Sample records for wood-plastic composites wpc

  1. Biological degradation of wood-plastic composites (WPC) and strategies for improving the resistance of WPC against biological decay

    Treesearch

    Anke Schirp; Rebecca E. Ibach; David E. Pendleton; Michael P. Wolcott

    2008-01-01

    Much of the research on wood-plastic composites (WPC) has focused on formulation development and processing while high biological durability of the material was assumed. The gap between assumption and knowledge in biodeterioration of WPC needs to be reduced. Although some information on the short-term resistance of WPC against biological degradation is available, long-...

  2. Innovative use of wood-plastic-composites (WPC) as a core material in the sandwich injection molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritzer, Elmar; Martin, Yannick

    2016-03-01

    The demand for materials based on renewable raw materials has risen steadily in recent years. With society's increasing interest for climate protection and sustainability, natural-based materials such as wood-plastic-composites (WPC) have gained market share thanks to their positive reputation. Due to advantages over unreinforced plastics such as cost reduction and weight savings it is possible to use WPC in a wide area of application. Additionally, an increase in mechanical properties such as rigidity and strength is achieved by the fibers compared to unreinforced polymers. The combination of plastic and wood combines the positive properties of both components in an innovative material. Despite the many positive properties of wood-plastic-composite, there are also negative characteristics that prevent the use of WPC in many product areas, such as automotive interiors. In particular, increased water intake, which may result in swelling of near-surface particles, increased odor emissions, poor surface textures and distortion of the components are unacceptable for many applications. The sandwich injection molding process can improve this situation by eliminating the negative properties of WPC by enclosing it with a pure polymer. In this case, a layered structure of skin and core material is produced, wherein the core component is completely enclosed by the skin component. The suitability of WPC as the core component in the sandwich injection molding has not yet been investigated. In this study the possibilities and limitations of the use of WPC are presented. The consideration of different fiber types, fiber contents, skin materials and its effect on the filling behavior are the focus of the presented analysis.

  3. Optimization of wood plastic composite decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravivarman, S.; Venkatesh, G. S.; Karmarkar, A.; Shivkumar N., D.; Abhilash R., M.

    2018-04-01

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) is a new class of natural fibre based composite material that contains plastic matrix reinforced with wood fibres or wood flour. In the present work, Wood Plastic Composite was prepared with 70-wt% of wood flour reinforced in polypropylene matrix. Mechanical characterization of the composite was done by carrying out laboratory tests such as tensile test and flexural test as per the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the laboratory test specimen (tensile test) was created and explicit finite element analysis was carried out on the finite element model in non-linear Explicit FE code LS - DYNA. The piecewise linear plasticity (MAT 24) material model was identified as a suitable model in LS-DYNA material library, describing the material behavior of the developed composite. The composite structures for decking application in construction industry were then optimized for cross sectional area and distance between two successive supports (span length) by carrying out various numerical experiments in LS-DYNA. The optimized WPC deck (Elliptical channel-2 E10) has 45% reduced weight than the baseline model (solid cross-section) considered in this study with the load carrying capacity meeting acceptance criterion (allowable deflection & stress) for outdoor decking application.

  4. Filling behaviour of wood plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretek, I.; Lucyshyn, T.; Holzer, C.

    2017-01-01

    Wood plastic composites (WPC) are a young generation of composites with rapidly growing usage within the plastics industry. The advantages are the availability and low price of the wood particles, the possibility of partially substituting the polymer in the mixture and sustainable use of the earth’s resources. The current WPC products on the market are to a large extent limited to extruded products. Nowadays there is a great interest in the market for consumer products in more use of WPC as an alternative to pure thermoplastics in injection moulding processes. This work presents the results of numerical simulation and experimental visualisation of the mould filling process in injection moulding of WPC. The 3D injection moulding simulations were done with the commercial software package Autodesk® Moldflow® Insight 2016 (AMI). The mould filling experiments were conducted with a box-shaped test part. In contrast to unfilled polymers the WPC has reduced melt elasticity so that the fountain flow often does not develop. This results in irregular flow front shapes in the moulded part, especially at high filler content.

  5. Moisture Sorption, Biological Durability, and Mechanical Performance of WPC Containing Modified Wood and Polylactates

    Treesearch

    B. Kristoffer Segerholm; Rebecca E. Ibach; Mats Westin

    2012-01-01

    Biological durability is an important feature for wood-plastic composites (WPC) intended for outdoor applications. One route to achieving WPC products with increased biological durability is to use wood preservative agents in the formulation of the WPC. Another option could be to use a chemically modified wood component that already exhibits increased resistance to...

  6. Evaluation of bolted connections in wood-plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnandha, Yudhi; Satyarno, Iman; Awaludin, Ali; Irawati, Inggar Septia; Ihsan, Muhamad; Wijanarko, Felyx Biondy; William, Mahdinur, Fardhani, Arfiati

    2017-03-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) is a relatively new material that consists of sawdust and plastic polymer using the extrusion process. Due to its attributes such as low water content, low maintenance, UV durability and being fungi and termite resistant. Nowadays, WPC has already been produced in Indonesia using sawdust from local wood such as Albizia (Paraserianthes falcataria) and Teak (Tectona grandis). Moreover preliminary studies about the physical and mechanical WPC board from Albizia sawdust and HDPE plastic have been carried out. Based on these studies, WPC has a high shear strength around 25-30 MPa higher than its original wood shear strength. This paper was a part of the research in evaluating WPC as potential sheathing in a shear wall system. Since still little is known about connection behavior in WPC using Indonesian local wood, this study evaluated the connection for both of these two types of wood-plastic composite. WPC board from Albizia sawdust will be projected as shear wall sheathing and WPC stud from Teak sawdust projected to be shear wall frame. For this study, the embedding strength for both WPC was determined according to ASTM D 5764 standard, using two types of bolts (stainless bolt and standard bolt) with several diameters as variation (6 mm, 8 mm, 10 and 12 mm). Hence, dowel-bearing test under fastened condition conducted accordance to ASTM D5652, hereby the yield strength then compared with the prediction yield strength from European Yield Model (EYM). According to both single and double shear connection, it can be concluded that yield strength from the EYM method tended to under-predict the 5% diameter offset yield than the actual yield strength from the test. The yield strength itself increase with the increase of bolt diameter. For single shear connection, the highest yield strength was 12 mm standard bolt around 9732 N, slightly higher than stainless bolt around 9393 N. Whereby for double shear connection, the highest yield strength was

  7. Substitution potentials of recycled HDPE and wood particles from post-consumer packaging waste in Wood-Plastic Composites.

    PubMed

    Sommerhuber, Philipp F; Welling, Johannes; Krause, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The market share of Wood-Plastic Composites (WPC) is small but expected to grow sharply in Europe. This raises some concerns about suitable wood particles needed in the wood-based panels industry in Europe. Concerns are stimulated by the competition between the promotion of wooden products through the European Bioeconomy Strategy and wood as an energy carrier through the Renewable Energy Directive. Cascade use of resources and valorisation of waste are potential strategies to overcome resource scarcity. Under experimental design conditions, WPC made from post-consumer recycled wood and plastic (HDPE) were compared to WPC made from virgin resources. Wood content in the polymer matrix was raised in two steps from 0% to 30% and 60%. Mechanical and physical properties and colour differences were characterized. The feasibility of using cascaded resources for WPC is discussed. Results indicate the technical and economic feasibility of using recycled HDPE from packaging waste for WPC. Based on technical properties, 30% recycled wood content for WPC is feasible, but economic and political barriers of efficient cascading of biomass need to be overcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface characterization of weathered wood-plastic composites produced from modified wood flour

    Treesearch

    James S. Fabiyi; Armando G. McDonald; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    The effects of weathering on the surface properties of wood-plastic composites (WPC) were examined. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) based WPCs made from modified wood flour (untreated, extractives free, and holocellulose (delignified) fibers) were subjected to accelerated (xenon-arc) weathering. Colorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to...

  9. Durability of wood-plastic composite lumber

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2010-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) lumber has been marketed as a low-maintenance, high-durability product. Retail sales in the United States were slightly less than $1 billion in 2008. Applications include docking, railing, windows, doors, fencing, siding, moldings, landscape timbers, car interior parts, and furniture. The majority of these products are used outdoors and...

  10. Engineering Biodegradable Flame Retardant Wood-Plastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linxi

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs), which are produced by blending wood and polymer materials, have attracted increasing attentions in market and industry due to the low cost and excellent performance. In this research, we have successfully engineered WPC by melt blending Polylactic Acid (PLA) and Poly(butylene adipate-co-terphthalate) (PBAT) with recycled wood flour. The thermal property and flammability of the composite are significantly improved by introducing flame retardant agent resorcinol bis(biphenyl phosphate) (RDP). The mechanical and morphological properties are also investigated via multiple techniques. The results show that wood material has increased toughness and impact resistance of the PLA/PBAT polymer matrix. SEM images have confirmed that PLA and PBAT are immiscible, but the incompatibility is reduced by the addition of wood. RDP is initially dispersed in the blends evenly. It migrates to the surface of the sample after flame application, and serves as a barrier between the fire and underlying polymers and wood mixture. It is well proved in the research that RDP is an efficient flame retardant agent in the WPC system.

  11. Wood-plastic composites utilizing wood flours derived from fast- growing trees common to the midwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are several non- or under-utilized hardwood trees common to the Midwestern states. Wood flour (WF) derived from fast-growing Midwest trees (Osage orange, Black Locust and Red Mulberry) were evaluated as a source of bio-based fiber reinforcements. Wood plastic composites (WPC) of high density p...

  12. Production of palm frond based wood plastic composite by using twin screw extruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russita, M.; Bahruddin

    2018-04-01

    Wood plastic composite (WPC) is the blending product from wood as filler and polymer thermoplastic as matric. Palm frond waste is a material with selulose about 68%, so it has potential to be developed as raw material for WPC. The purpose of this research was to learn how to produce WPC based on palm frond use twin screw extruder. It used popropilen as matric. As for aditif, it used Maleated Polypropilene (MAPP) as compatibilizer and paraffin as plasticizer. The size of palm frond is 40 – 80 mesh. WPC is made from blending polipropylene, palm frond, MAPP and paraffin with dry mixing method in room temperature. Then, PP, Palm frond and additive from dry mixing is fed into twin screw extruder at 190°C and 60 rpm. It use palm frond/polypropylene 60/40, MAPP 5% w/w and paraffin 2% w/w. From the result, it shown that WPC based on palm frond met the standards forcommercial WPC. It has tensile strength up to 19.2 MPa, bending strength 43.6 MPa and water adsorption 0,32% w/w. So, WPC based on palm frond has prospective to be developed for commercial WPC.

  13. Properties of flat-pressed wood plastic composites containing fire retardants

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan. T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (FRs) [5 or 15% by weight (wt)] at 50 wt % of the wood flour (WF). The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP) with maleic anhydride grafted PP (2 wt %), and FR powder formulations using a...

  14. Colemanite: a fire retardant candidate for wood plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Evren Terzi; Saip Nami Kartal; Sabriye Piskin; Nicole Stark; Aysel Kanturk Figen; Robert H. White

    2018-01-01

    The use of raw boron minerals (i.e. tincalconite, colemanite, and ulexite) was evaluated to increase the fire performance of wood plastic composites (WPCs) in comparison with commercially available fire retardants (FRs). Cone calorimetry and limited oxygen index tests were performed to evaluate the fire properties of WPC specimens. Artificial weathering and 3-point...

  15. Tension and Compression Creep Apparatus for wood-Plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2011-01-01

    Design of structural members made of wood-plastic composites (WPC) is not possible without accurate test data for tension and compression. The viscoelastic behavior of these materials means that these data are required for both the quasi-static stress-strain response, and the long-term creep response. Their relative incompressibility causes inherent difficulties in...

  16. Field and Laboratory Decay Evaluations of wood-plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Grace Sun

    2013-01-01

    Experimental wood–plastic composites (WPCs) were made so that they matched the manufacturing process, dimensions, and water absorption of some commercial decking boards. WPC samples from selected formulations were divided into two identical groups. The first group was exposed in exterior conditions in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Hilo, Hawaii, at sun and shadow...

  17. Laboratory and exterior decay of wood plastic composite boards: voids analysis and computed tomography

    Treesearch

    Grace Sun; Rebecca E. Ibach; Meghan Faillace; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie A. Glaeser; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    After exposure in the field and laboratory soil block culture testing, the void content of wood–plastic composite (WPC) decking boards was compared to unexposed samples. A void volume analysis was conducted based on calculations of sample density and from micro-computed tomography (microCT) data. It was found that reference WPC contains voids of different sizes from...

  18. Rheological Characterisation of the Flow Behaviour of Wood Plastic Composites in Consideration of Different Volume Fractions of Wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, N.; Hansmann, H.; Koch, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rheological properties of wood plastic composites (WPC) with different polymeric matrices (LDPE, low-density polyethylene and PP, polypropylene) and with different types of wood filler (hardwood flour and softwood flour) have been investigated by means of high pressure capillary rheometry. The volume fraction of wood was varied between 0 and 60 %. The shear thinning behaviour of the WPC melts can be well described by the Ostwald - de Waele power law relationship. The flow consistency index K of the power law shows a good correlation with the volume fraction of wood. Interparticular interaction effects of wood particles can be mathematically taken into account by implementation of an interaction exponent (defined as the ratio between flow exponent of WPC and flow exponent of polymeric matrix). The interaction exponent shows a good correlation with the flow consistency index. On the basis of these relationships the concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate has been modified. Thus, the flow behaviour of the investigated wood filled polymer melts could be well described mathematically by the modified concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate. On this basis, the shear thinning behaviour of WPC can now be estimated with good accuracy, taking into account the volume fraction of wood.

  19. Weathering Characteristics of Wood Plastic Composites Reinforced with Extracted or Delignified Wood Flour

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Stark, Nicole M.; Tshabalala, Mandla A.; Gao, Jianmin; Fan, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated weathering performance of an HDPE wood plastic composite reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour (WF). The wood flour was pre-extracted with three different solvents, toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW), or sodium chlorite/acetic acid. The spectral properties of the composites before and after artificial weathering under accelerated conditions were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the surface color parameters were analyzed using colorimetry, and the mechanical properties were determined by a flexural test. Weathering of WPC resulted in a surface lightening and a decrease in wood index (wood/HDPE) and flexural strength. WPCs that were reinforced with delignified wood flour showed higher ΔL* and ΔE* values, together with lower MOE and MOR retention ratios upon weathering when compared to those with non-extracted control and extracted WF. PMID:28773732

  20. Recent activities in flame retardancy of wood-plastic composites at the Forest Products Laboratory

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Nicole M. Stark; Nadir Ayrilmis

    2011-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, wood-plastic composite (WPC) products are widely available for some building applications. In applications such as outdoor decking, WPCs have gained a significant share of the market. As an option to improve the efficient use of wood fiber, the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), has an extensive research program on WPCs....

  1. Wood-thermoplastic composites manufactured using beetle-killed spruce from Alaska

    Treesearch

    V. Yadama; Eini Lowell; N. Petersen; D. Nicholls

    2009-01-01

    The primary objectives of the study were to characterize the critical properties of wood flour produced using highly deteriorated beetle-killed spruce for wood-plastic composite (WPC) production and evaluate important mechanical and physical properties of WPC extruded using an industry standard formulation. Chemical composition analysis indicated no significant...

  2. Exterior Decay of Wood-Plastic Composite Boards: Characterization and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Treesearch

    Rebecca Ibach; Grace Sun; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate free water content and distribution in wood-plastic composite (WPC) materials decayed during exterior exposure near Hilo, Hawaii. Two segments of the same board blend were selected from 6 commercial decking boards that had fungal fruiting bodies. One of the two board segments was exposed in sun, the other in shadow...

  3. Performance and thermal behavior of wood plastic composite produced by nonmetals of pulverized waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Tang, Yinen; Xu, Zhenming

    2010-07-15

    A new kind of wood plastic composite (WPC) was produced by compounding nonmetals from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs), recycled high-density polyethylene (HDPE), wood flour and other additives. The blended granules were then extruded to profile WPC products by a conical counter-rotating twin-screw extruder. The results showed that the addition of nonmetals in WPC improved the flexural strength and tensile strength and reduced screw withdrawal strength. When the added content of nonmetals was 40%, the flexural strength of WPC was 23.4 MPa, tensile strength was 9.6 MPa, impact strength was 3.03 J/m(2) and screw withdrawal strength was 1755 N. Dimensional stability and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of WPC panels were also investigated. Furthermore, thermogravimetric analysis showed that thermal degradation of WPC mainly included two steps. The first step was the decomposition of wood flour and nonmetals from 260 to 380 degrees C, and the second step was the decomposition of HDPE from 440 to 500 degrees C. The performance and thermal behavior of WPC produced by nonmetals from PCBs achieves the standard of WPC. It offers a novel method to treat nonmetals from PCBs. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Wood-plastic composites as promising green-composites for automotive industries!

    PubMed

    Ashori, Alireza

    2008-07-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) is a very promising and sustainable green material to achieve durability without using toxic chemicals. The term WPCs refers to any composites that contain plant fiber and thermosets or thermoplastics. In comparison to other fibrous materials, plant fibers are in general suitable to reinforce plastics due to relative high strength and stiffness, low cost, low density, low CO2 emission, biodegradability and annually renewable. Plant fibers as fillers and reinforcements for polymers are currently the fastest-growing type of polymer additives. Since automakers are aiming to make every part either recyclable or biodegradable, there still seems to be some scope for green-composites based on biodegradable polymers and plant fibers. From a technical point of view, these bio-based composites will enhance mechanical strength and acoustic performance, reduce material weight and fuel consumption, lower production cost, improve passenger safety and shatterproof performance under extreme temperature changes, and improve biodegradability for the auto interior parts.

  5. Outdoor durability of wood-polymer composites

    Treesearch

    N. M. Stark; D. J. Gardner

    2008-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) lumber is promoted as a low-maintenance, high-durability product (Clemons, 2002). However, after a decade of exterior use in the construction industry, questions have arisen regarding durability. These questions are based on documented evidence of failures in the field of WPC decking products due to such impacts as polymer degradation (...

  6. Mechanical and time-dependent behavior of wood-plastic composites subjected to bending

    Treesearch

    S. E. Hamel; John Hermanson; S. M. Cramer

    2015-01-01

    The most popular use of wood–plastic composite (WPC) members in the United States has been as outdoor decking material in residential construction. If the use of these products expands into more structural applications, such as beams and joists, it is imperative that the material’s mechanical behavior be understood. Since most of the potential structural uses of this...

  7. Modern Instrumental Methods to Investigate the Mechanism of Biological Decay in Wood Plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Grace Sun; Rebecca Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John Haight

    2014-01-01

    Various instrumental techniques were used to study the fungal decay process in wood plastic composite (WPC) boards. Commercial boards exposed near Hilo, Hawaii (HI) for eight years in both sun and shadow locations were inspected and tested periodically. After eight years of exposure, both boards were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while a selected...

  8. Characterization of wood plastic composites made from landfill-derived plastic and sawdust: Volatile compounds and olfactometric analysis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Félix, Juliana S., E-mail: jfelix@unizar.es; Domeño, Celia, E-mail: cdomeno@unizar.es; Nerín, Cristina, E-mail: cnerin@unizar.es

    Graphical abstract: This work details the characterization of VOCs of WPC, produced from residual materials which would have landfills as current destination, and evaluates their odor profile. Highlights: ► More than 140 volatile compounds were identified in raw materials and WPC products. ► Markers were related to the thermal degradation, sawdust or coupling agents. ► WPC prototype showed a characteristic odor profile of burnt, sweet and wax-like. ► Aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones and phenols were odor descriptors of WPC. - Abstract: Application of wood plastic composites (WPCs) obtained from recycled materials initially intended for landfill is usually limited by theirmore » composition, mainly focused on release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which could affect quality or human safety. The study of the VOCs released by a material is a requirement for new composite materials. Characterization and quantification of VOCs of several WPC produced with low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate (PE/EVA) films and sawdust were carried out, in each stage of production, by solid phase microextraction in headspace mode (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). An odor profile was also obtained by HS-SPME and GC–MS coupled with olfactometry analysis. More than 140 compounds were observed in the raw materials and WPC samples. Some quantified compounds were considered WPC markers such as furfural, 2-methoxyphenol, N-methylphthalimide and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. Hexanoic acid, acetic acid, 2-methoxyphenol, acetylfuran, diacetyl, and aldehydes were the most important odorants. None of the VOCs were found to affect human safety for use of the WPC.« less

  9. Rheological properties of wood polymer composites and their role in extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretek, I.; Schuschnigg, S.; Gooneie, A.; Langecker, G. R.; Holzer, C.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of the rheological behaviour of PP based wood plastic composites (WPC) has been investigated in this research by means of a high pressure capillary rheometer incorporating dies having different geometries. The rheological experiments were performed using slit and round dies. The influence of moisture content on the flow properties of the WPC has been investigated as well. It was observed that higher moisture contents lead to wall slippage effect. Furthermore, measured viscosity data have been used in flow simulation of an extrusion profile die. Also, the influence of different rheological models on the simulation results is demonstrated. This research work presents a theoretical and experimental study on the measurement and prediction of the die pressure in the extrusion process of wood-plastic composite (WPC).

  10. Advances and challenges of wood polymer composites

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2006-01-01

    Wood flour and fiber have been blended with thermoplastic such as polyethylene, polypropylene, polylactic acid and polyvinyl chloride to form wood plastic composites (WPC). WPCs have seen a large growth in the United States in recent years mainly in the residential decking market with the removal of CCA treated wood decking from residential markets. While there are...

  11. Continuous Ultrasonic Inspection of Extruded Wood-Plastic Composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tucker, Brian J.; Bender, Donald A.

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are needed for in-line monitoring of wood-plastic composite (WPC) quality during manufacturing for process control. Through-transmission ultrasonic inspection is useful in characterizing stiffness and detecting cracks and voids in a range of materials; however, little is documented about ultrasound propagation in WPC materials. The objectives of this research were to determine applicable ultrasonic transducer frequencies, coupling methods, configurations and placements for wave speed monitoring and web defect detection within an extrusion process; to quantify the effects of temperature on ultrasonic parameters; and to develop a prototype ultrasonic inspection system for a full-size extrusion line. An angledmore » beam, water-coupled ultrasonic inspection system using a pair of 50-kHz narrowband transducers was adequate for monitoring wave speed parallel to the extrusion direction. For locating internal web defects, water-coupled, 500-kHz broadband ultrasonic transducers were used in a through-thickness transmission setup. Temperature compensation factors were developed to adjust ultrasonic wave speed measurements. The prototype inspection system was demonstrated in a 55 mm conical twin-screw extrusion line.« less

  12. Dual morphology (fibres and particles) cellulosic filler for WPC materials

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Valente, Marco, E-mail: marco.valente@uniroma1.it; Tirillò, Jacopo; Quitadamo, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.quitadamo@uniroma1.it

    Wood-plastic composites (WPC) were fabricated by using a polyethylene (PE) matrix and filling it with wood flour in the amount of 30 wt.%, and compared with the same composites with further amount of 10 wt.% of cellulosic recycled fibres added. The materials were produced by turbomixing and subsequent moulding under pressure. Mechanical properties of both WPC and WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres were evaluated through mechanical and physical-chemical tests. Tensile tests clarified that a moderate reduction is strength is observed with the bare introduction of wood flour with respect to the neat PE matrix, whilst some recovery is offered bymore » the addition of recycled cellulose fibres. Even more promisingly, the elastic modulus of PE matrix is substantially improved by the addition of wood flour (around 8% on average) and much more so with the further addition of recycled cellulose (around 20% on average). The fracture surfaces from the tensile test were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicating a reduction in microporosity as an effect of added cellulose. The water absorption test and the hardness measure (Shore D) were also performed. SEM analysis underlined the weak interface between both wood particle and cellulosic recycled fibres and matrix. The water absorption test showed a higher mass variation for pure WPC than WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres. The hardness measurement showed that the presence of cellulosic recycled fibres improves both superficial hardness of the composite and temperature resistance.« less

  13. Dual morphology (fibres and particles) cellulosic filler for WPC materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Marco; Tirillò, Jacopo; Quitadamo, Alessia; Santulli, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPC) were fabricated by using a polyethylene (PE) matrix and filling it with wood flour in the amount of 30 wt.%, and compared with the same composites with further amount of 10 wt.% of cellulosic recycled fibres added. The materials were produced by turbomixing and subsequent moulding under pressure. Mechanical properties of both WPC and WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres were evaluated through mechanical and physical-chemical tests. Tensile tests clarified that a moderate reduction is strength is observed with the bare introduction of wood flour with respect to the neat PE matrix, whilst some recovery is offered by the addition of recycled cellulose fibres. Even more promisingly, the elastic modulus of PE matrix is substantially improved by the addition of wood flour (around 8% on average) and much more so with the further addition of recycled cellulose (around 20% on average). The fracture surfaces from the tensile test were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicating a reduction in microporosity as an effect of added cellulose. The water absorption test and the hardness measure (Shore D) were also performed. SEM analysis underlined the weak interface between both wood particle and cellulosic recycled fibres and matrix. The water absorption test showed a higher mass variation for pure WPC than WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres. The hardness measurement showed that the presence of cellulosic recycled fibres improves both superficial hardness of the composite and temperature resistance.

  14. Effect of stacking sequence on mechanical properties neem wood veneer plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamadhu, M.; Kumar, G. C. Mohan; Jeyaraj, P.

    2018-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of wood veneer stacking sequence on mechanical properties of neem wood polymer composite (WPC) experimentally. Wood laminated samples were fabricated by conventional hand layup technique in a mold and cured under pressure at room temperature and then post cured at elevated temperature. Initially, the tensile, flexural, and impact test were conducted to understand the effect of weight fraction of fiber on mechanical properties. The mechanical properties have increased with the weight fraction of fiber. Moreover the stacking sequence of neem wood plays an important role. As it has a significant impact on the mechanical properties. The results indicated that 0°/0° WPC shows highest mechanical properties as compared to other sequences (90°/90°, 0°/90°, 45°/90°, 45°/45°). The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Analysis were carried out to identify chemical compounds both in raw neem wood and neem wood epoxy composite. The microstructure raw/neat neem wood and the interfacial bonding characteristics of neem wood composite investigated using Scanning electron microscopy images.

  15. Flammability properties and radiant fraction of FRT wood plastic composites using mass loss calorimeter under HRR hood

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman; Nicole Stark

    2017-01-01

    A special test arrangement was used to assess the flammability of 4 different wood plastic composites (WPC), most with fire retardants, all of which has a tendency to high smoke production leading to high radiant energy losses to the apparatus walls. The mass loss calorimeter (MLC) was modified to include a thermopile on the exhaust pipe stack to compensate for radiant...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging used for the evaluation of water presence in wood plastic composite boards exposed to exterior conditions

    Treesearch

    Marek Gnatowski; Rebecca Ibach; Mathew Leung; Grace Sun

    2014-01-01

    Two wood plastic composite (WPC) boards, one experimental and one commercial, were exposed to exterior conditions and evaluated non-destructively using a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) unit for moisture content (MC) and distribution. The experimental board was exposed in Vancouver, British Columbia, for more than 8 years, and the commercial board was exposed...

  17. Evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of coffee tree wood flour - polypropylene composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Columbian coffee trees are subject to frequent replacement plantings due to disease and local climate changes which makes them an ideal source of wood fibers for wood plastic composites (WPC). Composites of polypropylene (PP) consisting of 25% and 40% by weight of coffee wood flour (CF) and 0% or 5%...

  18. Effect of wood flour content on the optical color, surface chemistry, mechanical and morphological properties of wood flour/recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE) composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chan Kok; Amin, Khairul Anuar Mat; Kee, Kwa Bee; Hassan, Mohd Faiz; Ali, E. Ghapur E.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, effect of wood flour content on the color, surface chemistry, mechanical properties and surface morphology of wood-plastic composite (WPC) on different mixture ratios of recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE) and wood flour were investigated in detail. The presence of wood flour in the composite indicates a significant total color change and a decrease of lightness. Functional groups of wood flour in WPC can be seen clearer from the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra as the wood flour content increases. The mechanical tensile testing shows that the tensile strength of Young's modulus is improved, whereas the strain and elongation at break were reduced by the addition of wood flour. The gap between the wood flour microvoid fibre and rHDPE matrix becomes closer when the wood flour content is increased as observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) image. This finding implies a significant improvement on the interaction of interfacial adhesion between the rHDPE matrix and wood flour filler in the present WPC.

  19. Some Exploitation Properties of Wood Plastic Hybrid Composites Based on Polypropylene and Plywood Production Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajaks, Janis; Kalnins, Karlis; Uzulis, Sandris; Matvejs, Juris

    2015-12-01

    During the last 20-30 years many researchers have paid attention to the studies of properties of thewood polymer composites (WPC). A lot of works are closely related to investigations of exploitation properties of wood fibres or wood flour containing polyolefine composites [1, 2]. The most useful from wide selection of polyolefines are polypropylenes, but timber industry waste materials comprising lignocellulose fibres are often used as reinforcement of WPC [3-12]. Plywood industry is not an exception - part of waste materials (by-products) are used for heat energy, i.e. burned. In this work we have approbated reinforcing of polypropylene (PP) with one of the plywood industry by-products, such as birch plywood sawdust (PSWD),which containswood fibre fractions with different length [13]. The main fraction (50%) includes fibres with length l = 0.5 - 1 mm. Our previous study [13] has confirmed that PSWD is a promising filler for PP reinforcing. Addition of PSWD up to 40-50 wt.% has increased WPC tensile and flexural modulus, but decreased deformation ability of PP matrix, impact strength, water resistance and fluidity of composite melts. It was shown [13] that modification of the composites with interfacial modifier - coupling agent maleated polypropylene (MAPP content up to 5-7 wt.%) considerably improved all the abovementioned properties. SEM investigations also confirmed positive action of coupling agent on strengthening of adhesion interaction between components wood and PP matrix. Another way how to make better properties of the WPC is to form hybridcomposites [1, 14-24]. Very popular WPC modifiers are nanoparticle additions like organonanoclays, which increase WPC physical-mechanical properties - microhardness, water resistance and diminish barrier properties and combustibility [1, 2, 14-17, 19, 20]. The goal of this study was to investigate organonanoclays influence on plywood production industry by-product birch plywood sawdust (PSWD) containing

  20. Evaluation of micron-sized wood and bark particles as filler in thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    David P. Harper; Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2010-01-01

    Micron-sized particles, prepared from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) wood and bark, were evaluated for use in wood-plastic composites (WPCs). Particles were also prepared from hard (periderm) and soft (obliterated phloem) components in the bark and compared to whole wood (without bark) filler commonly used by the WPC industry. All bark fillers had...

  1. Mechanical properties of wood fiber composites under the influence of temperature and humidity

    Treesearch

    Yibin Xue; David Veazie; Cindy Glinsey; Meagan Wright; Roger M. Rowell

    2003-01-01

    Woodfiber-thermoplastic composites (WPC) have received considerable attentions from the forest product industry for civil engineering applications due to its superior properties over wood and plastics alone. Particularly WPCs can be easily fabricated using traditional plastic processing techniques. The major limitation in the applications of WPCs is the poor...

  2. Considerations in recycling of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    J.E. Winandy; N.M. Stark; C.M. Clemons

    2004-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite decking has made major advances in material performance, processing and user acceptance. The growth of wood-plastic composite decking in North America has grown from less than 1 % in mid- 0's to over 10% today with growth projected by several studies to reach +20% before the end of this decade (2010). Preservative-treated wood decking...

  3. COMPOSITES FROM RECYCLED WOOD AND PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultimate goal of this research was to develop technology to convert recycled wood fiber and plastics into durable products that are recyclable and otherwise environmentally friendly. Two processing technologies were used to prepare wood-plastic composites: air-laying and melt...

  4. COMPOSITES FROM RECYCLED WOOD AND PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultimate goal of this research was to develop technology to convert recycled wood fiber and plastics into durable products that are recyclable and otherwise environmentally friendly. wo processing technologies were used to prepare wood-plastic composites: air-laying and melt-...

  5. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment of cellulose based fillers for wood plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekobou, William; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick; Scudiero, Louis

    2011-10-01

    The main challenge of wood plastic composites (WPC) resides in the low interfacial adhesion due to incompatibility between the cellulose based filler that has a polar surface and most common matrixes, polyolefins which are non-polar. Plasma treatment is a promising technique for surface modification and its implementation into the processing of WPC would provide this industry with a versatile and nearly environmentally benign manufacturing tool. Our investigation aims at designing a cold atmospheric pressure plasma reactor for coating fillers with a hydrophobic material prior to compounding with the matrix. Deposition was achieved with our reactor that includes an array of high voltage needles, a grounded metal mesh, Ar as carrier gas and C2H2 as the precursor molecule. Parameters studied have included gas feed rates and applied voltage; FTIR, ESCA, AFM and SEM imaging were used for film diagnostics. We will also report on deposition rate and its dependence on radial and axial position as well as the effects of plasma-polymerized acetylene on the surface free energy of cellulose based substrates.

  6. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of a Wood-Plastic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer; Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Leonard; Larsen, L. Scott

    The focus of this study was to examine the potential benefits of irradiating polyethylene (PE)-based wood-plastic composites (WPCs) in order to enhance the mechanical properties of the WPC. The PE-based WPCs were irradiated, post extrusion, at dose levels of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 kGy with an electron beam (EB). The irradiated WPCs were then evaluated using a third point bending test (ASTM D4761) along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity (MOE) increased with increasing dose level. Examination of the fracture surfaces of polyethylene revealed a distinct difference in failure between irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces.

  7. Formation of wood-plastic composites coupled with forest products

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Meister, J.J.; Zhang, Siyi

    We have developed a method to formulate (wood/paper)-plastic composites and developed a process to prepare materials with maximum strength, durability, and rigidity. We are applying the experience gained from our research to the preparation of wood reinforced, plastic blends. The steps in the process of making wood/plastic composites are described.

  8. Mechanical properties evaluation of extruded wood polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, A. S. Syah M.; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Rahman, Norherman Abdul; Jais, Farhana Hazwanee M.; Fauzan, M. Zarif; Sufian, N. Afiqah

    2017-09-01

    The rapidly expanding of interest in the manufacture of composite materials from waste industrial and agricultural materials is due to high demand for environmentally friendly materials. Wood polymer composite (WPC) are being used in many type of applications such as in the automobile, electronic, aerospace industry and construction. Therefore, this research study is to determine the mechanical properties behaviour of WPC after an extended Ultra Violet (UV) irradiation exposure. The fabricated sample has been used and to be compared in this research is consists of rice husk, waste fibre and polypropylene (PP) with 4 different types of WPC which are wood block waste (WBW), wood block virgin (WBV), wood sheet (WS) and wood sheet waste (WSW). The extruded specimens were tested for mechanical properties such as strength under compression, puncture strength and impact resistance, and density. In addition, the specimen has been irradiated with the UV exposure at 5000 hours, 10000 hours and 15000 hours. Generally, the mechanical properties the WPC which made from the recycled material were lower than the WPC from virgin material but the density was comparable between the two products after UV irradiation exposure.

  9. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  10. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  11. Recycling of ligno-cellulosic and polyethylene wastes from agricultural operations in thermoplastic composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the US, wood plastic composites (WPC) represent one of the successful markets for natural fiber-filled thermoplastic composites. The WPC typically use virgin or recycled thermoplastic as the substrate and wood fiber as the filler. A major application of the WPC is in non-structural building appli...

  12. Laboratory and environmental decay of wood–plastic composite boards: flexural properties

    Treesearch

    Rebecca Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Grace Sun; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John Haight

    2017-01-01

    The flexural properties of wood–plastic composite (WPC) deck boards exposed to 9.5 years of environmental decay in Hilo, Hawaii, were compared to samples exposed to moisture and decay fungi for 12 weeks in the laboratory, to establish a correlation between sample flexural properties and calculated void volume. Specimens were tested for flexural strength and modulus,...

  13. Weathering characteristics of wood plastic composites reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour

    Treesearch

    Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated weathering performance of an HDPE wood plastic composite reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour (WF). The wood flour was pre-extracted with three different solvents, toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW), or sodium chlorite/acetic acid. The spectral properties of the composites before and after artificial...

  14. Durability of Capped Wood Plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Mark Mankowski; Mark J. Manning; Damien P. Slowik

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturers of wood plastic composites (WPCs) have recently introduced capped decking to their product lines. These new materials have begun to take market share from the previous generation of uncapped products that possessed a homogenous composition throughout the thickness of their cross-section. These capped offerings have been introduced with claims that the...

  15. Long term durability of wood-plastic composites made with chemically modified wood

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons

    2017-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) have slower moisture sorption than solid wood, but over time moisture can impact the strength, stiffness, and decay of the composite. These changes will become increasingly important if WPCs are used in more challenging environments such as in ground-contact applications. There are several options for mitigating the moisture sorption of...

  16. Wood-plastic composites in the United States : the interfacing of two industries

    Treesearch

    Craig Clemons

    2002-01-01

    The term wood-plastic composites refers to any composites that contain wood (of any form) and thermosets or thermoplastics. Thermosets are plastics that, once cured, cannot be melted by reheating. These include resins such as epoxies and phenolics, plastics with which the forest products industry is most familiar. Thermoplastics are plastics that can be repeatedly...

  17. Recycling of ligno-cellulosic and polythylene wastes from agricultural operations in thermoplastic composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the US, wood plastic composites (WPC) represent one of the successful markets for natural fiber-filled thermoplastic composites. In the past several years, the availability of good quality wood fiber has been diminishing and prices of wood and plastic have been increasing. Therefore, the vast qua...

  18. Use of recycled plastics in wood plastic composites - a review.

    PubMed

    Kazemi Najafi, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    The use of recycled and waste thermoplastics has been recently considered for producing wood plastic composites (WPCs). They have great potential for WPCs manufacturing according to results of some limited researches. This paper presents a detailed review about some essential properties of waste and recycled plastics, important for WPCs production, and of research published on the effect of recycled plastics on the physical and mechanical properties of WPCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Moisture Performance of wood-plastic composites reinforced with extracted and delignified wood flour

    Treesearch

    Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using extracted and delignified wood flour on water sorption properties of wood–plastic composites. Wood flour (WF) extraction was performed with three solvent systems: toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW); delignification was conducted using sodium chlorite/acetic acid solution. A 24 full-factorial...

  20. Elastomer modified polypropylene–polyethylene blends as matrices for wood flour–plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Blends of polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) could potentially be used as matrices for wood–plastic composites (WPCs). The mechanical performance and morphology of both the unfilled blends and wood-filled composites with various elastomers and coupling agents were investigated. Blending of the plastics resulted in either small domains of the minor phase in a...

  1. Decay resistance of wood-plastic composites reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Yongming Fan; Jianmin Gao

    2014-01-01

    The moisture and decay resistance of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour (WF) was investigated. Three different extractions were preformed: toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW). Delignification (DL) was performed using a sodium chlorite/acetic acid solution. All WPCs specimens were made with 50% by...

  2. Properties of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) reinforced with extracted and delignified wood flour

    Treesearch

    Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan

    2014-01-01

    The water sorption and mechanical properties of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) made of extracted and delignified wood flour (WF) has been investigated. WF was prepared by extraction with the solvent systems toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW), and its delignification was conducted by means of sodium chlorite/acetic acid (AA) solution. A 2 4...

  3. The use of new, aqueous chemical wood modifications to improve the durability of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons; George C. Chen

    2017-01-01

    The wood flour used in wood-plastic composites (WPCs) can biologically deteriorate and thus the overall mechanical performance of WPCs decrease when exposed to moisture and fungal decay. Protecting the wood flour by chemical modification can improve the durability of the wood in a nontoxic way so it is not harmful to the environment. WPCs were made with modified wood...

  4. Effect of Hybrid Talc-Basalt Fillers in the Shell Layer on Thermal and Mechanical Performance of Co-Extruded Wood Plastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Runzhou; Mei, Changtong; Xu, Xinwu; Kärki, Timo; Lee, Sunyoung; Wu, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid basalt fiber (BF) and Talc filled high density polyethylene (HDPE) and co-extruded wood-plastic composites (WPCs) with different BF/Talc/HDPE composition levels in the shell were prepared and their mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were characterized. Incorporating BFs into the HDPE-Talc composite substantially enhanced the thermal expansion property, flexural, tensile and dynamic modulus without causing a significant decrease in the tensile and impact strength of the composites. Strain energy estimation suggested positive and better interfacial interactions of HDPE with BFs than that with talc. The co-extruded structure design improved the mechanical properties of WPC due to the protective shell layer. The composite flexural and impact strength properties increased, and the thermal expansion decreased as BF content increased in the hybrid BF/Talc filled shells. The cone calorimetry data demonstrated that flame resistance of co-extruded WPCs was improved with the use of combined fillers in the shell layer, especially with increased loading of BFs. The combined shell filler system with BFs and Talc could offer a balance between cost and performance for co-extruded WPCs. PMID:28793726

  5. Effect of Hybrid Talc-Basalt Fillers in the Shell Layer on Thermal and Mechanical Performance of Co-Extruded Wood Plastic Composites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Runzhou; Mei, Changtong; Xu, Xinwu; Kärki, Timo; Lee, Sunyoung; Wu, Qinglin

    2015-12-08

    Hybrid basalt fiber (BF) and Talc filled high density polyethylene (HDPE) and co-extruded wood-plastic composites (WPCs) with different BF/Talc/HDPE composition levels in the shell were prepared and their mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were characterized. Incorporating BFs into the HDPE-Talc composite substantially enhanced the thermal expansion property, flexural, tensile and dynamic modulus without causing a significant decrease in the tensile and impact strength of the composites. Strain energy estimation suggested positive and better interfacial interactions of HDPE with BFs than that with talc. The co-extruded structure design improved the mechanical properties of WPC due to the protective shell layer. The composite flexural and impact strength properties increased, and the thermal expansion decreased as BF content increased in the hybrid BF/Talc filled shells. The cone calorimetry data demonstrated that flame resistance of co-extruded WPCs was improved with the use of combined fillers in the shell layer, especially with increased loading of BFs. The combined shell filler system with BFs and Talc could offer a balance between cost and performance for co-extruded WPCs.

