Sample records for workflow management tool

  1. A Tool Supporting Collaborative Data Analytics Workflow Design and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Bao, Q.; Lee, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Collaborative experiment design could significantly enhance the sharing and adoption of the data analytics algorithms and models emerged in Earth science. Existing data-oriented workflow tools, however, are not suitable to support collaborative design of such a workflow, to name a few, to support real-time co-design; to track how a workflow evolves over time based on changing designs contributed by multiple Earth scientists; and to capture and retrieve collaboration knowledge on workflow design (discussions that lead to a design). To address the aforementioned challenges, we have designed and developed a technique supporting collaborative data-oriented workflow composition and management, as a key component toward supporting big data collaboration through the Internet. Reproducibility and scalability are two major targets demanding fundamental infrastructural support. One outcome of the project os a software tool, supporting an elastic number of groups of Earth scientists to collaboratively design and compose data analytics workflows through the Internet. Instead of recreating the wheel, we have extended an existing workflow tool VisTrails into an online collaborative environment as a proof of concept.

  2. Kwf-Grid workflow management system for Earth science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, V.; Hluchy, L.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present workflow management tool for Earth science applications in EGEE. The workflow management tool was originally developed within K-wf Grid project for GT4 middleware and has many advanced features like semi-automatic workflow composition, user-friendly GUI for managing workflows, knowledge management. In EGEE, we are porting the workflow management tool to gLite middleware for Earth science applications K-wf Grid workflow management system was developed within "Knowledge-based Workflow System for Grid Applications" under the 6th Framework Programme. The workflow mangement system intended to - semi-automatically compose a workflow of Grid services, - execute the composed workflow application in a Grid computing environment, - monitor the performance of the Grid infrastructure and the Grid applications, - analyze the resulting monitoring information, - capture the knowledge that is contained in the information by means of intelligent agents, - and finally to reuse the joined knowledge gathered from all participating users in a collaborative way in order to efficiently construct workflows for new Grid applications. Kwf Grid workflow engines can support different types of jobs (e.g. GRAM job, web services) in a workflow. New class of gLite job has been added to the system, allows system to manage and execute gLite jobs in EGEE infrastructure. The GUI has been adapted to the requirements of EGEE users, new credential management servlet is added to portal. Porting K-wf Grid workflow management system to gLite would allow EGEE users to use the system and benefit from its avanced features. The system is primarly tested and evaluated with applications from ES clusters.

  3. Managing and Communicating Operational Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Stuart T.; Danciu, Ioana; Unertl, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Healthcare team members in emergency department contexts have used electronic whiteboard solutions to help manage operational workflow for many years. Ambulatory clinic settings have highly complex operational workflow, but are still limited in electronic assistance to communicate and coordinate work activities. Objective To describe and discuss the design, implementation, use, and ongoing evolution of a coordination and collaboration tool supporting ambulatory clinic operational workflow at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). Methods The outpatient whiteboard tool was initially designed to support healthcare work related to an electronic chemotherapy order-entry application. After a highly successful initial implementation in an oncology context, a high demand emerged across the organization for the outpatient whiteboard implementation. Over the past 10 years, developers have followed an iterative user-centered design process to evolve the tool. Results The electronic outpatient whiteboard system supports 194 separate whiteboards and is accessed by over 2800 distinct users on a typical day. Clinics can configure their whiteboards to support unique workflow elements. Since initial release, features such as immunization clinical decision support have been integrated into the system, based on requests from end users. Conclusions The success of the electronic outpatient whiteboard demonstrates the usefulness of an operational workflow tool within the ambulatory clinic setting. Operational workflow tools can play a significant role in supporting coordination, collaboration, and teamwork in ambulatory healthcare settings. PMID:27081407

  4. Quality Metadata Management for Geospatial Scientific Workflows: from Retrieving to Assessing with Online Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibovici, D. G.; Pourabdollah, A.; Jackson, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experts and decision-makers use or develop models to monitor global and local changes of the environment. Their activities require the combination of data and processing services in a flow of operations and spatial data computations: a geospatial scientific workflow. The seamless ability to generate, re-use and modify a geospatial scientific workflow is an important requirement but the quality of outcomes is equally much important [1]. Metadata information attached to the data and processes, and particularly their quality, is essential to assess the reliability of the scientific model that represents a workflow [2]. Managing tools, dealing with qualitative and quantitative metadata measures of the quality associated with a workflow, are, therefore, required for the modellers. To ensure interoperability, ISO and OGC standards [3] are to be adopted, allowing for example one to define metadata profiles and to retrieve them via web service interfaces. However these standards need a few extensions when looking at workflows, particularly in the context of geoprocesses metadata. We propose to fill this gap (i) at first through the provision of a metadata profile for the quality of processes, and (ii) through providing a framework, based on XPDL [4], to manage the quality information. Web Processing Services are used to implement a range of metadata analyses on the workflow in order to evaluate and present quality information at different levels of the workflow. This generates the metadata quality, stored in the XPDL file. The focus is (a) on the visual representations of the quality, summarizing the retrieved quality information either from the standardized metadata profiles of the components or from non-standard quality information e.g., Web 2.0 information, and (b) on the estimated qualities of the outputs derived from meta-propagation of uncertainties (a principle that we have introduced [5]). An a priori validation of the future decision-making supported by the

  5. wft4galaxy: a workflow testing tool for galaxy.

    PubMed

    Piras, Marco Enrico; Pireddu, Luca; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2017-12-01

    Workflow managers for scientific analysis provide a high-level programming platform facilitating standardization, automation, collaboration and access to sophisticated computing resources. The Galaxy workflow manager provides a prime example of this type of platform. As compositions of simpler tools, workflows effectively comprise specialized computer programs implementing often very complex analysis procedures. To date, no simple way to automatically test Galaxy workflows and ensure their correctness has appeared in the literature. With wft4galaxy we offer a tool to bring automated testing to Galaxy workflows, making it feasible to bring continuous integration to their development and ensuring that defects are detected promptly. wft4galaxy can be easily installed as a regular Python program or launched directly as a Docker container-the latter reducing installation effort to a minimum. Available at https://github.com/phnmnl/wft4galaxy under the Academic Free License v3.0. marcoenrico.piras@crs4.it. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Scientific Workflow Management in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Jeroen S.; Deelder, André M.; Palmblad, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Data processing in proteomics can be a challenging endeavor, requiring extensive knowledge of many different software packages, all with different algorithms, data format requirements, and user interfaces. In this article we describe the integration of a number of existing programs and tools in Taverna Workbench, a scientific workflow manager currently being developed in the bioinformatics community. We demonstrate how a workflow manager provides a single, visually clear and intuitive interface to complex data analysis tasks in proteomics, from raw mass spectrometry data to protein identifications and beyond. PMID:22411703

  7. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensaku; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tatebe, Osamu; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro

    2011-09-08

    In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error.Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability and maintainability of rakefiles

  8. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error. Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. Findings We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Conclusions Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability

  9. NeuroManager: a workflow analysis based simulation management engine for computational neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, David B.; Santamaria, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    We developed NeuroManager, an object-oriented simulation management software engine for computational neuroscience. NeuroManager automates the workflow of simulation job submissions when using heterogeneous computational resources, simulators, and simulation tasks. The object-oriented approach (1) provides flexibility to adapt to a variety of neuroscience simulators, (2) simplifies the use of heterogeneous computational resources, from desktops to super computer clusters, and (3) improves tracking of simulator/simulation evolution. We implemented NeuroManager in MATLAB, a widely used engineering and scientific language, for its signal and image processing tools, prevalence in electrophysiology analysis, and increasing use in college Biology education. To design and develop NeuroManager we analyzed the workflow of simulation submission for a variety of simulators, operating systems, and computational resources, including the handling of input parameters, data, models, results, and analyses. This resulted in 22 stages of simulation submission workflow. The software incorporates progress notification, automatic organization, labeling, and time-stamping of data and results, and integrated access to MATLAB's analysis and visualization tools. NeuroManager provides users with the tools to automate daily tasks, and assists principal investigators in tracking and recreating the evolution of research projects performed by multiple people. Overall, NeuroManager provides the infrastructure needed to improve workflow, manage multiple simultaneous simulations, and maintain provenance of the potentially large amounts of data produced during the course of a research project. PMID:26528175

  10. NeuroManager: a workflow analysis based simulation management engine for computational neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Stockton, David B; Santamaria, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    We developed NeuroManager, an object-oriented simulation management software engine for computational neuroscience. NeuroManager automates the workflow of simulation job submissions when using heterogeneous computational resources, simulators, and simulation tasks. The object-oriented approach (1) provides flexibility to adapt to a variety of neuroscience simulators, (2) simplifies the use of heterogeneous computational resources, from desktops to super computer clusters, and (3) improves tracking of simulator/simulation evolution. We implemented NeuroManager in MATLAB, a widely used engineering and scientific language, for its signal and image processing tools, prevalence in electrophysiology analysis, and increasing use in college Biology education. To design and develop NeuroManager we analyzed the workflow of simulation submission for a variety of simulators, operating systems, and computational resources, including the handling of input parameters, data, models, results, and analyses. This resulted in 22 stages of simulation submission workflow. The software incorporates progress notification, automatic organization, labeling, and time-stamping of data and results, and integrated access to MATLAB's analysis and visualization tools. NeuroManager provides users with the tools to automate daily tasks, and assists principal investigators in tracking and recreating the evolution of research projects performed by multiple people. Overall, NeuroManager provides the infrastructure needed to improve workflow, manage multiple simultaneous simulations, and maintain provenance of the potentially large amounts of data produced during the course of a research project.

  11. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  12. Mobile task management tool that improves workflow of an acute general surgical service.

    PubMed

    Foo, Elizabeth; McDonald, Rod; Savage, Earle; Floyd, Richard; Butler, Anthony; Rumball-Smith, Alistair; Connor, Saxon

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and being able to measure constraints within a health system is crucial if outcomes are to be improved. Current systems lack the ability to capture decision making with regard to tasks performed within a patient journey. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile task management tool on clinical workflow within an acute general surgical service by analysing data capture and usability of the application tool. The Cortex iOS application was developed to digitize patient flow and provide real-time visibility over clinical decision making and task performance. Study outcomes measured were workflow data capture for patient and staff events. Usability was assessed using an electronic survey. There were 449 unique patient journeys tracked with a total of 3072 patient events recorded. The results repository was accessed 7792 times. The participants reported that the application sped up decision making, reduced redundancy of work and improved team communication. The mode of the estimated time the application saved participants was 5-9 min/h of work. Of the 14 respondents, nine discarded their analogue methods of tracking tasks by the end of the study period. The introduction of a mobile task management system improved the working efficiency of junior clinical staff. The application allowed capture of data not previously available to hospital systems. In the future, such data will contribute to the accurate mapping of patient journeys through the health system. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Schedule-Aware Workflow Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mans, Ronny S.; Russell, Nick C.; van der Aalst, Wil M. P.; Moleman, Arnold J.; Bakker, Piet J. M.

    Contemporary workflow management systems offer work-items to users through specific work-lists. Users select the work-items they will perform without having a specific schedule in mind. However, in many environments work needs to be scheduled and performed at particular times. For example, in hospitals many work-items are linked to appointments, e.g., a doctor cannot perform surgery without reserving an operating theater and making sure that the patient is present. One of the problems when applying workflow technology in such domains is the lack of calendar-based scheduling support. In this paper, we present an approach that supports the seamless integration of unscheduled (flow) and scheduled (schedule) tasks. Using CPN Tools we have developed a specification and simulation model for schedule-aware workflow management systems. Based on this a system has been realized that uses YAWL, Microsoft Exchange Server 2007, Outlook, and a dedicated scheduling service. The approach is illustrated using a real-life case study at the AMC hospital in the Netherlands. In addition, we elaborate on the experiences obtained when developing and implementing a system of this scale using formal techniques.

  14. Using Kepler for Tool Integration in Microarray Analysis Workflows.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhuohui; Stowe, Jennifer C; Altintas, Ilkay; McCulloch, Andrew D; Zambon, Alexander C

    Increasing numbers of genomic technologies are leading to massive amounts of genomic data, all of which requires complex analysis. More and more bioinformatics analysis tools are being developed by scientist to simplify these analyses. However, different pipelines have been developed using different software environments. This makes integrations of these diverse bioinformatics tools difficult. Kepler provides an open source environment to integrate these disparate packages. Using Kepler, we integrated several external tools including Bioconductor packages, AltAnalyze, a python-based open source tool, and R-based comparison tool to build an automated workflow to meta-analyze both online and local microarray data. The automated workflow connects the integrated tools seamlessly, delivers data flow between the tools smoothly, and hence improves efficiency and accuracy of complex data analyses. Our workflow exemplifies the usage of Kepler as a scientific workflow platform for bioinformatics pipelines.

  15. A software tool to analyze clinical workflows from direct observations.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Marco; Lasierra, Nelia; Hoerbst, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Observational data of clinical processes need to be managed in a convenient way, so that process information is reliable, valid and viable for further analysis. However, existing tools for allocating observations fail in systematic data collection of specific workflow recordings. We present a software tool which was developed to facilitate the analysis of clinical process observations. The tool was successfully used in the project OntoHealth, to build, store and analyze observations of diabetes routine consultations.

  16. From chart tracking to workflow management.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, P.; Vignes, G.; Venable, C.; Hazelwood, A.; Cade, T.

    1994-01-01

    The current interest in system-wide integration appears to be based on the assumption that an organization, by digitizing information and accepting a common standard for the exchange of such information, will improve the accessibility of this information and automatically experience benefits resulting from its more productive use. We do not dispute this reasoning, but assert that an organization's capacity for effective change is proportional to the understanding of the current structure among its personnel. Our workflow manager is based on the use of a Parameterized Petri Net (PPN) model which can be configured to represent an arbitrarily detailed picture of an organization. The PPN model can be animated to observe the model organization in action, and the results of the animation analyzed. This simulation is a dynamic ongoing process which changes with the system and allows members of the organization to pose "what if" questions as a means of exploring opportunities for change. We present, the "workflow management system" as the natural successor to the tracking program, incorporating modeling, scheduling, reactive planning, performance evaluation, and simulation. This workflow management system is more than adequate for meeting the needs of a paper chart tracking system, and, as the patient record is computerized, will serve as a planning and evaluation tool in converting the paper-based health information system into a computer-based system. PMID:7950051

  17. Workflow Management for Complex HEP Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Rieger, M.; von Cube, R. F.

    2017-10-01

    We present the novel Analysis Workflow Management (AWM) that provides users with the tools and competences of professional large scale workflow systems, e.g. Apache’s Airavata[1]. The approach presents a paradigm shift from executing parts of the analysis to defining the analysis. Within AWM an analysis consists of steps. For example, a step defines to run a certain executable for multiple files of an input data collection. Each call to the executable for one of those input files can be submitted to the desired run location, which could be the local computer or a remote batch system. An integrated software manager enables automated user installation of dependencies in the working directory at the run location. Each execution of a step item creates one report for bookkeeping purposes containing error codes and output data or file references. Required files, e.g. created by previous steps, are retrieved automatically. Since data storage and run locations are exchangeable from the steps perspective, computing resources can be used opportunistically. A visualization of the workflow as a graph of the steps in the web browser provides a high-level view on the analysis. The workflow system is developed and tested alongside of a ttbb cross section measurement where, for instance, the event selection is represented by one step and a Bayesian statistical inference is performed by another. The clear interface and dependencies between steps enables a make-like execution of the whole analysis.

  18. Medication Management: The Macrocognitive Workflow of Older Adults With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Robin S; Unertl, Kim M; Holden, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Older adults with chronic disease struggle to manage complex medication regimens. Health information technology has the potential to improve medication management, but only if it is based on a thorough understanding of the complexity of medication management workflow as it occurs in natural settings. Prior research reveals that patient work related to medication management is complex, cognitive, and collaborative. Macrocognitive processes are theorized as how people individually and collaboratively think in complex, adaptive, and messy nonlaboratory settings supported by artifacts. The objective of this research was to describe and analyze the work of medication management by older adults with heart failure, using a macrocognitive workflow framework. We interviewed and observed 61 older patients along with 30 informal caregivers about self-care practices including medication management. Descriptive qualitative content analysis methods were used to develop categories, subcategories, and themes about macrocognitive processes used in medication management workflow. We identified 5 high-level macrocognitive processes affecting medication management-sensemaking, planning, coordination, monitoring, and decision making-and 15 subprocesses. Data revealed workflow as occurring in a highly collaborative, fragile system of interacting people, artifacts, time, and space. Process breakdowns were common and patients had little support for macrocognitive workflow from current tools. Macrocognitive processes affected medication management performance. Describing and analyzing this performance produced recommendations for technology supporting collaboration and sensemaking, decision making and problem detection, and planning and implementation.

  19. Managing and Communicating Operational Workflow: Designing and Implementing an Electronic Outpatient Whiteboard.

    PubMed

    Steitz, Bryan D; Weinberg, Stuart T; Danciu, Ioana; Unertl, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare team members in emergency department contexts have used electronic whiteboard solutions to help manage operational workflow for many years. Ambulatory clinic settings have highly complex operational workflow, but are still limited in electronic assistance to communicate and coordinate work activities. To describe and discuss the design, implementation, use, and ongoing evolution of a coordination and collaboration tool supporting ambulatory clinic operational workflow at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). The outpatient whiteboard tool was initially designed to support healthcare work related to an electronic chemotherapy order-entry application. After a highly successful initial implementation in an oncology context, a high demand emerged across the organization for the outpatient whiteboard implementation. Over the past 10 years, developers have followed an iterative user-centered design process to evolve the tool. The electronic outpatient whiteboard system supports 194 separate whiteboards and is accessed by over 2800 distinct users on a typical day. Clinics can configure their whiteboards to support unique workflow elements. Since initial release, features such as immunization clinical decision support have been integrated into the system, based on requests from end users. The success of the electronic outpatient whiteboard demonstrates the usefulness of an operational workflow tool within the ambulatory clinic setting. Operational workflow tools can play a significant role in supporting coordination, collaboration, and teamwork in ambulatory healthcare settings.

  20. Information Management Workflow and Tools Enabling Multiscale Modeling Within ICME Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Austin, Nic; Terentjev, Igor; Cebon, Dave; Marsden, Will

    2016-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on reducing the cost and time to market of new materials, the need for analytical tools that enable the virtual design and optimization of materials throughout their processing - internal structure - property - performance envelope, along with the capturing and storing of the associated material and model information across its lifecycle, has become critical. This need is also fueled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing; consistency, quality and traceability of data; product design; engineering analysis; as well as control of access to proprietary or sensitive information. Fortunately, material information management systems and physics-based multiscale modeling methods have kept pace with the growing user demands. Herein, recent efforts to establish workflow for and demonstrate a unique set of web application tools for linking NASA GRC's Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) Granta MI database schema and NASA GRC's Integrated multiscale Micromechanics Analysis Code (ImMAC) software toolset are presented. The goal is to enable seamless coupling between both test data and simulation data, which is captured and tracked automatically within Granta MI®, with full model pedigree information. These tools, and this type of linkage, are foundational to realizing the full potential of ICME, in which materials processing, microstructure, properties, and performance are coupled to enable application-driven design and optimization of materials and structures.

  1. Medication Management: The Macrocognitive Workflow of Older Adults With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Older adults with chronic disease struggle to manage complex medication regimens. Health information technology has the potential to improve medication management, but only if it is based on a thorough understanding of the complexity of medication management workflow as it occurs in natural settings. Prior research reveals that patient work related to medication management is complex, cognitive, and collaborative. Macrocognitive processes are theorized as how people individually and collaboratively think in complex, adaptive, and messy nonlaboratory settings supported by artifacts. Objective The objective of this research was to describe and analyze the work of medication management by older adults with heart failure, using a macrocognitive workflow framework. Methods We interviewed and observed 61 older patients along with 30 informal caregivers about self-care practices including medication management. Descriptive qualitative content analysis methods were used to develop categories, subcategories, and themes about macrocognitive processes used in medication management workflow. Results We identified 5 high-level macrocognitive processes affecting medication management—sensemaking, planning, coordination, monitoring, and decision making—and 15 subprocesses. Data revealed workflow as occurring in a highly collaborative, fragile system of interacting people, artifacts, time, and space. Process breakdowns were common and patients had little support for macrocognitive workflow from current tools. Conclusions Macrocognitive processes affected medication management performance. Describing and analyzing this performance produced recommendations for technology supporting collaboration and sensemaking, decision making and problem detection, and planning and implementation. PMID:27733331

  2. Lessons from implementing a combined workflow-informatics system for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Zai, Adrian H; Grant, Richard W; Estey, Greg; Lester, William T; Andrews, Carl T; Yee, Ronnie; Mort, Elizabeth; Chueh, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    Shortcomings surrounding the care of patients with diabetes have been attributed largely to a fragmented, disorganized, and duplicative health care system that focuses more on acute conditions and complications than on managing chronic disease. To address these shortcomings, we developed a diabetes registry population management application to change the way our staff manages patients with diabetes. Use of this new application has helped us coordinate the responsibilities for intervening and monitoring patients in the registry among different users. Our experiences using this combined workflow-informatics intervention system suggest that integrating a chronic disease registry into clinical workflow for the treatment of chronic conditions creates a useful and efficient tool for managing disease.

  3. A patient workflow management system built on guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Dazzi, L.; Fassino, C.; Saracco, R.; Quaglini, S.; Stefanelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    To provide high quality, shared, and distributed medical care, clinical and organizational issues need to be integrated. This work describes a methodology for developing a Patient Workflow Management System, based on a detailed model of both the medical work process and the organizational structure. We assume that the medical work process is represented through clinical practice guidelines, and that an ontological description of the organization is available. Thus, we developed tools 1) for acquiring the medical knowledge contained into a guideline, 2) to translate the derived formalized guideline into a computational formalism, precisely a Petri Net, 3) to maintain different representation levels. The high level representation guarantees that the Patient Workflow follows the guideline prescriptions, while the low level takes into account the specific organization characteristics and allow allocating resources for managing a specific patient in daily practice. PMID:9357606

  4. Parallel workflow tools to facilitate human brain MRI post-processing

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zaixu; Zhao, Chenxi; Gong, Gaolang

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are widely applied in human brain studies. To obtain specific brain measures of interest from MRI datasets, a number of complex image post-processing steps are typically required. Parallel workflow tools have recently been developed, concatenating individual processing steps and enabling fully automated processing of raw MRI data to obtain the final results. These workflow tools are also designed to make optimal use of available computational resources and to support the parallel processing of different subjects or of independent processing steps for a single subject. Automated, parallel MRI post-processing tools can greatly facilitate relevant brain investigations and are being increasingly applied. In this review, we briefly summarize these parallel workflow tools and discuss relevant issues. PMID:26029043

  5. Implementation of Cyberinfrastructure and Data Management Workflow for a Large-Scale Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. S.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring with in situ environmental sensors and other forms of field-based observation presents many challenges for data management, particularly for large-scale networks consisting of multiple sites, sensors, and personnel. The availability and utility of these data in addressing scientific questions relies on effective cyberinfrastructure that facilitates transformation of raw sensor data into functional data products. It also depends on the ability of researchers to share and access the data in useable formats. In addition to addressing the challenges presented by the quantity of data, monitoring networks need practices to ensure high data quality, including procedures and tools for post processing. Data quality is further enhanced if practitioners are able to track equipment, deployments, calibrations, and other events related to site maintenance and associate these details with observational data. In this presentation we will describe the overall workflow that we have developed for research groups and sites conducting long term monitoring using in situ sensors. Features of the workflow include: software tools to automate the transfer of data from field sites to databases, a Python-based program for data quality control post-processing, a web-based application for online discovery and visualization of data, and a data model and web interface for managing physical infrastructure. By automating the data management workflow, the time from collection to analysis is reduced and sharing and publication is facilitated. The incorporation of metadata standards and descriptions and the use of open-source tools enhances the sustainability and reusability of the data. We will describe the workflow and tools that we have developed in the context of the iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydrosustainability) monitoring network. The iUTAH network consists of aquatic and climate sensors deployed in three watersheds to monitor Gradients Along Mountain to Urban

  6. Scientific Workflows + Provenance = Better (Meta-)Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludaescher, B.; Cuevas-Vicenttín, V.; Missier, P.; Dey, S.; Kianmajd, P.; Wei, Y.; Koop, D.; Chirigati, F.; Altintas, I.; Belhajjame, K.; Bowers, S.

    2013-12-01

    The origin and processing history of an artifact is known as its provenance. Data provenance is an important form of metadata that explains how a particular data product came about, e.g., how and when it was derived in a computational process, which parameter settings and input data were used, etc. Provenance information provides transparency and helps to explain and interpret data products. Other common uses and applications of provenance include quality control, data curation, result debugging, and more generally, 'reproducible science'. Scientific workflow systems (e.g. Kepler, Taverna, VisTrails, and others) provide controlled environments for developing computational pipelines with built-in provenance support. Workflow results can then be explained in terms of workflow steps, parameter settings, input data, etc. using provenance that is automatically captured by the system. Scientific workflows themselves provide a user-friendly abstraction of the computational process and are thus a form of ('prospective') provenance in their own right. The full potential of provenance information is realized when combining workflow-level information (prospective provenance) with trace-level information (retrospective provenance). To this end, the DataONE Provenance Working Group (ProvWG) has developed an extension of the W3C PROV standard, called D-PROV. Whereas PROV provides a 'least common denominator' for exchanging and integrating provenance information, D-PROV adds new 'observables' that described workflow-level information (e.g., the functional steps in a pipeline), as well as workflow-specific trace-level information ( timestamps for each workflow step executed, the inputs and outputs used, etc.) Using examples, we will demonstrate how the combination of prospective and retrospective provenance provides added value in managing scientific data. The DataONE ProvWG is also developing tools based on D-PROV that allow scientists to get more mileage from provenance metadata

  7. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing.

