority sustained or increased drinking after pregnancy recognition, with patterns typically including multiple days of binge drinking per week. Analysis of the textual data revealed five primary factors that contributed to drinking during pregnancy: 1) women used alcohol as a strategy to cope with stressors and negative emotions, including those associated with pregnancy; 2) women drank as a way to retain social connection, often during a difficult period of life transition; 3) social norms in women's peer groups supported drinking during pregnancy; 4) women lacked attachment to the pregnancy or were resistant to motherhood; and 5) women were driven physiologically by alcohol addiction. Our data suggest that alcohol-serving settings are important sites to identify and target women at risk of drinking during pregnancy. Intervention approaches to reduce alcohol use during pregnancy should include counseling and contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies, mental health and coping interventions targeting pregnant women, peer-based interventions to change norms around perinatal drinking, and treatment for alcohol dependence during pregnancy. Our findings suggest that innovative interventions that go beyond the

  1. Teenage pregnancy antenatal and perinatal morbidity: results from a tertiary centre in Greece.

    PubMed

    Pergialiotis, V; Vlachos, D-E G; Gkioka, E; Tsotra, K; Papantoniou, N; Vlachos, G D

    2015-01-01

    We present the experience of a tertiary referral hospital in Greece, evaluating obstetric and perinatal outcomes among teenage and average maternal age (AMA) women. We retrospectively assessed all singleton pregnancies during a twelve-month period (January-December 2012). A total of 1,704 cases were reviewed and divided into two groups: one of AMA mothers (20-34 years old) (1,460 women) and the other of teenage mothers (12-19 years old) (244 women). We observed significantly higher incidence rates of preterm births (p < 0.001), preterm premature rupture of the membranes (p < 0.001), gestational hypertension (p < 0.001), preeclampsia (p = 0.043) and Apgar scores < 7 at 5 min (p = 0.015) among teenage mothers. Antenatal surveillance was decreased among teenage mothers (p < 0.001), while rates of anaemia were higher (p < 0.001). Teenage pregnancy is accompanied by significant antenatal and perinatal complications that need specific obstetrical attention. Obstetricians should be aware of these complications in order to ameliorate the antenatal outcome of childbearing teenagers.

  2. Fetal lead exposure: antenatal factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ernhart, C.B.; Wolf, A.W.; Sokol, R.J.; Brittenham, G.M.; Erhard, P.

    1985-10-01

    It was hypothesized that maternal blood lead level at delivery and cord blood lead level of the neonate would be affected by maternal use of alcohol, history of alcohol abuse, and smoking. The possibility that iron status, as reflected in maternal serum ferritin, would be related to lead level was also explored. The maternal history of alcohol abuse was unrelated to lead level in 208 samples of maternal blood and 178 samples of cord blood. However, alcohol use during pregnancy was related in a dose-response fashion to maternal and to cord blood lead level. This effect was significant with and without control of maternal smoking. The effect of maternal smoking and serum thiocyanate on maternal and cord blood lead level were also highly significant with and without control of the maternal drinking variable. Serum ferritin was marginally related to lead level for white women and for black infants, but tests of the dichotomized maternal ferritin variable did not yield a significant linkage with maternal or cord blood lead level. The results further support recommendations that women abstain from alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking in pregnancy.

  3. Exploring risk of experiencing intimate partner violence after HIV infection: a qualitative study among women with HIV attending postnatal services in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Mulrenan, Claire; Colombini, Manuela; Kikuvi, Joshua; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore risks of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) after HIV infection among women with HIV in a postnatal care setting in Swaziland. Design A qualitative semistructured in-depth interview study, using thematic analysis with deductive and inductive coding, of IPV experiences after HIV infection extracted from service-integration interview transcripts. Setting Swaziland. Participants 19 women with HIV, aged 18–44, were purposively sampled for an in-depth interview about their experiences of services, HIV and IPV from a quantitative postnatal cohort participating in an evaluation of HIV and reproductive health services integration in Swaziland. Results Results indicated that women were at risk of experiencing IPV after HIV infection, with 9 of 19 disclosing experiences of physical violence and/or coercive control post-HIV. IPV was initiated through two key pathways: (1) acute interpersonal triggers (eg, status disclosure, mother-to-child transmission of HIV) and (2) chronic normative tensions (eg, fertility intentions, initiating contraceptives). Conclusions The results highlight a need to mitigate the risk of IPV for women with HIV in shorter and longer terms in Swaziland. While broader changes are needed to resolve gender disparities, practical steps can be institutionalised within health facilities to reduce, or avoid increasing, IPV pathways for women with HIV. These might include mutual disclosure between partners, greater engagement of Swazi males with HIV services, and promoting positive masculinities that support and protect women. Trial registration number NCT01694862. PMID:25976760

  4. Antenatal diagnosis of thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, D V; Modell, B; Berdoukas, V; Alter, B P; Nathan, D G; Loukopoulos, D; Wood, W; Clegg, J B; Weatherall, D J

    1978-02-11

    Haemoglobin synthesis was studied in fetal blood samples obtained at 17 to 20 weeks' gestation in 22 women at risk of carrying a fetus with homozygous beta-thalassaemia. A presumptive diagnosis of homozygous beta-thalassaemia was made in four cases, and the pregnancy was terminated. An inconclusive answer was obtained in one case, and the patient also chose to have her pregnancy terminated. Two fetuses were lost as a result of the procedure. Of the remaining 15 pregnancies, 13 proceeded to term and two to 36 weeks; in each case a normal infant or one heterozygous for beta-thalassaemia was delivered. Current efforts should be directed towards improving the blood sampling technology so that fetal blood sampling can be used widely in those countries where thalassaemia is a major problem.

  5. Traumatic stress and the mediating role of alcohol use on HIV-related sexual risk behavior: Results from a longitudinal cohort of South African women who attend alcohol-serving venues

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Laurie; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Watt, Melissa H.; Pitpitan, Eileen V.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Skinner, Donald; Pieterse, Desiree

    2014-01-01

    Background In South Africa, alcohol contributes to the HIV epidemic, in part, by influencing sexual behaviors. For some, high levels of alcohol consumption may be driven by previous traumatic experiences that result in traumatic stress. The purpose of this study was to quantify the longitudinal association between traumatic stress and unprotected sex among women who attend drinking venues and to assess whether this association was explained by mediation through alcohol use. Methods Data were collected in four waves over a year from a prospective cohort of 560 women who regularly attended alcohol-serving venues in a Cape Town township. Longitudinal mixed models examined: 1) the relationship between traumatic stress and counts of unprotected sex, and 2) whether alcohol use mediated the association between traumatic stress and unprotected sex. Results Most women reported elevated traumatic stress (80%) and hazardous alcohol use (88%) at least once during the study period. In models adjusted for covariates, traumatic stress was associated with unprotected sex (b=0.28, SE=0.06, t=4.82, p<.001). In addition, traumatic stress was associated with alcohol use (b=0.27, SE=0.02, t=14.25, p<.001), and was also associated with unprotected sex (b=0.20, SE=0.06, t=3.27, p<.01) while controlling for alcohol use (b=0.28, SE=0.07, t=4.25, p<.001). The test for the mediated effect established that alcohol use was a significant mediator, accounting for 27% of the total effect of traumatic stress on unprotected sex. Conclusions These results highlight the need to address traumatic stress among female venue patrons as an important precursor of HIV risk due to alcohol use. PMID:25394191

  6. Occurrence of menstrual cycle related seizure patterns among epileptic women attending the tertiary neurology clinics of the National Hospital of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kariyawasam, S H; Mannapperuma, U; Jayasuriya, W J A B N; Weerathunga, J; Munasinghe, K

    2009-04-01

    Female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone have effects on seizure activity. Patterns of seizure exacerbations associated with the menstrual cycle have been described as catamenial epilepsy. This study was done to investigate the menstrual cycle related seizure occurrence among female epileptics using seizure-menstrual calendars and sex hormonal assays. Frequency and the patterns of seizure occurrence within the menstrual cycles were determined analyzing seizure-menstrual calendars. Luteal phase serum estradiol and progesterone were determined in those with menstrual cycle related seizure patterns to be compared with that of healthy women. Out of 349 epileptics, 6% showed occurrence of perimenstrual, periovulatory or perimenstrual+periovulatory seizure patterns on analysis of seizure-menstrual calendars. These women showed significantly higher luteal serum estradiol concentrations in comparison to age-matched healthy volunteers. There was no significant difference in the luteal serum progesterone concentrations. This study showed menstrual cycle related patterns of seizure occurrence in a minority of Sri Lankan epileptic women, similar to catamenial epilepsy patterns described by previous studies. These seizure patterns may be due to altered hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis function playing a role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. We suggest the importance of maintaining seizure-menstrual calendars and hormonal studies in all epileptic women to establish the role of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in epilepsy and to achieve efficient control of epilepsy in women of childbearing age.

  7. Health insurance determines antenatal, delivery and postnatal care utilisation: evidence from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveillance data

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Joyce L; Kayode, Gbenga A; Arhinful, Daniel; Fidder, Samuel A J; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the effect of maternal health insurance status on the utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. Design A population-based cross-sectional study. Setting and participants We utilised the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey data of Ghana, which included 2987 women who provided information on maternal health insurance status. Primary outcomes Utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. Statistical analyses Multivariable logistic regression was applied to determine the independent association between maternal health insurance and utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. Results After adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic and obstetric factors, we observed that among insured women the likelihood of having antenatal care increased by 96% (OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.52 to 2.52; p value<0.001) and of skilled delivery by 129% (OR 2.29; 95% CI 1.92 to 2.74; p value<0.001), while postnatal care among insured women increased by 61% (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.17 to 2.21; p value<0.01). Conclusions This study demonstrated that maternal health insurance status plays a significant role in the uptake of the maternal, neonatal and child health continuum of care service. PMID:26993621

  8. Self-Defining as Sexually Abused and Adult Sexual Risk Behavior: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey of Women Attending an STD Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.; Coury-Doniger, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with increased sexual risk behavior in adulthood, and this association may be mediated by traumagenic dynamics constructs (i.e., traumatic sexualization, trust, guilt, and powerlessness). However, few studies have investigated whether such relationships hold for women who do not identify as…

  9. Student Admission and Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majestic, Ann L.

    1988-01-01

    Considers the North Carolina statutes that define the process for admitting students to public schools and ensuring their attendance. Examines cases relating to issues of school admission and compulsory attendance. (MLF)

  10. Antenatal testing for human immunodeficiency virus. Results from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists' National Study of HIV Infection in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davison, C F; Ades, A E; Hudson, C N; Peckham, C S

    1989-12-16

    Current policies on antenatal testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the main obstetric units of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland were surveyed by postal questionnaire; 294 of 299 units responded. HIV testing was available at 192 (65%) of the 294 units that responded. 414 HIV-positive pregnancies in 386 women were reported from 74 (25%) units. Most were from Scotland, the four Thames Regions, and Ireland. In 46% of the HIV-positive women the infection was identified by antenatal testing; the remainder had been tested previously and knew that they were infected. The findings support the view that selective antenatal testing should be established in areas where no testing is offered at present and possibly that testing should be offered to all pregnant women in high-prevalence areas.

  11. Race/ethnic differences in desired body mass index and dieting practices among young women attending college in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Schembre, Susan M; Nigg, Claudio R; Albright, Cheryl L

    2011-07-01

    In accordance with the sociocultural model, race/ethnicity is considered a major influence on factors associated with body image and body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders are often characterized as problems that are primarily limited to young White women from Western cultures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences that exist by race in desired body weight; the importance placed on those ideals; and dieting strategies among White, Asian American, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders, and other mixed-race young women in Hawai'i. A total of 144 female college students 18-20 years of age were surveyed about body weight as well as eating and exercise habits. Results demonstrated that all the young women wanted to lose weight. However, there were no differences in desired body weight or desired weight change by race after controlling for body mass index suggesting that current weight rather than race/ethnicity is the predominant influence on weight-related concerns. Young White women placed the greatest level of importance on achieving a lower body weight, which corresponded with a greater likelihood to be attempting weight loss (dieting) and greater endorsement of behaviors consistent with weight loss compared to their counterparts. Findings imply that, for young women, race/ethnicity may not have as significant an impact on factors associated with body weight ideals as previously believed. Rather, differences in the value placed on achieving a desired body weight, as it relates to disordered eating, should be further explored among race/ethnic groups.

  12. [Alimentary, nutritional and health aspects of elderly women in attendance at the Núcleo de Atenção ao Idoso, Recife/2005].

    PubMed

    Amado, Tânia Campos Fell; Arruda, Ilma Kruze Grande de; Ferreira, Rogério Anderson Rodrigues

    2007-12-01

    Aging has become a worldwide problem. In order to identify food, nutritional and health aspects of elderly women, a across-sectional study was carried out in 2005 with 106 women over 60 years of age cared for at Núcleo de Atenção ao idoso-NAI at Federal University of Pernambuco. Clinical and social-demographic variables, along with the nutritional status by BMI (OMS and Lipschtz) were assessed, and the frequency of food intake according to food groups. The results disclosed that 38% of the elderly were pre-obese (WHO) and 47.2% were overweight (Lipschitz). As for blood pressure (BP) 69% was found to be hypertensive and 31% normotensive. The BMI mean of hypertensive and normal elderly women was statistically significant (p=0.027). Cereal and bread groups were reported to have been the highest consumption on a daily basis by the elderly women, 89% and 82% respectively. Legumes were present in 53% of the women's meals followed by vegetables with 61% and fruits with 66%. Concerning water intake, 51.9% stated to have ingested one to four glasses of water daily. There was a positive correlation between BMI and systolic (SP) and diastolic pressure (DP) (p<0.001). SP and DP levels showed no correlation with the food intake studied. The results are indicative of an overweight and not conscientious population as regards adequate food intake and point to the necessity of more effective actions in control and/or prevention, particularly for those still young.

  13. Malarial Infection among Antenatal and Maternity Clinics Attendees at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Amuta, Elizabeth; Houmsou, Robert; Wama, Emmanuel; Ameh, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the level of malarial infection in relation to some epidemiological factors, gravidity and pregnancy period of antenatal clinic attendees of the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria. We also assessed malarial infection in placental blood in relation to gravidity of pregnant women at delivery in the maternity clinic of the same hospital. Thin and thick blood films were prepared for microscopic examination. A questionnaire was administered to each pregnant woman at the antenatal clinic to collect data on educational level, occupation, gravidity, pregnancy period, malaria preventive measures and malaria symptoms. Of the 163 pregnant women examined at the antenatal clinic, 68.3% (111/163) were infected with malaria. Pregnant women that are illiterates (χ2=15.44, P=0.100) and those that are farmers (χ2=9.20, P=0.270) had the highest infection rate with no significant difference respectively. Malarial infection was significantly higher in the multigravidae, 57.6% (34/59) (χ2=5.16, P=0.007) and non-significant in the pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy, 60.9% (53/89) (χ2=4.45, P=0.108). Placental malaria was significantly higher in the primigravidae among pregnant women at delivery (χ2=9.33, P=0.000). A significant difference (χ2=33.52, P=0.000) was observed between pregnant women that did not use any malaria preventive methods, 91.2% (31/34) and those that used single, 64.3% (65/101) and combined, 46.4% (13/28) methods of prevention. Malaria remains highly prevalent among antenatal clinics attendees in Makurdi, Nigeria. Combined method of prevention (insecticides treated nets and insecticide spray) yielded good results and its use is advocated in preventing malaria among the pregnant women. PMID:24757507

  14. Effectiveness of a specialized vs. traditional AIDS education program attended by homeless and drug-addicted women alone or with supportive persons.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, A; Flaskerud, J; Keenan, C; Leake, B

    1998-10-01

    This research examined the impact of including a supportive person on the outcomes of two culturally sensitive AIDS education programs, an education-only (traditional) program and a program combining education with self-esteem and coping enhancement (specialized). Research participants in this quasi-experimental study included 241 homeless women, who were randomly assigned by residence (drug treatment program or shelter) to one of four treatment groups. The outcomes measured at baseline, 6, and 12 months were risk behaviors, cognitive factors, and psychological functioning. Study results demonstrated significant improvements at both 6 and 12 months for the entire sample in all psychological, behavioral and cognitive outcome variables except active coping. Women in the specialized program improved more on AIDS knowledge and reduction in non-injection drug use than did those in the traditional program, but their active coping scores declined. Participation of a supportive person did not appear to have any effect on outcome.