  6. Enhancement of the Mechanical Properties of Basalt Fiber-Wood-Plastic Composites via Maleic Anhydride Grafted High-Density Polyethylene (MAPE) Addition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinxiang; Wang, Yong; Gu, Chenglong; Liu, Jianxun; Liu, Yufu; Li, Min; Lu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms, using microscopy and strength testing approaches, by which the addition of maleic anhydride grafted high-density polyethylene (MAPE) enhances the mechanical properties of basalt fiber-wood-plastic composites (BF-WPCs). The maximum values of the specific tensile and flexural strengths areachieved at a MAPE content of 5%–8%. The elongation increases rapidly at first and then continues slowly. The nearly complete integration of the wood fiber with the high-density polyethylene upon MAPE addition to WPC is examined, and two models of interfacial behavior are proposed. We examined the physical significance of both interfacial models and their ability to accurately describe the effects of MAPE addition. The mechanism of formation of the Model I interface and the integrated matrix is outlined based on the chemical reactions that may occur between the various components as a result of hydrogen bond formation or based on the principle of compatibility, resulting from similar polarity. The Model I fracture occurred on the outer surface of the interfacial layer, visually demonstrating the compatibilization effect of MAPE addition. PMID:28809285

  7. Enhancement of the Mechanical Properties of Basalt Fiber-Wood-Plastic Composites via Maleic Anhydride Grafted High-Density Polyethylene (MAPE) Addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinxiang; Wang, Yong; Gu, Chenglong; Liu, Jianxun; Liu, Yufu; Li, Min; Lu, Yun

    2013-06-18

    This study investigated the mechanisms, using microscopy and strength testing approaches, by which the addition of maleic anhydride grafted high-density polyethylene (MAPE) enhances the mechanical properties of basalt fiber-wood-plastic composites (BF-WPCs). The maximum values of the specific tensile and flexural strengths are achieved at a MAPE content of 5%-8%. The elongation increases rapidly at first and then continues slowly. The nearly complete integration of the wood fiber with the high-density polyethylene upon MAPE addition to WPC is examined, and two models of interfacial behavior are proposed. We examined the physical significance of both interfacial models and their ability to accurately describe the effects of MAPE addition. The mechanism of formation of the Model I interface and the integrated matrix is outlined based on the chemical reactions that may occur between the various components as a result of hydrogen bond formation or based on the principle of compatibility, resulting from similar polarity. The Model I fracture occurred on the outer surface of the interfacial layer, visually demonstrating the compatibilization effect of MAPE addition.

  8. Characterizing wood-plastic composites via data-driven methodologies

    Treesearch

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Robert Badaliance

    2007-01-01

    The recent increase of wood-plastic composite materials in various application areas has underlined the need for an efficient and robust methodology to characterize their nonlinear anisotropic constitutive behavior. In addition, the multiplicity of various loading conditions in structures utilizing these materials further increases the need for a characterization...

  9. Enhancing anti-microbial properties of wood-plastic composites produced from timber and plastic wastes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi Sun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-05-01

    Considering the resource waste and environmental burden for timber and plastic materials ending up at landfills, this study proposed upcycling wood and plastic waste into value-added wood-plastic composites (WPCs), complying with the standard requirements of flexural strength, thickness swelling, water absorption and thermal insulation. Biological deterioration is a major concern of WPCs. Bacterial survival, fungal attack and algal growth of bactericide-treated WPCs were holistically analysed. Melamine resin was adopted for impregnating anti-microbial agents on the surface. All the agents showed excellent bactericidal rate (Escherichia coli), yet poly-diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride (PolyDADMAC) and silver had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations. In terms of weight loss and strength reduction due to fungal decay (Coriolus versicolor), PolyDADMAC, silver and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) imparted the highest resistance on the WPCs. Moreover, PolyDADMAC and copper provided the most protection against algal growth (Chlorella vulgaris), and the former presented durable inhibitory effect. This study presents a value-added solution to wood/plastic waste recycling.

  10. Using small diameter trees for wood fiber-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Phil T. Archuletta

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an extended abstract only) P&M Plastics, Inc. ("P&M" or the "Company" began operation in 1998 as a result of efforts within P&M Signs, a sister company, to develop a new composite material to be used for external signage-one more rugged than wood. The result of these efforts is a 40% woody biomass and a 60% plastic...

  11. Development of fine-celled bio-fiber composite foams using physical blowing agents and nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gangjian

    As one of eco-friendly bio-fibers, wood-fiber has been incorporated in plastics to make wood-fiber/plastic composites (WPC) with an increased stiffness, durability and lowered cost. However, these improvements are usually accompanied by loss in the ductility and impact strength of the composites. These shortcomings can be significantly improved by incorporating a fine-cell foam structure in the composites. This thesis presents the development of the foaming technology for the manufacture of fine-cell WPC foams with environmentally benign physical blowing agents (PBAs), and focuses on the elucidation of the fundamental foaming mechanisms and the related issues involved. One critical issue comes from the volatiles evolved from the wood-fiber during high temperature processing. The volatiles, as a blowing agent, can contribute to the foaming process. However, they lead to gross deterioration of the cell structure of WPC foams. The presence of volatiles makes foaming of WPC "a poorly understood black art". With the use of PBAs, a strategy of lowering processing temperature becomes feasible, to suppress the generation of volatiles. A series of PBA-based experiments were designed using a statistical design of experiments (DOE) technique, and were performed to establish the relationship of processing and material variables with the structure of WPC foams. Fundamental foaming behaviors for two different PBAs and two different polymer systems were identified. WPC foams with a fine-cell morphology and a desired density were successfully obtained at the optimized conditions. Another limitation for the wider application of WPC is their flammability. Innovative use of a small amount of nano-clay in WPC significantly improved the flame-retarding property of WPC, and the key issue was to achieve a high degree of exfoliation of nano-particles in the polymer matrix, to achieve a desired flammability reduction. The synergistic effects of nano-particles in foaming of WPC were

  12. Considerations in the weathering of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    During weathering, wood-plastic composites (WPCs) can fade and lose stiffness and strength. Weathering variables that induce these changes include exposure to UV light and water. Each variable degrades WPCs independently, but can also act synergistically. Recent efforts have highlighted the need to understand how WPCs weather, and to develop schemes for protection. The...

  13. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Rodney E. Jacobson; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood-plastic composites” refers to any number of composites that contain wood (of any form) and either thermoset or thermoplastic polymers. Thermosets or thermoset polymers are plastics that, once cured, cannot be remelted by heating. These include cured resins, such as epoxies and phenolics, plastics with which the forest products industry is most familiar (...

  14. Moisture Sorption in Artificially aged wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    B. Kristoffer Segerholm; Rebecca E. Ibach; Magnus E.P. Wålinder

    2012-01-01

    Moisture sorption in wood-plastic composites (WPCs) affects their durability and dimensional stability. In certain outdoor exposures, the moisture properties of WPCs are altered due to e.g. cracks induced by swelling and shrinkage of the components, as well as UV degradation or biological attack. The aim of this work was to study the effect of different artificial...

  15. Properties of wood-plastic composites: effect of inorganic additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakraji, Elias Hanna; Salman, Numan

    2003-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites from Syrian tree species (white poplar, cypress tree, and white willow) were prepared using gamma-ray irradiation. Dry wood was impregnated with acrylamide or butylmethacrylate at various methanol compositions as the swelling solvent. Effect of inorganic additives and co-additives such as lithium nitrate (LiNO 3), copper sulfate (CuSO 4) and sulfuric acid (H 2SO 4), used at a very low concentration (1%), on the polymer loading (PL) and the compression strength (CS) was also investigated. It has been found that all the additives and co-additives, except Cu 2+, increase the PL values and only Li + has a positive effect on CS.

  16. Characterization of weathered wood-plastic composite surfaces using FTIR spectroscopy, contact angle, and XPS

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2007-01-01

    Much of the current growth of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) is due to increased penetration into the decking market; therefore it has become imperative to understand the durability of WPCs in outdoor applications. In this study, wood flour filled high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites were manufactured through either injection molding or extrusion. A set of...

  17. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Roger M. Rowell

    2010-01-01

    The wood industry can expand into new sustainable markets with the formation of a new class of composites with the marriage of the wood industry and the plastics industry. The wood component, usually a flour or fiber, is combined with a thermoplastic to form an extrudable, injectable or thermoformable composite that can be used in many non-structural applications....

  18. Composites from wood and plastics

    Treesearch

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Composites made from thermoplastics and fillers or reinforcements derived from wood or other natural fibers are a dynamic research area encompassing a wide variety of composite materials. For example, as the use of biopolymers grows, wood and other natural fiber sources are being investigated as renewable sources of fillers and reinforcements to modify performance....

  19. Wood-plastic composites using thermomechanical pulp made from oxalic acid-pretreated red pine chips

    Treesearch

    J.E. Winandy; N.M. Stark; E. Horn

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics and properties of wood fiber is one of many factors of critical importance to the performance of wood-plastic composites. In commercial thermo-mechanical pulping (TMP) of wood chips to produce fibers, high temperatures (>100°C) are used to separate the fibers during TMP refining. These mechanical pressures and temperatures are usually modulated...

  20. Thermochemical pretreatment of underutilized woody biomass for manufacturing wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaez Samaniego, Manuel Raul

    Prescribed fires, one method for reducing hazardous fuel loads from forest lands in the US, are limited by geographical, environmental, and social impacts. Mechanical operations are an alternative type of fuel treatment but these processes are constrained by the difficulty of economically harvesting and/or using large amounts of low-value woody biomass. Adoption and integration of new technologies into existing wood composite facilities offer better utilization of this material. A pretreatment that enables integration of technologies in a typical composite facility will aid with diversification of product portfolio (e.g. wood composites, fuel pellets, liquid fuels, chemicals). Hot water extraction (HWE) is an option for wood pretreatment. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical changes to wood resulting from HWE, and how these changes impact processing and performance of composites. Specific objectives were to: 1) review literature on studies related to the manufacture of composites produced with thermally pretreated wood, 2) manufacture wood plastic composites (WPC) and particleboard using HWE wood and evaluate the impacts of pretreatment on product properties, 3) develop an understanding of the effect of HWE on lignin properties, specifically lignin at the cells surface level after migration from cell walls and middle lamella, 4) discern the influence of lignin on the fiber surface on processing WPCs, and, 5) investigate the effect of changing the pretreatment environment (inert gas instead of water) on lignin behavior. Results show that HWE enhances the resistance of both WPCs and particleboard to water with positive or no effect on mechanical properties. Reduction of hemicelluloses and lignin property changes are suggested as the main reasons for enhancing interaction between wood fiber and resins during composite processing. Lignin on the surface of particles after HWE interacts with thermoplastics during WPCs compounding, thus

  1. High-Temperature Hot Air/Silane Coupling Modification of Wood Fiber and Its Effect on Properties of Wood Fiber/HDPE Composites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Han, Guangping; Li, Qingde; Gao, Xun; Cheng, Wanli

    2017-01-01

    The surfaces of poplar wood fibers were modified using high-temperature hot air (HTHA) treatment and silane coupling agent. The single factor test was then used to investigate the performances (e.g., the change of functional groups, polarity, cellulose crystallinity, and thermal stability) of modified poplar wood fibers (mPWF) through Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analysis for the subsequent preparation of wood-plastic composites (WPCs). The effect of HTHA treatment conditions—such as temperature, inlet air velocity, and feed rate—on the performances of WPCs was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. The main findings indicated that HTHA treatment could promote the hydration of mPWF and improve the mechanical properties of WPCs. Treatment temperature strongly affected the mechanical properties and moisture adsorption characteristics of the prepared composites. With the increase of treated temperature and feed rate, the number of hydroxyl groups, holocellulose content, and the pH of mPWF decreased. The degree of crystallinity and thermal stability and the storage modulus of the prepared composites of mPWF increased. However, dimensional stability and water absorption of WPCs significantly reduced. The best mechanical properties enhancement was observed with treatment temperature at 220 °C. This study demonstrated the feasibility for the application of an HTHA treatment in the WPC production industry. PMID:28772646

  2. High-Temperature Hot Air/Silane Coupling Modification of Wood Fiber and Its Effect on Properties of Wood Fiber/HDPE Composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Han, Guangping; Li, Qingde; Gao, Xun; Cheng, Wanli

    2017-03-13

    The surfaces of poplar wood fibers were modified using high-temperature hot air (HTHA) treatment and silane coupling agent. The single factor test was then used to investigate the performances (e.g., the change of functional groups, polarity, cellulose crystallinity, and thermal stability) of modified poplar wood fibers (mPWF) through Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analysis for the subsequent preparation of wood-plastic composites (WPCs). The effect of HTHA treatment conditions-such as temperature, inlet air velocity, and feed rate-on the performances of WPCs was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. The main findings indicated that HTHA treatment could promote the hydration of mPWF and improve the mechanical properties of WPCs. Treatment temperature strongly affected the mechanical properties and moisture adsorption characteristics of the prepared composites. With the increase of treated temperature and feed rate, the number of hydroxyl groups, holocellulose content, and the pH of mPWF decreased. The degree of crystallinity and thermal stability and the storage modulus of the prepared composites of mPWF increased. However, dimensional stability and water absorption of WPCs significantly reduced. The best mechanical properties enhancement was observed with treatment temperature at 220 °C. This study demonstrated the feasibility for the application of an HTHA treatment in the WPC production industry.

  3. Potassium methyl siliconate-treated pulp fibers and their effects on wood plastic composites: Water sorption and dimensional stability

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Monlezun

    2013-01-01

    Potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) was investigated as a new nano modifier of wood fiber and wood flour to improve the compatibility between the fiber/flour and the plastic matrix in fiber reinforced plastic composites. Before injection molding, bleached and brown pulp fibers and mixed species wood flour were pretreated in PMS solutions. The morphology of the treated...

  4. How craftsmen and home hobbyists can make and use wood-plastic composite materials.

    Treesearch

    Howard N. Rosen

    1974-01-01

    An inexpensive method that can be used by the home hobbyist, craftsman, or small businessman for making wood-plastic composites is described. Several examples are given to demonstrate the ease and versatility of the method.

  5. Analysis of Flexible Anchored Hollow WPC Quay Walls of the New Berth in Tur, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Ayman

    2017-10-01

    A seawall, also known as a bulkhead or retaining wall, is a structure built to reduce the effects of strong waves and to defend costal land from erosion. Traditionally, seawalls are made of steel, timber or concrete construction. Composite materials, however, have been recently introduced for their ease of installation/maintenance in dry processing, low cost, and environmentally friendly materials. A wood plastic composite (WPC) seawall system has been developed and patented for its unique hollow structure that can give greater stiffness and stability under various external stresses. This paper describes the development of design method used in the analysis of the WPC walls. The main challenge during the physical excavation works is to limit the deformations involved in order to minimize damage on adjacent structures. The deformations depend largely on the excavation and strutting procedures, but also on the properties of the structural elements like the soil, the sheet pile and strutting members. The detailed design procedure involves numerical analyses, national regulations and common practice considerations. The contribution of finite element method in this field was used herein to determine the lateral movements, the bending moments of the wall, the passive earth pressure of the soil and the tensile force exerted by the anchor rods. The overall objectives of this research can be divided into two categories, First calibration of the finite element model for the new Tur quay walls (the case study) and reviewing the results of the steel cross section that chosen and the suggested one. Second, analysis and comparing the results of WPC cross-sections with the designed Steel sheet pile wall (SPW).

  6. Impact of plasma treatment under atmospheric pressure on surface chemistry and surface morphology of extruded and injection-molded wood-polymer composites (WPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hünnekens, Benedikt; Avramidis, Georg; Ohms, Gisela; Krause, Andreas; Viöl, Wolfgang; Militz, Holger

    2018-05-01

    The influence of plasma treatment performed at atmospheric pressure and ambient air as process gas by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) on the morphological and chemical surface characteristics of wood-polymer composites (WPC) was investigated by applying several surface-sensitive analytical methods. The surface free energy showed a distinct increase after plasma treatment for all tested materials. The analyzing methods for surface topography-laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-revealed a roughening induced by the treatment which is likely due to a degradation of the polymeric surface. This was accompanied by the formation of low-molecular-weight oxidized materials (LMWOMs), appearing as small globular structures. With increasing discharge time, the nodules increase in size and the material degradation proceeds. The surface degradation seems to be more serious for injection-molded samples, whereas the formation of nodules became more apparent and were evenly distributed on extruded surfaces. These phenomena could also be confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, differences between extruded and injection-molded surfaces could be observed. Besides the morphological changes, the chemical composition of the substrates' surfaces was affected by the plasma discharge. Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated the formation of new oxygen containing polar groups on the modified surfaces.

  7. Light stabilizers added to the shell of co-extruded wood/high-density polyethylene composites to improve mechanical and anti-UV ageing properties

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Changtong; Xu, Bing; Chen, Weimin; Yong, Cheng; Wang, Ke; Wu, Qinglin

    2018-01-01

    Weathering of wood--plastic composites (WPCs) leads to discoloration and cracks, which greatly limits their outdoor application. In this study, light stabilizers (including UV-327, HS-944 and nano-SiO2) were added to the shell of a co-extruded high-density polyethylene-based WPC to improve its anti-ultraviolet (UV) ageing properties and simultaneously to maintain its good mechanical properties. The results showed that UV-327 was the most effective light stabilizer for improving the mechanical and anti-UV ageing properties of the composites among the three stabilizers used. WPC samples combined with 2% UV-327 had the highest retention rates in flexural strength and also had the smoothest surface after 2500 h of UV ageing. The samples with 2% UV-327 added had the best protection for discoloration, showing the lowest values of ΔE* (colour difference) and ΔL* (luminescence) in all samples after 2500 h of UV ageing. WPC samples with 2% UV-327 were also oxidized the least after 2500 h of UV ageing. The results reported herein serve to enhance our understanding of the efficiency of light stabilizers in preventing UV degradation of WPCs, with a view to developing co-extruded WPCs with low cost, high anti-UV ageing properties and good mechanical properties for outdoor applications. PMID:29892445

  8. Improving the color stability of wood-plastic composites through fiber pre-treatment

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Scott A. Mueller

    2008-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) continue to make inroads into the decking market. One of the main drawbacks from the consumer’s perspective is that they can fade during weathering. It has been shown that WPCs fade more when exposed to a combination of light and water spray than when exposed only to light. This suggests that the loss of the color-imparting extractives...

  9. Chapter 13:Wood/Nonwood Thermoplastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Roger M. Rowell; David Plackett; B. Kristoffer Segerholm

    2013-01-01

    Composites made from wood, other biomass resources and polymers have existed for a long time but the nature of many of these composites has changed in recent decades. Wood-thermoset composites date to the early 1900s. "Thermosets" or thermosetting polymers are plastics that, once cured, cannot be remelted by heating. These include cured resins such as epoxies...

  10. Effect of processing method on accelerated weathering of wood-flour/HDPE composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana; Craig M. Clemons

    2003-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood-plastic composites may experience a color change and/or loss in mechanical properties. Different methods of manufacturing wood-plastic composites lead to different surface characteristics, which can influence weathering, In this study, 50...

  11. An applied investigation of corn-based distillers dried grains with solubles in the production of natural fiber-plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Hugo Eudosio

    The main objective of this research was to examine uses for distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of ethanol production plant, in the fiber-reinforced plastic composites industry. Initially the effort intended to take advantage of the DDGS components, using chemical reactions, to produce coupling agents to improve the physical properties of the composite. Four different chemicals plus water were used to convert proteins into soluble amino acids. The results were not as expected, and appeared to show an early pyrolysis of DDGS components. This may be due to regeneration of proteins when pH of solutions is neutralized. Procedures were then investigated to utilize DDGS for different markets. Considering that oils and proteins of DDGS can thermally decompose, it seemed important to separate the major components and work with DDGS fiber alone. A procedure to extract oil from DDGS using ethanol and then to hydrolyze proteins with ethanol diluted with water, acid and sodium sulfite, was developed. The resulting DDGS fiber or residual material, with a low content of oil and proteins, was used as filler in a propylene matrix with a lubricant and coupling agent to make natural fiber plastic composites (NFPC). Composites containing wood flour (WPC) were prepared simultaneously with those of DDGS fiber to compare tensile properties and fracture surfaces of the specimens by scanning electron microscope (SEM). This study demonstrates that DDGS fiber can replace wood fiber as a filler in NFPC.

  12. Final Report: Development of Renewable Microbial Polyesters for Cost Effective and Energy-Efficient Wood-Plastic Composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    David N. Thompson, Robert W. Emerick, Alfred B. England, James P. Flanders, Frank J. Loge, Katherine A. Wiedeman, Michael P. Wolcott

    The forestry, wood and paper industries in the United States provide thousands of productive well-paying jobs; however, in the face of the recent economic downturn it faces significant challenges in remaining economically viable and competitive. To compete successfully on a global market that is increasingly driven by the need for sustainable products and practices, the industry must improve margins and diversify product lines while continuing to produce the staple products. One approach that can help to accomplish this goal sustainably is the forest biorefinery. In the forest biorefinery, traditional waste streams are utilized singly or in combination to manufacture additionalmore » products in a profitable and environmentally sustainable manner. In this project, we proposed to produce wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (WFRTCs) using microbial thermoplastic polyesters in place of petroleum-derived plastic. WFRTCs are a rapidly growing product area, averaging a 38% growth rate since 1997. Their production is dependent on substantial quantities of petroleum based thermoplastics, increasing their overall energy costs by over 230% when compared to traditional Engineered Wood Products (EWP). Utilizing bio-based thermoplastics for these materials can reduce our dependence on foreign petroleum. Renewable microbial polyesters are not currently used in WFRTCs primarily because their production costs are several times higher than those of conventional petrochemical-derived plastics, limiting their use to small specialty markets. The strategy for this project was to economically produce WFRTCs using microbial polyesters by reducing or eliminating the most costly steps in the bio-plastic production. This would be achieved by producing them in and from waste effluents from the municipal and forest products sectors, and by eliminating the costly purification steps. After production the plasticladen biosolids would be dried and used directly to replace petroleum

  13. Mechanical and time-dependent behavior of wood-plastic composites subjected to tension and compression

    Treesearch

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2012-01-01

    The thermoplastics within wood—plastic composites (WPCs) are known to experience significant time-dependent deformation or creep. In some formulations, creep deformation can be twice as much as the initial quasi-static strain in as little as 4 days. While extensive work has been done on the creep behavior of pure polymers, little information is available on the...

  14. Final Report: Development of Renewable Microbial Polyesters for Cost Effective and Energy- Efficient Wood-Plastic Composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Thompson, David N.; Emerick, Robert W.; England, Alfred B.

    In this project, we proposed to produce wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (WFRTCs) using microbial thermoplastic polyesters in place of petroleum-derived plastic. WFRTCs are a rapidly growing product area, averaging a 38% growth rate since 1997. Their production is dependent on substantial quantities of petroleum based thermoplastics, increasing their overall energy costs by over 230% when compared to traditional Engineered Wood Products (EWP). Utilizing bio-based thermoplastics for these materials can reduce our dependence on foreign petroleum. We have demonstrated that biopolymers (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) can be successfully produced from wood pulping waste streams and that viable wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic compositemore » products can be produced from these materials. The results show that microbial polyester (PHB in this study) can be extruded together with wastewater-derived cell mass and wood flour into deck products having performance properties comparable to existing commercial HDPE/WF composite products. This study has thus proven the underlying concept that the microbial polyesters produced from waste effluents can be used to make cost-effective and energy-efficient wood-plastic composites. The cost of purified microbial polyesters is about 5-20 times that of HDPE depending on the cost of crude oil, due to high purification (40%), carbon substrate (40%) and sterilized fermentation (20%) costs for the PHB. Hence, the ability to produce competitive and functional composites with unpurified PHA-biomass mixtures from waste carbon sources in unsterile systems—without cell debris removal—is a significant step forward in producing competitive value-added structural composites from forest products residuals using a biorefinery approach. As demonstrated in the energy and waste analysis for the project, significant energy savings and waste reductions can also be realized using this approach. We recommend that the next step for

  15. Effect of processing method on surface and weathering characteristics of wood-flour/HDPE composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana; Craig M. Clemons

    2004-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood-plastic composites may experience a color change and/or loss in mechanical properties. Different methods of manufacturing wood-plastic composites lead to different surface characteristics, which can influence weathering, In this study, 50...

  16. Dimensional stability of wood-plastic composites reinforced with potassium methyl siliconate modified fiber and sawdust made from beetle-killed trees

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Montezun

    2014-01-01

    Wood fromtwovarieties of beetle-killed trees was used to fabricate wood–plastic composites. Loblolly pine and lodgepole pine beetle-killed trees were defibrated mechanically and thermomechanically, respectively, into fiber. Fiber and sawdust produced from the trees were modified with potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) and injection-molded into fiber/sawdust reinforced...

  17. Effects of raw materials on the properties of wood fiber-polyethylene composites--part 3: effect of a compatibilizer and wood adhesive on the interfacial adhesion of wood/plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Chin-yin Hwang; Chung-yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of maleated polypropylene compatabilizer on the interfacial properties of wood and polyolefins. Birch wood dowels containing an adhesive applied on the surface were embedded in molten plastic matrices using specially designed jigs. The three plastics investigated included low density polyethylene (LFPE), linear low...

  18. Wood-plastic composites with reduced moisture : effects of chemical modification on durability in the laboratory and field

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons; Rebecca L. Schumann

    2007-01-01

    Although laboratory evaluations of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) are helpful in predicting long-term durability, field studies are needed to verify overall long-term durability. Field exposure can encompass numerous degradations i.e., fungal, ultraviolet light, moisture, wind, temperature, freeze/thaw, wet/ dry cycling, termites, mold, etc. that traditionally are...

  19. Evaluation of various fire retardants for use in wood flour--polyethylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Robert H. White; Scott A. Mueller; Tim A. Osswald

    2010-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites represent a growing class of materials used by the residential construction industry and the furniture industry. For some applications in these industries, the fire performance of the material must be known, and in some cases improved. However, the fire performance of wood-plastic composites is not well understood, and there is little...

  20. The use of image analysis in evaluation of the fibers orientation in Wood-polymer composites (WPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Arkadiusz; Frącz, Wiesław; Janowski, Grzegorz

    2016-12-01

    In this paper a novel way of a digital analysis of fibers orientation with a five-step algorithmwas presented. In the study, a molded piece with a dumbbell shape prepared from wood-polymer composite was used. The injection molding process was examined in experimental and numerical way. Based on the developed mathematical algorithm, a significant compliance of fiber orientation in different areas of the molded piece was obtained. The main aim of thisworkwas fiber orientation analysis of wood-polymer composites. An additional goal of thiswork was the comparison of the results reached in numerical analysis with results obtained from an experiment. The results of this research were important for the scientific and also from the practical point of view. In future works the prepared algorithm could be used to reach optimal parameters of the injection molding process.

  1. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  2. Influence of moisture absorption on mechanical properties of wood flour- polypropylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole Stark

    2001-09-01

    Wood-plastic composites are being examined for a greater number of structural-type applications that may be exposed to different environments, some of them adverse. This paper discusses the influence of moisture absorption on the mechanical proper-ties of wood flour-polypropylene composites. Composites filled with 20% or 40% wood flour (by weight) were placed in...

  3. Predicting the flexure response of wood-plastic composites from uni-axial and shear data using a finite-element model

    Treesearch

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2014-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs), commonly used in residential decks and railings, exhibit mechanical behavior that is bimodal, anisotropic, and nonlinear viscoelastic. They exhibit different stress-strain responses to tension and compression, both of which are nonlinear. Their mechanical properties vary with respect to extrusion direction, their deformation under...

  4. Effect of fibre treatment using fluorosilane on Sansevieria Trifasciata/Polypropylene composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref, Yanzur Mohd; Baharum, Azizah

    2018-04-01

    Recently, there is an increasing interest in the development of wood-plastic composites (WPC) due to their advantages such as wide availability, low cost, environment friendliness and sustainability. However, some major factors limiting the large scales production of WPC including the tendency of natural fibres to absorb water and the poor compatibility between fibre and matrix. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of natural fibre treatment using fluorosilane in imparting hydrophobicity to the polypropylene (PP) matrix composite reinforced with Sansevieria Trifasciata (ST) fibres. ST fibres are subjected to silane treatment with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxsysilane (POTS) at 1, 3 and 5% for a period of 2 hours. Influence of POTS treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of composites was studied to determine the optimum condition of silane treatment. The water contact angle (WCA) of WPC increased after POTS treatment where the highest value of 115° was shown by 3% POTS treated ST/PP composite. Based on mechanical properties results, incorporation of POTS treated ST fibre improves the mechanical properties with the enhancement of flexural and impact strength. The treatment with 3% POTS revealed statistically higher flexural strength and modulus compared to 1 and 5%. The water absorption test of ST/PP composites also gives the best result for 3% POTS treatment with 20.90% water uptake.

  5. Coating WPC's using co-extrusion to improve durability

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2007-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) have been gaining market share in the residential construction industry as lumber for decking, roof tiles, and siding. The durability of these materials in exterior environments is just beginning to be understood. Current research suggests that controlling moisture absorption by the composite is key to improving durability. Methods to...

  6. Raw materials for wood-polymer composites.

    Treesearch

    Craig Clemons

    2008-01-01

    To understand wood-plastic composites (WPCs) adequately, we must first understand the two main constituents. Though both are polymer based, they are very different in origin, structure, and performance. Polymers are high molecular weight materials whose performance is largely determined by its molecular architecture. In WPCs, a polymer matrix forms the continuous phase...

  7. Changes in wood flour/HDPE composites after accelerated weathering with and without water spray

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark

    2005-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low-maintenance high-durability product. After weathering, however, wood-plasticcomposites (WPCs) often fide and lose mechanical properties. In the first part ofthis study, 50%wood-flour-filled high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composite samples were injection molded or extruded. Composites were exposed to two accelerated weathering...

  8. Wood composites

    Treesearch

    Lars Berglund; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    A composite can be defined as two or more elements held together by a matrix. By this definition, what we call “solid wood” is a composite. Solid wood is a three-dimensional composite composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (with smaller amounts of inorganics and extractives), held together by a lignin matrix. The advantages of developing wood composites are (...

  9. Effects of fire retardants on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of flat-pressed WPCs

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (10% by weight) at different levels of wood flour (WF) content, 40, 50, or 60 wt%, were investigated. The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP), and fire retardant (FR) powders with maleic anhydride-grafted PP (2...

  10. Interrelationship between lignin-rich dichloromethane extracts of hot water-treated wood fibers and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in wood plastic composite (WPC) production

    Treesearch

    Manuel R. Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Eini Lowell; Rui Zhu; Karl Englund

    2016-01-01

    Hot water extraction (HWE) partially removes hemicelluloses from wood while leaving the majority of the lignin and cellulose; however, the lignin partially migrates to the inner surfaces of the cell wall where it can be deposited as a layer that is sometimes visible as droplets. This lignin-rich material was isolated via Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane to...

  11. Photostabilization of wood flour filled HDPE composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2002-01-01

    Wood/plastic composites are increasingly examined for non-structural building applications. As outdoor applications become more widespread, durability becomes an issue. Ultraviolet exposure can lead to photodegradation, resulting in a change in appearance and/or mechanical properties. Photodegradation can be slowed through the addition of photostabilizers. This study...

  12. Hot water extracted wood fiber for production of wood plastic composites (WPCs)

    Treesearch

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Eini Lowell; Thomas E. Amidon; Timothy L. Chaffee

    2013-01-01

    Undebarked ponderosa pine chips were treated by hot water extraction to modify the chemical composition. In the treated pine (TP) , the mass was reduced by approximately 20%, and the extract was composed mainly of degradation products of hemicelluloses. Wood flour produced from TP and unextracted chips (untreated pine, UP) was blended with high-density polyethylene (...

  13. Effects of material parameters on the diffusion and sorption properties of wood-flour/polypropylene composites

    Treesearch

    Vera Steckel; Craig Merrill Clemons; Heiko Thoemen

    2007-01-01

    Composites of wood in a thermoplastic matrix (wood–plastic composites) are considered a low maintenance solution to using wood in outdoor applications. Knowledge of moisture uptake and transport properties would be useful in estimating moisture-related effects such as fungal attack and loss of mechanical strength. Our objectives were to determine how material...

  14. Effect of weathering cycle and manufacturing method on performance of wood flour and high-density polyethylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark

    2006-01-01

    Wood–plastic lumber is promoted as a low-maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood–plastic composites may experience a color change and loss in mechanical properties. Differences in weathering cycle and composite surface characteristics can affect the rate and amount of change caused by weathering. In this study, 50%...

  15. [The Use of FTIR Coupled with Partial Least Square for Quantitative Analysis of the Main Composition of Bamboo/Polypropylene Composites].

    PubMed

    Lao, Wan-li; He, Yu-chan; Li, Gai-yun; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    The biomass to plastic ratio in wood plastic composites (WPCs) greatly affects the physical and mechanical properties and price. Fast and accurate evaluation of the biomass to plastic ratio is important for the further development of WPCs. Quantitative analysis of the WPC main composition currently relies primarily on thermo-analytical methods. However, these methods have some inherent disadvantages, including time-consuming, high analytical errors and sophisticated, which severely limits the applications of these techniques. Therefore, in this study, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in combination with partial least square (PLS) has been used for rapid prediction of bamboo and polypropylene (PP) content in bamboo/PP composites. The bamboo powders were used as filler after being dried at 105 degrees C for 24 h. PP was used as matrix materials, and some chemical regents were used as additives. Then 42 WPC samples with different ratios of bamboo and PP were prepared by the methods of extrusion. FTIR spectral data of 42 WPC samples were collected by means of KBr pellets technique. The model for bamboo and PP content prediction was developed by PLS-2 and full cross validation. Results of internal cross validation showed that the first derivative spectra in the range of 1 800-800 cm(-1) corrected by standard normal variate (SNV) yielded the optimal model. For both bamboo and PP calibration, the coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.955. The standard errors of calibration (SEC) were 1.872 for bamboo content and 1.848 for PP content, respectively. For both bamboo and PP validation, the R2 values were 0.950. The standard errors of cross validation (SECV) were 1.927 for bamboo content and 1.950 for PP content, respectively. And the ratios of performance to deviation (RPD) were 4.45 for both biomass and PP examinations. The results of external validation showed that the relative prediction deviations for both biomass and PP contents were lower than ± 6

  16. Behavior of native microbial populations of WPC-34 and WPC-80 whey protein stored at different temperatures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whey protein (WPC34 and 80) has been used as food ingredients and as a base for making biodegradable product. However, there is limited information on the behavior of native microflora associated with these products. WPC 34 and WPC80 were obtained from the manufacturer, and were stored at 5, 10, 15,...

  17. The stress-strain relationships in wood and fiber-reinforced plastic laminae of reinforced glued-laminated wood beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Daniel Arthur

    The reinforcement of wood and wood composite structural products to improve their mechanical properties has been in practice for many years. Recently, the use of high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) as a reinforcement in such applications has been commercialized. The reinforcement is manufactured using a standard pultrusion process or alternatively a sheet-forming process commonly referred to as "pulforming". The high-modulus fibers are predominately unidirectional, although off-axis fibers are often used to enhance off-axis properties. The fibers used are either of a single type or multiple types, which are called "hybrids". Unidirectional, single, and hybrid fiber FRP physical properties and characteristics were compared to wood. Full-scale reinforced glulams were tested. Aramid-reinforced plastics (ARP) used as tensile reinforcements were found to be superior in strength applications to other types of FRP made with fiber, such as carbon and fiberglass. Carbon/aramid-reinforced plastic (CARP) was shown to be superior in both modulus and strength design situations. Fiberglass was shown to be suitable only in hybrid situations with another fiber such as aramid or carbon and only in limited use situations where modulus was a design criteria. The testing and analysis showed that the global response of reinforced glulam beams is controlled by localized strength variations in the wood such as slope of grain, knots, finger joints, etc. in the tensile zone. The elemental tensile strains in the extreme wood tensile laminae, due to global applied loads, were found to be well below the strain at failure in clear wood samples recovered from the failure area. Two areas affecting the relationship between the wood and the FRP were investigated: compatibility of the wood and FRP materials and interface characteristics between the wood and FRP. The optimum strain value at yield point for an FRP was assessed to be slightly higher than the clear wood value in tension for a

  18. Effects of processing method and moisture history on laboratory fungal resistance of wood-HDPE composites.

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Rebecca E. Ibach

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of composite processing and moisture sorption on laboratory fungal resistance of wood-plastic composites. A 2-week water soaking or cyclic boiling-drying procedure was used to infuse moisture into composites made from high-density polyethylene filled with 50 percent wood flour and processed by extrusion, compression...

  19. Tensile properties of wood flour/kenaf fiber polypropylene hybrid composites

    Treesearch

    Jamal Mirbagheri; Mehdi Tajvidi; John C. Hermanson; Ismaeil Ghasemi

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid composites of wood flour/kenaf fiber and polypropylene were prepared at a fixed fiber to plastic ratio of 40 : 60 and variable ratios of the two reinforcements namely 40 : 0, 30 : 10, 20 : 20, 10 : 30, and 0 : 40 by weight. Polypropylene was used as the polymer matrix, and 40–80 mesh kenaf fiber and 60–100 mesh wood flour were used as the...

  20. Sorption Isotherm of Southern Yellow Pine-High Density Polyethylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feihong; Han, Guangping; Cheng, Wanli; Wu, Qinglin

    2015-01-20

    Temperature and relative humidity (RH) are two major external factors, which affect equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood-plastic composites (WPCs). In this study, the effect of different durability treatments on sorption and desorption isotherms of southern yellow pine (SYP)-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was investigated. All samples were equilibriumed at 20 °C and various RHs including 16%, 33%, 45%, 66%, 75%, 85%, 93%, and100%. EMCs obtained from desorption and absorption for different WPC samples were compared with Nelson's sorption isotherm model predictions using the same temperature and humidity conditions. The results indicated that the amount of moisture absorbed increased with the increases in RH at 20 °C. All samples showed sorption hysteresis at a fixed RH. Small difference between EMC data of WPC samples containing different amount of ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers were observed. Similar results were observed among the samples containing different amount of zinc borate (ZB). The experimental data of EMCs at various RHs fit to the Nelson's sorption isotherm model well. The Nelson's model can be used to predicate EMCs of WPCs under different RH environmental conditions.

  1. Sorption Isotherm of Southern Yellow Pine—High Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feihong; Han, Guangping; Cheng, Wanli; Wu, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Temperature and relative humidity (RH) are two major external factors, which affect equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood-plastic composites (WPCs). In this study, the effect of different durability treatments on sorption and desorption isotherms of southern yellow pine (SYP)-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was investigated. All samples were equilibriumed at 20 °C and various RHs including 16%, 33%, 45%, 66%, 75%, 85%, 93%, and100%. EMCs obtained from desorption and absorption for different WPC samples were compared with Nelson’s sorption isotherm model predictions using the same temperature and humidity conditions. The results indicated that the amount of moisture absorbed increased with the increases in RH at 20 °C. All samples showed sorption hysteresis at a fixed RH. Small difference between EMC data of WPC samples containing different amount of ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers were observed. Similar results were observed among the samples containing different amount of zinc borate (ZB). The experimental data of EMCs at various RHs fit to the Nelson’s sorption isotherm model well. The Nelson’s model can be used to predicate EMCs of WPCs under different RH environmental conditions. PMID:28787943

  2. Thermal load histories for North American roof assembles using various cladding materials including wood-thermoplastic composite shingles

    Treesearch

    J. E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, thermal load histories for various roof cladding types have been monitored in outdoor attic structures that simulate classic North American light-framed construction. In this paper, the 2005 thermal loads for wood-based composite roof sheathing, wood rafters, and attics under wood-plastic composite shingles are compared to common North American roof...

  3. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  4. Changes in microbial populations of WPC34 and WPC80 whey protein during long term storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of whey protein (WPC34 and WPC80) as a food ingredient and as a base for making biodegradable products is increasing. The need to alleviate world hunger in arid and semi-arid regions demands that we investigate the behavior of native bacteria in these products, especially during long term st...

  5. Continuous microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride and compatibilization of polyvinyl chloride and polylactide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavesh

    This dissertation focuses on overcoming existing limitations of WPCs which prevent them from realizing their full market potential. These limitations include: (i) lack of a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and its composites using supercritical fluids to reduce the high density of the WPCs, (ii) need for an efficient coupling agent for WPCs to overcome the poor compatibility between wood and plastic, and (iii) unproven use of wood as a filler for the biopolymer polylactide (PLA) to make "green" composites. These limitations were addressed through experimentation to develop a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming, and through surface modification of wood flour using natural coupling agents. The effects of wood flour, acrylic modifier and plasticizer content on the rheological properties of PVC based WPCs were studied using an extrusion capillary rheometer and a two-level factorial design. Wood flour content and acrylic modifier content were the major factors affecting the die swell ratio. Addition of plasticizer decreased the true viscosity of unfilled and filled PVC, irrespective of the acrylic modifier content. However, the addition of acrylic modifier significantly increased the viscosity of unfilled PVC but decreased the composite viscosity. Results of the rheological study were used to set baseline conditions for the continuous extrusion foaming of PVC WPCs using supercritical CO 2. Effects of material composition and processing conditions on the morphology of foamed samples were investigated. Foamed samples were produced using various material compositions and processing conditions, but steady-state conditions could not be obtained for PVC. Thus the relationships could not be determined. Incompatibility between wood flour and PVC was the focus of another study. The natural polymers chitin and chitosan were used as novel coupling agents to improve interfacial adhesion between the polymer matrix

  6. The effects of different silane crosslinking approaches on composites of polyethylene blends and wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Ronald C. Sabo; Kolby C. Hirth

    2011-01-01

    Though silane chemistry has been used to crosslink unfilled polyethylene for many years, such crosslinking has only been recently applied to wood plastic composites to improve properties such as creep resistance. However, the presence of wood significantly changes the silane chemistry and a greater understanding is necessary for optimal processing and performance. We...

  7. Ultraviolet weathering of photostabilized wood-flour-filled high-density polyethylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2003-01-01

    Wood–plastic composites are being increasingly examined for nonstructural or semistructural building applications. As outdoor applications become more widespread, durability becomes an issue. Ultraviolet exposure can lead to photodegradation, which results in a change in appearance and/or mechanical properties. Photodegradation can be slowed through the addition of...

  8. Impact of recycling on the mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of wood flour/high density polyethylene and wood flour/poly lactic acid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sujal

    This research concentrates on the recyclability of two wood plastic composites (WPCs)--wood flour/HDPE and wood flour/PLA composites. Two different filler loadings (30 and 50 wt%) were considered for each polymer composite. Each composite formulation contained 3 wt% of a coupling agent, and was individually recycled up to six times by extrusion process. Samples for mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests were prepared by injection molding. All test results were statistically analyzed with a confidence level of 95%. Additional tests such as fiber length measurement, GPC, DSC, TGA, FTIR, and SEM were also performed at specific reprocessing cycles. After reprocessing six times, all formulations showed lower relative decrease in most stiffness properties but higher relative increase in most strain properties. In strength properties, both HDPE composites showed lower relative decrease after reprocessed six times; however, higher and lower filler PLA composites showed sharp decrease reprocessed at second and six times respectively.