    PubMed

    Brown, David K; Penkler, David L; Musyoka, Thommas M; Bishop, Özlem Tastan

    2015-01-01

    Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC) clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS), a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC). JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS.

  8. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David K.; Penkler, David L.; Musyoka, Thommas M.; Bishop, Özlem Tastan

    2015-01-01

    Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC) clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS), a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC). JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS. PMID:26280450

  9. Flexible Workflow Software enables the Management of an Increased Volume and Heterogeneity of Sensors, and evolves with the Expansion of Complex Ocean Observatory Infrastructures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlin, M. C.; Jenkyns, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) collects data from observatories in the northeast Pacific, Salish Sea, Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and land-based sites in British Columbia. Data are streamed, collected autonomously, or transmitted via satellite from a variety of instruments. The Software Engineering group at ONC develops and maintains Oceans 2.0, an in-house software system that acquires and archives data from sensors, and makes data available to scientists, the public, government and non-government agencies. The Oceans 2.0 workflow tool was developed by ONC to manage a large volume of tasks and processes required for instrument installation, recovery and maintenance activities. Since 2013, the workflow tool has supported 70 expeditions and grown to include 30 different workflow processes for the increasing complexity of infrastructures at ONC. The workflow tool strives to keep pace with an increasing heterogeneity of sensors, connections and environments by supporting versioning of existing workflows, and allowing the creation of new processes and tasks. Despite challenges in training and gaining mutual support from multidisciplinary teams, the workflow tool has become invaluable in project management in an innovative setting. It provides a collective place to contribute to ONC's diverse projects and expeditions and encourages more repeatable processes, while promoting interactions between the multidisciplinary teams who manage various aspects of instrument development and the data they produce. The workflow tool inspires documentation of terminologies and procedures, and effectively links to other tools at ONC such as JIRA, Alfresco and Wiki. Motivated by growing sensor schemes, modes of collecting data, archiving, and data distribution at ONC, the workflow tool ensures that infrastructure is managed completely from instrument purchase to data distribution. It integrates all areas of expertise and helps fulfill ONC's mandate to offer quality data to users.

  10. A characterization of workflow management systems for extreme-scale applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Filgueira, Rosa; Pietri, Ilia

    We present that the automation of the execution of computational tasks is at the heart of improving scientific productivity. Over the last years, scientific workflows have been established as an important abstraction that captures data processing and computation of large and complex scientific applications. By allowing scientists to model and express entire data processing steps and their dependencies, workflow management systems relieve scientists from the details of an application and manage its execution on a computational infrastructure. As the resource requirements of today’s computational and data science applications that process vast amounts of data keep increasing, there is a compellingmore » case for a new generation of advances in high-performance computing, commonly termed as extreme-scale computing, which will bring forth multiple challenges for the design of workflow applications and management systems. This paper presents a novel characterization of workflow management systems using features commonly associated with extreme-scale computing applications. We classify 15 popular workflow management systems in terms of workflow execution models, heterogeneous computing environments, and data access methods. Finally, the paper also surveys workflow applications and identifies gaps for future research on the road to extreme-scale workflows and management systems.« less

  11. A characterization of workflow management systems for extreme-scale applications

    DOE PAGES

    Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Filgueira, Rosa; Pietri, Ilia; ...

    2017-02-16

    We present that the automation of the execution of computational tasks is at the heart of improving scientific productivity. Over the last years, scientific workflows have been established as an important abstraction that captures data processing and computation of large and complex scientific applications. By allowing scientists to model and express entire data processing steps and their dependencies, workflow management systems relieve scientists from the details of an application and manage its execution on a computational infrastructure. As the resource requirements of today’s computational and data science applications that process vast amounts of data keep increasing, there is a compellingmore » case for a new generation of advances in high-performance computing, commonly termed as extreme-scale computing, which will bring forth multiple challenges for the design of workflow applications and management systems. This paper presents a novel characterization of workflow management systems using features commonly associated with extreme-scale computing applications. We classify 15 popular workflow management systems in terms of workflow execution models, heterogeneous computing environments, and data access methods. Finally, the paper also surveys workflow applications and identifies gaps for future research on the road to extreme-scale workflows and management systems.« less

  12. Context-aware workflow management of mobile health applications.

    PubMed

    Salden, Alfons; Poortinga, Remco

    2006-01-01

    We propose a medical application management architecture that allows medical (IT) experts readily designing, developing and deploying context-aware mobile health (m-health) applications or services. In particular, we elaborate on how our application workflow management architecture enables chaining, coordinating, composing, and adapting context-sensitive medical application components such that critical Quality of Service (QoS) and Quality of Context (QoC) requirements typical for m-health applications or services can be met. This functional architectural support requires learning modules for distilling application-critical selection of attention and anticipation models. These models will help medical experts constructing and adjusting on-the-fly m-health application workflows and workflow strategies. We illustrate our context-aware workflow management paradigm for a m-health data delivery problem, in which optimal communication network configurations have to be determined.

  13. Jflow: a workflow management system for web applications.

    PubMed

    Mariette, Jérôme; Escudié, Frédéric; Bardou, Philippe; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Noirot, Céline; Trotard, Marie-Stéphane; Gaspin, Christine; Klopp, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Biologists produce large data sets and are in demand of rich and simple web portals in which they can upload and analyze their files. Providing such tools requires to mask the complexity induced by the needed High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. The connection between interface and computing infrastructure is usually specific to each portal. With Jflow, we introduce a Workflow Management System (WMS), composed of jQuery plug-ins which can easily be embedded in any web application and a Python library providing all requested features to setup, run and monitor workflows. Jflow is available under the GNU General Public License (GPL) at http://bioinfo.genotoul.fr/jflow. The package is coming with full documentation, quick start and a running test portal. Jerome.Mariette@toulouse.inra.fr. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Galaxy tools and workflows for sequence analysis with applications in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Cock, Peter J A; Grüning, Björn A; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Pritchard, Leighton

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy Project offers the popular web browser-based platform Galaxy for running bioinformatics tools and constructing simple workflows. Here, we present a broad collection of additional Galaxy tools for large scale analysis of gene and protein sequences. The motivating research theme is the identification of specific genes of interest in a range of non-model organisms, and our central example is the identification and prediction of "effector" proteins produced by plant pathogens in order to manipulate their host plant. This functional annotation of a pathogen's predicted capacity for virulence is a key step in translating sequence data into potential applications in plant pathology. This collection includes novel tools, and widely-used third-party tools such as NCBI BLAST+ wrapped for use within Galaxy. Individual bioinformatics software tools are typically available separately as standalone packages, or in online browser-based form. The Galaxy framework enables the user to combine these and other tools to automate organism scale analyses as workflows, without demanding familiarity with command line tools and scripting. Workflows created using Galaxy can be saved and are reusable, so may be distributed within and between research groups, facilitating the construction of a set of standardised, reusable bioinformatic protocols. The Galaxy tools and workflows described in this manuscript are open source and freely available from the Galaxy Tool Shed (http://usegalaxy.org/toolshed or http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu).

  15. High-volume workflow management in the ITN/FBI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Thomas L.

    1997-02-01

    The Identification Tasking and Networking (ITN) Federal Bureau of Investigation system will manage the processing of more than 70,000 submissions per day. The workflow manager controls the routing of each submission through a combination of automated and manual processing steps whose exact sequence is dynamically determined by the results at each step. For most submissions, one or more of the steps involve the visual comparison of fingerprint images. The ITN workflow manager is implemented within a scaleable client/server architecture. The paper describes the key aspects of the ITN workflow manager design which allow the high volume of daily processing to be successfully accomplished.

  16. A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shaul, Israel Z.; Heineman, George T.

    1996-12-01

    A workflow management system (WFMS) employs a workflow manager (WM) to execute and automate the various activities within a workflow. To protect the consistency of data, the WM encapsulates each activity with a transaction; a transaction manager (TM) then guarantees the atomicity of activities. Since workflows often group several activities together, the TM is responsible for guaranteeing the atomicity of these units. There are scalability issues, however, with centralized WFMSs. Decentralized WFMSs provide an architecture for multiple autonomous WFMSs to interoperate, thus accommodating multiple workflows and geographically-dispersed teams. When atomic units are composed of activities spread across multiple WFMSs, however, there is a conflict between global atomicity and local autonomy of each WFMS. This paper describes a decentralized atomicity model that enables workflow administrators to specify the scope of multi-site atomicity based upon the desired semantics of multi-site tasks in the decentralized WFMS. We describe an architecture that realizes our model and execution paradigm.

  17. Adaptive Workflows for Diabetes Management: Self-Management Assistant and Remote Treatment for Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Iván; Kiefer, Stephan; Vehi, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes self-management is a crucial element for all people with diabetes and those at risk for developing the disease. Diabetic patients should be empowered to increase their self-management skills in order to prevent or delay the complications of diabetes. This work presents the proposal and first development stages of a smartphone application focused on the empowerment of the patients with diabetes. The concept of this interventional tool is based on the personalization of the user experience from an adaptive and dynamic perspective. The segmentation of the population and the dynamical treatment of user profiles among the different experience levels is the main challenge of the implementation. The self-management assistant and remote treatment for diabetes aims to develop a platform to integrate a series of innovative models and tools rigorously tested and supported by the research literature in diabetes together the use of a proved engine to manage workflows for healthcare.

  18. Galaxy tools and workflows for sequence analysis with applications in molecular plant pathology

    PubMed Central

    Grüning, Björn A.; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Pritchard, Leighton

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy Project offers the popular web browser-based platform Galaxy for running bioinformatics tools and constructing simple workflows. Here, we present a broad collection of additional Galaxy tools for large scale analysis of gene and protein sequences. The motivating research theme is the identification of specific genes of interest in a range of non-model organisms, and our central example is the identification and prediction of “effector” proteins produced by plant pathogens in order to manipulate their host plant. This functional annotation of a pathogen’s predicted capacity for virulence is a key step in translating sequence data into potential applications in plant pathology. This collection includes novel tools, and widely-used third-party tools such as NCBI BLAST+ wrapped for use within Galaxy. Individual bioinformatics software tools are typically available separately as standalone packages, or in online browser-based form. The Galaxy framework enables the user to combine these and other tools to automate organism scale analyses as workflows, without demanding familiarity with command line tools and scripting. Workflows created using Galaxy can be saved and are reusable, so may be distributed within and between research groups, facilitating the construction of a set of standardised, reusable bioinformatic protocols. The Galaxy tools and workflows described in this manuscript are open source and freely available from the Galaxy Tool Shed (http://usegalaxy.org/toolshed or http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu). PMID:24109552

  19. An Auto-management Thesis Program WebMIS Based on Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li; Jie, Shi; Weibo, Zhong

    An auto-management WebMIS based on workflow for bachelor thesis program is given in this paper. A module used for workflow dispatching is designed and realized using MySQL and J2EE according to the work principle of workflow engine. The module can automatively dispatch the workflow according to the date of system, login information and the work status of the user. The WebMIS changes the management from handwork to computer-work which not only standardizes the thesis program but also keeps the data and documents clean and consistent.

  20. Biowep: a workflow enactment portal for bioinformatics applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Paolo; Bartocci, Ezio; Bertolini, Guglielmo; De Paoli, Flavio; Marra, Domenico; Mauri, Giancarlo; Merelli, Emanuela; Milanesi, Luciano

    2007-03-08

    The huge amount of biological information, its distribution over the Internet and the heterogeneity of available software tools makes the adoption of new data integration and analysis network tools a necessity in bioinformatics. ICT standards and tools, like Web Services and Workflow Management Systems (WMS), can support the creation and deployment of such systems. Many Web Services are already available and some WMS have been proposed. They assume that researchers know which bioinformatics resources can be reached through a programmatic interface and that they are skilled in programming and building workflows. Therefore, they are not viable to the majority of unskilled researchers. A portal enabling these to take profit from new technologies is still missing. We designed biowep, a web based client application that allows for the selection and execution of a set of predefined workflows. The system is available on-line. Biowep architecture includes a Workflow Manager, a User Interface and a Workflow Executor. The task of the Workflow Manager is the creation and annotation of workflows. These can be created by using either the Taverna Workbench or BioWMS. Enactment of workflows is carried out by FreeFluo for Taverna workflows and by BioAgent/Hermes, a mobile agent-based middleware, for BioWMS ones. Main workflows' processing steps are annotated on the basis of their input and output, elaboration type and application domain by using a classification of bioinformatics data and tasks. The interface supports users authentication and profiling. Workflows can be selected on the basis of users' profiles and can be searched through their annotations. Results can be saved. We developed a web system that support the selection and execution of predefined workflows, thus simplifying access for all researchers. The implementation of Web Services allowing specialized software to interact with an exhaustive set of biomedical databases and analysis software and the creation of

  1. Biowep: a workflow enactment portal for bioinformatics applications

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Paolo; Bartocci, Ezio; Bertolini, Guglielmo; De Paoli, Flavio; Marra, Domenico; Mauri, Giancarlo; Merelli, Emanuela; Milanesi, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    Background The huge amount of biological information, its distribution over the Internet and the heterogeneity of available software tools makes the adoption of new data integration and analysis network tools a necessity in bioinformatics. ICT standards and tools, like Web Services and Workflow Management Systems (WMS), can support the creation and deployment of such systems. Many Web Services are already available and some WMS have been proposed. They assume that researchers know which bioinformatics resources can be reached through a programmatic interface and that they are skilled in programming and building workflows. Therefore, they are not viable to the majority of unskilled researchers. A portal enabling these to take profit from new technologies is still missing. Results We designed biowep, a web based client application that allows for the selection and execution of a set of predefined workflows. The system is available on-line. Biowep architecture includes a Workflow Manager, a User Interface and a Workflow Executor. The task of the Workflow Manager is the creation and annotation of workflows. These can be created by using either the Taverna Workbench or BioWMS. Enactment of workflows is carried out by FreeFluo for Taverna workflows and by BioAgent/Hermes, a mobile agent-based middleware, for BioWMS ones. Main workflows' processing steps are annotated on the basis of their input and output, elaboration type and application domain by using a classification of bioinformatics data and tasks. The interface supports users authentication and profiling. Workflows can be selected on the basis of users' profiles and can be searched through their annotations. Results can be saved. Conclusion We developed a web system that support the selection and execution of predefined workflows, thus simplifying access for all researchers. The implementation of Web Services allowing specialized software to interact with an exhaustive set of biomedical databases and analysis

  2. A Model of Workflow Composition for Emergency Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Chen; Bin-ge, Cui; Feng, Zhang; Xue-hui, Xu; Shan-shan, Fu

    The common-used workflow technology is not flexible enough in dealing with concurrent emergency situations. The paper proposes a novel model for defining emergency plans, in which workflow segments appear as a constituent part. A formal abstraction, which contains four operations, is defined to compose workflow segments under constraint rule. The software system of the business process resources construction and composition is implemented and integrated into Emergency Plan Management Application System.

  3. Taverna: a tool for building and running workflows of services

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Duncan; Wolstencroft, Katy; Stevens, Robert; Goble, Carole; Pocock, Mathew R.; Li, Peter; Oinn, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Taverna is an application that eases the use and integration of the growing number of molecular biology tools and databases available on the web, especially web services. It allows bioinformaticians to construct workflows or pipelines of services to perform a range of different analyses, such as sequence analysis and genome annotation. These high-level workflows can integrate many different resources into a single analysis. Taverna is available freely under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) from . PMID:16845108

  4. Pathology economic model tool: a novel approach to workflow and budget cost analysis in an anatomic pathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, David; Aoun, Patricia; Powell, Michael; Juncker, Flemming; Mollerup, Jens

    2010-08-01

    The need for higher efficiency, maximum quality, and faster turnaround time is a continuous focus for anatomic pathology laboratories and drives changes in work scheduling, instrumentation, and management control systems. To determine the costs of generating routine, special, and immunohistochemical microscopic slides in a large, academic anatomic pathology laboratory using a top-down approach. The Pathology Economic Model Tool was used to analyze workflow processes at The Nebraska Medical Center's anatomic pathology laboratory. Data from the analysis were used to generate complete cost estimates, which included not only materials, consumables, and instrumentation but also specific labor and overhead components for each of the laboratory's subareas. The cost data generated by the Pathology Economic Model Tool were compared with the cost estimates generated using relative value units. Despite the use of automated systems for different processes, the workflow in the laboratory was found to be relatively labor intensive. The effect of labor and overhead on per-slide costs was significantly underestimated by traditional relative-value unit calculations when compared with the Pathology Economic Model Tool. Specific workflow defects with significant contributions to the cost per slide were identified. The cost of providing routine, special, and immunohistochemical slides may be significantly underestimated by traditional methods that rely on relative value units. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis may identify specific workflow processes requiring improvement.

  5. chemalot and chemalot_knime: Command line programs as workflow tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Man-Ling; Aliagas, Ignacio; Feng, Jianwen A; Gabriel, Thomas; O'Donnell, T J; Sellers, Benjamin D; Wiswedel, Bernd; Gobbi, Alberto

    2017-06-12

    Analyzing files containing chemical information is at the core of cheminformatics. Each analysis may require a unique workflow. This paper describes the chemalot and chemalot_knime open source packages. Chemalot is a set of command line programs with a wide range of functionalities for cheminformatics. The chemalot_knime package allows command line programs that read and write SD files from stdin and to stdout to be wrapped into KNIME nodes. The combination of chemalot and chemalot_knime not only facilitates the compilation and maintenance of sequences of command line programs but also allows KNIME workflows to take advantage of the compute power of a LINUX cluster. Use of the command line programs is demonstrated in three different workflow examples: (1) A workflow to create a data file with project-relevant data for structure-activity or property analysis and other type of investigations, (2) The creation of a quantitative structure-property-relationship model using the command line programs via KNIME nodes, and (3) The analysis of strain energy in small molecule ligand conformations from the Protein Data Bank database. The chemalot and chemalot_knime packages provide lightweight and powerful tools for many tasks in cheminformatics. They are easily integrated with other open source and commercial command line tools and can be combined to build new and even more powerful tools. The chemalot_knime package facilitates the generation and maintenance of user-defined command line workflows, taking advantage of the graphical design capabilities in KNIME. Graphical abstract Example KNIME workflow with chemalot nodes and the corresponding command line pipe.

  6. a Standardized Approach to Topographic Data Processing and Workflow Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, J. M.; Bailey, P.; Glenn, N. F.; Hensleigh, J.; Hudak, A. T.; Shrestha, R.; Spaete, L.

    2013-12-01

    An ever-increasing list of options exist for collecting high resolution topographic data, including airborne LIDAR, terrestrial laser scanners, bathymetric SONAR and structure-from-motion. An equally rich, arguably overwhelming, variety of tools exists with which to organize, quality control, filter, analyze and summarize these data. However, scientists are often left to cobble together their analysis as a series of ad hoc steps, often using custom scripts and one-time processes that are poorly documented and rarely shared with the community. Even when literature-cited software tools are used, the input and output parameters differ from tool to tool. These parameters are rarely archived and the steps performed lost, making the analysis virtually impossible to replicate precisely. What is missing is a coherent, robust, framework for combining reliable, well-documented topographic data-processing steps into a workflow that can be repeated and even shared with others. We have taken several popular topographic data processing tools - including point cloud filtering and decimation as well as DEM differencing - and defined a common protocol for passing inputs and outputs between them. This presentation describes a free, public online portal that enables scientists to create custom workflows for processing topographic data using a number of popular topographic processing tools. Users provide the inputs required for each tool and in what sequence they want to combine them. This information is then stored for future reuse (and optionally sharing with others) before the user then downloads a single package that contains all the input and output specifications together with the software tools themselves. The user then launches the included batch file that executes the workflow on their local computer against their topographic data. This ZCloudTools architecture helps standardize, automate and archive topographic data processing. It also represents a forum for discovering and

  7. A data management and publication workflow for a large-scale, heterogeneous sensor network.

    PubMed

    Jones, Amber Spackman; Horsburgh, Jeffery S; Reeder, Stephanie L; Ramírez, Maurier; Caraballo, Juan

    2015-06-01

    It is common for hydrology researchers to collect data using in situ sensors at high frequencies, for extended durations, and with spatial distributions that produce data volumes requiring infrastructure for data storage, management, and sharing. The availability and utility of these data in addressing scientific questions related to water availability, water quality, and natural disasters relies on effective cyberinfrastructure that facilitates transformation of raw sensor data into usable data products. It also depends on the ability of researchers to share and access the data in useable formats. In this paper, we describe a data management and publication workflow and software tools for research groups and sites conducting long-term monitoring using in situ sensors. Functionality includes the ability to track monitoring equipment inventory and events related to field maintenance. Linking this information to the observational data is imperative in ensuring the quality of sensor-based data products. We present these tools in the context of a case study for the innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydrosustainability (iUTAH) sensor network. The iUTAH monitoring network includes sensors at aquatic and terrestrial sites for continuous monitoring of common meteorological variables, snow accumulation and melt, soil moisture, surface water flow, and surface water quality. We present the overall workflow we have developed for effectively transferring data from field monitoring sites to ultimate end-users and describe the software tools we have deployed for storing, managing, and sharing the sensor data. These tools are all open source and available for others to use.

  8. Big data analytics workflow management for eScience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Sandro; D'Anca, Alessandro; Palazzo, Cosimo; Elia, Donatello; Mariello, Andrea; Nassisi, Paola; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    In many domains such as climate and astrophysics, scientific data is often n-dimensional and requires tools that support specialized data types and primitives if it is to be properly stored, accessed, analysed and visualized. Currently, scientific data analytics relies on domain-specific software and libraries providing a huge set of operators and functionalities. However, most of these software fail at large scale since they: (i) are desktop based, rely on local computing capabilities and need the data locally; (ii) cannot benefit from available multicore/parallel machines since they are based on sequential codes; (iii) do not provide declarative languages to express scientific data analysis tasks, and (iv) do not provide newer or more scalable storage models to better support the data multidimensionality. Additionally, most of them: (v) are domain-specific, which also means they support a limited set of data formats, and (vi) do not provide a workflow support, to enable the construction, execution and monitoring of more complex "experiments". The Ophidia project aims at facing most of the challenges highlighted above by providing a big data analytics framework for eScience. Ophidia provides several parallel operators to manipulate large datasets. Some relevant examples include: (i) data sub-setting (slicing and dicing), (ii) data aggregation, (iii) array-based primitives (the same operator applies to all the implemented UDF extensions), (iv) data cube duplication, (v) data cube pivoting, (vi) NetCDF-import and export. Metadata operators are available too. Additionally, the Ophidia framework provides array-based primitives to perform data sub-setting, data aggregation (i.e. max, min, avg), array concatenation, algebraic expressions and predicate evaluation on large arrays of scientific data. Bit-oriented plugins have also been implemented to manage binary data cubes. Defining processing chains and workflows with tens, hundreds of data analytics operators is the

  9. The future of scientific workflows

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Deelman, Ewa; Peterka, Tom; Altintas, Ilkay

    Today’s computational, experimental, and observational sciences rely on computations that involve many related tasks. The success of a scientific mission often hinges on the computer automation of these workflows. In April 2015, the US Department of Energy (DOE) invited a diverse group of domain and computer scientists from national laboratories supported by the Office of Science, the National Nuclear Security Administration, from industry, and from academia to review the workflow requirements of DOE’s science and national security missions, to assess the current state of the art in science workflows, to understand the impact of emerging extreme-scale computing systems on thosemore » workflows, and to develop requirements for automated workflow management in future and existing environments. This article is a summary of the opinions of over 50 leading researchers attending this workshop. We highlight use cases, computing systems, workflow needs and conclude by summarizing the remaining challenges this community sees that inhibit large-scale scientific workflows from becoming a mainstream tool for extreme-scale science.« less

  10. Akuna: An Open Source User Environment for Managing Subsurface Simulation Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, V. L.; Agarwal, D.; Bensema, K.; Finsterle, S.; Gable, C. W.; Keating, E. H.; Krishnan, H.; Lansing, C.; Moeglein, W.; Pau, G. S. H.; Porter, E.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is investing in development of a numerical modeling toolset called ASCEM (Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management) to support modeling analyses at legacy waste sites. ASCEM is an open source and modular computing framework that incorporates new advances and tools for predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM toolset includes both a Platform with Integrated Toolsets (called Akuna) and a High-Performance Computing multi-process simulator (called Amanzi). The focus of this presentation is on Akuna, an open-source user environment that manages subsurface simulation workflows and associated data and metadata. In this presentation, key elements of Akuna are demonstrated, which includes toolsets for model setup, database management, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, and visualization of both model setup and simulation results. A key component of the workflow is in the automated job launching and monitoring capabilities, which allow a user to submit and monitor simulation runs on high-performance, parallel computers. Visualization of large outputs can also be performed without moving data back to local resources. These capabilities make high-performance computing accessible to the users who might not be familiar with batch queue systems and usage protocols on different supercomputers and clusters.

  11. Nexus: A modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The management of simulation workflows represents a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  12. A microseismic workflow for managing induced seismicity risk as CO 2 storage projects

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Matzel, E.; Morency, C.; Pyle, M.