  15. Offering Self-Sampling Kits for HPV Testing to Reach Women Who Do Not Attend in the Regular Cervical Cancer Screening Program.

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Castle, Philip E

    2015-05-01

    In 2016, the Netherlands will switch, as first European country, from cytology-based to HPV-based cervical cancer screening, with cytology triage for those with a positive HPV test. The new Dutch program includes sending self-sampling devices to women who do not respond to an invitation to have a cervical sample taken by their general practitioner. The cost-effectiveness of this additional strategy will depend on its capacity to recruit nonscreened women and in particular those at increased risk of cervical (pre)cancer, the possible switch of previous responders to self-sampling, the accuracy and cost of the HPV assay-self-sampler combination, and the compliance of women being self-sample HPV-positive with further follow-up. Validated PCR-based assays, detecting high-risk HPV DNA, are as accurate on self-samples as on clinician-collected samples. On the contrary, HPV assays, based on signal amplification, are less sensitive and specific on self-samples. The introduction of self-sampling strategies should be carefully prepared and evaluated in pilot studies integrated in well-organized settings before general rollout. Opt-in procedures involving a request for a self-sampler may reduce response rates. Therefore, an affordable device that can be included with the invitation to all nonattendees may yield a stronger effect on participation.

  16. Anaemia in pregnancy: a cross-sectional study of pregnant women in a Sahelian tertiary hospital in Northeastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kagu, M B; Kawuwa, M B; Gadzama, G B

    2007-10-01

    This prospective study was carried out between June 2005 and June 2006, to determine the prevalence and determinants of anaemia among pregnant women attending a tertiary Sahelian Hospital in Northeastern Nigeria. A total of 1,040 pregnant women enrolled at their first antenatal visit were monitored through pregnancy for anaemia. The overall prevalence of anaemia, malaria parasitaemia and schistosomiasis was 72.0%, 22.1% and 3.8%, respectively. Mild, moderate and severe anaemia constituted 31.8%, 39.4% and 0.9%, respectively. Anaemia was most common among the multipara and women presenting in late stages of pregnancy. More multipara and primigravidae had malaria parasitaemia than grandmultipara. Schistosomiasis, malaria infestation and a short birth interval as well as illiteracy are additional risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy. This study confirms the high prevalence of anaemia in pregnancy in this area. Appropriate intervention strategies are necessary to reduce the prevalence of anaemia.

  17. Prognostic Evaluation of DNA Index in HIV-HPV Co-Infected Women Cervical Samples Attending in Reference Centers for HIV-AIDS in Recife

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barbosa, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Tenório, Terezinha; Maruza, Magda; Ximenes, Ricardo A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Persistence of cervical infection caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types with high oncogenic risk may lead to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether, in HIV-positive women, the presence of aneuploidy in cervical cell samples is associated with presence and evolution of CIN. Methods The present study had two stages. In the first stage, comprising a cross-sectional study, the association between the presence of aneuploidy seen via flow cytometry and sociodemographic characteristics, habits and characteristics relating to HPV and HIV infection was analyzed. In the second stage, comprising a cohort study, it was investigated whether aneuploidy was predictive of CIN evolution. Results No association was observed between the presence of aneuploidy and HPV infection, or between its presence and alterations seen in oncotic cytological analysis. On the other hand, aneuploidy was associated with the presence of CIN (p = 0.030) in histological analysis and with nonuse of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001). Most of the HIV-positive women (234/272) presented normal CD4+ T lymphocyte counts (greater than 350 cells/mm3) and showed a greater aneuploidy regression rate (77.5%) than a progression rate (23.9%) over a follow-up of up to two years. Conclusion Although there was an association between the presence of cervical tissue lesions and the DNA index, the latter was not predictive of progression of the cervical lesion. This suggests that progression of the cervical lesion to cancer in HIV-positive women may also be changed through improvement of the immunological state enabled by using antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25144309

  18. Nutrition, mental health and violence: from pregnancy to postpartum Cohort of women attending primary care units in Southern Brazil - ECCAGE study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Woman's nutritional status, before and during pregnancy, is a strong determinant of health outcomes in the mother and newborn. Gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention increases risk of overweight or obesity in the future and they depend on the pregestational nutritional status and on food consumption and eating behavior during pregnancy. Eating behavior during pregnancy may be the cause or consequence of mood changes during pregnancy, especially depression, which increases likelihood of postpartum depression. In Brazil, a study carried out in the immediate postpartum period found that one in three women experienced some type of violence during pregnancy. Violence and depression are strongly associated and both exposures during pregnancy are associated with increased maternal stress and subsequent harm to the infant. The main objectives of this study are: to identify food intake and eating behaviors patterns; to estimate the prevalence of common mental disorders and the experience of violence during and after pregnancy; and to estimate the association between these exposures and infant's health and development. Methods/Design This is a cohort study of 780 pregnant women receiving care in 18 primary care units in two cities in Southern Brazil. Pregnant women were first evaluated between the 16th and 36th week of pregnancy at a prenatal visit. Follow-up included immediate postpartum assessment and around the fifth month postpartum. Information was obtained on sociodemographic characteristics, living circumstances, food intake, eating behaviors, mental health and exposure to violence, and on infant's development and anthropometrics measurements. Discussion This project will bring relevant information for a better understanding of the relationship between exposures during pregnancy and how they might affect child development, which can be useful for a better planning of health actions aiming to enhance available resources in primary health

  19. Rational case management of malaria with a rapid diagnostic test, Paracheck Pf®, in antenatal health care in Bangui, Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Both treatment and prevention strategies are recommended by the World Health Organization for the control of malaria during pregnancy in tropical areas. The aim of this study was to assess use of a rapid diagnostic test for prompt management of malaria in pregnancy in Bangui, Central African Republic. Methods A cohort of 76 pregnant women was screened systematically for malaria with ParacheckPf® at each antenatal visit. The usefulness of the method was analysed by comparing the number of malaria episodes requiring treatment in the cohort with the number of prescriptions received by another group of pregnant women followed-up in routine antenatal care. Results In the cohort group, the proportion of positive ParacheckPf® episodes during antenatal clinics visits was 13.8%, while episodes of antimalarial prescriptions in the group which was followed-up routinely by antenatal personnel was estimated at 26.3%. Hence, the relative risk of the cohort for being prescribed an antimalarial drug was 0.53. Therefore, the attributable fraction of presumptive treatment avoided by systematic screening with ParacheckPf® was 47%. Conclusions Use of a rapid diagnostic test is useful, affordable and easy for adequate treatment of malaria in pregnant women. More powerful studies of the usefulness of introducing the test into antenatal care are needed in all heath centres in the country and in other tropical areas. PMID:22734602

  20. The risk of prematurity and small-for-gestational-age birth in Mexico City: the effects of working conditions and antenatal leave.

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Mireles, P; Harlow, S D; Sánchez-Carrillo, C I

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the effect of working conditions, occupational stress, and antenatal leave on risk of small-for-gestational age and premature births in Mexico City. METHODS: Over a 3-month period, 2663 (96.2%) of 2767 women who gave birth at three major hospitals and worked at least 3 months during pregnancy were interviewed shortly after delivery. After the exclusion of multiple gestations and birth defects, 261 (10.0%) small-for-gestational-age and 288 (11.0%) preterm births were identified. RESULTS: For small-for-gestational-age births, working more than 50 hours a week (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59), standing more than 7 hours a day (OR = 1.40), and no antenatal leave (OR = 1.55) were associated with an increased risk. Women with no antenatal leave were also much more likely to give birth prematurely (OR = 3.04). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, arduous working conditions and lack of antenatal leave benefits were found to increase the risk of poor birth outcome in Mexican women. Enforcement of existing antenatal leave laws and provision of comparable benefits for the uninsured may reduce the incidence of small-for-gestational-age births and prematurity. PMID:8659657

  1. Risk of preterm birth after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among women attending colposcopy in England: retrospective-prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Castanon, Alejandra; Brocklehurst, Peter; Evans, Heather; Peebles, Donald; Singh, Naveena; Walker, Patrick; Patnick, Julietta

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between preterm delivery and treatment at colposcopy. Design Retrospective-prospective cohort study using record linkage. Setting 12 National Health Service hospitals in England. Participants Women who had a cervical histology sample taken between 1987 and 2009. These women were linked by hospital episode statistics to hospital obstetric records between 1998 and 2009 for the whole of England to identify singleton live births between 20-43 gestational weeks before or after cervical histology. Main outcome measures Proportion of preterm births (<37 weeks); the relative risk for the strength of association between preterm births and treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Results 18 441 singleton births occurred: 4176 before histology and 14 265 after histology. Of the singleton births after histology, 9.0% (n=1284) were preterm compared with 6.7% of all births in England over the same period (excess risk 2.3 per 100 births, 95% confidence interval 1.8% to 2.8%). Among first births after histology, the adjusted relative risk associated with previous treatment was 1.19 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.41); among first births before histology the relative risk associated with subsequent treatment was 1.47 (1.05 to 2.05). Combining these, the relative risk associated with treatment adjusted for timing relative to histology was 0.91 (0.66 to 1.26) corresponding to an absolute difference of −0.25 (−2.61 to 2.11) per 100 singleton births. Among 372 women who gave birth both before and after treatment, there were 30 preterm births after treatment and 32 before treatment (relative risk 0.94, 0.62 to 1.43). Conclusion The risk of preterm delivery in women treated by colposcopy in England was substantially less than that in many other studies, predominantly from Nordic countries. The increased risk may be a consequence of confounding and not caused by treatment. Although this study is reassuring for large loop excision of

  2. Effects of natural childbirth preparation versus standard antenatal education on epidural rates, experience of childbirth and parental stress in mothers and fathers: a randomised controlled multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, M; Kieler, H; Waldenström, U

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with psychoprophylactic training versus standard antenatal education on the use of epidural analgesia, experience of childbirth and parental stress in first-time mothers and fathers. Design Randomised controlled multicentre trial. Setting Fifteen antenatal clinics in Sweden between January 2006 and May 2007. Sample A total of 1087 nulliparous women and 1064 of their partners. Methods Natural group: Antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with training in breathing and relaxation techniques (psychoprophylaxis). Standard care group: Standard antenatal education focussing on both childbirth and parenthood, without psychoprophylactic training. Both groups: Four 2-hour sessions in groups of 12 participants during third trimester of pregnancy and one follow-up after delivery. Main outcome measures Epidural analgesia during labour, experience of childbirth as measured by the Wijma Delivery Experience Questionnaire (B), and parental stress measured by the Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire. Results The epidural rate was 52% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the experience of childbirth or parental stress between the randomised groups, either in women or men. Seventy percent of the women in the Natural group reported having used psychoprophylaxis during labour. A minority in the Standard care group (37%) had also used this method, but subgroup analysis where these women were excluded did not change the principal findings. Conclusion Natural childbirth preparation including training in breathing and relaxation did not decrease the use of epidural analgesia during labour, nor did it improve the birth experience or affect parental stress in early parenthood in nulliparous women and men, compared with a standard form of antenatal education. PMID:19538406

  3. Integration of Traditional Birth Attendants into Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission at Primary Health Facilities in Kaduna, North-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nsirim, Reward O.; Iyongo, Joseph A.; Adekugbe, Olayinka; Ugochuku, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges to implementing successful prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programs in Nigeria is the uptake of PMTCT services at health facilities. Several issues usually discourage many pregnant women from receiving antenatal care services at designated health facilities within their communities. The CRS Nigeria PMTCT Project funded by the Global Fund in its Round 9 Phase 1 in Nigeria, sought to increase demand for HIV counseling and testing services for pregnant women at 25 supported primary health centers (PHCs) in Kaduna State, North-West Nigeria by integrating traditional birth attendants (TBAs) across the communities where the PHCs were located into the project. Community dialogues were held with the TBAs, community leaders and women groups. These dialogues focused on modes of mother to child transmission of HIV and the need for TBAs to refer their clients to PHCs for testing. Subsequently, data on number of pregnant women who were counseled, tested and received results was collected on a monthly basis from the 25 facilities using the national HIV/AIDS tools. Prior to this integration, the average number of pregnant women that were counseled, tested and received results was 200 pregnant women across all the 25 health facilities monthly. After the integration of TBAs into the program, the number of pregnant women that were counseled, tested and received results kept increasing month after month up to an average of 1500 pregnant women per month across the 25 health facilities. TBAs can thus play a key role in improving service uptake and utilization for pregnant women at primary health centers in the community – especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. They thus need to be integrated, rather than alienated, from primary healthcare service delivery. PMID:28299134

  4. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of a rapid immunochromatographic test and the rapid plasma reagin test for antenatal syphilis screening in Mozambique.

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Pablo J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Brentlinger, Paula E.; Blanco, Ana J.; Floriano, Florencia; Sairosse, Josefa; Gloyd, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Programmes to control syphilis in developing countries are hampered by a lack of laboratory services, delayed diagnosis, and doubts about current screening methods. We aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of an immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test and the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test with the combined gold standard (RPR, Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay and direct immunofluorescence stain done at a reference laboratory) for the detection of syphilis in pregnancy. METHODS: We included test results from 4789 women attending their first antenatal visit at one of six health facilities in Sofala Province, central Mozambique. We compared diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of ICS and RPR done at the health facilities and ICS performed at the reference laboratory. We also made subgroup comparisons by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malaria status. FINDINGS: For active syphilis, the sensitivity of the ICS was 95.3% at the reference laboratory, and 84.1% at the health facility. The sensitivity of the RPR at the health facility was 70.7%. Specificity and positive and negative predictive values showed a similar pattern. The ICS outperformed RPR in all comparisons (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: The diagnostic accuracy of the ICS compared favourably with that of the gold standard. The use of the ICS in Mozambique and similar settings may improve the diagnosis of syphilis in health facilities, both with and without laboratories. PMID:16501726

  5. Antenatal smoking in vulnerable population groups: an area of need.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, C; Sanson-Fisher, R; Eades, S; D'Este, C

    2007-10-01

    Antenatal smoking is a potentially preventable risk factor associated with pre-term birth and low birth weight. Rates of antenatal smoking, low birth weight, and infant mortality are all higher among the Indigenous populations than the non-Indigenous populations of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the USA. Given this, it might be expected that publications examining smoking cessation efforts in Indigenous antenatal groups would be substantive. We examined the differences in the number and type of antenatal smoking publications for Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations across three time periods (1984-86, 1994-96 and 2004-06). Articles were classified as research studies (focusing on measurement, descriptive, or intervention studies), literature reviews, descriptions of programmes or research (with no data), or discussions. There was a significant increase in the number of publications relating to antenatal smoking among Indigenous populations in the time periods examined, but the total number of publications remained small. The number relating to general antenatal populations increased, but remained substantially lower than that relating to low birth weight. There was no increase in the proportional allocation of research articles to the intervention category in the later time period. The pattern of research output relating to antenatal smoking by mainstream or Indigenous populations is not optimal for advancement of knowledge in the field. There is a clear need for intervention-based research to allow the development of evidence-based practice for reducing the prevalence of antenatal smoking and associated health issues.

  6. Antenatal Ultrasound and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Judith K.; Li, Sherian Xu; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Croen, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated antenatal ultrasound (U/S) exposure as a risk factor for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), comparing affected singleton children and control children born 1995-1999 and enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente health care system. Among children with ASD (n = 362) and controls (n = 393), 13% had no antenatal exposure to U/S examinations;…

  7. Case report: Antenatal MRI diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst.

    PubMed

    Rangasami, Rajeswaran; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Archana, Lal; Santhosh, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are classified as a subgroup of foregut duplication cysts. They are very rare and are predominantly detected in children. Antenatal detection is very rare. We report a case of an esophageal duplication cyst that was accurately identified antenatally by USG and MRI.