  9. Characterization of wood polymer composite and design of root trainer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, K. N.; Abhilash, R. M.; Chauhan, Shakti Singh; Venkatesh, G. S.; Shivkumar, N. D.

    2018-04-01

    Biopolymers have received much attention of researchers due to concerns over disposal of plastics, greenhouse gas emission and environmental problems associated with it. Polylactic Acid (PLA) is one of the thermoplastic biopolymer made from lactic acid by using agricultural resources. PLA has received significant interest due to its competitive properties when compared to commodity plastics such as Polyethylene, Polypropylene and Polystyrene. PLA has interesting properties such as high stiffness, UV stability, clear and glossy finish. However, application of PLA is restricted due to its brittle nature. Engineering and thermal properties of PLA can be improved by reinforcing fibres and fillers. Lignocelluloses or natural fibres such as Jute, Hemp, Bamboo, Sisal and Wood fibres can be used as reinforcement. By using natural fibres, a very bio-compostable composite can be produced. In the present study, short fibres from Melia Dubia wood were extracted and used as reinforcement to PLA Bio-Polymer matrix. Characterization of developed composite was obtained using tensile and flexural tests. Tensile test simulation of composite was performed using Altair Hypermesh, a Finite Element (FE) preprocessor and LS-Dyna an explicit FE solver. MAT_01, an elastic material model in LS-Dyna was used to model the behaviour. Further, the design of Root Trainer using developed composite has been explored. A Root Trainer is an aid to the cultivation of seedlings in nurseries. Root Trainer made by using developed composite has advantage of biodegradability and eco-friendly nature.

  10. [Quantification of Wood Flour and Polypropylene in Chinese Fir/Polypropylene Composites by FTIR].

    PubMed

    Lao, Wan-li; Li, Gai-yun; Zhou, Qun; Qin, Te-fu

    2015-06-01

    The ratio of wood and plastic in Wood Plastic Composites (WPCss) influences quality and price, but traditional thermochemical methods cannot rapidly and accurately quantify the ratio of wood/PP in WPCss. This paper was addressed to investigate the feasibility of quantifying the wood flour content and plastic content in WPCss by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. With Chinese fir, polypropylene (PP) and other additives as raw materials, 13 WPCs samples with different wood flour contents, ranging from 9.8% to 61.5%, were prepared by modifying wood flour, mixing materials and extrusion pelletizing. The samples were analyzed by FTIR with the KBr pellets technique. The absorption peaks of WPCss at 1059, 1 033 and 1 740 cm(-1) are considered as characteristic of Chinese fir, and the absorption peaks at 1 377, 2 839 and 841 cm(-1) are typical of PP by comparing the spectra of WPCss with that of Chinese fir, PP and other additives. The relationship between the wood flour content, PP content in WPCss and their characteristic IR peaks height ratio was established. The results show that there is a strong linear correlation between the wood flour content in WPCss and I1 059/l 1 377/I1 033, /I1377, R2 are 0.992 and 0.993 respectively; there is a high linear correlation between the PP content in WPCss and I1 377/I1 740, I2 839 /I1 740 R2 are 0.985 and 0.981, respectively. Quantitative methods of the wood flour content and PP content in WPCss by FTIR were developed, the predictive equations of the wood flour content in WPCss are y = 53.297x-9. 107 and y = 55.922x-10.238, the predictive equations of the PP content in WPCss are y = 6.828 5x+5.403 6 and y = 8.719 7x+3.295 8. The results of the accuracy test and precision test show that the method has strong repeatability and high accuracy. The average prediction relative deviations of the wood flour content and PP content in WPCss are about 5%. The prediction accuracy has been improved remarkably, compared to

  11. WPC Winter Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  12. WPC Excessive Rainfall Forecasts

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  13. A novel approach in organic waste utilization through biochar addition in wood/polypropylene composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    Highlights: • Biochar made from waste wood was added with wood polypropylene composites. • 24% biochar gave the best mechanical properties. • 6% biochar had no effect on physico-mechanical properties of composites. • Coupling agent remained unreacted in composites having higher amount of biochar. - Abstract: In an attempt to concurrently address the issues related to landfill gas emission and utilization of organic wastes, a relatively novel idea is introduced to develop biocomposites where biochar made from pyrolysis of waste wood (Pinus radiata) is added with the same wood, plastic/polymer (polypropylene) and maleated anhydride polypropylene (MAPP). Experiments were conducted bymore » manufacturing wood and polypropylene composites (WPCs) mixed with 6 wt%, 12 wt%, 18 wt%, 24 wt%, and 30 wt% biochar. Though 6 wt% addition had similar properties to that of the control (composite without biochar), increasing biochar content to 24 wt% improved the composite’s tensile/flexural strengths and moduli. The biochar, having high surface area due to fine particles and being highly carbonised, acted as reinforcing filler in the biocomposite. Composites having 12 wt% and 18 wt% of biochar were found to be the most ductile and thermally stable, respectively. This study demonstrates that, WPCs added with biochar has good potential to mitigate wastes while simultaneously producing biocomposites having properties that might be suited for various end applications.« less

  14. Comparison of three dielectric barrier discharges regarding their physical characteristics and influence on the adhesion properties on maple, high density fiberboards and wood plastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, F.; Hünnekens, B.; Wieneke, S.; Militz, H.; Ohms, G.; Viöl, W.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, three different dielectric barrier discharges, based on the same setup and run with the same power supply, are characterized by emission spectroscopy with regards to the reduced electrical field strength, and the rotational, vibrational and electron temperature. To compare discharges common for the treatment on wood, a coplanar surface barrier discharge, a direct dielectric barrier discharge and a jet system/remote plasma are chosen. To minimize influences due to the setups or power, the discharges are realized with the same electrodes and power supply and normalized to the same power. To evaluate the efficiency of the different discharges and the influence on treated materials, the surface free energy is determined on a maple wood, high density fiberboard and wood plastic composite. The influence is measured depending on the treatment time, with the highest impact in the time of 5 s.

  15. Waste-wood-derived fillers for plastics

    Treesearch

    Brent English; Craig M. Clemons; Nicole Stark; James P. Schneider

    1996-01-01

    Filled thermoplastic composites are stiffer, stronger, and more dimensionally stable than their unfilled counterparts. Such thermoplastics are usually provided to the end-user as a precompounded, pelletized feedstock. Typical reinforcing fillers are inorganic materials like talc or fiberglass, but materials derived from waste wood, such as wood flour and recycled paper...

  16. Physical Morphology and Quantitative Characterization of Chemical Changes of Weathered PVC/Pine Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-22

    occurred by oxidation process. Also, oxidation and lignin (from the wood) degradation influenced the color (light- ness) of PVC based WPC upon weathering...and lignin (from the wood) degradation influenced the color (lightness) of PVC based WPC upon weathering. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY...with DEab. More importantly, previous report showed that color change in wood during weathering was due to the lignin degradation [33]. Infrared spectra

  17. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  18. Influence of photostabilizers on wood flour-HDPE composites exposed to xenon-arc radiation with and without water spray

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2006-01-01

    The weathering of wood-plastic composites changes their appearance and/or mechanical properties. These changes can be slowed through the addition of ultraviolet absorbers and pigments. The first phase of this study examined the effect of incorporating different concentrations of an ultraviolet absorber and/or pigment into wood-flour-filled high-density polyethylene (WF...

  19. Two-year Wisconsin thermal loads for roof assemblies and wood, wood–plastic composite, and fiberglass shingles

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Michael Grambsch; Cherilyn Hatfield

    2005-01-01

    Temperature histories for various types of roof shingles, wood roof sheathing, roof rafters, and non-ventilated attics are being monitored in outdoor attic structures using simulated North American light-framed construction. This report presents 2-year data histories for annual thermal loads for western redcedar, wood–thermoplastic composite, and fiberglass shingles...

  20. Study of thermal and fire behavior of wood fiber/thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladipo, Adedejo Bukola

    The fire safety characteristics of wood fiber/thermoplastic composite materials were investigated in this study. Composites comprising wood fiber fillers and polymeric binders are known to offer many advantages such as good strength to weight ratio, ease of manufacture, low cost, and the possibility for recycling. In spite of these advantages however, the fire safety question of plastic-based materials is an important one since they can, under certain conditions, drip or run, under fire, thereby potentially spreading fire from one location to the other. It is important therefore to understand the fire behavior of such a composite if the advantages it offers are to be fully utilized. To this end, numerical and experimental studies of opposed flow flame spread over the composite were conducted with emphasis on the influences of gravity, material thermal property variations, and finite-rate chemistry on the rate of spread. The thermal properties of the composite material, needed for opposed flame spread computations, were first determined using a combination of inverse heat conduction and non-linear parameter estimation procedures. The influences of wood fiber mass fraction and temperature on the effective thermal properties of the composite were established. The means for predicting the effective properties from those of the individual constituents were also examined and the results showed that the composite is close to being isotropic. The experimental and numerical methods used to determine the thermal properties of the composite were also adapted for the investigation of various proprietary automobile sound blanket materials to assess their effectiveness as thermal barriers separating the engine compartment from the passenger cabin. The results of opposed flame spread study over the composite suggests that, for opposed flow velocities lower than about 245 cm/s, finite rate chemistry will dominate the spread process when the oxygen mass fraction is 70% or less

  1. Cone calorimeter tests of wood composites

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Kuma Sumathipala

    2013-01-01

    The cone calorimeter is widely used for the determination of the heat release rate (HRR) of building products and other materials. As part of an effort to increase the availability of cone calorimeter data on wood products, the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory and the American Wood Council conducted this study on composite wood products in cooperation with the Composite...

  2. Effect of acetylated wood flour or coupling agent on moisture, UV, and biological resistance of extruded woodfiber-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons

    2006-01-01

    Although moisture sorption in woodfiber-thermoplastic composites (WPCs) is slower than in unmodified solid wood, it still affects strength and ultimately results in decay of the material in moist outdoor exposure conditions. Chemical modification of the hydroxyl groups of wood with acetic anhydride esterifies the hydroxyl making the wood more hydrophobic and...

  3. Wood plastic composites from agro-waste materials: Analysis of mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Amir; Ashori, Alireza

    2010-04-01

    This article presents the application of agro-waste materials (i.e., corn stalk, reed stalk, and oilseed stalk) in order to evaluate and compare their suitability as reinforcement for thermoplastics as an alternative to wood fibers. The effects of fiber loading and CaCO(3) content on the mechanical properties were also studied. Overall trend shows that with addition of agro-waste materials, tensile and flexural properties of the composites are significantly enhanced. Oilseed fibers showed superior mechanical properties due to their high aspect ratio and chemical characteristics. The order of increment in the mechanical properties of the composites is oilseed stalk >corn stalk>reed stalk at all fiber loadings. The tensile and flexural properties of the composite significantly decreased with increasing CaCO(3) content, due to the reduction of interface bond between the fiber and matrix. It can be concluded from this study that the used agro-waste materials are attractive reinforcements from the standpoint of their mechanical properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. WPC Surface Analysis Archive

    Science.gov Websites

    Calculators Contact Us About Our Site About Our Products USA.gov is the U.S. Government's official web portal to all federal, state, and local government web resources and services. WPC's Surface Analysis analysis overlaid with IR satellite imagery (IR Satellite Imagery) Latest image Loop: [3] [7] Days Latest

  5. Fatigue testing of wood-concrete composite beams.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    Currently, wood-concrete composite structural members are usually applied in building structures. There are a relatively small number (in the low 100s) of known bridge applications involving wood-concrete composites. A problem with using these novel ...

  6. Wood-Based Nanocomposite Derived by in Situ Formation of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Polymer within Wood via a Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoying; Zhuo, Xiao; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Yongfeng

    2017-03-15

    Solid wood materials and wood-plastic composites as two kinds of lightweight materials are attracting great interest from academia and industry due to their green and recycling nature. However, the relatively lower specific strength limits their wider applications. In particular, solid wood is vulnerable to moisture and decay fungi in nature, resulting in its poor durability for effectively long-term utilization. Inspired from the porous structure of wood, we propose a new design to build a wood-based nanocomposite with higher specific strength and satisfactory durability by in situ generation of organic-inorganic hybrid polymer within wood via a sol-gel method. The derived composite has 50-1200% improvement of impact toughness, 56-192% improvement of tensile strength, and 110-291% improvement of flexural strength over those of typical wood-plastic composites, respectively; and even 34% improvement of specific tensile strength than that of 36A steel; 208% enhancement of hardness; and 156% enhancement of compression strength than those of compared solid wood, respectively; as well as significantly improved dimensional stability and decay resistance over those of untreated natural wood. Such materials could be potentially utilized as lightweight and high-strength materials for applications in construction and automotive industries. This method could be extended to constitute other inorganic nanomaterials for novel organic-inorganic hybrid polymer within wood.

  7. Respiratory morbidity of pattern and model makers exposed to wood, plastic, and metal products

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Robins, T.G.; Haboubi, G.; Demers, R.Y.

    Pattern and model makers are skilled tradespersons who may be exposed to hardwoods, softwoods, phenol-formaldehyde resin-impregnated woods, epoxy and polyester/styrene resin systems, and welding and metal-casting fumes. The relationship of respiratory symptoms (wheezing, chronic bronchitis, dyspnea) and pulmonary function (FVC% predicted, FEV1% predicted, FEV1/FVC% predicted) with interview-derived cumulative exposure estimates to specific workplace agents and to all work with wood, plastic, or metal products was investigated in 751 pattern and model makers in southeast Michigan. In stratified analyses and age- and smoking-adjusted linear and logistic regression models, measures of cumulative wood exposures were associated with decrements in pulmonary function andmore » dyspnea, but not with other symptoms. In similar analyses, measures of cumulative plastic exposures were associated with wheezing, chronic bronchitis, and dyspnea, but not with decrements in pulmonary function. Prior studies of exposure levels among pattern and model makers and of respiratory health effects of specific agents among other occupational groups support the plausibility of wood-related effects more strongly than that of plastic-related effects.« less

  8. WPC 48-Hour Surface Weather Forecast

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  9. WPC 12-Hour Surface Weather Forecast

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  10. WPC 36-Hour Surface Weather Forecast

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  11. WPC 24-Hour Surface Weather Forecast

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  12. An examination of the sustainable adoption of whole-person care (WPC).

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Laughon, Debbie; Bogue, Richard J

    2011-11-01

    This study illustrates how King's theory of goal attainment was used to focus an examination of whole-person care (WPC) and to extend the range of knowledge needed for WPC and nursing practice. Leadership implemented a faith-based innovation using continuing education for patient care that incorporates body-mind-spirit and eight principles called CREATION. Three questions arose: (1) Is there an evidence-based framework to determine whether the philosophy supports the discipline of nursing? (2) How extensive is the adoption and application of WPC? (3) Does the model make a difference in the context of nurse-patient interactions and outcomes in support of Magnet recognition criteria? Interpretative phenomenology was used and an interview protocol was developed to examine the adoption and movement toward a culture of WPC. WPC was 'lived.' it is a relationship-oriented patient care model. However, except in direct patient care, the principles of creation were poorly diffused. These results contribute to nursing leadership's roles in fostering a workplace climate that enables the diffusion of innovative models of care. In addition, these results support the Institute of Medicine's call for nurses to take the lead in adopting innovations and provides leaders with actionable strategies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Effects of wood fiber characteristics on mechanical properties of wood/polypropylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Robert E. Rowlands

    2003-01-01

    Commercial wood flour, the most common wood-derived filler for thermoplastics, is produced in a mixture of particle sizes and generally has a lower aspect ratio than wood and other natural fibers. To understand how wood flour and fiber characteristics influence the mechanical properties of polypropylene composites, we first investigated the effect of different sizes of...

  14. Track recording plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, Gregory (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Improved nuclear track recording plastic compositions are provided which exhibit greatly decreased surface roughness when etched to produce visible tracks of energetic nuclear particles which have passed into and/or through said plastic. The improved compositions incorporate a small quantity of a phthalic acid ester into the major plastic component which is derived from the polymerization of monomeric di-ethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate. Di-substituted phthalic acid esters are preferred as the added component, with the further perference that the ester substituent has a chain length of 2 or more carbon atoms. The inclusion of the phthalic acid ester to an extent of from about 1-2% by weight of the plastic compositions is sufficient to drastically reduce the surface roughness ordinarily produced when the track recording plastic is contacted by etchants.

  15. Surface chemistry and mechanical property changes of wood-flour/high-density-polyethylene composites after accelerated weathering

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2004-01-01

    Although wood–plastic composites have become more accepted and used in recent years and are promoted as low-maintenance, high-durability building products, they do experience a color change and a loss in mechanical properties with accelerated weathering. In this study, we attempted to characterize the modulus-of-elasticity (MOE) loss of photostabilized high- density...

  16. Mechanical properties of wood-based composite materials

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai; Robert J. Ross

    2010-01-01

    The term composite is used to describe any wood material bonded together with adhesives. The current product mix ranges from fiberboard to laminated beams and components. In this chapter, wood-based composite materials are classified into the following categories: panel products (plywood, oriented strandboard (OSB), particleboard, fiberboard, medium-density fiberboard...

  17. Wood-Polymer composites obtained by gamma irradiation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gago, J.; Lopez, A.; Rodriguez, J.

    2007-10-26

    In this work we impregnate three Peruvian woods (Calycophy spruceanum Be, Aniba amazonica Meiz and Hura crepitans L) with styrene-polyester resin and methyl methacrylate. The polymerization of the system was promoted by gamma radiation and the experimental optimal condition was obtained with styrene-polyester 1:1 and 15 kGy. The obtained composites show reduced water absorption and better mechanical properties compared to the original wood. The structure of the wood-polymer composites was studied by light microscopy. Water absorption and hardness were also obtained.

  18. Advanced wood- and bio-composites : enhanced performance and sustainability

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    Use of wood-based-composites technology to create value-added commodities and traditional construction materials is generally accepted worldwide. Engineered wood- and lignocellulosic-composite technologies allow users to add considerable value to a diverse number of wood- and lignocellulosic feedstocks including small-diameter timber, fast plantation-grown timber,...

  19. WPC Excessive Rainfall and Winter Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  20. Performance of waste-paper/PETG wood–plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lijie; An, Shuxiang; Li, Chunying; Huang, Chongxing; Wang, Shuangfei; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Mingzi; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Wood-plastic composites were prepared from polyethylene terephthalate- 1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol ester (PETG) and waste-paper fiber that was unmodified, modified with alkyl-ketene-dimer (AKD), and modified with a silane-coupling agent. The mechanical properties, water absorption properties, surface structure, and thermal properties of the three prepared materials were compared. The results showed that the optimum amount of waste-paper powder is 10 wt%, while that of the waste-paper particles is 60-80 mesh. The use of AKD and coupling agent KH550 can reduce the water absorption of the composite; however, the reductive effect of the coupling agent is better, in that it is reduced by 0.3%. Modification using a 1-wt% KH550 coupling agent can effectively increase the tensile strength of a composite from 31.36 to 41.67 MPa (increase of 32.8%), while the bending strength increased from 86.47 to 98.31 MPa (increase of 13.7%). This also enhances the thermal stability of the composites. With the addition of the coupling agent, the composite material maintains good mechanical properties even after being immersed in water; this can enable the safe use of these composite materials in outdoor environments.

  1. Some Properties of Composite Panels Made from Wood Flour and Recycled Polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Turgay; Mengeloglu, Fatih

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of board type (unmodified vs. MAPE modified) on the surface quality and thickness swelling-water absorption properties of recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE) based wood plastic composites. Additionally, two commercially available coatings (cellulosic coating and polyurethane lacquer coating) were also applied to composite surfaces and their adhesion strength, abrasion and scratch resistance, and gloss values were determined. This study showed that modification of the composites with MAPE coupling agent increased the surface smoothness and reduced the water absorption and thickness swelling of the panels. Abrasion resistance of the composites was also improved through MAPE modification. Regardless of board type, higher scratch resistance and gloss values were observed for polyurethane lacquer coated samples compared to those of cellulosic varnish coated ones. Improvement of adhesion strength was also seen on SEM micrographs. PMID:19330092

  2. Plasticity of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) wood-forming tissues during a growing season.

    PubMed

    Paiva, J A P; Garnier-Géré, P H; Rodrigues, J C; Alves, A; Santos, S; Graça, J; Le Provost, G; Chaumeil, G; Da Silva-Perez, D; Bosc, A; Fevereiro, P; Plomion, C

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal effect is the most significant external source of variation affecting vascular cambial activity and the development of newly divided cells, and hence wood properties. Here, the effect of edapho-climatic conditions on the phenotypic and molecular plasticity of differentiating secondary xylem during a growing season was investigated. Wood-forming tissues of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) were collected from the beginning to the end of the growing season in 2003. Data from examination of fibre morphology, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), analytical pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were combined to characterize the samples. Strong variation was observed in response to changes in edapho-climatic conditions. A genomic approach was used to identify genes differentially expressed during this growing season. Out of 3512 studied genes, 19% showed a significant seasonal effect. These genes were clustered into five distinct groups, the largest two representing genes over-expressed in the early- or late-wood-forming tissues, respectively. The other three clusters were characterized by responses to specific edapho-climatic conditions. This work provides new insights into the plasticity of the molecular machinery involved in wood formation, and reveals candidate genes potentially responsible for the phenotypic differences found between early- and late-wood.

  3. The potential of wood-based composite poles

    Treesearch

    Todd F. Shupe; Cheng Piao; Chung Y. Hse

    2009-01-01

    Wood-based composite utility poles are receiving increasing attention in the North American pole market. This interest is being driven by many increasing factors such as increasing: (1) disposal costs of solid wood poles, (2) liability and environmental concerns with traditional means of disposal of solid wood poles, (3) cost and concerns of long-term...

  4. Enhancing durability of wood-based composites with nanotechnology

    Treesearch

    Carol Clausen

    2012-01-01

    Wood protection systems are needed for engineered composite products that are susceptible to moisture and biodeterioration. Protection systems using nano-materials are being developed to enhance the durability of wood-based composites through improved resistance to biodeterioration, reduced environmental impact from chemical leaching, and improved resistance to...

  5. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood compositesmore » such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  6. Effects of silane on the properties of wood-plastic composites with polyethylene-polypropylene blends as matrices

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Ronald C. Sabo; Michael L. Kaland; Kolby C. Hirth

    2011-01-01

    The influence of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate and benzoyl peroxide on gel content, crystallinity, and mechanical performance of unfilled PP-PE blends, and their composites with wood was investigated. All materials were compounded in a twin screw extruder and then injection molded. Specimens were then exposed to high-humidity and elevated temperature in a...

  7. Relationship of wood surface energy to surface composition

    Treesearch

    Feipeng P. Liu; Timothy G. Rials; John Simonsen

    1998-01-01

    The wood cell wall is composed of cellulose, lignin, hemicelluloses, and extractives. Thus, the surface energy of the wood material must be some combination of the surface energies of these components. The influence of extractives on wood surface chemistry can be important in diverse industrial applications, such as coating, pulping, and wood-based composites. In this...

  8. Effect of Modified Red Pottery Clay on the Moisture Absorption Behavior and Weatherability of Polyethylene-Based Wood-Plastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingde; Gao, Xun; Cheng, Wanli; Han, Guangping

    2017-01-01

    Red pottery clay (RPC) was modified using a silane coupling agent, and the modified RPC (mRPC) was then used to enhance the performance of high-density polyethylene-based wood-plastic composites. The effect of the mRPC content on the performances of the composites was investigated through Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, differential mechanical analysis (DMA) and ultraviolet (UV)-accelerated aging tests. After adding the mRPC, a moisture adsorption hysteresis was observed. The DMA results indicated that the mRPC effectively enhanced the rigidity and elasticity of the composites. The mRPC affected the thermal gravimetric, leading to a reduction of the thermal degradation rate and a right-shift of the thermal degradation peak; the initial thermal degradation temperature was increased. After 3000 h of UV-accelerated aging, the flexural strength and impact strength both declined. For aging time between 0 and 1000 h, the increase in amplitude of ΔL* (luminescence) and ΔE* (color) reached a maximum; the surface fading did not became obvious. ΔL* and ΔE* increased more significantly between 1000 and 2000 h. These characterization results indicate that the chromophores of the mRPC became briefly active. However, when the aging times were higher than 2000 h, the photo-degradation reaction was effectively prevented by adding the mRPC. The best overall enhancement was observed for an mRPC mass percentage of 5%, with a storage modulus of 3264 MPa and an increase in loss modulus by 16.8%, the best anti-aging performance and the lowest degree of color fading. PMID:28772470

  9. Whey Protein Concentrate WPC-80 Improves Antioxidant Defense Systems in the Salivary Glands of 14-Month Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Mateusz; Maciejczyk, Mateusz; Koprowicz, Tomasz; Mikołuć, Bożena; Milewska, Anna; Zalewska, Anna; Car, Halina

    2018-06-17

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is characterized by powerful antioxidant properties, but its effect on redox homeostasis of salivary glands of aging organisms is still unknown. In this study, we are the first to evaluate the antioxidant barrier of salivary glands of 14-month Wistar rats fed WPC-80. Total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) as well as concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) are estimated in the submandibular and parotid glands of rats administered WPC-80 intragastrically for a period of 7 and 14 days. We demonstrate a significant increase in GSH, GPx and SOD in the salivary glands of rats fed WPC-80 for 14 days and a significant increase in TAS, GPx and SOD in the parotid glands of rats fed WPC-80 for 7 days compared to control rats. The beneficial effects of WPC-80 on salivary glands are also demonstrated by lower TOS and OSI in the parotid glands of rats fed WPC-80 compared to the submandibular glands. In summary, we demonstrate that WPC-80 improves redox homeostasis in salivary glands, particularly in the parotid glands of old rats.

  10. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  11. Morphology and properties of wood-fiber reinforced blends of recycled polystyrene and polyethylene

    Treesearch

    John Simonsen; Timothy G. Rials

    1996-01-01

    Material properties of composites produced from recycled plastics and recycled wood fiber were compared. A blend of high-density polyethylene and polystyrene was used as a simulated mixed plastic. Stiffness was generally improved by the addition of fiber, as expected, but brittleness also increased. Pre-treatment of the wood filler with phenol-formaldehyde resins did...

  12. A review of wood thermal pretreatments to improve wood composite properties

    Treesearch

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Eini Lowell; Raul Espinoza-Herrera

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the published literature on improving properties of wood composites through thermal pretreatment of wood. Thermal pretreatment has been conducted in moist environments using hot water or steam at temperatures up to 180 and 230 ˚C, respectively, or in dry environments using inert gases at temperatures up to 240 ...

  13. A sustainable and resilient approach through biochar addition in wood polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2015-04-15

    Biocomposites have been used for sustainability for a few years now and considerable advancements have been made to perfect the physical and mechanical properties. However, there still remain some considerable disadvantages (such as inferior mechanical strength, thickness swell, and rotting) which restrict their proper utilization in wider markets. Attempts have been made to remedy these drawbacks but still further investigation is required to address all the issues and alleviate as many shortcomings as possible. Additionally, concerns related to landfill gas emission prompted the necessity for effective utilization of organic wastes. Lignocellulosic wastes can be valorized by thermo-chemical conversion to form a carbonaceous and renewable material called biochar. Keeping these two problems in mind, a relatively novel idea is recommended for the manufacture of biocomposites where biochar made from pyrolysis of waste could be added with wood and plastic. It is expected to mitigate the general disadvantages of conventional wood plastic composites (WPCs) and at the same time manage landfill wastes giving rise to a potential new breed of improved next generation biocomposites. Furthermore, a 'resilient' perspective is conferred where the long term viability of the state-of-the-art product could be ensured. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of boron compounds on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of injection molded wood plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Turgay Akbulut; Turker Dundar; Robert H. White; Fatih Mengeloglu; Zeki Candan; Umit Buyuksari; Erkan Avci

    2011-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the injection-molded wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels of boron compounds, borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %) and zinc borate (ZB) (4, 8, or 12 wt %) were investigated. The effect of the coupling agent loading (2, 4, or 6 wt %), maleic anhydride-grafted PP (MAPP), on the...

  15. Polymer/clay/wood nanocomposites: The effect of incorporation of nanoclay into the wood/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzer, Max E.

    Thermoplastic composites play an important role in our society. The uses of these composites range from cookware to components for the space shuttle. In recent years, researchers at Toyota developed numerous methods of preparation for composites made from olefins and inorganic fillers such as clay and calcium carbonate. Wood fibers have been used as reinforcing filler in polymer matrices for the past several decades. The advantages of using wood fibers as reinforcing fillers are: the low cost of the fibers (or flour), low density, and resistance to breakage. The disadvantage of using wood as a filler is the thermal instability of wood above 200 °C. The majority of thermoplastics exhibit melting points between 160 and 220 °C, which is in the range of thermal decomposition of wood. Nanoclay was first successfully used as a filler in polyolefin materials by the Toyota research team in early 90s. It was found that the addition of a small amount (< 5 wt.%) of nanoclay increased the mechanical properties of a Nylon-6 matrix dramatically. Since Nylon-6 is a hydrophilic material no compatibilizer was necessary to exfoliate the nanoclay. The use of compatibilizers such as maleic modified polyethylenes (MAPEs) is necessary upon addition of nanoclay to a hydrophobic polyolefin systems such polyethylene (PE) or polypropylene (PP). Few researchers have attempted to reinforce the polymer matrix via the use of the nanoclay for use as a matrix in wood/polymer composites. High molecular weight and low molecular weight MAPEs have been used to enhance the bonding between the nanoclay and the polymer matrix as well as between the wood flour and the polymer matrix. The effects of combinations of the high and low molecular weight MAPEs on the mechanical and thermal properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites (PCNs) and of wood/polymer/clay composites (WPCs) were investigated. The effects of adding nanoclay to wood/polymer systems on the mechanical and thermal properties of the

  16. Chemical Composition of Cacti Wood and Comparison with the Wood of Other Taxonomic Groups.

    PubMed

    Maceda, Agustín; Soto-Hernández, Marcos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; Terrazas, Teresa

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the wood chemical composition of 25 species of Cactaceae and to relate the composition to their anatomical diversity. The hypothesis was that wood chemical components differ in relationship to their wood features. The results showed significant differences in wood chemical compounds across species and genera (P < 0.05). Pereskia had the highest percentage of lignin, whereas species of Coryphantha had the lowest; extractive compounds in water were highest for Echinocereus, Mammillaria, and Opuntia. Principal component analysis showed that lignin proportion separated the fibrous, dimorphic, and non-fibrous groups; additionally, the differences within each type of wood occurred because of the lignification of the vascular tissue and the type of wall thickening. Compared with other groups of species, the Cactaceae species with fibrous and dimorphic wood had a higher lignin percentage than did gymnosperms and Acer species. Lignin may confer special rigidity to tracheary elements to withstand desiccation without damage during adverse climatic conditions. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  17. Mechanical properties of small-scale wood laminated composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse

    2004-01-01

    Power companies in the United States consume millions of solid wood poles every year. These poles are from high-valued trees that are becoming more expensive and less available. wood laminated composite poles (LCP) are a novel alternative to solid wood poles. LCP consists of trapezoid wood strips that are bonded by a synthetic resin. The wood strips can be made from...

  18. Stability of Glass Fiber-Plastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    miniiiii’ 5 0712 01016774 9 x TECHNICA. . LIBRARY Jt U*Al>/l 1 Technical Report RL-75-6 STABILITY OF GLASS FIBER -PLASTIC COMPOSITES Wartan A...Subtitle) STABILITY OF GLASS FIBER -PLASTIC COMPOSITES 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7...Exploratory research was conducted to determine the stages and nature of degradation of glass fiber -plastic composite systems under various environmental

  19. Moisture sorption properties of composite boards from esterified aspen fiber

    Treesearch

    C. Clemons; R. A. Young; R. M. Rowell

    1992-01-01

    One barrier to producing wood-plastic composites with wood fiber is the poor thermoplasticity of wood fiber. The objective of our study was to determine the plasticization of chemically modified wood fiber through tests on unmodified and esterified fiberboards. Attrition-milled aspen fiber was esterified with neat acetic, maleic, or succinic anhydride. Fourier...

  20. Cone calorimeter tests of wood-based decking materials

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    New technologies in building materials have resulted in the use of a wide variety of materials in decks. As part of our effort to address fire concerns in the wildland-urban interface, the Forest Products Laboratory has been examining the fire performance of decking products. In addition to preservative-treated wood, decking products include wood-plastic composites and...

  1. Environment-friendly wood fibre composite with high bonding strength and water resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaodi; Dong, Yue; Nguyen, Tat Thang; Chen, Xueqi

    2018-01-01

    With the growing depletion of wood-based materials and concerns over emissions of formaldehyde from traditional wood fibre composites, there is a desire for environment-friendly binders. Herein, we report a green wood fibre composite with specific bonding strength and water resistance that is superior to a commercial system by using wood fibres and chitosan-based adhesives. When the mass ratio of solid content in the adhesive and absolute dry wood fibres was 3%, the bonding strength and water resistance of the wood fibre composite reached the optimal level, which was significantly improved over that of wood fibre composites without adhesive and completely met the requirements of the Chinese national standard GB/T 11718-2009. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations revealed that the excellent performance of the binder might partly be due to the amide linkages and hydrogen bonding between wood fibres and the chitosan-based adhesive. We believe that this strategy could open new insights into the design of environment-friendly wood fibre composites with high bonding strength and water resistance for multifunctional applications. PMID:29765653

  2. Environment-friendly wood fibre composite with high bonding strength and water resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaodi; Dong, Yue; Nguyen, Tat Thang; Chen, Xueqi; Guo, Minghui

    2018-04-01

    With the growing depletion of wood-based materials and concerns over emissions of formaldehyde from traditional wood fibre composites, there is a desire for environment-friendly binders. Herein, we report a green wood fibre composite with specific bonding strength and water resistance that is superior to a commercial system by using wood fibres and chitosan-based adhesives. When the mass ratio of solid content in the adhesive and absolute dry wood fibres was 3%, the bonding strength and water resistance of the wood fibre composite reached the optimal level, which was significantly improved over that of wood fibre composites without adhesive and completely met the requirements of the Chinese national standard GB/T 11718-2009. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations revealed that the excellent performance of the binder might partly be due to the amide linkages and hydrogen bonding between wood fibres and the chitosan-based adhesive. We believe that this strategy could open new insights into the design of environment-friendly wood fibre composites with high bonding strength and water resistance for multifunctional applications.

  3. Correlation of water vapor adsorption behavior of wood with surface thermodynamic properties

    Treesearch

    Mandla A. Tshabalala; Agnes R. Denes; R. Sam Williams

    1999-01-01

    To improve the overall performance of wood-plastic composites, appropriate technologies are needed to control moisture sorption and to improve the interaction of wood fiber with selected hydrophobic matrices. The objective of this study was to determine the surface thermodynamic characteristics of a wood fiber and to correlate those characteristics with the fiberas...

  4. Feasibility of using saltcedar as a filler in injection-molded polyethylene composites

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Nicole M. Stark

    2009-01-01

    Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) was investigated for use as a filler in wood–plastic composites (WPCs). The mineral content, water-soluble extractive content, and thermal stability of saltcedar flour were compared with those of a commercial pine wood flour. The wood flours were compounded with plastic, and the viscosities of the composite melts containing the two...

  5. Application of laboratory fungal resistance tests to solid wood and wood-plastic composite

    Treesearch

    Craig Merrill Clemons; Rebecca E. Ibach

    2003-01-01

    The fungal resistance of high density polyethylene filled with 50% wood flour was investigated using laboratory soil block tests. Modifications to standard test methods were made to increase initial moisture content, increase exposure surface area, and track moisture content, mechanical properties, and weight loss over the exposure period. Mechanical properties...

  6. Physical and mechanical properties of bio-composites from wood particles and liquefied wood resin

    Treesearch

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    Compression molded composites were made from wood particles and a liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde co-condensed resin. Based on our previous research, a phenol to wood (P/W) ratio of 2/1 was chosen for this study. The two experimental variables selected were: 1) liquefaction temperature (150o and 180oC) and 2) cooking method (atmospheric and sealed). Panels were...

  7. Effect of weathering variables on the lightness of high-density polyethylene woodflour composites

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark

    2005-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low-maintenance, high-durability product. After weathering, however, wood-plastic composites (WPCs) often fade. In the first part of this study, 50 percent woodflour-filled high- density polyethylene (HDPE) composite samples were manufactured. Composites were exposed to two accelerated weathering cycles in a xenon- arc type...

  8. Durability of wood/plastic composites made from Parthenium species

    Treesearch

    Poo Chow; Francis S. Nakayama; John A. Youngquist; James H. Muehl; Andrzej M. Krzysik

    2002-01-01

    Previous study indicated that the natural chemical constituents of the guayule plant (Parthenium argentatum) improved some durability properties of wood when it was treated with resin extracted from guayule. At present, there are about a dozen species of Parthenium growing in the North American continent. P. argentatum is the only species with harvestable amounts of...

  9. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  10. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity.

  11. Comparison of Wood Composite Properties Using Cantilever-Beam Bending

    Treesearch

    Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Lujing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Wood-based composite panels generally are first tested out-of-plane in the primarypanel directionfollowed by the cross panel direction, but rarely edgewise. While most applications use wood-based composites in the flat-wise orientation and only need the out-of-plane properties, there are construction configurations where edgewise properties are needed for improved...

  12. Composition, structure and functional properties of protein concentrates and isolates produced from walnut (Juglans regia L.).

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, composition, structure and the functional properties of protein concentrate (WPC) and protein isolate (WPI) produced from defatted walnut flour (DFWF) were investigated. The results showed that the composition and structure of walnut protein concentrate (WPC) and walnut protein isolate (WPI) were significantly different. The molecular weight distribution of WPI was uniform and the protein composition of DFWF and WPC was complex with the protein aggregation. H(0) of WPC was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those of DFWF and WPI, whilst WPI had a higher H(0) compared to DFWF. The secondary structure of WPI was similar to WPC. WPI showed big flaky plate like structures; whereas WPC appeared as a small flaky and more compact structure. The most functional properties of WPI were better than WPC. In comparing most functional properties of WPI and WPC with soybean protein concentrate and isolate, WPI and WPC showed higher fat absorption capacity (FAC). Emulsifying properties and foam properties of WPC and WPI in alkaline pH were comparable with that of soybean protein concentrate and isolate. Walnut protein concentrates and isolates can be considered as potential functional food ingredients.

  13. Assemblage composition of fungal wood-decay species has a major influence on how climate and wood quality modify decomposition.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Parvathy; Junninen, Kaisa; Edman, Mattias; Kouki, Jari

    2017-03-01

    The interactions among saprotrophic fungal species, as well as their interactions with environmental factors, may have a major influence on wood decay and carbon release in ecosystems. We studied the effect that decomposer diversity (species richness and assemblage composition) has on wood decomposition when the climatic variables and substrate quality vary simultaneously. We used two temperatures (16 and 21°C) and two humidity levels (70% and 90%) with two wood qualities (wood from managed and old-growth forests) of Pinus sylvestris. In a 9-month experiment, the effects of fungal diversity were tested using four wood-decaying fungi (Antrodia xantha, Dichomitus squalens, Fomitopsis pinicola and Gloeophyllum protractum) at assemblage levels of one, two and four species. Wood quality and assemblage composition affected the influence of climatic factors on decomposition rates. Fungal assemblage composition was found to be more important than fungal species richness, indicating that species-specific fungal traits are of paramount importance in driving decomposition. We conclude that models containing fungal wood-decay species (and wood-based carbon) need to take into account species-specific and assemblage composition-specific properties to improve predictive capacity in regard to decomposition-related carbon dynamics. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Plastic-aluminum composites in transportation infrastructure.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    This report presents an initial investigation of the mechanics of I-beams developed with plastic-aluminum composite technology. Plastic-aluminum composites in structural beam/frame/truss elements are a relatively new concept that has seen little, if ...

  15. Influence of Water on Tribological Properties of Wood-Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysiukiewicz, Olga; Sterzyński, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    Utilization of ecological materials for appliances and products is one of the ways to achieve the goal of sustainability.Wood-polymer composites as a cheap, lightweight, durable and esthetic material has gained attention of scientists, engineers and consumers alike. Different kinds of polymeric matrices, plants used as the fillers, chemical of physical modifiers and processing technologies have already been widely studied. Nonetheless, surprisingly few information on Wood-Polymer Composites' tribology can be found. This paper is an attempt to fill this gap. Polypropylene-and poly(lactic acid)-based composites with varying wood flour content have been analyzed. The Brinell's hardness and coefficient of friction of the samples have been determined. In order to evaluate the influence of the moisture content on the tribological and mechanical properties of the composites, the samples have also been aged in water. The investigation revealed that polymeric composites filled with wood flour can present favorable coefficient of friction, compared to the neat resins. The results of our study can establish a good starting point for further investigation.

  16. Optimization of composite wood structural components : processing and design choices

    Treesearch

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1985-01-01

    Decreasing size and quality of the world's forest resources are responsible for interest in producing composite wood structural components. Process and design optimization methods are offered in this paper. Processing concepts for wood composite structural products are reviewed to illustrate manufacturing boundaries and areas of high potential. Structural...

  17. Rice straw-wood particle composite for sound absorbing wooden construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Seung; Kim, Dae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2003-01-01

    In this study, rice straw-wood particle composite boards were manufactured as insulation boards using the method used in the wood-based panel industry. The raw material, rice straw, was chosen because of its availability. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8, and a rice straw content (10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 weight of rice straw/wood particle) of 10, 20, and 30 wt.%. A commercial urea-formaldehyde adhesive was used as the composite binder, to achieve 140-290 psi of bending modulus of rupture (MOR) with 0.4 specific gravity, 700-900 psi of bending MOR with 0.6 specific gravity, and 1400-2900 psi of bending MOR with a 0.8 specific gravity. All of the composite boards were superior to insulation board in strength. Width and length of the rice straw particle did not affect the bending MOR. The composite boards made from a random cutting of rice straw and wood particles were the best and recommended for manufacturing processes. Sound absorption coefficients of the 0.4 and 0.6 specific gravity boards were higher than the other wood-based materials. The recommended properties of the rice straw-wood particle composite boards are described, to absorb noises, preserve the temperature of indoor living spaces, and to be able to partially or completely substitute for wood particleboard and insulation board in wooden constructions.