    2015-10-27

    It is well established that fluid injection has the potential to induce earthquakes—from microseismicity to large, damaging events—by altering state-of-stress conditions in the subsurface. While induced seismicity has not been a major operational issue for carbon storage projects to date, a seismicity hazard exists and must be carefully addressed. Two essential components of effective seismic risk management are (1) sensitive microseismic monitoring and (2) robust data interpretation tools. This report describes a novel workflow, based on advanced processing algorithms applied to microseismic data, to help improve management of seismic risk. This workflow has three main goals: (1) to improve themore » resolution and reliability of passive seismic monitoring, (2) to extract additional, valuable information from continuous waveform data that is often ignored in standard processing, and (3) to minimize the turn-around time between data collection, interpretation, and decision-making. These three objectives can allow for a better-informed and rapid response to changing subsurface conditions.« less

  13. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantummore » chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.« less

  14. Workflow computing. Improving management and efficiency of pathology diagnostic services.

    PubMed

    Buffone, G J; Moreau, D; Beck, J R

    1996-04-01

    Traditionally, information technology in health care has helped practitioners to collect, store, and present information and also to add a degree of automation to simple tasks (instrument interfaces supporting result entry, for example). Thus commercially available information systems do little to support the need to model, execute, monitor, coordinate, and revise the various complex clinical processes required to support health-care delivery. Workflow computing, which is already implemented and improving the efficiency of operations in several nonmedical industries, can address the need to manage complex clinical processes. Workflow computing not only provides a means to define and manage the events, roles, and information integral to health-care delivery but also supports the explicit implementation of policy or rules appropriate to the process. This article explains how workflow computing may be applied to health-care and the inherent advantages of the technology, and it defines workflow system requirements for use in health-care delivery with special reference to diagnostic pathology.

  15. Optimizing CyberShake Seismic Hazard Workflows for Large HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Juve, G.; Vahi, K.; Deelman, E.; Jordan, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The CyberShake computational platform is a well-integrated collection of scientific software and middleware that calculates 3D simulation-based probabilistic seismic hazard curves and hazard maps for the Los Angeles region. Currently each CyberShake model comprises about 235 million synthetic seismograms from about 415,000 rupture variations computed at 286 sites. CyberShake integrates large-scale parallel and high-throughput serial seismological research codes into a processing framework in which early stages produce files used as inputs by later stages. Scientific workflow tools are used to manage the jobs, data, and metadata. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) developed the CyberShake platform using USC High Performance Computing and Communications systems and open-science NSF resources.CyberShake calculations were migrated to the NSF Track 1 system NCSA Blue Waters when it became operational in 2013, via an interdisciplinary team approach including domain scientists, computer scientists, and middleware developers. Due to the excellent performance of Blue Waters and CyberShake software optimizations, we reduced the makespan (a measure of wallclock time-to-solution) of a CyberShake study from 1467 to 342 hours. We will describe the technical enhancements behind this improvement, including judicious introduction of new GPU software, improved scientific software components, increased workflow-based automation, and Blue Waters-specific workflow optimizations.Our CyberShake performance improvements highlight the benefits of scientific workflow tools. The CyberShake workflow software stack includes the Pegasus Workflow Management System (Pegasus-WMS, which includes Condor DAGMan), HTCondor, and Globus GRAM, with Pegasus-mpi-cluster managing the high-throughput tasks on the HPC resources. The workflow tools handle data management, automatically transferring about 13 TB back to SCEC storage.We will present performance metrics from the most recent Cyber

  16. Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling Simulator for Real Workflows Energy-Aware Management in Green Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Cotes-Ruiz, Iván Tomás; Prado, Rocío P.; García-Galán, Sebastián; Muñoz-Expósito, José Enrique; Ruiz-Reyes, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the growing computational capabilities of Cloud systems rely on the reduction of the consumed power of their data centers to make them sustainable and economically profitable. The efficient management of computing resources is at the heart of any energy-aware data center and of special relevance is the adaptation of its performance to workload. Intensive computing applications in diverse areas of science generate complex workload called workflows, whose successful management in terms of energy saving is still at its beginning. WorkflowSim is currently one of the most advanced simulators for research on workflows processing, offering advanced features such as task clustering and failure policies. In this work, an expected power-aware extension of WorkflowSim is presented. This new tool integrates a power model based on a computing-plus-communication design to allow the optimization of new management strategies in energy saving considering computing, reconfiguration and networks costs as well as quality of service, and it incorporates the preeminent strategy for on host energy saving: Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling (DVFS). The simulator is designed to be consistent in different real scenarios and to include a wide repertory of DVFS governors. Results showing the validity of the simulator in terms of resources utilization, frequency and voltage scaling, power, energy and time saving are presented. Also, results achieved by the intra-host DVFS strategy with different governors are compared to those of the data center using a recent and successful DVFS-based inter-host scheduling strategy as overlapped mechanism to the DVFS intra-host technique. PMID:28085932

  17. Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling Simulator for Real Workflows Energy-Aware Management in Green Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Cotes-Ruiz, Iván Tomás; Prado, Rocío P; García-Galán, Sebastián; Muñoz-Expósito, José Enrique; Ruiz-Reyes, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the growing computational capabilities of Cloud systems rely on the reduction of the consumed power of their data centers to make them sustainable and economically profitable. The efficient management of computing resources is at the heart of any energy-aware data center and of special relevance is the adaptation of its performance to workload. Intensive computing applications in diverse areas of science generate complex workload called workflows, whose successful management in terms of energy saving is still at its beginning. WorkflowSim is currently one of the most advanced simulators for research on workflows processing, offering advanced features such as task clustering and failure policies. In this work, an expected power-aware extension of WorkflowSim is presented. This new tool integrates a power model based on a computing-plus-communication design to allow the optimization of new management strategies in energy saving considering computing, reconfiguration and networks costs as well as quality of service, and it incorporates the preeminent strategy for on host energy saving: Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling (DVFS). The simulator is designed to be consistent in different real scenarios and to include a wide repertory of DVFS governors. Results showing the validity of the simulator in terms of resources utilization, frequency and voltage scaling, power, energy and time saving are presented. Also, results achieved by the intra-host DVFS strategy with different governors are compared to those of the data center using a recent and successful DVFS-based inter-host scheduling strategy as overlapped mechanism to the DVFS intra-host technique.

  18. Vel-IO 3D: A tool for 3D velocity model construction, optimization and time-depth conversion in 3D geological modeling workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesano, Francesco E.; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    We present Vel-IO 3D, a tool for 3D velocity model creation and time-depth conversion, as part of a workflow for 3D model building. The workflow addresses the management of large subsurface dataset, mainly seismic lines and well logs, and the construction of a 3D velocity model able to describe the variation of the velocity parameters related to strong facies and thickness variability and to high structural complexity. Although it is applicable in many geological contexts (e.g. foreland basins, large intermountain basins), it is particularly suitable in wide flat regions, where subsurface structures have no surface expression. The Vel-IO 3D tool is composed by three scripts, written in Python 2.7.11, that automate i) the 3D instantaneous velocity model building, ii) the velocity model optimization, iii) the time-depth conversion. They determine a 3D geological model that is consistent with the primary geological constraints (e.g. depth of the markers on wells). The proposed workflow and the Vel-IO 3D tool have been tested, during the EU funded Project GeoMol, by the construction of the 3D geological model of a flat region, 5700 km2 in area, located in the central part of the Po Plain. The final 3D model showed the efficiency of the workflow and Vel-IO 3D tool in the management of large amount of data both in time and depth domain. A 4 layer-cake velocity model has been applied to a several thousand (5000-13,000 m) thick succession, with 15 horizons from Triassic up to Pleistocene, complicated by a Mesozoic extensional tectonics and by buried thrusts related to Southern Alps and Northern Apennines.

  19. Content and Workflow Management for Library Websites: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Holly, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Using database-driven web pages or web content management (WCM) systems to manage increasingly diverse web content and to streamline workflows is a commonly practiced solution recognized in libraries today. However, limited library web content management models and funding constraints prevent many libraries from purchasing commercially available…

  20. FluxCTTX: A LIMS-based tool for management and analysis of cytotoxicity assays data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytotoxicity assays have been used by researchers to screen for cytotoxicity in compound libraries. Researchers can either look for cytotoxic compounds or screen "hits" from initial high-throughput drug screens for unwanted cytotoxic effects before investing in their development as a pharmaceutical. These assays may be used as an alternative to animal experimentation and are becoming increasingly important in modern laboratories. However, the execution of these assays in large scale and different laboratories requires, among other things, the management of protocols, reagents, cell lines used as well as the data produced, which can be a challenge. The management of all this information is greatly improved by the utilization of computational tools to save time and guarantee quality. However, a tool that performs this task designed specifically for cytotoxicity assays is not yet available. Results In this work, we have used a workflow based LIMS -- the Flux system -- and the Together Workflow Editor as a framework to develop FluxCTTX, a tool for management of data from cytotoxicity assays performed at different laboratories. The main work is the development of a workflow, which represents all stages of the assay and has been developed and uploaded in Flux. This workflow models the activities of cytotoxicity assays performed as described in the OECD 129 Guidance Document. Conclusions FluxCTTX presents a solution for the management of the data produced by cytotoxicity assays performed at Interlaboratory comparisons. Its adoption will contribute to guarantee the quality of activities in the process of cytotoxicity tests and enforce the use of Good Laboratory Practices (GLP). Furthermore, the workflow developed is complete and can be adapted to other contexts and different tests for management of other types of data. PMID:26696462

  1. Cytoscape: the network visualization tool for GenomeSpace workflows.

    PubMed

    Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Reich, Michael; Liefeld, Ted; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Mesirov, Jill P

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic analysis often requires workflows incorporating multiple best-of-breed tools. GenomeSpace is a web-based visual workbench that combines a selection of these tools with mechanisms that create data flows between them. One such tool is Cytoscape 3, a popular application that enables analysis and visualization of graph-oriented genomic networks. As Cytoscape runs on the desktop, and not in a web browser, integrating it into GenomeSpace required special care in creating a seamless user experience and enabling appropriate data flows. In this paper, we present the design and operation of the Cytoscape GenomeSpace app, which accomplishes this integration, thereby providing critical analysis and visualization functionality for GenomeSpace users. It has been downloaded over 850 times since the release of its first version in September, 2013.

  2. Cytoscape: the network visualization tool for GenomeSpace workflows

    PubMed Central

    Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Reich, Michael; Liefeld, Ted; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic analysis often requires workflows incorporating multiple best-of-breed tools. GenomeSpace is a web-based visual workbench that combines a selection of these tools with mechanisms that create data flows between them. One such tool is Cytoscape 3, a popular application that enables analysis and visualization of graph-oriented genomic networks. As Cytoscape runs on the desktop, and not in a web browser, integrating it into GenomeSpace required special care in creating a seamless user experience and enabling appropriate data flows. In this paper, we present the design and operation of the Cytoscape GenomeSpace app, which accomplishes this integration, thereby providing critical analysis and visualization functionality for GenomeSpace users. It has been downloaded over 850 times since the release of its first version in September, 2013. PMID:25165537

  3. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-01-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:24462600

  4. Common Workflow Service: Standards Based Solution for Managing Operational Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinio, A. W.; Hollins, G. A.

    2017-06-01

    The Common Workflow Service is a collaborative and standards-based solution for managing mission operations processes using techniques from the Business Process Management (BPM) discipline. This presentation describes the CWS and its benefits.

  5. Contextual cloud-based service oriented architecture for clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Conde, Jesús; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Núñez-Benjumea, Francisco J; Parra-Calderón, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Given that acceptance of systems within the healthcare domain multiple papers highlighted the importance of integrating tools with the clinical workflow. This paper analyse how clinical context management could be deployed in order to promote the adoption of cloud advanced services and within the clinical workflow. This deployment will be able to be integrated with the eHealth European Interoperability Framework promoted specifications. Throughout this paper, it is proposed a cloud-based service-oriented architecture. This architecture will implement a context management system aligned with the HL7 standard known as CCOW.

  6. Workflows in bioinformatics: meta-analysis and prototype implementation of a workflow generator.

    PubMed

    Garcia Castro, Alexander; Thoraval, Samuel; Garcia, Leyla J; Ragan, Mark A

    2005-04-07

    Computational methods for problem solving need to interleave information access and algorithm execution in a problem-specific workflow. The structures of these workflows are defined by a scaffold of syntactic, semantic and algebraic objects capable of representing them. Despite the proliferation of GUIs (Graphic User Interfaces) in bioinformatics, only some of them provide workflow capabilities; surprisingly, no meta-analysis of workflow operators and components in bioinformatics has been reported. We present a set of syntactic components and algebraic operators capable of representing analytical workflows in bioinformatics. Iteration, recursion, the use of conditional statements, and management of suspend/resume tasks have traditionally been implemented on an ad hoc basis and hard-coded; by having these operators properly defined it is possible to use and parameterize them as generic re-usable components. To illustrate how these operations can be orchestrated, we present GPIPE, a prototype graphic pipeline generator for PISE that allows the definition of a pipeline, parameterization of its component methods, and storage of metadata in XML formats. This implementation goes beyond the macro capacities currently in PISE. As the entire analysis protocol is defined in XML, a complete bioinformatic experiment (linked sets of methods, parameters and results) can be reproduced or shared among users. http://if-web1.imb.uq.edu.au/Pise/5.a/gpipe.html (interactive), ftp://ftp.pasteur.fr/pub/GenSoft/unix/misc/Pise/ (download). From our meta-analysis we have identified syntactic structures and algebraic operators common to many workflows in bioinformatics. The workflow components and algebraic operators can be assimilated into re-usable software components. GPIPE, a prototype implementation of this framework, provides a GUI builder to facilitate the generation of workflows and integration of heterogeneous analytical tools.

  7. A Two-Stage Probabilistic Approach to Manage Personal Worklist in Workflow Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Rui; Liu, Yingbo; Wen, Lijie; Wang, Jianmin

    The application of workflow scheduling in managing individual actor's personal worklist is one area that can bring great improvement to business process. However, current deterministic work cannot adapt to the dynamics and uncertainties in the management of personal worklist. For such an issue, this paper proposes a two-stage probabilistic approach which aims at assisting actors to flexibly manage their personal worklists. To be specific, the approach analyzes every activity instance's continuous probability of satisfying deadline at the first stage. Based on this stochastic analysis result, at the second stage, an innovative scheduling strategy is proposed to minimize the overall deadline violation cost for an actor's personal worklist. Simultaneously, the strategy recommends the actor a feasible worklist of activity instances which meet the required bottom line of successful execution. The effectiveness of our approach is evaluated in a real-world workflow management system and with large scale simulation experiments.

  8. Progress in digital color workflow understanding in the International Color Consortium (ICC) Workflow WG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The ICC Workflow WG serves as the bridge between ICC color management technologies and use of those technologies in real world color production applications. ICC color management is applicable to and is used in a wide range of color systems, from highly specialized digital cinema color special effects to high volume publications printing to home photography. The ICC Workflow WG works to align ICC technologies so that the color management needs of these diverse use case systems are addressed in an open, platform independent manner. This report provides a high level summary of the ICC Workflow WG objectives and work to date, focusing on the ways in which workflow can impact image quality and color systems performance. The 'ICC Workflow Primitives' and 'ICC Workflow Patterns and Dimensions' workflow models are covered in some detail. Consider the questions, "How much of dissatisfaction with color management today is the result of 'the wrong color transformation at the wrong time' and 'I can't get to the right conversion at the right point in my work process'?" Put another way, consider how image quality through a workflow can be negatively affected when the coordination and control level of the color management system is not sufficient.

  9. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-06-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Scientist-Centered Workflow Abstractions via Generic Actors, Workflow Templates, and Context-Awareness for Groundwater Modeling and Analysis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chin, George; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-07-04

    A drawback of existing scientific workflow systems is the lack of support to domain scientists in designing and executing their own scientific workflows. Many domain scientists avoid developing and using workflows because the basic objects of workflows are too low-level and high-level tools and mechanisms to aid in workflow construction and use are largely unavailable. In our research, we are prototyping higher-level abstractions and tools to better support scientists in their workflow activities. Specifically, we are developing generic actors that provide abstract interfaces to specific functionality, workflow templates that encapsulate workflow and data patterns that can be reused and adaptedmore » by scientists, and context-awareness mechanisms to gather contextual information from the workflow environment on behalf of the scientist. To evaluate these scientist-centered abstractions on real problems, we apply them to construct and execute scientific workflows in the specific domain area of groundwater modeling and analysis.« less

  11. Workflow technology: the new frontier. How to overcome the barriers and join the future.

    PubMed

    Shefter, Susan M

    2006-01-01

    Hospitals are catching up to the business world in the introduction of technology systems that support professional practice and workflow. The field of case management is highly complex and interrelates with diverse groups in diverse locations. The last few years have seen the introduction of Workflow Technology Tools, which can improve the quality and efficiency of discharge planning by the case manager. Despite the availability of these wonderful new programs, many case managers are hesitant to adopt the new technology and workflow. For a myriad of reasons, a computer-based workflow system can seem like a brick wall. This article discusses, from a practitioner's point of view, how professionals can gain confidence and skill to get around the brick wall and join the future.

  12. Questioned document workflow for handwriting with automated tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Krishnanand; Srihari, Sargur N.; Srinivasan, Harish

    2012-01-01

    During the last few years many document recognition methods have been developed to determine whether a handwriting specimen can be attributed to a known writer. However, in practice, the work-flow of the document examiner continues to be manual-intensive. Before a systematic or computational, approach can be developed, an articulation of the steps involved in handwriting comparison is needed. We describe the work flow of handwritten questioned document examination, as described in a standards manual, and the steps where existing automation tools can be used. A well-known ransom note case is considered as an example, where one encounters testing for multiple writers of the same document, determining whether the writing is disguised, known writing is formal while questioned writing is informal, etc. The findings for the particular ransom note case using the tools are given. Also observations are made for developing a more fully automated approach to handwriting examination.

  13. Towards seamless workflows in agile data science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J. F.; Robertson, J.

    2017-12-01

    Agile workflows are a response to projects with requirements that may change over time. They prioritise rapid and flexible responses to change, preferring to adapt to changes in requirements rather than predict them before a project starts. This suits the needs of research very well because research is inherently agile in its methodology. The adoption of agile methods has made collaborative data analysis much easier in a research environment fragmented across institutional data stores, HPC, personal and lab computers and more recently cloud environments. Agile workflows use tools that share a common worldview: in an agile environment, there may be more that one valid version of data, code or environment in play at any given time. All of these versions need references and identifiers. For example, a team of developers following the git-flow conventions (github.com/nvie/gitflow) may have several active branches, one for each strand of development. These workflows allow rapid and parallel iteration while maintaining identifiers pointing to individual snapshots of data and code and allowing rapid switching between strands. In contrast, the current focus of versioning in research data management is geared towards managing data for reproducibility and long-term preservation of the record of science. While both are important goals in the persistent curation domain of the institutional research data infrastructure, current tools emphasise planning over adaptation and can introduce unwanted rigidity by insisting on a single valid version or point of truth. In the collaborative curation domain of a research project, things are more fluid. However, there is no equivalent to the "versioning iso-surface" of the git protocol for the management and versioning of research data. At CSIRO we are developing concepts and tools for the agile management of software code and research data for virtual research environments, based on our experiences of actual data analytics projects in the

  14. Support for Taverna workflows in the VPH-Share cloud platform.

    PubMed

    Kasztelnik, Marek; Coto, Ernesto; Bubak, Marian; Malawski, Maciej; Nowakowski, Piotr; Arenas, Juan; Saglimbeni, Alfredo; Testi, Debora; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2017-07-01

    To address the increasing need for collaborative endeavours within the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) community, the VPH-Share collaborative cloud platform allows researchers to expose and share sequences of complex biomedical processing tasks in the form of computational workflows. The Taverna Workflow System is a very popular tool for orchestrating complex biomedical & bioinformatics processing tasks in the VPH community. This paper describes the VPH-Share components that support the building and execution of Taverna workflows, and explains how they interact with other VPH-Share components to improve the capabilities of the VPH-Share platform. Taverna workflow support is delivered by the Atmosphere cloud management platform and the VPH-Share Taverna plugin. These components are explained in detail, along with the two main procedures that were developed to enable this seamless integration: workflow composition and execution. 1) Seamless integration of VPH-Share with other components and systems. 2) Extended range of different tools for workflows. 3) Successful integration of scientific workflows from other VPH projects. 4) Execution speed improvement for medical applications. The presented workflow integration provides VPH-Share users with a wide range of different possibilities to compose and execute workflows, such as desktop or online composition, online batch execution, multithreading, remote execution, etc. The specific advantages of each supported tool are presented, as are the roles of Atmosphere and the VPH-Share plugin within the VPH-Share project. The combination of the VPH-Share plugin and Atmosphere engenders the VPH-Share infrastructure with far more flexible, powerful and usable capabilities for the VPH-Share community. As both components can continue to evolve and improve independently, we acknowledge that further improvements are still to be developed and will be described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An ontology-based framework for bioinformatics workflows.

    PubMed

    Digiampietri, Luciano A; Perez-Alcazar, Jose de J; Medeiros, Claudia Bauzer

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of bioinformatics activities brings new challenges - how to understand and organise these resources, how to exchange and reuse successful experimental procedures, and to provide interoperability among data and tools. This paper describes an effort toward these directions. It is based on combining research on ontology management, AI and scientific workflows to design, reuse and annotate bioinformatics experiments. The resulting framework supports automatic or interactive composition of tasks based on AI planning techniques and takes advantage of ontologies to support the specification and annotation of bioinformatics workflows. We validate our proposal with a prototype running on real data.

  16. Web-Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Roelof Versteeg; Roelof Versteeg; Trevor Rowe

    2006-03-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a web accessible scientific workflow system for environmental monitoring. This workflow environment integrates distributed, automated data acquisition with server side data management and information visualization through flexible browser based data access tools. Component technologies include a rich browser-based client (using dynamic Javascript and HTML/CSS) for data selection, a back-end server which uses PHP for data processing, user management, and result delivery, and third party applications which are invoked by the back-end using webservices. This environment allows for reproducible, transparent result generation by a diverse user base. It has been implemented for several monitoringmore » systems with different degrees of complexity.« less

  17. Scientific workflows as productivity tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shon, John; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Hammer, Juergen

    2008-05-01

    Large pharmaceutical companies annually invest tens to hundreds of millions of US dollars in research informatics to support their early drug discovery processes. Traditionally, most of these investments are designed to increase the efficiency of drug discovery. The introduction of do-it-yourself scientific workflow platforms has enabled research informatics organizations to shift their efforts toward scientific innovation, ultimately resulting in a possible increase in return on their investments. Unlike the handling of most scientific data and application integration approaches, researchers apply scientific workflows to in silico experimentation and exploration, leading to scientific discoveries that lie beyond automation and integration. This review highlights some key requirements for scientific workflow environments in the pharmaceutical industry that are necessary for increasing research productivity. Examples of the application of scientific workflows in research and a summary of recent platform advances are also provided.

  18. DataUp: Helping manage and archive data within the researcher's workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, C.

    2012-12-01

    There are many barriers to data management and sharing among earth and environmental scientists; among the most significant are lacks of knowledge about best practices for data management, metadata standards, or appropriate data repositories for archiving and sharing data. We have developed an open-source add-in for Excel and an open source web application intended to help researchers overcome these barriers. DataUp helps scientists to (1) determine whether their file is CSV compatible, (2) generate metadata in a standard format, (3) retrieve an identifier to facilitate data citation, and (4) deposit their data into a repository. The researcher does not need a prior relationship with a data repository to use DataUp; the newly implemented ONEShare repository, a DataONE member node, is available for any researcher to archive and share their data. By meeting researchers where they already work, in spreadsheets, DataUp becomes part of the researcher's workflow and data management and sharing becomes easier. Future enhancement of DataUp will rely on members of the community adopting and adapting the DataUp tools to meet their unique needs, including connecting to analytical tools, adding new metadata schema, and expanding the list of connected data repositories. DataUp is a collaborative project between Microsoft Research Connections, the University of California's California Digital Library, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and DataONE.

  19. Pegasus Workflow Management System: Helping Applications From Earth and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, G.; Deelman, E.; Vahi, K.; Silva, F.