  8. Audit of Childbirth Emergency Referrals by Trained Traditional Birth Attendants in Enugu, Southeast, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, II; Arinze-Onyia, SU; Ohayi, SAR; Onyekpa, JI; Ugwu, EO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The essence of training traditional birth attendants (TBAs) is to attend to women in uncomplicated labor and to refer them immediately to hospitals when complications develop. Aim: The aim was to audit childbirth emergency referrals by trained TBAs to a specialist hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective study of 205 childbirth emergencies referred to Semino Hospital and Maternity (SHM), Enugu by trained TBAs from August 1, 2011 to January 31, 2014. Data analysis was descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level. Results: Most of the patients (185/205, 90.2%) were married and (100/205, 48.8%) had earlier booked for antenatal care in formal health facilities. There were obstetric danger signs or previous bad obstetric histories (pregnancies with unfavorable outcome) in 110 (110/205, 53.7%) women on admission at SHM. One hundred and fifteen (115/205, 56.1%) women walked into the hospital by themselves while 50 (50/205, 24.39%) could not walk. The fetal heart sounds were normal in 94 (94/205, 45.6%), abnormal in 65 (65/205, 31.8%) and absent in 42 (42/205, 20.4%) of the women on admission. Five healthy babies were delivered by the TBAs before referring their mothers. Delays of more than 12 h had occurred in 155 (155/205, 76.6%) of the women before referrals. Prolonged labor (100/205, 48.8%), obstructed labor (40/205, 19.5%), attempted vaginal birth after previous cesarean delivery (40/205, 19.5%) and malpresentation (30/205, 14.6%) were the common indications for referrals. The maternal mortality and perinatal mortality ratios were 610/100,000 live births and 228/1000 total births respectively. Conclusion: Delays at TBA centers are common before referral and most patients are referred in poor clinical state. Further training and re-training of the TBAs with more emphasis on recognition of obstetric danger signs and bad obstetric histories may help in screening high-risk patients for prompt referral to hospitals before

  9. Antenatal steroids and the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, A.; Thoresen, M.

    2000-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials show that two injections of corticosteroid into the mother before preterm delivery reduce respiratory distress syndrome, neonatal mortality, and intraventricular haemorrhage. However, repeated courses of antenatal steroid are not backed by such evidence of safety and efficacy. Animal studies have shown that maternal corticosteroid delays myelination and reduces the growth of all fetal brain areas particularly the hippocampus. Corticosteroids may reduce or enhance hypoxic-ischaemic injury to the developing brain depending on timing and dosage. Clinical trials of maternally administered corticosteroid show no evidence of increased disability on follow up but numbers are small. Postnatal trials of dexamethasone when brain maturity is still preterm show a significant increase in later disability in the dexamethasone treated groups. There is evidence from randomised trials, retrospective data, experiments on pregnant mice, and the chemical make up of the preparations that betamethasone may be safer and more protective of the immature brain than dexamethasone. Single course corticosteroid treatment before preterm delivery must still be recommended as a life saving and cost effective intervention, but clinicians may wish to change from using dexamethasone to betamethasone. In view of the animal and postnatal data, clinicians should be cautious with repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids and repetition may be unnecessary for lung maturity.

 PMID:10952714

  10. Hypnosis Antenatal Training for Childbirth (HATCh): a randomised controlled trial [NCT00282204

    PubMed Central

    Cyna, Allan M; Andrew, Marion I; Robinson, Jeffrey S; Crowther, Caroline A; Baghurst, Peter; Turnbull, Deborah; Wicks, Graham; Whittle, Celia

    2006-01-01

    Background Although medical interventions play an important role in preserving lives and maternal comfort they have become increasingly routine in normal childbirth. This may increase the risk of associated complications and a less satisfactory birth experience. Antenatal hypnosis is associated with a reduced need for pharmacological interventions during childbirth. This trial seeks to determine the efficacy or otherwise of antenatal group hypnosis preparation for childbirth in late pregnancy. Methods/design A single centre, randomised controlled trial using a 3 arm parallel group design in the largest tertiary maternity unit in South Australia. Group 1 participants receive antenatal hypnosis training in preparation for childbirth administered by a qualified hypnotherapist with the use of an audio compact disc on hypnosis for re-enforcement; Group 2 consists of antenatal hypnosis training in preparation for childbirth using an audio compact disc on hypnosis administered by a nurse with no training in hypnotherapy; Group 3 participants continue with their usual preparation for childbirth with no additional intervention. Women > 34 and < 39 weeks gestation, planning a vaginal birth, not in active labour, with a singleton, viable fetus of vertex presentation, are eligible to participate. Allocation concealment is achieved using telephone randomisation. Participants assigned to hypnosis groups commence hypnosis training as near as possible to 37 weeks gestation. Treatment allocations are concealed from treating obstetricians, anaesthetists, midwives and those personnel collecting and analysing data. Our sample size of 135 women/group gives the study 80% power to detect a clinically relevant fall of 20% in the number of women requiring pharmacological analgesia – the primary endpoint. We estimate that approximately 5–10% of women will deliver prior to receiving their allocated intervention. We plan to recruit 150 women/group and perform sequential interim analyses

  11. Between life and death: exploring the sociocultural context of antenatal mental distress in rural Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Rob; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Alem, Atalay; Prince, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of antenatal common mental disorders in sub-Saharan Africa compared to high-income countries is poorly understood. This qualitative study explored the sociocultural context of antenatal mental distress in a rural Ethiopian community. Five focus group discussions and 25 in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively sampled community stakeholders. Inductive analysis was used to develop final themes. Worry about forthcoming delivery and fears for the woman’s survival were prominent concerns of all participants, but only rarely perceived to be pathological in intensity. Sociocultural practices such as continuing physical labour, dietary restriction, prayer and rituals to protect against supernatural attack were geared towards safe delivery and managing vulnerability. Despite strong cultural norms to celebrate pregnancy, participants emphasised that many pregnancies were unwanted and an additional burden on top of pre-existing economic and marital difficulties. Short birth interval and pregnancy out of wedlock were both seen as shameful and potent sources of mental distress. The notion that pregnancy in traditional societies is uniformly a time of joy and happiness is misplaced. Although antenatal mental distress may be self-limiting for many women, in those with enduring life difficulties, including poverty and abusive relationships, poor maternal mental health may persist. PMID:20148274

  12. Between life and death: exploring the sociocultural context of antenatal mental distress in rural Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Charlotte; Whitley, Rob; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Alem, Atalay; Prince, Martin

    2010-10-01

    The high prevalence of antenatal common mental disorders in sub-Saharan Africa compared to high-income countries is poorly understood. This qualitative study explored the sociocultural context of antenatal mental distress in a rural Ethiopian community. Five focus group discussions and 25 in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively sampled community stakeholders. Inductive analysis was used to develop final themes. Worry about forthcoming delivery and fears for the woman's survival were prominent concerns of all participants, but only rarely perceived to be pathological in intensity. Sociocultural practices such as continuing physical labour, dietary restriction, prayer and rituals to protect against supernatural attack were geared towards safe delivery and managing vulnerability. Despite strong cultural norms to celebrate pregnancy, participants emphasised that many pregnancies were unwanted and an additional burden on top of pre-existing economic and marital difficulties. Short birth interval and pregnancy out of wedlock were both seen as shameful and potent sources of mental distress. The notion that pregnancy in traditional societies is uniformly a time of joy and happiness is misplaced. Although antenatal mental distress may be self-limiting for many women, in those with enduring life difficulties, including poverty and abusive relationships, poor maternal mental health may persist.

  13. Relative professional roles in antenatal care: results of a survey in Scottish rural general practice.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jane; Stimpson, Paul; Tucker, Janet

    2003-11-01

    There is evidence of variation and some ambiguity about self-perceived relative professional roles in antenatal care in the UK. There is little information about models of antenatal care provision in UK rural areas. In rural areas, in particular, women have limited choice in accessing health care professionals or alternative primary care delivery settings. In the light of a recent review of Scottish maternity services, it is important and timely to examine models of care and interprofessional working in antenatal care in rural areas. This study explores midwives' and GPs' perceptions about their relative professional roles in remote and rural general practice in Scotland. A questionnaire survey involving all 174 Scottish remote and rural general practices (using one definition of rurality) was conducted, followed by 20 interviews. At least one professional returned a completed questionnaire from 91% of rural practices. A number of areas of dissonance were noted between GPs' and midwives' perceptions of their roles in maternity care and, given the context of service provision, these may impact upon rural patients. Findings are relevant to wider debates on extending the primary care team and strengthening inter-disciplinary working, particularly in rural areas.

  14. Acceptance and Utilisation of Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine and Insecticide-Treated Nets among Pregnant Women in Oyo State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeola, Aderonke A.; Okwilagwe, Eugenia A.

    2015-01-01

    The study is an investigation of the acceptance and utilisation of Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (Fansidar), the drug of choice for Intermittent Preventive Treatment in pregnancy, and Insecticide-Treated Nets among pregnant women who access different health facilities in Oyo State, Nigeria. Pregnant women (582) attending government primary healthcare antenatal clinics and 50 attending faith clinics purposively selected responded to structured instruments that were analysed using percentages, t-test correlation, and multiple regression. Acceptance and utilisation of RBM tools were higher in government clinics than faith clinics and in rural areas. Pregnant women in government clinics, 60.8% and 66.8%, and faith clinics, 18% and 38.0%, utilised Roll Back Malaria tools, significant at t(630) = 5.81, p ≤ 0.05, and t(630) = 3.99, p ≤ 0.05, respectively. Pregnant women in rural locations who accessed government clinics utilised Roll Back Malaria tools more than those in urban areas, t(580) = −641, p ≤ 0.05. Number of pregnancies, educational qualification of the pregnant women, and marital status significantly and consistently influenced acceptance and utilisation of these tools. To ensure that set targets are met, the utilization of RBM tools among the two categories of pregnant women can be improved by increasing the supply of the tools and ensuring that treatment is free. PMID:26839732

  15. Antenatal psychosomatic programming to reduce postpartum depression risk and improve childbirth outcomes: a randomized controlled trial in Spain and France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postpartum depression (PPD) and poor childbirth outcomes are associated with poverty; these variables should be addressed by an adapted approach. The aim of this research was to evaluate the impact of an antenatal programme based on a novel psychosomatic approach to pregnancy and delivery, regarding the risk of PPD and childbirth outcomes in disadvantaged women. Methods A multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial comparing a novel to standard antenatal programme. Primary outcome was depressive symptoms (using EPDS) and secondary outcome was preterm childbirth (fewer 37 weeks). The sample comprised 184 couples in which the women were identified to be at PPD risk by validated interview. The study was conducted in three public hospitals with comparable standards of perinatal care. Women were randomly distributed in to an experimental group (EG) or a control group (CG), and evaluated twice: during pregnancy (T1) and four weeks post-partum (T2). At T2, the variables were compared using the chi square test. Data analysis was based on intention to treat. The novel programme used the Tourné psychosomatic approach focusing on body awareness sensations, construction of an individualized childbirth model, and attachment. The 10 group antenatal sessions each lasted two hours, with one telephone conversation between sessions. In the control group, the participants choose the standard model of antenatal education, i.e., 8 to 10 two-hour sessions focused on childbirth by obstetrical prophylaxis. Results A difference of 11.2% was noted in postpartum percentages of PPD risk (EPDS ≥ 12): 34.3% (24) in EG and 45.5% (27) in CG (p = 0.26). The number of depressive symptoms among EG women decreased at T2 (intragroup p = 0.01). Premature childbirth was four times less in EG women: three (4.4%) compared to 13 (22.4%) among CG women (p = 0.003). Birth weight was higher in EG women (p = 0.01). Conclusions The decrease of depressive symptoms in women was not conclusive

  16. Seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 infection among native and immigrant pregnant women in Spain.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Ana; Aguilera, Antonio; Caballero, Estrella; Toro, Carlos; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Rodríguez-Calviño, Juan J; Tuset, Concepción; Gómez-Hernando, César; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Ramos, José Manuel; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan C; Benito, Rafael; Trigo, Matilde; García-Campello, Marta; Calderón, Enrique; Garcia, Juan; Rodríguez, Carmen; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-06-01

    HTLV-1=2 antenatal screening is not mandatory in European countries. The rapid increase in immigrants coming from areas endemic for HTLV-1 infection has compelled a review of this policy in Spain. From February 2006 to December 2007, a cross-sectional study was carried out in all pregnant women attended at 10 different Spanish hospitals. An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to test serum HTLV-1=2 antibodies; reactive samples were further confirmed by Western blot and=or polymerase chain reaction. A total of 20,518 pregnant women were examined, of whom 18,266 (89%) were native Spaniards. Overall, 946 (4.6%) of the immigrants came from HTLV-1 endemic areas (mainly Central and South America and sub-Saharan Africa). Four samples were EIA seroreactive for HTLV-1=2, two of them in women infected with HTLV-1 coming from endemic areas. The other two women were infected with HTLV-2; one was an immigrant from Bolivia and another was a native Spaniard who admitted prior injection drug use and was HIV-1 positive. The overall HTLV-1=2 seroprevalence was 0.19 per 1000 (95% CI: 0.05-0.49=1000). For HTLV-1, the seroprevalence was 2.11 per 1000 (95% CI: 0.26-7.62=1000) in pregnant women from endemic areas. The seroprevalence of HTLV-1=2 infection is below 0.02% among pregnant women in Spain, and therefore universal screening for HTLV-1=2 infection in antenatal clinics is not warranted. However, HTLV-1=2 screening could be considered in pregnant women coming from endemic areas, in whom the rate of infection is nearly 1000-fold higher than in native Spaniards and are the only group infected with the more pathogenic HTLV-1.

  17. Social networks and social support among ball-attending African American men who have sex with men and transgender women are associated with HIV-related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Emily A; Sterrett-Hong, Emma; Jonas, Adam; Pollack, Lance M

    2016-05-11

    The House Ball Community (HBC) is an understudied network of African American men who have sex with men and transgender women, who join family-like houses that compete in elaborate balls in cities across the United States. From 2011 to 2012, we surveyed 274 recent attendees of balls in the San Francisco Bay Area, focusing on social networks, social support, and HIV-related behaviours. Participants with a high percentage of alters who were supportive of HIV testing were significantly more likely to have tested in the past six months (p = .02), and less likely to have engaged in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the past three months (p = .003). Multivariate regression analyses of social network characteristics, and social support, revealed that testing in the past six months was significantly associated with social support for safer sex, instrumental social support, and age. Similarly, UAI in the past three months was significantly associated with social support for safer sex, homophily based on sexual identity and HIV status. HIV-related social support provided through the HBC networks was correlated with recent HIV testing and reduced UAI. Approaches utilising networks within alternative kinship systems, may increase HIV-related social support and improve HIV-related outcomes.

  18. [Antenatal corticosteroids in respiratory distress syndrome prevention: efficacy in relation to treatment--delivery interval].

    PubMed

    Heljić, Suada; Maksić, Hajrija; Misanović, Verica; Dizdarević, Jadranka

    2009-01-01

    Antenatal corticosteroids given to women, who are 24 to 34 weeks pregnant and may deliver within the next 24 hours to 7 days, are associated with significant reduction in rates of respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage and mortality of pre-term babies. The aim of this study is assessment of antenatal corticosteroid effectiveness in reduction of RDS incidence in optimal delivery-treatment interval, in comparison to babies delivered before and after the optimal treatment interval has elapsed. This investigation included 80 pre-term babies between 26 and 34 gestational weeks whose mothers received corticosteroids before delivery. Control group consisted of 92 children of the same gestational age, whose mothers did not received corticosteroids antenatally. Babies of diabetic mothers, babies with IUGR and babies with congenital abnormalities were excluded. RDS was significantly less frequent in babies antenatally treated by corticosteroids (x2 31,473 p < 0.0001 coefficient contingency 0.366) then in babies whose mothers did not received corticosteroids before delivery. The majority of babies, 54.67% (p < 0.01) were born in optimal interval, 24 hours to 7 days from the beginning of the treatment, 32.0% (24/75) children were born within 24 hours and 13.3% (10/75) were born more then 7 days after the start of treatment. Comparing the incidence of RDS between groups of children born in optimal treatment-delivery interval (1 -7 days) and in the group of children born within 24 hours or after 7 days from the beginning of the treatment, no significant difference was found. The effect was clinically comparable, which suggests the possibility of reduction treatment-delivery interval in acute clinical conditions.