  18. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.

    The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane--treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of themore » coupling agent.« less

  19. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity. PMID:26485431

  20. Analysis of three-year Wisconsin temperature histories for roof systems using wood, wood-thermoplastic composite, and fiberglass shingles

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Cherilyn A. Hatfield

    2007-01-01

    Temperature histories for various types of roof shingles, wood roof sheathing, rafters, and nonventilated attics were monitored in outdoor attic structures using simulated North American light-framed construction. In this paper, 3-year thermal load histories for wood-based composite roof sheathing, wood rafters, and attics under western redcedar (WRC) shingles, wood-...

  1. Durability and mechanical properties of silane cross-linked wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Magnus Bengtsson; Nicole M. Stark; Kristiina Oksman

    2007-01-01

    In this study, silane cross-linked wood–polyethylene composite profiles were manufactured by reactive extrusion. These composites were evaluated regarding their durability and mechanical properties in comparison with two non-cross-linked wood– polyethylene composites. An addition of only 2% w/w of silane solution during manufacturing was enough to achieve almost 60%...

  2. Elastic-plastic analysis of AS4/PEEK composite laminate using a one-parameter plasticity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relations of coupon specimens were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter plasticity model. The results show that the one-parameter plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  3. Fabrication of low-cost Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Gougeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zuteck, M.

    1983-01-01

    The wood composite blades were fabricated by using epoxy resin-bonded laminates of Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge spar sections and honeycomb-cored birch plywood panels for the blade trailing edge or afterbody sections. The blade was joined to the wind turbine hub assembly by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs. The wood composite blades were installed in the Mod-OA wind turbine test facility at Kahuku, Hawaii. The wood composite blades have successfully completed high power (average of 150 kW) operations for an eighteen month period (nearly 8,000 hr) before replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The original set of blades was taken out of service because of the failure of the shank on one stud. An inspection of the blades at NASA-Lewis showed that the shank failure was caused by a high stress concentration at a corrosion pit on the shank fillet radius which resulted in fatigue stresses in excess of the endurance limit.

  4. Theoretical modeling and experimental analyses of laminated wood composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Vijaya Gopu; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Wood laminated composite poles consist of trapezoid-shaped wood strips bonded with synthetic resin. The thick-walled hollow poles had adequate strength and stiffness properties and were a promising substitute for solid wood poles. It was necessary to develop theoretical models to facilitate the manufacture and future installation and maintenance of this novel...

  5. Preparation of Desirable Porous Cell Structure Polylactide/Wood Flour Composite Foams Assisted by Chain Extender

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youyong; Song, Yongming; Du, Jun; Xi, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingwen

    2017-01-01

    Polylactide (PLA)/wood flour composite foam were prepared through a batch foaming process. The effect of the chain extender on the crystallization behavior and dynamic rheological properties of the PLA/wood flour composites were investigated as well as the crystal structure and cell morphology of the composite foams. The incorporation of the chain extender enhanced the complex viscosity and storage modulus of PLA/wood flour composites, indicating the improved melt elasticity. The chain extender also led to a decreased crystallization rate and final crystallinity of PLA/wood flour composites. With an increasing chain extender content, a finer and more uniform cell structure was formed, and the expansion ratio of PLA/wood flour composite foams was much higher than without the chain extender. Compared to the unfoamed composites, the crystallinity of the foamed PLA/wood flour composites was improved and the crystal was loosely packed. However, the new crystalline form was not evident. PMID:28846604

  6. Composites from southern pine juvenile wood. Part 2. Durability and dimensional stability

    Treesearch

    Anton D. Pugel; Eddie W. Price; Chung-Yun Hse

    1990-01-01

    Southern pine juvenile and mature wood were processed into three composites: flakeboard, particleboard, and fiberboard. The durability of these composites was assessed by subjecting specimens to an ovendry-vacuumpressure-soak (ODVPS) treatment, and then evaluated for modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, and internal bond. Overall, juvenile wood composites had...

  7. Surface properties of thermally treated composite wood panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Spirchez, Cosmin; Lunguleasa, Aurel; Cristea, Daniel; Roata, Ionut Claudiu; Pop, Mihai Alin; Bedo, Tibor; Stanciu, Elena Manuela; Pascu, Alexandru

    2018-04-01

    Composite finger-jointed spruce and oak wood panels have been thermally treated under standard pressure and oxygen content conditions at two different temperatures, 180 °C and respectively 200 °C for short time periods (3 and 5 h). Due to the thermally-aided chemical restructuration of the wood components, a decrease in water uptake and volumetric swelling values with up to 45% for spruce and 35% for oak have been registered, comparing to the reference samples. In relation to water resistance, a 15% increase of the dispersive component of the surface energy has been registered for the thermal-treated spruce panels, which impedes water spreading on the surface. The thermal-treated wood presents superior resistance to accelerated UV exposure and subsequently, with up to 10% higher Brinell hardness values than reference wood. The proposed thermal treatment improves the durability of the finger-jointed wood through a more economically and environmental friendly method than traditional impregnation, with minimal degradative impact on the structural components of wood.

  8. 78 FR 51695 - Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental... composite wood products. After receiving requests for an extension, EPA extended the comment period from... Environmental protection, Formaldehyde, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Toxic substances, Wood. Dated...

  9. Metal/ceramic composites via infiltration of an interconnected wood-derived ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Thomas E.

    The use of composites is increasing as they afford scientists and engineers the ability to combine the advantageous properties of each constituent phase, e.g. metal ductility and ceramic stiffness. With respect to materials design, biomimetics is garnering increasing attention due to the complex, yet efficient, natural microstructures. One such biomimetic, or in this case 'bio-derived,' curiosity is wood-derived ceramic, which is made by either replicating or converting wood into a ceramic. The resulting porous and anisotropic material retains the precursor microstructure. The wide variety of precursors can yield materials with a range of pore sizes and distribution of pores. The purpose of this work was to study the processing, microstructure, and properties of aluminum/silicon carbide composites. The composites were made by infiltrating molten aluminum into porous wood-derived SIC, which was produced by the reactive melt-infiltration of silicon into pyrolyzed wood. The composite microstructure consisted of interconnected SiC surrounding Al-alloy 'fibers.' The strength, modulus, and toughness were measured in both longitudinal and transverse orientations. The Al → SiC load transfer was investigated with high-energy X-ray diffraction in combination with in-situ compressive loading. The properties in flexure were found to decrease with increasing temperature. Despite the complex microstructure, predictions of the composite flexural modulus and longitudinal fracture toughness were obtained using simple models: Halpin-Tsai bounds and the Ashby et al. model of the effect of ductile particle-reinforcements on the toughness of brittle materials (Ashby et al. 1989), respectively. In addition, the Al/SiC research inspired the investigation of carbon-reinforced copper composites. The goal was to explore the feasibility of making a high-thermal conductivity composite by infiltrating copper into wood-derived carbon. Results indicated that Cu/C composites could be made with

  10. Plastics & Composites Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed plastics and composites technology program for design engineers. General information was obtained through a literature search, from the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., the Michigan Employment Security Commission, and interviews with…

  11. 78 FR 44089 - Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental... composite wood products. This document extends the comment period from August 9, 2013, to September 9, 2013... requirements, Toxic substances, Wood. Dated: July 17, 2013. James Jones, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office...

  12. Stretching-induced wrinkling in plastic-rubber composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junyu; Damle, Sameer; Maiti, Spandan; Velankar, Sachin S

    2017-01-25

    We examine the mechanics of three-layer composite films composed of an elastomeric layer sandwiched between two thin surface layers of plastic. Upon stretching and releasing such composite films, they develop a highly wrinkled surface texture. The mechanism for this texturing is that during stretching, the plastic layers yield and stretch irreversibly whereas the elastomer stretches reversibly. Thus upon releasing, the plastic layers buckle due to compressive stress imposed by the elastomer. Experiments are conducted using SEPS elastomer and 50 micron thick LLDPE plastic films. Stretching and releasing the composites to 2-5 times their original length induces buckles with wavelength on the order of 200 microns, and the wavelength decreases as the stretching increases. FEM simulations reveal that plastic deformation is involved at all stages during this process: (1) during stretching, the plastic layer yields in tension; (2) during recovery, the plastic layer first yields in-plane in compression and then buckles; (3) post-buckling, plastic hinges are formed at high-curvature regions. Homogeneous wrinkles are predicted only within a finite window of material properties: if the yield stress is too low, the plastic layers yield in-plane, without wrinkling, whereas if the yield stress is too high, non-homogeneous wrinkles are predicted. This approach to realizing highly wrinkled textures offers several advantages, most importantly the fact that high aspect ratio wrinkles (amplitude to wavelength ratios exceeding 0.4) can be realized.

  13. PAFAC- PLASTIC AND FAILURE ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing number of applications of fiber-reinforced composites in industry demands a detailed understanding of their material properties and behavior. A three-dimensional finite-element computer program called PAFAC (Plastic and Failure Analysis of Composites) has been developed for the elastic-plastic analysis of fiber-reinforced composite materials and structures. The evaluation of stresses and deformations at edges, cut-outs, and joints is essential in understanding the strength and failure for metal-matrix composites since the onset of plastic yielding starts very early in the loading process as compared to the composite's ultimate strength. Such comprehensive analysis can only be achieved by a finite-element program like PAFAC. PAFAC is particularly suited for the analysis of laminated metal-matrix composites. It can model the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix phase while the fibers remain elastic. Since the PAFAC program uses a three-dimensional element, the program can also model the individual layers of the laminate to account for thickness effects. In PAFAC, the composite is modeled as a continuum reinforced by cylindrical fibers of vanishingly small diameter which occupy a finite volume fraction of the composite. In this way, the essential axial constraint of the phases is retained. Furthermore, the local stress and strain fields are uniform. The PAFAC finite-element solution is obtained using the displacement method. Solution of the nonlinear equilibrium equations is obtained with a Newton-Raphson iteration technique. The elastic-plastic behavior of composites consisting of aligned, continuous elastic filaments and an elastic-plastic matrix is described in terms of the constituent properties, their volume fractions, and mutual constraints between phases indicated by the geometry of the microstructure. The program uses an iterative procedure to determine the overall response of the laminate, then from the overall response determines the stress

  14. PCM/wood composite to store thermal energy in passive building envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreneche, C.; Vecstaudza, J.; Bajare, D.; Fernandez, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    The development of new materials to store thermal energy in a passive building system is a must to improve the thermal efficiency by thermal-regulating the indoor temperatures. This fact will deal with the reduction of the gap between energy supply and energy demand to achieve thermal comfort in building indoors. The aim of this work was to test properties of novel PCM/wood composite materials developed at Riga Technical University. Impregnation of PCM (phase change material) in wood increases its thermal mass and regulates temperature fluctuations during day and night. The PCM used are paraffin waxes (RT-21 and RT-27 from Rubitherm) and the wood used was black alder, the most common wood in Latvia. The PCM distribution inside wood sample has been studied as well as its thermophysical, mechanical and fire reaction properties. Developed composite materials are promising in the field of energy saving in buildings.

  15. Interfacial Structure and Properties of Wood/Polypropylene Composites

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; Suzhow Yin

    2000-01-01

    Composite wood products have traditionally relied on thermosetting polymers like phenol-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde resins as binders. The continuing need to effectively utilize lignocellulosic fiber from low-quality hardwoods and from recycling streams has prompted consideration of new composites based on thermoplastic polymers [1,2]. Much of the development...

  16. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time-Temperature Superposition Principle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng-Chun; Chien, Yi-Chi; Wu, Tung-Lin; Hung, Ke-Chang; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2017-03-30

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP), and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance ( ICR ) of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature.

  17. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time–Temperature Superposition Principle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Teng-Chun; Chien, Yi-Chi; Wu, Tung-Lin; Hung, Ke-Chang; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time–temperature superposition principle (TTSP), and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance (ICR) of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature. PMID:28772726

  18. Morphology, composition, and mixing state of primary particles from combustion sources - crop residue, wood, and solid waste.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Kong, Shaofei; Zhang, Yinxiao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liang; Yan, Qin; Lingaswamy, A P; Shi, Zongbo; Lv, Senlin; Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye; Li, Weijun

    2017-07-11

    Morphology, composition, and mixing state of individual particles emitted from crop residue, wood, and solid waste combustion in a residential stove were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study showed that particles from crop residue and apple wood combustion were mainly organic matter (OM) in smoldering phase, whereas soot-OM internally mixed with K in flaming phase. Wild grass combustion in flaming phase released some Cl-rich-OM/soot particles and cardboard combustion released OM and S-rich particles. Interestingly, particles from hardwood (pear wood and bamboo) and softwood (cypress and pine wood) combustion were mainly soot and OM in the flaming phase, respectively. The combustion of foam boxes, rubber tires, and plastic bottles/bags in the flaming phase released large amounts of soot internally mixed with a small amount of OM, whereas the combustion of printed circuit boards and copper-core cables emitted large amounts of OM with Br-rich inclusions. In addition, the printed circuit board combustion released toxic metals containing Pb, Zn, Sn, and Sb. The results are important to document properties of primary particles from combustion sources, which can be used to trace the sources of ambient particles and to know their potential impacts in human health and radiative forcing in the air.

  19. In-Situ Preparation and Magnetic Properties of Fe3O4/WOOD Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Honglin; Zhang, Genlin; Wu, Guoyuan; Guan, Hongtao

    2011-06-01

    Fe3O4/wood composite, a magnetic material, was prepared by In-situ chemosynthesis method at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the average partical size of Fe3O4 was about 14 nm. The magnetic properties of the resulting composites were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The composites have saturation magnetization (Ms) values from 4.7 to 25.3 emu/g with the increase of weight percent gains (WPG) of the wood for the composites, but coercive forces (Hc) are invariable, which is different from the magnetic materials reported before. It may be due to the fact that the interaction between wood and Fe3O4 becomes stronger when less of Fe3O4 particles are introduced in the composition, and this also changes the surface anisotropy (Ks) of the magnetism. A structural characterization by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) proved the interaction between Fe3O4 particles and wood matrix, and it also illustrates that this interaction influences the coercive force of the composite.

  20. Surface chemistry changes of weathered HDPE/wood-flour composites studied by XPS and FTIR spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2004-01-01

    The use of wood-derived fillers by the thermoplastic industry has been growing, fueled in part by the use of wood-fiber–thermoplastic composites by the construction industry. As a result, the durability of wood-fiber– thermoplastic composites after ultraviolet exposure has become a concern. Samples of 100% high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and HDPE filled with 50% wood-...

  1. Finite element analyses of wood laminated composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Finite element analyses using ANSYS were conducted on orthotropic, polygonal, wood laminated composite poles subjected to a body force and a concentrated load at the free end. Deflections and stress distributions of small-scale and full-size composite poles were analyzed and compared to the results obtained in an experimental study. The predicted deflection for both...

  2. Method of coextruding plastics to form a composite sheet

    DOEpatents

    Tsien, Hsue C.

    1985-06-04

    This invention pertains to a method of producing a composite sheet of plastic materials by means of coextrusion. Two plastic materials are matched with respect to their melt indices. These matched plastic materials are then coextruded in a side-by-side orientation while hot and soft to form a composite sheet having a substantially uniform demarkation therebetween. The plastic materials are fed at a substantially equal extrusion velocity and generally have substantially equal viscosities. The coextruded plastics can be worked after coextrusion while they are still hot and soft.

  3. An analysis of the composition and metal contamination of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).

    PubMed

    Stenvall, Erik; Tostar, Sandra; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Möller, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    The compositions of three WEEE plastic batches of different origin were investigated using infrared spectroscopy, and the metal content was determined with inductively coupled plasma. The composition analysis of the plastics was based mainly on 14 samples collected from a real waste stream, and showed that the major constituents were high impact polystyrene (42 wt%), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (38 wt%) and polypropylene (10 wt%). Their respective standard deviations were 21.4%, 16.5% and 60.7%, indicating a considerable variation even within a single batch. The level of metal particle contamination was found to be low in all samples, whereas wood contamination and rubber contamination were found to be about 1 wt% each in most samples. In the metal content analysis, iron was detected at levels up to 700 ppm in the recyclable waste plastics fraction, which is of concern due to its potential to catalyse redox reactions during melt processing and thus accelerate the degradation of plastics during recycling. Toxic metals were found only at very low concentrations, with the exception of lead and cadmium which could be detected at 200 ppm and 70 ppm levels, respectively, but these values are below the current threshold limits of 1000 ppm and 100 ppm set by the Restriction of Hazardous Substances directive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Engineering Design Handbook Short Fiber Plastic Base Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-31

    ENGINEERING DESIGN HANDBOOK N ’~rttl SHORT FIBER PLASTIC BASE COMPOSITES l ,.. HEADQUARTERS, US ARrm MAlERIEL COIVMAND JULY 1975 DEPARTMENT OF...HANDBOOK SHORT FIBER PLASTIC BASE COMPOSITES TABLE OF CONTENTS 31 July 1975 Paragraph Page 1-1 1-2 1-2.1 1-2.2 1-3 1-3.1 1-3.2 1-3.3 1...General ............................... . Molding Short Fiber Compounds ........... . Classification of Polymer Based Composites

  5. WPC's Short Range Forecasts (Days 0.5 - 2.5) - Black and White

    Science.gov Websites

    Summaries Heat Index Tropical Products Daily Weather Map GIS Products Current Watches/ Warnings Satellite and Radar Imagery GOES-East Satellite GOES-West Satellite National Radar Product Archive WPC

  6. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  7. Wood chemical composition in species of Cactaceae: the relationship between lignification and stem morphology.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Rivera, Jorge; Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos; Terrazas, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level.

  8. Laboratory tests on fungal resistance of wood filled polyethylene composites

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Rebecca E. Ibach

    2002-01-01

    A standard method for determining the durability of structural wood was modified for testing the fungal resistance of composites made from high density polyethylene filled with 50% wood flour. Moisture content, mechanical properties, and weight loss were measured over 12 weeks exposure to brown-and white-rot fungi. Mechanical properties were decreased, but irreversible...

  9. Construction of low-cost, Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Two sixty-foot, low-cost, wood composite blades for service on 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbines were constructed. The blades were constructed of epoxy resin-bonded Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge sections, and paper honeycombcored, birch plywood faced panels for the afterbody sections. The blades were joined to the wind turbine hub by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs embedded into the root end of the blades. The blades were installed on the 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbine facility at Kahuku, Hawaii, The blades completed nearly 8,000 hours of operation over an 18 month period at an average power of 150 kW prior to replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The blades were replaced because of a corrosion failure of the steel shank on one stud. Inspections showed that the wood composite structure remained in excellent condition.

  10. Do Polyethylene Plastic Covers Affect Smoke Emissions from Debris Piles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, D. R.; Jung, H.; Cocker, D.; Hosseini, E.; Li, Q.; Shrivastava, M.; McCorison, M.

    2010-12-01

    Shrubs and small diameter trees exist in the understories of many western forests. They are important from an ecological perspective; however, this vegetation also presents a potential hazard as “ladder fuels” or as a heat source to damage the overstory during prescribed burns. Cutting and piling of this material to burn under safe conditions is a common silvicultural practice. To improve ignition success of the piled debris, polyethylene plastic is often used to cover a portion of the pile. While burning of piled forest debris is an acceptable practice in southern California from an air quality perspective, inclusion of plastic in the piles changes these debris piles to rubbish piles which should not be burned. With support from the four National Forests in southern California, we conducted a laboratory experiment to determine if the presence of polyethylene plastic in a pile of burning wood changed the smoke emissions. Debris piles in southern California include wood and foliage from common forest trees such as sugar and ponderosa pines, white fir, incense cedar, and California black oak and shrubs such as ceanothus and manzanita in addition to forest floor material and dirt. Manzanita wood was used to represent the debris pile in order to control the effects of fuel bed composition. The mass of polyethylene plastic incorporated into the pile was 0, 0.25 and 2.5% of the wood mass—a range representative of field conditions. Measured emissions included NOx, CO, CO2, SO2, polycyclic and light hydrocarbons, carbonyls, particulate matter (5 to 560 nm), elemental and organic carbon. The presence of polyethylene did not alter the emissions composition from this experiment.

  11. Wood-based Tri-Axial Sandwich Composite Materials: Design, Fabrication, Testing, Modeling and Application

    Treesearch

    Jinghao Li; John F. Hunt; Shaoqin Gong; Zhiyong Cai

    2014-01-01

    As the demand for sustainable materials increases, there are unique challenges and opportunities to develop light-weight green composites materials for a wide range of applications. Thus wood-based composite materials from renewable forests may provide options for some niche applications while helping to protect our environment. In this paper, the wood-based tri-axial...

  12. The fungal composition of natural biofinishes on oil-treated wood.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Elke J; Houbraken, Jos A M P; Punt, Peter J; Roeselers, Guus; Adan, Olaf C G; Samson, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Biofinished wood is considered to be a decorative and protective material for outdoor constructions, showing advantages compared to traditional treated wood in terms of sustainability and self-repair. Natural dark wood staining fungi are essential to biofinish formation on wood. Although all sorts of outdoor situated timber are subjected to fungal staining, the homogenous dark staining called biofinish has only been detected on specific vegetable oil-treated substrates. Revealing the fungal composition of various natural biofinishes on wood is a first step to understand and control biofinish formation for industrial application. A culture-based survey of fungi in natural biofinishes on oil-treated wood samples showed the common wood stain fungus Aureobasidium and the recently described genus Superstratomyces to be predominant constituents. A culture-independent approach, based on amplification of the internal transcribed spacer regions, cloning and Sanger sequencing, resulted in clone libraries of two types of biofinishes. Aureobasidium was present in both biofinish types, but was only predominant in biofinishes on pine sapwood treated with raw linseed oil. Most cloned sequences of the other biofinish type (pine sapwood treated with olive oil) could not be identified. In addition, a more in-depth overview of the fungal composition of biofinishes was obtained with Illumina amplicon sequencing that targeted the internal transcribed spacer region 1. All investigated samples, that varied in wood species, (oil) treatments and exposure times, contained Aureobasidium and this genus was predominant in the biofinishes on pine sapwood treated with raw linseed oil. Lapidomyces was the predominant genus in most of the other biofinishes and present in all other samples. Surprisingly, Superstratomyces , which was predominantly detected by the cultivation-based approach, could not be found with the Illumina sequencing approach, while Lapidomyces was not detected in the culture

  13. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Alessandra

    2018-03-18

    Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented.

  14. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented. PMID:29562635

  15. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T.; Voriskova, Jana; Heise, Janine; Rønn, Regin; Kjøller, Rasmus; Hansen, Hans C. B.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2017-01-01

    Recirculation of wood ash from energy production to forest soil improves the sustainability of this energy production form as recycled wood ash contains nutrients that otherwise would be lost at harvest. In addition, wood-ash is beneficial to many soils due to its inherent acid-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha-1. We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha-1 to alkaline at 167 t ha-1. Bacterial numbers significantly increased up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha-1 followed by significant decrease at 167 t ha-1 wood ash. The soil bacterial community composition changed after wood ash application with copiotrophic bacteria responding positively up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha-1 while the adverse effect was seen for oligotrophic bacteria. Marked changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a wood ash dose of 167 t ha-1 with a single alkaliphilic genus dominating. Additionally, spore-formers became abundant at an ash dose of 167 t ha-1 whereas this was not the case at lower ash doses. Lastly, bacterial richness and diversity strongly decreased with increasing amount of wood ash applied. All of the observed bacterial responses can be directly

  16. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition.

    PubMed

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T; Voriskova, Jana; Heise, Janine; Rønn, Regin; Kjøller, Rasmus; Hansen, Hans C B; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2017-01-01

    Recirculation of wood ash from energy production to forest soil improves the sustainability of this energy production form as recycled wood ash contains nutrients that otherwise would be lost at harvest. In addition, wood-ash is beneficial to many soils due to its inherent acid-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha -1 . We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha -1 to alkaline at 167 t ha -1 . Bacterial numbers significantly increased up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha -1 followed by significant decrease at 167 t ha -1 wood ash. The soil bacterial community composition changed after wood ash application with copiotrophic bacteria responding positively up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha -1 while the adverse effect was seen for oligotrophic bacteria. Marked changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a wood ash dose of 167 t ha -1 with a single alkaliphilic genus dominating. Additionally, spore-formers became abundant at an ash dose of 167 t ha -1 whereas this was not the case at lower ash doses. Lastly, bacterial richness and diversity strongly decreased with increasing amount of wood ash applied. All of the observed bacterial responses can be

  17. Determining shear modulus of thin wood composite materials using a cantilever beam vibration method

    Treesearch

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Haicheng Yan

    2016-01-01

    Shear modulus (G) of thin wood composite materials is one of several important indicators that characterizes mechanical properties. However, there is not an easy method to obtain this value. This study presents the use of a newly developed cantilever beam free vibration test apparatus to detect in-plane G of thin wood composite...

  18. 49 CFR 178.522 - Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for composite packagings with inner... Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles. (a) The following are the identification codes for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles: (1) 6HA1 for a plastic receptacle within...

  19. Nanoindentation of the interphase region of a wood-reinforced polypropylene composite

    Treesearch

    Joseph E. Jakes; John C. Hermanson; Donald S. Stone

    2007-01-01

    The interphase region of a wood-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composite was investigated with nanoindentation techniques capable of separating intrinsic properties of PP in the interphase region from the effect of elastic discontinuity caused by the nearby wood cell wall. From data collected in this experiment, no differences in hardness or Young’s modulus for PP were...

  20. Investigating interphase development is wood polymer composites by inverse gas chromatography

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; John Simonsen

    2000-01-01

    The influence of secondary interactions on the development of interfacial structure in composites of wood and amorphous thermoplastic polymers is not well understood. This study used inverse gas chromatography to investigate the effect of different polymers on the surfirce energy of partially or fully coated white pine wood meal. In this way, the development of the...

  1. Cantilever-beam dynamic modulus for wood composite products. Part 1, apparatus

    Treesearch

    Chris Turk; John F. Hunt; David J. Marr

    2008-01-01

    A cantilever-beam vibration-testing apparatus has been developed to provide a means of dynamic and non-destructive evaluation of modulus of elasticity for small samples of wood or wood-composite material. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam and then releases the beam into its natural first-mode vibration and records displacement as a...

  2. Analysis physical properties of composites polymer from cocofiber and polypropylene plastic waste with maleic anhydrate as crosslinking agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelita, E.; Hidayani, T. R.; Akbar, A.

    2017-07-01

    This research was conducted with the aim to produce composites polymer with polypropylene plastic waste materials and cocofiber which aims to produce wood replacement material in the home furnishings industry. This research was conducted with several stages. The first stage is the process of soaking coco fiber with detergent to remove oil and 2% NaOH. The second stage is to combine the polypropylene plastic waste with cocofiber is a chemical bond, modification by adding maleic anhydride as a crosslinking agent and benzoyl peroxide as an initiator each as much as 1%. Mixing materials done by reflux method using xylene solvent. In this study, carried out a wide range of weight variation of coco fiber are added to the 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%. The third stage is a polymer composite molding process using hot press at a temperature of 158°C. The results of polymer composites Showed optimum condition on the addition of 40% cocofiber with supple tensile strength value of 90.800 kgf /cm2 and value of elongation break at 3.6726 x 104 (kgf/cm2), melting point at 160.02°C, burning point 463.43°C, residue of TGA is 19%, the density of 0.84 g/mL. From these data, conclude that the resulting polymer composites meet the SNI 03-2105-2006 about ordinary composite polymer and polymer composite structural type 8 regular types from 17.5 to 10.5.

  3. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 323 - Word Processing Center (WPC) Safeguards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM Pt. 323, App. D Appendix D to.... 2. Storing media containing personal data in separate files or areas. 3. Marking the storage... the areas discussed in this enclosure, as well as any special risks that the WPC location...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 323 - Word Processing Center (WPC) Safeguards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM Pt. 323, App. D Appendix D to.... 2. Storing media containing personal data in separate files or areas. 3. Marking the storage... the areas discussed in this enclosure, as well as any special risks that the WPC location...

  5. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 323 - Word Processing Center (WPC) Safeguards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM Pt. 323, App. D Appendix D to.... 2. Storing media containing personal data in separate files or areas. 3. Marking the storage... the areas discussed in this enclosure, as well as any special risks that the WPC location...

  6. Composites from southern pine juvenile wood. Part 3. Juvenile and mature wood furnish mixtures

    Treesearch

    A.D. Pugel; E.W. Price; Chung-Yun Hse; T.F. Shupe

    2004-01-01

    Composite panelsmade from mixtures ofmature andjuvenile southern pine (Pinus taeda L.) were evaluated for initial mechanical properties and dimensional stability. The effect that the proportion of juvenile wood had on panel properties was analyzed by regression and rule-of-mixtures models. The mixed furnish data: 1) highlighted the degree to which...

  7. Mechanical properties of small-scale laminated wood composite poles: effects of taper and webs

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2006-01-01

    Laminated hollow wood composite poles represent an efficient utilization of the timber resource and a promising alternative for solid poles that are commonly used in the power transmission and telecommunication lines. The objective of this study was to improve the performance of composite poles by introducing the bio-mimicry concept into the design of hollow wood...

  8. Finite element modeling of small-scale tapered wood-laminated composite poles with biomimicry features

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2008-01-01

    Tapered composite poles with biomimicry features as in bamboo are a new generation of wood laminated composite poles that may some day be considered as an alternative to solid wood poles that are widely used in the transmission and telecommunication fields. Five finite element models were developed with ANSYS to predict and assess the performance of five types of...

  9. On the role of CFRP reinforcement for wood beams stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianasi, A. C.

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, carbon fiber composites have been increasingly used in different ways in reinforcing structural elements. Specifically, the use of composite materials as a reinforcement for wood beams under bending loads requires paying attention to several aspects of the problem such as the number of the composite layers applied on the wood beams. Study consolidation of composites revealed that they are made by bonding fibrous material impregnated with resin on the surface of various elements, to restore or increase the load carrying capacity (bending, cutting, compression or torque) without significant damage of their rigidity. Fibers used in building applications can be fiberglass, aramid or carbon. Items that can be strengthened are concrete, brick, wood, steel and stone, and in terms of structural beams, walls, columns and floors. This paper describes an experimental study which was designed to evaluate the effect of composite material on the stiffness of the wood beams. It proposes a summary of the fundamental principles of analysis of composite materials and the design and use. The type of reinforcement used on the beams is the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheet and plates and also an epoxy resin for bonding all the elements. Structural epoxy resins remain the primary choice of adhesive to form the bond to fiber-reinforced plastics and are the generally accepted adhesives in bonded CFRP-wood connections. The advantages of using epoxy resin in comparison to common wood-laminating adhesives are their gap-filling qualities and the low clamping pressures that are required to form the bond between carbon fiber plates or sheets and the wood beams. Mechanical tests performed on the reinforced wood beams showed that CFRP materials may produce flexural displacement and lifting increases of the beams. Observations of the experimental load-displacement relationships showed that bending strength increased for wood beams reinforced with CFRP composite plates

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Dowel-Type Joints Made of Wood Scrimber Composite

    PubMed Central

    He, Minjuan; Tao, Duo; Li, Zheng; Li, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    As a renewable building material with low embodied energy characteristics, wood has gained more and more attention in the green and sustainable building industry. In terms of material resource and physical properties, scrimber composite not only makes full use of fast-growing wood species, but also has better mechanical performance and less inherent variability than natural wood material. In this study, the mechanical behavior of bolted beam-to-column joints built with a kind of scrimber composite was investigated both experimentally and numerically. Two groups of specimens were tested under monotonic and low frequency cyclic loading protocols. The experimental results showed that the bolted joints built with scrimber composite performed well in initial stiffness, ductility, and energy dissipation. A three-dimensional (3D) non-linear finite element model (FEM) for the bolted beam-to-column joints was then developed and validated by experimental results. The validated model was further used to investigate the failure mechanism of the bolted joints through stress analysis. This study can contribute to the application of the proposed scrimber composite in structural engineering, and the developed FEM can serve as a useful tool to evaluate the mechanical behavior of such bolted beam-to-column joints with different configurations in future research. PMID:28773703

  11. Mechanical Behavior of Dowel-Type Joints Made of Wood Scrimber Composite.

    PubMed

    He, Minjuan; Tao, Duo; Li, Zheng; Li, Maolin

    2016-07-15

    As a renewable building material with low embodied energy characteristics, wood has gained more and more attention in the green and sustainable building industry. In terms of material resource and physical properties, scrimber composite not only makes full use of fast-growing wood species, but also has better mechanical performance and less inherent variability than natural wood material. In this study, the mechanical behavior of bolted beam-to-column joints built with a kind of scrimber composite was investigated both experimentally and numerically. Two groups of specimens were tested under monotonic and low frequency cyclic loading protocols. The experimental results showed that the bolted joints built with scrimber composite performed well in initial stiffness, ductility, and energy dissipation. A three-dimensional (3D) non-linear finite element model (FEM) for the bolted beam-to-column joints was then developed and validated by experimental results. The validated model was further used to investigate the failure mechanism of the bolted joints through stress analysis. This study can contribute to the application of the proposed scrimber composite in structural engineering, and the developed FEM can serve as a useful tool to evaluate the mechanical behavior of such bolted beam-to-column joints with different configurations in future research.

  12. Predicting Plywood Properties with Wood-based Composite Models

    Treesearch

    Christopher Adam Senalik; Robert J. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Previous research revealed that stress wave nondestructive testing techniques could be used to evaluate the tensile and flexural properties of wood-based composite materials. Regression models were developed that related stress wave transmission characteristics (velocity and attenuation) to modulus of elasticity and strength. The developed regression models accounted...

  13. Variations in the monoterpene composition of ponderosa pine wood oleoresin

    Treesearch

    Richard H. Smith

    1964-01-01

    A wide range in quantitative composition of the wood oleoresin monoterpenes was found among 64 ponderosa pines in the central Sierra Nevada by gas chromatographic analysis. An inverse relationship was found in the amount of β-pinene and Δ3-carene. Practically no difference in composition could be associated with (a) type of...

  14. Characterization and evaluation physical properties biodegradable plastic composite from seaweed (Eucheuma cottonii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deni, Glar Donia; Dhaningtyas, Shalihat Afifah; Fajar, Ibnu; Sudarno

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and evaluation of biodegradable plastic composed of a mixture PVA - carrageenan - chitosan was conducted in this study. Obtained data were then compared to commercial biodegradable plastic. Characteristic of plastic was mechanical tested such as tensile - strength and elongation. Plastic degradation was studied using composting method for 7 days and 14 days. The results showed that the increase carrageenan will decrease tensile-strength and elongation plastic composite. In addition, increase carrageenan would increase the degraded plastics composite.

  15. Molding apparatus. [for thermosetting plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus for compression molding of thermosetting plastics compositions including interfitting hollow male and female components is reported. The components are adapted to be compressed to form a rocket nozzle in a cavity. A thermal jacket is provided exteriorly adjacent to the female component for circulating a thermal transfer fluid to effect curing of a thermosetting plastics material being molded. Each of the male and female components is provided with suitable inlets and outlets for circulating a thermal transfer fluid.

  16. A Planning Guide for Small and Medium Size Wood Products Companies

    Treesearch

    Jeff Howe; Stephen Bratkovich

    2005-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century, North American wood products companies are facing competitive pressure from numerous sources. Traditional products are being manufactured in new regions (e.g., China and the developing nations), and substitute products are being developed by competing industries (e.g., plastics and composites). The bottom line is strained by...

  17. Biological resistance of polyethylene composites made with chemically modified fiber or flour

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons

    2002-01-01

    The role of moisture in the biological decay of wood-plastic composites was investigated. Southern pine wood fiber and ponderosa pine wood flour were chemically modified using either acetic anhydride (AA), butylene oxide (BO), or propylene oxide (PO). A 50:50 mixture of high density polyethylene and either chemically modified fiber or flour, or untreated fiber or flour...

  18. Effects of copper amine treatments on mechanical, biological and surface/interphase properties of poly (vinyl chloride)/wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haihong

    2005-11-01

    The copper ethanolamine (CuEA) complex was used as a wood surface modifier and a coupling agent for wood-PVC composites. Mechanical properties of composites, such as unnotched impact strength, flexural strength and flexural toughness, were significantly increased, and fungal decay weight loss was dramatically decreased by wood surface copper amine treatments. It is evident that copper amine was a very effective coupling agent and decay inhibitor for PVC/wood flour composites, especially in high wood flour loading level. A DSC study showed that the heat capacity differences (DeltaCp) of composites before and after PVC glass transition were reduced by adding wood particles. A DMA study revealed that the movements of PVC chain segments during glass transition were limited and obstructed by the presence of wood molecule chains. This restriction effect became stronger by increasing wood flour content and by using Cu-treated wood flour. Wood flour particles acted as "physical cross-linking points" inside the PVC matrix, resulting in the absence of the rubbery plateau of PVC and higher E', E'' above Tg, and smaller tan delta peaks. Enhanced mechanical performances were attributed to the improved wetting condition between PVC melts and wood surfaces, and the formation of a stronger interphase strengthened by chemical interactions between Cu-treated wood flour and the PVC matrix. Contact angles of PVC solution drops on Cu-treated wood surfaces were decreased dramatically compared to those on the untreated surfaces. Acid-base (polar), gammaAB, electron-acceptor (acid) (gamma +), electron-donor (base) (gamma-) surface energy components and the total surface energies increased after wood surface Cu-treatments, indicating a strong tendency toward acid-base or polar interactions. Improved interphase and interfacial adhesion were further confirmed by measuring interfacial shear strength between wood and the PVC matrix.

  19. Evaluation of mechanical properties and durability performance of HDPE-wood composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tazi, M.; Erchiqui, F.; Kaddami, H.

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the mechanical properties and durability performance of bio-composite materials made from sawdust and thermoplastic polymer (HDPE). For the preparation of the composites, sawdust in different proportions with Maleic Anhydride grafted Polyethylene (MAPE) as the coupling agent was used. The thermal and mechanical properties were successively characterized. The results indicate that adding wood fillers to a polymer matrix increases the degree of crystallinity and improves the tensile strength and ductility of composites. On the contrary, resistance to water absorption decreases as a function of the wood fillers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was usedmore » to analyze morphological structure alteration when exposed to intense weathering. The biodegradability of bio-composites up to 97 days was also investigated; the results indicate that, by increasing the filler content, the amount of weight loss increased as well. In other words, even though the addition of sawdust to thermoplastic polymer improves the mechanical performance of a composite material, it also accelerates the biodegradation rate of the composite. An optimum amount of filler content might compromise the effect of biodegradation and mechanical properties of composite materials.« less

  20. Factsheet -- EPA’s Rule to Implement the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This factsheet explains EPA's final rule to implement the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Act and reduce exposure to formaldehyde vapors from certain wood products produced domestically or imported into the United States.

  1. Wood-Graphene Oxide Composite for Highly Efficient Solar Steam Generation and Desalination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Raliya, Ramesh; Biswas, Pratim; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2017-03-01

    Solar steam generation is a highly promising technology for harvesting solar energy, desalination and water purification. We introduce a novel bilayered structure composed of wood and graphene oxide (GO) for highly efficient solar steam generation. The GO layer deposited on the microporous wood provides broad optical absorption and high photothermal conversion resulting in rapid increase in the temperature at the liquid surface. On the other hand, wood serves as a thermal insulator to confine the photothermal heat to the evaporative surface and to facilitate the efficient transport of water from the bulk to the photothermally active space. Owing to the tailored bilayer structure and the optimal thermo-optical properties of the individual components, the wood-GO composite structure exhibited a solar thermal efficiency of ∼83% under simulated solar excitation at a power density of 12 kW/m 2 . The novel composite structure demonstrated here is highly scalable and cost-efficient, making it an attractive material for various applications involving large light absorption, photothermal conversion and heat localization.

  2. The Carbon Impacts of Wood Products

    Treesearch

    Richard Bergman; Maureen Puettmann; Adam Taylor; Kenneth E. Skog

    2014-01-01

    Wood products have many environmental advantages over nonwood alternatives. Documenting and publicizing these merits helps the future competitiveness of wood when climate change impacts are being considered. The manufacture of wood products requires less fossil fuel than nonwood alternative building materials such as concrete, metals, or plastics. By nature, wood is...