    2010-12-01

    Pegasus WMS is a Workflow Management System that can manage large-scale scientific workflows across Grid, local and Cloud resources simultaneously. Pegasus WMS provides a means for representing the workflow of an application in an abstract XML form, agnostic of the resources available to run it and the location of data and executables. It then compiles these workflows into concrete plans by querying catalogs and farming computations across local and distributed computing resources, as well as emerging commercial and community cloud environments in an easy and reliable manner. Pegasus WMS optimizes the execution as well as data movement by leveraging existing Grid and cloud technologies via a flexible pluggable interface and provides advanced features like reusing existing data, automatic cleanup of generated data, and recursive workflows with deferred planning. It also captures all the provenance of the workflow from the planning stage to the execution of the generated data, helping scientists to accurately measure performance metrics of their workflow as well as data reproducibility issues. Pegasus WMS was initially developed as part of the GriPhyN project to support large-scale high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments. Direct funding from the NSF enabled support for a wide variety of applications from diverse domains including earthquake simulation, bacterial RNA studies, helioseismology and ocean modeling. Earthquake Simulation: Pegasus WMS was recently used in a large scale production run in 2009 by the Southern California Earthquake Centre to run 192 million loosely coupled tasks and about 2000 tightly coupled MPI style tasks on National Cyber infrastructure for generating a probabilistic seismic hazard map of the Southern California region. SCEC ran 223 workflows over a period of eight weeks, using on average 4,420 cores, with a peak of 14,540 cores. A total of 192 million files were produced totaling about 165TB out of which 11TB of data was saved

  20. Workflow-Based Software Development Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Software Developer's Assistant (SDA) helps software teams more efficiently and accurately conduct or execute software processes associated with NASA mission-critical software. SDA is a process enactment platform that guides software teams through project-specific standards, processes, and procedures. Software projects are decomposed into all of their required process steps or tasks, and each task is assigned to project personnel. SDA orchestrates the performance of work required to complete all process tasks in the correct sequence. The software then notifies team members when they may begin work on their assigned tasks and provides the tools, instructions, reference materials, and supportive artifacts that allow users to compliantly perform the work. A combination of technology components captures and enacts any software process use to support the software lifecycle. It creates an adaptive workflow environment that can be modified as needed. SDA achieves software process automation through a Business Process Management (BPM) approach to managing the software lifecycle for mission-critical projects. It contains five main parts: TieFlow (workflow engine), Business Rules (rules to alter process flow), Common Repository (storage for project artifacts, versions, history, schedules, etc.), SOA (interface to allow internal, GFE, or COTS tools integration), and the Web Portal Interface (collaborative web environment

  1. Data and Workflow Management Challenges in Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Orsvuran, R.; Krischer, L.; Chen, Y.; Balasubramanian, V.; Hill, J.; Turilli, M.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Jha, S.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    It is crucial to take the complete physics of wave propagation into account in seismic tomography to further improve the resolution of tomographic images. The adjoint method is an efficient way of incorporating 3D wave simulations in seismic tomography. However, global adjoint tomography is computationally expensive, requiring thousands of wavefield simulations and massive data processing. Through our collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) computing group and an allocation on Titan, ORNL's GPU-accelerated supercomputer, we are now performing our global inversions by assimilating waveform data from over 1,000 earthquakes. The first challenge we encountered is dealing with the sheer amount of seismic data. Data processing based on conventional data formats and processing tools (such as SAC), which are not designed for parallel systems, becomes our major bottleneck. To facilitate the data processing procedures, we designed the Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) and developed a set of Python-based processing tools to replace legacy FORTRAN-based software. These tools greatly enhance reproducibility and accountability while taking full advantage of highly parallel system and showing superior scaling on modern computational platforms. The second challenge is that the data processing workflow contains more than 10 sub-procedures, making it delicate to handle and prone to human mistakes. To reduce human intervention as much as possible, we are developing a framework specifically designed for seismic inversion based on the state-of-the art workflow management research, specifically the Ensemble Toolkit (EnTK), in collaboration with the RADICAL team from Rutgers University. Using the initial developments of the EnTK, we are able to utilize the full computing power of the data processing cluster RHEA at ORNL while keeping human interaction to a minimum and greatly reducing the data processing time. Thanks to all the improvements, we are now able to

  2. Integrated workflows for spiking neuronal network simulations

    PubMed Central

    Antolík, Ján; Davison, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of computational resources is enabling more detailed, realistic modeling in computational neuroscience, resulting in a shift toward more heterogeneous models of neuronal circuits, and employment of complex experimental protocols. This poses a challenge for existing tool chains, as the set of tools involved in a typical modeler's workflow is expanding concomitantly, with growing complexity in the metadata flowing between them. For many parts of the workflow, a range of tools is available; however, numerous areas lack dedicated tools, while integration of existing tools is limited. This forces modelers to either handle the workflow manually, leading to errors, or to write substantial amounts of code to automate parts of the workflow, in both cases reducing their productivity. To address these issues, we have developed Mozaik: a workflow system for spiking neuronal network simulations written in Python. Mozaik integrates model, experiment and stimulation specification, simulation execution, data storage, data analysis and visualization into a single automated workflow, ensuring that all relevant metadata are available to all workflow components. It is based on several existing tools, including PyNN, Neo, and Matplotlib. It offers a declarative way to specify models and recording configurations using hierarchically organized configuration files. Mozaik automatically records all data together with all relevant metadata about the experimental context, allowing automation of the analysis and visualization stages. Mozaik has a modular architecture, and the existing modules are designed to be extensible with minimal programming effort. Mozaik increases the productivity of running virtual experiments on highly structured neuronal networks by automating the entire experimental cycle, while increasing the reliability of modeling studies by relieving the user from manual handling of the flow of metadata between the individual workflow stages. PMID

  3. Integrated workflows for spiking neuronal network simulations.

    PubMed

    Antolík, Ján; Davison, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of computational resources is enabling more detailed, realistic modeling in computational neuroscience, resulting in a shift toward more heterogeneous models of neuronal circuits, and employment of complex experimental protocols. This poses a challenge for existing tool chains, as the set of tools involved in a typical modeler's workflow is expanding concomitantly, with growing complexity in the metadata flowing between them. For many parts of the workflow, a range of tools is available; however, numerous areas lack dedicated tools, while integration of existing tools is limited. This forces modelers to either handle the workflow manually, leading to errors, or to write substantial amounts of code to automate parts of the workflow, in both cases reducing their productivity. To address these issues, we have developed Mozaik: a workflow system for spiking neuronal network simulations written in Python. Mozaik integrates model, experiment and stimulation specification, simulation execution, data storage, data analysis and visualization into a single automated workflow, ensuring that all relevant metadata are available to all workflow components. It is based on several existing tools, including PyNN, Neo, and Matplotlib. It offers a declarative way to specify models and recording configurations using hierarchically organized configuration files. Mozaik automatically records all data together with all relevant metadata about the experimental context, allowing automation of the analysis and visualization stages. Mozaik has a modular architecture, and the existing modules are designed to be extensible with minimal programming effort. Mozaik increases the productivity of running virtual experiments on highly structured neuronal networks by automating the entire experimental cycle, while increasing the reliability of modeling studies by relieving the user from manual handling of the flow of metadata between the individual workflow stages.

  4. Integrating the Allen Brain Institute Cell Types Database into Automated Neuroscience Workflow.

    PubMed

    Stockton, David B; Santamaria, Fidel

    2017-10-01

    We developed software tools to download, extract features, and organize the Cell Types Database from the Allen Brain Institute (ABI) in order to integrate its whole cell patch clamp characterization data into the automated modeling/data analysis cycle. To expand the potential user base we employed both Python and MATLAB. The basic set of tools downloads selected raw data and extracts cell, sweep, and spike features, using ABI's feature extraction code. To facilitate data manipulation we added a tool to build a local specialized database of raw data plus extracted features. Finally, to maximize automation, we extended our NeuroManager workflow automation suite to include these tools plus a separate investigation database. The extended suite allows the user to integrate ABI experimental and modeling data into an automated workflow deployed on heterogeneous computer infrastructures, from local servers, to high performance computing environments, to the cloud. Since our approach is focused on workflow procedures our tools can be modified to interact with the increasing number of neuroscience databases being developed to cover all scales and properties of the nervous system.

  5. A PDA study management tool (SMT) utilizing wireless broadband and full DICOM viewing capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge; Liu, Brent; Zhou, Zheng; Huang, H. K.; Documet, Luis

    2007-03-01

    During the last 4 years IPI (Image Processing and Informatics) Laboratory has been developing a web-based Study Management Tool (SMT) application that allows Radiologists, Film librarians and PACS-related (Picture Archiving and Communication System) users to dynamically and remotely perform Query/Retrieve operations in a PACS network. The users utilizing a regular PDA (Personal Digital Assistant) can remotely query a PACS archive to distribute any study to an existing DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) node. This application which has proven to be convenient to manage the Study Workflow [1, 2] has been extended to include a DICOM viewing capability in the PDA. With this new feature, users can take a quick view of DICOM images providing them mobility and convenience at the same time. In addition, we are extending this application to Metropolitan-Area Wireless Broadband Networks. This feature requires Smart Phones that are capable of working as a PDA and have access to Broadband Wireless Services. With the extended application to wireless broadband technology and the preview of DICOM images, the Study Management Tool becomes an even more powerful tool for clinical workflow management.

  6. SynTrack: DNA Assembly Workflow Management (SynTrack) v2.0.1

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    MENG, XIANWEI; SIMIRENKO, LISA

    2016-12-01

    SynTrack is a dynamic, workflow-driven data management system that tracks the DNA build process: Management of the hierarchical relationships of the DNA fragments; Monitoring of process tasks for the assembly of multiple DNA fragments into final constructs; Creations of vendor order forms with selectable building blocks. Organizing plate layouts barcodes for vendor/pcr/fusion/chewback/bioassay/glycerol/master plate maps (default/condensed); Creating or updating Pre-Assembly/Assembly process workflows with selected building blocks; Generating Echo pooling instructions based on plate maps; Tracking of building block orders, received and final assembled for delivering; Bulk updating of colony or PCR amplification information, fusion PCR and chewback results; Updating with QA/QCmore » outcome with .csv & .xlsx template files; Re-work assembly workflow enabled before and after sequencing validation; and Tracking of plate/well data changes and status updates and reporting of master plate status with QC outcomes.« less

  7. Radiology information system: a workflow-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyan; Lu, Xudong; Nie, Hongchao; Huang, Zhengxing; van der Aalst, W M P

    2009-09-01

    Introducing workflow management technology in healthcare seems to be prospective in dealing with the problem that the current healthcare Information Systems cannot provide sufficient support for the process management, although several challenges still exist. The purpose of this paper is to study the method of developing workflow-based information system in radiology department as a use case. First, a workflow model of typical radiology process was established. Second, based on the model, the system could be designed and implemented as a group of loosely coupled components. Each component corresponded to one task in the process and could be assembled by the workflow management system. The legacy systems could be taken as special components, which also corresponded to the tasks and were integrated through transferring non-work- flow-aware interfaces to the standard ones. Finally, a workflow dashboard was designed and implemented to provide an integral view of radiology processes. The workflow-based Radiology Information System was deployed in the radiology department of Zhejiang Chinese Medicine Hospital in China. The results showed that it could be adjusted flexibly in response to the needs of changing process, and enhance the process management in the department. It can also provide a more workflow-aware integration method, comparing with other methods such as IHE-based ones. The workflow-based approach is a new method of developing radiology information system with more flexibility, more functionalities of process management and more workflow-aware integration. The work of this paper is an initial endeavor for introducing workflow management technology in healthcare.

  8. Managing Written Directives: A Software Solution to Streamline Workflow.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert H; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Gabriel, Medhat S; Halama, James R; Bova, Davide

    2017-06-01

    A written directive is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for any use of 131 I above 1.11 MBq (30 μCi) and for patients receiving radiopharmaceutical therapy. This requirement has also been adopted and must be enforced by the agreement states. As the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals increases therapeutic options in nuclear medicine, time spent on regulatory paperwork also increases. The pressure of managing these time-consuming regulatory requirements may heighten the potential for inaccurate or incomplete directive data and subsequent regulatory violations. To improve on the paper-trail method of directive management, we created a software tool using a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant database. This software allows for secure data-sharing among physicians, technologists, and managers while saving time, reducing errors, and eliminating the possibility of loss and duplication. Methods: The software tool was developed using Visual Basic, which is part of the Visual Studio development environment for the Windows platform. Patient data are deposited in an Access database on a local HIPAA-compliant secure server or hard disk. Once a working version had been developed, it was installed at our institution and used to manage directives. Updates and modifications of the software were released regularly until no more significant problems were found with its operation. Results: The software has been used at our institution for over 2 y and has reliably kept track of all directives. All physicians and technologists use the software daily and find it superior to paper directives. They can retrieve active directives at any stage of completion, as well as completed directives. Conclusion: We have developed a software solution for the management of written directives that streamlines and structures the departmental workflow. This solution saves time, centralizes the information for all staff to share, and decreases

  9. Workflow management in large distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, I.; Newman, H.; Voicu, R.; Dobre, C.; Grigoras, C.

    2011-12-01

    The MonALISA (Monitoring Agents using a Large Integrated Services Architecture) framework provides a distributed service system capable of controlling and optimizing large-scale, data-intensive applications. An essential part of managing large-scale, distributed data-processing facilities is a monitoring system for computing facilities, storage, networks, and the very large number of applications running on these systems in near realtime. All this monitoring information gathered for all the subsystems is essential for developing the required higher-level services—the components that provide decision support and some degree of automated decisions—and for maintaining and optimizing workflow in large-scale distributed systems. These management and global optimization functions are performed by higher-level agent-based services. We present several applications of MonALISA's higher-level services including optimized dynamic routing, control, data-transfer scheduling, distributed job scheduling, dynamic allocation of storage resource to running jobs and automated management of remote services among a large set of grid facilities.

  10. A standard-enabled workflow for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Myers, Chris J; Beal, Jacob; Gorochowski, Thomas E; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Madsen, Curtis; McLaughlin, James Alastair; Mısırlı, Göksel; Nguyen, Tramy; Oberortner, Ernst; Samineni, Meher; Wipat, Anil; Zhang, Michael; Zundel, Zach

    2017-06-15

    A synthetic biology workflow is composed of data repositories that provide information about genetic parts, sequence-level design tools to compose these parts into circuits, visualization tools to depict these designs, genetic design tools to select parts to create systems, and modeling and simulation tools to evaluate alternative design choices. Data standards enable the ready exchange of information within such a workflow, allowing repositories and tools to be connected from a diversity of sources. The present paper describes one such workflow that utilizes, among others, the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) to describe genetic designs, the Systems Biology Markup Language to model these designs, and SBOL Visual to visualize these designs. We describe how a standard-enabled workflow can be used to produce types of design information, including multiple repositories and software tools exchanging information using a variety of data standards. Recently, the ACS Synthetic Biology journal has recommended the use of SBOL in their publications. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Generic worklist handler for workflow-enabled products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Joachim; Meetz, Kirsten; Wendler, Thomas

    1999-07-01

    Workflow management (WfM) is an emerging field of medical information technology. It appears as a promising key technology to model, optimize and automate processes, for the sake of improved efficiency, reduced costs and improved patient care. The Application of WfM concepts requires the standardization of architectures and interfaces. A component of central interest proposed in this report is a generic work list handler: A standardized interface between a workflow enactment service and application system. Application systems with embedded work list handlers will be called 'Workflow Enabled Application Systems'. In this paper we discus functional requirements of work list handlers, as well as their integration into workflow architectures and interfaces. To lay the foundation for this specification, basic workflow terminology, the fundamentals of workflow management and - later in the paper - the available standards as defined by the Workflow Management Coalition are briefly reviewed.

  12. From the desktop to the grid: scalable bioinformatics via workflow conversion.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Luis; Veit, Johannes; Szolek, Andras; Röttig, Marc; Aiche, Stephan; Gesing, Sandra; Reinert, Knut; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-03-12

    Reproducibility is one of the tenets of the scientific method. Scientific experiments often comprise complex data flows, selection of adequate parameters, and analysis and visualization of intermediate and end results. Breaking down the complexity of such experiments into the joint collaboration of small, repeatable, well defined tasks, each with well defined inputs, parameters, and outputs, offers the immediate benefit of identifying bottlenecks, pinpoint sections which could benefit from parallelization, among others. Workflows rest upon the notion of splitting complex work into the joint effort of several manageable tasks. There are several engines that give users the ability to design and execute workflows. Each engine was created to address certain problems of a specific community, therefore each one has its advantages and shortcomings. Furthermore, not all features of all workflow engines are royalty-free -an aspect that could potentially drive away members of the scientific community. We have developed a set of tools that enables the scientific community to benefit from workflow interoperability. We developed a platform-free structured representation of parameters, inputs, outputs of command-line tools in so-called Common Tool Descriptor documents. We have also overcome the shortcomings and combined the features of two royalty-free workflow engines with a substantial user community: the Konstanz Information Miner, an engine which we see as a formidable workflow editor, and the Grid and User Support Environment, a web-based framework able to interact with several high-performance computing resources. We have thus created a free and highly accessible way to design workflows on a desktop computer and execute them on high-performance computing resources. Our work will not only reduce time spent on designing scientific workflows, but also make executing workflows on remote high-performance computing resources more accessible to technically inexperienced users. We

  13. Tigres Workflow Library: Supporting Scientific Pipelines on HPC Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hendrix, Valerie; Fox, James; Ghoshal, Devarshi; ...

    2016-07-21

    The growth in scientific data volumes has resulted in the need for new tools that enable users to operate on and analyze data on large-scale resources. In the last decade, a number of scientific workflow tools have emerged. These tools often target distributed environments, and often need expert help to compose and execute the workflows. Data-intensive workflows are often ad-hoc, they involve an iterative development process that includes users composing and testing their workflows on desktops, and scaling up to larger systems. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of Tigres, a workflow library that supports the iterativemore » workflow development cycle of data-intensive workflows. Tigres provides an application programming interface to a set of programming templates i.e., sequence, parallel, split, merge, that can be used to compose and execute computational and data pipelines. We discuss the results of our evaluation of scientific and synthetic workflows showing Tigres performs with minimal template overheads (mean of 13 seconds over all experiments). We also discuss various factors (e.g., I/O performance, execution mechanisms) that affect the performance of scientific workflows on HPC systems.« less

  14. Tigres Workflow Library: Supporting Scientific Pipelines on HPC Systems

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hendrix, Valerie; Fox, James; Ghoshal, Devarshi

    The growth in scientific data volumes has resulted in the need for new tools that enable users to operate on and analyze data on large-scale resources. In the last decade, a number of scientific workflow tools have emerged. These tools often target distributed environments, and often need expert help to compose and execute the workflows. Data-intensive workflows are often ad-hoc, they involve an iterative development process that includes users composing and testing their workflows on desktops, and scaling up to larger systems. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of Tigres, a workflow library that supports the iterativemore » workflow development cycle of data-intensive workflows. Tigres provides an application programming interface to a set of programming templates i.e., sequence, parallel, split, merge, that can be used to compose and execute computational and data pipelines. We discuss the results of our evaluation of scientific and synthetic workflows showing Tigres performs with minimal template overheads (mean of 13 seconds over all experiments). We also discuss various factors (e.g., I/O performance, execution mechanisms) that affect the performance of scientific workflows on HPC systems.« less

  15. Metaworkflows and Workflow Interoperability for Heliophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierantoni, Gabriele; Carley, Eoin P.

    2014-06-01

    Heliophysics is a relatively new branch of physics that investigates the relationship between the Sun and the other bodies of the solar system. To investigate such relationships, heliophysicists can rely on various tools developed by the community. Some of these tools are on-line catalogues that list events (such as Coronal Mass Ejections, CMEs) and their characteristics as they were observed on the surface of the Sun or on the other bodies of the Solar System. Other tools offer on-line data analysis and access to images and data catalogues. During their research, heliophysicists often perform investigations that need to coordinate several of these services and to repeat these complex operations until the phenomena under investigation are fully analyzed. Heliophysicists combine the results of these services; this service orchestration is best suited for workflows. This approach has been investigated in the HELIO project. The HELIO project developed an infrastructure for a Virtual Observatory for Heliophysics and implemented service orchestration using TAVERNA workflows. HELIO developed a set of workflows that proved to be useful but lacked flexibility and re-usability. The TAVERNA workflows also needed to be executed directly in TAVERNA workbench, and this forced all users to learn how to use the workbench. Within the SCI-BUS and ER-FLOW projects, we have started an effort to re-think and re-design the heliophysics workflows with the aim of fostering re-usability and ease of use. We base our approach on two key concepts, that of meta-workflows and that of workflow interoperability. We have divided the produced workflows in three different layers. The first layer is Basic Workflows, developed both in the TAVERNA and WS-PGRADE languages. They are building blocks that users compose to address their scientific challenges. They implement well-defined Use Cases that usually involve only one service. The second layer is Science Workflows usually developed in TAVERNA. They

  16. Innovations in Medication Preparation Safety and Wastage Reduction: Use of a Workflow Management System in a Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen Jerome; Hurtado, Josephine; Nguyen, Rosemary; Huynh, Tran; Lindon, Ivan; Hudnall, Cedric; Bork, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Background: USP <797> regulatory requirements have mandated that pharmacies improve aseptic techniques and cleanliness of the medication preparation areas. In addition, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) recommends that technology and automation be used as much as possible for preparing and verifying compounded sterile products. Objective: To determine the benefits associated with the implementation of the workflow management system, such as reducing medication preparation and delivery errors, reducing quantity and frequency of medication errors, avoiding costs, and enhancing the organization's decision to move toward positive patient identification (PPID). Methods: At Texas Children's Hospital, data were collected and analyzed from January 2014 through August 2014 in the pharmacy areas in which the workflow management system would be implemented. Data were excluded for September 2014 during the workflow management system oral liquid implementation phase. Data were collected and analyzed from October 2014 through June 2015 to determine whether the implementation of the workflow management system reduced the quantity and frequency of reported medication errors. Data collected and analyzed during the study period included the quantity of doses prepared, number of incorrect medication scans, number of doses discontinued from the workflow management system queue, and the number of doses rejected. Data were collected and analyzed to identify patterns of incorrect medication scans, to determine reasons for rejected medication doses, and to determine the reduction in wasted medications. Results: During the 17-month study period, the pharmacy department dispensed 1,506,220 oral liquid and injectable medication doses. From October 2014 through June 2015, the pharmacy department dispensed 826,220 medication doses that were prepared and checked via the workflow management system. Of those 826,220 medication doses, there were 16 reported incorrect volume errors

  17. RABIX: AN OPEN-SOURCE WORKFLOW EXECUTOR SUPPORTING RECOMPUTABILITY AND INTEROPERABILITY OF WORKFLOW DESCRIPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Ivkovic, Sinisa; Simonovic, Janko; Tijanic, Nebojsa; Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi; Kural, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    As biomedical data has become increasingly easy to generate in large quantities, the methods used to analyze it have proliferated rapidly. Reproducible and reusable methods are required to learn from large volumes of data reliably. To address this issue, numerous groups have developed workflow specifications or execution engines, which provide a framework with which to perform a sequence of analyses. One such specification is the Common Workflow Language, an emerging standard which provides a robust and flexible framework for describing data analysis tools and workflows. In addition, reproducibility can be furthered by executors or workflow engines which interpret the specification and enable additional features, such as error logging, file organization, optimizations1 to computation and job scheduling, and allow for easy computing on large volumes of data. To this end, we have developed the Rabix Executor a , an open-source workflow engine for the purposes of improving reproducibility through reusability and interoperability of workflow descriptions. PMID:27896971

  18. RABIX: AN OPEN-SOURCE WORKFLOW EXECUTOR SUPPORTING RECOMPUTABILITY AND INTEROPERABILITY OF WORKFLOW DESCRIPTIONS.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Ivkovic, Sinisa; Simonovic, Janko; Tijanic, Nebojsa; Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi; Kural, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    As biomedical data has become increasingly easy to generate in large quantities, the methods used to analyze it have proliferated rapidly. Reproducible and reusable methods are required to learn from large volumes of data reliably. To address this issue, numerous groups have developed workflow specifications or execution engines, which provide a framework with which to perform a sequence of analyses. One such specification is the Common Workflow Language, an emerging standard which provides a robust and flexible framework for describing data analysis tools and workflows. In addition, reproducibility can be furthered by executors or workflow engines which interpret the specification and enable additional features, such as error logging, file organization, optim1izations to computation and job scheduling, and allow for easy computing on large volumes of data. To this end, we have developed the Rabix Executor, an open-source workflow engine for the purposes of improving reproducibility through reusability and interoperability of workflow descriptions.

  19. Flexible Early Warning Systems with Workflows and Decision Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, F.; Chaves, F.; Zeiner, H.

    2012-04-01

    are usually only suited for rigid processes. We show how improvements can be achieved by using decision tables and rule-based adaptive workflows. Decision tables have been shown to be an intuitive tool that can be used by domain experts to express rule sets that can be interpreted automatically at runtime. Adaptive workflows use a rule-based approach to increase the flexibility of workflows by providing mechanisms to adapt workflows based on context changes, human intervention and availability of services. The combination of workflows, decision tables and rule-based adaption creates a framework that opens up new possibilities for flexible and adaptable workflows, especially, for use in early warning and crisis management systems.

  20. Rethinking Clinical Workflow.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Burdick, Kendall; Baum, Sarah; Bellomy, Melissa; Mueller, Dorothee; MacDonald, Alistair; Chern, Alex; Chrouser, Kristin; Burger, Christie

    2018-03-01

    The concept of clinical workflow borrows from management and leadership principles outside of medicine. The only way to rethink clinical workflow is to understand the neuroscience principles that underlie attention and vigilance. With any implementation to improve practice, there are human factors that can promote or impede progress. Modulating the environment and working as a team to take care of patients is paramount. Clinicians must continually rethink clinical workflow, evaluate progress, and understand that other industries have something to offer. Then, novel approaches can be implemented to take the best care of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CERES AuTomAted job Loading SYSTem (CATALYST): An automated workflow manager for satellite data production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, J. L.; Hillyer, T. N.; Wilkins, J.

    2012-12-01

    The CERES Science Team integrates data from 5 CERES instruments onboard the Terra, Aqua and NPP missions. The processing chain fuses CERES observations with data from 19 other unique sources. The addition of CERES Flight Model 5 (FM5) onboard NPP, coupled with ground processing system upgrades further emphasizes the need for an automated job-submission utility to manage multiple processing streams concurrently. The operator-driven, legacy-processing approach relied on manually staging data from magnetic tape to limited spinning disk attached to a shared memory architecture system. The migration of CERES production code to a distributed, cluster computing environment with approximately one petabyte of spinning disk containing all precursor input data products facilitates the development of a CERES-specific, automated workflow manager. In the cluster environment, I/O is the primary system resource in contention across jobs. Therefore, system load can be maximized with a throttling workload manager. This poster discusses a Java and Perl implementation of an automated job management tool tailored for CERES processing.