  19. Predictors of postnatal mother-infant bonding: the role of antenatal bonding, maternal substance use and mental health.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Larissa; Hutchinson, Delyse; Wilson, Judy; Burns, Lucy; A Olsson, Craig; Allsop, Steve; J Elliott, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Sue; Macdonald, Jacqueline A; Mattick, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    The emotional bond that a mother feels towards her baby is critical to social, emotional and cognitive development. Maternal health and wellbeing through pregnancy and antenatal bonding also play a key role in determining bonding postnatally, but the extent to which these relationships may be disrupted by poor mental health or substance use is unclear. This study aimed to examine the extent to which mother-fetal bonding, substance use and mental health through pregnancy predicted postnatal mother-infant bonding at 8 weeks. Participants were 372 women recruited from three metropolitan hospitals in Australia. Data was collected during trimesters one, two and three of pregnancy and 8 weeks postnatal using the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale (MAAS), Maternal Postnatal Attachment Scale (MPAS), the Edinburgh Antenatal and Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the Depression and Anxiety Scales (DASS-21), frequency and quantity of substance use (caffeine, alcohol and tobacco) as well as a range of demographic and postnatal information. Higher antenatal bonding predicted higher postnatal bonding at all pregnancy time-points in a fully adjusted regression model. Maternal depressive symptoms in trimesters two and three and stress in trimester two were inversely related to poorer mother-infant bonding 8 weeks postnatally. This study extends previous work on the mother's felt bond to her developing child by drawing on a large sample of women and documenting the pattern of this bond at three time points in pregnancy and at 8 weeks postnatally. Utilising multiple antenatal waves allowed precision in isolating the relationships in pregnancy and at key intervention points. Investigating methods to enhance bonding and intervene in pregnancy is needed. It is also important to assess maternal mental health through pregnancy.

  20. Antenatal Magnesium and Cerebral Palsy in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Hirtz, Deborah G.; Weiner, Steven J.; Bulas, Dorothy; DiPietro, Michael; Seibert, Joanna; Rouse, Dwight J.; Mercer, Brian M.; Varner, Michael W.; Reddy, Uma M.; Iams, Jay D.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Sorokin, Yoram; Thorp, John M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Malone, Fergal D.; Carpenter, Marshall W.; O’Sullivan, Mary J.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Dudley, Donald; Caritis, Steve N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship of maternal antenatal magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) with neonatal cranial ultrasound abnormalities and cerebral palsy (CP). Study design In a randomized trial of MgSO4 or placebo in women at high risk of preterm delivery, up to three cranial ultrasound were obtained in the neonatal period. Images were reviewed by at least two pediatric radiologists masked to treatment and other clinical conditions. Diagnoses were predefined for intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), intracerebral echolucency or echodensity, and ventriculomegaly. CP was diagnosed at two years by standardized neurological examination. Results Intraventricular hemorrhage, PVL, intracerebral echolucency or echodensity, and ventriculomegaly were all strongly associated with an increased risk of CP. MgSO4 administration did not affect the risk of cranial ultrasound abnormality observed at 35 weeks post-menstrual age or later. However, for the 82% of infants born at <32 weeks gestation, MgSO4 was associated with a reduction in risk of echolucency or echodensity. The reduction in risk for echolucency explained 21% of the effect of MgSO4 on CP (p=0.04), and for echodensity explained 20% of the effect (p=0.02). Conclusions MgSO4 given prior to preterm delivery was associated with decreased risk of developing echodensities and echolucencies at <32 weeks gestation. However, this effect can only partially explain the effect of MgSO4 on CP at two years of age. PMID:26254839

  1. Dietary Diversity Is Not Associated with Haematological Status of Pregnant Women Resident in Rural Areas of Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Oladele, Jeremiah; Larbi, Asamoah; Hoeschle-Zeledon, Irmgard

    2017-01-01

    Background. Information regarding how dietary diversity is related to haematological status of the pregnant women in rural areas of Northern Ghana is limited. This study therefore evaluated maternal dietary intake and how it relates to the nutritional status of pregnant women belonging to different socioeconomic conditions in Northern Ghana. Methods. This study was cross-sectional in design involving 400 pregnant women. Midupper arm circumference (MUAC) and anaemia status were used to assess the nutritional status of pregnant women. Results. The mean dietary diversity score (DDS) of the study population from ten food groups was 4.2 ± 1.5 (95% CI: 4.08 to 4.37). Of the 400 women, 46.1% (95% CI: 40.0 to 52.2) met the new minimum dietary diversity for women (MDD-W). The mean haemoglobin concentration among the pregnant women studied was 10.1 g/dl ± 1.40 (95% CI: 9.8 to 10.3). The independent predictors of haemoglobin concentration were maternal educational attainment, gestational age, frequency of antenatal care (ANC) attendance, number of under-five children in the household, size of MUAC, and maternal height. Conclusions. Irrespective of the socioeconomic status, women minimum dietary diversity (MDD-W) was not associated with anaemia among pregnant women resident in the rural areas of Northern Ghana. PMID:28168052

  2. Antenatal Care and Couples' HIV Testing in Rural Northern Uganda: A Gender Relations Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudrum, Sarah; Oliffe, John L; Brown, Helen

    2015-09-23

    HIV rates continue to increase among heterosexual couples in many countries including Uganda. This article examines approaches to antenatal care and heterosexual partners' HIV testing in Amuru subcounty, northern Uganda, drawing on findings derived from fieldwork and interviews. The study findings reveal how institutional structures influence the uptake of HIV testing amid power dynamics, wherein many male partners refuse to be tested. Discussed are the coercive approaches to HIV testing in which couples' participation in HIV testing is leveraged by connecting testing to future maternity care. This article advances understandings about how heterosexual gender relations at the local, regional, and global levels affect the health of women, men, and families in Amuru subcounty.

  3. Transactional sex among women in Soweto, South Africa: prevalence, risk factors and association with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Dunkle, Kristin L; Jewkes, Rachel K; Brown, Heather C; Gray, Glenda E; McIntryre, James A; Harlow, Siobán D

    2004-10-01

    Sex workers have long been considered a high-risk group for HIV infection, but to date little quantitative research has explored the association between HIV risk and exchange of sex for material gain by women in the general population. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of such transactional sex among women attending antenatal clinics in Soweto, South Africa, to identify demographic and social variables associated with reporting transactional sex, and to determine the association between transactional sex and HIV serostatus. We conducted a cross-sectional study of women seeking antenatal care in four Soweto health centres who accepted routine antenatal HIV testing. Private face-to-face interviews covered socio-demographics, sexual history and experience of gender-based violence. 21.1% of participants reported having ever had sex with a non-primary male partner in exchange for material goods or money. Women who reported past experience of violence by male intimate partners, problematic substance use, urban residence, ever earning money, or living in substandard housing were more likely to report transactional sex, while women who reported delayed first coitus, were married, or had a post-secondary education were less likely to report transactional sex. Transactional sex was associated with HIV seropositivity after controlling for lifetime number of male sex partners and length of time a woman had been sexually active (OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.07, 2.21). Women who reported non-primary partners without transactional sex did not have increased odds of being HIV seropositive (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.75, 1.43). We conclude that transactional sex may place women at increased risk for HIV, and is associated with gender-based violence, substance use and socio-economic disadvantage. Research, policy and programmatic initiatives should consider the role of transactional sex in women's HIV risk, with attention to the intersecting roles of violence, poverty

  4. High prevalence of HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea among men who have sex with men and transgender women attending trusted community centres in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Keshinro, Babajide; Crowell, Trevor A; Nowak, Rebecca G; Adebajo, Sylvia; Peel, Sheila; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Rodriguez-Hart, Cristina; Baral, Stefan D; Walsh, Melissa J; Njoku, Ogbonnaya S; Odeyemi, Sunday; Ngo-Ndomb, Teclaire; Blattner, William A; Robb, Merlin L; Charurat, Manhattan E; Ake, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV prevalence have been reported to be higher amongst men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nigeria than in the general population. The objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence of HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea in this population using laboratory-based universal testing. Methods TRUST/RV368 represents a cohort of MSM and transgender women (TGW) recruited at trusted community centres in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria, using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Participants undergo a structured comprehensive assessment of HIV-related risks and screening for anorectal and urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and HIV. Crude and RDS-weighted prevalence estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Log-binomial regression was used to explore factors associated with prevalent HIV infection and STIs. Results From March 2013 to January 2016, 862 MSM and TGW (316 in Lagos and 546 in Abuja) underwent screening for HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea at study enrolment. Participants’ median age was 24 years [interquartile range (IQR) 21–27]. One-third (34.2%) were identified as gay/homosexual and 65.2% as bisexual. The overall prevalence of HIV was 54.9%. After adjusting for the RDS recruitment method, HIV prevalence in Abuja was 43.5% (95% CI 37.3–49.6%) and in Lagos was 65.6% (95% CI 54.7–76.5%). The RDS-weighted prevalence of chlamydia was 17.0% (95% CI 11.8–22.3%) in Abuja and 18.3% (95% CI 11.1–25.4%) in Lagos. Chlamydia infection was detected only at the anorectal site in 70.2% of cases. The RDS-weighted prevalence of gonorrhoea was 19.1% (95% CI 14.6–23.5%) in Abuja and 25.8% (95% CI 17.1–34.6%) in Lagos. Overall, 84.2% of gonorrhoea cases presented with anorectal infection only. Over 95% of STI cases were asymptomatic. In a multivariable model, increased risk for chlamydia/gonorrhoea was associated with younger age, gay/homosexual sexual orientation and higher

  5. Recent partner violence and sexual and drug-related STI/HIV risk among adolescent and young adult women attending family planning clinics

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michele R.; Miller, Elizabeth; McCauley, Heather L.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Anderson, Heather; Levenson, Rebecca R.; Silverman, Jay G.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Adolescent and young adult women are at high risk for both STI/HIV and intimate partner violence (IPV). We evaluate the prevalence of IPV in the past three months and its associations with STI/HIV risk, STI, and related care-seeking over the same time period. Methods Female family planning clinic patients ages 16–29 (n=3,504) participated in a cross-sectional survey in 2011–2012 as a baseline assessment for an intervention study. We examined associations of recent IPV with sexual and drug-related STI/HIV risk behavior, self-reported STI, and STI-related clinical care seeking via logistic regression. Results Recent physical or sexual IPV (prevalence 11%) was associated with recent sexual and drug-related STI/HIV risk, specifically unprotected vaginal sex (AOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.52, 2.44), unprotected anal sex (AOR 2.22, 95% CI 1.51, 3.27) and injection drug use, both their own (AOR 3.39, 95% CI 1.47, 7.79) and their partner’s (AOR 3.85, 1.91, 7.75). IPV was also linked with coercive sexual risk: involuntary condom non-use (AOR 1.87, 95% CI 1.51, 2.33), and fears of requesting condoms (AOR 4.15, 95% CI 2.73, 6.30) and refusing sex (AOR 11.84, 95% CI 7.59, 18.45). STI-related care-seeking was also more common among those abused (AOR 2.49, 95% CI 1.87, 3.31). Conclusions Recent IPV is concurrent with sexual and drug-related STI/HIV risk, including coercive sexual risk, thus compromising women’s agency in STI/HIV risk reduction. Clinical risk assessments should broaden to include unprotected heterosexual anal sex, coercive sexual risk, and IPV, and should promote safety and harm reduction. PMID:24234072

  6. Stage of change is associated with assessment of the health risks of maternal smoking among pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Haslam, C; Draper, E

    2000-10-01

    This study explored pregnant women's assessment of the health risks associated with maternal smoking. The aim was to determine if stage of change relating to smoking is associated with risk assessment. A cross-sectional survey (employing a self-completion questionnaire) was conducted of all women who attended antenatal clinics at Leicester Royal Infirmary, National Health Service Trust, UK over a 2 week period. Questionnaires were completed by 254 respondents. Twenty seven percent of non-smokers agreed with more than 75% of a series of statements about the dangers of maternal smoking compared to 5% of smokers and 44% of women in social class I (highest social class) agreed with more than 75% of the statements compared with only 10% of women in social classes IV and V (lower social class groups). Married women were twice as likely to concur with more than 75% of the health risks compared to single or cohabiting women and 29% of women intending to breastfeed agreed with more than 75% of the statements compared with only 8.7% of women not intending to breastfeed. There was no significant effect of age, whether the pregnancy was planned, previous obstetric complications or whether the woman had a child with asthma or respiratory infections. A multiple regression analysis indicated that smokers were much less likely to agree with the health risks than their non-smoking counterparts (p = 0.034). Stage of change was related to both the number of health risks agreed with and the level of conviction. A woman's stage of change could be assessed at the start of antenatal care so that appropriate smoking cessation advice can be offered.

  7. Teaching antenatal counseling skills to neonatal providers.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Theophil A; Watson, Katie L; Boss, Renee D

    2014-02-01

    Counseling a family confronted with the birth of a periviable neonate is one of the most difficult tasks that a neonatologist must perform. The neonatologist's goal is to facilitate an informed, collaborative decision about whether life-sustaining therapies are in the best interest of this baby. Neonatologists are trained to provide families with a detailed account of the morbidity and mortality data they believe are necessary to facilitate a truly informed decision. Yet these complicated and intensely emotional conversations require advanced communication and counseling skills that our current fellowship-training strategies are not adequately providing. We review educational models for training neonatology fellows to provide antenatal counseling at the threshold of viability. We believe that training aimed at teaching these skills should be incorporated into the neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship. The optimal approaches for teaching these skills remain uncertain, and there is a need for continued innovation and outcomes-based research.

  8. Postnatal Treatment in Antenatally Diagnosed Meconium Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, S; Andrei, B; Oancea, M; Licsandru, E; Ivanov, M; Marcu, V; Popa-Stanila, R; Mocanu, M

    2015-01-01

    Meconium peritonitis is a rare prenatal disease with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Distinctive features revealed by prenatal and postnatal ultrasoundmay be present: abdominal calcifications, ascites, polyhydramnios, meconium pseudocyst, echogenic mass and dilated bowel or intestinal obstruction. Establishing clear postnatal treatment and prognosis is difficult because of the heterogeneity of the results obtained by ultrasound. The aim of the study is to determine how prenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis is associated with perinatal management and further evolution. Clinical results are different depending on the presence of antenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis and its form, which can be mild or severe. Surgical treatment and management of meconium peritonitis depend on the clinical presentation of the newborn. Meconium peritonitis diagnosed prenatally differs from that of the newborn, not only concerning the mortality rates but also through reduced morbidity and overall better prognosis.

  9. The Impact of Including Husbands in Antenatal Health Education Services on Maternal Health Practices in Urban Nepal: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullany, Britta C.; Becker, S.; Hindin, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Observational studies suggest that including men in reproductive health interventions can enhance positive health outcomes. A randomized controlled trial was designed to test the impact of involving male partners in antenatal health education on maternal health care utilization and birth preparedness in urban Nepal. In total, 442 women seeking…

  10. An initial assessment of the risk approach to antenatal management in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Somboonsook, B; Wakerman, J; Hattch, C T; Collison, M; Barnes, A; Kyi, W; Karim, R

    1995-09-01

    This study was the first assessment of a nationwide risk approach system to antenatal management introduced to Malaysia in 1989. Three rapid, record-based surveys on three different study groups were conducted to determine risk factor prevalence, accuracy of risk assignment, action after risk assignment and the relationship of risk level and place of delivery. The most frequent risk factors were short birth interval, high parity and first pregnancy. Accuracy of risk assignment was highest at the lowest levels of risk and poorest at the highest levels. Women at the lowest levels of risk were more likely to be seen by a doctor than women at highest risk. These was a trend to deliver in hospital, rather than at home, as level of risk increased; but many women at high risk still delivered at home. Recommendations are made on modifications to the system prior to future evaluation.