  3. Frequent Questions about Starting-up New Composite Wood Mills and the Use of Experimental Products and Resins

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following frequently asked questions (FAQs) address issues relating to starting-up new doestice composite wood mills and the use of experimental product and resin systems under the Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products final rule

  4. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of storage, heat treatment, and solids composition on the bleaching of whey with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomeng E; Campbell, Rachel E; Fox, Aaron J; Gerard, Patrick D; Drake, MaryAnne

    2012-07-01

    The residual annatto colorant in liquid whey is bleached to provide a desired neutral color in dried whey ingredients. This study evaluated the influence of starter culture, whey solids and composition, and spray drying on bleaching efficacy. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto was manufactured with starter culture or by addition of lactic acid and rennet. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was ultrafiltered (retentate) and spray dried to 34% whey protein concentrate (WPC34). Aliquots were bleached at 60 °C for 1 h (hydrogen peroxide, 250 ppm), before pasteurization, after pasteurization, after storage at 3 °C and after freezing at -20 °C. Aliquots of retentate were bleached analogously immediately and after storage at 3 or -20 °C. Freshly spray dried WPC34 was rehydrated to 9% (w/w) solids and bleached. In a final experiment, pasteurized fat-separated whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried to WPC34 and WPC80. The WPC34 and WPC80 retentates were diluted to 7 or 9% solids (w/w) and bleached at 50 °C for 1 h. Freshly spray-dried WPC34 and WPC80 were rehydrated to 9 or 12% solids and bleached. Bleaching efficacy was measured by extraction and quantification of norbixin. Each experiment was replicated 3 times. Starter culture, fat separation, or pasteurization did not impact bleaching efficacy (P > 0.05) while cold or frozen storage decreased bleaching efficacy (P < 0.05). Bleaching efficacy of 80% (w/w) protein liquid retentate was higher than liquid whey or 34% (w/w) protein liquid retentate (P < 0.05). Processing steps, particularly holding times and solids composition, influence bleaching efficacy of whey. Optimization of whey bleaching conditions is important to reduce the negative effects of bleaching on the flavor of dried whey ingredients. This study established that liquid storage and whey composition are critical processing points that influence bleaching efficacy. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. All-natural bio-plastics using starch-betaglucan composites.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Domenico; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Giosafatto, Concetta Valeria L; Ogrodowicz, Natalia; Kruczała, Krzysztof; Mikkelsen, Mette S; Maigret, Jean-Eudes; Lourdin, Denis; Mortensen, Kell; Blennow, Andreas

    2017-09-15

    Grain polysaccharides represent potential valuable raw materials for next-generation advanced and environmentally friendly plastics. Thermoplastic starch (TPS) is processed using conventional plastic technology, such as casting, extrusion, and molding. However, to adapt the starch to specific functionalities chemical modifications or blending with synthetic polymers, such as polycaprolactone are required (e.g. Mater-Bi). As an alternative, all-natural and compostable bio-plastics can be produced by blending starch with other polysaccharides. In this study, we used a maize starch (ST) and an oat β-glucan (BG) composite system to produce bio-plastic prototype films. To optimize performing conditions, we investigated the full range of ST:BG ratios for the casting (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100 BG). The plasticizer used was glycerol. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) as a spin probe, showed that the composite films with high BG content had a flexible chemical environment. They showed decreased brittleness and improved cohesiveness with high stress and strain values at the break. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction displayed a decrease in crystallinity at high BG content. Our data show that the blending of starch with other natural polysaccharides is a noteworthy path to improve the functionality of all-natural polysaccharide bio-plastics systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanical, Thermomechanical and Reprocessing Behavior of Green Composites from Biodegradable Polymer and Wood Flour

    PubMed Central

    Morreale, Marco; Liga, Antonio; Mistretta, Maria Chiara; Ascione, Laura; La Mantia, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The rising concerns in terms of environmental protection and the search for more versatile polymer-based materials have led to an increasing interest in the use of polymer composites filled with natural organic fillers (biodegradable and/or coming from renewable resources) as a replacement for traditional mineral inorganic fillers. At the same time, the recycling of polymers is still of fundamental importance in order to optimize the utilization of available resources, reducing the environmental impact related to the life cycle of polymer-based items. Green composites from biopolymer matrix and wood flour were prepared and the investigation focused on several issues, such as the effect of reprocessing on the matrix properties, wood flour loading effects on virgin and reprocessed biopolymer, and wood flour effects on material reprocessability. Tensile, Dynamic-mechanical thermal (DMTA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and creep tests were performed, pointing out that wood flour leads to an improvement of rigidity and creep resistance in comparison to the pristine polymer, without compromising other properties such as the tensile strength. The biopolymer also showed a good resistance to multiple reprocessing; the latter even allowed for improving some properties of the obtained green composites. PMID:28793656

  8. Comparative effects of pyrolytic products of fiber reinforced plastic and wood shavings on the respiratory variables in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Deb, Utsab; Gautam, Anshoo; Vijayaraghavan, R; Ratna, Debdatta; Chakraborty, B C

    2010-08-01

    Comparative inhalation toxicity studies of pyrolytic products (smoke) from synthetic polymer, fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) and teak wood shavings were carried out in male Swiss albino mice. The breathing pattern and the respiratory variables were monitored using a computer program that recognizes the modifications of the respiratory pattern. Exposure to the smoke from both the polymers caused a concentration dependent decrease in normal breathing and an increase in sensory irritation measure. The acute lethal concentration 50 values for a 15 min static inhalation exposure to the smoke from FRP and teak wood shavings were found to be > 200.00 and 62.99 g/m(3), respectively. Hence the inhalation toxicity of smoke from FRP sample on a mass basis is approximately one-third that of the smoke from teak wood. The concentration of smoke causing 50% respiratory depression of the exposed animals were found to be 6.877 and 0.106 g/m(3) for FRP and teak wood samples, respectively. Thus the sensory irritancy of the smoke from FRP sample is approximately 65 times lesser than the smoke from teak wood. The higher sensory irritancy potential of wood smoke as compared to FRP smoke may be caused by a greater number of submicron particles (size range of 2 micron and less) and greater percentage of gases present in wood smoke as compared to FRP smoke. Thus in case of accidental fires, synthetic polymers like FRP may be a safer choice for structural parts and interiors than the natural wood.

  9. Injection molded composites from kenaf and recycled plastic

    Treesearch

    Poo Chow; Dilpreet S. Bajwa; Wen-da Lu; John A. Youngquist; Nicole M. Stark; Qiang Li; Brent English

    1998-01-01

    Kenaf-based thermoplastic composites were developed and evaluated in this study. The kenaf stems were collected from farms in central Illinois. The kenaf fibers were blended with commercial virgin plastic or polypropylene and with recycled plastics or low-cost polyethylene in form of post-consumer film wastes and shrink wraps. Investigations on the fiber properties and...

  10. Frequently Asked Questions on Starting-up New Composite Wood Mills and the Use of Experimental Products and Resins

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following frequently asked questions (FAQs) address issues relating to starting-up new doestice composite wood mills and the use of experimental product and resin systems under the Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products final rule

  11. Damage of Wood-Concrete Composite subjected to variable hygrometric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loulou, L.; Caré, S.; Le Roy, R.; Bornert, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the factors influencing the durability of glued assemblies of wood and cementitious material under variable hygrometric conditions. The composite specimens are composed of cement paste connected to plywood using epoxy glue. The cement paste is subjected to autogeneous shrinkage and the wood is subjected to imbibition test. Plywood is used so that the swelling deformations due to the imbibition process are parallel to the connection plane. Swelling strains in wood are related to the water content measured by gammadensimetry technique. Global strains above and below the glue interface have been measured and have been compared to the free strains. We showed that there are restrained deformations at the glue interface and that the cement paste is damaged. Local strains have been characterized by means of the digital image correlation technique. We showed in particular that the deformations in wood are related to the microstructure of the layers of plywood and that the restrained deformations at the glue interface lead to a bending of the cement paste. In the case of strong adhesion properties, this bending induces cracking in cement paste.

  12. Effect of Wood Aging on Wine Mineral Composition and 87Sr/86Sr Isotopic Ratio.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ayse D; Bruno de Sousa, Raúl; Curvelo-Garcia, António S; Ricardo-da-Silva, Jorge M; Catarino, Sofia

    2017-06-14

    The evolution of mineral composition and wine strontium isotopic ratio 87 Sr/ 86 Sr (Sr IR) during wood aging were investigated. A red wine was aged in stainless steel tanks with French oak staves (Quercus sessiliflora Salisb.), with three industrial scale replicates. Sampling was carried out after 30, 60, and 90 days of aging, and the wines were evaluated in terms of general analysis, phenolic composition, total polysaccharides, multielement composition, and Sr IR. Li, Be, Mg, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Sb, Cs, Ba, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu, Tl, and Pb elements and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr were determined by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS) and Na, K, Ca, and Fe by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Two-way ANOVA was applied to assess wood aging and time effect on Sr IR and mineral composition. Wood aging resulted in significantly higher concentrations of Mg, V, Co, Ni, and Sr. At the end of the aging period, wine exhibited statistically identical Sr IR compared to control. Study suggests that wood aging does not affect 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, not precluding the use of this parameter for wine traceability purposes.

  13. Controlling mold on wood Pallets

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2012-01-01

    THE WOOD PALLET AND CONTAINER INDUSTRY CONSUMES 4.5 billion board feet (BBF) of hardwoods and 1.8 BBF of softwoods for the annual production of 400-500 million solid wood pallets. While alternative materials such as plastic, corrugated paperboard and metal have entered the market, solid wood remains the material of choice for a majority of pallets on the market (more...

  14. Gene expression patterns of wood decay fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are influenced by wood substrate composition during degradation

    Treesearch

    Oleksandr Skyba; Daniel Cullen; Carl J. Douglas; Shawn D. Mansfield

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the specific genes and enzymes involved in the fungal degradation of lignocellulosic biomass derived from feedstocks with various compositions is essential to the development of improved bioenergy processes. In order to elucidate the effect of substrate composition on gene expression in wood-rotting fungi, we employed microarrays based on the...

  15. Sunflower cake as a natural composite: composition and plastic properties.

    PubMed

    Geneau-Sbartaï, Céline; Leyris, Juliette; Silvestre, Françoise; Rigal, Luc

    2008-12-10

    Nowadays, the end-of-life of plastic products and the decrease of fossil energy are great environmental problems. Moreover, with the increase of food and nonfood transformations of renewable resources, the quantities of agro-industrial byproducts and wastes increase hugely. These facts allow the development of plastic substitutes made from agro-resources. Many researches show the feasibility of molding biopolymers extracted from plants like a common polymeric matrix. Other natural macromolecules are used like fillers into polyolefins, for example. However, limited works present results about the transformation of a natural blend of biopolymers into a plastic material. The aim of this study is the determination of the composition of sunflower cake (SFC) and also the characterization of its components. These were identified by chemical and biochemical analysis often used in agricultural or food chemistry. Most of the extraction and purification processes modify the macrostructure of several biopolymers (e.g., denaturation of proteins, cleavage or creation of weak bonds, etc.). So, the composition of different parts of the sunflower seed (husk, kernel, and also protein isolate) was determined, and the plasticlike properties of their components were studied with thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a dynamic mechanical thermal analysis apparatus. Finally, this indirect way of characterization showed that SFC can be considered a natural composite. In SFC, several components like lignocellulosic fibers [40%/dry matter (DM)], which essentially come from the husk of sunflower seed, can act as fillers. However, other biopolymers like globulins ( approximately 30% of the 30% of sunflower seed proteins/DM of SFC) can be shaped as a thermoplastic-like material because this kind of protein has a temperature of glass transition and a temperature of denaturation that seems to be similar to a melting temperature. These proteins have also viscoelastic

  16. Properties of vapor detector arrays formed through plasticization of carbon black-organic polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Koscho, Michael E; Grubbs, Robert H; Lewis, Nathan S

    2002-03-15

    Arrays of vapor detectors have been formed through addition of varying mass fractions of the plasticizer diethylene glycol dibenzoate to carbon black-polymer composites of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) or of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). Addition of plasticizer in 5% mass fraction increments produced 20 compositionally different detectors from each polymer composite. Differences in vapor sorption and permeability that effected changes in the dc electrical resistance response of these compositionally different detectors allowed identification and classification of various test analytes using standard chemometric methods. Glass transition temperatures, Tg, were measured using differential scanning calorimetry for plasticized polymers having a mass fraction of 0, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30, 0.40, or 0.50 of plasticizer in the composite. The plasticized PVAc composites with Tg < 25 degrees C showed rapid responses at room temperature to all of the test analyte vapors studied in this work, whereas composites with Tg > 25 degrees C showed response times that were highly dependent on the polymer/analyte combination. These composites showed a discontinuity in the temperature dependence of their resistance, and this discontinuity provided a simple method for determining the Tg of the composite and for determining the temperature or plasticizer mass fraction above which rapid resistance responses could be obtained for all members of the test set of analyte vapors. The plasticization approach provides a method for achieving rapid detector response times as well as for producing a large number of chemically different vapor detectors from a limited number of initial chemical feedstocks.

  17. Frequently Asked Questions on Starting-up New Domestic Composite Wood Mills and the Use of Experimental Products and Resins

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following frequently asked questions (FAQs) address issues relating to starting-up new doestice composite wood mills and the use of experimental product and resin systems under the Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products final rule

  18. Fabrication of Wood-Rubber Composites Using Rubber Compound as a Bonding Agent Instead of Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Dongwei; Xu, Min; Cai, Liping; Shi, Sheldon Q.

    2016-01-01

    Differing from the hot-pressing method in the manufacturing of traditional wood-rubber composites (WRCs), this study was aimed at fabricating WRCs using rubber processing to improve water resistance and mechanical properties. Three steps were used to make WRCs, namely, fiber-rubber mixing, tabletting, and the vulcanization molding process. Ninety-six WRC panels were made with wood fiber contents of 0%–50% at rotor rotational speeds of 15–45 rpm and filled coefficients of 0.55–0.75. Four regression equations, i.e., the tensile strength (Ts), elongation at break (Eb), hardness (Ha) and rebound resilience (Rr) as functions of fiber contents, rotational speed and filled coefficient, were derived and a nonlinear programming model were developed to obtain the optimum composite properties. Although the Ts, Eb and Rr of the panels were reduced, Ha was considerably increased by 17%–58% because of the wood fiber addition. Scanning electron microscope images indicated that fibers were well embedded in rubber matrix. The 24 h water absorption was only 1%–3%, which was much lower than commercial wood-based composites. PMID:28773591

  19. Fabrication of Wood-Rubber Composites Using Rubber Compound as a Bonding Agent Instead of Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongwei; Xu, Min; Cai, Liping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2016-06-14

    Differing from the hot-pressing method in the manufacturing of traditional wood-rubber composites (WRCs), this study was aimed at fabricating WRCs using rubber processing to improve water resistance and mechanical properties. Three steps were used to make WRCs, namely, fiber-rubber mixing, tabletting, and the vulcanization molding process. Ninety-six WRC panels were made with wood fiber contents of 0%-50% at rotor rotational speeds of 15-45 rpm and filled coefficients of 0.55-0.75. Four regression equations, i.e. , the tensile strength ( T s), elongation at break ( E b), hardness ( H a) and rebound resilience ( R r) as functions of fiber contents, rotational speed and filled coefficient, were derived and a nonlinear programming model were developed to obtain the optimum composite properties. Although the T s, E b and R r of the panels were reduced, H a was considerably increased by 17%-58% because of the wood fiber addition. Scanning electron microscope images indicated that fibers were well embedded in rubber matrix. The 24 h water absorption was only 1%-3%, which was much lower than commercial wood-based composites.

  20. 49 CFR 178.522 - Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... plastic receptacles. 178.522 Section 178.522 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... packagings with inner plastic receptacles. (a) The following are the identification codes for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles: (1) 6HA1 for a plastic receptacle within a protective steel drum...

  1. 49 CFR 178.522 - Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... plastic receptacles. 178.522 Section 178.522 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... packagings with inner plastic receptacles. (a) The following are the identification codes for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles: (1) 6HA1 for a plastic receptacle within a protective steel drum...

  2. 49 CFR 178.522 - Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... plastic receptacles. 178.522 Section 178.522 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... packagings with inner plastic receptacles. (a) The following are the identification codes for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles: (1) 6HA1 for a plastic receptacle within a protective steel drum...

  3. 49 CFR 178.522 - Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... plastic receptacles. 178.522 Section 178.522 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... packagings with inner plastic receptacles. (a) The following are the identification codes for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles: (1) 6HA1 for a plastic receptacle within a protective steel drum...

  4. Wood-based composites and panel products

    Treesearch

    John A. Youngquist

    1999-01-01

    Because wood properties vary among species, between trees of the same species, and between pieces from the same tree, solid wood cannot match reconstituted wood in the range of properties that can be controlled in processing. When processing variables are properly selected, the end result can sometimes surpass nature’s best effort. With solid wood, changes in...

  5. Axisymmetric micromechanics of elastic-perfectly plastic fibrous composites under uniaxial tension loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The uniaxial response of a continuous fiber elastic-perfectly plastic composite is modeled herein as a two-element composite cylinder. An axisymmetric analytical micromechanics solution is obtained for the rate-independent elastic-plastic response of the two-element composite cylinder subjected to tensile loading in the fiber direction for the case wherein the core fiber is assumed to be a transversely isotropic elastic-plastic material obeying the Tsai-Hill yield criterion, with yielding simulating fiber failure. The matrix is assumed to be an isotropic elastic-plastic material obeying the Tresca yield criterion. It is found that there are three different circumstances that depend on the fiber and matrix properties: fiber yield, followed by matrix yielding; complete matrix yield, followed by fiber yielding; and partial matrix yield, followed by fiber yielding, followed by complete matrix yield. The order in which these phenomena occur is shown to have a pronounced effect on the predicted uniaxial effective composite response.

  6. Construction loads experienced by plastic composite ties.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-07-01

    Damage to plastic composite ties during handling and track installation has been reported by a number of railroads. Results from : a survey conducted to identify specific handling issues were used to develop field and laboratory tests to measure the ...

  7. Potential of chicken feather fibre in wood MDF composites

    Treesearch

    Jerold E. Winandy; James H. Muehl; Jessie A. Micales; Ashok Raina; Walter Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    We made a series of aspen fibre medium density fibreboard panels adding various levels of chicken feather fibre to determine the relative effect of the feather fibre-wood fibre mixtures on composite panel properties. Chicken feathers are a waste product left over after processing chickens for meat. The feather fibre amounts used ranged from 20% to 95% and a 5%...

  8. Study of Selected Composites Copper Concentrate-Plastic Waste Using Thermal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyszka, Danuta

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents thermal analysis of selected composites (copper concentrate, plastic waste) in two stages. The first stage consisted in thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis on the applied plastic waste and copper concentrate, and subsequently, a comparative study has been carried out on products obtained, constituting composites of those materials. As a result of analyses, it was found that up to ca. 400 °C composites show high thermal stability, whereas above that temperature, a thermal decomposition of the composite occurs, resulting in emissions of organic compounds, i.e. hydrocarbon compounds and organic oxygenate derivatives.

  9. Nonlinear analysis of AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite laminate using a one parameter plasticity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1990-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the orthotropic plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The nonlinear stress-strain relations were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter elastic-plastic constitutive model. The results show that the one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  10. Properties of high density polyethylene – Paulownia wood flour composites via injection molding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Paulownia wood (PW) flour is evaluated as a bio-based fiber reinforcement. Composites of high density polyethylene (HDPE), 25% by weight of PW, and either 0% or 5% by weight of maleated polyethylene (MAPE) were produced by twin screw compounding followed by injection molding. Molded test composite...

  11. "Greener" hybrid adhesives composed of urea formaldehyde resin and cottonseed meal for wood based composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Urea formaldehyde (UF) resins are one of the most widely used adhesives in wood based composites. The major concerns of the resin utilization are free formaldehyde release and poor water resistance. As a renewable raw materials, water washed conttonseed meal can be used in wood bonding. To produce “...

  12. The Plasma and Suprathermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC) Investigation on the STEREO Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Popecki, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Ellis, L.; Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Boehm, M.; Carroll, J.; Crawshaw, A.; Conti, M.; Demaine, P.; Ellis, S.; Gaidos, J. A.; Googins, J.; Granoff, M.; Gustafson, A.; Heirtzler, D.; King, B.; Knauss, U.; Levasseur, J.; Longworth, S.; Singer, K.; Turco, S.; Vachon, P.; Vosbury, M.; Widholm, M.; Blush, L. M.; Karrer, R.; Bochsler, P.; Daoudi, H.; Etter, A.; Fischer, J.; Jost, J.; Opitz, A.; Sigrist, M.; Wurz, P.; Klecker, B.; Ertl, M.; Seidenschwang, E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Koeten, M.; Thompson, B.; Steinfeld, D.

    2008-04-01

    The Plasma and Suprathermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC) investigation provides the in situ solar wind and low energy heliospheric ion measurements for the NASA Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission, which consists of two spacecraft (STEREO-A, STEREO-B). PLASTIC-A and PLASTIC-B are identical. Each PLASTIC is a time-of-flight/energy mass spectrometer designed to determine the elemental composition, ionic charge states, and bulk flow parameters of major solar wind ions in the mass range from hydrogen to iron. PLASTIC has nearly complete angular coverage in the ecliptic plane and an energy range from ˜0.3 to 80 keV/e, from which the distribution functions of suprathermal ions, including those ions created in pick-up and local shock acceleration processes, are also provided.

  13. Advancing sustainable forestry by using engineered wood or bio-composites

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy

    2005-01-01

    As worldwide demand for timber and bio-fiber resources grows, sustainable resource management and industrial utilization must collaborate to develop a shared vision for both long-term sustainable management of forest and bio-resources and sustainable economic development. Engineered wood- and bio-composites offer a tool that can both achieve resource sustainability and...

  14. A phenomenological intra-laminar plasticity model for FRP composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yinhua; Hou, Chi; Wang, Wenzhi; Zhao, Meiying; Wan, Xiaopeng

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinearity of fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have significant effects on the analysis of composite structures. This article proposes a phenomenological intralaminar plasticity model to represent the nonlinearity of FRP composite materials. Based on the model presented by Ladeveze et al., the plastic potential and hardening functions are improved to give a more rational description of phenomenological nonlinearity behavior. A four-parameter hardening model is built to capture important features of the hardening curve and consequently gives the good matching of the experiments. Within the frame of plasticity theory, the detailed constitutive model, the numerical algorithm and the derivation of the tangent stiffness matrix are presented in this study to improve model robustness. This phenomenological model achieved excellent agreement between the experimental and simulation results in element scale respectively for glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP). Moreover, the model is capable of simulating the nonlinear phenomenon of laminates, and good agreement is achieved in nearly all cases.

  15. Development and Application of Wood Flour-Filled Polylactic Acid Composite Filament for 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yubo; Wang, Honglei; Li, Zelong; Li, Peng; Shi, Sheldon Q.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development of wood flour (WF)-filled polylactic acid (PLA) composite filaments for a fused deposition modeling (FDM) process with the aim of application to 3D printing. The composite filament consists of wood flour (5 wt %) in a PLA matrix. The detailed formulation and characterization of the composite filament were investigated experimentally, including tensile properties, microstructure, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The feedstock filaments of this composite were produced and used successfully in an assembled FDM 3D printer. The research concludes that compared with pure PLA filament, adding WF changed the microstructure of material fracture surface, the initial deformation resistance of the composite was enhanced, the starting thermal degradation temperature of the composite decreased slightly, and there were no effects on the melting temperature. The WF/PLA composite filament is suitable to be printed by the FDM process. PMID:28772694

  16. Young's modulus and internal friction of the SiC/Si biomorphic composite based on the sapele wood precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardashev, B. K.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of the vibrational strain amplitude on the Young’s modulus and ultrasound absorption (internal friction) of a SiC/Si biomorphic composite prepared by pyrolysis of sapele wood followed by infiltration of silicon were investigated. The studies were conducted in air and in vacuum by the acoustic resonance method with the use of a composite vibrator in longitudinal vibrations at frequencies of about 100 kHz. Measurements performed on sapele wood-based bio-SiC/Si samples revealed a substantial effect of adsorption-desorption of molecules contained in air on the effective elasticity modulus and elastic vibration decrement. Microplastic characteristics of the SiC/Si composites prepared from wood of different tree species were compared.

  17. Dynamic control of moisture during hot pressing of wood composites

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse

    2006-01-01

    Hot pressing is an important step in the manufacture of wood composites. In the conventional pressing system, hot press output often acts as a constraint to increased production. Severe drying of the furnish (e.g., particles, flakes, or fibers) required by this process substantially increases the manufacturing cost and creates air-polluting emissions of volatile...

  18. Nondestructive estimation of wood chemical composition of sections of radial wood strips by diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    P. David Jones; Laurence R. Schimleck; Gary F. Peter; Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark

    2006-01-01

    The use of calibrated near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for predicting the chemical composition of Pirus taeda L. (loblolly pine) wood samples is investigated. Seventeen P. taeda radial strips, representing seven different sites were selected and NlR spectra were obtained from the radial longitudinal face of each strip. The spectra...

  19. Orthotropic elasto-plastic behavior of AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Rui, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were performed on off-axis coupon specimens of unidirectional AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite at various temperatures. The elasto-plastic and strength properties of AS4/APC-2 composite were characterized with respect to temperature variation by using a one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model and a one-parameter failure criterion. Experimental results show that the orthotropic plastic behavior can be characterized quite well using the plasticity model, and the matrix-dominant compressive strengths can be predicted very accurately by the one-parameter failure criterion.

  20. Whey protein preloads are more beneficial than soy protein preloads in regulating appetite, calorie intake, anthropometry, and body composition of overweight and obese men.

    PubMed

    Tahavorgar, Atefeh; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Gohari, Mahmoodreza; Heydari, Iraj

    2014-10-01

    High-protein diets exert beneficial effects on appetite, anthropometry, and body composition; however, the effects of protein preloads depend on the amount, type, and time of consumption. Therefore, we hypothesized that long-term supplemental preloads of whey protein concentrate (WPC) and soy protein isolate (SPI) consumed 30 minutes before the largest meal would decrease appetite, calorie intake (CI), and anthropometry and improve body composition in overweight and obese men in free-living conditions. The subjects included 45 men with a body mass index between 25 and 40 kg/m(2) and who were randomly allocated to either the WPC (n = 26) or SPI (n = 19) groups. For 12 weeks, the subjects consumed 65 g WPC or 60 g SPI that was dissolved in 500 mL water 30 minutes before their ad libitum lunch. Appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition were assessed before and after the study and biweekly throughout. After 12 weeks, mean changes between the groups were significant for appetite (P = .032), CI (P = .045), anthropometry (body weight [P = .008], body mass index [P = .006], and waist circumference), and body composition (body fat mass and lean muscle [P < .001]). Relative to baseline, within-group mean changes from WPC were significant for appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition (P < .001). In the SPI group, mean changes were significant, relative to baseline, for all variables except lean muscle (P = .37). According to this 12-week study, WPC preloads conducted 30 minutes prior to the ad libitum main meal exerted stronger beneficial effects than did SPI preloads on appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition of free-living overweight and obese men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prepublication Copy: Voluntary Consensus Standards Update; Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Prepublication copy of the final rule Voluntary Consensus Standards Update; Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products. Updates several voluntary consensus standards listed at 40 CFR § 770.99.

  2. Nanoindentation methods for wood-adhesive bond lines

    Treesearch

    Joseph E. Jakes; Donald S. Stone; Charles R. Frihart

    2008-01-01

    As an adherend, wood is structurally, chemically, and mechanically more complex than metals or plastics, and the largest source of this complexity is wood’s chemical and mechanical inhomogeneities. Understanding and predicting the performance of adhesively bonded wood requires knowledge of the interactions occurring at length scales ranging from the macro down to the...

  3. Wood as an adherend

    Treesearch

    Bryan H. River; Charles B. Vick; Robert H. Gillespie

    1991-01-01

    Wood is a porous, permeable, hygroscopic, orthotropic, biological composite material of extreme chemical diversity and physical intricacy. Table 1.1 provides an overview of the may variables, including wood variables, that bear on the bonding and performance of wood in wood joints and wood-based materials. Of particular note is the fact that wood properties vary...

  4. Coupled thermal stresses analysis in the composite elastic-plastic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashkin, E. V.; Dats, E. P.

    2018-04-01

    The present study is devoted to the set of boundary value problems in the frameworks of coupled thermoelastoplasticity under axial symmetry conditions for a composite circular cylinder. Throughout the paper the conventional Prandtl–Reuss elastic–plastic model generalised on the thermal effects is used. The yield stress is assumed by linear function of the temperature. The plastic potential is chosen in the form of Tresca yield criterion and the associated plastic flow rule is derived. The adding process of a heated cylinder to another is simulated. The coupled thermal stresses are calculated during processes of cooling and material unloading. The elastic-plastic borders positions are calculated and plastic flow domains are localized. Numerical results are graphically analysed.

  5. Changes in composition and porosity occurring during the thermal degradation of wood and wood components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, David W.; Wershaw, Robert L.; Cox, Larry G.

    2005-01-01

    Samples of pine and poplar wood, pine bark, and purified cellulose and lignin were charred at temperatures ranging from 250?C to 500?C for times ranging from 1 hour to 168 hours. Changes in composition were examined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry, mass loss, and elemental composition (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen) of the char. Structural changes were examined by changes in porosity as measured by nitrogen gas adsorption. 13C NMR spectrometry, mass loss, and elemental composition were combined to estimate the mass of aromatic and aliphatic carbon remaining in the char. Mass loss and elemental composition were combined to estimate the chemical composition of material lost for various time intervals of heating. These analyses showed that aliphatic components in the test materials were either lost or converted to aromatic carbon early in the charring process. Nitrogen adsorption showed that no porosity develops for any of the test materials with heating at 250?C, even though substantial loss of material and changes in composition occurred. Porosity development coincided with the loss of aromatic carbon, indicating that micropores were developing within a fused-ring matrix.

  6. Combined ultraviolet and water exposure as a preconditioning method in laboratory fungal durability testing

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons; Nicole M. Stark

    2003-01-01

    During outdoor exposure, woodfiber-plastic composites (WPC) are subject to biological, moisture, and ultraviolet (UV) degradation. The purpose of laboratory evaluations is to simulate outdoor conditions and accelerate the testing for quicker results. Traditionally, biological, moisture, and W laboratory tests are done separately, and only combined in outdoor field...

  7. The Effect of Ultraviolet Light on the "Liquid Wood"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Nedelcu; Sabina, Zǎgan; Ticuta, Negreanu-Pirjol; Remus, Zǎgan; Constantin, Cǎrausu

    2014-08-01

    To preserve resources, the goal is to use biobased materials containing the maximum possible amount of renewable biomass-based derivatives to secure a sustainable future. Bioplastics, biocomposites, biological fibres and related biomaterials will serve as substitutes for materials and products traditionally made from petroleum resources. To support this need, in 1998, Fraunhofer Institute of Chemistry and Tecnaro GmbH Company (founded by Jurgen Pfitzer and Helmut Nagele in Germany) investigated and developed a new compound made of wood components that can be processed as a thermoplastic material. It is well known that bioplastic and biocomposite materials represent another important group of bio-materials that include plastics reinforced with natural fibers and wood-plastic composites (WPCs). The aim of this research is to identify the behavior of "Liquid Wood" after UV irradiation. The materials used were Arbofill Fichte, Arboblend V2 Nature and Arboform L, V3 Nature. The samples were obtained by injection and the experimental study plan followed the Taguchi method with six input parameters and two levels for each of them. Three samples from each material were tested in an ultraviolet environment using different time of exposure in order to establish the material characteristics. After the irradiation process the material did not turn to yellow, which suggests that the composition of the sample liquid timber inhibitors have stability and the number of α-carbonyl (C = O) groups is sufficiently low. After the graphs analyzing can be inferred relatively similar performance of the samples in the first stage both UV and the VIS, indicating that the activity is almost absent. In UV is clearly observed the peak amplitude (maximum absorbance) at different wavelengths (λ). So, in terms of peak intensity the samples follow the order: Arboform L, V3 Nature; Arbofill Fichte and Arboblend V2 Nature.

  8. Bacterial Community Succession in Pine-Wood Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kielak, Anna M; Scheublin, Tanja R; Mendes, Lucas W; van Veen, Johannes A; Kuramae, Eiko E

    2016-01-01

    Though bacteria and fungi are common inhabitants of decaying wood, little is known about the relationship between bacterial and fungal community dynamics during natural wood decay. Based on previous studies involving inoculated wood blocks, strong fungal selection on bacteria abundance and community composition was expected to occur during natural wood decay. Here, we focused on bacterial and fungal community compositions in pine wood samples collected from dead trees in different stages of decomposition. We showed that bacterial communities undergo less drastic changes than fungal communities during wood decay. Furthermore, we found that bacterial community assembly was a stochastic process at initial stage of wood decay and became more deterministic in later stages, likely due to environmental factors. Moreover, composition of bacterial communities did not respond to the changes in the major fungal species present in the wood but rather to the stage of decay reflected by the wood density. We concluded that the shifts in the bacterial communities were a result of the changes in wood properties during decomposition and largely independent of the composition of the wood-decaying fungal communities.

  9. Bacterial Community Succession in Pine-Wood Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Kielak, Anna M.; Scheublin, Tanja R.; Mendes, Lucas W.; van Veen, Johannes A.; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-01-01

    Though bacteria and fungi are common inhabitants of decaying wood, little is known about the relationship between bacterial and fungal community dynamics during natural wood decay. Based on previous studies involving inoculated wood blocks, strong fungal selection on bacteria abundance and community composition was expected to occur during natural wood decay. Here, we focused on bacterial and fungal community compositions in pine wood samples collected from dead trees in different stages of decomposition. We showed that bacterial communities undergo less drastic changes than fungal communities during wood decay. Furthermore, we found that bacterial community assembly was a stochastic process at initial stage of wood decay and became more deterministic in later stages, likely due to environmental factors. Moreover, composition of bacterial communities did not respond to the changes in the major fungal species present in the wood but rather to the stage of decay reflected by the wood density. We concluded that the shifts in the bacterial communities were a result of the changes in wood properties during decomposition and largely independent of the composition of the wood-decaying fungal communities. PMID:26973611

  10. Changes in the Chemical Composition and Decay Resistance of Thermally-Modified Hevea brasiliensis Wood

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of thermal treatment on the equilibrium moisture content, chemical composition and biological resistance to decay fungi of juvenile and mature Hevea brasiliensis wood (rubber wood) was evaluated. Samples were taken from a 53-year-old rubber wood plantation located in Tabapuã, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The samples were thermally-modified at 180°C, 200°C and 220°C. Results indicate that the thermal modification caused: (1) a significant increase in the extractive content and proportional increase in the lignin content at 220°C; (2) a significant decrease in the equilibrium moisture content, holocelluloses, arabinose, galactose and xylose content, but no change in glucose content; and (3) a significant increase in wood decay resistance against both Pycnoporus sanguineus (L.) Murrill and Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.) Murrill decay fungi. The greatest decay resistance was achieved from treatment at 220°C which resulted in a change in wood decay resistance class from moderately resistant to resistant. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the influence of thermal treatment in mature wood was lower than in juvenile wood. PMID:26986200

  11. Recycling disposable cups into paper plastic composites.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Vandeperre, Luc; Dvorak, Rob; Kosior, Ed; Tarverdi, Karnik; Cheeseman, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    The majority of disposable cups are made from paper plastic laminates (PPL) which consist of high quality cellulose fibre with a thin internal polyethylene coating. There are limited recycling options for PPLs and this has contributed to disposable cups becoming a high profile, problematic waste. In this work disposable cups have been shredded to form PPL flakes and these have been used to reinforce polypropylene to form novel paper plastic composites (PPCs). The PPL flakes and polypropylene were mixed, extruded, pelletised and injection moulded at low temperatures to prevent degradation of the cellulose fibres. The level of PPL flake addition and the use of a maleated polyolefin coupling agent to enhance interfacial adhesion have been investigated. Samples have been characterised using tensile testing, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis. Use of a coupling agent allows composites containing 40 wt.% of PPL flakes to increase tensile strength of PP by 50% to 30 MPa. The Young modulus also increases from 1 to 2.5 GPa and the work to fracture increases by a factor of 5. The work demonstrates that PPL disposable cups have potential to be beneficially reused as reinforcement in novel polypropylene composites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polysaccharides and lignin from oak wood used in cooperage: Composition, interest, assays: A review.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Alexandra; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2015-11-19

    It is widely accepted that alcoholic beverage quality depends on their ageing in premium quality oak wood. From the choice of wood to beverage ageing, through the different steps in cask manufacturing, many factors should be considered. One of the biggest challenge in cooperages is to take into account all these factors. Most of the studies are interested in phenolic compounds, extracted during ageing and especially involved in wine oxidation, colour, and sensory properties such as astringency and bitterness. Oak aroma volatile compounds have also been the subject of numerous studies. These compounds of interest are part of low molecular weight compounds which represent 2%-10% of oak wood composition. However, three polymers constitute the main part of oak wood: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. As far as we are aware, few studies concerning the role of these major macromolecules in oak wood have been published previously. This article reviews oak wood polysaccharides and lignin, their potential interest and different assays used to determine their content. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reusing remediated CCA-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2003-01-01

    Options for recycling and reusing chromated-copper-arsenate- (CCA) treated material include dimensional lumber and round wood size reduction, composites, and remediation. Size reduction by remilling, shaving, or resawing CCA-treated wood reduces the volume of landfilled waste material and provides many options for reusing used treated wood. Manufacturing composite...

  14. Composite resin reinforcement of flared canals using light-transmitting plastic posts.

    PubMed

    Lui, J L

    1994-05-01

    Composite resins have been advocated as a reinforcing build-up material for badly damaged endodontically treated teeth with flared canals. However, the control of an autocuring composite resin is difficult because it polymerizes rapidly within the root canal. While the light-curing composite resins are more user friendly, their polymerization can be a problem deep in the root canal. Light-transmitting plastic posts allow the transmission of light into the root canal and enable intraradicular composite resin reconstitution and reinforcement of weakened roots. At the same time, the light-transmitting plastic post forms an optimal post canal in the rehabilitated root and can accurately fit a matching retentive final post. These light-transmitting posts are a useful addition to the dental armamentarium.

  15. Combustion and Gasification Properties of Plastics Particles.

    PubMed

    Zevenhoven, Ron; Karlsson, Magnus; Hupa, Mikko; Frankenhaeuser, Martin

    1997-08-01

    The combustion and gasification behavior of the most common plastics is studied and compared with conventional fuels such as coal, peat, and wood. The aim is to give background data for finding the optimum conditions for co-combustion or co-gasification of a conventional fuel with a certain amount of plastic-derived fuel. Atmospheric or pressurized fluidized bed co-combustion of conventional fuels and plastics are considered to be promising future options. The plastics investigated were poly(ethylene) (PE), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(styrene) (PS), and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). Some of the samples had a print or color. The reference fuels were Polish bituminous coal, Finnish peat, and Finnish pine wood. PE, PP, and PS were found to burn like oil. The particles shrank to a droplet and burned completely during the pyrolysis stage, leaving no char. Printing and coloring left a small portion of ash. PVC was the only plastic that produced a carbonaceous residue, and its timescales for heating, devolatilization, and char burning were of the same order as those for peat and wood, and much shorter for the other plastics studied. An important result is that char from PVC contains less than 1% chlorine,99% hydrocarbon. The gasification rate of PVC char (at 1 bar and 25 bar) was of the same order as that of char from coal. Peat-char and wood-char were gasified an order of magnitude faster.

  16. Implementation of recycled cellulosic fibres into cement based composites and testing their influence on resulting properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodarova, V.; Stevulova, N.; Vaclavik, V.; Dvorsky, T.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the application of raw materials from renewable sources such as wood, plants and waste paper to building materials preparing has gained a significant interest in this research area. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of the selected plasticizer on properties of fibres composites made of cellulosic fibres coming from recycled waste paper and cement. Investigations were performed on specimens with 0.5 wt. % of fibre addition without and with plasticizer. A comparative study did not show positive influence of plasticizer on the density and thermal conductivity of 28 days hardened composite. The specimens after 1, 3 and 7 days of hardening with plasticizer exhibited the highest impact on compressive strength in comparison to composite without plasticizer but 28 days hardened specimens reached the same value of strength characteristic (41 MPa).

  17. A comparative study on the properties of graphene oxide and activated carbon based sustainable wood starch composites.

    PubMed

    Baishya, Prasanta; Maji, Tarun Kumar

    2018-08-01

    Activated carbon (AC) prepared from Jatropha curcas and graphene oxide (GO) were employed in the preparation of natural polymer based wood starch composites (WSC) through the solution blending technique using water as a solvent. In this study, methyl methacrylate (MMA) was grafted onto the starch polymer and this MMA grafted starch (MMA-g-starch) was cross-linked with the cheap soft wood flour using the citric acid as cross-linker and water as a solvent in the whole process. The prepared GO and AC were characterized through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Raman study. The interaction of GO and AC, with MMA-g-starch, citric acid and wood were studied by FTIR, XRD and SEM analysis. The GO and AC treated composites exhibited outstanding mechanical properties, thermal stability and fire resistance properties. The tensile strength of the composites increased by 178% and 200% with addition of 2 phr AC and GO respectively compared to untreated composites. A significant enhancement in water resistance properties of GO and AC treated composites was also attained. The study showed that the properties of the composites containing AC prepared from the seeds of Jatropha curcas was quite comparable with the composites reinforced with GO. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of early diagenesis on the chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of wood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of modern and ancient buried wood show that there is a linear correlation between carbohydrate content and the stable carbon isotope composition as carbohydrates are preferentially degraded during early diagenesis. As the carbohydrate content decreases, the ??13C value of the degraded wood decreases 1 to 2 per mil, approaching the value of the residual lignin. These results indicate that carbohydrate degradation products are lost and not incorporated into the aromatic structure as lignin is selectively preserved during early diagenesis of wood. These results also indicate that attempts to quantify terrestrial inputs to modern sedimentary organic matter based on ??13C values should consider the possibility of a 1 to 2 per mil decrease in the ??13C value of degraded wood. ?? 1987.

  19. Green Composites Based on Blends of Polypropylene with Liquid Wood Reinforced with Hemp Fibers: Thermomechanical Properties and the Effect of Recycling Cycles.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Gianluca; Tosto, Claudio; Latteri, Alberta; La Rosa, Angela Daniela; Blanco, Ignazio; Elsabbagh, Ahmed; Russo, Pietro; Ziegmann, Gerhard

    2017-08-26

    Green composites from polypropylene and lignin-based natural material were manufactured using a melt extrusion process. The lignin-based material used was the so called "liquid wood". The PP/"Liquid Wood" blends were extruded with "liquid wood" content varying from 20 wt % to 80 wt %. The blends were thoroughly characterized by flexural, impact, and dynamic mechanical testing. The addition of the Liquid Wood resulted in a great improvement in terms of both the flexural modulus and strength but, on the other hand, a reduction of the impact strength was observed. For one blend composition, the composites reinforced with hemp fibers were also studied. The addition of hemp allowed us to further improve the mechanical properties. The composite with 20 wt % of hemp, subjected to up to three recycling cycles, showed good mechanical property retention and thermal stability after recycling.

  20. Improvement of mechanical robustness of the superhydrophobic wood surface by coating PVA/SiO2 composite polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Shuliang; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Miaolian; Wang, Chengyu; Li, Jian

    2013-09-01

    Improvement of the robustness of superhydrophobic surfaces is crucial for the purpose of achieving commercial applications of these surfaces in such various areas as self-cleaning, water repellency and corrosion resistance. We have investigated a fabrication of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/silica (SiO2) composite polymer coating on wooden substrates with super repellency toward water, low sliding angles, low contact angle hysteresis, and relatively better mechanical robustness. The composite polymer slurry, consisting of well-mixing SiO2 particles and PVA, is prepared simply and subsequently coated over wooden substrates with good adhesion. In this study, the mechanical robustness of superhydrophobic wood surfaces was evaluated. The effect of petaloid structures of the composite polymer on robustness was investigated using an abrasion test and the results were compared with those of superhydrophobic wood surfaces fabricated by other processes. The produced wood surfaces exhibited promising superhydrophobic properties with a contact angle of 159̊ and a sliding angle of 4̊, and the relatively better mechanical robustness.

  1. Ultraviolet weathering of HDPE/wood-flour composites coextruded with a clear HDPE cap layer

    Treesearch

    Laurent M. Matuana; Shan Jin; Nicole M. Stark

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect coextruding a clear HDPE cap layer onto HDPE/wood-flour composites has on the discoloration of coextruded composites exposed to accelerated UV tests. Chroma meter, FTIRATR, XPS, SEM, and UV vis measurements accounted for the analysis of discoloration, functional groups, and degree of oxidation of both uncapped (control) and coextruded...