  2. Modeling Complex Workflow in Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gomah, Mohamed E.; Turley, James P.; Lu, Huimin; Jones, Dan

    2010-01-01

    One of the hurdles to achieving personalized medicine has been implementing the laboratory processes for performing and reporting complex molecular tests. The rapidly changing test rosters and complex analysis platforms in molecular diagnostics have meant that many clinical laboratories still use labor-intensive manual processing and testing without the level of automation seen in high-volume chemistry and hematology testing. We provide here a discussion of design requirements and the results of implementation of a suite of lab management tools that incorporate the many elements required for use of molecular diagnostics in personalized medicine, particularly in cancer. These applications provide the functionality required for sample accessioning and tracking, material generation, and testing that are particular to the evolving needs of individualized molecular diagnostics. On implementation, the applications described here resulted in improvements in the turn-around time for reporting of more complex molecular test sets, and significant changes in the workflow. Therefore, careful mapping of workflow can permit design of software applications that simplify even the complex demands of specialized molecular testing. By incorporating design features for order review, software tools can permit a more personalized approach to sample handling and test selection without compromising efficiency. PMID:20007844

  3. A practical workflow for making anatomical atlases for biological research.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yong; Lewis, A Kelsey; Colasanto, Mary; van Langeveld, Mark; Kardon, Gabrielle; Hansen, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The anatomical atlas has been at the intersection of science and art for centuries. These atlases are essential to biological research, but high-quality atlases are often scarce. Recent advances in imaging technology have made high-quality 3D atlases possible. However, until now there has been a lack of practical workflows using standard tools to generate atlases from images of biological samples. With certain adaptations, CG artists' workflow and tools, traditionally used in the film industry, are practical for building high-quality biological atlases. Researchers have developed a workflow for generating a 3D anatomical atlas using accessible artists' tools. They used this workflow to build a mouse limb atlas for studying the musculoskeletal system's development. This research aims to raise the awareness of using artists' tools in scientific research and promote interdisciplinary collaborations between artists and scientists. This video (http://youtu.be/g61C-nia9ms) demonstrates a workflow for creating an anatomical atlas.

  4. Widening the adoption of workflows to include human and human-machine scientific processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salayandia, L.; Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Gates, A. Q.

    2010-12-01

    Scientific workflows capture knowledge in the form of technical recipes to access and manipulate data that help scientists manage and reuse established expertise to conduct their work. Libraries of scientific workflows are being created in particular fields, e.g., Bioinformatics, where combined with cyber-infrastructure environments that provide on-demand access to data and tools, result in powerful workbenches for scientists of those communities. The focus in these particular fields, however, has been more on automating rather than documenting scientific processes. As a result, technical barriers have impeded a wider adoption of scientific workflows by scientific communities that do not rely as heavily on cyber-infrastructure and computing environments. Semantic Abstract Workflows (SAWs) are introduced to widen the applicability of workflows as a tool to document scientific recipes or processes. SAWs intend to capture a scientists’ perspective about the process of how she or he would collect, filter, curate, and manipulate data to create the artifacts that are relevant to her/his work. In contrast, scientific workflows describe the process from the point of view of how technical methods and tools are used to conduct the work. By focusing on a higher level of abstraction that is closer to a scientist’s understanding, SAWs effectively capture the controlled vocabularies that reflect a particular scientific community, as well as the types of datasets and methods used in a particular domain. From there on, SAWs provide the flexibility to adapt to different environments to carry out the recipes or processes. These environments range from manual fieldwork to highly technical cyber-infrastructure environments, i.e., such as those already supported by scientific workflows. Two cases, one from Environmental Science and another from Geophysics, are presented as illustrative examples.

  5. Climate Data Analytics Workflow Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Mattmann, C. A.; Lee, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    In this project we aim to pave a novel path to create a sustainable building block toward Earth science big data analytics and knowledge sharing. Closely studying how Earth scientists conduct data analytics research in their daily work, we have developed a provenance model to record their activities, and to develop a technology to automatically generate workflows for scientists from the provenance. On top of it, we have built the prototype of a data-centric provenance repository, and establish a PDSW (People, Data, Service, Workflow) knowledge network to support workflow recommendation. To ensure the scalability and performance of the expected recommendation system, we have leveraged the Apache OODT system technology. The community-approved, metrics-based performance evaluation web-service will allow a user to select a metric from the list of several community-approved metrics and to evaluate model performance using the metric as well as the reference dataset. This service will facilitate the use of reference datasets that are generated in support of the model-data intercomparison projects such as Obs4MIPs and Ana4MIPs. The data-centric repository infrastructure will allow us to catch richer provenance to further facilitate knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the Earth science community. This project is part of Apache incubator CMDA project.

  6. A Portable Regional Weather and Climate Downscaling System Using GEOS-5, LIS-6, WRF, and the NASA Workflow Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, E. M.; Putman, W. M.; Gurganus, J.; Burns, R. W.; Damon, M. R.; McConaughy, G. R.; Seablom, M. S.; Wojcik, G. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a regional downscaling system (RDS) suitable for high-resolution weather and climate simulations in multiple supercomputing environments. The RDS is built on the NASA Workflow Tool, a software framework for configuring, running, and managing computer models on multiple platforms with a graphical user interface. The Workflow Tool is used to run the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model Version 5 (GEOS-5), a global atmospheric-ocean model for weather and climate simulations down to 1/4 degree resolution; the NASA Land Information System Version 6 (LIS-6), a land surface modeling system that can simulate soil temperature and moisture profiles; and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) community model, a limited-area atmospheric model for weather and climate simulations down to 1-km resolution. The Workflow Tool allows users to customize model settings to user needs; saves and organizes simulation experiments; distributes model runs across different computer clusters (e.g., the DISCOVER cluster at Goddard Space Flight Center, the Cray CX-1 Desktop Supercomputer, etc.); and handles all file transfers and network communications (e.g., scp connections). Together, the RDS is intended to aid researchers by making simulations as easy as possible to generate on the computer resources available. Initial conditions for LIS-6 and GEOS-5 are provided by Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data stored on DISCOVER. The LIS-6 is first run for 2-4 years forced by MERRA atmospheric analyses, generating initial conditions for the WRF soil physics. GEOS-5 is then initialized from MERRA data and run for the period of interest. Large-scale atmospheric data, sea-surface temperatures, and sea ice coverage from GEOS-5 are used as boundary conditions for WRF, which is run for the same period of interest. Multiply nested grids are used for both LIS-6 and WRF, with the innermost grid run at a resolution sufficient for typical

  7. Worklist handling in workflow-enabled radiological application systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim; von Berg, Jens

    2000-05-01

    For the next generation integrated information systems for health care applications, more emphasis has to be put on systems which, by design, support the reduction of cost, the increase inefficiency and the improvement of the quality of services. A substantial contribution to this will be the modeling. optimization, automation and enactment of processes in health care institutions. One of the perceived key success factors for the system integration of processes will be the application of workflow management, with workflow management systems as key technology components. In this paper we address workflow management in radiology. We focus on an important aspect of workflow management, the generation and handling of worklists, which provide workflow participants automatically with work items that reflect tasks to be performed. The display of worklists and the functions associated with work items are the visible part for the end-users of an information system using a workflow management approach. Appropriate worklist design and implementation will influence user friendliness of a system and will largely influence work efficiency. Technically, in current imaging department information system environments (modality-PACS-RIS installations), a data-driven approach has been taken: Worklist -- if present at all -- are generated from filtered views on application data bases. In a future workflow-based approach, worklists will be generated by autonomous workflow services based on explicit process models and organizational models. This process-oriented approach will provide us with an integral view of entire health care processes or sub- processes. The paper describes the basic mechanisms of this approach and summarizes its benefits.

  8. Implementing bioinformatic workflows within the bioextract server

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computational workflows in bioinformatics are becoming increasingly important in the achievement of scientific advances. These workflows typically require the integrated use of multiple, distributed data sources and analytic tools. The BioExtract Server (http://bioextract.org) is a distributed servi...

  9. Case Report: Activity Diagrams for Integrating Electronic Prescribing Tools into Clinical Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B.; FitzHenry, Fern

    2006-01-01

    To facilitate the future implementation of an electronic prescribing system, this case study modeled prescription management processes in various primary care settings. The Vanderbilt e-prescribing design team conducted initial interviews with clinic managers, physicians and nurses, and then represented the sequences of steps carried out to complete prescriptions in activity diagrams. The diagrams covered outpatient prescribing for patients during a clinic visit and between clinic visits. Practice size, practice setting, and practice specialty type influenced the prescribing processes used. The model developed may be useful to others engaged in building or tailoring an e-prescribing system to meet the specific workflows of various clinic settings. PMID:16622168

  10. Autonomic Management of Application Workflows on Hybrid Computing Infrastructure

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Hyunjoo; el-Khamra, Yaakoub; Rodero, Ivan; ...

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a programming and runtime framework that enables the autonomic management of complex application workflows on hybrid computing infrastructures. The framework is designed to address system and application heterogeneity and dynamics to ensure that application objectives and constraints are satisfied. The need for such autonomic system and application management is becoming critical as computing infrastructures become increasingly heterogeneous, integrating different classes of resources from high-end HPC systems to commodity clusters and clouds. For example, the framework presented in this paper can be used to provision the appropriate mix of resources based on application requirements and constraints.more » The framework also monitors the system/application state and adapts the application and/or resources to respond to changing requirements or environment. To demonstrate the operation of the framework and to evaluate its ability, we employ a workflow used to characterize an oil reservoir executing on a hybrid infrastructure composed of TeraGrid nodes and Amazon EC2 instances of various types. Specifically, we show how different applications objectives such as acceleration, conservation and resilience can be effectively achieved while satisfying deadline and budget constraints, using an appropriate mix of dynamically provisioned resources. Our evaluations also demonstrate that public clouds can be used to complement and reinforce the scheduling and usage of traditional high performance computing infrastructure.« less

  11. A free tool integrating GIS features and workflows to evaluate sediment connectivity in alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crema, Stefano; Schenato, Luca; Goldin, Beatrice; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The increased interest in sediment connectivity has brought the geomorphologists' community to focus on sediment fluxes as a key process (Cavalli et al., 2013; Heckmann and Schwanghart, 2013). The challenge of dealing with erosion-related processes in alpine catchments is of primary relevance for different fields of investigations and applications, including, but not limited to natural hazards, hydraulic structures design, ecology and stream restoration. The present work focuses on the development of a free tool for sediment connectivity assessment as described in Cavalli et al. (2013), introducing some novel improvements. The choice of going for a free software is motivated by the need of widening the access and improving participation beyond the restrictions on algorithms customization, typical of commercial software. A couple of features further enhance the tool: being completely free and adopting a user-friendly interface, its target audience includes researchers and stakeholders (e.g., local managers and civil protection authorities in charge of planning the priorities of intervention in the territory), being written in Python programming language, it can benefit from optimized algorithms for high-resolution DEMs (Digital Elevation Models) handling and for propagation workflows implementation; these two factors make the tool computationally competitive with the most recent commercial GIS products. The overall goal of this tool is supporting the analysis of sediment connectivity, facing the challenge of widening, as much as possible, the users' community among scientists and stakeholders. This aspect is crucial, as future improvement of this tool will benefit of feedbacks from users in order to improve the quantitative assessment of sediment connectivity as a major input information for the optimal management of mountain areas. References: Cavalli, M., Trevisani, S., Comiti, F., Marchi, L., 2013. Geomorphometric assessment of spatial sediment connectivity in

  12. Light-weight Parallel Python Tools for Earth System Modeling Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, S. A.; Paul, K.; Xu, H.; Dennis, J.; Brown, D. I.

    2015-12-01

    With the growth in computing power over the last 30 years, earth system modeling codes have become increasingly data-intensive. As an example, it is expected that the data required for the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report (AR6) will increase by more than 10x to an expected 25PB per climate model. Faced with this daunting challenge, developers of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) have chosen to change the format of their data for long-term storage from time-slice to time-series, in order to reduce the required download bandwidth needed for later analysis and post-processing by climate scientists. Hence, efficient tools are required to (1) perform the transformation of the data from time-slice to time-series format and to (2) compute climatology statistics, needed for many diagnostic computations, on the resulting time-series data. To address the first of these two challenges, we have developed a parallel Python tool for converting time-slice model output to time-series format. To address the second of these challenges, we have developed a parallel Python tool to perform fast time-averaging of time-series data. These tools are designed to be light-weight, be easy to install, have very few dependencies, and can be easily inserted into the Earth system modeling workflow with negligible disruption. In this work, we present the motivation, approach, and testing results of these two light-weight parallel Python tools, as well as our plans for future research and development.

  13. Tools for automated acoustic monitoring within the R package monitoR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    The R package monitoR contains tools for managing an acoustic-monitoring program including survey metadata, template creation and manipulation, automated detection and results management. These tools are scalable for use with small projects as well as larger long-term projects and those with expansive spatial extents. Here, we describe typical workflow when using the tools in monitoR. Typical workflow utilizes a generic sequence of functions, with the option for either binary point matching or spectrogram cross-correlation detectors.

  14. How to Take HRMS Process Management to the Next Level with Workflow Business Event System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajeshuni, Sarala; Yagubian, Aram; Kunamaneni, Krishna

    2006-01-01

    Oracle Workflow with the Business Event System offers a complete process management solution for enterprises to manage business processes cost-effectively. Using Workflow event messaging, event subscriptions, AQ Servlet and advanced queuing technologies, this presentation will demonstrate the step-by-step design and implementation of system solutions in order to integrate two dissimilar systems and establish communication remotely. As a case study, the presentation walks you through the process of propagating organization name changes in other applications that originated from the HRMS module without changing applications code. The solution can be applied to your particular business cases for streamlining or modifying business processes across Oracle and non-Oracle applications.

  15. Workflow based framework for life science informatics.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Abhishek; Sekhar, Arvind K T

    2007-10-01

    Workflow technology is a generic mechanism to integrate diverse types of available resources (databases, servers, software applications and different services) which facilitate knowledge exchange within traditionally divergent fields such as molecular biology, clinical research, computational science, physics, chemistry and statistics. Researchers can easily incorporate and access diverse, distributed tools and data to develop their own research protocols for scientific analysis. Application of workflow technology has been reported in areas like drug discovery, genomics, large-scale gene expression analysis, proteomics, and system biology. In this article, we have discussed the existing workflow systems and the trends in applications of workflow based systems.

  16. The impact of missing sensor information on surgical workflow management.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, Philipp; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Wiedemann, Peter; Neumuth, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Sensor systems in the operating room may encounter intermittent data losses that reduce the performance of surgical workflow management systems (SWFMS). Sensor data loss could impact SWFMS-based decision support, device parameterization, and information presentation. The purpose of this study was to understand the robustness of surgical process models when sensor information is partially missing. SWFMS changes caused by wrong or no data from the sensor system which tracks the progress of a surgical intervention were tested. The individual surgical process models (iSPMs) from 100 different cataract procedures of 3 ophthalmologic surgeons were used to select a randomized subset and create a generalized surgical process model (gSPM). A disjoint subset was selected from the iSPMs and used to simulate the surgical process against the gSPM. The loss of sensor data was simulated by removing some information from one task in the iSPM. The effect of missing sensor data was measured using several metrics: (a) successful relocation of the path in the gSPM, (b) the number of steps to find the converging point, and (c) the perspective with the highest occurrence of unsuccessful path findings. A gSPM built using 30% of the iSPMs successfully found the correct path in 90% of the cases. The most critical sensor data were the information regarding the instrument used by the surgeon. We found that use of a gSPM to provide input data for a SWFMS is robust and can be accurate despite missing sensor data. A surgical workflow management system can provide the surgeon with workflow guidance in the OR for most cases. Sensor systems for surgical process tracking can be evaluated based on the stability and accuracy of functional and spatial operative results.

  17. Clinic Workflow Simulations using Secondary EHR Data

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Biermann, David; Read-Brown, Sarah; Reznick, Leah; Lombardi, Lorinna; Parikh, Mansi; Chamberlain, Winston; Yackel, Thomas R.; Chiang, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians today face increased patient loads, decreased reimbursements and potential negative productivity impacts of using electronic health records (EHR), but have little guidance on how to improve clinic efficiency. Discrete event simulation models are powerful tools for evaluating clinical workflow and improving efficiency, particularly when they are built from secondary EHR timing data. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that these simulation models can be used for resource allocation decision making as well as for evaluating novel scheduling strategies in outpatient ophthalmology clinics. Key findings from this study are that: 1) secondary use of EHR timestamp data in simulation models represents clinic workflow, 2) simulations provide insight into the best allocation of resources in a clinic, 3) simulations provide critical information for schedule creation and decision making by clinic managers, and 4) simulation models built from EHR data are potentially generalizable. PMID:28269861

  18. An ontological knowledge framework for adaptive medical workflow.

    PubMed

    Dang, Jiangbo; Hedayati, Amir; Hampel, Ken; Toklu, Candemir

    2008-10-01

    As emerging technologies, semantic Web and SOA (Service-Oriented Architecture) allow BPMS (Business Process Management System) to automate business processes that can be described as services, which in turn can be used to wrap existing enterprise applications. BPMS provides tools and methodologies to compose Web services that can be executed as business processes and monitored by BPM (Business Process Management) consoles. Ontologies are a formal declarative knowledge representation model. It provides a foundation upon which machine understandable knowledge can be obtained, and as a result, it makes machine intelligence possible. Healthcare systems can adopt these technologies to make them ubiquitous, adaptive, and intelligent, and then serve patients better. This paper presents an ontological knowledge framework that covers healthcare domains that a hospital encompasses-from the medical or administrative tasks, to hospital assets, medical insurances, patient records, drugs, and regulations. Therefore, our ontology makes our vision of personalized healthcare possible by capturing all necessary knowledge for a complex personalized healthcare scenario involving patient care, insurance policies, and drug prescriptions, and compliances. For example, our ontology facilitates a workflow management system to allow users, from physicians to administrative assistants, to manage, even create context-aware new medical workflows and execute them on-the-fly.

  19. Inferring Clinical Workflow Efficiency via Electronic Medical Record Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Xie, Wei; Gunter, Carl A; Liebovitz, David; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Zhang, He; Malin, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Complexity in clinical workflows can lead to inefficiency in making diagnoses, ineffectiveness of treatment plans and uninformed management of healthcare organizations (HCOs). Traditional strategies to manage workflow complexity are based on measuring the gaps between workflows defined by HCO administrators and the actual processes followed by staff in the clinic. However, existing methods tend to neglect the influences of EMR systems on the utilization of workflows, which could be leveraged to optimize workflows facilitated through the EMR. In this paper, we introduce a framework to infer clinical workflows through the utilization of an EMR and show how such workflows roughly partition into four types according to their efficiency. Our framework infers workflows at several levels of granularity through data mining technologies. We study four months of EMR event logs from a large medical center, including 16,569 inpatient stays, and illustrate that over approximately 95% of workflows are efficient and that 80% of patients are on such workflows. At the same time, we show that the remaining 5% of workflows may be inefficient due to a variety of factors, such as complex patients. PMID:26958173

  20. SMITH: a LIMS for handling next-generation sequencing workflows.

    PubMed

    Venco, Francesco; Vaskin, Yuriy; Ceol, Arnaud; Muller, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Life-science laboratories make increasing use of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) for studying bio-macromolecules and their interactions. Array-based methods for measuring gene expression or protein-DNA interactions are being replaced by RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq. Sequencing is generally performed by specialized facilities that have to keep track of sequencing requests, trace samples, ensure quality and make data available according to predefined privileges. An integrated tool helps to troubleshoot problems, to maintain a high quality standard, to reduce time and costs. Commercial and non-commercial tools called LIMS (Laboratory Information Management Systems) are available for this purpose. However, they often come at prohibitive cost and/or lack the flexibility and scalability needed to adjust seamlessly to the frequently changing protocols employed. In order to manage the flow of sequencing data produced at the Genomic Unit of the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), we developed SMITH (Sequencing Machine Information Tracking and Handling). SMITH is a web application with a MySQL server at the backend. Wet-lab scientists of the Centre for Genomic Science and database experts from the Politecnico of Milan in the context of a Genomic Data Model Project developed SMITH. The data base schema stores all the information of an NGS experiment, including the descriptions of all protocols and algorithms used in the process. Notably, an attribute-value table allows associating an unconstrained textual description to each sample and all the data produced afterwards. This method permits the creation of metadata that can be used to search the database for specific files as well as for statistical analyses. SMITH runs automatically and limits direct human interaction mainly to administrative tasks. SMITH data-delivery procedures were standardized making it easier for biologists and analysts to navigate the data. Automation also helps saving time. The workflows are available

  1. SMITH: a LIMS for handling next-generation sequencing workflows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Life-science laboratories make increasing use of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) for studying bio-macromolecules and their interactions. Array-based methods for measuring gene expression or protein-DNA interactions are being replaced by RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq. Sequencing is generally performed by specialized facilities that have to keep track of sequencing requests, trace samples, ensure quality and make data available according to predefined privileges. An integrated tool helps to troubleshoot problems, to maintain a high quality standard, to reduce time and costs. Commercial and non-commercial tools called LIMS (Laboratory Information Management Systems) are available for this purpose. However, they often come at prohibitive cost and/or lack the flexibility and scalability needed to adjust seamlessly to the frequently changing protocols employed. In order to manage the flow of sequencing data produced at the Genomic Unit of the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), we developed SMITH (Sequencing Machine Information Tracking and Handling). Methods SMITH is a web application with a MySQL server at the backend. Wet-lab scientists of the Centre for Genomic Science and database experts from the Politecnico of Milan in the context of a Genomic Data Model Project developed SMITH. The data base schema stores all the information of an NGS experiment, including the descriptions of all protocols and algorithms used in the process. Notably, an attribute-value table allows associating an unconstrained textual description to each sample and all the data produced afterwards. This method permits the creation of metadata that can be used to search the database for specific files as well as for statistical analyses. Results SMITH runs automatically and limits direct human interaction mainly to administrative tasks. SMITH data-delivery procedures were standardized making it easier for biologists and analysts to navigate the data. Automation also helps saving time. The

  2. Provenance-Powered Automatic Workflow Generation and Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Lee, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, scientists have learned how to codify tools into reusable software modules that can be chained into multi-step executable workflows. Existing scientific workflow tools, created by computer scientists, require domain scientists to meticulously design their multi-step experiments before analyzing data. However, this is oftentimes contradictory to a domain scientist's daily routine of conducting research and exploration. We hope to resolve this dispute. Imagine this: An Earth scientist starts her day applying NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) published climate data processing algorithms over ARGO deep ocean temperature and AMSRE sea surface temperature datasets. Throughout the day, she tunes the algorithm parameters to study various aspects of the data. Suddenly, she notices some interesting results. She then turns to a computer scientist and asks, "can you reproduce my results?" By tracking and reverse engineering her activities, the computer scientist creates a workflow. The Earth scientist can now rerun the workflow to validate her findings, modify the workflow to discover further variations, or publish the workflow to share the knowledge. In this way, we aim to revolutionize computer-supported Earth science. We have developed a prototyping system to realize the aforementioned vision, in the context of service-oriented science. We have studied how Earth scientists conduct service-oriented data analytics research in their daily work, developed a provenance model to record their activities, and developed a technology to automatically generate workflow starting from user behavior and adaptability and reuse of these workflows for replicating/improving scientific studies. A data-centric repository infrastructure is established to catch richer provenance to further facilitate collaboration in the science community. We have also established a Petri nets-based verification instrument for provenance-based automatic workflow generation and recommendation.

  3. SigWin-detector: a Grid-enabled workflow for discovering enriched windows of genomic features related to DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Inda, Márcia A; van Batenburg, Marinus F; Roos, Marco; Belloum, Adam S Z; Vasunin, Dmitry; Wibisono, Adianto; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Breit, Timo M

    2008-08-08

    Chromosome location is often used as a scaffold to organize genomic information in both the living cell and molecular biological research. Thus, ever-increasing amounts of data about genomic features are stored in public databases and can be readily visualized by genome browsers. To perform in silico experimentation conveniently with this genomics data, biologists need tools to process and compare datasets routinely and explore the obtained results interactively. The complexity of such experimentation requires these tools to be based on an e-Science approach, hence generic, modular, and reusable. A virtual laboratory environment with workflows, workflow management systems, and Grid computation are therefore essential. Here we apply an e-Science approach to develop SigWin-detector, a workflow-based tool that can detect significantly enriched windows of (genomic) features in a (DNA) sequence in a fast and reproducible way. For proof-of-principle, we utilize a biological use case to detect regions of increased and decreased gene expression (RIDGEs and anti-RIDGEs) in human transcriptome maps. We improved the original method for RIDGE detection by replacing the costly step of estimation by random sampling with a faster analytical formula for computing the distribution of the null hypothesis being tested and by developing a new algorithm for computing moving medians. SigWin-detector was developed using the WS-VLAM workflow management system and consists of several reusable modules that are linked together in a basic workflow. The configuration of this basic workflow can be adapted to satisfy the requirements of the specific in silico experiment. As we show with the results from analyses in the biological use case on RIDGEs, SigWin-detector is an efficient and reusable Grid-based tool for discovering windows enriched for features of a particular type in any sequence of values. Thus, SigWin-detector provides the proof-of-principle for the modular e-Science based concept

  4. Bioinformatics workflows and web services in systems biology made easy for experimentalists.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Rafael C; Corpas, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Workflows are useful to perform data analysis and integration in systems biology. Workflow management systems can help users create workflows without any previous knowledge in programming and web services. However the computational skills required to build such workflows are usually above the level most biological experimentalists are comfortable with. In this chapter we introduce workflow management systems that reuse existing workflows instead of creating them, making it easier for experimentalists to perform computational tasks.