  11. Rural Gambian women's reliance on health workers to deliver sulphadoxine – pyrimethamine as recommended intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Brabin, Loretta; Stokes, Elizabeth; Dumbaya, Isatou; Owens, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of most anti-malarial medications is restricted during pregnancy, but two doses of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are recommended after the first trimester as intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp). In The Gambia, only 32% of women receive two doses and very little research has been conducted on women's awareness of drug safety during pregnancy. The objective of this paper was to assess whether rural Gambian women were aware of the importance of the timing of the two-dose IPT dose schedule and its relevance to drug safety. Methods This was a qualitative study in which 41 interviews and 16 focus group discussions with women, adolescents, men and traditional birth attendants were conducted. A generic qualitative approach was used to generate a theory as to why women might not participate in IPTp as recommended. Results Although most women used calendar months to count their stage of pregnancy, these months did not correlate with their concept of foetal development. Foetal growth was described following Islamic tradition as water, clot, piece of meat and human being, although there was little consensus about the order or timing in which these stages occurred. Common signs and conditions of malaria were known. Women were anxious about miscarriage and recognized that some medicines should not be taken in the first trimester, but were urged by men and traditional birth attendants to attend for antenatal care in the first trimester to "start treatment." General knowledge about the purpose of pregnancy medications and when they should be taken was poor among both men and women. One important result was that women relied entirely on health workers to provide safe drugs, at the correct time. Conclusion Women did not have relevant information to judge the safety and appropriate timing of pregnancy drugs, which made them over-reliant on health workers. They should be encouraged to date their own pregnancies in culturally relevant terms and to

  12. Prevalence of maternal HIV infection and knowledge on mother–to–child transmission of HIV and its prevention among antenatal care attendees in a rural area in northwest Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Feteh, Vitalis F.; Tindong, Maxime; Tanyi, John T.; Bihle, Nestor Mbinkar; Angwafo, Fru F.

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2010, an estimated 141 new HIV infections occurred per day in Cameroon and reports suggest an upsurge of these rates by 2020 if current trends continue. Mother—to—child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a major public health challenge, and maternal knowledge on HIV transmission during pregnancy and its prevention is important in curtailing paediatric HIV acquisition. Objectives We aimed at establishing the prevalence of maternal HIV infection as well as assessing knowledge on HIV, MTCT and prevention of MTCT (PMTCT) of HIV among pregnant women in a rural area of Cameroon. Methods This study was conducted in two phases: a 29 month retrospective analysis of 1866 deliveries within three rural health facilities in the Babessi sub—division, Northwest Cameroon and a 1 month prospective phase wherein 150 consenting pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) at the study centres were consecutively recruited. Results Overall, the prevalence of maternal HIV infection was 5.0% (100/2016). All (100%) of the interviewed pregnant women were aware of HIV infection and most (76.7%) had adequate knowledge on its routes of transmission. Meanwhile, only 79.3% (119/150) of them were aware of MTCT with slightly above a third (37.0%) having adequate knowledge on the periods of transmission. The proportions of women correctly stating: during pregnancy, during labour/delivery and during breastfeeding as possible periods of MTCT of HIV were 63.0%, 60.5% and 89.1% respectively. A majority (76.3%) of these women had inadequate knowledge on PMTCT of HIV. Conclusion The overall prevalence of maternal HIV warrants strengthening of current intervention strategies including scaling—up of PMTCT measures. Among others, intensification of HIV—related ANC services to improve the pregnant women’s awareness and knowledge on MTCT and its prevention are vital steps in curbing the growing burden of paediatric HIV. PMID:28199373

  13. Sociodemographic predictors of acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among pregnant women in a large maternity hospital, Omdurman, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Idris, A K M; Elsamani, E Z; Elnasri, A E A

    2015-06-09

    This study aimed to determine the sociodemographic predictors of willingness of pregnant women in Sudan to accept HIV testing. A random sample of 500 pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in Omdurman maternity hospital in 2010 were interviewed. Significant predictors of women's tendency to accept HIV testing were: age < 30 years (OR 3.5, 95% CI: 2.2-5.8), primigravida (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0-2.3), better education level (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.7-6.7), owning a radio (OR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.4), in employment (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2-5.0) and ≥ 2 antenatal care visits (OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-2.9). Husband's age ≥ 35 years (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 2.0-5.2) and Christian faith (OR 3.8, 95% CI: 1.4-10.7) were significant variables, although with a wide margin of confidence. These predictors should be considered in strategies to increase the acceptance and use of HIV testing and counselling services.

  14. Early Childhood Screen Time and Parental Attitudes Toward Child Television Viewing in a Low-Income Latino Population Attending the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

    PubMed Central

    Kair, Laura R.; Arain, Yassar H.; Cervantes, Marlene; Oreskovic, Nicolas M.; Zuckerman, Katharine E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early childhood media exposure is associated with obesity and multiple adverse health conditions. The aims of this study were to assess parental attitudes toward childhood television (TV) viewing in a low-income population and examine the extent to which child BMI, child/parent demographics, and household media environment are associated with adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for screen time. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey study of 314 parents of children ages 0–5 years surveyed in English or Spanish by self-administered questionnaire at a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) clinic in Oregon. Results: In this majority Latino sample (73%), half (53%) of the children met AAP guidelines on screen time limits, 56% met AAP guidelines for no TV in the child's bedroom, and 29% met both. Children were more likely to meet AAP guidelines when there were <2 TVs in the home, there was no TV during dinner, or their parents spent less time viewing electronic media. Parents who spent less time viewing electronic media were more likely to report believing that TV provides little value or usefulness. Conclusions: In this low-income, predominantly Latino population attending WIC, parent media-viewing and household media environment are strongly associated with child screen time. Programs aimed at reducing child screen time may benefit from interventions that address parental viewing habits. PMID:26390321

  15. Gender, pregnancy and the uptake of antenatal care services in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Zubia; Salway, Sarah M

    2007-01-01

    An integrated analysis of detailed ethnography and large-scale survey data is presented to explore the gendered influences on women's uptake of antenatal care (ANC) services in Punjab, Pakistan. Pregnancy and its associated decisions were shown to be normatively the older women's domain, with pregnant women and their husbands being distanced from the decision-making process. Women who successfully claimed ANC did so not by overtly challenging the dominant construction of young femininity, but rather by using existing gendered structures and channels of communication to influence authority figures. The quality of a woman's inter-personal ties, particularly with her mother-in-law and husband, were found to be important in accessing resources, including ANC. Gendered influences were moderated by social class. Family finances were an important determinant of ANC use, as was women's education. Wealthier, higher status women also found it easier to circumvent gendered proscriptions against their mobility while pregnant. As well as illuminating the ways in which the sociocultural construction of gender acts to constrain women's access to ANC, the empirical findings are used to highlight significant inadequacies in the 'autonomy paradigm' that has dominated much of the research into women's reproductive health in South Asia.

  16. Unrecognized sexually transmitted infections in rural South African women: a hidden epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, D.; Abdool Karim, S. S.; Harrison, A.; Lurie, M.; Colvin, M.; Connolly, C.; Sturm, A. W.

    1999-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are of major public health concern in developing countries, not least because they facilitate transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The present article presents estimates of the prevalence, on any given day, of STIs among women in rural South Africa and the proportion who are asymptomatic, symptomatic but not seeking care, and symptomatic and seeking care. The following data sources from Hlabisa district were used: clinical surveillance for STI syndromes treated in health facilities, microbiological studies among women attending antenatal and family planning clinics, and a community survey. Population census provided denominator data. Adequacy of drug treatment was determined through quality of care surveys. Of 55,974 women aged 15-49 years, a total of 13,943 (24.9%) were infected on any given day with at least one of Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, or Treponema pallidum. Of the women investigated, 6697 (48%) were asymptomatic, 6994 (50%) were symptomatic but not seeking care, 238 (1.7%) were symptomatic and would seek care, and 14 (0.3%) were seeking care on that day. Only 9 of the 14 women (65%) were adequately treated. STIs remained untreated because either women were asymptomatic or the symptoms were not recognized and acted upon. Improved case management alone is therefore unlikely to have a major public health impact. Improving partner treatment and women's awareness of symptoms is essential, while the potential of mass STI treatment needs to be explored. PMID:10063657

  17. Factors associated with pregnant women's anticipations and experiences of HIV-related stigma in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cuca, Yvette P; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Turan, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    Pregnant women who fear or experience HIV-related stigma may not get care for their own health or medications to reduce perinatal transmission of HIV. This study examined factors associated with anticipating and experiencing HIV-related stigma among 1777 pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in rural Kenya. Women were interviewed at baseline, offered HIV testing and care, and a sub-set was re-interviewed at 4-8 weeks postpartum. Women who were older, had less education, whose husbands had other wives, and who perceived community discrimination against people with HIV had significantly greater adjusted odds of anticipating HIV stigma. Over half of the HIV-positive women interviewed postpartum reported having experienced stigma, much of which was self-stigma. Women experiencing minor depression, and those whose family knew of their HIV status had significantly greater adjusted odds of experiencing stigma. Lack of women's empowerment, as well as depression, may be important risk factors for HIV-related stigma and discrimination.

  18. Male Partner’s Role during Pregnancy, Labour and Delivery: Expectations of Pregnant women in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Abiodun S.; Aboyeji, Abiodun P.; Fawole, Adegboyega A.; Balogun, Olayinka R.; Adesina, Kikelomo T.; Adeniran, Peace I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the expectations of pregnant women on the role of the male partner during conception and delivery. Methodology A prospective multi-centre observational study comprising 506 pregnant women at eight health facilities in Ilorin, Nigeria from January to June 2014. Consenting women were recruited at antenatal clinics using multistage purposive sampling and a self-administered questionnaire was administered with provision for interpreters in local dialects for those without western education. The data was analyzed using SPSS using percentages and chi-square test; p <0.05 was termed significant. Results Participants were aged 17 to 49 years (mean 30.23±4.81), 82.4% desire male partners company during antenatal clinic visits and 59.1% experienced this in index pregnancy. During labour and delivery, 427(84.4%) want company; 345(80.8%) chose the male partner with 211(57.7%) hoping men will appreciate the value of females afterwards although 27.9% feared the men may disturb the health workers, 72(14.2%) male partners attended previous delivery and 84.8% of the women were satisfied with the experience. Significant predictors of support for male partner’s presence at delivery were maternal age (p=0.001), secondary or higher education (p=0.001) and parity less than four (p=0.001); religion (x21.010; p>0.001) and social status (p>0.001) were statistically insignificant. Pregnant women wanted education for male partners on care of pregnant women (77.0%) and sex during conception (25.2%). Conclusion Parturient desire male partners’ presence at deliveries but their past participation was low; health facility modifications and education for men are required to meet the desires. PMID:26609295

  19. Complications of childbirth and maternal deaths in Kinshasa hospitals: testimonies from women and their families

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality in Kinshasa is high despite near universal availability of antenatal care and hospital delivery. Possible explanations are poor-quality care and by delays in the uptake of care. There is, however, little information on the circumstances surrounding maternal deaths. This study describes and compares the circumstances of survivors and non survivors of severe obstetric complications. Method Semi structured interviews with 208 women who survived their obstetric complication and with the families of 110 women who died were conducted at home by three experienced nurses under the supervision of EK. All the cases were identified from twelve referral hospitals in Kinshasa after admission for a serious acute obstetric complication. Transcriptions of interviews were analysed with N-Vivo 2.0 and some categories were exported to SPSS 14.0 for further quantitative analysis. Results Testimonies showed that despite attendance at antenatal care, some women were not aware of or minimized danger signs and did not seek appropriate care. Cost was a problem; 5 deceased and 4 surviving women tried to avoid an expensive caesarean section by delivering in a health centre, although they knew the risk. The majority of surviving mothers (for whom the length of stay was known) had the caesarean section on the day of admission while only about a third of those who died did so. Ten women died before the required caesarean section or blood transfusion could take place because they did not bring the money in time. Negligence and lack of staff competence contributed to the poor quality of care. Interviews revealed that patients and their families were aware of the problem, but often powerless to do anything about it. Conclusion Our findings suggest that women with serious obstetric complications have a greater chance of survival in Kinshasa if they have cash, go directly to a functioning referral hospital and have some leverage when dealing with health care staff PMID

  20. Plasmodium vivax Malaria in Pregnant Women in the Brazilian Amazon and the Risk Factors Associated with Prematurity and Low Birth Weight: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Silva dos Santos, Mônica Caroline; Lopes Simplício, Janicéia; Menezes de Medeiros, Jandira; Barroso Gomes, Kelly Cristina; de Carvalho Costa, Isabel Cristina; Batista-Silva, Eva; Teixeira do Nascimento, Cristiana; da Silva Chagas, Eda Cristina; Jardim Sardinha, José Felipe; Simões de Santana Filho, Franklin; Brock, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria species in the American region. Brazil accounts for the higher number of the malaria cases reported in pregnant women in the Americas. This study aims to describe the characteristics of pregnant women with malaria in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon and the risk factors associated with prematurity and low birth weight (LBW). Methods/Principal Findings Between December 2005 and March 2008, 503 pregnant women with malaria that attended a tertiary health centre were enrolled and followed up until delivery and reported a total of 1016 malaria episodes. More than half of study women (54%) were between 20–29 years old, and almost a third were adolescents. The prevalence of anaemia at enrolment was 59%. Most women (286/503) reported more than one malaria episode and most malaria episodes (84.5%, 846/1001) were due to P. vivax infection. Among women with only P. vivax malaria, the risk of preterm birth and low birth weight decreased in multigravidae (OR, 0.36 [95% CI, 0.16–0.82]; p = 0.015 and OR 0.24 [95% CI, 0.10–0.58]; p = 0.001, respectively). The risk of preterm birth decreased with higher maternal age (OR 0.43 [95% CI, 0.19–0.95]; p = 0.037) and among those women who reported higher antenatal care (ANC) attendance (OR, 0.32 [95% CI, 0.15–0.70]; p = 0.005). Conclusion This study shows that P. vivax is the prevailing species among pregnant women with malaria in the region and shows that vivax clinical malaria may represent harmful consequences for the health of the mother and their offsprings particularly on specific groups such as adolescents, primigravidae and those women with lower ANC attendance. PMID:26675007

  1. On the socio-economic determinants of antenatal care utilization in Azerbaijan: evidence and policy implications for reforms.

    PubMed

    Habibov, Nazim N

    2011-04-01

    Azerbaijan is a country with one of the highest child mortality rates in the regions of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Drawing on the nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey, this study examines the utilization of antenatal care in Azerbaijan to identify the socio-economic determinants of the usage, and its frequency, timing and quality. Consequently, binomial logit, two ordered logit and negative binomial regression models are specified to estimate the effect of various socio-economic characteristics on the likelihood of utilization. Place of living is an important determinant of antenatal healthcare utilization in Azerbaijan. It is important in determining the likelihood of utilization, its timing and quality of care received, whereas it is not significant in the model predicting the frequency of antenatal utilization. Women's education is also significant in three models out of four. Education is important in explaining the frequency and timing of utilization as well as the quality of services received, but it is not significant in predicting the likelihood of utilization. Wealth gradient is another important determinant of antenatal care utilization in Azerbaijan inasmuch as it is significant in explaining the likelihood of prenatal care utilization and its frequency. In addition, two variables, birth order and desirability of the last child or current pregnancy, are significant only in explaining the likelihood of utilization. Therefore, we confirm the findings of previous studies, which reported that the utilization of prenatal health care is a multistage process in which decisions are sequential. Although the same set of factors may affect decision-making at all stages, the effect of these factors is different at different stages. Implications for reforms in the healthcare sector to improve antenatal care utilization in Azerbaijan are provided and discussed.