  2. Recycling of plastic: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Thomas; Fruergaard, Thilde; Christensen, Thomas H

    2009-11-01

    Major greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to plastic waste recycling were evaluated with respect to three management alternatives: recycling of clean, single-type plastic, recycling of mixed/contaminated plastic, and use of plastic waste as fuel in industrial processes. Source-separated plastic waste was received at a material recovery facility (MRF) and processed for granulation and subsequent downstream use. In the three alternatives, plastic was assumed to be substituting virgin plastic in new products, wood in low-strength products (outdoor furniture, fences, etc.), and coal or fuel oil in the case of energy utilization. GHG accounting was organized in terms of indirect upstream emissions (e.g. provision of energy, fuels, and materials), direct emissions at the MRF (e.g. fuel combustion), and indirect downstream emissions (e.g. avoided emissions from production of virgin plastic, wood, or coal/oil). Combined, upstream and direct emissions were estimated to be roughly between 5 and 600 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne( -1) of plastic waste depending on treatment at the MRF and CO(2) emissions from electricity production. Potential downstream savings arising from substitution of virgin plastic, wood, and energy fuels were estimated to be around 60- 1600 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne( -1) of plastic waste depending on substitution ratios and CO(2) emissions from electricity production. Based on the reviewed data, it was concluded that substitution of virgin plastic should be preferred. If this is not viable due to a mixture of different plastic types and/or contamination, the plastic should be used for energy utilization. Recycling of plastic waste for substitution of other materials such as wood provided no savings with respect to global warming.

  3. Thermal-stress analysis for a wood composite blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, K. C.; Harb, A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal-stress analysis of a wind turbine blade made of wood composite material is reported. First, the governing partial differential equation on heat conduction is derived, then, a finite element procedure using variational approach is developed for the solution of the governing equation. Thus, the temperature distribution throughout the blade is determined. Next, based on the temperature distribution, a finite element procedure using potential energy approach is applied to determine the thermal-stress distribution. A set of results is obtained through the use of a computer, which is considered to be satisfactory. All computer programs are contained in the report.

  4. Issues related to durability and protection affecting the acceptance and use of engineered wood composites in Europe

    Treesearch

    Mark Hughes; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2007-01-01

    Engineered wood composites (EWC) offer significant potential in applications in the built environment, ranging from domestic dwellings to bridges and public buildings. Nevertheless, EWCs, which include products such as glulam, laminated veneer lumber, oriented stand-board, and plywood enjoy a relatively small market share of total wood-based material production and...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in...

  8. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800 and...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800 and...

  11. Ingredient selection for plastic composite supports for L-(+)-lactic acid biofilm fermentation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, K L; Pometto, A L; Hinz, P N; Dickson, J S; Demirci, A

    1997-01-01

    Plastic composite supports containing 50% agricultural products (oat hulls, soybean hulls, yeast extract, soybean flour, dried bovine erythrocytes, bovine albumin, and/or mineral salts) and 50% (wt/wt) polypropylene were produced by high-temperature twin-screw extrusion. The research employed two half sets of a five-factorial fractional design (2(5 - 1)) to evaluate the effects of different agricultural components on the properties of the plastic composite supports and to select the best plastic composite support formulation for lactic acid fermentation. The biofilm population was affected by the contact angle and relative hydrophobicity of the supports (r = 0.79 to 0.82). Lactic acid was produced by the suspended cells (r = 0.96) and the biofilm on the plastic composite support discs (r = 0.85). Incorporation of yeast extract into plastic composite supports enhanced growth of free and attached cells in minimal medium (P < 0.0001). The presence of soybean hulls, yeast extract, or mineral salts in plastic composite supports produced less hydrophobic supports (P < 0.0001) and enhanced cell attachment (P < 0.03). Under all conditions, suspended-cell and polypropylene disc controls gave negligible lactic acid production and cell density. Plastic composite supports containing soybean hulls, yeast extract, soybean flour, bovine albumin, and mineral salts gave the highest biofilm population (2.3 x 10(9) CFU/g of support), cell density (absorbance of 1.8 at 620 nm), and lactic acid concentration (7.6 g/liter) in minimal medium. PMID:9212402

  12. Differentiation of Wines Treated with Wood Chips Based on Their Phenolic Content, Volatile Composition, and Sensory Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kyraleou, Maria; Kallithraka, Stamatina; Chira, Kleopatra; Tzanakouli, Eleni; Ligas, Ioannis; Kotseridis, Yorgos

    2015-12-01

    The effects of both wood chips addition and contact time on phenolic content, volatile composition, color parameters, and organoleptic character of red wine made by a native Greek variety (Agiorgitiko) were evaluated. For this purpose, chips from American, French, Slavonia oak, and Acacia were added in the wine after fermentation. A mixture consisting of 50% French and 50% Americal oak chips was also evaluated. In an attempt to categorize wine samples, various chemical parameters of wines and sensory parameters were studied after 1, 2, and 3 mo of contact time with chips. The results showed that regardless of the type of wood chips added in the wines, it was possible to differentiate the samples according to the contact time based on their phenolic composition and color parameters. In addition, wood-extracted volatile compounds seem to be the critical parameter that could separate the samples according to the wood type. The wines that were in contact with Acacia and Slavonia chips could be separated from the rest mainly due to their distinct sensory characters. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Theoretical Development of an Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Generalized Composite Material Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Harrington, Joseph; Subramanian, Rajan; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive industries. While there are several composite material models currently available within LS-DYNA (Registered), there are several features that have been identified that could improve the predictive capability of a composite model. To address these needs, a combined plasticity and damage model suitable for use with both solid and shell elements is being developed and is being implemented into LS-DYNA as MAT_213. A key feature of the improved material model is the use of tabulated stress-strain data in a variety of coordinate directions to fully define the stress-strain response of the material. To date, the model development efforts have focused on creating the plasticity portion of the model. The Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic material model with a non-associative flow rule. The coefficients of the yield function, and the stresses to be used in both the yield function and the flow rule, are computed based on the input stress-strain curves using the effective plastic strain as the tracking variable. The coefficients in the flow rule are computed based on the obtained stress-strain data. The developed material model is suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA for use in analyzing the nonlinear response of polymer composites.

  14. Theoretical Development of an Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Generalized Composite Material Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert; Carney, Kelly; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Harrington, Joseph; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive industries. While there are several composite material models currently available within LSDYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation), there are several features that have been identified that could improve the predictive capability of a composite model. To address these needs, a combined plasticity and damage model suitable for use with both solid and shell elements is being developed and is being implemented into LS-DYNA as MAT_213. A key feature of the improved material model is the use of tabulated stress-strain data in a variety of coordinate directions to fully define the stress-strain response of the material. To date, the model development efforts have focused on creating the plasticity portion of the model. The Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic yield function with a nonassociative flow rule. The coefficients of the yield function, and the stresses to be used in both the yield function and the flow rule, are computed based on the input stress-strain curves using the effective plastic strain as the tracking variable. The coefficients in the flow rule are computed based on the obtained stress-strain data. The developed material model is suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA for use in analyzing the nonlinear response of polymer composites.

  15. Thermal-stress analysis for wood composite blade. [horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, K. C.; Harb, A.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal-stress induced by solar insolation on a wood composite blade of a Mod-OA wind turbine was investigated. The temperature distribution throughout the blade (a heat conduction problem) was analyzed and the thermal-stress distribution of the blades caused by the temperature distribution (a thermal-stress analysis problem) was then determined. The computer programs used for both problems are included along with output examples.

  16. Model for understanding the durability performance of wood adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2007-01-01

    When dry wood is placed in water, the water not only fills the lumen (void in the cells) but also diffuses into the cell walls, causing them to expand. Although the wood becomes weaker via this cell wall plasticization, failure generally increases in the bondline rather than in the wood under wet conditions. Thus, the question is why water exposure often causes a...

  17. Structure and function of wood

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Regis B. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Despite the many human uses to which various woods are suited, at a fundamental level wood is a complex biological structure, itself a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of the plant. Although humans have striven to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood...

  18. Chemical composition and sensory properties of non-wooded and wooded Shiraz (Vitis vinifera L.) wine as affected by vineyard row orientation and grape ripeness level.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacobus J; Volschenk, Cornelis G

    2018-05-01

    The study aimed to unravel vineyard row orientation (NS, EW, NE-SW, NW-SE) and grape ripeness level (23, 25, 27 °Balling) implications for grape and wine composition and sensory properties/style (non-wooded/wooded wines) of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz (rootstock 101-14 Mgt). Soluble solid/titratable acidity ratios were lowest for EW, whereas warmer canopy sides (NW, N, NE) advanced grape ripening. Skin anthocyanins and phenolics generally decreased with ripening. NW-SE rows and S, SE, E and NE canopy sides showed highest skin total anthocyanins and phenolics. Wine total anthocyanins and phenolics increased with grape ripening; EW had lower values. Wine phenolic contents differed between canopy sides; N, NE, E and SE tended higher. Wine sensory profiles increased with grape ripening. For non-wooded wines, NW-SE and NE-SW row orientations generally resulted in highest scores, followed by NS. For EW rows, the N side presented better wines. Wood addition enhanced specific sensory descriptor perceptions. A large collection of wine styles surfaced in the same vineyard and terroir, increasing options to contribute positively to sustainable products. The study generated globally applicable, novel information vital for unlocking and valorising terroir/site potential for grape and wine chemical composition and wine sensory/style properties. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Pyrolysis of polyethylene mixed with paper and wood: Interaction effects on tar, char and gas yields.

    PubMed

    Grieco, E M; Baldi, G

    2012-05-01

    In the present study the interactions between the main constituents of the refuse derived fuel (plastics, paper, and wood) during pyrolysis were studied. Binary mixtures of polyethylene-paper and polyethylene/sawdust have been transformed into pellets and pyrolyzed. Various mixtures with different composition were analyzed and pyrolysis products (tar, gas, and char) were collected. The mixtures of wood/PE and paper/PE have a different behavior. The wood/PE mixtures showed a much reduced interaction of the various compounds because the yields of pyrolysis products of the mixture can be predicted as linear combination of those of the pure components. On the contrary, a strong char yield increase was found at a low heating rate for paper/PE mixtures. In order to explain the results, the ability of wood and paper char to adsorb and convert the products of PE pyrolysis into was studied. Adsorption and desorption tests were performed on the char obtained by paper and wood by using n-hexadecane as a model compound for the heavy products of PE pyrolysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Machinability Study on Milling Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials using Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, H.; Haron, C. H. C.; Ghani, J. A.; Suhaily, M.; Yuzairi, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of a milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials are depending on the milling parameters (spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut). Therefore, a study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the milling parameters and their effects on a kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The composite panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) method. A full factorial design of experiments was use as an initial step to screen the significance of the parameters on the defects using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). If the curvature of the collected data shows significant, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is then applied for obtaining a quadratic modelling equation that has more reliable in expressing the optimization. Thus, the objective of this research is obtaining an optimum setting of milling parameters and modelling equations to minimize the surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The spindle speed and feed rate contributed the most in affecting the surface roughness and the delamination factor of the kenaf composite materials.

  1. Stiff, Thermally Stable and Highly Anisotropic Wood-Derived Carbon Composite Monoliths for Electromagnetic Interference Shielding.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Sun, Xianxian; Yang, Minglong; Xu, Fan; Lin, Zaishan; Zhao, Xu; Ding, Yujie; Li, Jianjun; Yin, Weilong; Peng, Qingyu; He, Xiaodong; Li, Yibin

    2017-06-28

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials for electronic devices in aviation and aerospace not only need lightweight and high shielding effectiveness, but also should withstand harsh environments. Traditional EMI shielding materials often show heavy weight, poor thermal stability, short lifetime, poor tolerance to chemicals, and are hard-to-manufacture. Searching for high-efficiency EMI shielding materials overcoming the above weaknesses is still a great challenge. Herein, inspired by the unique structure of natural wood, lightweight and highly anisotropic wood-derived carbon composite EMI shielding materials have been prepared which possess not only high EMI shielding performance and mechanical stable characteristics, but also possess thermally stable properties, outperforming those metals, conductive polymers, and their composites. The newly developed low-cost materials are promising for specific applications in aerospace electronic devices, especially regarding extreme temperatures.

  2. Rapid induction bonding of composites, plastics, and metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.; Fox, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The Toroid Bonding Gun is and induction heating device. It is a self contained, portable, low powered induction welding system developed for bonding or joining plastic, ceramic, or metallic parts. Structures can be bonded in a factory or in a the field. This type of equipment allows for applying heat directly to the bond lines and/or to the adhesives without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. The induction heating gun originally developed for use in the fabrication of space Gangs of bonders are now used to rapidly join composite sheet and structural components. Other NASA-developed applications of this bonding technique include the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials.

  3. Evaluating wood-based composites for incipient fungal decay with the immunodiagnostic wood decay test.

    Treesearch

    C.A. Clausen; L. Haughton; C. Murphy

    2003-01-01

    Early and accurate detection of the extent of fungal deterioration during forensic inspection of the building envelope would eliminate excessive or unnecessary replacement of wood-based building materials. Areas of water infiltration in wood-framed building envelopes in the Pacific Northwest were evaluated visually and sampled for moisture content. Wood samples were...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES AND EMISSIONS AND POLLUTION PREVENTION OPTIONS FOR THE COMPOSITE WOOD INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes information gathered on emissions from the composite wood industry (also called the Plywood and particleboard industry) and potential pollution prevention options. Information was gathered during a literature search that included trade association publicatio...

  5. High-performance biodegradable polylactide composites fabricated using a novel plasticizer and functionalized eggshell powder.

    PubMed

    Kong, Junjun; Li, Yi; Bai, Yungang; Li, Zonglin; Cao, Zengwen; Yu, Yancun; Han, Changyu; Dong, Lisong

    2018-06-01

    A novel polyester poly(diethylene glycol succinate) (PDEGS) was synthesized and evaluated as a plasticizer for polylactide (PLA) in this study. Meanwhile, an effective sustainable filler, functionalized eggshell powder (FES) with a surface layer of calcium phenyphosphonate was also prepared. Then, PLA biocomposites were prepared from FES and PDEGS using a facile melt blending process. The addition of 15 wt% PDEGS as plasticizer showed good miscibility with PLA macromolecules and increased the chain mobility of PLA. The crystallization kinetics of PLA composites revealed that the highly effective nucleating FES significantly improved the crystallization ability of PLA at both of non-isothermal and isothermal conditions. In addition, the effective plasticizer and well-dispersed FES increased the elongation at break from 6% of pure PLA to over 200% for all of the plasticized PLA composites. These biodegradable PLA biocomposites, coupled with excellent crystallization ability and tunable mechanical properties, demonstrate their potential as alternatives to traditional commodity plastics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reinforced Plastic Composites Production: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National emissions standards for hazardous air pollutants for reinforced plastic composites production facilities. Regulates production and ancillary processes used to manufacture products with thermoset resins and gel coats.

  7. Structure and Function of Wood

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many cell types and chemistries acting together to serve the needs of living plant. Attempting to understand wood inthe context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants-conduction of water from the...

  8. A safety roadmap for future plastics and composites intensive vehicles

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-11-01

    This report summarizes the approach, activities, and results of a study to evaluate the potential safety benefits of Plastics and Composites Intensive Vehicles (PCIVs) to enable their deployment by 2020. The main goals were to review and assess the s...

  9. Lateral-Torsional Buckling Instability Caused by Individuals Walking on Wood Composite I-Joists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor Aguilar, Jose Maria

    Recent research has shown that a significant number of the falls from elevation occur when laborers are working on unfinished structures. Workers walking on wood I-joists on roofs and floors are prone to fall hazards. Wood I-joists have been replacing dimension lumber for many floor systems and a substantial number of roof systems in light-frame construction. Wood I-joists are designed to resist axial stresses on the flanges and shear stresses on the web while minimizing material used. However, wood I-joists have poor resistance to applied lateral and torsional loads and are susceptible to lateral-torsional buckling instability. Workers walking on unbraced or partially braced wood I-joists can induce axial and lateral forces as well as twist. Experimental testing demonstrated that workers cause lateral-torsional buckling instability in wood I-joists. However, no research was found related to the lateral-torsional buckling instability induced by individuals walking on the wood I-joists. Furthermore, no research was found considering the effects of the supported end conditions and partial bracing in the lateral-torsional buckling instability of wood I-joists. The goal of this research was to derive mathematical models to predict the dynamic lateral-torsional buckling instability of wood composite I-joists loaded by individuals walking considering different supported end conditions and bracing system configurations. The dynamic lateral-torsional buckling instability was analyzed by linearly combining the static lateral-torsional buckling instability with the lateral bending motion of the wood Ijoists. Mathematical models were derived to calculate the static critical loads for the simply supported end condition and four wood I-joist hanger supported end conditions. Additionally, mathematical models were derived to calculate the dynamic maximum lateral displacements and positions of the individual walking on the wood Ijoists for the same five different supported end

  10. The compression of wood/thermoplastic fiber mats during consolidation

    Treesearch

    Karl R. Englund; Michael P. Wolcott; John C. Hermanson

    2004-01-01

    Secondary processing of non-woven wood and wood/thermoplastic fiber mats is generally performed using compression molding, where heated platens or dies form the final product. Although the study and use of wood-fiber composites is widespread, few research efforts have explicitly described the fundamentals of mat consolidation. In contrast, the wood composite literature...

  11. Characterization of elastic-plastic properties of AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1988-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic properties of AS4/APC-2 composites were characterized with respect to temperature variation by using a one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model and a one parameter failure criterion. Simple uniaxial off-axis tension tests were performed on coupon specimens of unidirectional AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite at various temperatures. To avoid the complication caused by the extension-shear coupling effect in off-axis testing, new tabs were designed and used on the test specimens. The experimental results showed that the nonlinear behavior of constitutive relations and the failure strengths can be characterized quite well using the one parameter plasticity model and the failure criterion, respectively.

  12. Surface modification of cellulose fibers: towards wood composites by biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Gradwell, Sheila E; Renneckar, Scott; Esker, Alan R; Heinze, Thomas; Gatenholm, Paul; Vaca-Garcia, Carlos; Glasser, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    A biomimetic approach was taken for studying the adsorption of a model copolymer (pullulan abietate, DS 0.027), representing the lignin-carbohydrate complex, to a model surface for cellulose fibers (Langmuir-Blodgett thin films of regenerated cellulose). Adsorption results were assayed using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Rapid, spontaneous, and desorption-resistant surface modification resulted. This effort is viewed as a critical first step towards the permanent surface modification of cellulose fibers with a layer of molecules amenable to either enzymatic crosslinking for improved wood composites or thermoplastic consolidation.

  13. The influence of technological parameters on the dynamic behavior of "liquid wood" samples obtained by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu Mazurchevici, Simona; Carausu, Constantin; Comaneci, Radu; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2017-10-01

    The plastic products contribute to environmental pollution. Replacing the plastic materials with biodegradable materials with superior properties is an absolute necessity and important research direction for the near future. The first steps in this regard were the creation of composite materials containing natural fibers with positive effects on the environment that have penetrated in different fields. The bioplastics and biocomposites made from natural fibers is a topical solution. The next step was made towards obtaining biodegradable and recyclable materials based on cellulose, lignin and no carcinogens. In this category fall the "liquid wood" with a use up to five times without affecting the mechanical properties. "Liquid wood" is a high quality thermoplastic biocomposite. "Liquid wood" is a biopolymer composite divided in three categories, ARBOFORM®, ARBOBLEND® and ARBOFILL®, which have differed composition in terms of lignin percentage, being delivered by Tecnaro, as granules, [1]. The paper's research was focus on Arboform L V3 Nature and Arboform L V3 Nature reinforced with aramid fiber. In the experimental plan were taken into account six parameters (Dinj - direction of injection [°]; Ttop - melting temperature [°C]; Pinj - injection pressure [MPa] Ss - speed [m/min]; tinj - injection time [s] and tc - cooling time [s]) each with two levels, research carried on by Taguchi methodology. Processing Taguchi method allowed both Taguchi setting work parameters influence on storage modulus and damping as the size and influence their ranking. Experimental research concerning the influence technological parameters on storage modulus of samples obtained by injection from Arboform L V3 Nature yielded an average of 6055MPa and descending order as follows: Trac, Ss, Pinj, Dinj and Ttop. The average of model for reinforced material was 6419MPa and descending order of parameters influence such as: Dinj, Trac, Ttop, tinj, Ss and Pinj.

  14. Structure and function of wood

    Treesearch

    Alex Wiedenhoeft

    2010-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of a living plant. Attempting to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants― conduction of water...

  15. Fatigue behavior of wood-fiber-based tri-axial engineered sandwich composite panels (ESCP)

    Treesearch

    Jinghao Li; John F. Hunt; Shaoqin Gong; Zhiyong Cai

    2015-01-01

    The static and fatigue bending behavior of wood-fiber-based tri-axial engineered sandwich composite panels (ESCP) has been investigated by four-point bending tests. Fatigue panels and weakened panels (wESCP) with an initial interface defect were manufactured for the fatigue tests. Stress σ vs. number of cycles curves (S-N) were recorded under the different stress...

  16. Chemical compositions, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry study on brown-rotted woods

    Treesearch

    Gai-Yun Li; Luo-Hua Huang; Chung Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of brown-rot decay on the chemical composition and crystallinity of Masson pine was studied by exposing it to Wolfiporia cocos (Schwein.) Ryvarden and Gilbn. for durations of up to 15 weeks in the field. The holocellulose content, α-cellulose content, and wood crystallinity decreased slowly in the initial stage, followed by a significant reduction...

  17. Durability of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    J.J. Morrell; Nicole M. Stark; David E. Pendleton; Armando G. McDonald

    2006-01-01

    Deterioration is broadly defined as any negative effect on the properties of a material. The effects can be due to biological attack or to various non-living agents (sunlight, moisture, temperature), but often, deterioration results from a combination of factors. Nowhere is this more evident than with WPCs, owing to the marriage of dissimilar materials. This article...

  18. Evaluation of Paulownia elongata wood polyethylene composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Paulownia wood flour (PWF), a byproduct of milling lumber, was employed as a bio-filler and blended with high density polyethylene (HDPE) via extrusion. Paulownia wood (PW) shavings were milled through a 1-mm screen then separated via shaking into various particle fractions using sieves (#30 - < #2...

  19. The central role of wood biology in understanding the durability of wood-coating interactions

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2007-01-01

    To design effectively for durability, one must actively and honestly assess the material properties and limitations of each of the components in the design system; wood or wood composite, and the coating. Inasmuch as wood coatings are manufactured to specified tolerances from known materials, we have control of that component of the system. Compared to manmade...

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Young's Moduli of Full-Size wood Laminated Composite Poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shube; Chung Y. Hse; R.C. Tang

    2004-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to evaluate the Young's moduli of wood laminated composite poles (LCP) by using a free transverse vibration method. Full-size LCP, 6.1 m long and 10.2 cm in diameter, were lab-fabricated with 9 and/or 12 southern yellow pine [SYP] strips of thickness, 1.9 cm, 2.9 cm and 3.8 cm. The frequency of free transverse vibration in a LCP...

  1. Untargeted Identification of Wood Type-Specific Markers in Particulate Matter from Wood Combustion.

    PubMed

    Weggler, Benedikt A; Ly-Verdu, Saray; Jennerwein, Maximilian; Sippula, Olli; Reda, Ahmed A; Orasche, Jürgen; Gröger, Thomas; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-09-20

    Residential wood combustion emissions are one of the major global sources of particulate and gaseous organic pollutants. However, the detailed chemical compositions of these emissions are poorly characterized due to their highly complex molecular compositions, nonideal combustion conditions, and sample preparation steps. In this study, the particulate organic emissions from a masonry heater using three types of wood logs, namely, beech, birch, and spruce, were chemically characterized using thermal desorption in situ derivatization coupled to a GCxGC-ToF/MS system. Untargeted data analyses were performed using the comprehensive measurements. Univariate and multivariate chemometric tools, such as analysis of variance (ANOVA), principal component analysis (PCA), and ANOVA simultaneous component analysis (ASCA), were used to reduce the data to highly significant and wood type-specific features. This study reveals substances not previously considered in the literature as meaningful markers for differentiation among wood types.

  2. Mapping Viscoelastic and Plastic Properties of Polymers and Polymer-Nanotube Composites using Instrumented Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Andrew J.; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    An instrumented indentation method is developed for generating maps of time-dependent viscoelastic and time-independent plastic properties of polymeric materials. The method is based on a pyramidal indentation model consisting of two quadratic viscoelastic Kelvin-like elements and a quadratic plastic element in series. Closed-form solutions for indentation displacement under constant load and constant loading-rate are developed and used to determine and validate material properties. Model parameters are determined by point measurements on common monolithic polymers. Mapping is demonstrated on an epoxy-ceramic interface and on two composite materials consisting of epoxy matrices containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A fast viscoelastic deformation process in the epoxy was unaffected by the inclusion of the nanotubes, whereas a slow viscoelastic process was significantly impeded, as was the plastic deformation. Mapping revealed considerable spatial heterogeneity in the slow viscoelastic and plastic responses in the composites, particularly in the material with a greater fraction of nanotubes. PMID:27563168

  3. Dynamic mechanical analysis of compatibilizer effect on the mechanical properties of wood flour/high-density polyethylene composites

    Treesearch

    Mehdi Behzad; Medhi Tajvidi; Ghanbar Ehrahimi; Robert H. Falk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, effect of MAPE (maleic anhydride polyethylene) as the compatibilizer on the mechanical properties of wood-flour polyethylene composites has been investigated by using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Composites were made at 25% and 50% by weight fiber contents and 1% and 2% compatibilizer respectively. Controls were also made at the same fiber contents...

  4. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  5. Effect of environmental conditions on the mechanical properties and fungal degradation of polycaprolactone/microcrystalline cellulose/wood flour composites

    Treesearch

    Ronald Sabo; Liwei Jin; Nicole Stark; Rebecca E. Ibach

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), wood flour (WF), or both were characterized before and after exposure to various environmental conditions for 60 days. PCL/WF composites had the greatest tensile strength and modulus compared to neat PCL or PCL composites containing MCC. Electron microscopy indicated better adhesion between WF...

  6. Fabrication of a Nano-ZnO/Polyethylene/Wood-Fiber Composite with Enhanced Microwave Absorption and Photocatalytic Activity via a Facile Hot-Press Method

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Baokang; Chen, Yipeng; Shen, Xiaoping; Chen, Bo; Sun, Qingfeng; Jin, Chunde

    2017-01-01

    A polyethylene/wood-fiber composite loaded with nano-ZnO was prepared by a facile hot-press method and was used for the photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds as well as for microwave absorption. ZnO nanoparticles with an average size of 29 nm and polyethylene (PE) powders were dispersed on the wood fibers’ surface through a viscous cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) solution. The reflection loss (RL) value of the resulting composite was −21 dB, with a thickness of 3.5 mm in the frequency of 17.17 GHz. The PE/ZnO/wood-fiber (PZW) composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity (84% methyl orange degradation within 300 min) under UV light irradiation. ZnO nanoparticels (NPs) increased the storage modulus of the PZW composite, and the damping factor was transferred to the higher temperature region. The PZW composite exhibited the maximum flexural strength of 58 MPa and a modulus of elasticity (MOE) of 9625 MPa. Meanwhile, it also displayed dimensional stability (thickness swelling value of 9%). PMID:29099777

  7. Determination of Thermal Properties and Morphology of Eucalyptus Wood Residue Filled High Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Kabakci, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    Thermal behaviors of eucalyptus wood residue (EWR) filled recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites have been measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Morphology of the materials was also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Addition of the EWR into the recycled HDPE matrix reduced the starting of degradation temperature. EWR filled recycled HDPE had two main decomposition peaks, one for EWR around 350 °C and one for recycled HDPE around 460 °C. Addition of EWR did not affect the melting temperature of the recycled HDPE. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between wood residue and recycled HDPE. PMID:19325736

  8. A new method of determining moisture gradient in wood

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai

    2008-01-01

    Moisture gradient in wood and wood composites is one of most important factors that affects both physical stability and mechanical performance. This paper describes a method for measuring moisture gradient in lumber and engineering wood composites as it varies across material thickness. This innovative method employs a collimated radiation beam (x rays or [gamma] rays...

  9. The Statistics of wood assays for preservative retention

    Treesearch

    Patricia K. Lebow; Scott W. Conklin

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers general statistical concepts that apply to interpreting wood assay retention values. In particular, since wood assays are typically obtained from a single composited sample, the statistical aspects, including advantages and disadvantages, of simple compositing are covered.

  10. Wood mimetic hydrogel beads for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Park, Saerom; Kim, Sung Hee; Won, Keehoon; Choi, Joon Weon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-22

    Wood component-based composite hydrogels have potential applications in biomedical fields owing to their low cost, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. The controllable properties of wood mimetic composites containing three major wood components are useful for enzyme immobilization. Here, lipase from Candida rugosa was entrapped in wood mimetic beads containing cellulose, xylan, and lignin by dissolving wood components with lipase in [Emim][Ac], followed by reconstitution. Lipase entrapped in cellulose/xylan/lignin beads in a 5:3:2 ratio showed the highest activity; this ratio is very similar to that in natural wood. The lipase entrapped in various wood mimetic beads showed increased thermal and pH stability. The half-life times of lipase entrapped in cellulose/alkali lignin hydrogel were 31- and 82-times higher than those of free lipase during incubation under denaturing conditions of high temperature and low pH, respectively. Owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and controllable properties, wood mimetic hydrogel beads can be used to immobilize various enzymes for applications in the biomedical, bioelectronic, and biocatalytic fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Faecal-wood biomass co-combustion and ash composition analysis.

    PubMed

    Somorin, Tosin Onabanjo; Kolios, Athanasios J; Parker, Alison; McAdam, Ewan; Williams, Leon; Tyrrel, Sean

    2017-09-01

    Fuel blending is a widely used approach in biomass combustion, particularly for feedstocks with low calorific value and high moisture content. In on-site sanitation technologies, fuel blending is proposed as a pre-treatment requirement to reduce moisture levels and improve the physiochemical properties of raw faeces prior to drying. This study investigates the co-combustion performance of wood dust: raw human faeces blends at varying air-to-fuel ratios in a bench-scale combustor test rig. It concludes with ash composition analyses and discusses their potential application and related problems. The study shows that a 50:50 wood dust (WD): raw human faeces (FC) can reduce moisture levels in raw human faeces by ∼40% prior to drying. The minimum acceptable blend for treating moist faeces without prior drying at a combustion air flow rate of 14-18 L/min is 30:70 WD: FC. For self-sustained ignition and flame propagation, the minimum combustion temperature required for conversion of the fuel to ash is ∼400 °C. The most abundant elements in faecal ash are potassium and calcium, while elements such as nickel, aluminium and iron are in trace quantities. This suggests the potential use of faecal ash as a soil conditioner, but increases the tendency for fly ash formation and sintering problems.

  12. Size and composition distribution of fine particulate matter emitted from wood burning, meat charbroiling, and cigarettes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kleeman, M.J.; Schauer, J.J.; Cass, G.R.

    A dilution source sampling system is augmented to measure the size-distributed chemical composition of fine particle emissions from air pollution sources. Measurements are made using a laser optical particle counter (OPC), a differential mobility analyzer/condensation nucleus counter (DMA/CNC) combination, and a pair of microorifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs). The sources tested with this system include wood smoke (pine, oak, eucalyptus), meat charbroiling, and cigarettes. The particle mass distributions from all wood smoke sources have a single mode that peaks at approximately 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter. The smoke from meat charbroiling shows a major peak in the particle mass distribution atmore » 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter, with some material present at larger particle sizes. Particle mass distributions from cigarettes peak between 0.3 and 0.4 {micro}m particle diameter. Chemical composition analysis reveals that particles emitted from the sources tested here are largely composed of organic compounds. Noticeable concentrations of elemental carbon are found in the particles emitted from wood burning. The size distributions of the trace species emissions from these sources also are presented, including data for Na, K, Ti, Fe, Br, Ru, Cl, Al, Zn, Ba, Sr, V, Mn, Sb, La, Ce, as well as sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion when present in statistically significant amounts. These data are intended for use with air quality models that seek to predict the size distribution of the chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles.« less

  13. The development and manufacture of wood composite wind turbine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuteck, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The physical properties, operational experience, and construction methods of the wood/epoxy composite MOD 0A wind turbine blades are considered. Blades of this type have accumulated over 10,000 hours of successful operation at the Kahuku, Hawaii and Block Island, Rhode Island test sites. That body of experience is summarized and related to the structural concepts and design drivers which motivated the original design and choice of interior layout. Actual manufacturing experience and associated low first unit costs for these blades, as well as projections for high production rates, are presented. Application of these construction techniques to a wide range of other blade sizes is also considered.

  14. Self-actuating and self-diagnosing plastically deforming piezo-composite flapping wing MAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, Ajay B.; Harursampath, Dineshkumar; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we propose a constitutive model to describe the behavior of Piezoelectric Fiber Reinforced Composite (PFRC) material consisting of elasto-plastic matrix reinforced by strong elastic piezoelectric fibers. Computational efficiency is achieved using analytical solutions for elastic stifness matrix derived from Variational Asymptotic Methods (VAM). This is extended to provide Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) based on plasticity induced degradation of flapping frequency of PFRC. Overall this work provides an effective mathematical tool that can be used for structural self-health monitoring of plasticity induced flapping degradation of PFRC flapping wing MAVs. The developed tool can be re-calibrated to also provide SHM for other forms of failures like fatigue, matrix cracking etc.

  15. Estimation of wood density and chemical composition by means of diffuse reflectance mid-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT-MIR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nuopponen, Mari H; Birch, Gillian M; Sykes, Rob J; Lee, Steve J; Stewart, Derek

    2006-01-11

    Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) samples (491) from 50 different clones as well as 24 different tropical hardwoods and 20 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) samples were used to construct diffuse reflectance mid-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT-MIR) based partial least squares (PLS) calibrations on lignin, cellulose, and wood resin contents and densities. Calibrations for density, lignin, and cellulose were established for all wood species combined into one data set as well as for the separate Sitka spruce data set. Relationships between wood resin and MIR data were constructed for the Sitka spruce data set as well as the combined Scots pine and Sitka spruce data sets. Calibrations containing only five wavenumbers instead of spectral ranges 4000-2800 and 1800-700 cm(-1) were also established. In addition, chemical factors contributing to wood density were studied. Chemical composition and density assessed from DRIFT-MIR calibrations had R2 and Q2 values in the ranges of 0.6-0.9 and 0.6-0.8, respectively. The PLS models gave residual mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) values of 1.6-1.9, 2.8-3.7, and 0.4 for lignin, cellulose, and wood resin contents, respectively. Density test sets had RMSEP values ranging from 50 to 56. Reduced amount of wavenumbers can be utilized to predict the chemical composition and density of a wood, which should allow measurements of these properties using a hand-held device. MIR spectral data indicated that low-density samples had somewhat higher lignin contents than high-density samples. Correspondingly, high-density samples contained slightly more polysaccharides than low-density samples. This observation was consistent with the wet chemical data.

  16. Wood-Based Nanotechnologies toward Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Li, Tian; Li, Yiju; Zhang, Ying; Gong, Amy; Dai, Jiaqi; Hitz, Emily; Luo, Wei; Hu, Liangbing

    2018-01-01

    With over 30% global land coverage, the forest is one of nature's most generous gifts to human beings, providing shelters and materials for all living beings. Apart from being sustainable, renewable, and biodegradable, wood and its derivative materials are also extremely fascinating from a materials aspect, with numerous advantages including porous and hierarchical structure, excellent mechanical performance, and versatile chemistry. Here, strategies for designing novel wood-based materials via advanced nanotechnologies are summarized, including both the controllable bottom-up assembly from the highly crystalline nanocellulose building block and the more efficient top-down approaches directly from wood. Beyond material design, recent advances regarding the sustainable applications of these novel wood-based materials are also presented, focusing on areas that are traditionally dominated by man-made nonrenewable materials such as plastic, glass, and metals, as well as more advanced applications in the areas of energy storage, wastewater treatment and solar-steam-assisted desalination. With all recent progress pertaining to materials' design and sustainable applications presented, a vision for the future engineering of wood-based materials to promote continuous and healthy progress toward true sustainability is outlined. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Forecasting waste compositions: A case study on plastic waste of electronic display housings.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Jef R; Vanegas, Paul; Kellens, Karel; Wang, Feng; Huisman, Jaco; Dewulf, Wim; Duflou, Joost R

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid succession of technological developments, the architecture and material composition of many products used in daily life have drastically changed over the last decades. As a result, well-adjusted recycling technologies need to be developed and installed to cope with these evolutions. This is essential to guarantee continued access to materials and to reduce the ecological impact of our material consumption. However, limited information is currently available on the material composition of arising waste streams and even less on how these waste streams will evolve. Therefore, this paper presents a methodology to forecast trends in the material composition of waste streams. To demonstrate the applicability and value of the proposed methodology, it is applied to forecast the evolution of plastic housing waste from flat panel display (FPD) TVs, FPD monitors, cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs and CRT monitors. The results of the presented forecasts indicate that a wide variety of plastic types and additives, such as flame retardants, are found in housings of similar products. The presented case study demonstrates that the proposed methodology allows the identification of trends in the evolution of the material composition of waste streams. In addition, it is demonstrated that the recycling sector will need to adapt its processes to deal with the increasing complexity of plastics of end-of-life electronic displays while respecting relevant directives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Crash safety assurance strategies for future plastic and composite intensive vehicles (PCIVs).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    This report identifies outstanding safety issues and research needs for Plastics and Composite Intensive Vehicles (PCIV) to facilitate their safe deployment by 2020. A PCIV definition is proposed, which ensures that the weight and efficiency objectiv...

  19. The extractives of Pinus pinaster wood

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway; W. E. Hillis; L. S. Lau

    1973-01-01

    The extractives in Pinus pinaster wood grown in South Australia were examined as part of an assessment of the suitability of this wood for manufacture of absorbent tissues from bisulphite pulps. The average petroleum solubility of the wood was 2.0% but the amount and composition of the petroleum extract varied widely depending upon the age of the...

  20. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic techniques for wood and wood-based composites: a review

    Treesearch

    Sumire Kawamoto; R. Sam Williams

    2002-01-01

    This review focuses on the feasibility of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for monitoring defects in wood, particularly during drying. The advantages and disadvantages of AE and AU techniques are described. Particular emphasis is placed on the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in wood and the associated measurement problems....

  1. Polystyrene/wood composites and hydrophobic wood coatings from water-based hydrophilic-hydrophobic block copolymers

    Treesearch

    Marja-Leena Kosonen; Bo Wang; Gerard T. Caneba; Douglas J. Gardner; Tim G. Rials

    2000-01-01

    The combination of synthetic thermoplastic polymers and wood is normally problematic because wood surfaces are hydrophilic while typical thermoplastic polymers are hydrophobic. A possible solution is to use block copolymer coupling agents. In this work we show the use of a potentially useful synthetic method of producing hydrophilic-hydrophobic block copolymers as...

  2. How to make a beetle out of wood: multi-elemental stoichiometry of wood decay, xylophagy and fungivory.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Michał; Weiner, January

    2014-01-01

    The majority of terrestrial biomass is wood, but the elemental composition of its potential consumers, xylophages, differs hugely from that of wood. This causes a severe nutritional imbalance. We studied the stoichiometric relationships of 11 elements (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Na) in three species of pine-xylem-feeding insects, Stictoleptura rubra, Arhopalus rusticus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) and Chalcophora mariana (Coleoptera, Buprestidae), to elucidate their mechanisms of tissue growth and to match their life histories to their dietary constraints. These beetles do not differ from other Coleoptera in their absolute elemental compositions, which are approximately 1000 (N), 100 (P, Cu) and 50 (K, Na) times higher than in dead but undecayed pine wood. This discrepancy diminishes along the wood decay gradient, but the elemental concentrations remain higher by an order of magnitude in beetles than in highly decayed wood. Numerical simulation of the life history of S. rubra shows that feeding on nutrient-poor undecayed wood would extend its development time to implausible values, whereas feeding on highly decomposed wood (heavily infected with fungi) would barely balance its nutritional budget during the long development period of this species. The changes in stoichiometry indicate that the relative change in the nutrient levels in decaying wood cannot be attributed solely to carbon loss resulting from decomposer respiration: the action of fungi substantially enriches the decaying wood with nutritional elements imported from the outside of the system, making it a suitable food for wood-eating invertebrates.

  3. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I know if my reinforced plastic... for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

  4. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I know if my reinforced plastic... Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected...

  5. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I know if my reinforced plastic... Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected...

  6. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I know if my reinforced plastic... Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected...

  7. Influence of a stabilized cap layer on the photodegradation of coextruded high density polyethylene/woodflour composites

    Treesearch

    Shan Jin; Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2013-01-01

    The effect of light stabilizer’s addition method into wood-plastic composites (WPCs), i.e., surface versus bulk, on their photostability was evaluated. Blends of ultraviolet absorbers (benzotriazole or hydroxyphenyltriazine) with a hindered amine light stabilizer were used as the stabilizing additives. Both unstabilized and photostabilized uncapped (control) samples,...

  8. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of Dynamic Viscoelasticity of Full-Size Wood Composite Panels Using a Vibration Testing Method

    Treesearch

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Lujing Zhou; Dan Feng

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic viscoelasticity of full-size wood composite panels (WCPs) under the free-free vibrational state were determined by a vibration testing method. Vibration detection tests were performed on 194 pieces of three types of full-size WCPs (particleboard, medium density fiberboard, and plywood (PW)). The dynamic viscoelasticity from smaller specimens cut from the...