  5. The Archive Solution for Distributed Workflow Management Agents of the CMS Experiment at LHC

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kuznetsov, Valentin; Fischer, Nils Leif; Guo, Yuyi

    The CMS experiment at the CERN LHC developed the Workflow Management Archive system to persistently store unstructured framework job report documents produced by distributed workflow management agents. In this paper we present its architecture, implementation, deployment, and integration with the CMS and CERN computing infrastructures, such as central HDFS and Hadoop Spark cluster. The system leverages modern technologies such as a document oriented database and the Hadoop eco-system to provide the necessary flexibility to reliably process, store, and aggregatemore » $$\\mathcal{O}$$(1M) documents on a daily basis. We describe the data transformation, the short and long term storage layers, the query language, along with the aggregation pipeline developed to visualize various performance metrics to assist CMS data operators in assessing the performance of the CMS computing system.« less

  6. The Archive Solution for Distributed Workflow Management Agents of the CMS Experiment at LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Kuznetsov, Valentin; Fischer, Nils Leif; Guo, Yuyi

    2018-03-19

    The CMS experiment at the CERN LHC developed the Workflow Management Archive system to persistently store unstructured framework job report documents produced by distributed workflow management agents. In this paper we present its architecture, implementation, deployment, and integration with the CMS and CERN computing infrastructures, such as central HDFS and Hadoop Spark cluster. The system leverages modern technologies such as a document oriented database and the Hadoop eco-system to provide the necessary flexibility to reliably process, store, and aggregatemore » $$\\mathcal{O}$$(1M) documents on a daily basis. We describe the data transformation, the short and long term storage layers, the query language, along with the aggregation pipeline developed to visualize various performance metrics to assist CMS data operators in assessing the performance of the CMS computing system.« less

  7. A Web application for the management of clinical workflow in image-guided and adaptive proton therapy for prostate cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Daniel; Boes, Peter; Ho, Meng Wei; Li, Zuofeng

    2015-05-08

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), based on radiopaque markers placed in the prostate gland, was used for proton therapy of prostate patients. Orthogonal X-rays and the IBA Digital Image Positioning System (DIPS) were used for setup correction prior to treatment and were repeated after treatment delivery. Following a rationale for margin estimates similar to that of van Herk,(1) the daily post-treatment DIPS data were analyzed to determine if an adaptive radiotherapy plan was necessary. A Web application using ASP.NET MVC5, Entity Framework, and an SQL database was designed to automate this process. The designed features included state-of-the-art Web technologies, a domain model closely matching the workflow, a database-supporting concurrency and data mining, access to the DIPS database, secured user access and roles management, and graphing and analysis tools. The Model-View-Controller (MVC) paradigm allowed clean domain logic, unit testing, and extensibility. Client-side technologies, such as jQuery, jQuery Plug-ins, and Ajax, were adopted to achieve a rich user environment and fast response. Data models included patients, staff, treatment fields and records, correction vectors, DIPS images, and association logics. Data entry, analysis, workflow logics, and notifications were implemented. The system effectively modeled the clinical workflow and IGRT process.

  8. A Web application for the management of clinical workflow in image‐guided and adaptive proton therapy for prostate cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Peter; Ho, Meng Wei; Li, Zuofeng

    2015-01-01

    Image‐guided radiotherapy (IGRT), based on radiopaque markers placed in the prostate gland, was used for proton therapy of prostate patients. Orthogonal X‐rays and the IBA Digital Image Positioning System (DIPS) were used for setup correction prior to treatment and were repeated after treatment delivery. Following a rationale for margin estimates similar to that of van Herk,(1) the daily post‐treatment DIPS data were analyzed to determine if an adaptive radiotherapy plan was necessary. A Web application using ASP.NET MVC5, Entity Framework, and an SQL database was designed to automate this process. The designed features included state‐of‐the‐art Web technologies, a domain model closely matching the workflow, a database‐supporting concurrency and data mining, access to the DIPS database, secured user access and roles management, and graphing and analysis tools. The Model‐View‐Controller (MVC) paradigm allowed clean domain logic, unit testing, and extensibility. Client‐side technologies, such as jQuery, jQuery Plug‐ins, and Ajax, were adopted to achieve a rich user environment and fast response. Data models included patients, staff, treatment fields and records, correction vectors, DIPS images, and association logics. Data entry, analysis, workflow logics, and notifications were implemented. The system effectively modeled the clinical workflow and IGRT process. PACS number: 87 PMID:26103504

  9. Research and Implementation of Key Technologies in Multi-Agent System to Support Distributed Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tianheng

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the combination of workflow management system and Multi-agent technology is a hot research field. The problem of lack of flexibility in workflow management system can be improved by introducing multi-agent collaborative management. The workflow management system adopts distributed structure. It solves the problem that the traditional centralized workflow structure is fragile. In this paper, the agent of Distributed workflow management system is divided according to its function. The execution process of each type of agent is analyzed. The key technologies such as process execution and resource management are analyzed.

  10. Modelling and analysis of workflow for lean supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinping; Wang, Kanliang; Xu, Lida

    2011-11-01

    Cross-organisational workflow systems are a component of enterprise information systems which support collaborative business process among organisations in supply chain. Currently, the majority of workflow systems is developed in perspectives of information modelling without considering actual requirements of supply chain management. In this article, we focus on the modelling and analysis of the cross-organisational workflow systems in the context of lean supply chain (LSC) using Petri nets. First, the article describes the assumed conditions of cross-organisation workflow net according to the idea of LSC and then discusses the standardisation of collaborating business process between organisations in the context of LSC. Second, the concept of labelled time Petri nets (LTPNs) is defined through combining labelled Petri nets with time Petri nets, and the concept of labelled time workflow nets (LTWNs) is also defined based on LTPNs. Cross-organisational labelled time workflow nets (CLTWNs) is then defined based on LTWNs. Third, the article proposes the notion of OR-silent CLTWNS and a verifying approach to the soundness of LTWNs and CLTWNs. Finally, this article illustrates how to use the proposed method by a simple example. The purpose of this research is to establish a formal method of modelling and analysis of workflow systems for LSC. This study initiates a new perspective of research on cross-organisational workflow management and promotes operation management of LSC in real world settings.

  11. Changes in the cardiac rehabilitation workflow process needed for the implementation of a self-management system.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, Anne-Marieke; Vosbergen, Sandra; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik; Jaspers, Monique; Peek, Niels

    2013-01-01

    E-health interventions are of a growing importance for self-management of chronic conditions. This study aimed to describe the process adaptions that are needed in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to implement a self-management system, called MyCARDSS. We created a generic workflow model based on interviews and observations at three CR clinics. Subsequently, a workflow model of the ideal situation after implementation of MyCARDSS was created. We found that the implementation will increase the complexity of existing working procedures because 1) not all patients will use MyCARDSS, 2) there is a transfer of tasks and responsibilities from professionals to patients, and 3) information in MyCARDSS needs to be synchronized with the EPR system for professionals.

  12. Building asynchronous geospatial processing workflows with web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peisheng; Di, Liping; Yu, Genong

    2012-02-01

    Geoscience research and applications often involve a geospatial processing workflow. This workflow includes a sequence of operations that use a variety of tools to collect, translate, and analyze distributed heterogeneous geospatial data. Asynchronous mechanisms, by which clients initiate a request and then resume their processing without waiting for a response, are very useful for complicated workflows that take a long time to run. Geospatial contents and capabilities are increasingly becoming available online as interoperable Web services. This online availability significantly enhances the ability to use Web service chains to build distributed geospatial processing workflows. This paper focuses on how to orchestrate Web services for implementing asynchronous geospatial processing workflows. The theoretical bases for asynchronous Web services and workflows, including asynchrony patterns and message transmission, are examined to explore different asynchronous approaches to and architecture of workflow code for the support of asynchronous behavior. A sample geospatial processing workflow, issued by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Service, Phase 6 (OWS-6), is provided to illustrate the implementation of asynchronous geospatial processing workflows and the challenges in using Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) to develop them.

  13. Design and implementation of workflow engine for service-oriented architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shuqing; Duan, Huining; Chen, Deyun

    2009-04-01

    As computer network is developed rapidly and in the situation of the appearance of distribution specialty in enterprise application, traditional workflow engine have some deficiencies, such as complex structure, bad stability, poor portability, little reusability and difficult maintenance. In this paper, in order to improve the stability, scalability and flexibility of workflow management system, a four-layer architecture structure of workflow engine based on SOA is put forward according to the XPDL standard of Workflow Management Coalition, the route control mechanism in control model is accomplished and the scheduling strategy of cyclic routing and acyclic routing is designed, and the workflow engine which adopts the technology such as XML, JSP, EJB and so on is implemented.

  14. Leveraging workflow control patterns in the domain of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Katharina; Marcos, Mar

    2016-02-10

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) include recommendations describing appropriate care for the management of patients with a specific clinical condition. A number of representation languages have been developed to support executable CPGs, with associated authoring/editing tools. Even with tool assistance, authoring of CPG models is a labor-intensive task. We aim at facilitating the early stages of CPG modeling task. In this context, we propose to support the authoring of CPG models based on a set of suitable procedural patterns described in an implementation-independent notation that can be then semi-automatically transformed into one of the alternative executable CPG languages. We have started with the workflow control patterns which have been identified in the fields of workflow systems and business process management. We have analyzed the suitability of these patterns by means of a qualitative analysis of CPG texts. Following our analysis we have implemented a selection of workflow patterns in the Asbru and PROforma CPG languages. As implementation-independent notation for the description of patterns we have chosen BPMN 2.0. Finally, we have developed XSLT transformations to convert the BPMN 2.0 version of the patterns into the Asbru and PROforma languages. We showed that although a significant number of workflow control patterns are suitable to describe CPG procedural knowledge, not all of them are applicable in the context of CPGs due to their focus on single-patient care. Moreover, CPGs may require additional patterns not included in the set of workflow control patterns. We also showed that nearly all the CPG-suitable patterns can be conveniently implemented in the Asbru and PROforma languages. Finally, we demonstrated that individual patterns can be semi-automatically transformed from a process specification in BPMN 2.0 to executable implementations in these languages. We propose a pattern and transformation-based approach for the development of CPG models

  15. Integrated Automatic Workflow for Phylogenetic Tree Analysis Using Public Access and Local Web Services.

    PubMed

    Damkliang, Kasikrit; Tandayya, Pichaya; Sangket, Unitsa; Pasomsub, Ekawat

    2016-11-28

    At the present, coding sequence (CDS) has been discovered and larger CDS is being revealed frequently. Approaches and related tools have also been developed and upgraded concurrently, especially for phylogenetic tree analysis. This paper proposes an integrated automatic Taverna workflow for the phylogenetic tree inferring analysis using public access web services at European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), and our own deployed local web services. The workflow input is a set of CDS in the Fasta format. The workflow supports 1,000 to 20,000 numbers in bootstrapping replication. The workflow performs the tree inferring such as Parsimony (PARS), Distance Matrix - Neighbor Joining (DIST-NJ), and Maximum Likelihood (ML) algorithms of EMBOSS PHYLIPNEW package based on our proposed Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) similarity score. The local web services are implemented and deployed into two types using the Soaplab2 and Apache Axis2 deployment. There are SOAP and Java Web Service (JWS) providing WSDL endpoints to Taverna Workbench, a workflow manager. The workflow has been validated, the performance has been measured, and its results have been verified. Our workflow's execution time is less than ten minutes for inferring a tree with 10,000 replicates of the bootstrapping numbers. This paper proposes a new integrated automatic workflow which will be beneficial to the bioinformaticians with an intermediate level of knowledge and experiences. All local services have been deployed at our portal http://bioservices.sci.psu.ac.th.

  16. Integrated Automatic Workflow for Phylogenetic Tree Analysis Using Public Access and Local Web Services.

    PubMed

    Damkliang, Kasikrit; Tandayya, Pichaya; Sangket, Unitsa; Pasomsub, Ekawat

    2016-03-01

    At the present, coding sequence (CDS) has been discovered and larger CDS is being revealed frequently. Approaches and related tools have also been developed and upgraded concurrently, especially for phylogenetic tree analysis. This paper proposes an integrated automatic Taverna workflow for the phylogenetic tree inferring analysis using public access web services at European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), and our own deployed local web services. The workflow input is a set of CDS in the Fasta format. The workflow supports 1,000 to 20,000 numbers in bootstrapping replication. The workflow performs the tree inferring such as Parsimony (PARS), Distance Matrix - Neighbor Joining (DIST-NJ), and Maximum Likelihood (ML) algorithms of EMBOSS PHYLIPNEW package based on our proposed Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) similarity score. The local web services are implemented and deployed into two types using the Soaplab2 and Apache Axis2 deployment. There are SOAP and Java Web Service (JWS) providing WSDL endpoints to Taverna Workbench, a workflow manager. The workflow has been validated, the performance has been measured, and its results have been verified. Our workflow's execution time is less than ten minutes for inferring a tree with 10,000 replicates of the bootstrapping numbers. This paper proposes a new integrated automatic workflow which will be beneficial to the bioinformaticians with an intermediate level of knowledge and experiences. The all local services have been deployed at our portal http://bioservices.sci.psu.ac.th.

  17. Flexible workflow sharing and execution services for e-scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacsuk, Péter; Terstyanszky, Gábor; Kiss, Tamas; Sipos, Gergely

    2013-04-01

    The sequence of computational and data manipulation steps required to perform a specific scientific analysis is called a workflow. Workflows that orchestrate data and/or compute intensive applications on Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCIs) recently became standard tools in e-science. At the same time the broad and fragmented landscape of workflows and DCIs slows down the uptake of workflow-based work. The development, sharing, integration and execution of workflows is still a challenge for many scientists. The FP7 "Sharing Interoperable Workflow for Large-Scale Scientific Simulation on Available DCIs" (SHIWA) project significantly improved the situation, with a simulation platform that connects different workflow systems, different workflow languages, different DCIs and workflows into a single, interoperable unit. The SHIWA Simulation Platform is a service package, already used by various scientific communities, and used as a tool by the recently started ER-flow FP7 project to expand the use of workflows among European scientists. The presentation will introduce the SHIWA Simulation Platform and the services that ER-flow provides based on the platform to space and earth science researchers. The SHIWA Simulation Platform includes: 1. SHIWA Repository: A database where workflows and meta-data about workflows can be stored. The database is a central repository to discover and share workflows within and among communities . 2. SHIWA Portal: A web portal that is integrated with the SHIWA Repository and includes a workflow executor engine that can orchestrate various types of workflows on various grid and cloud platforms. 3. SHIWA Desktop: A desktop environment that provides similar access capabilities than the SHIWA Portal, however it runs on the users' desktops/laptops instead of a portal server. 4. Workflow engines: the ASKALON, Galaxy, GWES, Kepler, LONI Pipeline, MOTEUR, Pegasus, P-GRADE, ProActive, Triana, Taverna and WS-PGRADE workflow engines are already

  18. Dynamic reusable workflows for ocean science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard; Fernandez, Filipe; Wilcox, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Digital catalogs of ocean data have been available for decades, but advances in standardized services and software for catalog search and data access make it now possible to create catalog-driven workflows that automate — end-to-end — data search, analysis and visualization of data from multiple distributed sources. Further, these workflows may be shared, reused and adapted with ease. Here we describe a workflow developed within the US Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) which automates the skill-assessment of water temperature forecasts from multiple ocean forecast models, allowing improved forecast products to be delivered for an open water swim event. A series of Jupyter Notebooks are used to capture and document the end-to-end workflow using a collection of Python tools that facilitate working with standardized catalog and data services. The workflow first searches a catalog of metadata using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalog Service for the Web (CSW), then accesses data service endpoints found in the metadata records using the OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for in situ sensor data and OPeNDAP services for remotely-sensed and model data. Skill metrics are computed and time series comparisons of forecast model and observed data are displayed interactively, leveraging the capabilities of modern web browsers. The resulting workflow not only solves a challenging specific problem, but highlights the benefits of dynamic, reusable workflows in general. These workflows adapt as new data enters the data system, facilitate reproducible science, provide templates from which new scientific workflows can be developed, and encourage data providers to use standardized services. As applied to the ocean swim event, the workflow exposed problems with two of the ocean forecast products which led to improved regional forecasts once errors were corrected. While the example is specific, the approach is general, and we hope to see increased use of dynamic

  19. Defining Usability Heuristics for Adoption and Efficiency of an Electronic Workflow Document Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Usability heuristics have been established for different uses and applications as general guidelines for user interfaces. These can affect the implementation of industry solutions and play a significant role regarding cost reduction and process efficiency. The area of electronic workflow document management (EWDM) solutions, also known as…

  20. Knowledge Annotations in Scientific Workflows: An Implementation in Kepler

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gandara, Aida G.; Chin, George; Pinheiro Da Silva, Paulo

    2011-07-20

    Abstract. Scientic research products are the result of long-term collaborations between teams. Scientic workfows are capable of helping scientists in many ways including the collection of information as to howresearch was conducted, e.g. scientic workfow tools often collect and manage information about datasets used and data transformations. However,knowledge about why data was collected is rarely documented in scientic workflows. In this paper we describe a prototype system built to support the collection of scientic expertise that infuences scientic analysis. Through evaluating a scientic research eort underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we identied features that would most benefit PNNL scientistsmore » in documenting how and why they conduct their research making this information available to the entire team. The prototype system was built by enhancing the Kepler Scientic Work-flow System to create knowledge-annotated scientic workfows and topublish them as semantic annotations.« less

  1. It's All About the Data: Workflow Systems and Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plale, B.

    2009-05-01

    Digital data is fueling new advances in the computational sciences, particularly geospatial research as environmental sensing grows more practical through reduced technology costs, broader network coverage, and better instruments. e-Science research (i.e., cyberinfrastructure research) has responded to data intensive computing with tools, systems, and frameworks that support computationally oriented activities such as modeling, analysis, and data mining. Workflow systems support execution of sequences of tasks on behalf of a scientist. These systems, such as Taverna, Apache ODE, and Kepler, when built as part of a larger cyberinfrastructure framework, give the scientist tools to construct task graphs of execution sequences, often through a visual interface for connecting task boxes together with arcs representing control flow or data flow. Unlike business processing workflows, scientific workflows expose a high degree of detail and control during configuration and execution. Data-driven science imposes unique needs on workflow frameworks. Our research is focused on two issues. The first is the support for workflow-driven analysis over all kinds of data sets, including real time streaming data and locally owned and hosted data. The second is the essential role metadata/provenance collection plays in data driven science, for discovery, determining quality, for science reproducibility, and for long-term preservation. The research has been conducted over the last 6 years in the context of cyberinfrastructure for mesoscale weather research carried out as part of the Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) project. LEAD has pioneered new approaches for integrating complex weather data, assimilation, modeling, mining, and cyberinfrastructure systems. Workflow systems have the potential to generate huge volumes of data. Without some form of automated metadata capture, either metadata description becomes largely a manual task that is difficult if not impossible

  2. Coupling of a continuum ice sheet model and a discrete element calving model using a scientific workflow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, Shahbaz; Vallot, Dorothée; Zwinger, Thomas; Neukirchen, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Scientific communities generate complex simulations through orchestration of semi-structured analysis pipelines which involves execution of large workflows on multiple, distributed and heterogeneous computing and data resources. Modeling ice dynamics of glaciers requires workflows consisting of many non-trivial, computationally expensive processing tasks which are coupled to each other. From this domain, we present an e-Science use case, a workflow, which requires the execution of a continuum ice flow model and a discrete element based calving model in an iterative manner. Apart from the execution, this workflow also contains data format conversion tasks that support the execution of ice flow and calving by means of transition through sequential, nested and iterative steps. Thus, the management and monitoring of all the processing tasks including data management and transfer of the workflow model becomes more complex. From the implementation perspective, this workflow model was initially developed on a set of scripts using static data input and output references. In the course of application usage when more scripts or modifications introduced as per user requirements, the debugging and validation of results were more cumbersome to achieve. To address these problems, we identified a need to have a high-level scientific workflow tool through which all the above mentioned processes can be achieved in an efficient and usable manner. We decided to make use of the e-Science middleware UNICORE (Uniform Interface to Computing Resources) that allows seamless and automated access to different heterogenous and distributed resources which is supported by a scientific workflow engine. Based on this, we developed a high-level scientific workflow model for coupling of massively parallel High-Performance Computing (HPC) jobs: a continuum ice sheet model (Elmer/Ice) and a discrete element calving and crevassing model (HiDEM). In our talk we present how the use of a high

  3. Identifying impact of software dependencies on replicability of biomedical workflows.

    PubMed

    Miksa, Tomasz; Rauber, Andreas; Mina, Eleni

    2016-12-01

    Complex data driven experiments form the basis of biomedical research. Recent findings warn that the context in which the software is run, that is the infrastructure and the third party dependencies, can have a crucial impact on the final results delivered by a computational experiment. This implies that in order to replicate the same result, not only the same data must be used, but also it must be run on an equivalent software stack. In this paper we present the VFramework that enables assessing replicability of workflows. It identifies whether any differences in software dependencies among two executions of the same workflow exist and whether they have impact on the produced results. We also conduct a case study in which we investigate the impact of software dependencies on replicability of Taverna workflows used in biomedical research of Huntington's disease. We re-execute analysed workflows in environments differing in operating system distribution and configuration. The results show that the VFramework can be used to identify the impact of software dependencies on the replicability of biomedical workflows. Furthermore, we observe that despite the fact that the workflows are executed in a controlled environment, they still depend on specific tools installed in the environment. The context model used by the VFramework improves the deficiencies of provenance traces and documents also such tools. Based on our findings we define guidelines for workflow owners that enable them to improve replicability of their workflows. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein-ligand structure determination.

    PubMed

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Collins, Patrick; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian; von Delft, Frank

    2017-03-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein-ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallographic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011), Acta Cryst. D67, 235-242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010), Acta Cryst. D66, 213-221] have entrenched the paradigm that a `project' is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects.

  5. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein–ligand structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian

    2017-01-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein–ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallo­graphic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011 ▸), Acta Cryst. D67, 235–242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010 ▸), Acta Cryst. D66, 213–221] have entrenched the paradigm that a ‘project’ is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects. PMID:28291762

  6. Using CyberShake Workflows to Manage Big Seismic Hazard Data on Large-Scale Open-Science HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Juve, G.; Vahi, K.; Deelman, E.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The CyberShake computational platform, developed by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), is an integrated collection of scientific software and middleware that performs 3D physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Southern California. CyberShake integrates large-scale and high-throughput research codes to produce probabilistic seismic hazard curves for individual locations of interest and hazard maps for an entire region. A recent CyberShake calculation produced about 500,000 two-component seismograms for each of 336 locations, resulting in over 300 million synthetic seismograms in a Los Angeles-area probabilistic seismic hazard model. CyberShake calculations require a series of scientific software programs. Early computational stages produce data used as inputs by later stages, so we describe CyberShake calculations using a workflow definition language. Scientific workflow tools automate and manage the input and output data and enable remote job execution on large-scale HPC systems. To satisfy the requests of broad impact users of CyberShake data, such as seismologists, utility companies, and building code engineers, we successfully completed CyberShake Study 15.4 in April and May 2015, calculating a 1 Hz urban seismic hazard map for Los Angeles. We distributed the calculation between the NSF Track 1 system NCSA Blue Waters, the DOE Leadership-class system OLCF Titan, and USC's Center for High Performance Computing. This study ran for over 5 weeks, burning about 1.1 million node-hours and producing over half a petabyte of data. The CyberShake Study 15.4 results doubled the maximum simulated seismic frequency from 0.5 Hz to 1.0 Hz as compared to previous studies, representing a factor of 16 increase in computational complexity. We will describe how our workflow tools supported splitting the calculation across multiple systems. We will explain how we modified CyberShake software components, including GPU implementations and

  7. Make Your Workflows Smarter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey; Kapatos, Dennis; Skradski, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Do you have workflows with many manual tasks that slow down your business? Or, do you scale back workflows because there are simply too many manual tasks? Basic workflow robots can automate some common tasks, but not everything. This presentation will show how advanced robots called "expression robots" can be set up to perform everything from simple tasks such as: moving, creating folders, renaming, changing or creating an attribute, and revising, to more complex tasks like: creating a pdf, or even launching a session of Creo Parametric and performing a specific modeling task. Expression robots are able to utilize the Java API and Info*Engine to do almost anything you can imagine! Best of all, these tools are supported by PTC and will work with later releases of Windchill. Limited knowledge of Java, Info*Engine, and XML are required. The attendee will learn what task expression robots are capable of performing. The attendee will learn what is involved in setting up an expression robot. The attendee will gain a basic understanding of simple Info*Engine tasks

  8. Workflow Automation: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge management has proven to be a sustainable competitive advantage for many organizations. Knowledge management systems are abundant, with multiple functionalities. The literature reinforces the use of workflow automation with knowledge management systems to benefit organizations; however, it was not known if process automation yielded…

  9. REDLetr: Workflow and tools to support the migration of legacy clinical data capture systems to REDCap.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William D; Cobb, Jake; Levey, Allan I; Gutman, David A

    2016-09-01

    A memory clinic at an academic medical center has relied on several ad hoc data capture systems including Microsoft Access and Excel for cognitive assessments over the last several years. However these solutions are challenging to maintain and limit the potential of hypothesis-driven or longitudinal research. REDCap, a secure web application based on PHP and MySQL, is a practical solution for improving data capture and organization. Here, we present a workflow and toolset to facilitate legacy data migration and real-time clinical research data collection into REDCap as well as challenges encountered. Legacy data consisted of neuropsychological tests stored in over 4000 Excel workbooks. Functions for data extraction, norm scoring, converting to REDCap-compatible formats, accessing the REDCap API, and clinical report generation were developed and executed in Python. Over 400 unique data points for each workbook were migrated and integrated into our REDCap database. Moving forward, our REDCap-based system replaces the Excel-based data collection method as well as eases the integration into the standard clinical research workflow and Electronic Health Record. In the age of growing data, efficient organization and storage of clinical and research data is critical for advancing research and providing efficient patient care. We believe that the workflow and tools described in this work to promote legacy data integration as well as real time data collection into REDCap ultimately facilitate these goals. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Workflows for microarray data processing in the Kepler environment.