  2. Lay support for pregnant women with social risk: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Sara; Jolly, Kate; Hemming, Karla; Hope, Lucy; Blissett, Jackie; Dann, Sophie-Anna; Lilford, Richard; MacArthur, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought evidence of effectiveness of lay support to improve maternal and child outcomes in disadvantaged families. Design Prospective, pragmatic, individually randomised controlled trial. Setting 3 Maternity Trusts in West Midlands, UK. Participants Following routine midwife systematic assessment of social risk factors, 1324 nulliparous women were assigned, using telephone randomisation, to standard maternity care, or addition of referral to a Pregnancy Outreach Worker (POW) service. Those under 16 years and teenagers recruited to the Family Nurse Partnership trial were excluded. Interventions POWs were trained to provide individual support and case management for the women including home visiting from randomisation to 6 weeks after birth. Standard maternity care (control) included provision for referring women with social risk factors to specialist midwifery services, available to both arms. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were antenatal visits attended and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) 8–12 weeks postpartum. Prespecified, powered, subgroup comparison was among women with 2 or more social risks. Secondary outcomes included maternal and neonatal birth outcomes; maternal self-efficacy, and mother-to-infant bonding at 8–12 weeks; child development assessment at 6 weeks, breastfeeding at 6 weeks, and immunisation uptake at 4 months, all collected from routine child health systems. Results Antenatal attendances were high in the standard care control and did not increase further with addition of the POW intervention (10.1 vs 10.1 (mean difference; MD) −0.00, 95% CI (95% CI −0.37 to 0.37)). In the powered subgroup of women with 2 or more social risk factors, mean EPDS (MD −0.79 (95% CI −1.56 to −0.02) was significantly better, although for all women recruited, no significant differences were seen (MD −0.59 (95% CI −1.24 to 0.06). Mother-to-infant bonding was significantly better in the intervention group

  3. Migrant maternity in an era of superdiversity: New migrants' access to, and experience of, antenatal care in the West Midlands, UK.

    PubMed

    Phillimore, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Rapid increase in the scale, speed and spread of immigration over the past two decades has led to an increase in complexity of populations termed superdiversity. Concerns have been expressed about impacts of the pressure that superdiversity is said to place upon maternity services. High migrant fertility and infant and maternal mortality rates have long been observed in diverse areas with inadequate antenatal monitoring seen as a major causal factor in migrants' maternity outcomes. Using qualitative data from a study of new migrants' access to maternity services in the UK's West Midlands region, with some of the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in Europe, this paper looks at the reasons migrants' access to antenatal care is poor. The paper finds that contrary to earlier studies which pointed to a lack of priority placed on such care by migrants, a combination of structural, legal and institutional barriers prevent migrant women accessing effective antenatal care.

  4. Pregnancy and the maintenance of self-identity: implications for antenatal care in the community.

    PubMed

    Earle, Sarah

    2000-07-01

    It is widely acknowledged that many women prefer to receive their antenatal care in the community. This paper explores one explanation for why this may be the case. The paper is based on a qualitative study of 19 primagravidae, aged between 16 and 30 years, who were interviewed using the technique of repeated in-depth interviewing. The aim of the research was to explore the relationship between women's experiences of pregnancy and the maintenance of self-identity during this time. The research findings indicate that the relationship between the midwife and her antenatal patient can foster both a sense of similarity to others and a sense of personal uniqueness, which appear essential to the maintenance of self-identity during pregnancy. Good communication seems to be an essential tool for the community midwife, as it allows patients to normalise their experiences and yet feel that their experiences of pregnancy are unique. The findings indicate that continuity of care may be important in fostering a sense of similarity to others and that continuity of carer may be required to ensure uniqueness.

  5. Do Malawian women critically assess the quality of care? A qualitative study on women’s perceptions of perinatal care at a district hospital in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malawi has a high perinatal mortality rate of 40 deaths per 1,000 births. To promote neonatal health, the Government of Malawi has identified essential health care packages for improving maternal and neonatal health in health care facilities. However, regardless of the availability of health services, women’s perceptions of the care is important as it influences whether the women will or will not use the services. In Malawi 95% of pregnant women receive antenatal care from skilled attendants, but the number is reduced to 71% deliveries being conducted by skilled attendants. The objective of this study was to describe women’s perceptions on perinatal care among the women delivered at a district hospital. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using semi-structured interview guides collecting information on women’s perceptions on perinatal care. A total of 14 in depth interviews were conducted with women delivering at Chiradzulu District Hospital from February to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum. They were also asked about the information they received during provision of care. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Two themes from the study were good care and unsatisfactory care. Subthemes under good care were: respect, confidentiality, privacy and normal delivery. Providers’ attitude, delay in providing care, inadequate care, and unavailability of delivery attendants were subthemes under unsatisfactory care. Conclusions Although the results show that women wanted to be well received at health facilities, respected, treated with kindness, dignity and not shouted at, they were not critical of the care they received. The women did not know the quality of care to expect because they were not well informed. The

  6. Consequences of Missed Opportunities for HIV Testing during Pregnancy and Delayed Diagnosis for Mexican Women, Children and Male Partners

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Tamil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction HIV testing during pregnancy permits prevention of vertical (mother-to-child) transmission and provides an opportunity for women living with HIV to access treatment for their own health. In 2001, Mexico’s National HIV Action Plan committed to universal offer of HIV testing to pregnant women, but in 2011, only 45.6% of women who attended antenatal care (ANC) were tested for HIV. The study objective was to document the consequences of missed opportunities for HIV testing and counseling during pregnancy and late HIV diagnosis for Mexican women living with HIV and their families. Methods Semi-structured-interviews with 55 women living with HIV who had had a pregnancy since 2001 were completed between 2009 and 2011. Interviews were analyzed thematically using a priori and inductive codes. Results Consistent with national statistics, less than half of the women living with HIV (42%) were offered HIV testing and counseling during ANC. When not diagnosed during ANC, women had multiple contacts with the health-care system due to their own and other family members’ AIDS-related complications before being diagnosed. Missed opportunities for HIV testing and counseling during antenatal care and health-care providers failure to recognize AIDS-related complications resulted in pediatric HIV infections, AIDS-related deaths of children and male partners, and HIV disease progression among women and other family members. In contrast, HIV diagnosis permitted timely access to interventions to prevent vertical HIV transmission and long-term care and treatment for women living with HIV. Conclusions Omissions of the offer of HIV testing and counseling in ANC and health-care providers’ failure to recognize AIDS-related complications had negative health, economic and emotional consequences. Scaling-up provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling within and beyond antenatal care and pre-service and in-service trainings on HIV and AIDS for health-care providers can hasten

  7. Intrauterine Growth Restriction: Antenatal and Postnatal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Shastri, Sweta; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a condition that occurs due to various reasons, is an important cause of fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. It has been defined as a rate of fetal growth that is less than normal in light of the growth potential of that specific infant. Usually, IUGR and small for gestational age (SGA) are used interchangeably in literature, even though there exist minute differences between them. SGA has been defined as having birth weight less than two standard deviations below the mean or less than the 10th percentile of a population-specific birth weight for specific gestational age. These infants have many acute neonatal problems that include perinatal asphyxia, hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and polycythemia. The likely long-term complications that are prone to develop when IUGR infants grow up includes growth retardation, major and subtle neurodevelopmental handicaps, and developmental origin of health and disease. In this review, we have covered various antenatal and postnatal aspects of IUGR. PMID:27441006

  8. Swaziland's Traditional Birth Attendants Survey.

    PubMed

    Lech, M M; Mngadi, T P

    2005-12-01

    The Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) Survey in Swaziland was undertaken between March 27th 1996 and April 8th 1996. The objective of the survey was to generate reliable information regarding activities of TBAs in Swaziland. The survey was conducted in 25 Chiefdoms sampled out of a total of 206 Chiefdoms registered in Swaziland. The total number of sampled respondents in the 25 Chiefdoms was 721. From the survey, it is estimated that there were probably 3000 TBAs in the country, and in the majority of cases such TBAs would be a 51-year old woman who herself had delivered six children and had worked as a TBA for at least 10 years. Between 9,000 and 12,000 deliveries are estimated to take place out of health facilities. Of these many, nearly 43.5% are assisted by "TBAs"; 16.3% of woman interviewed deliver relative/family member and 15.1% are assisted by friends/neighbours, etc. Some of TBAs carry out procedures which are considered to be potentially harmful. Nearly 30% of TBAs have administered herbs; 45% attend to abnormal deliveries (breech and multiple pregnancies); 26.7% re-use their cord cutting tools and in the case of haemorrhage 23.4% do manual procedures within reproductive tract of delivering women.

  9. Proportion and Factors Associated with late Antenatal Care Booking among Pregnant Mothers in Gondar Town, North West Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gudayu, Temesgen W

    2015-06-01

    The proportion of pregnant women initiating prenatal care during first trimester pregnancy is one of the standard clinical performance measures to assess the quality of maternal health care. Aiming to assess the proportion and factors associated with late booking at antenatal care, this health-institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2012 among 390 pregnant mothers in Gondar town. The proportion of late entry to antenatal care was 64.9% with the mean time being 4.5 ± 1.8 months of pregnancy. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that respondents who didn't get information on correct time of booking, perceived the right time of booking beyond 12 weeks of pregnancy, were not autonomous to use antenatal care and recognized their pregnancy by missing periods were more likely to book late. Late booking was high in the study area. Empowering women and providing information, education and communication with emphasis on timely booking is important.

  10. Low seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 among pregnant women in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Silman; Toure Kane, Coumba; Legoff, Jérôme; Gaye, Astou Gueye; Mboup, Souleymane; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is considered as a major co-factor of both sexual transmission and acquisition of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The HIV epidemic in Senegal is characterized by a remarkable and stable low prevalence. Whether HSV-2 may also constitute a possible co-factor favouring the spreading of HIV epidemic in Senegal is yet unknown. This prompted us to evaluate the HSV-2 seroprevalence in the sentinel population of pregnant women in Senegal. Two hundred and sixty pregnant women attending Roi Baudouin maternity in the capital city Dakar (n = 14; 135) and the antenatal clinic in Kaolack (n = 125), the third city of Senegal, were prospectively recruited between March and August 2003. Fifty-six women (22%) were positive for HSV-2 serology. The prevalence of HSV-2 seropositivity was higher in women living in Dakar (26%) than in those living in Kaolack (16%) (P < 0.01). Only two women from Dakar and two other from Kaolack were found to be HIV-1-infected. Our observations suggest a seemingly low seroprevalence of HSV-2 infection in adult women Senegal, comparable with those usually reported in Western countries. Further, epidemiological surveys are needed to confirm these results in the general population.

  11. Infant mortality in a deprived area of Papua New Guinea: priorities for antenatal services and health education.

    PubMed

    Garner, P; Heywood, P; Baea, M; Lai, D; Smith, T

    1996-03-01

    This cross-sectional study of women was conducted in a deprived area of Papua New Guinea with an estimated infant mortality rate of 133/1000 live births. Mortality patterns derived from birth histories showed that neonatal deaths contribute proportionally more to infant mortality than postneonatal deaths, emphasizing the need for better care at delivery. To examine possible mechanisms for intervention, pregnant women were interviewed to determine patterns of antenatal clinic use, antimalarial drugs and micronutrient supplements given, and how much the women smoked. The results showed that the health system was failing to implement current routine supplementation and prophylaxis regimens, and that there was a need to revise national guidelines. A large proportion of pregnant women smoked during pregnancy, and this behaviour could be a target for future public health campaigns and health worker promotion advice to women.

  12. Making Connections: Attending Professional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherrstrom, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Attending a professional conference is an effective way to explore and advance knowledge, skills, and careers. For graduate students, attending a conference is an effective way to explore academic fields and new professions. However, attending a professional conference requires precious resources--time and money--so the decision to attend, or not,…

  13. Antenatal corticosteroids for maturity of term or near term fetuses: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids given at ≥34 weeks’ gestation. Design Systematic review with meta-analysis. Data sources Electronic databases were searched from their inception to February 2016. Eligibility criteria for study selection Randomized clinical trials comparing antenatal corticosteroids with placebo or no treatment in women with a singleton pregnancy at ≥34 weeks’ gestation. Trials on antenatal steroids in women expected to deliver late preterm (340-366 weeks) and trials given before planned cesarean delivery at term (≥37 weeks) were included. Data synthesis The primary outcome was the incidence of severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The summary measures were reported as relative risks or mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results Six trials, including 5698 singleton pregnancies, were analyzed. Three included 3200 women at 340-366 weeks’ gestation and at risk of imminent premature delivery at the time of hospital admission. The three other trials included 2498 women undergoing planned cesarean delivery at ≥37 weeks. Overall, infants of mothers who received antenatal corticosteroids at ≥34 weeks had a significantly lower risk of RDS (relative risk 0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.91), mild RDS (0.67, 0.46 to 0.96), moderate RDS (0.39, 0.18 to 0.89), transient tachypnea of the newborn (0.56, 0.37 to 0.86), severe RDS (0.55, 0.33 to 0.91), use of surfactant, and mechanical ventilation, and a significantly lower time receiving oxygen (mean difference −2.06 hours, 95% confidence interval −2.17 to −1.95), lower maximum inspired oxygen concentration (−0.66%, −0.69% to −0.63%), shorter stay on a neonatal intensive care unit (−7.64 days, −7.65 to −7.64), and higher APGAR scores compared with controls. Infants of mothers who received antenatal betamethasone at 340-366 weeks’ gestation had a significantly lower incidence of transient tachypnea of the newborn

  14. Impact of intimate partner violence on anxiety and depression amongst women in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Mapayi, Boladale; Makanjuola, R O A; Mosaku, S K; Adewuya, O A; Afolabi, O; Aloba, O O; Akinsulore, A

    2013-02-01

    Research into intimate partner violence in the Nigerian environment has been limited. The objective of this study was to determine, amongst a sample of women attending the Enuwa Primary Health Care Center, Ile-Ife, the association between intimate partner violence and anxiety/depression. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 373 women who attended the antenatal clinic and welfare units of a primary health centre in Ile-Ife using the Composite Abuse Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a socio-demographic scale as instruments. Slightly over a third (36.7 %) reported intimate partner violence within the past year, 5.6 % had anxiety and 15.5 % were depressed. Anxiety and depression in the respondents were significantly associated with intimate partner violence. Women were ten times more likely to report being depressed and 17 times more likely to report anxiety if they were in violent relationships. This research has shown that the magnitude of intimate partner violence within the study population is comparable to those found in the developing countries. There are significant associations between intimate partner violence, anxiety and depression amongst the study population and this fact undoubtedly has implications for the mental health of the Nigerian woman.

  15. Sexually transmitted pathogens in pregnant women in a rural South African community.

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, N; Hoosen, A A; Kharsany, A B; van den Ende, J

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and ninety three consecutive pregnant women attending peripheral antenatal clinics attached to Ngwelezana Hospital, Empangeni, Kwa-Zulu, were examined for evidence of sexually transmitted pathogens. The following incidences were found: Trichomonas vaginalis 49.2% (95), Candida spp 38.3% (74), Chlamydia trachomatis 11.4% (22), Gardnerella vaginalis 6.2% (12), Neisseria gonorrhoeae 5.7% (11), positive syphilis serology results 11.9% (23), hepatitis B surface antigen 4.1% (eight). No woman had antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Dyskaryotic smears were found in 20 (10.4%). Human papillomavirus (HPV) was detected cytologically in 11 (5.7%). The range of sexually transmitted pathogens found in this rural community was similar to that found in urban groups studied in South Africa. PMID:2807289

  16. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  17. School Counselors Improving Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, LaWanda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of interventions used to address attendance issues at a middle school located in the Southern United States. School-wide interventions were implemented to address absenteeism of all students and individual interventions were implemented to address absenteeism with targeted students. An explanation of each…

  18. Student Attendance Accounting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitas, Joseph M.

    In response to state legislation authorizing procedures for changes in academic calendars and measurement of student workload in California community colleges, this manual from the Chancellor's Office provides guidelines for student attendance accounting. Chapter 1 explains general items such as the academic calendar, admissions policies, student…

  19. Women Students at Coeducational and Women's Colleges: How Do Their Experiences Compare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzie, Jillian L.; Thomas, Auden D.; Palmer, Megan M.; Umbach, Paul D.; Kuh, George D.