  10. Interfacial composition and stability of emulsions made with mixtures of commercial sodium caseinate and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Aiqian

    2008-10-15

    The interfacial composition and the stability of oil-in-water emulsion droplets (30% soya oil, pH 7.0) made with mixtures of sodium caseinate and whey protein concentrate (WPC) (1:1 by protein weight) at various total protein concentrations were examined. The average volume-surface diameter (d32) and the total surface protein concentration of emulsion droplets were similar to those of emulsions made with both sodium caseinate alone and WPC alone. Whey proteins were adsorbed in preference to caseins at low protein concentrations (<3%), whereas caseins were adsorbed in preference to whey proteins at high protein concentrations. The creaming stability of the emulsions decreased markedly as the total protein concentration of the system was increased above 2% (sodium caseinate >1%). This was attributed to depletion flocculation caused by the sodium caseinate in these emulsions. Whey proteins did not retard this instability in the emulsions made with mixtures of sodium caseinate and WPC. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Local melting to design strong and plastically deformable bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yue-Sheng; Han, Xiao-Liang; Song, Kai-Kai; Tian, Yu-Hao; Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Wang, Li; Sun, Bao-An; Wang, Gang; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites reinforced by the TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) effect have been explored in attempt to accomplish an optimal of trade-off between strength and ductility. However, the design of such BMG composites with advanced mechanical properties still remains a big challenge for materials engineering. In this work, we proposed a technique of instantaneously and locally arc-melting BMG plate to artificially induce the precipitation of B2 crystals in the glassy matrix and then to tune mechanical properties. Through adjusting local melting process parameters (i.e. input powers, local melting positions, and distances between the electrode and amorphous plate), the size, volume fraction, and distribution of B2 crystals were well tailored and the corresponding formation mechanism was clearly clarified. The resultant BMG composites exhibit large compressive plasticity and high strength together with obvious work-hardening ability. This compelling approach could be of great significance for the steady development of metastable CuZr-based alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:28211890

  12. Custom Machines Advance Composite Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Here is a brief list of materials that NASA will not be using to construct spacecraft: wood, adobe, fiberglass, bone. While it might be obvious why these materials would not make for safe space travel, they do share a common characteristic with materials that may well be the future foundation of spacecraft design: They all are composites. Formed of two or more unlike materials - such as cellulose and lignin in the case of wood, or glass fibers and plastic resin in the case of fiberglass-composites provide enhanced mechanical and physical properties through the combination of their constituent materials. For this reason, composites are used in everything from buildings, bathtubs, and countertops to boats, racecars, and sports equipment. NASA continually works to develop new materials to enable future space missions - lighter, less expensive materials that can still withstand the extreme demands of space travel. Composites such as carbon fiber materials offer promising solutions in this regard, providing strength and stiffness comparable to metals like aluminum but with less weight, allowing for benefits like better fuel efficiency and simpler propulsion system design. Composites can also be made fatigue tolerant and thermally stable - useful in space where temperatures can swing hundreds of degrees. NASA has recently explored the use of composites for aerospace applications through projects like the Composite Crew Module (CCM), a composite-constructed version of the aluminum-lithium Multipurpose Crew Capsule. The CCM was designed to give NASA engineers a chance to gain valuable experience developing and testing composite aerospace structures.

  13. Orthotropic elastic-plastic behavior of AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1989-01-01

    Inelastic and strength properties of AS4/APC-2 composites were characterized with respect to temperature variation by using a one parameter orthotropic plasticity model and a one parameter failure criterion. Simple uniaxial off-axis tension tests were performed on coupon specimens of unidirectional AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite at various temperatures. To avoid the complication caused by the extension-shear coupling effect in off-axis testing, new tabs were designed and used on the test specimens. The experimental results showed that the nonlinear behavior of constitutive relations and the strength can be characterized quite well using the one parameter plasticity model and the failure criterion, respectively.

  14. Effect of Boron and Phosphate compounds on Thermal and Fire Properties of wood/HDPE composites

    Treesearch

    Turgay Akbulut; Nadir Ayrilmis; Turker Dundar; Ali Durmus; Robert H. White; Murat Teker

    2011-01-01

    Melting and non-isothermal crystallization behaviors, oxidative induction time, and fire performance of the injection-molded wood flour-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels (4, 8, or 12 wt %) of boron compounds [borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %), zinc borate (ZB)] and phosphorus compounds [mono- and di-ammonium...

  15. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... composites production facility is a new affected source or an existing affected source? 63.5795 Section 63... for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

  16. Numerical simulation of elasto-plastic deformation of composites: evolution of stress microfields and implications for homogenization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C.; Segurado, J.; LLorca, J.

    2004-07-01

    The deformation of a composite made up of a random and homogeneous dispersion of elastic spheres in an elasto-plastic matrix was simulated by the finite element analysis of three-dimensional multiparticle cubic cells with periodic boundary conditions. "Exact" results (to a few percent) in tension and shear were determined by averaging 12 stress-strain curves obtained from cells containing 30 spheres, and they were compared with the predictions of secant homogenization models. In addition, the numerical simulations supplied detailed information of the stress microfields, which was used to ascertain the accuracy and the limitations of the homogenization models to include the nonlinear deformation of the matrix. It was found that secant approximations based on the volume-averaged second-order moment of the matrix stress tensor, combined with a highly accurate linear homogenization model, provided excellent predictions of the composite response when the matrix strain hardening rate was high. This was not the case, however, in composites which exhibited marked plastic strain localization in the matrix. The analysis of the evolution of the matrix stresses revealed that better predictions of the composite behavior can be obtained with new homogenization models which capture the essential differences in the stress carried by the elastic and plastic regions in the matrix at the onset of plastic deformation.

  17. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drums, Plastic drums and Jerricans, Composite packagings which are in the shape of a drum Six—(three for... of natural wood, Plywood boxes, Reconstituted wood boxes, Fiberboard boxes, Plastic boxes, Steel or... Administrator. (c) Special preparation of test samples for the drop test. (1) Testing of plastic drums, plastic...

  18. Effect of boron and phosphate compounds on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of wood-polypropylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Turgay Akbulut; Turker Dundar; Robert H. White; Fatih Mengeloglu; Umit Buyuksari; Zeki Candan; Erkan Avci

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the injection-molded wood flour/polypropylene composites incorporated with different contents of boron compounds; borax/boric acid and zinc borate, and phosphate compounds; mono and diammonium phosphates were investigated. The effect of the coupling agent content, maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene, on the properties of...

  19. How to Make a Beetle Out of Wood: Multi-Elemental Stoichiometry of Wood Decay, Xylophagy and Fungivory

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Michał; Weiner, January

    2014-01-01

    The majority of terrestrial biomass is wood, but the elemental composition of its potential consumers, xylophages, differs hugely from that of wood. This causes a severe nutritional imbalance. We studied the stoichiometric relationships of 11 elements (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Na) in three species of pine-xylem-feeding insects, Stictoleptura rubra, Arhopalus rusticus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) and Chalcophora mariana (Coleoptera, Buprestidae), to elucidate their mechanisms of tissue growth and to match their life histories to their dietary constraints. These beetles do not differ from other Coleoptera in their absolute elemental compositions, which are approximately 1000 (N), 100 (P, Cu) and 50 (K, Na) times higher than in dead but undecayed pine wood. This discrepancy diminishes along the wood decay gradient, but the elemental concentrations remain higher by an order of magnitude in beetles than in highly decayed wood. Numerical simulation of the life history of S. rubra shows that feeding on nutrient-poor undecayed wood would extend its development time to implausible values, whereas feeding on highly decomposed wood (heavily infected with fungi) would barely balance its nutritional budget during the long development period of this species. The changes in stoichiometry indicate that the relative change in the nutrient levels in decaying wood cannot be attributed solely to carbon loss resulting from decomposer respiration: the action of fungi substantially enriches the decaying wood with nutritional elements imported from the outside of the system, making it a suitable food for wood-eating invertebrates. PMID:25536334

  20. Finishes for Wood Bowls, Butcher Blocks, Other Items Used for Food, and Children's Toys

    Treesearch

    Mark T. Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    The durability and beauty of wood make it an attractive material for bowls, butcher blocks, and other items used to serve or prepare food. Wood also tends to be less prone to harbor bacteria than are some other materials such as plastic.

  1. Effects of whey protein concentrate, feed moisture and temperature on the physicochemical characteristics of a rice-based extruded flour.

    PubMed

    Teba, Carla da Silva; Silva, Erika Madeira Moreira da; Chávez, Davy William Hidalgo; Carvalho, Carlos Wanderlei Piler de; Ascheri, José Luis Ramírez

    2017-08-01

    The influence of whey protein concentrate (WPC), feed moisture and temperature on the physicochemical properties of rice-based extrudates has been investigated. WPC (0.64-7.36g/100g rice) was extruded under 5 moisture (16.64-23.36g/100g) and 5 temperature (106.36-173.64°C) established by a 3 2 central composite rotational design. Physicochemical properties [color, porosimetry, crystallinity, water solubility and absorption, pasting properties, reconstitution test, proximate composition, amino acids, minerals and electrophoresis] were determined. WPC and feed moisture increased redness, yellowness and decreased luminosity. Feed moisture and temperature increased density and total volume pore. WPC and moisture increased crystallinity, but only WPC increased solubility and decrease the retrogradation tendency. Increasing temperature increased the viscosity of the extrudates. The addition of WPC improved the nutritional composition of the extrudates, especially proteins. It is suggested that the extrusion process positively affected the retention of most of the polypeptides chains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The nature of the MDI/wood bond

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Marcinko, J.J.; Phanopoulos, C.; Newman, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    Polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate (pMDI) binders have been used in the wood composite industry for 20 years. Almost one half of the oriented strand board (OSB) manufactures in North America are taking advantage of its processing speed and superior board performance. MDI`s current use in Strandboard, MDF (medium density fiber board), LVL (laminated veneer lumber), Plywood, and Particleboard is wide spread. A fundamental understanding of the role of MIDI as a binder in these complex composites is essential for further processing optimization. Experimental data is presented which investigates the nature of the chemical bonding in wood composites. Solid state nuclear magneticmore » resonance (NMR) data is combined with data from thermal analysis and fluorescence microscopy to investigate the chemistry, penetration, and morphology of the isocyanate/wood interphase. Structure property relationships are developed and related to composite performance. The study contrasts isocyanate and phenol formaldehyde binder systems.« less

  3. Experimental and theoretical modal analysis of full-sized wood composite panels supported on four nodes

    Treesearch

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang; Hu Miao; Lujing Zhou; Fenglu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Key elastic properties of full-sized wood composite panels (WCPs) must be accurately determined not only for safety, but also serviceability demands. In this study, the modal parameters of full-sized WCPs supported on four nodes were analyzed for determining the modulus of elasticity (E) in both major and minor axes, as well as the in-plane shear modulus of panels by...

  4. Common wood decay fungi found in the Caribbean Basin

    Treesearch

    D. Jean Lodge

    2016-01-01

    There are hundreds of wood-decay fungi in the Caribbean Basin, but relatively few of these are likely to grow on manmade structures built of wood or wood-composites. The wood-decay fungi of greatest concern are those that cause brown-rot, and especially brown-rot fungi that are resistant to copper-based wood preservatives. Some fungi that grow in the Caribbean and...

  5. Failure of structural elements made of polymer supported composite materials during the multiyear natural aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinkov, Pavel; Ogorodov, Leonid; Grabovyy, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Modern high-rise construction introduces a number of limitations and tasks. In addition to durability, comfort and profitability, projects should take into account energy efficiency and environmental problems. Polymer building materials are used as substitutes for materials such as brick, concrete, metal, wood and glass, and in addition to traditional materials. Plastic materials are light, can be formed into complex shapes, durable and low, and also possess a wide range of properties. Plastic materials are available in various forms, colors and textures and require minimal or no color. They are resistant to heat transfer and diffusion of moisture and do not suffer from metal corrosion or microbial attack. Polymeric materials, including thermoplastics, thermoset materials and wood-polymer composites, have many structural and non-structural applications in the construction industry. They provide unique and innovative solutions at a low cost, and their use is likely to grow in the future. A number of polymer composite materials form complex material compositions, which are applied in the construction in order to analyze the processes of damage accumulation under the conditions of complex nonstationary loading modes, and to determine the life of structural elements considering the material aging. This paper present the results of tests on short-term compression loading with a deformation rate of v = 2 mm/min using composite samples of various shapes and sizes.

  6. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  7. A novel wood flour-filled composite based on microfibrillar high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/Nylon-6 blends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhi; Yao, Fei; Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-05-01

    A novel wood flour (WF)-filled composite based on the microfibrillar high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and Nylon-6 co-blend, in which both in situ formed Nylon-6 microfibrils and WF acted as reinforcing elements, was successfully developed using a two-step extrusion method. At the 30wt.% WF loading level, WF-filled composite based on the microfibrillized HDPE/Nylon-6 blend exhibited higher strengths and moduli than the corresponding HDPE-based composite. The incorporation of WF reduced short-term creep response of HDPE matrix and the presence of Nylon-6 microfibrils further contributed to the creep reduction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Design and evaluation of low-cost laminated wood composite blades for intermediate size wind turbines: Blade design, fabrication concept, and cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, S.; Gaugeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zueck, M.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a program to reduce wind turbine costs, an evaluation was conducted of a laminated wood composite blade for the Mod-OA 200 kW wind turbine. The effort included the design and fabrication concept for the blade, together with cost and load analyses. The blade structure is composed of laminated Douglas fir veneers for the primary spar and nose sections, and honeycomb cored plywood panels for the trailing edges sections. The attachment of the wood blade to the rotor hub was through load takeoff studs bonded into the blade root. Tests were conducted on specimens of the key structural components to verify the feasibility of the concept. It is concluded that the proposed wood composite blade design and fabrication concept is suitable for Mod-OA size turbines (125-ft diameter rotor) at a cost that is very competitive with other methods of manufacture.

  9. Wood products research in the USA

    Treesearch

    Theodore Wegner

    2010-01-01

    Forest biomass conversion to biofuels and other value-added co-products; hyper-performance advanced composites custom tailored to end use requirements; advanced high performance wood-based structures; and nanomaterials and nano-enable high performance products from wood represent important research and development investment areas for the successful transformation of...

  10. Source emission and model evaluation of formaldehyde from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the measurement and model evaluation of formaldehyde source emissions from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber under dynamic conditions using ASTM D 6670-01 (2007). Four brands of the same type furniture product were tested. The data we...

  11. Enhancement of Moisture Protective Properties and Stability of Pectin through Formation of a Composite Film: Effects of Shellac and Plasticizer.

    PubMed

    Luangtana-Anan, Manee; Soradech, Sitthiphong; Saengsod, Suthep; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop the high moisture protective ability and stable pectin through the design of composite films based on varying shellac concentrations. A film casting method was applied to prepare a free film. The moisture protective properties and mechanical properties were investigated. The findings was the composite films exhibited the reductions in the hydrophilicity, water vapor permeability, and the moisture content compared with pectin films. The single and composite films were then study for their stability at 40 °C and 75% RH for 90 d. Among the concentrations of shellac, 50% (w/w) could improve stability in terms of moisture protection after 90 d of storage, whereas lower concentrations of shellac (10% to 40%) could not achieve this. However, the higher shellac content also contributed to weaker mechanical properties. The mechanical improvement and stability of composite films with the incorporation of plasticizers were further investigated. Polyethylene glycol 400 and diethyl phthalate at a concentration of 10% were used. The results indicated that both plasticizers could enhance the mechanical characteristics and had a slight effect on moisture protection. The stability of pectin in terms of moisture protective properties could, therefore, be modified through the fabrication of composite films with hydrophobic polymers, that is, shellac and the addition of proper plasticizers to enhance mechanical properties, which could offer wide applications for edible film in food, agro, and pharmaceutical industries. The composite film with 50% shellac could improve moisture protective properties of pectin film. Adding a plasticizer could build up the higher mechanical characteristics of composite film. Stability of pectin could be modified by fabrication of composite films with proper content of shellac and plasticizer. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Syringyl-rich lignin renders poplars more resistant to degradation by wood decay fungi.

    PubMed

    Skyba, Oleksandr; Douglas, Carl J; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2013-04-01

    In order to elucidate the effects of lignin composition on the resistance of wood to degradation by decay fungi, wood specimens from two transgenic poplar lines expressing an Arabidopsis gene encoding ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) driven by the cinnimate-4-hydroxylase promoter (C4H::F5H) that increased syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monolignol ratios relative to those in the untransformed control wood were incubated with six different wood decay fungi. Alterations in wood weight and chemical composition were monitored over the incubation period. The results showed that transgenic poplar lines extremely rich in syringyl lignin exhibited a drastically improved resistance to degradation by all decay fungi evaluated. Lignin monomer composition and its distribution among cell types and within different cell layers were the sole wood chemistry parameters determining wood durability. Since transgenic poplars with exceedingly high syringyl contents were recalcitrant to degradation, where wood durability is a critical factor, these genotypes may offer improved performance.

  13. Syringyl-Rich Lignin Renders Poplars More Resistant to Degradation by Wood Decay Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Skyba, Oleksandr; Douglas, Carl J.

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effects of lignin composition on the resistance of wood to degradation by decay fungi, wood specimens from two transgenic poplar lines expressing an Arabidopsis gene encoding ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) driven by the cinnimate-4-hydroxylase promoter (C4H::F5H) that increased syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monolignol ratios relative to those in the untransformed control wood were incubated with six different wood decay fungi. Alterations in wood weight and chemical composition were monitored over the incubation period. The results showed that transgenic poplar lines extremely rich in syringyl lignin exhibited a drastically improved resistance to degradation by all decay fungi evaluated. Lignin monomer composition and its distribution among cell types and within different cell layers were the sole wood chemistry parameters determining wood durability. Since transgenic poplars with exceedingly high syringyl contents were recalcitrant to degradation, where wood durability is a critical factor, these genotypes may offer improved performance. PMID:23396333

  14. Laboratory assays evaluate the influence of physical guidelines on subterranean termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) tunneling, bait discovery, and consumption.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, L E; Miller, D M

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory assays were conducted to determine whether physical guidelines could direct subterranean termite foraging behavior. Several materials (wood, plastics, and wood thermoplastic composites) were evaluated for their potential to serve as termite guidelines. Termite tunneling along the different types of guidelines was measured. The proportion of baits discovered when connected by a guideline was compared with the proportion of unconnected baits discovered. Termite consumption of baits also was quantified. Assay results indicated that the termites did not respond to all guideline materials in the same way. Termites built significantly longer tunnels along wood guidelines than they did along any of the plastic guidelines tested. However, tunnel length along the wood and the wood thermoplastic composites was not significantly different. The probability of two baits being discovered when they were connected by wood guidelines was significantly greater than when the baits were connected by plastic guidelines or left unconnected (no guideline). Pairs of baits connected by wood thermoplastic composites were also significantly more likely to be discovered than unconnected baits. Bait consumption was not enhanced by the presence of the guidelines. It is likely that guidelines made of wood competed with the baits as a termite food resource.

  15. Nutritional evaluation of caseins and whey proteins and their hydrolysates from Protamex*

    PubMed Central

    Sindayikengera, Séverin; Xia, Wen-shui

    2006-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC 80) and sodium caseinate were hydrolyzed by Protamex to 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% degree of hydrolysis (DH). WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were then analyzed, compared and evaluated for their nutritional qualities. Their chemical composition, protein solubility, amino acid composition, essential amino acid index (EAA index), biological value (BV), nutritional index (NI), chemical score, enzymic protein efficiency ratio (E-PER) and in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) were determined. The results indicated that the enzymatic hydrolysis of WPC 80 and sodium caseinate by Protamex improved the solubility and IVPD of their hydrolysates. WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were high-quality proteins and had a surplus of essential amino acids compared with the FAO/WHO/UNU (1985) reference standard. The nutritive value of WPC 80 and its hydrolysates was superior to that of sodium caseinate and its hydrolysates as indicated by some nutritional parameters such as the amino acid composition, chemical score, EAA index and predicted BV. However, the E-PER was lower for the WPC hydrolysates as compared to unhydrolyzed WPC 80 but sodium caseinate and its hydrolysates did not differ significantly. The nutritional qualities of WPC 80, sodium caseinate and their hydrolysates were good and make them appropriate for food formulations or as nutritional supplements. PMID:16421963

  16. Thermal degradation of wood fibers during hot-pressing of MDF composites. Part I, Relative effects and benefits of thermal exposure

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Andrzej M. Krzysik

    2007-01-01

    This research evaluated the potential of wood fiber to chemically decompose during hot-pressing. We evaluated changes in carbohydrate composition and structure as a function of multiple press temperatures (180°, 200°, and 220°C) and an array of hot-pressing durations from 180 to 2500 s. Results show how this thermal degradation in chemical composition directly results...

  17. The Great Wood vs. Plastic Pegboard Controversy: A Definitive Answer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droege, Robert C.; Hawk, John

    1976-01-01

    This study was performed to resolve the question of comparability of manual dexterity scores obtained on wooden and plastic versions of the USES pegboard. Currently authorized equipment, either plastic or wooden, may be used with the confidence that scores are not affected by the type of equipment used. (Author)

  18. Influence of particle size on water absorption capacity and mechanical properties of polyethylene-wood flour composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, A. K.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Kolesnikova, N. N.; Popov, A. A.; Olkhov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Biocomposites based on low density polyethylene (LDPE) and birch wood flour (WF) were investigated. The mechanical properties and water absorption capacity were examined depending on the particle size of a filler in biocomposites. The aim of the paper is the investigation of composite properties depending on the filler particle size. The filler particle sizes were 0-80 µm, 80-140 µm, 140-200 µm, and 0-200 µm. The tensile strength of composite samples varied within the range 5.7-8.2 MPa. Elongation at break of composites varied within the range 5.1-7.5%. Highest mechanical properties were found in composites with the lowest filler fraction. Highest water absorption was observed in composition with a complex fraction of the filler. The influence of the filler particle size on composite properties was shown. It was found that an increase of the filler particle size decreases mechanical parameters and increases water absorption.

  19. Incorporation of Plasticity and Damage Into an Orthotropic Three-Dimensional Model with Tabulated Input Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blackenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites under impact conditions is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive industries. While there are several composite material models currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes, several features have been identified as being lacking in the currently available material models that could substantially enhance the predictive capability of the impact simulations. A specific desired feature pertains to the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model. Another desired feature relates to using experimentally based tabulated stress-strain input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to specifying discrete input properties (such as modulus and strength) and employing analytical functions to track the response of the material. To begin to address these needs, a combined plasticity and damage model suitable for use with both solid and shell elements is being developed for implementation within the commercial code LS-DYNA. The plasticity model is based on extending the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The evolution of the yield surface is determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions and is tracked using the effective plastic strain. The effective plastic strain is computed by using the non-associative flow rule in combination with appropriate numerical methods. To compute the evolution of damage, a strain equivalent semi-coupled formulation is used, in which a load in one direction results in a stiffness reduction in multiple coordinate directions. A specific laminated composite is examined to demonstrate the process of characterizing and analyzing the response of a composite using the developed

  20. Improvements in processing characteristics and engineering properties of wood flour-filled high density polyethylene composite sheeting in the presence of hollow glass microspheres

    Treesearch

    Baris Yalcin; Steve E Amos; Andrew S D Souza; Craig M Clemons; I Sedat Gunes; Troy K Ista

    2012-01-01

    Hollow glass microspheres were introduced into wood flour/high density polyethylene composites by melt compounding in a twin-screw extruder. The prepared composites were subsequently converted to extruded profiles in order to obtain composite sheeting. The presence of hollow glass microspheres highly reduced the density of the extruded sheets down to 0.9 g/cc, while...

  1. Bioinspired Wood Nanotechnology for Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Lars A; Burgert, Ingo

    2018-05-01

    It is a challenging task to realize the vision of hierarchically structured nanomaterials for large-scale applications. Herein, the biomaterial wood as a large-scale biotemplate for functionalization at multiple scales is discussed, to provide an increased property range to this renewable and CO 2 -storing bioresource, which is available at low cost and in large quantities. The Progress Report reviews the emerging field of functional wood materials in view of the specific features of the structural template and novel nanotechnological approaches for the development of wood-polymer composites and wood-mineral hybrids for advanced property profiles and new functions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dynamic determination of modulus of elasticity of full-size wood composite panels using a vibration method

    Treesearch

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; Lujing Zhou; Xiping Wang

    2015-01-01

    A vibration testing method based on free vibration theory in a ‘‘free–free” support condition was investigated for evaluating the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of full-size wood composite panels (WCPs). Vibration experiments were conducted on three types of WCPs (medium density fibreboard, particleboard, and plywood) to determine the dynamic MOE of the panels. Static...

  3. Eco-friendly materials for large area piezoelectronics: self-oriented Rochelle salt in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, E.; Ayela, C.; Atli, A.

    2018-02-01

    Upgraded biodegradable piezoelectric composite materials elaborated by incorporation of Rochelle salt (RS, Sodium potassium tartrate tetrahydrate) in wood were reported. RS crystals, known as the first discovered piezoelectric material, were grown in the micro-cavities of wood, having naturally a tubular structure, by soaking the wood into RS saturated water. Since most of the cavities in wood are oriented in the same direction, the piezoelectric effect was improved when the cavities were filled by RS crystals. The mechanical, structural and piezoelectric properties of RS incorporated wood composite samples were characterized. Both direct and converse piezoelectric effects are illustrated. The wood-base composite exhibits an effective piezoelectric constant d 33 of 11 pC N-1. Also, the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity were enhanced by inserting RS into the wood, nevertheless the samples became more brittle. The wood-based piezoelectric samples prepared in this work can be used as actuators, sensors or energy harvesters. The process developed here permits us to manufacture large area piezoelectric devices which are environmentally and economically unsurpassed.

  4. The size, mass, and composition of plastic debris in the western North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Morét-Ferguson, Skye; Law, Kara Lavender; Proskurowski, Giora; Murphy, Ellen K; Peacock, Emily E; Reddy, Christopher M

    2010-10-01

    This study reports the first inventory of physical properties of individual plastic debris in the North Atlantic. We analyzed 748 samples for size, mass, and material composition collected from surface net tows on 11 expeditions from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to the Caribbean Sea between 1991 and 2007. Particles were mostly fragments less than 10mm in size with nearly all lighter than 0.05 g. Material densities ranged from 0.808 to 1.24 g ml(-1), with about half between 0.97 and 1.04 g ml(-1), a range not typically found in virgin plastics. Elemental analysis suggests that samples in this density range are consistent with polypropylene and polyethylene whose densities have increased, likely due to biofouling. Pelagic densities varied considerably from that of beach plastic debris, suggesting that plastic particles are modified during their residence at sea. These analyses provide clues in understanding particle fate and potential debris sources, and address ecological implications of pelagic plastic debris. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of processing method on the mechanical and thermal of Silvergrass/HDPE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Jin, Yueqiang; Wang, Shuying

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of compression and injection molding methods on properties of Silvergrass-HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) composites, with respect to mechanical behaviors. Maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was added in the composite and improved the mechanical property of the composite. The research founds MAPE can improve the mechanical property because it improved the interfacial compatibility as a coupling agent. When added a content of 8% of MAPE, Silvergrass-HDPE composites made from compression molding shows a better mechanical performance in tensile strength and flexural strength than that made from injection molding, with increasing Silvergrass fiber content from 30% to 50%. However, the WPCs (wood plastics composites) made from injection molding had a lower degree of crystallinity with or without MAPE treatment.

  6. Elasto-plastic analysis of interface layers for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix in metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic fibers induces high thermal stresses in the matrix. Elasto-plastic analyses - with different degrees of simplification and modelization - show that an interface layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the tensile hoop stress in the matrix substantially.

  7. Air quality and composite wood products

    Treesearch

    Melissa G. D. Baumann

    1999-01-01

    Research at the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) is being conducted to identify the compounds emitted from wood products during their manufacture and subsequent use. The FPL researchers are measuring the types and quantities of VOCs that are emitted from particleboard and MDF products to provide quantitative emissions information. This information...

  8. The O₂-enriched air gasification of coal, plastics and wood in a fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Mastellone, Maria Laura; Zaccariello, Lucio; Santoro, Donato; Arena, Umberto

    2012-04-01

    The effect of oxygen-enriched air during fluidized bed co-gasification of a mixture of coal, plastics and wood has been investigated. The main components of the obtained syngas were measured by means of on-line analyzers and a gas chromatograph while those of the condensate phase were off-line analysed by means of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The characterization of condensate phase as well as that of the water used as scrubbing medium completed the performed diagnostics. The experimental results were further elaborated in order to provide material and substances flow analyses inside the plant boundaries. These analyses allowed to obtain the main substance distribution between solid, gaseous and condensate phases and to estimate the conversion efficiency of carbon and hydrogen but also to easily visualise the waste streams produced by the process. The process performance was then evaluated on the basis of parameters related to the conversion efficiency of fuels into valuable products (i.e. by considering tar and particulate as process losses) as well as those related to the energy recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioplastic composite foam prepared from poly(lactic acid) and natural wood flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannakas, Pokkes; Petrchwattana, Nawadon; Covavisaruch, Sirijutaratana

    2016-03-01

    The major drawbacks of Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) bioplastic are its cost and brittleness. This study aims to reduce the cost by foaming PLA reinforced with wood flour. A series of PLA/ natural fiber (WF) composite was prepared by using WF of selected conifers up to 5 wt%; each composite formulation was then foamed using 2 wt% of Azodicarbonamide (ADC) as chemical foaming agent. ADC effectively reduced the density of PLA and the PLA/WF composite foam by about 45% to 0.64 g/cm3 from 1.24 g/cm3 of neat PLA and 1.26 g/cm3 of PLA/WF composites when 2 wt% ADC was applied. Mechanical behaviors in terms of compressive and impact properties were investigated. With the presence of WF, the compressive stress increased with the WF content due to the good interfacial adhesion between the PLA matrix and the WF. This was verified by microscopic observation, leading to efficient stress transfer at the interface between PLA matrix and the WF. The presence of WF raised the specific compressive modulus and strength of PLA/WF composites to around 0.94 GPa.cm3/g and 2.65 MPa.cm3/g but foaming the PLA or the PLA/WF composites led to a dramatic reduction of the compressive modulus to 0.2-0.4 GPa.cm3/g, implying that the PLA and the PLA/WF foams had become softened. This was evidently observed in the significant reduction of hardness coupled with the vast drop of stress required to compressively deform the foams.

  10. Effect of carbon fiber addition on the electromagnetic shielding properties of carbon fiber/polyacrylamide/wood based fiberboards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Baokang; Chen, Yipeng; Yang, Ning; Chen, Bo; Sun, Qingfeng

    2018-05-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite boards are fabricated by mechanical grind-assisted hot-pressing, and are used for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. CF with an average diameter of 150 nm is distributed on wood fiber, which is then encased by polyacrylamide. The CF/polyacrylamide/wood fiber (CPW) composite exhibits an optimal EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of 41.03 dB compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (0.41 dB), which meets the requirements of commercial merchandise. Meanwhile, the CPW composite also shows high mechanical strength. The maximum modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of CPW composites are 39.52 MPa and 5823.15 MPa, respectively. The MOR and MOE of CPW composites increased by 38% and 96%, respectively, compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (28.64 and 2967.35 MPa).

  11. Effect of carbon fiber addition on the electromagnetic shielding properties of carbon fiber/polyacrylamide/wood based fiberboards.

    PubMed

    Dang, Baokang; Chen, Yipeng; Yang, Ning; Chen, Bo; Sun, Qingfeng

    2018-05-11

    Carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite boards are fabricated by mechanical grind-assisted hot-pressing, and are used for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. CF with an average diameter of 150 nm is distributed on wood fiber, which is then encased by polyacrylamide. The CF/polyacrylamide/wood fiber (CPW) composite exhibits an optimal EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of 41.03 dB compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (0.41 dB), which meets the requirements of commercial merchandise. Meanwhile, the CPW composite also shows high mechanical strength. The maximum modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of CPW composites are 39.52 MPa and 5823.15 MPa, respectively. The MOR and MOE of CPW composites increased by 38% and 96%, respectively, compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (28.64 and 2967.35 MPa).

  12. The properties of the wood-polystyrene interphase determined by inverse gas chromatography

    Treesearch

    John Simonsen; Zhenqiu Hong; Timothy G. Rials

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the interphase in wood-polymer composites are important determinants of the properties of the final composite. This study used inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to measure interphasal properties of composites of polystyrene and two types of wood fiber fillers and an inoranic substrate (CW) with varying amounts of surface coverage of polystyrene. Glass...

  13. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood pulp...

  14. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood pulp...

  15. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood pulp...

  16. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood pulp...

  17. Black carbon surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The dual-vaporizer SP-AMS provided information on the OM and BC components of the soot as well as on refractory components internally mixed with BC. By switching the SP-AMS laser vaporizer off and using only the AMS thermal vaporizer (at 600 °C), information on the OM component only was obtained. In both modes, OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. In SP-AMS mode, BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C1-5+), oxygenated carbonaceous ions (CO1-2+), potassium (K+), and water (H2O+ and related fragments). The C4+ : C3+ ratio, but not the C1+ : C3+ ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO1-2+ signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO2+ increased relative to C1-3+ while CO2+ simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (positive matrix factorization) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a modified error model to address peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface

  18. Optimization of High Temperature and Pressurized Steam Modified Wood Fibers for High-Density Polyethylene Matrix Composites Using the Orthogonal Design Method

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xun; Li, Qingde; Cheng, Wanli; Han, Guangping; Xuan, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    The orthogonal design method was used to determine the optimum conditions for modifying poplar fibers through a high temperature and pressurized steam treatment for the subsequent preparation of wood fiber/high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. The extreme difference, variance, and significance analyses were performed to reveal the effect of the modification parameters on the mechanical properties of the prepared composites, and they yielded consistent results. The main findings indicated that the modification temperature most strongly affected the mechanical properties of the prepared composites, followed by the steam pressure. A temperature of 170 °C, a steam pressure of 0.8 MPa, and a processing time of 20 min were determined as the optimum parameters for fiber modification. Compared to the composites prepared from untreated fibers, the tensile, flexural, and impact strength of the composites prepared from modified fibers increased by 20.17%, 18.5%, and 19.3%, respectively. The effect on the properties of the composites was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. When the temperature, steam pressure, and processing time reached the highest values, the composites exhibited the best mechanical properties, which were also well in agreement with the results of the extreme difference, variance, and significance analyses. Moreover, the crystallinity and thermal stability of the fibers and the storage modulus of the prepared composites improved; however, the hollocellulose content and the pH of the wood fibers decreased. PMID:28773963

  19. Optimization of High Temperature and Pressurized Steam Modified Wood Fibers for High-Density Polyethylene Matrix Composites Using the Orthogonal Design Method.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xun; Li, Qingde; Cheng, Wanli; Han, Guangping; Xuan, Lihui

    2016-10-18

    The orthogonal design method was used to determine the optimum conditions for modifying poplar fibers through a high temperature and pressurized steam treatment for the subsequent preparation of wood fiber/high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. The extreme difference, variance, and significance analyses were performed to reveal the effect of the modification parameters on the mechanical properties of the prepared composites, and they yielded consistent results. The main findings indicated that the modification temperature most strongly affected the mechanical properties of the prepared composites, followed by the steam pressure. A temperature of 170 °C, a steam pressure of 0.8 MPa, and a processing time of 20 min were determined as the optimum parameters for fiber modification. Compared to the composites prepared from untreated fibers, the tensile, flexural, and impact strength of the composites prepared from modified fibers increased by 20.17%, 18.5%, and 19.3%, respectively. The effect on the properties of the composites was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. When the temperature, steam pressure, and processing time reached the highest values, the composites exhibited the best mechanical properties, which were also well in agreement with the results of the extreme difference, variance, and significance analyses. Moreover, the crystallinity and thermal stability of the fibers and the storage modulus of the prepared composites improved; however, the hollocellulose content and the pH of the wood fibers decreased.

  20. An All-Organic Composite System for Resistive Change Memory via the Self-Assembly of Plastic-Crystalline Molecules.

    PubMed

    Cha, An-Na; Lee, Sang-A; Bae, Sukang; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dong Su; Wang, Gunuk; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2017-01-25

    An all-organic composite system was introduced as an active component for organic resistive memory applications. The active layer was prepared by mixing a highly polar plastic-crystalline organic molecule (succinonitrile, SN) into an insulating polymer (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). As increasing concentrations of SN from 0 to 3.0 wt % were added to solutions of different concentrations of PMMA, we observed distinguishable microscopic surface structures on blended films of SN and PMMA at certain concentrations after the spin-casting process. The structures were organic dormant volcanos composed of micron-scale PMMA craters and disk type SN lava. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) analysis showed that these structures were located in the middle of the film. Self-assembly of the plastic-crystalline molecules resulted in the phase separation of the SN:PMMA mixture during solvent evaporation. The organic craters remained at the surface after the spin-casting process, indicative of the formation of an all-organic composite film. Because one organic crater contains one SN disk, our system has a coplanar monolayer disk composite system, indicative of the simplest composite type of organic memory system. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the composite films with organic craters revealed that our all-organic composite system showed unipolar type resistive switching behavior. From logarithmic I-V characteristics, we found that the current flow was governed by space charge limited current (SCLC). From these results, we believe that a plastic-crystalline molecule-polymer composite system is one of the most reliable ways to develop organic composite systems as potential candidates for the active components of organic resistive memory applications.

  1. Can niche plasticity promote biodiversity-productivity relationships through increased complementarity?

    PubMed

    Niklaus, Pascal A; Baruffol, Martin; He, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Keping; Schmid, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Most experimental biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research to date has addressed herbaceous plant communities. Comparably little is known about how forest communities will respond to species losses, despite their importance for global biogeochemical cycling. We studied tree species interactions in experimental subtropical tree communities with 33 distinct tree species mixtures and one, two, or four species. Plots were either exposed to natural light levels or shaded. Trees grew rapidly and were intensely competing above ground after 1.5 growing seasons when plots were thinned and the vertical distribution of leaves and wood determined by separating the biomass of harvested trees into 50 cm height increments. Our aim was to analyze effects of species richness in relation to the vertical allocation of leaf biomass and wood, with an emphasis on bipartite competitive interactions among species. Aboveground productivity increased with species richness. The community-level vertical leaf and wood distribution depended on the species composition of communities. Mean height and breadth of species-level vertical leaf and wood distributions did not change with species richness. However, the extra biomass produced by mixtures compared to monocultures of the component species increased when vertical leaf distributions of monocultures were more different. Decomposition of biodiversity effects with the additive partitioning scheme indicated positive complementarity effects that were higher in light than in shade. Selection effects did not deviate from zero, irrespective of light levels. Vertical leaf distributions shifted apart in mixed stands as consequence of competition-driven phenotypic plasticity, promoting realized complementarity. Structural equation models showed that this effect was larger for species that differed more in growth strategies that were characterized by functional traits. In 13 of the 18 investigated two-species mixtures, both species benefitted

  2. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and mesic nestling house sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, form a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. Previously, we measured cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC of adult house sparrows from two populations, one living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and another living in mesic Ohio. Adult desert house sparrows had a lower CWL, a lower proportion of free fatty acids, and a higher proportion of ceramides and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic sparrows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity of CWL and lipid composition of the SC in desert and mesic nestling house sparrows reared in low and high humidity and compared our results with previous work on adults. We measured CWL of nestlings and analyzed the lipid composition of the SC using thin-layer chromatography. We showed that nestling house sparrows from both localities had higher CWL than adults in their natural environment, a result of major modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response to opposed selection pressures, thermoregulation and water conservation, at different life stages, on which regulation of CWL plays a crucial role. Desert nestlings showed a greater degree of plasticity in CWL and lipid composition of the SC than did mesic nestlings, a finding consistent with the idea that organisms exposed to more environmental stress ought to be more plastic than individuals living in more benign environments. PMID:18838693

  3. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and mesic nestling house sparrows.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-10-07

    Intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, form a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. Previously, we measured cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC of adult house sparrows from two populations, one living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and another living in mesic Ohio. Adult desert house sparrows had a lower CWL, a lower proportion of free fatty acids, and a higher proportion of ceramides and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic sparrows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity of CWL and lipid composition of the SC in desert and mesic nestling house sparrows reared in low and high humidity and compared our results with previous work on adults. We measured CWL of nestlings and analyzed the lipid composition of the SC using thin-layer chromatography. We showed that nestling house sparrows from both localities had higher CWL than adults in their natural environment, a result of major modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response to opposed selection pressures, thermoregulation and water conservation, at different life stages, on which regulation of CWL plays a crucial role. Desert nestlings showed a greater degree of plasticity in CWL and lipid composition of the SC than did mesic nestlings, a finding consistent with the idea that organisms exposed to more environmental stress ought to be more plastic than individuals living in more benign environments.

  4. Structural wood panels with improved fire resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Structural wood paneling or other molded wood compositions consisting of finely divided wood chips, flour, or strands are bound together and hot pressed with a modified novolac resin which is the cured product of a prepolymer made from an aralkyl ether or halide with a phenol and a hardening agent such as hexamethylene tetramine. The fire resistance of these articles is further improved by incorporating in the binder certain inorganic fillers, especially a mixture of ammonium oxalate and ammonium phosphate.

  5. Rigidified pneumatic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dessel, Steven

    2000-10-01

    The overall objective of the research presented in this dissertation was to address global issues of adequate housing for all and the need for more sustainable human settlement. In order to address these, the emerging technology of rigidified pneumatic composites was investigated. Rigidified pneumatic composites (RPC) are defined as thin flexible membrane structures that are pneumatically deployed. After deployment, these structures harden due to chemical or physical change of the membrane. Because of this change, these structures do no longer require pneumatic pressure to maintain their shape. For the first time, a systematic listing of the various means available to develop polymeric materials useful in RPC technology is presented. With the aim to reduce the cost of RPC structures, a new material was proposed, developed, and evaluated. This material involved the formation of a semi-interpenetrating polymer network based on poly vinyl chloride and an acrylate based reactive plasticizer. The economical and environmental performances of RPC structures using this new material were assessed by means of a case study. In this study, the performance of RPC technology was compared with that of a typical wood light frame structure in the application of a small single-family house. The study indicated that the cost of ownership in present day value for the RPC structure was approximately 33% less than the cost of a comparable wood light frame structure. The study also indicated that significant environmental benefits exist with the use of RPC structures. It was found that the RPC structure used significantly less resources compared to the wood light frame structure. About 3.5 times less materials coming from non-renewable fossil resources, about 2.5 times less materials coming from trees, and about 19 times less materials coming from inorganic resources was used in the RPC structure relative to the wood light frame structure. The study concluded with pointing out various

  6. Poultry rearing on perforated plastic floors and the effect on air quality, growth performance, and carcass injuries-Experiment 1: Thermal Comfort.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Arantes de Souza, Lilian Francisco; Sant'Anna, Aline Cristina; Bahiense, Raphael Nogueira; Macari, Marcos; Furlan, Renato Luis

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigated the use of perforated plastic floors in the rearing of male and female poultry under thermal comfort conditions. The study was conducted in 2 climate chambers, in one was conventional poultry litter (wood shavings) and in the other was a perforated plastic floor. The experimental design was a completely randomized design with the factors wood shavings and plastic floor. In each chamber, the animals were divided into 16 experimental pens (8 with males and 8 with females) with a density of 12 birds/m2. The poultry rearing effect was evaluated in terms of air quality (% concentration of ammonia [NH3] and carbon dioxide [CO2]); broiler performance, e.g., weight gain (kg), feed intake (kg), feed conversion, carcass yield and parts (%), meat production (kg/m2), and viability (% of live birds at d 42); scores of hygiene and mobility; and injuries in the chest, hocks, and footpads. Treatments affected air quality, with higher concentrations of NH3 on d 42 (25 ppm vs. 2 ppm) and CO2 (1,400 ppm vs. 1,000 ppm) for wood shavings than for perforated plastic floor, respectively. Males showed a better performance (weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion) than females on d 42 in both floor types (wood shavings and plastic floor). Males reared on wood shavings showed a higher meet production (35.992 kg/m2) than females (32.257 kg/m2). On the plastic floor, males showed a better viability (100%) than females (94.05%), as well better meet production for males (38.55 kg·m-2) than females (31.64 kg/m2). There was no incidence of breast lesions in any of the studied systems. The birds reared on the plastic floor had better hygiene scores and lower hock injury rates than birds reared in the wood shavings chambers. The results of the present study show that the use of perforated plastic floors in chicken farming is an efficient method, which promotes a better-quality environment, superior production rates, and reduced incidence of injuries.