    PubMed

    Stropp, Thomas; McPhillips, Timothy; Ludäscher, Bertram; Bieda, Mark

    2012-05-17

    Microarray data analysis has been the subject of extensive and ongoing pipeline development due to its complexity, the availability of several options at each analysis step, and the development of new analysis demands, including integration with new data sources. Bioinformatics pipelines are usually custom built for different applications, making them typically difficult to modify, extend and repurpose. Scientific workflow systems are intended to address these issues by providing general-purpose frameworks in which to develop and execute such pipelines. The Kepler workflow environment is a well-established system under continual development that is employed in several areas of scientific research. Kepler provides a flexible graphical interface, featuring clear display of parameter values, for design and modification of workflows. It has capabilities for developing novel computational components in the R, Python, and Java programming languages, all of which are widely used for bioinformatics algorithm development, along with capabilities for invoking external applications and using web services. We developed a series of fully functional bioinformatics pipelines addressing common tasks in microarray processing in the Kepler workflow environment. These pipelines consist of a set of tools for GFF file processing of NimbleGen chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarray (ChIP-chip) datasets and more comprehensive workflows for Affymetrix gene expression microarray bioinformatics and basic primer design for PCR experiments, which are often used to validate microarray results. Although functional in themselves, these workflows can be easily customized, extended, or repurposed to match the needs of specific projects and are designed to be a toolkit and starting point for specific applications. These workflows illustrate a workflow programming paradigm focusing on local resources (programs and data) and therefore are close to traditional shell scripting or R

  11. VisTrails SAHM: visualization and workflow management for species habitat modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Holcombe, Tracy R.; Talbert, Colin B.; Ignizio, Drew A.; Talbert, Marian; Silva, Claudio; Koop, David; Swanson, Alan; Young, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    The Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM) has been created to both expedite habitat modeling and help maintain a record of the various input data, pre- and post-processing steps and modeling options incorporated in the construction of a species distribution model through the established workflow management and visualization VisTrails software. This paper provides an overview of the VisTrails:SAHM software including a link to the open source code, a table detailing the current SAHM modules, and a simple example modeling an invasive weed species in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA.

  12. E-Science technologies in a workflow for personalized medicine using cancer screening as a case study.

    PubMed

    Spjuth, Ola; Karlsson, Andreas; Clements, Mark; Humphreys, Keith; Ivansson, Emma; Dowling, Jim; Eklund, Martin; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Czene, Kamila; Grönberg, Henrik; Sparén, Pär; Wiklund, Fredrik; Cheddad, Abbas; Pálsdóttir, Þorgerður; Rantalainen, Mattias; Abrahamsson, Linda; Laure, Erwin; Litton, Jan-Eric; Palmgren, Juni

    2017-09-01

    We provide an e-Science perspective on the workflow from risk factor discovery and classification of disease to evaluation of personalized intervention programs. As case studies, we use personalized prostate and breast cancer screenings. We describe an e-Science initiative in Sweden, e-Science for Cancer Prevention and Control (eCPC), which supports biomarker discovery and offers decision support for personalized intervention strategies. The generic eCPC contribution is a workflow with 4 nodes applied iteratively, and the concept of e-Science signifies systematic use of tools from the mathematical, statistical, data, and computer sciences. The eCPC workflow is illustrated through 2 case studies. For prostate cancer, an in-house personalized screening tool, the Stockholm-3 model (S3M), is presented as an alternative to prostate-specific antigen testing alone. S3M is evaluated in a trial setting and plans for rollout in the population are discussed. For breast cancer, new biomarkers based on breast density and molecular profiles are developed and the US multicenter Women Informed to Screen Depending on Measures (WISDOM) trial is referred to for evaluation. While current eCPC data management uses a traditional data warehouse model, we discuss eCPC-developed features of a coherent data integration platform. E-Science tools are a key part of an evidence-based process for personalized medicine. This paper provides a structured workflow from data and models to evaluation of new personalized intervention strategies. The importance of multidisciplinary collaboration is emphasized. Importantly, the generic concepts of the suggested eCPC workflow are transferrable to other disease domains, although each disease will require tailored solutions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  13. The medical simulation markup language - simplifying the biomechanical modeling workflow.

    PubMed

    Suwelack, Stefan; Stoll, Markus; Schalck, Sebastian; Schoch, Nicolai; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Bendl, Rolf; Heuveline, Vincent; Speidel, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of the human body by means of continuum mechanics has become an important tool in diagnostics, computer-assisted interventions and training. This modeling approach seeks to construct patient-specific biomechanical models from tomographic data. Usually many different tools such as segmentation and meshing algorithms are involved in this workflow. In this paper we present a generalized and flexible description for biomechanical models. The unique feature of the new modeling language is that it not only describes the final biomechanical simulation, but also the workflow how the biomechanical model is constructed from tomographic data. In this way, the MSML can act as a middleware between all tools used in the modeling pipeline. The MSML thus greatly facilitates the prototyping of medical simulation workflows for clinical and research purposes. In this paper, we not only detail the XML-based modeling scheme, but also present a concrete implementation. Different examples highlight the flexibility, robustness and ease-of-use of the approach.

  14. Wireless remote control of clinical image workflow: using a PDA for off-site distribution and disaster recovery.

    PubMed

    Documet, Jorge; Liu, Brent J; Documet, Luis; Huang, H K

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) tool based on Web technology that remotely manages medical images between a PACS archive and remote destinations. Successfully implemented in a clinical environment and also demonstrated for the past 3 years at the conferences of various organizations, including the Radiological Society of North America, this tool provides a very practical and simple way to manage a PACS, including off-site image distribution and disaster recovery. The application is robust and flexible and can be used on a standard PC workstation or a Tablet PC, but more important, it can be used with a personal digital assistant (PDA). With a PDA, the Web application becomes a powerful wireless and mobile image management tool. The application's quick and easy-to-use features allow users to perform Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) queries and retrievals with a single interface, without having to worry about the underlying configuration of DICOM nodes. In addition, this frees up dedicated PACS workstations to perform their specialized roles within the PACS workflow. This tool has been used at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, for 2 years. The average number of queries per month is 2,021, with 816 C-MOVE retrieve requests. Clinical staff members can use PDAs to manage image workflow and PACS examination distribution conveniently for off-site consultations by referring physicians and radiologists and for disaster recovery. This solution also improves radiologists' effectiveness and efficiency in health care delivery both within radiology departments and for off-site clinical coverage.

  15. A Community-Driven Workflow Recommendations and Reuse Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Votava, P.; Lee, T. J.; Lee, C.; Xiao, S.; Nemani, R. R.; Foster, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aiming to connect the Earth science community to accelerate the rate of discovery, NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) has established an online repository and platform, so that researchers can publish and share their tools and models with colleagues. In recent years, workflow has become a popular technique at NEX for Earth scientists to define executable multi-step procedures for data processing and analysis. The ability to discover and reuse knowledge (sharable workflows or workflow) is critical to the future advancement of science. However, as reported in our earlier study, the reusability of scientific artifacts at current time is very low. Scientists often do not feel confident in using other researchers' tools and utilities. One major reason is that researchers are often unaware of the existence of others' data preprocessing processes. Meanwhile, researchers often do not have time to fully document the processes and expose them to others in a standard way. These issues cannot be overcome by the existing workflow search technologies used in NEX and other data projects. Therefore, this project aims to develop a proactive recommendation technology based on collective NEX user behaviors. In this way, we aim to promote and encourage process and workflow reuse within NEX. Particularly, we focus on leveraging peer scientists' best practices to support the recommendation of artifacts developed by others. Our underlying theoretical foundation is rooted in the social cognitive theory, which declares people learn by watching what others do. Our fundamental hypothesis is that sharable artifacts have network properties, much like humans in social networks. More generally, reusable artifacts form various types of social relationships (ties), and may be viewed as forming what organizational sociologists who use network analysis to study human interactions call a 'knowledge network.' In particular, we will tackle two research questions: R1: What hidden knowledge may be extracted from

  16. OPPL-Galaxy, a Galaxy tool for enhancing ontology exploitation as part of bioinformatics workflows

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomedical ontologies are key elements for building up the Life Sciences Semantic Web. Reusing and building biomedical ontologies requires flexible and versatile tools to manipulate them efficiently, in particular for enriching their axiomatic content. The Ontology Pre Processor Language (OPPL) is an OWL-based language for automating the changes to be performed in an ontology. OPPL augments the ontologists’ toolbox by providing a more efficient, and less error-prone, mechanism for enriching a biomedical ontology than that obtained by a manual treatment. Results We present OPPL-Galaxy, a wrapper for using OPPL within Galaxy. The functionality delivered by OPPL (i.e. automated ontology manipulation) can be combined with the tools and workflows devised within the Galaxy framework, resulting in an enhancement of OPPL. Use cases are provided in order to demonstrate OPPL-Galaxy’s capability for enriching, modifying and querying biomedical ontologies. Conclusions Coupling OPPL-Galaxy with other bioinformatics tools of the Galaxy framework results in a system that is more than the sum of its parts. OPPL-Galaxy opens a new dimension of analyses and exploitation of biomedical ontologies, including automated reasoning, paving the way towards advanced biological data analyses. PMID:23286517

  17. RESTFul based heterogeneous Geoprocessing workflow interoperation for Sensor Web Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Chen, Nengcheng; Di, Liping

    2012-10-01

    Advanced sensors on board satellites offer detailed Earth observations. A workflow is one approach for designing, implementing and constructing a flexible and live link between these sensors' resources and users. It can coordinate, organize and aggregate the distributed sensor Web services to meet the requirement of a complex Earth observation scenario. A RESTFul based workflow interoperation method is proposed to integrate heterogeneous workflows into an interoperable unit. The Atom protocols are applied to describe and manage workflow resources. The XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) and Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) workflow standards are applied to structure a workflow that accesses sensor information and one that processes it separately. Then, a scenario for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from a volcanic eruption is used to investigate the feasibility of the proposed method. The RESTFul based workflows interoperation system can describe, publish, discover, access and coordinate heterogeneous Geoprocessing workflows.

  18. PANORAMA: An approach to performance modeling and diagnosis of extreme-scale workflows

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Deelman, Ewa; Carothers, Christopher; Mandal, Anirban

    Here we report that computational science is well established as the third pillar of scientific discovery and is on par with experimentation and theory. However, as we move closer toward the ability to execute exascale calculations and process the ensuing extreme-scale amounts of data produced by both experiments and computations alike, the complexity of managing the compute and data analysis tasks has grown beyond the capabilities of domain scientists. Therefore, workflow management systems are absolutely necessary to ensure current and future scientific discoveries. A key research question for these workflow management systems concerns the performance optimization of complex calculation andmore » data analysis tasks. The central contribution of this article is a description of the PANORAMA approach for modeling and diagnosing the run-time performance of complex scientific workflows. This approach integrates extreme-scale systems testbed experimentation, structured analytical modeling, and parallel systems simulation into a comprehensive workflow framework called Pegasus for understanding and improving the overall performance of complex scientific workflows.« less

  19. PANORAMA: An approach to performance modeling and diagnosis of extreme-scale workflows

    DOE PAGES

    Deelman, Ewa; Carothers, Christopher; Mandal, Anirban; ...

    2015-07-14

    Here we report that computational science is well established as the third pillar of scientific discovery and is on par with experimentation and theory. However, as we move closer toward the ability to execute exascale calculations and process the ensuing extreme-scale amounts of data produced by both experiments and computations alike, the complexity of managing the compute and data analysis tasks has grown beyond the capabilities of domain scientists. Therefore, workflow management systems are absolutely necessary to ensure current and future scientific discoveries. A key research question for these workflow management systems concerns the performance optimization of complex calculation andmore » data analysis tasks. The central contribution of this article is a description of the PANORAMA approach for modeling and diagnosing the run-time performance of complex scientific workflows. This approach integrates extreme-scale systems testbed experimentation, structured analytical modeling, and parallel systems simulation into a comprehensive workflow framework called Pegasus for understanding and improving the overall performance of complex scientific workflows.« less

  20. Accounting for aquifer heterogeneity from geological data to management tools.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Martin; Martel, Richard; Gloaguen, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    A nested workflow of multiple-point geostatistics (MPG) and sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS) was tested on a study area of 6 km(2) located about 20 km northwest of Quebec City, Canada. In order to assess its geological and hydrogeological parameter heterogeneity and to provide tools to evaluate uncertainties in aquifer management, direct and indirect field measurements are used as inputs in the geostatistical simulations to reproduce large and small-scale heterogeneities. To do so, the lithological information is first associated to equivalent hydrogeological facies (hydrofacies) according to hydraulic properties measured at several wells. Then, heterogeneous hydrofacies (HF) realizations are generated using a prior geological model as training image (TI) with the MPG algorithm. The hydraulic conductivity (K) heterogeneity modeling within each HF is finally computed using SGS algorithm. Different K models are integrated in a finite-element hydrogeological model to calculate multiple transport simulations. Different scenarios exhibit variations in mass transport path and dispersion associated with the large- and small-scale heterogeneity respectively. Three-dimensional maps showing the probability of overpassing different thresholds are presented as examples of management tools. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  1. KDE Bioscience: platform for bioinformatics analysis workflows.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Hao, Pei; Curcin, Vasa; He, Weizhong; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Qing-Ming; Guo, Yi-Ke; Li, Yi-Xue

    2006-08-01

    Bioinformatics is a dynamic research area in which a large number of algorithms and programs have been developed rapidly and independently without much consideration so far of the need for standardization. The lack of such common standards combined with unfriendly interfaces make it difficult for biologists to learn how to use these tools and to translate the data formats from one to another. Consequently, the construction of an integrative bioinformatics platform to facilitate biologists' research is an urgent and challenging task. KDE Bioscience is a java-based software platform that collects a variety of bioinformatics tools and provides a workflow mechanism to integrate them. Nucleotide and protein sequences from local flat files, web sites, and relational databases can be entered, annotated, and aligned. Several home-made or 3rd-party viewers are built-in to provide visualization of annotations or alignments. KDE Bioscience can also be deployed in client-server mode where simultaneous execution of the same workflow is supported for multiple users. Moreover, workflows can be published as web pages that can be executed from a web browser. The power of KDE Bioscience comes from the integrated algorithms and data sources. With its generic workflow mechanism other novel calculations and simulations can be integrated to augment the current sequence analysis functions. Because of this flexible and extensible architecture, KDE Bioscience makes an ideal integrated informatics environment for future bioinformatics or systems biology research.

  2. Data Integration Tool: From Permafrost Data Translation Research Tool to A Robust Research Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, H.; Schaefer, K. M.; Jafarov, E. E.; Strawhacker, C.; Pulsifer, P. L.; Thurmes, N.

    2016-12-01

    The United States National Science Foundation funded PermaData project led by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) with a team from the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) aimed to improve permafrost data access and discovery. We developed a Data Integration Tool (DIT) to significantly speed up the time of manual processing needed to translate inconsistent, scattered historical permafrost data into files ready to ingest directly into the GTN-P. We leverage this data to support science research and policy decisions. DIT is a workflow manager that divides data preparation and analysis into a series of steps or operations called widgets. Each widget does a specific operation, such as read, multiply by a constant, sort, plot, and write data. DIT allows the user to select and order the widgets as desired to meet their specific needs. Originally it was written to capture a scientist's personal, iterative, data manipulation and quality control process of visually and programmatically iterating through inconsistent input data, examining it to find problems, adding operations to address the problems, and rerunning until the data could be translated into the GTN-P standard format. Iterative development of this tool led to a Fortran/Python hybrid then, with consideration of users, licensing, version control, packaging, and workflow, to a publically available, robust, usable application. Transitioning to Python allowed the use of open source frameworks for the workflow core and integration with a javascript graphical workflow interface. DIT is targeted to automatically handle 90% of the data processing for field scientists, modelers, and non-discipline scientists. It is available as an open source tool in GitHub packaged for a subset of Mac, Windows, and UNIX systems as a desktop application with a graphical workflow manager. DIT was used to completely translate one dataset (133 sites) that was successfully added to GTN-P, nearly translate three datasets

  3. Tools for Integrating Data Access from the IRIS DMC into Research Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, C. G.; Suleiman, Y. Y.; Trabant, C.; Karstens, R.; Weertman, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Web service interfaces at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) provide access to a vast archive of seismological and related geophysical data. These interfaces are designed to easily incorporate data access into data processing workflows. Examples of data that may be accessed include: time series data, related metadata, and earthquake information. The DMC has developed command line scripts, MATLAB® interfaces and a Java library to support a wide variety of data access needs. Users of these interfaces do not need to concern themselves with web service details, networking, or even (in most cases) data conversion. Fetch scripts allow access to the DMC archive and are a comfortable fit for command line users. These scripts are written in Perl and are well suited for automation and integration into existing workflows on most operating systems. For metdata and event information, the Fetch scripts even parse the returned data into simple text summaries. The IRIS Java Web Services Library (IRIS-WS Library) allows Java developers the ability to create programs that access the DMC archives seamlessly. By returning the data and information as native Java objects the Library insulates the developer from data formats, network programming and web service details. The MATLAB interfaces leverage this library to allow users access to the DMC archive directly from within MATLAB (r2009b or newer), returning data into variables for immediate use. Data users and research groups are developing other toolkits that use the DMC's web services. Notably, the ObsPy framework developed at LMU Munich is a Python Toolbox that allows seamless access to data and information via the DMC services. Another example is the MATLAB-based GISMO and Waveform Suite developments that can now access data via web services. In summary, there now exist a host of ways that researchers can bring IRIS DMC data directly into their workflows. MATLAB users can use irisFetch.m, command line users can use the various

  4. COSMOS: Python library for massively parallel workflows

    PubMed Central

    Gafni, Erik; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Lancaster, Alex K.; Hawkins, Jared B.; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Souilmi, Yassine; Wall, Dennis P.; Tonellato, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Efficient workflows to shepherd clinically generated genomic data through the multiple stages of a next-generation sequencing pipeline are of critical importance in translational biomedical science. Here we present COSMOS, a Python library for workflow management that allows formal description of pipelines and partitioning of jobs. In addition, it includes a user interface for tracking the progress of jobs, abstraction of the queuing system and fine-grained control over the workflow. Workflows can be created on traditional computing clusters as well as cloud-based services. Availability and implementation: Source code is available for academic non-commercial research purposes. Links to code and documentation are provided at http://lpm.hms.harvard.edu and http://wall-lab.stanford.edu. Contact: dpwall@stanford.edu or peter_tonellato@hms.harvard.edu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24982428

  5. COSMOS: Python library for massively parallel workflows.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Erik; Luquette, Lovelace J; Lancaster, Alex K; Hawkins, Jared B; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Souilmi, Yassine; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter J

    2014-10-15

    Efficient workflows to shepherd clinically generated genomic data through the multiple stages of a next-generation sequencing pipeline are of critical importance in translational biomedical science. Here we present COSMOS, a Python library for workflow management that allows formal description of pipelines and partitioning of jobs. In addition, it includes a user interface for tracking the progress of jobs, abstraction of the queuing system and fine-grained control over the workflow. Workflows can be created on traditional computing clusters as well as cloud-based services. Source code is available for academic non-commercial research purposes. Links to code and documentation are provided at http://lpm.hms.harvard.edu and http://wall-lab.stanford.edu. dpwall@stanford.edu or peter_tonellato@hms.harvard.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. CamBAfx: Workflow Design, Implementation and Application for Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Cinly; Bullmore, Edward T.; Wink, Alle-Meije; Sendur, Levent; Barnes, Anna; Achard, Sophie; Aspden, John; Abbott, Sanja; Yue, Shigang; Kitzbichler, Manfred; Meunier, David; Maxim, Voichita; Salvador, Raymond; Henty, Julian; Tait, Roger; Subramaniam, Naresh; Suckling, John

    2009-01-01

    CamBAfx is a workflow application designed for both researchers who use workflows to process data (consumers) and those who design them (designers). It provides a front-end (user interface) optimized for data processing designed in a way familiar to consumers. The back-end uses a pipeline model to represent workflows since this is a common and useful metaphor used by designers and is easy to manipulate compared to other representations like programming scripts. As an Eclipse Rich Client Platform application, CamBAfx's pipelines and functions can be bundled with the software or downloaded post-installation. The user interface contains all the workflow facilities expected by consumers. Using the Eclipse Extension Mechanism designers are encouraged to customize CamBAfx for their own pipelines. CamBAfx wraps a workflow facility around neuroinformatics software without modification. CamBAfx's design, licensing and Eclipse Branding Mechanism allow it to be used as the user interface for other software, facilitating exchange of innovative computational tools between originating labs. PMID:19826470

  7. Modeling workflow to design machine translation applications for public health practice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne M.; Brownstein, Megumu K.; Cole, Kate; Karasz, Hilary; Kirchhoff, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Provide a detailed understanding of the information workflow processes related to translating health promotion materials for limited English proficiency individuals in order to inform the design of context-driven machine translation (MT) tools for public health (PH). Materials and Methods We applied a cognitive work analysis framework to investigate the translation information workflow processes of two large health departments in Washington State. Researchers conducted interviews, performed a task analysis, and validated results with PH professionals to model translation workflow and identify functional requirements for a translation system for PH. Results The study resulted in a detailed description of work related to translation of PH materials, an information workflow diagram, and a description of attitudes towards MT technology. We identified a number of themes that hold design implications for incorporating MT in PH translation practice. A PH translation tool prototype was designed based on these findings. Discussion This study underscores the importance of understanding the work context and information workflow for which systems will be designed. Based on themes and translation information workflow processes, we identified key design guidelines for incorporating MT into PH translation work. Primary amongst these is that MT should be followed by human review for translations to be of high quality and for the technology to be adopted into practice. Counclusion The time and costs of creating multilingual health promotion materials are barriers to translation. PH personnel were interested in MT's potential to improve access to low-cost translated PH materials, but expressed concerns about ensuring quality. We outline design considerations and a potential machine translation tool to best fit MT systems into PH practice. PMID:25445922

  8. Design and implementation of a secure workflow system based on PKI/PMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Kai; Jiang, Chao-hui

    2013-03-01

    As the traditional workflow system in privilege management has the following weaknesses: low privilege management efficiency, overburdened for administrator, lack of trust authority etc. A secure workflow model based on PKI/PMI is proposed after studying security requirements of the workflow systems in-depth. This model can achieve static and dynamic authorization after verifying user's ID through PKC and validating user's privilege information by using AC in workflow system. Practice shows that this system can meet the security requirements of WfMS. Moreover, it can not only improve system security, but also ensures integrity, confidentiality, availability and non-repudiation of the data in the system.