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the experiences of women attending women's colleges with those of women attending coeducational institutions. Analyses of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) from random samples of female first-year and senior students from 26 women's colleges and 264 other four-year institutions were conducted. Women at…

  20. The Effect of Combined Antenatal and Postnatal Counselling on Postpartum Modern Contraceptive Use: Prospective Case-Control Study in Kocaeli, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Birol; Cakiroglu, Yigit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The integration of family planning education into obstetric care has been suggested to increase postpartum contraception use. However, ideal time and type of counseling is controversial. There is no prospective study about combining prenatal and postnatal education on the postpartum modern contraceptive use (PPMC). Aim This study was aimed to explore the effects of the addition of postpartum contraceptive counselling to antenatal education on PPMC. Materials and Methods Family planning counselling was given to all participating patients throughout antenatal care (ANC) via brief communications. After delivery, the women were categorised into two age-matched groups with a 1:1 allocation ratio in the order of the birth date. No further intervention was performed for Group I (n: 98). Women in Group II (n: 102) received further contraceptive education at six weeks after hospital discharge. Six months after delivery, PPMC was compared between the two groups. Results PPMC was similar between Group I and II (p>0.05). Previous contraceptive experiences, obstetric care service intensity and partner’s support were the factors related to postnatal contraceptive use. Logistic regression analysis showed that PPMC was independent of confounding factors in each group. Conclusion The addition of postnatal counseling to antenatal one did not further increase PPMC. The results of this study suggested that family planning counseling should be provided antenatally. PMID:27190896

  1. Voluntary counseling and HIV testing for pregnant women in the Kassena-Nankana district of northern Ghana: is couple counseling the way forward?

    PubMed

    Baiden, Frank; Remes, P; Baiden, R; Williams, J; Hodgson, A; Boelaert, M; Buve, A

    2005-07-01

    This study reports the results of a cross-sectional questionnaire survey undertaken in the Kassena-Nankana district of Ghana to assess the perception and attitude of 270 antenatal clinic attendants towards voluntary counseling and HIV testing. It was found that although 92.6% (95% CI 88.8-95.4) of respondents indicated a willingness to get tested, only 51% (95% CI 45.0-57.2) considered HIV testing for pregnant women to be useful. Most (93.6%) indicated they would like their husbands (partners) to know the result of the test and 52.2% indicated that their husbands would be willing to accompany them to antenatal clinic (ANC) at least once during the pregnancy. The perception of the usefulness of HIV testing (OR = 8.5, 95% CI 1.8-40.0), the willingness to disclose test result to the husband (OR = 13.3, 95% CI 4.0-44.5) and perceived willingness of husband to accompany wife to antenatal clinic (OR = 5.2, 95% CI 1.4-19.8) were found to be independent predictors of a woman's willingness to get tested. The willingness to disclose test result to husband (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-10.5) and knowledge of at least one mode of MTCT HIV transmission (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.6) were found to be independent predictors of a woman's perception that getting tested was useful. The results suggest that for pregnant women in this district, the willingness to get tested for HIV does not equate with the perception of the test's usefulness, and that spouses are likely to exert strong influence on the attitude of pregnant women towards VCT. Couple counseling facilitated through couple-friendly ANC services should be explored as strategy for the intended VCT program in this district.

  2. Testing for HIV in the antenatal clinic: the views of midwives.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J; Catalan, J; Sherr, L; Stone, Y; Gazzard, B

    1992-01-01

    Self administered questionnaires were given to 34 midwives, who regularly counsel parturient women about the HIV antibody test, to investigate their attitudes to the test being offered in the antenatal clinic. Most of the midwives felt that testing should not be compulsory and that the test should be offered to all pregnant women who ask for it, not only those in recognized risk groups. Most also felt that women should be told the results of the test and that it should not be the midwives aim to increase the number of women having the test. Most felt that all midwives should counsel about the test but would like health advisers, GPs and obstetricians to be involved also. They also felt that they did not have sufficient knowledge in some areas to counsel particularly with regard to the practical and psychological implications of being HIV positive. This has implications in terms of the provision of adequate pre-test counselling for all pregnant women as an improvement in counselling services requires an allocation of finances, e.g. for training of midwives, which may be seen as unnecessary in areas of low seroprevalence. Further discussion and debate of these issues is required.

  3. Couples' voluntary counselling and testing and nevirapine use in antenatal clinics in two African capitals: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With the accessibility of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) services in sub-Saharan Africa, more women are being tested for HIV in antenatal care settings. Involving partners in the counselling and testing process could help prevent horizontal and vertical transmission of HIV. This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of couples' voluntary counseling and testing (CVCT) in antenatal care and to measure compliance with PMTCT. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted over eight months at two public antenatal clinics in Kigali, Rwanda, and Lusaka, Zambia. A convenience sample of 3625 pregnant women was enrolled. Of these, 1054 women were lost to follow up. The intervention consisted of same-day individual voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) and weekend CVCT; HIV-positive participants received nevirapine tablets. In Kigali, nevirapine syrup was provided in the labour and delivery ward; in Lusaka, nevirapine syrup was supplied in pre-measured single-dose syringes. The main outcome measures were nurse midwife-recorded deliveries and reported nevirapine use. Results In eight months, 1940 women enrolled in Kigali (984 VCT, 956 CVCT) and 1685 women enrolled in Lusaka (1022 VCT, 663 CVCT). HIV prevalence was 14% in Kigali, and 27% in Lusaka. Loss to follow up was more common in Kigali than Lusaka (33% vs. 24%, p = 0.000). In Lusaka, HIV-positive and HIV-negative women had significantly different loss-to-follow-up rates (30% vs. 22%, p = 0.002). CVCT was associated with reduced loss to follow up: in Kigali, 31% of couples versus 36% of women testing alone (p = 0.011); and in Lusaka, 22% of couples versus 25% of women testing alone (p = 0.137). Among HIV-positive women with follow up, CVCT had no impact on nevirapine use (86-89% in Kigali; 78-79% in Lusaka). Conclusions Weekend CVCT, though new, was feasible in both capital cities. The beneficial impact of CVCT on loss to follow up was significant, while nevirapine compliance was

  4. Antenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome: how good is state of the art.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Riju; Varghese, Raji Mathew; Puliyel, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A newborn with Down syndrome can be expected once in a thousand deliveries. Amniocentesis for karyotyping of foetal cells or detection of foetal cell in the maternal circulation ie, fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH) and karyotyping, are definitive methods of making the diagnosis antenatally. The cost of doing this routinely in all pregnancies is prohibitive. This has led to dependence on screening tests, to select women more likely to be carrying a Down foetus, to offer karyotyping in a more cost efficient manner. Unfortunately, these screening criteria, namely maternal age, biochemical markers and ultrasound pointers, are rather insensitive and miss a large number of cases of Down syndrome. At the same time they are very non-specific, picking up a large number of false positive cases, resulting in undue anxiety and unnecessary alarm in a large number of mothers. Till a non-invasive, definitive test, like FISH can be routinely used in all pregnancies at affordable costs, accurate antenatal diagnosis on a community basis will be a hit and miss affair.

  5. Antenatal depression and antidepressants during pregnancy: unraveling the complex interactions for the offspring.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström Poromaa, Inger

    2015-04-15

    During pregnancy the risk for a woman to develop a depressive episode is as high as 20%. Antenatal depression is not harmless for the developing child as several changes, including neurodevelopmental alterations, have been reported. Sometimes it is unavoidable to treat a pregnant mother with antidepressants, especially when she is suicidal. Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the pharmacological choice of antidepressant treatment. SSRIs do not cause gross teratogenic alterations and are generally considered safe for use in pregnancy. However, although SSRIs may relieve the maternal symptoms, they definitively cross the placenta partially influencing the neurodevelopment of the fetus. In this review an overview is given of the effects on the offspring of maternal antenatal depression and the putative neurodevelopmental effects of SSRI treatment during pregnancy. Although we primarily focus on human data, some animal data are discussed to describe possible mechanisms on how SSRIs are affecting underlying biological mechanisms associated with depression. In summary, maternal depression may have long-lasting effects on the offspring, whereas prenatal SSRI exposure also increases the risk for long-lasting effects. It remains to be determined whether the effects found after SSRI treatment in pregnant women are only due to the SSRI exposure or if the underlying depression is also contributing to these effects. The possibility of epigenetic alterations as one of the underlying mechanisms that is altered by SSRI exposure is discussed. However much more research in this area is needed to explain the exact role of epigenetic mechanisms in SSRI exposure during pregnancy.

  6. Intra-amniotic LPS and antenatal betamethasone: inflammation and maturation in preterm lamb lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, Elke; Collins, Jennifer J. P.; Kramer, Boris W.; Ofman, Gaston; Nitsos, Ilias; Pillow, J. Jane; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Gavilanes, Antonio W. D.; Nowacki, Relana; Ikegami, Machiko; Jobe, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    The proinflammatory stimulus of chorioamnionitis is commonly associated with preterm delivery. Women at risk of preterm delivery receive antenatal glucocorticoids to functionally mature the fetal lung. However, the effects of the combined exposures of chorioamnionitis and antenatal glucocorticoids on the fetus are poorly understood. Time-mated ewes with singleton fetuses received an intra-amniotic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either preceding or following maternal intramuscular betamethasone 7 or 14 days before delivery, and the fetuses were delivered at 120 days gestational age (GA) (term = 150 days GA). Gestation matched controls received intra-amniotic and maternal intramuscular saline. Compared with saline controls, intra-amniotic LPS increased inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage and myeloperoxidase, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 mRNA, PU.1, CD3, and Foxp3-positive cells in the fetal lung. LPS-induced lung maturation measured as increased airway surfactant and improved lung gas volumes. Intra-amniotic LPS-induced inflammation persisted until 14 days after exposure. Betamethasone treatment alone induced modest lung maturation but, when administered before intra-amniotic LPS, suppressed lung inflammation. Interestingly, betamethasone treatment after LPS did not counteract inflammation but enhanced lung maturation. We conclude that the order of exposures of intra-amniotic LPS or maternal betamethasone had large effects on fetal lung inflammation and maturation. PMID:22160306

  7. Quality of antenatal and childbirth care in northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Duysburgh, E; Williams, A; Williams, J; Loukanova, S; Temmerman, M

    2014-09-01

    The QUALMAT research project aims to improve maternal and newborn health by improving the quality of antenatal and childbirth care provided in primary healthcare facilities. Within the frame of this project, a comprehensive quality assessment took place in selected health centres in northern Ghana. The results of this assessment showed that overall quality of routine antenatal and childbirth care was satisfactory, although some critical gaps were identified. Counselling and health education practices need to be improved; laboratory investigations are often not performed; examination and monitoring of mother and newborn during childbirth are inadequate; partographs are often not used and poorly completed; and equipment to provide assisted vaginal deliveries was absent.

  8. HIV/AIDS stigma and refusal of HIV testing among pregnant women in rural Kenya: results from the MAMAS Study.

    PubMed

    Turan, Janet M; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Onono, Maricianah; Holzemer, William L; Miller, Suellen; Cohen, Craig R

    2011-08-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma is a common thread in the narratives of pregnant women affected by HIV/AIDS globally and may be associated with refusal of HIV testing. We conducted a cross-sectional study of women attending antenatal clinics in Kenya (N = 1525). Women completed an interview with measures of HIV/AIDS stigma and subsequently information on their acceptance of HIV testing was obtained from medical records. Associations of stigma measures with HIV testing refusal were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Rates of anticipated HIV/AIDS stigma were high-32% anticipated break-up of their relationship, and 45% anticipated losing their friends. Women who anticipated male partner stigma were more than twice as likely to refuse HIV testing, after adjusting for other individual-level predictors (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.15-3.85). This study demonstrated quantitatively that anticipations of HIV/AIDS stigma can be barriers to acceptance of HIV testing by pregnant women and highlights the need to develop interventions that address pregnant women's fears of HIV/AIDS stigma and violence from male partners.

  9. Maternal health care amid political unrest: the effect of armed conflict on antenatal care utilization in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Price, James I; Bohara, Alok K

    2013-05-01

    Armed conflicts, which primarily occur in low- and middle-income countries, have profound consequences for the health of affected populations, among them a decrease in the utilization of maternal health care services. The quantitative relationship between armed conflict and maternal health care utilization has received limited attention in the public health literature. We evaluate this relationship for a particular type of health care service, antenatal care, in Nepal. Using count regression techniques, household survey data and sub-national conflict data, we find a negative correlation between the number of antenatal care visits and incidents of conflict-related violence within a respondent's village development committee. Specifically, we find that under high-intensity conflict conditions women receive between 0.3 and 1.5 fewer antenatal care check-ups. These findings imply that maternal health care utilization is partially determined by characteristics of the social environment (e.g. political instability) and suggest health care providers need to revise maternal health strategies in conflict-affected areas. Strategies may include decentralization of services, maintaining neutrality among factions, strengthening community-based health services and developing mobile clinics.

  10. Congenital microvillous inclusion disease presenting as antenatal bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kennea, N; Norbury, R; Anderson, G; Tekay, A

    2001-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound has led to confidence in the antenatal diagnosis of intestinal obstruction allowing counseling and birth planning. We describe a male infant of a diabetic mother who had an antenatal diagnosis of distal bowel obstruction. This baby was subsequently found not to have bowel obstruction, but a congenital enteropathy - microvillous inclusion disease. The antenatal scans had demonstrated polyhydramnios as well as multiple fluid-filled dilated loops of bowel in the fetal abdomen. To our knowledge, similar prenatal ultrasound findings have not been previously described in this condition. The baby was delivered in a pediatric surgical center and postnatally there was no evidence of bowel obstruction either clinically or on abdominal X-ray. This baby initially fed well, but became collapsed and acidotic on his third day, having lost 26% of his birth weight due to excessive stool loss. The diagnosis of microvillous inclusion disease was made by electron microscopy of a small bowel biopsy. Congenital microvillous inclusion disease is a very rare inherited enteropathy with high mortality and morbidity. This condition, and other enteropathies, should be considered in cases in which antenatally diagnosed bowel obstruction is not confirmed after birth.

  11. Sacro-coccigeal teratoma: antenatal diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, M; Morales, V; Gallina, D; Ferrari, A

    1999-05-01

    We report a case of sacro-coccygeal teratoma (ScT) in a 29 years old primigravida at 19 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonographic evaluation in antenatal management of these abnormalities is discussed. The main sonographic criteria appear to be two: dimension and rapid growth of the tumour. Cariotype must be performed to exclude aneuploidy, frequently associated.

  12. Mothers' Antenatal Depression and Their Children's Antisocial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Dale F.; Pawlby, Susan; Waters, Cerith S.; Perra, Oliver; Sharp, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Interviews of 120 British adolescents and their parents (80% of a random sample of antenatal patients drawn from a representative urban population and followed longitudinally) revealed that 40 (33%) had been arrested and/or had a diagnosis of "DSM-IV" conduct disorder by 16 years of age; of those, 18 (45%) had committed violent acts.…

  13. Severe antenatally diagnosed renal disorders: background, prognosis and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Aulbert, Wiebke; Kemper, Markus J

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays most renal disorders, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease, are diagnosed antenatally. In cases of severe bilateral disease, intrauterine renal dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios (ROH), resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia which affects perinatal mortality and morbidity as well as the long-term outcome. However, some infants may only have mild pulmonary and renal disease, and advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcome even in those infants with severe ROH. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and clinical experience of patients presenting antenatally with severe bilateral renal disorders and ROH. By addressing underlying mechanisms, intrauterine tools of diagnosis and treatment as well as published outcome data, we hope to improve antenatal counselling and postnatal care. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Nowadays most renal disorders are diagnosed antenatally, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease. 2. Severe kidney dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios, which can cause pulmonary hypoplasia and is a risk factor of perinatal mortality and postnatal renal outcome. However, as considerable clinical heterogeneity is present, outcome predictions need to be treated with caution. 3. Advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcomes even in infants with severe renal oligohydramnios. 4. A multidisciplinary approach with specialist input is required when counselling a family with an ROH-affected fetus as the decision-making process is very challenging.