  7. Twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) and work hardening in Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Qiao, J W; Wang, Z H; Rao, W; Kang, G Z

    2017-05-12

    The present study demonstrates that Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a normal composition of Ti 43 Zr 32 Ni 6 Ta 5 Be 14 containing ductile dendrites dispersed in the glass matrix has been developed, and deformation mechanisms about the tensile property have been investigated by focusing on twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect. The Ti-based MGMC has excellent tensile properties and pronounced tensile work-hardening capacity, with a yield strength of 1100 MPa and homogeneous elongation of 4%. The distinguished strain hardening is ascribed to the formation of deformation twinning within the dendrites. Twinning generated in the dendrites works as an obstacle for the rapid propagation of shear bands, and then, the localized necking is avoided, which ensures the ductility of such kinds of composites. Besides, a finite-element model (FEM) has been established to explain the TWIP effect which brings out a work-hardening behavior in the present MGMC instead of a localized strain concentration. According to the plasticity theory of traditional crystal materials and some new alloys, TWIP effect is mainly controlled by stacking fault energy (SFE), which has been analyzed intensively in the present MGMC.

  8. Society of the plastic industry process emission initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    At first view, plastics process emissions research may not seem to have much bearing on outgassing considerations relative to advanced composite materials; however, several parallel issues and cross currents are of mutual interest. The following topics are discussed: relevance of plastics industry research to aerospace composites; impact of clean air act amendment requirements; scope of the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. activities in thermoplastic process emissions and reinforced plastics/composites process emissions; and utility of SPI research for advanced polymer composites audiences.

  9. Chemical composition of particles from traditional burning of Pakistani wood species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2015-11-01

    Total particulate matter (TPM) emitted during burning of three types of Pakistani wood (eucalyptus camaldulensis, local name Safeeda; acacia nilotica, local name Kikar, Babul; dalbergia sissoo, Shisham, Tali) in a traditional brick stove were collected and analyzed for anhydrosugars, sugar alcohols, trace metals, soluble ions and carbonaceous species. This is a first study reporting anhydrosugars in wood smoke particles emitted during traditional burning of common wood types in Pakistan. Carbonaceous species showed the highest contribution to the particulate matter. Although the total carbon (TC) contribution was similar for all burnings (64.8-70.2%), the EC/OC ratio varied significantly, from 0.2 to 0.3 for Accacia and Dalbergia to 0.7-0.8 for Eucalyptus and Wood-mix. Among inorganic constituents potassium chloride and silicon were found at levels higher than 1%. The levoglucosan concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 6.6% (average 5.6%) with the highest value for Accacia and lowest value for the wood-mix. The high levoglucosan/mannosan ratios of 20-28 were typical for hardwood. The ratio between levoglucosan and galactosan varied stronger and was found to be around 13-20 for Accacia, Eucalyptus and Wood mix, and 43 for Dalbergia. The determined levoglucosan concentrations allowed assessing the conversion factor for calculation of biomass smoke contribution to ambient particulate matter levels in Pakistan.

  10. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  11. Wood Properties and Kinds; A Base Syllabus on Wood Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Kentucky Univ., Richmond.

    Prepared by participants in the 1968 National Defense Education Act Institute on Wood Technology, this syllabus is one of a series of basic outlines designed to aid college level industrial arts instructors in improving and broadening the scope and content of their programs. This booklet is concerned largely with the physical composition and…

  12. Self-sensing of elastic strain, matrix yielding and plasticity in multiwall carbon nanotube/vinyl ester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Avilés, F.; Seidel, G. D.

    2013-08-01

    The piezoresistive response of multiwalled carbon nanotube/vinyl ester composites containing 0.3, 0.5 and 1% w/w carbon nanotubes (CNTs) loaded in tension and compression is investigated. The change in electrical resistance (ΔR) under tension loading was positive and showed a linear relationship with the applied strain up to failure, with slightly increased sensitivity for decreased CNT content. In compression, a nonlinear and non-monotonic piezoresistive behavior was observed, with ΔR initially decreasing in the elastic regime, leveling off at the onset of yielding and increasing after matrix yielding. The piezoresistive response of the composite is more sensitive to the CNT content for compression than for tension, and the calculated gage factors are higher in the compressive plastic regime. The results show that the piezoresistive signal is dependent on the CNT concentration, loading type and material elastoplastic behavior, and that recording ΔR during mechanical loading can allow self-identification of the elastic and plastic regimes of the composite.

  13. Development and Characterization of a Rate-Dependent Three-Dimensional Macroscopic Plasticity Model Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Several key capabilities have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the material/models for composite materials currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes such as LS-DYNA. Some of the specific desired features that have been identified include the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model, the capability of using the material model to analyze the response of both three-dimensional solid elements and two dimensional shell elements, and the ability to simulate the response of composites composed with a variety of composite architectures, including laminates, weaves and braids. In addition, a need has been expressed to have a material model that utilizes tabulated experimentally based input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to utilizing discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength) and analytical functions based on curve fitting. To begin to address these needs, an orthotropic macroscopic plasticity based model suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA has been developed. Specifically, the Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The coefficients in the yield function are determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions, along with selected off-axis curves. Incorporating rate dependence into the yield function is achieved by using a series of tabluated input curves, each at a different constant strain rate. The non-associative flow-rule is used to compute the evolution of the effective plastic strain. Systematic procedures have been developed to determine the values of the various coefficients in the yield function and the flow rule based on the tabulated input data. An algorithm based on the radial return method has been developed to facilitate the numerical implementation of the material

  14. Amplicon-Based Sequencing of Soil Fungi from Wood Preservative Test Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kirker, Grant T.; Bishell, Amy B.; Jusino, Michelle A.; Palmer, Jonathan M.; Hickey, William J.; Lindner, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from field sites in two AWPA (American Wood Protection Association) wood decay hazard zones in North America. Two field plots at each site were exposed to differing preservative chemistries via in-ground installations of treated wood stakes for approximately 50 years. The purpose of this study is to characterize soil fungal species and to determine if long term exposure to various wood preservatives impacts soil fungal community composition. Soil fungal communities were compared using amplicon-based DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the rDNA array. Data show that soil fungal community composition differs significantly between the two sites and that long-term exposure to different preservative chemistries is correlated with different species composition of soil fungi. However, chemical analyses using ICP-OES found levels of select residual preservative actives (copper, chromium and arsenic) to be similar to naturally occurring levels in unexposed areas. A list of indicator species was compiled for each treatment-site combination; functional guild analyses indicate that long-term exposure to wood preservatives may have both detrimental and stimulatory effects on soil fungal species composition. Fungi with demonstrated capacity to degrade industrial pollutants were found to be highly correlated with areas that experienced long-term exposure to preservative testing. PMID:29093702

  15. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal–metal composites

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. A dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with our experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts themore » strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.« less

  16. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  17. Oxygen index evaluation of fire-retardant-treated wood

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of using the oxygen index test (ASTM D 2863-76) to obtain an indication of the relative flammability of fire-retardant- treated wood products was investigated. The oxygen index is the minimum percentage oxygen that is required to maintain flaming combustion of a specimen under specified laboratory conditions. Within the plastics industry, the test is...

  18. Pretreatment Characteristics of Waste Oak Wood by Ammonia Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Seok; Kim, Hyunjoon; Lee, Jin-Suk; Lee, Joon-Pyo; Park, Soon-Chul

    A log of waste oak wood collected from a Korean mushroom farm has been tested for ammonia percolation pretreatment. The waste log has different physical characteristics from that of virgin oak wood. The density of the waste wood was 30% lower than that of virgin oak wood. However, there is little difference in the chemical compositions between the woods. Due to the difference in physical characteristics, the optimal pretreatment conditions were also quite different. While for waste oak the optimum temperature was determined to be 130°C, for virgin oak wood the optimum pretreatment was only achieved at 170°C. Presoaking for 12 h with ammonia solution before pretreatment was helpful to increase the delignification efficiency.

  19. Analytical, Numerical and Experimental Examination of Reinforced Composites Beams Covered with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimzade, A. A.; Tuhta, S.

    2012-03-01

    In the article, analytical, numerical (Finite Element Method) and experimental investigation results of beam that was strengthened with fiber reinforced plastic-FRP composite has been given as comparative, the effect of FRP wrapping number to the maximum load and moment capacity has been evaluated depending on this results. Carbon FRP qualitative dependences have been occurred between wrapping number and beam load and moment capacity for repair-strengthen the reinforced concrete beams with carbon fiber. Shown possibilities of application traditional known analysis programs, for the analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) strengthened structures.

  20. Analysis of polyethylene terephthalate PET plastic bottle jointing system using finite element method (FEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, N. A.; Rosli, Muhamad Farizuan; Effendi, M. S. M.; Abdullah, Mohamad Hariri

    2017-09-01

    For almost all injection molding applications of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) plastic was analyzed the strength, durability and stiffness of properties by using Finite Element Method (FEM) for jointing system of wood furniture. The FEM was utilized for analyzing the PET jointing system for Oak and Pine as wood based material of furniture. The difference pattern design of PET as wood jointing furniture gives the difference value of strength furniture itself. The results show the wood specimen with grooves and eclipse pattern design PET jointing give lower global estimated error is 28.90%, compare to the rectangular and non-grooves wood specimen of global estimated error is 63.21%.

  1. Analysis of linear elasticity and non-linearity due to plasticity and material damage in woven and biaxial braided composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Deepak

    Textile composites have a wide variety of applications in the aerospace, sports, automobile, marine and medical industries. Due to the availability of a variety of textile architectures and numerous parameters associated with each, optimal design through extensive experimental testing is not practical. Predictive tools are needed to perform virtual experiments of various options. The focus of this research is to develop a better understanding of linear elastic response, plasticity and material damage induced nonlinear behavior and mechanics of load flow in textile composites. Textile composites exhibit multiple scales of complexity. The various textile behaviors are analyzed using a two-scale finite element modeling. A framework to allow use of a wide variety of damage initiation and growth models is proposed. Plasticity induced non-linear behavior of 2x2 braided composites is investigated using a modeling approach based on Hill's yield function for orthotropic materials. The mechanics of load flow in textile composites is demonstrated using special non-standard postprocessing techniques that not only highlight the important details, but also transform the extensive amount of output data into comprehensible modes of behavior. The investigations show that the damage models differ from each other in terms of amount of degradation as well as the properties to be degraded under a particular failure mode. When compared with experimental data, predictions of some models match well for glass/epoxy composite whereas other's match well for carbon/epoxy composites. However, all the models predicted very similar response when damage factors were made similar, which shows that the magnitude of damage factors are very important. Full 3D as well as equivalent tape laminate predictions lie within the range of the experimental data for a wide variety of braided composites with different material systems, which validated the plasticity analysis. Conclusions about the effect of

  2. Wood Shakes and Shingles for Roof Applications: Tips for Longer Life

    Treesearch

    Mark T. Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Many wood shakes and shingles have been replaced by composition or asphalt-based shingles. Nevertheless, wood shakes and shingles are still widely used on commercial structures and residential houses.

  3. Extraction of cellulose microcrystalline from galam wood for biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ika; Sa'adiyah, Devy; Rahajeng, Putri; Suprayitno, Abdi; Andiana, Rocky

    2018-04-01

    Consumption of plastic raw materials tends to increase, but until now the meet of the consumption of plastic raw are still low, even some are still imported. Nowadays, Indonesia's plastic needs are supported by petrochemicals where raw materials are still dependent abroad and petropolymer raw materials are derived from petroleum which will soon be depleted due to rising petroleum needs. Therefore, various studies have been conducted to develop natural fiber-based polymers that are biodegradable and abundant in nature. It is because the natural polymer production process is very efficient and very environmentally friendly. There have been many studies of biopolymers especially natural fiber-based polymers from plants, due to plants containing cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. However, cellulose is the only one who has crystalline structures. Cellulose has a high crystality compared to amorphous lignin and hemicellulose. In this study, extracted cellulose as biopolymer and amplifier on composite. The cellulose is extracted from galam wood from East Kalimantan. Cellulose extraction will be obtained in nano / micro form through chemical and mechanical treatment processes. The chemical treatment of cellulose extraction is alkalinization process using NaOH solution, bleaching using NaClO2 and acid hydrolysis using sulfuric acid. After chemical treatment, ultrasonic mechanical treatment is made to make cellulose fibers into micro or nano size. Besides, cellulose results will be characterized. Characterization was performed to analyze molecules of cellulose compounds extracted from plants using Fourier Transformation Infra Red (FTIR) testing. XRD testing to analyze cellulose crystallinity. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) test to analyze morphology and fiber size.

  4. Laser cutting plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancleave, R. A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000 watt CO2 laser was demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics were laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposal tooling made from acrylic.

  5. Solution-state NMR analysis of hydroxymethylated resorcinol cured in the presence of crude milled-wood lignin from Acer saccharum

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle

    2017-01-01

    Resorcinol-formaldehyde adhesives can reinforce stress fractures that appear from wood surface preparation. Researchers have found that applying the resorcinol-formaldehyde prepolymer, hydroxymethylated resorcinol is thought to plasticize lignin components and stabilize stress fractures through reactions with lignin subunits and hemicelluloses in wood. In this study, a...

  6. Adhesives with wood materials : bond formation and performance

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood plays an increasing role in the forest products industry and is a key factor for efficiently utilizing our timber resource. The main use of adhesives is in the manufacture of building materials, including plywood, oriented strandboard, particleboard, fiberboard, structural composite lumber, doors, windows and frames, and factory-laminated wood...

  7. Juniper wood structure under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Bogolitsyn, Konstantin G; Zubov, Ivan N; Gusakova, Maria A; Chukhchin, Dmitry G; Krasikova, Anna A

    2015-05-01

    The investigations confirm the physicochemical nature of the structure and self-assembly of wood substance and endorse its application in plant species. The characteristic morphological features, ultra-microstructure, and submolecular structure of coniferous wood matrix using junipers as the representative tree were investigated by scanning electron (SEM) and atomic-force microscopy (AFM). Novel results on the specific composition and cell wall structure features of the common juniper (Juniperus Communis L.) were obtained. These data confirm the possibility of considering the wood substance as a nanobiocomposite. The cellulose nanofibrils (20-50 nm) and globular-shaped lignin-carbohydrate structures (diameter of 5-60 nm) form the base of such a nanobiocomposite.

  8. Conductivity and Thermal Studies on Plasticized Nano-Composite Solid Polymer Electrolyte, Peo: Ec: LiTf: Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitawala, H. M. J. C.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    Poly (ethylene oxide)-(PEO)-based composite polymer electrolytes are of great interest for solid-state-electrochemical devices. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study on electrical conductivity and thermal behavior (DSC) of composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) containing PEO: LiCF3SO3 complexed with plasticizer (EC) and incorporating nano-sized particles of the ceramic filler Al2O3. Ionic conductivity enhancement in these electrolytes has been obtained by optimizing the combined effect of the plasticizer and the ceramic filler. Nano-composite, plasticized polymer electrolyte films (400-600μm) were prepared by common solvent casting method. It was revealed that the presence of the Al2O3 filler in PEO: LiTf polymer electrolyte significantly enhanced the ionic conductivity in the temperature range of interest, giving the maximum conductivity for (PEO)9LiTf+15 wt.% Al2O3 CPE [σRT (max)=2×10-5 S cm-1]. It was also observed that the addition of plasticizer (EC) to this electrolyte up to a concentration of 50 wt. % EC, showed a further conductivity enhancement [σRT (max) = 1.5×10-4 S cm-1]. It is suggested that the conductivity is enhanced mainly by two mechanisms. The plasticizer (EC) would directly contribute by reducing the crystallinity and increasing the amorphous phase content of the polymer electrolytes. The ceramic filler (Al2O3) would contribute to conductivity enhancement by creating additional sites to migrating ionic species through transient bonding with O/OH groups in the filler surface. The decrease of Tg values of plasticized CPE systems seen in the DSC thermograms points towards the improved segmental flexibility of polymer chains, increasing the mobility of conducting ions.

  9. Development and application of wood adhesives in China

    Treesearch

    Jiyou Gu; Zhiyong Cai

    2010-01-01

    Rapid economic development and growth in China has resulted in a substantial increase in the demand for utilization of bio-based composites. This provides a unique opportunity for developing wood adhesives. This study reviews research development and major accomplishments in wood adhesives and technology in China over the last 50 years. It also discusses the...

  10. Development of a new approach based on midwave infrared spectroscopy for post-consumer black plastic waste sorting in the recycling industry.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Puckrin, Eldon; Adamowski, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Waste sorting is key to the process of waste recycling. Exact identification of plastic resin and wood products using Near Infrared (NIR, 1-1.7µm) sensing is currently in use. Yet, dark targets characterized by low reflectance, such as black plastics, are hard to identify by this method. Following the recent success of Midwave Infrared (MWIR, 3-12µm) measurements to identify coloured plastic polymers, the aim of this study was to assess whether this technique is applicable to sorting black plastic polymers and wood products. We performed infrared reflectance contact measurements of 234 plastic samples and 29 samples of wood and paper products. Plastic samples included black, coloured and transparent Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), Polyethylene (PE), Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), Polypropylene (PP), Polylactic acid (PLA) and Polystyrene (PS). The spectral signatures of the black and coloured plastic samples were compared with clear plastic samples and signatures documented in the literature to identify the polymer spectral features in the presence of coloured material. This information was used to determine the spectral bands that best suit the sorting of black plastic polymers. The main NIR-MWIR absorption features of wood, cardboard and paper were identified as well according to the spectral measurements. Good agreement was found between our measurements and the absorption features documented in the literature. The new approach using MWIR spectral features appears to be useful for black plastics as it overcomes some of the limitations in the NIR region to identify them. The main limitation of this technique for industrial applications is the trade-off between the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensor operating in standoff mode and the speed at which waste is moved under the sensor. This limitation can be resolved by reducing the system's spectral resolution to 16cm -1 , which allows for faster spectra acquisition while maintaining a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio

  11. Wood production response to climate change will depend critically on forest composition and structure.

    PubMed

    Coomes, David A; Flores, Olivier; Holdaway, Robert; Jucker, Tommaso; Lines, Emily R; Vanderwel, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Established forests currently function as a major carbon sink, sequestering as woody biomass about 26% of global fossil fuel emissions. Whether forests continue to act as a global sink will depend on many factors, including the response of aboveground wood production (AWP; MgC ha(-1 ) yr(-1) ) to climate change. Here, we explore how AWP in New Zealand's natural forests is likely to change. We start by statistically modelling the present-day growth of 97 199 individual trees within 1070 permanently marked inventory plots as a function of tree size, competitive neighbourhood and climate. We then use these growth models to identify the factors that most influence present-day AWP and to predict responses to medium-term climate change under different assumptions. We find that if the composition and structure of New Zealand's forests were to remain unchanged over the next 30 years, then AWP would increase by 6-23%, primarily as a result of physiological responses to warmer temperatures (with no appreciable effect of changing rainfall). However, if warmth-requiring trees were able to migrate into currently cooler areas and if denser canopies were able to form, then a different AWP response is likely: forests growing in the cool mountain environments would show a 30% increase in AWP, while those in the lowland would hardly respond (on average, -3% when mean annual temperature exceeds 8.0 °C). We conclude that response of wood production to anthropogenic climate change is not only dependent on the physiological responses of individual trees, but is highly contingent on whether forests adjust in composition and structure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Issues and concepts for making durable composites

    Treesearch

    Frederick A. Kamke; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2008-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest obstacle facing the acceptance of engineered wood composite products into new markets is the perceived lack of durability. Public perception is that particleboard and other wood-based composites fall apart when exposed to water. This paper will review the unique characteristics of wood based composites that make them more or less susceptible to...

  13. Pretreatments for converting wood into paper and chemicals

    Treesearch

    William R. Kenealy; Carl J. Houtman; Jose Laplaza; Thomas W. Jeffries; Eric G. Horn

    2007-01-01

    Biorefining wood into paper and chemicals is not as easy as making a single traditional paper product. Paper is made from the cellulose- containing fractions of wood and processing may remove lignin and hemicellulose components. The yield and composition of the product depend upon the type of paper being produced. The paper process often alters the noncellulose...

  14. Fire resistance of engineered wood rim board products.

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2003-01-01

    Engineered wood products, such as oriented strandboard, laminated veneer lumber, and other composite wood products, are being used more often in construction. This includes use as rim boards, which are the components around the perimeter of a floor assembly. This situation has increased the need for information about the fire resistance of these products. In this study...

  15. Novel AC Servo Rotating and Linear Composite Driving Device for Plastic Forming Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin-Tao; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Li, Yong-Yi; Zhu, Mu-Zhi

    2017-07-01

    The existing plastic forming equipment are mostly driven by traditional AC motors with long transmission chains, low efficiency, large size, low precision and poor dynamic response are the common disadvantages. In order to realize high performance forming processes, the driving device should be improved, especially for complicated processing motions. Based on electric servo direct drive technology, a novel AC servo rotating and linear composite driving device is proposed, which features implementing both spindle rotation and feed motion without transmission, so that compact structure and precise control can be achieved. Flux switching topology is employed in the rotating drive component for strong robustness, and fractional slot is employed in the linear direct drive component for large force capability. Then the mechanical structure for compositing rotation and linear motion is designed. A device prototype is manufactured, machining of each component and the whole assembly are presented respectively. Commercial servo amplifiers are utilized to construct the control system of the proposed device. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed composite driving device, experimental study on the dynamic test benches are conducted. The results indicate that the output torque can attain to 420 N·m and the dynamic tracking errors are less than about 0.3 rad in the rotating drive. the dynamic tracking errors are less than about 1.6 mm in the linear feed. The proposed research provides a method to construct high efficiency and accuracy direct driving device in plastic forming equipment.

  16. Functional lignocellulosic materials prepared by ATRP from a wood scaffold.

    PubMed

    Cabane, Etienne; Keplinger, Tobias; Künniger, Tina; Merk, Vivian; Burgert, Ingo

    2016-08-10

    Wood, a natural and abundant source of organic polymers, has been used as a scaffold to develop novel wood-polymer hybrid materials. Through a two-step surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), the porous wood structure can be effectively modified with polymer chains of various nature. In the present study, polystyrene and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) were used. As shown with various characterization techniques including confocal Raman microscopy, FTIR, and SEM/EDX, the native wood ultrastructure and features are retained and the polymer chains can be introduced deep within the wood, i.e. inside the wood cell walls. The physical properties of the new materials have been studied, and results indicate that the insertion of polymer chains inside the wood cell wall alters the intrinsic properties of wood to yield a hybrid composite material with new functionalities. This approach to the functionalization of wood could lead to the fabrication of a new class of interesting functional materials and promote innovative utilizations of the renewable resource wood.

  17. The use of wood for wind turbine blade construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.

    1979-01-01

    The interrelationships between moisture and wood, conditions for dry rot spore activity, the protection of wood fibers from moisture, wood resin composites, wood laminating, quality control, and the mechanical properties of wood are discussed. The laminated veneer and the bonded sawn stock fabrication techniques, used in the construction of a turbine blade with a monocoque 'D' section forming the leading edge and a built up trailing edge section, are described. A 20 foot root end sample complete with 24 bonded-in studs was successfully subjected to large onetime loads in both the flatwise and edgewise directions, and to fatigue tests. Results indicate that wood is both a viable and advantageous material for use in wind turbine blades. The basic material is reasonably priced, domestically available, ecologically sound, and easily fabricated with low energy consumption.

  18. Significance of wood extractives for wood bonding.

    PubMed

    Roffael, Edmone

    2016-02-01

    Wood contains primary extractives, which are present in all woods, and secondary extractives, which are confined in certain wood species. Extractives in wood play a major role in wood-bonding processes, as they can contribute to or determine the bonding relevant properties of wood such as acidity and wettability. Therefore, extractives play an immanent role in bonding of wood chips and wood fibres with common synthetic adhesives such as urea-formaldehyde-resins (UF-resins) and phenol-formaldehyde-resins (PF-resins). Extractives of high acidity accelerate the curing of acid curing UF-resins and decelerate bonding with alkaline hardening PF-resins. Water-soluble extractives like free sugars are detrimental for bonding of wood with cement. Polyphenolic extractives (tannins) can be used as a binder in the wood-based industry. Additionally, extractives in wood can react with formaldehyde and reduce the formaldehyde emission of wood-based panels. Moreover, some wood extractives are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and insofar also relevant to the emission of VOC from wood and wood-based panels.

  19. The ultimate state of polymeric materials and laminated and fibrous composites under asymmetric high-cycle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Pogrebniak, A. D.; Kochetkova, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    The prediction of the high-cycle fatigue strength of polymeric and composite materials in asymmetric loading is considered. The problem is solved on the basis of a nonlinear model of ultimate state allowing us to describe all typical forms of the diagrams of ultimate stresses. The material constants of the model are determined from the results of fatigue tests in symmetric reversed cycling, in a single fatigue test with the minimum stress equal to zero, and in a short-term strength test. The fatigue strength characteristics of some polymers, glass-fiber laminates, glass-fiber-reinforced plastics, organic-fiber-reinforced plastics, and wood laminates in asymmetric tension-compression, bending, and torsion have been calculated and approved experimentally.

  20. Incorporation of Damage and Failure into an Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Three-Dimensional Model with Tabulated Input Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; Dubois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Khaled, Bilal; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A material model which incorporates several key capabilities which have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the composite impact models currently available in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) is under development. In particular, the material model, which is being implemented as MAT 213 into a tailored version of LS-DYNA being jointly developed by the FAA and NASA, incorporates both plasticity and damage within the material model, utilizes experimentally based tabulated input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to specifying discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength), and is able to analyze the response of composites composed with a variety of fiber architectures. The plasticity portion of the orthotropic, three-dimensional, macroscopic composite constitutive model is based on an extension of the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a generalized yield function with a non-associative flow rule. The capability to account for the rate and temperature dependent deformation response of composites has also been incorporated into the material model. For the damage model, a strain equivalent formulation is utilized to allow for the uncoupling of the deformation and damage analyses. In the damage model, a diagonal damage tensor is defined to account for the directionally dependent variation of damage. However, in composites it has been found that loading in one direction can lead to damage in multiple coordinate directions. To account for this phenomena, the terms in the damage matrix are semi-coupled such that the damage in a particular coordinate direction is a function of the stresses and plastic strains in all of the coordinate directions. The onset of material failure, and thus element deletion, is being developed to be a function of the stresses and plastic strains in the various coordinate directions. Systematic procedures are being developed to generate the required input parameters based on the results of

  1. From waste plastics to industrial raw materials: A life cycle assessment of mechanical plastic recycling practice based on a real-world case study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fu; Guo, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wujie; Summers, Peter A; Hall, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical recycling of waste plastics is an environmental solution to the problem of waste plastic disposal, and has already become a common practice in industry. However, limited information can be found on either the industralised plastic recycling or the recycled materials, despite the use of recycled plastics has already extended to automobile production. This study investigates the life cycle environmental impacts of mechanical plastic recycling practice of a plastic recycling company in China. Waste plastics from various sources, such as agricultural wastes, plastic product manufacturers, collected solid plastic wastes and parts dismantled from waste electric and electronic equipments, are processed in three routes with products end up in different markets. The results of life cycle assessments show that the extrusion process has the largest environmental impacts, followed by the use of fillers and additives. Compared to production of virgin plastics and composites, the mechanical recycling is proved to be a superior alternative in most environmental aspects. Substituting virgin plastic composites with recycled plastic composites has achieved the highest environmental benefits, as virgin composite production has an impact almost 4 times higher that of the recycled composite production in each ReCiPe endpoint damage factor. Sensitivity analysis shows that the coverage of collecting network contribute affect little to overall environmental impact, and centralisation plays an important role in reducing overall environmental impacts. Among the fillers and additives, impact modifiers account for the most significant contributions to the environmental impacts of recycled composites. This study provides necessary information about the existing industrialised plastic recycling practice, and recommendations are given. Research implications are presented with the purpose to achieve higher substitution rate and lower environmental impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  2. Cell-wall recovery after irreversible deformation of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keckes, Jozef; Burgert, Ingo; Frühmann, Klaus; Müller, Martin; Kölln, Klaas; Hamilton, Myles; Burghammer, Manfred; Roth, Stephan V.; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie; Fratzl, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of biological materials reside in their complex hierarchical architecture and in specific molecular mechanistic phenomena. The fundamental importance of molecular interactions and bond recovery has been suggested by studies on deformation and fracture of bone and nacre. Like these mineral-based materials, wood also represents a complex nanocomposite with excellent mechanical performance, despite the fact that it is mainly based on polymers. In wood, however, the mechanistic contribution of processes in the cell wall is not fully understood. Here we have combined tensile tests on individual wood cells and on wood foils with simultaneous synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis in order to separate deformation mechanisms inside the cell wall from those mediated by cell-cell interactions. We show that tensile deformation beyond the yield point does not deteriorate the stiffness of either individual cells or foils. This indicates that there is a dominant recovery mechanism that re-forms the amorphous matrix between the cellulose microfibrils within the cell wall, maintaining its mechanical properties. This stick-slip mechanism, rather like Velcro operating at the nanometre level, provides a 'plastic response' similar to that effected by moving dislocations in metals. We suggest that the molecular recovery mechanism in the cell matrix is a universal phenomenon dominating the tensile deformation of different wood tissue types.

  3. The impact of co-combustion of polyethylene plastics and wood in a small residential boiler on emissions of gaseous pollutants, particulate matter, PAHs and 1,3,5- triphenylbenzene.

    PubMed

    Tomsej, Tomas; Horak, Jiri; Tomsejova, Sarka; Krpec, Kamil; Klanova, Jana; Dej, Milan; Hopan, Frantisek

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate a banned but widely spread practice of co-combustion of plastic with wood in a small residential boiler and to quantify its impact on emissions of gaseous pollutants, particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene (135TPB), a new tracer of polyethylene plastic combustion. Supermarket polyethylene shopping bags (PE) and polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) were burnt as supplementary fuels with beech logs (BL) in an old-type 20 kW over-fire boiler both at a nominal and reduced heat output. An impact of co-combustion was more pronounced at the nominal heat output: an increase in emissions of PM, total organic carbon (TOC), toxic equivalent (TEQ) of 7 carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) and a higher ratio of c-PAHs TEQ in particulate phase was observed during co-combustion of both plastics. 135TPB was found in emissions from both plastics both at a nominal and reduced output. In contrast to findings reported in the literature, 135TPB was a dominant compound detected by mass spectrometry on m/z 306 exclusively in emissions from co-combustion of PE. Surprisingly, six other even more abundant compounds of unknown identity were found on this m/z in emissions from co-combustion of PET. One of these unknown compounds was identified as p-quaterphenyl (pQ). Principal component analysis revealed strong correlation among 135TPB, pQ and five unknown compounds. pQ seems to be suitable tracers of polyethylene terephthalate plastic co-combustion, while 135TPB proved its suitability to be an all-purpose tracer of polyethylene plastics combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy.

  5. Continuous microcellular foaming of polylactic acid/natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Acosta, Carlos A.

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a biodegradable thermoplastic derived from renewable resources, stands out as a substitute to petroleum-based plastics. In spite of its excellent properties, commercial applications are limited because PLA is more expensive and more brittle than traditional petroleum-based resins. PLA can be blended with cellulosic fibers to reduce material cost. However, the lowered cost comes at the expense of flexibility and impact strength, which can be enhanced through the production of microcellular structures in the composite. Microcellular foaming uses inert gases (e.g., carbon dioxide) as physical blowing agents to make cellular structures with bubble sizes of less than 10 microm and cell-population densities (number of bubbles per unit volume) greater than 109 cells/cm³. These unique characteristics result in a significant increase in toughness and elongation at break (ductility) compared with unfoamed parts because the presence of small bubbles can blunt the crack-tips increasing the energy needed to propagate the crack. Microcellular foams have been produced through a two step batch process. First, large amounts of gas are dissolved in the solid plastic under high pressure (sorption process) to form a single-phase solution. Second, a thermodynamic instability (sudden drop in solubility) triggers cell nucleation and growth as the gas diffuses out of the plastic. Batch production of microcellular PLA has addressed some of the drawbacks of PLA. Unfortunately, the batch foaming process is not likely to be implemented in the industrial production of foams because it is not cost-effective. This study investigated the continuous microcellular foaming process of PLA and PLA/wood-fiber composites. The effects of the processing temperature and material compositions on the melt viscosity, pressure drop rate, and cell-population density were examined in order to understand the nucleation mechanisms in neat and filled PLA foams. The results indicated that

  6. 1200 and 1300 K slow plastic compression properties of Ni-50Al composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Kumar, K. S.; Mannan, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    XD synthesis, powder blending, and hot pressing techniques have been utilized to produce NiAl composites containing 4, 7.5, 15, and 25 vol pct alumina whiskers and hybrid composite materials with 15 vol pct Al2O3 + 10 or 20 vol pct, nominally 1 micron TiB2 particles. The resistance to slow plastic flow was determined at 1200 and 1300 K via compression testing in air under constant velocity conditions. The stress-strain behavior of the intermetallic composites depended on the fraction of second phases where the 4 and 7.5 percent Al2O3 materials flowed at a nominally constant stress after about 2 percent deformation, while all the other composites exhibited diffuse yielding followed by strain softening. The flow stress-strain rate properties increased with volume fraction of Al2O3 whiskers except for the 4 and 7.5 percent materials, which had similar strengths. The hybrid composite NiAl + 15Al2O3 + 10TiB2 was substantially stronger than the materials simply containing alumina. Deformation in these composites can be described by the Kelly and Street model of creep in perfectly bonded, rigid, discontinuous fiber materials.

  7. Macroinvertebrate community assembly on deep-sea wood falls in Monterey Bay is strongly influenced by wood type.

    PubMed

    Judge, Jenna; Barry, James P

    2016-11-01

    Environmental filtering, including the influence of environmental constraints and biological interactions on species' survival, is known to significantly affect patterns of community assembly in terrestrial ecosystems. However, its role in regulating patterns and processes of community assembly in deep-sea environments is poorly studied. Here we investigated the role of wood characteristics in the assembly of deep-sea wood fall communities. Ten different wood species (substrata) that varied in structural complexity were sunk to a depth of 3,100 m near Monterey Bay, CA. In total, 28 wood parcels were deployed on the deep-sea bed. After 2 yr, the wood parcels were recovered with over 7,000 attached or colonizing macroinvertebrates. All macroinvertebrates were identified to the lowest taxonomic level possible, and included several undescribed species. Diversity indices and multivariate analyses of variance detected significant variation in the colonizing community assemblages among different wood substrata. Structural complexity seemed to be the primary factor altering community composition between wood substrata. For example, wood-boring clams were most abundant on solid logs, while small arthropods and limpets were more abundant on bundles of branches that provided more surface area and small, protected spaces to occupy. Other factors such as chemical defenses, the presence of bark, and wood hardness likely also played a role. Our finding that characteristics of woody debris entering the marine realm can have significant effects on community assembly supports the notion of ecological and perhaps evolutionarily significant links between land and sea. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Functional lignocellulosic materials prepared by ATRP from a wood scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Cabane, Etienne; Keplinger, Tobias; Künniger, Tina; Merk, Vivian; Burgert, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Wood, a natural and abundant source of organic polymers, has been used as a scaffold to develop novel wood-polymer hybrid materials. Through a two-step surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), the porous wood structure can be effectively modified with polymer chains of various nature. In the present study, polystyrene and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) were used. As shown with various characterization techniques including confocal Raman microscopy, FTIR, and SEM/EDX, the native wood ultrastructure and features are retained and the polymer chains can be introduced deep within the wood, i.e. inside the wood cell walls. The physical properties of the new materials have been studied, and results indicate that the insertion of polymer chains inside the wood cell wall alters the intrinsic properties of wood to yield a hybrid composite material with new functionalities. This approach to the functionalization of wood could lead to the fabrication of a new class of interesting functional materials and promote innovative utilizations of the renewable resource wood. PMID:27506369

  9. Basic temperature correction of QWIP cameras in thermoelastic/plastic tests of composite materials.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Simone; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; Meola, Carosena

    2016-12-01

    The present work is concerned with the use of a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) infrared camera to measure very small temperature variations, which are related to thermoelastic/plastic effects, developing on composites under relatively low loads, either periodic or due to impact. As is evident from previous work, some temperature variations are difficult to measure, being at the edge of the IR camera resolution and/or affected by the instrument noise. Conversely, they may be valuable to get either information about the material characteristics and its behavior under periodic load (thermoelastic), or to assess the overall extension of delaminations due to impact (thermo-plastic). An image post-processing procedure is herein described that, with the help of a reference signal, allows for suppression of the instrument noise and better discrimination of thermal signatures induced by the two different loads.

  10. Birefringence of wood at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoruk, Tara M.; Schneider, Jon; Hartley, Ian D.; Reid, Matthew

    2008-06-01

    Fibre content of solid wood plays an important role in the wood products industry in terms of value. Additionally, fibre structure in composite wood products such as Oriented Strand Board (OSB) and paper products plays an important role in terms of strength properties. The effect of moisture content on wood properties is important in the manufacturing process and final product performance, and therefore its effect on the birefringence is of considerable interest. Since solid wood exhibits strong birefringence at terahertz frequencies, there may be potential applications of terahertz spectroscopy to fibre content and structure sensing. There are two potential sources for this strong birefringence: (i) form birefringence resulting from the porous structure of solid wood and (ii) intrinsic birefringence resulting from the dielectric properties of the material itself. In this report, the variability of birefringence within and between species, the dependence of the birefringence on moisture content and the relative contributions from form and intrinsic birefringence are examined. In order to clarify the role of these contributions to the measured birefringence, polarized terahertz reflection spectroscopy is examined and compared to the results obtained in a transmission geometry. Comparison of the birefringence measured in transmission and reflection geometries suggests that form birefringence may dominate.

  11. Preparation and properties of water and glycerol-plasticized sugar beet pulp plastics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP), the residue from sugar extraction, was compounded and turned into thermoplastic composite materials. The compounding was performed using a common twin screw compounding extruder and water and glycerol were used as plasticizers. The plasticization of SBP utilized the water-solu...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Off-Gassing From Bags of Wood Pellets.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Rossner, Alan; Hopke, Philip K

    2018-02-13

    Wood pellets are increasingly used for space heating in the United States and globally. Prior work has shown that stored bulk wood pellets produce sufficient carbon monoxide (CO) to represent a health concern and exceed regulatory standards for occupational exposures. However, most of the pellets used for residential heating are sold in 40-pound (18.1 kg) plastic bags. This study measured CO emission factors from fresh, bagged-wood pellets as a function of temperature and relative humidity. CO concentrations increased with increasing temperature and moisture in the container. CO measurements in a pellet mill warehouse with stored pallets of bagged pellets had 8-h average CO concentrations up to 100 ppm exceeding occupational standards for worker exposure. Thus, manufacturers, distributors, and home owners should be aware of the potential for CO in storage areas and design facilities with appropriate ventilation and CO sensors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  13. 40 CFR 63.2267 - Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. 63.2267 Section 63.2267 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Plywood and Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2267 Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. If you operate a reconstituted wood...

  14. 40 CFR 63.2267 - Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. 63.2267 Section 63.2267 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Plywood and Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2267 Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. If you operate a reconstituted wood...

  15. 40 CFR 63.2267 - Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. 63.2267 Section 63.2267 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Plywood and Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2267 Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. If you operate a reconstituted wood...

  16. 40 CFR 63.2267 - Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. 63.2267 Section 63.2267 Protection of Environment... and Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2267 Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. If you operate a reconstituted wood product...

  17. 40 CFR 63.2267 - Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. 63.2267 Section 63.2267 Protection of Environment... and Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2267 Initial compliance demonstration for a reconstituted wood product press or board cooler. If you operate a reconstituted wood product...

  18. Microbiology, biochemistry, and volatile composition of Tulum cheese ripened in goat's skin or plastic bags.

    PubMed

    Hayaloglu, A A; Cakmakci, S; Brechany, E Y; Deegan, K C; McSweeney, P L H

    2007-03-01

    Tulum cheeses were manufactured from raw ewe's milk and ripened in goat's skin bags (tulums) or plastic containers to understand the effect of ripening container on the chemical composition, biochemistry, microbiology, and volatile composition of Tulum cheeses during 150 d of ripening. Chemical compositions of the cheeses ripened in tulums were significantly different and the moisture contents decreased rapidly in those cheeses because of the porous structure of the tulum. Higher microbial counts were detected in the cheeses ripened in plastic than in cheeses ripened in tulums. Differences in nitrogenous compounds and total free AA of the cheeses were not significant. Total concentrations of free AA in cheeses increased with age and Glu, Ala, Val, Leu, and Phe were the most abundant AA in the cheeses. Urea-PAGE of pH 4.6-insoluble fractions of the cheeses during ripening showed similar degradation patterns in all cheeses. Peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC of pH 4.6- and ethanol-soluble or ethanol-insoluble fractions of the cheeses revealed only minor differences in the concentrations of some peptides among the cheeses; however, age-related changes in peptide concentrations were significantly different among the cheeses. Cheeses were analyzed at 90 d of ripening for volatile compounds by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. One hundred volatile components were identified, including 11 acids, 16 esters, 12 methyl ketones, 7 aldehydes, 22 alcohols, 7 sulfur compounds, 6 terpenes, and 19 miscellaneous compounds. The main components were short-chain fatty acids, 2-butanone, diacetyl, and primary alcohols. Quantitative differences in several volatile compounds were evident among the cheeses. Cheeses ripened in tulums or plastic had similar aroma patterns, but the concentrations of some components were different.

  19. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material.

    Treesearch

    Forest Products Laboratory

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  20. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Ross; Forest Products Laboratory USDA Forest Service.

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.