  14. Neuromodulation and antenatal depression: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deborah R; Snell, Jessica L; Ewing, Grace C; O’Reardon, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression during pregnancy affects 5%–8% of women. While the percentage of women in the US taking serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy has risen over the last decade, pregnant women continue to report that they prefer non-pharmacologic interventions. Objective We review the literature regarding neuromodulation techniques for major depressive disorder during pregnancy. The rationale for their use in this population, new developments, and future directions are discussed. Methods A literature search was conducted in PubMed Plus, Ovid Medline, and Embase to collect all articles on neuromodulation for the treatment of depression during pregnancy. Key search words included electroconvulsive therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, neuromodulation, depression, and pregnancy. Given the sparse literature, all articles from 1960 to 2014 that addressed the use of neuromodulation in pregnancy were included. Conclusion The data support the use of electroconvulsive therapy in all trimesters of pregnancy for major depressive disorder. New data are emerging for the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation in pregnancy, which is likely safe, but more data are needed before it can be recommended as a primary treatment modality during pregnancy. Other neuromodulation techniques have not been well studied in this population. PMID:25897234

  15. Dopamine receptor polymorphism modulates the relation between antenatal maternal anxiety and fetal movement.

    PubMed

    Kaitz, Marsha; Mankuta, David; Rokem, Ann Marie; Faraone, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    We determined whether the combination of fetal genotype (dopamine D4 receptor; DRD4) and mothers' anxiety during pregnancy is associated with fetal behavior. Two hundred and six pregnant women underwent an ultrasound exam. Fetal movement measures (Movement Frequency, Total Activity, Movement Duration, and Longest Quiet Time) were derived from off-line coding. A moderating role of the DRD4-III polymorphism was found: Results indicate that higher levels of antenatal maternal anxiety symptoms were associated with more frequent fetal movements among fetuses carrying a 7R allele, but not among fetuses carrying shorter alleles. Total Activity did not show full moderation by DRD4, though the measure was correlated with maternal anxiety among fetuses in the Anxious Group with a 7R allele; not among fetuses without both factors. The findings provide the first evidence of a GXE interaction in association with fetal behavior. Results also demonstrate that some individuals are inherently more susceptible to uterine environmental influences than are others.

  16. High prevalence of curable sexually transmitted infections among pregnant women in a rural county hospital in Kilifi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wahome, Elizabeth; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Cools, Piet; Crucitti, Tania; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women attending antenatal care (ANC) in resource-limited countries are frequently screened for syphilis and HIV, but rarely for other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We assessed the prevalence of curable STIs, defined as infection with either Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Trichomonas vaginalis, from July to September 2015. Methods In a cross-sectional study, women attending ANC at the Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya, had a urine sample tested for C. trachomatis/N. gonorrhoeae by GeneXpert® and a vaginal swab for T. vaginalis by culture. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was defined as a Nugent score of 7–10 of the Gram stain of a vaginal smear in combination with self-reported vaginal discharge. Genital ulcers were observed during collection of vaginal swabs. All women responded to questions on socio-demographics and sexual health and clinical symptoms of STIs. Predictors for curable STIs were assessed in multivariable logistic regression. Results A total of 42/202 (20.8%, 95% confidence interval (CI):15.4–27.0) women had a curable STI. The prevalence was 14.9% for C. trachomatis (95% CI:10.2–20.5), 1.0% for N. gonorrhoeae (95% CI: 0.1–3.5), 7.4% for T. vaginalis (95% CI:4.2–12.0), 19.3% for BV (95% CI: 14.1–25.4) and 2.5% for genital ulcers (95% CI: 0.8–5.7). Predictors for infection with curable STIs included women with a genital ulcer (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 35.0, 95% CI: 2.7–461.6) compared to women without a genital ulcer, women who used water for cleaning after visiting the toilet compared to those who used toilet paper or other solid means (AOR = 4.1, 95% CI:1.5–11.3), women who reported having sexual debut ≤ 17 years compared to women having sexual debut ≥18 years (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI:1.1–6.6), and BV-positive women (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI:1.1–6.6) compared to BV-negative women. Conclusion One in five women attending ANC had a curable STI. These infections were associated with genital ulcers, hygiene

  17. Home birth attendants in low income countries: who are they and what do they do?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearly half the world’s babies are born at home. We sought to evaluate the training, knowledge, skills, and access to medical equipment and testing for home birth attendants across 7 international sites. Methods Face-to-face interviews were done by trained interviewers to assess level of training, knowledge and practices regarding care during the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum periods. The survey was administered to a sample of birth attendants conducting home or out-of-facility deliveries in 7 sites in 6 countries (India, Pakistan, Guatemala, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya and Zambia). Results A total of 1226 home birth attendants were surveyed. Less than half the birth attendants were literate. Eighty percent had one month or less of formal training. Most home birth attendants did not have basic equipment (e.g., blood pressure apparatus, stethoscope, infant bag and mask manual resuscitator). Reporting of births and maternal and neonatal deaths to government agencies was low. Indian auxilliary nurse midwives, who perform some home but mainly clinic births, were far better trained and differed in many characteristics from the birth attendants who only performed deliveries at home. Conclusions Home birth attendants in low-income countries were often illiterate, could not read numbers and had little formal training. Most had few of the skills or access to tests, medications and equipment that are necessary to reduce maternal, fetal or neonatal mortality. PMID:22583622

  18. Occurrence of anti-D alloantibodies among pregnant women in Kasese District, Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mbalibulha, Yona; Muwanguzi, Enoch; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Natukunda, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to determine the distribution of ABO/RhD (rhesus D antigen) blood phenotypes, prevalence of anti-D alloantibodies, and the risk factors for alloimmunization among pregnant women in Kasese District, Western Uganda. Materials and methods Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid-containing plasma samples and serum samples were taken from pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic. The blood groups were identified using the microplate grouping method, while the presence of anti-D alloantibodies was detected by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT). Data were also collected from the pregnant women on the risk factors associated with anti-D alloantibody formation. Results Among the 726 participants, the blood group distribution was as follows: O: 356 (49.%); A: 190 (26.%); B: 152 (21%); and AB: 28 (4%). A total of 28 (3.86%) pregnant women were RhD negative. Anti-D alloantibodies were detected in 88 (12.1%) of the participants; and of these, 13 (14.8%) were RhD negative. Statistically significant risk factors for anti-D alloimmunization included miscarriage, stillbirth, and postpartum hemorrhage. Conclusion Blood group O was the most common among the pregnant women in this study and the prevalence of Rh negativity was 3.8%. The frequency of anti-D alloimmunization among pregnant women in Kasese District was 12.12%, with 85.5% of these being RhD positive. Risk factors such as a history of stillbirths, miscarriages, and incidence of postpartum hemorrhage were significantly associated with anti-D alloimmunization. There is a need to routinely carry out antenatal blood grouping and IAT screening on pregnant women in Uganda to detect anti-D alloimmunization. Given the high prevalence of anti-D alloantibody formation among RhD-positive women, we recommend additional research studies on the role of autoimmunity among antigen-positive women, as well as the occurrence of RhD variants plus their implications on hemolytic disease of the fetus and

  19. Universal HbA1c Measurement in Early Pregnancy to Detect Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Ethnic Disparities in Antenatal Diabetes Screening: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In response to the type 2 diabetes epidemic, measuring HbA1c with the first-antenatal blood screen was recently recommended in NZ. This would enable prompt treatment of women with unrecognised type 2 diabetes, who may otherwise go undetected until the gestational diabetes (GDM) screen. We compare inter-ethnic antenatal screening practices to examine whether the HbA1c test would be accessed by ethnicities most at risk of diabetes, and we determined the prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in our pregnant population. This is an observational study of pregnancies in Christchurch NZ during 2008–2010. Utilising electronic databases, we matched maternal characteristics to first-antenatal bloods, HbA1c, and GDM screens (glucose challenge tests and oral glucose tolerance tests). Overall uptake of the first-antenatal bloods versus GDM screening was 83.1% and 53.8% respectively in 11,580 pregnancies. GDM screening was lowest in Māori 39.3%, incidence proportion ratio (IPR) 0.77 (0.71, 0.84) compared with Europeans. By including HbA1c with the first-antenatal bloods, the number screened for diabetes increases by 28.5% in Europeans, 40.0% in Māori, 28.1% in Pacific People, and 26.7% in ‘Others’ (majority of Asian descent). The combined prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by NZ criteria, HbA1c ≥5.9% (41mmol/mol), was 2.1% in Europeans, Māori 4.7% IPR 2.59 (1.71, 3.93), Pacific People 9.5% IPR 4.76 (3.10, 7.30), and ‘Others’ 6.2% IPR 2.99 (2.19, 4.07). Applying these prevalence data to 2013 NZ national births data, routine antenatal HbA1c testing could have identified type 2 diabetes in 0.44% and prediabetes in 3.96% of women. Routine HbA1c measurement in early pregnancy is an ideal screening opportunity, particularly benefitting vulnerable groups, reducing ethnic disparities in antenatal diabetes screening. This approach is likely to have world-wide relevance and applicability. Further research is underway to establish

  20. Antenatal anxiety disorder as a predictor of postnatal depression: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Helen F; Murray, Lynne; Royal-Lawson, Melanie; Cooper, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Previous research has implicated high levels of antenatal anxiety as a predictor of postnatal depression, but there is a paucity of evidence on the relationship between the various forms of anxiety and postnatal depression. A longitudinal study of 246 mothers (56 with antenatal generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), 68 with antenatal generalised social phobia, 28 with both disorders in the antenatal period, and 94 with no antenatal GAD or social phobia) allowed us to explore whether antenatal social phobia and GAD predict high Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) scores (probable depression >12) at 10-14 days, 10-12 weeks, 10 months, 14 months, and 24 months postnatally. We found that, after accounting for the presence of other antenatal anxiety disorders, antenatal depression, maternal age at child's birth, socio-economic status and ethnicity in the models, antenatal GAD independently predicted depression at all time points after delivery. A less robust relationship was found for antenatal social phobia, which predicted postnatal depression at only 10 months after birth. One possibility consistent with our findings is that there may be differences in the timing of postnatal depression with different forms of antenatal anxiety disorders.

  1. A survey of current United Kingdom practice for antenatal screening for inherited disorders of globin chain synthesis. UK Forum for Haemoglobin Disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B J; Chapman, C

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To document current United Kingdom practice for antenatal screening for inherited disorders of globin chain synthesis and to compare such practice with guidelines published by the British Committee for Standards in Haematology and the Standing Committee on Sickle Cell, Thalassaemia and other Haemoglobinopathies (SMAC). METHODS: The members of the UK Forum on Haemoglobin Disorders were surveyed about their current practice for antenatal haemoglobinopathy screening. The UK Forum is a national group of haematologists, paediatricians, laboratory scientists, and counsellors working in the field of diagnosis and management of disorders of haemoglobin synthesis; such disorders including the alpha and beta thalassaemias, sickle cell disease, and other haemoglobinopathies. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires from 38 hospitals (or cooperating groups of hospitals) were analysed. The great majority of hospitals were applying appropriate laboratory methods, but problems were commonly encountered in ensuring that appropriate testing of antenatal patients and, when necessary, of their partners, was carried out early in pregnancy. When screening was selective there was quite often a failure to identify all women in whom testing was indicated, and cut off points used as an indication for further testing were sometimes inappropriate. CONCLUSIONS: Many practical problems are still encountered in following guidelines for the antenatal diagnosis of haemoglobinopathies. A need for improved administrative procedures and increased funding was identified. In addition there is a need for agreed guidelines giving more specific advice on technical aspects of laboratory practice. PMID:9708206

  2. Factors associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and perceptions of risk factors among reproductive age women in Soba LGA, Kaduna State 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Aishatu Abubakar; Poggensee, Gabriele; Nguku, Patrick; Sabitu, Kabir; Abubakar, Aisha; Puone, Thandi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maternal mortality defined as deaths due to complications of pregnancy or childbirth remains a public health concern. Although statistics show a decline in maternal mortality ratio from 380 deaths to 210 deaths per 100,000 live births from1990 to 2013, in Sub-Saharan Africa, maternal mortality rates remain unacceptably high. Maternal mortality In Nigeria is currently 560/100,000 live births. This study was conducted to identify the associated risk factors and perceptions of adverse pregnancy outcomes among reproductive age women in Soba local government area (LGA). Methods A 1:1 unmatched case control study with 138 respondents was used. Cases were women aged 15-49 years with a history of adverse pregnancy outcome. Controls: 15-49 years without a history of adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes were: pregnancy induced hypertension and spontaneous abortions. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were taken. Six focus group discussions (FGDs) with grandmothers, mothers and teenagers were used to explore perceptions. Quantitative data was analyzed using Epi-info version 3.5.3. Qualitative data analyzed by thematic approach. Results The median age of cases was: 25 years (Range: 16-44years), Median age of controls: 27 years (Range: 16-43years). Commencement of Antenatal care (ANC) attendance <4months (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.32; 95% CI: 0.12-0.81) and Number of pregnancies ≥4 (AOR: 5.02; 95% CI: 1.97-12.82) were found to be associated with adverse outcomes. Conclusion Risk factors associated with outcomes are multiple pregnancies and delayed commencement of antenatal care. There was poor perception of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We recommended frequent community health talks, early commencement of antenatal and Utilization of Family planning services. PMID:28292074

  3. Neonatal opioid withdrawal and antenatal opioid prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Tara; Camacho, Ximena; Yao, Zhan; Guttmann, Astrid; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Juurlink, David N.; Dhalla, Irfan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal is increasing in both Canada and the United States. However, the degree to which the treatment of pain with opioids, rather than the misuse of prescription opioids or heroin, contributes to the prevalence of neonatal opioid withdrawal remains unknown. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population-based, cross-sectional study between 1992 and 2011 in Ontario with 2 objectives. First, we determined the annual incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome. Second, using data from a subset of women eligible for publicly funded prescription drugs, we determined what proportion of women who deliver an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome were given a prescription for an opioid before and during pregnancy. Results The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome in Ontario increased 15-fold during the study period, from 0.28 per 1000 live births in 1992 to 4.29 per 1000 live births in 2011. During the final 5 years of the study, we identified 927 deliveries of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome to mothers who were public drug plan beneficiaries. Of these mothers, 67% had received an opioid prescription in the 100 days preceding delivery, including 53.3% who received methadone, an increase from 28.6% in the interval spanning 1 to 2 years before delivery (p < 0.001). Prescription for nonmethadone opioids decreased from 38% to 17% (p < 0.001). Interpretation The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal in Ontario has increased substantially over the last 20 years. Most of the women in this cohort who delivered an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome had received a prescription for an opioid both before and during their pregnancy. PMID:25844370

  4. Pregnancy outcomes in women with tuberculosis: a 10-year experience from an Indian tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Seema; Siwatch, Sujata; Aggarwal, Neelam; Sikka, Pooja; Suri, Vanita

    2016-08-30

    Our study sought to determine the characteristics of antenatal patients with tuberculosis (TB) and their pregnancy outcomes. Case records of 50 antenatal women with extra-pulmonary and pulmonary TB at a tertiary centre in India were compared to 150 antenatal women not suffering from TB, for adverse medical, obstetric and neonatal outcomes. The prevalence of TB was 1.16 per 1000 deliveries. Of these, 62% had extra-pulmonary TB. There were two maternal deaths. TB in pregnancy was associated with a five times higher risk of prematurity and three times higher risk of intrauterine growth restriction than the norm. Maternal prognosis depends on the complications of tuberculosis and treatment compliance.

  5. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women