  9. Using aerial images for establishing a workflow for the quantification of water management measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschner, Annette; Merz, Christoph; van Gasselt, Stephan; Steidl, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Quantified landscape characteristics, such as morphology, land use or hydrological conditions, play an important role for hydrological investigations as landscape parameters directly control the overall water balance. A powerful assimilation and geospatial analysis of remote sensing datasets in combination with hydrological modeling allows to quantify landscape parameters and water balances efficiently. This study focuses on the development of a workflow to extract hydrologically relevant data from aerial image datasets and derived products in order to allow an effective parametrization of a hydrological model. Consistent and self-contained data source are indispensable for achieving reasonable modeling results. In order to minimize uncertainties and inconsistencies, input parameters for modeling should be extracted from one remote-sensing dataset mainly if possbile. Here, aerial images have been chosen because of their high spatial and spectral resolution that permits the extraction of various model relevant parameters, like morphology, land-use or artificial drainage-systems. The methodological repertoire to extract environmental parameters range from analyses of digital terrain models, multispectral classification and segmentation of land use distribution maps and mapping of artificial drainage-systems based on spectral and visual inspection. The workflow has been tested for a mesoscale catchment area which forms a characteristic hydrological system of a young moraine landscape located in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. These dataset were used as input-dataset for multi-temporal hydrological modelling of water balances to detect and quantify anthropogenic and meteorological impacts. ArcSWAT, as a GIS-implemented extension and graphical user input interface for the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was chosen. The results of this modeling approach provide the basis for anticipating future development of the hydrological system, and regarding system changes for

  10. Facilitating hydrological data analysis workflows in R: the RHydro package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon; Skoien, Jon; Pebesma, Edzer; Reusser, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    The advent of new technologies such as web-services and big data analytics holds great promise for hydrological data analysis and simulation. Driven by the need for better water management tools, it allows for the construction of much more complex workflows, that integrate more and potentially more heterogeneous data sources with longer tool chains of algorithms and models. With the scientific challenge of designing the most adequate processing workflow comes the technical challenge of implementing the workflow with a minimal risk for errors. A wide variety of new workbench technologies and other data handling systems are being developed. At the same time, the functionality of available data processing languages such as R and Python is increasing at an accelerating pace. Because of the large diversity of scientific questions and simulation needs in hydrology, it is unlikely that one single optimal method for constructing hydrological data analysis workflows will emerge. Nevertheless, languages such as R and Python are quickly gaining popularity because they combine a wide array of functionality with high flexibility and versatility. The object-oriented nature of high-level data processing languages makes them particularly suited for the handling of complex and potentially large datasets. In this paper, we explore how handling and processing of hydrological data in R can be facilitated further by designing and implementing a set of relevant classes and methods in the experimental R package RHydro. We build upon existing efforts such as the sp and raster packages for spatial data and the spacetime package for spatiotemporal data to define classes for hydrological data (HydroST). In order to handle simulation data from hydrological models conveniently, a HM class is defined. Relevant methods are implemented to allow for an optimal integration of the HM class with existing model fitting and simulation functionality in R. Lastly, we discuss some of the design challenges

  11. xGDBvm: A Web GUI-Driven Workflow for Annotating Eukaryotic Genomes in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Duvick, Jon; Standage, Daniel S; Merchant, Nirav; Brendel, Volker P

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide annotation of gene structure requires the integration of numerous computational steps. Currently, annotation is arguably best accomplished through collaboration of bioinformatics and domain experts, with broad community involvement. However, such a collaborative approach is not scalable at today's pace of sequence generation. To address this problem, we developed the xGDBvm software, which uses an intuitive graphical user interface to access a number of common genome analysis and gene structure tools, preconfigured in a self-contained virtual machine image. Once their virtual machine instance is deployed through iPlant's Atmosphere cloud services, users access the xGDBvm workflow via a unified Web interface to manage inputs, set program parameters, configure links to high-performance computing (HPC) resources, view and manage output, apply analysis and editing tools, or access contextual help. The xGDBvm workflow will mask the genome, compute spliced alignments from transcript and/or protein inputs (locally or on a remote HPC cluster), predict gene structures and gene structure quality, and display output in a public or private genome browser complete with accessory tools. Problematic gene predictions are flagged and can be reannotated using the integrated yrGATE annotation tool. xGDBvm can also be configured to append or replace existing data or load precomputed data. Multiple genomes can be annotated and displayed, and outputs can be archived for sharing or backup. xGDBvm can be adapted to a variety of use cases including de novo genome annotation, reannotation, comparison of different annotations, and training or teaching. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  12. Create, run, share, publish, and reference your LC-MS, FIA-MS, GC-MS, and NMR data analysis workflows with the Workflow4Metabolomics 3.0 Galaxy online infrastructure for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Guitton, Yann; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Martin, Jean-François; Pétéra, Mélanie; Roger-Mele, Pierrick; Delabrière, Alexis; Goulitquer, Sophie; Monsoor, Misharl; Duperier, Christophe; Canlet, Cécile; Servien, Rémi; Tardivel, Patrick; Caron, Christophe; Giacomoni, Franck; Thévenot, Etienne A

    2017-12-01

    Metabolomics is a key approach in modern functional genomics and systems biology. Due to the complexity of metabolomics data, the variety of experimental designs, and the multiplicity of bioinformatics tools, providing experimenters with a simple and efficient resource to conduct comprehensive and rigorous analysis of their data is of utmost importance. In 2014, we launched the Workflow4Metabolomics (W4M; http://workflow4metabolomics.org) online infrastructure for metabolomics built on the Galaxy environment, which offers user-friendly features to build and run data analysis workflows including preprocessing, statistical analysis, and annotation steps. Here we present the new W4M 3.0 release, which contains twice as many tools as the first version, and provides two features which are, to our knowledge, unique among online resources. First, data from the four major metabolomics technologies (i.e., LC-MS, FIA-MS, GC-MS, and NMR) can be analyzed on a single platform. By using three studies in human physiology, alga evolution, and animal toxicology, we demonstrate how the 40 available tools can be easily combined to address biological issues. Second, the full analysis (including the workflow, the parameter values, the input data and output results) can be referenced with a permanent digital object identifier (DOI). Publication of data analyses is of major importance for robust and reproducible science. Furthermore, the publicly shared workflows are of high-value for e-learning and training. The Workflow4Metabolomics 3.0 e-infrastructure thus not only offers a unique online environment for analysis of data from the main metabolomics technologies, but it is also the first reference repository for metabolomics workflows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Workflow as a Service in the Cloud: Architecture and Scheduling Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwu; Korambath, Prakashan; Altintas, Ilkay; Davis, Jim; Crawl, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    With more and more workflow systems adopting cloud as their execution environment, it becomes increasingly challenging on how to efficiently manage various workflows, virtual machines (VMs) and workflow execution on VM instances. To make the system scalable and easy-to-extend, we design a Workflow as a Service (WFaaS) architecture with independent services. A core part of the architecture is how to efficiently respond continuous workflow requests from users and schedule their executions in the cloud. Based on different targets, we propose four heuristic workflow scheduling algorithms for the WFaaS architecture, and analyze the differences and best usages of the algorithms in terms of performance, cost and the price/performance ratio via experimental studies. PMID:29399237

  14. Workflow as a Service in the Cloud: Architecture and Scheduling Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwu; Korambath, Prakashan; Altintas, Ilkay; Davis, Jim; Crawl, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    With more and more workflow systems adopting cloud as their execution environment, it becomes increasingly challenging on how to efficiently manage various workflows, virtual machines (VMs) and workflow execution on VM instances. To make the system scalable and easy-to-extend, we design a Workflow as a Service (WFaaS) architecture with independent services. A core part of the architecture is how to efficiently respond continuous workflow requests from users and schedule their executions in the cloud. Based on different targets, we propose four heuristic workflow scheduling algorithms for the WFaaS architecture, and analyze the differences and best usages of the algorithms in terms of performance, cost and the price/performance ratio via experimental studies.

  15. A Computational Workflow for the Automated Generation of Models of Genetic Designs.

    PubMed

    Misirli, Göksel; Nguyen, Tramy; McLaughlin, James Alastair; Vaidyanathan, Prashant; Jones, Timothy S; Densmore, Douglas; Myers, Chris; Wipat, Anil

    2018-06-05

    Computational models are essential to engineer predictable biological systems and to scale up this process for complex systems. Computational modeling often requires expert knowledge and data to build models. Clearly, manual creation of models is not scalable for large designs. Despite several automated model construction approaches, computational methodologies to bridge knowledge in design repositories and the process of creating computational models have still not been established. This paper describes a workflow for automatic generation of computational models of genetic circuits from data stored in design repositories using existing standards. This workflow leverages the software tool SBOLDesigner to build structural models that are then enriched by the Virtual Parts Repository API using Systems Biology Open Language (SBOL) data fetched from the SynBioHub design repository. The iBioSim software tool is then utilized to convert this SBOL description into a computational model encoded using the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). Finally, this SBML model can be simulated using a variety of methods. This workflow provides synthetic biologists with easy to use tools to create predictable biological systems, hiding away the complexity of building computational models. This approach can further be incorporated into other computational workflows for design automation.

  16. RetroPath2.0: A retrosynthesis workflow for metabolic engineers.

    PubMed

    Delépine, Baudoin; Duigou, Thomas; Carbonell, Pablo; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic biology applied to industrial biotechnology is transforming the way we produce chemicals. However, despite advances in the scale and scope of metabolic engineering, the research and development process still remains costly. In order to expand the chemical repertoire for the production of next generation compounds, a major engineering biology effort is required in the development of novel design tools that target chemical diversity through rapid and predictable protocols. Addressing that goal involves retrosynthesis approaches that explore the chemical biosynthetic space. However, the complexity associated with the large combinatorial retrosynthesis design space has often been recognized as the main challenge hindering the approach. Here, we provide RetroPath2.0, an automated open source workflow for retrosynthesis based on generalized reaction rules that perform the retrosynthesis search from chassis to target through an efficient and well-controlled protocol. Its easiness of use and the versatility of its applications make this tool a valuable addition to the biological engineer bench desk. We show through several examples the application of the workflow to biotechnological relevant problems, including the identification of alternative biosynthetic routes through enzyme promiscuity or the development of biosensors. We demonstrate in that way the ability of the workflow to streamline retrosynthesis pathway design and its major role in reshaping the design, build, test and learn pipeline by driving the process toward the objective of optimizing bioproduction. The RetroPath2.0 workflow is built using tools developed by the bioinformatics and cheminformatics community, because it is open source we anticipate community contributions will likely expand further the features of the workflow. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A workflow learning model to improve geovisual analytics utility

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Robert E; MacEachren, Alan M; McCabe, Craig A

    2011-01-01

    concept of scientific workflows. Second, we implemented an interface in the G-EX Portal Learn Module to demonstrate the workflow learning model. The workflow interface allows users to drag learning artifacts uploaded to the G-EX Portal onto a central whiteboard and then annotate the workflow using text and drawing tools. Once completed, users can visit the assembled workflow to get an idea of the kind, number, and scale of analysis steps, view individual learning artifacts associated with each node in the workflow, and ask questions about the overall workflow or individual learning artifacts through the associated forums. An example learning workflow in the domain of epidemiology is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. Results/Conclusions In the context of geovisual analytics, GIScientists are not only responsible for developing software to facilitate visually-mediated reasoning about large and complex spatiotemporal information, but also for ensuring that this software works. The workflow learning model discussed in this paper and demonstrated in the G-EX Portal Learn Module is one approach to improving the utility of geovisual analytics software. While development of the G-EX Portal Learn Module is ongoing, we expect to release the G-EX Portal Learn Module by Summer 2009. PMID:21983545

  18. A workflow learning model to improve geovisual analytics utility.

    PubMed

    Roth, Robert E; Maceachren, Alan M; McCabe, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    the concept of scientific workflows. Second, we implemented an interface in the G-EX Portal Learn Module to demonstrate the workflow learning model. The workflow interface allows users to drag learning artifacts uploaded to the G-EX Portal onto a central whiteboard and then annotate the workflow using text and drawing tools. Once completed, users can visit the assembled workflow to get an idea of the kind, number, and scale of analysis steps, view individual learning artifacts associated with each node in the workflow, and ask questions about the overall workflow or individual learning artifacts through the associated forums. An example learning workflow in the domain of epidemiology is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: In the context of geovisual analytics, GIScientists are not only responsible for developing software to facilitate visually-mediated reasoning about large and complex spatiotemporal information, but also for ensuring that this software works. The workflow learning model discussed in this paper and demonstrated in the G-EX Portal Learn Module is one approach to improving the utility of geovisual analytics software. While development of the G-EX Portal Learn Module is ongoing, we expect to release the G-EX Portal Learn Module by Summer 2009.

  19. SHIWA Services for Workflow Creation and Sharing in Hydrometeorolog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terstyanszky, Gabor; Kiss, Tamas; Kacsuk, Peter; Sipos, Gergely

    2014-05-01

    pre-deployed workflow engines or submits workflow engines with the workflow to local or remote resources to execute workflows. The SHIWA Proxy Server manages certificates needed to execute the workflows on different DCIs. Currently SSP supports sharing of ASKALON, Galaxy, GWES, Kepler, LONI Pipeline, MOTEUR, Pegasus, P-GRADE, ProActive, Triana, Taverna and WS-PGRADE workflows. Further workflow systems can be added to the simulation platform as required by research communities. The FP7 'Building a European Research Community through Interoperable Workflows and Data' (ER-flow) project disseminates the achievements of the SHIWA project to build workflow user communities across Europe. ER-flow provides application supports to research communities within (Astrophysics, Computational Chemistry, Heliophysics and Life Sciences) and beyond (Hydrometeorology and Seismology) to develop, share and run workflows through the simulation platform. The simulation platform supports four usage scenarios: creating and publishing workflows in the repository, searching and selecting workflows in the repository, executing non-native workflows and creating and running meta-workflows. The presentation will outline the CGI concept, the SHIWA Simulation Platform, the ER-flow usage scenarios and how the Hydrometeorology research community runs simulations on SSP.

  20. The BioExtract Server: a web-based bioinformatic workflow platform

    PubMed Central

    Lushbough, Carol M.; Jennewein, Douglas M.; Brendel, Volker P.

    2011-01-01

    The BioExtract Server (bioextract.org) is an open, web-based system designed to aid researchers in the analysis of genomic data by providing a platform for the creation of bioinformatic workflows. Scientific workflows are created within the system by recording tasks performed by the user. These tasks may include querying multiple, distributed data sources, saving query results as searchable data extracts, and executing local and web-accessible analytic tools. The series of recorded tasks can then be saved as a reproducible, sharable workflow available for subsequent execution with the original or modified inputs and parameter settings. Integrated data resources include interfaces to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) nucleotide and protein databases, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL-Bank) non-redundant nucleotide database, the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt), and the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef) database. The system offers access to numerous preinstalled, curated analytic tools and also provides researchers with the option of selecting computational tools from a large list of web services including the European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite (EMBOSS), BioMoby, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). The system further allows users to integrate local command line tools residing on their own computers through a client-side Java applet. PMID:21546552

  1. Experiences and lessons learned from creating a generalized workflow for data publication of field campaign datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Ramachandran, R.; Deb, D.; Beaty, T.; Wright, D.

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the workflow challenges of curating and publishing data produced from disparate data sources and provides a generalized workflow solution to efficiently archive data generated by researchers. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics and the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) DAAC have been collaborating on the development of a generalized workflow solution to efficiently manage the data publication process. The generalized workflow presented here are built on lessons learned from implementations of the workflow system. Data publication consists of the following steps: Accepting the data package from the data providers, ensuring the full integrity of the data files. Identifying and addressing data quality issues Assembling standardized, detailed metadata and documentation, including file level details, processing methodology, and characteristics of data files Setting up data access mechanisms Setup of the data in data tools and services for improved data dissemination and user experience Registering the dataset in online search and discovery catalogues Preserving the data location through Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) We will describe the steps taken to automate, and realize efficiencies to the above process. The goals of the workflow system are to reduce the time taken to publish a dataset, to increase the quality of documentation and metadata, and to track individual datasets through the data curation process. Utilities developed to achieve these goal will be described. We will also share metrics driven value of the workflow system and discuss the future steps towards creation of a common software framework.

  2. Improving diabetes population management efficiency with an informatics solution.

    PubMed

    Zai, Adrian; Grant, Richard; Andrews, Carl; Yee, Ronnie; Chueh, Henry

    2007-10-11

    Despite intensive resource use for diabetes management in the U.S., our care continues to fall short of evidence-based goals, partly due to system inefficiencies. Diabetes registries are increasingly being utilized as a critical tool for population level disease management by providing real-time data. Since the successful adoption of a diabetes registry depends on how well it integrates with disease management workflows, we optimized our current diabetes management workflow and designed our registry application around it.

  3. A Drupal-Based Collaborative Framework for Science Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Gandara, A.

    2010-12-01

    Cyber-infrastructure is built from utilizing technical infrastructure to support organizational practices and social norms to provide support for scientific teams working together or dependent on each other to conduct scientific research. Such cyber-infrastructure enables the sharing of information and data so that scientists can leverage knowledge and expertise through automation. Scientific workflow systems have been used to build automated scientific systems used by scientists to conduct scientific research and, as a result, create artifacts in support of scientific discoveries. These complex systems are often developed by teams of scientists who are located in different places, e.g., scientists working in distinct buildings, and sometimes in different time zones, e.g., scientist working in distinct national laboratories. The sharing of these specifications is currently supported by the use of version control systems such as CVS or Subversion. Discussions about the design, improvement, and testing of these specifications, however, often happen elsewhere, e.g., through the exchange of email messages and IM chatting. Carrying on a discussion about these specifications is challenging because comments and specifications are not necessarily connected. For instance, the person reading a comment about a given workflow specification may not be able to see the workflow and even if the person can see the workflow, the person may not specifically know to which part of the workflow a given comments applies to. In this paper, we discuss the design, implementation and use of CI-Server, a Drupal-based infrastructure, to support the collaboration of both local and distributed teams of scientists using scientific workflows. CI-Server has three primary goals: to enable information sharing by providing tools that scientists can use within their scientific research to process data, publish and share artifacts; to build community by providing tools that support discussions between

  4. xGDBvm: A Web GUI-Driven Workflow for Annotating Eukaryotic Genomes in the Cloud[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide annotation of gene structure requires the integration of numerous computational steps. Currently, annotation is arguably best accomplished through collaboration of bioinformatics and domain experts, with broad community involvement. However, such a collaborative approach is not scalable at today’s pace of sequence generation. To address this problem, we developed the xGDBvm software, which uses an intuitive graphical user interface to access a number of common genome analysis and gene structure tools, preconfigured in a self-contained virtual machine image. Once their virtual machine instance is deployed through iPlant’s Atmosphere cloud services, users access the xGDBvm workflow via a unified Web interface to manage inputs, set program parameters, configure links to high-performance computing (HPC) resources, view and manage output, apply analysis and editing tools, or access contextual help. The xGDBvm workflow will mask the genome, compute spliced alignments from transcript and/or protein inputs (locally or on a remote HPC cluster), predict gene structures and gene structure quality, and display output in a public or private genome browser complete with accessory tools. Problematic gene predictions are flagged and can be reannotated using the integrated yrGATE annotation tool. xGDBvm can also be configured to append or replace existing data or load precomputed data. Multiple genomes can be annotated and displayed, and outputs can be archived for sharing or backup. xGDBvm can be adapted to a variety of use cases including de novo genome annotation, reannotation, comparison of different annotations, and training or teaching. PMID:27020957

  5. Workflow4Metabolomics: a collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Giacomoni, Franck; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Monsoor, Misharl; Landi, Marion; Pericard, Pierre; Pétéra, Mélanie; Duperier, Christophe; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Martin, Jean-François; Jacob, Daniel; Goulitquer, Sophie; Thévenot, Etienne A.; Caron, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The complex, rapidly evolving field of computational metabolomics calls for collaborative infrastructures where the large volume of new algorithms for data pre-processing, statistical analysis and annotation can be readily integrated whatever the language, evaluated on reference datasets and chained to build ad hoc workflows for users. We have developed Workflow4Metabolomics (W4M), the first fully open-source and collaborative online platform for computational metabolomics. W4M is a virtual research environment built upon the Galaxy web-based platform technology. It enables ergonomic integration, exchange and running of individual modules and workflows. Alternatively, the whole W4M framework and computational tools can be downloaded as a virtual machine for local installation. Availability and implementation: http://workflow4metabolomics.org homepage enables users to open a private account and access the infrastructure. W4M is developed and maintained by the French Bioinformatics Institute (IFB) and the French Metabolomics and Fluxomics Infrastructure (MetaboHUB). Contact: contact@workflow4metabolomics.org PMID:25527831

  6. Closha: bioinformatics workflow system for the analysis of massive sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Ko, GunHwan; Kim, Pan-Gyu; Yoon, Jongcheol; Han, Gukhee; Park, Seong-Jin; Song, Wangho; Lee, Byungwook

    2018-02-19

    While next-generation sequencing (NGS) costs have fallen in recent years, the cost and complexity of computation remain substantial obstacles to the use of NGS in bio-medical care and genomic research. The rapidly increasing amounts of data available from the new high-throughput methods have made data processing infeasible without automated pipelines. The integration of data and analytic resources into workflow systems provides a solution to the problem by simplifying the task of data analysis. To address this challenge, we developed a cloud-based workflow management system, Closha, to provide fast and cost-effective analysis of massive genomic data. We implemented complex workflows making optimal use of high-performance computing clusters. Closha allows users to create multi-step analyses using drag and drop functionality and to modify the parameters of pipeline tools. Users can also import the Galaxy pipelines into Closha. Closha is a hybrid system that enables users to use both analysis programs providing traditional tools and MapReduce-based big data analysis programs simultaneously in a single pipeline. Thus, the execution of analytics algorithms can be parallelized, speeding up the whole process. We also developed a high-speed data transmission solution, KoDS, to transmit a large amount of data at a fast rate. KoDS has a file transfer speed of up to 10 times that of normal FTP and HTTP. The computer hardware for Closha is 660 CPU cores and 800 TB of disk storage, enabling 500 jobs to run at the same time. Closha is a scalable, cost-effective, and publicly available web service for large-scale genomic data analysis. Closha supports the reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analysis workflows in a fully automated manner. Closha provides a user-friendly interface to all genomic scientists to try to derive accurate results from NGS platform data. The Closha cloud server is freely available for use from http://closha.kobic.re.kr/ .

  7. An integrated development workflow for community-driven FOSS-projects using continuous integration tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilke, Lars; Watanabe, Norihiro; Naumov, Dmitri; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    A complex software project in general with high standards regarding code quality requires automated tools to help developers in doing repetitive and tedious tasks such as compilation on different platforms and configurations, doing unit testing as well as end-to-end tests and generating distributable binaries and documentation. This is known as continuous integration (CI). A community-driven FOSS-project within the Earth Sciences benefits even more from CI as time and resources regarding software development are often limited. Therefore testing developed code on more than the developers PC is a task which is often neglected and where CI can be the solution. We developed an integrated workflow based on GitHub, Travis and Jenkins for the community project OpenGeoSys - a coupled multiphysics modeling and simulation package - allowing developers to concentrate on implementing new features in a tight feedback loop. Every interested developer/user can create a pull request containing source code modifications on the online collaboration platform GitHub. The modifications are checked (compilation, compiler warnings, memory leaks, undefined behaviors, unit tests, end-to-end tests, analyzing differences in simulation run results between changes etc.) from the CI system which automatically responds to the pull request or by email on success or failure with detailed reports eventually requesting to improve the modifications. Core team developers review the modifications and merge them into the main development line once they satisfy agreed standards. We aim for efficient data structures and algorithms, self-explaining code, comprehensive documentation and high test code coverage. This workflow keeps entry barriers to get involved into the project low and permits an agile development process concentrating on feature additions rather than software maintenance procedures.

  8. The MPO system for automatic workflow documentation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Abla, G.; Coviello, E. N.; Flanagan, S. M.

    Data from large-scale experiments and extreme-scale computing is expensive to produce and may be used for critical applications. However, it is not the mere existence of data that is important, but our ability to make use of it. Experience has shown that when metadata is better organized and more complete, the underlying data becomes more useful. Traditionally, capturing the steps of scientific workflows and metadata was the role of the lab notebook, but the digital era has resulted instead in the fragmentation of data, processing, and annotation. Here, this article presents the Metadata, Provenance, and Ontology (MPO) System, the softwaremore » that can automate the documentation of scientific workflows and associated information. Based on recorded metadata, it provides explicit information about the relationships among the elements of workflows in notebook form augmented with directed acyclic graphs. A set of web-based graphical navigation tools and Application Programming Interface (API) have been created for searching and browsing, as well as programmatically accessing the workflows and data. We describe the MPO concepts and its software architecture. We also report the current status of the software as well as the initial deployment experience.« less

  9. The MPO system for automatic workflow documentation

    DOE PAGES

    Abla, G.; Coviello, E. N.; Flanagan, S. M.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Data from large-scale experiments and extreme-scale computing is expensive to produce and may be used for critical applications. However, it is not the mere existence of data that is important, but our ability to make use of it. Experience has shown that when metadata is better organized and more complete, the underlying data becomes more useful. Traditionally, capturing the steps of scientific workflows and metadata was the role of the lab notebook, but the digital era has resulted instead in the fragmentation of data, processing, and annotation. Here, this article presents the Metadata, Provenance, and Ontology (MPO) System, the softwaremore » that can automate the documentation of scientific workflows and associated information. Based on recorded metadata, it provides explicit information about the relationships among the elements of workflows in notebook form augmented with directed acyclic graphs. A set of web-based graphical navigation tools and Application Programming Interface (API) have been created for searching and browsing, as well as programmatically accessing the workflows and data. We describe the MPO concepts and its software architecture. We also report the current status of the software as well as the initial deployment experience.« less

  10. An evolving computational platform for biological mass spectrometry: workflows, statistics and data mining with MASSyPup64.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In biological mass spectrometry, crude instrumental data need to be converted into meaningful theoretical models. Several data processing and data evaluation steps are required to come to the final results. These operations are often difficult to reproduce, because of too specific computing platforms. This effect, known as 'workflow decay', can be diminished by using a standardized informatic infrastructure. Thus, we compiled an integrated platform, which contains ready-to-use tools and workflows for mass spectrometry data analysis. Apart from general unit operations, such as peak picking and identification of proteins and metabolites, we put a strong emphasis on the statistical validation of results and Data Mining. MASSyPup64 includes e.g., the OpenMS/TOPPAS framework, the Trans-Proteomic-Pipeline programs, the ProteoWizard tools, X!Tandem, Comet and SpiderMass. The statistical computing language R is installed with packages for MS data analyses, such as XCMS/metaXCMS and MetabR. The R package Rattle provides a user-friendly access to multiple Data Mining methods. Further, we added the non-conventional spreadsheet program teapot for editing large data sets and a command line tool for transposing large matrices. Individual programs, console commands and modules can be integrated using the Workflow Management System (WMS) taverna. We explain the useful combination of the tools by practical examples: (1) A workflow for protein identification and validation, with subsequent Association Analysis of peptides, (2) Cluster analysis and Data Mining in targeted Metabolomics, and (3) Raw data processing, Data Mining and identification of metabolites in untargeted Metabolomics. Association Analyses reveal relationships between variables across different sample sets. We present its application for finding co-occurring peptides, which can be used for target proteomics, the discovery of alternative biomarkers and protein-protein interactions. Data Mining derived models

  11. Optimization of tomographic reconstruction workflows on geographically distributed resources

    DOE PAGES

    Bicer, Tekin; Gursoy, Doga; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; ...

    2016-01-01

    New technological advancements in synchrotron light sources enable data acquisitions at unprecedented levels. This emergent trend affects not only the size of the generated data but also the need for larger computational resources. Although beamline scientists and users have access to local computational resources, these are typically limited and can result in extended execution times. Applications that are based on iterative processing as in tomographic reconstruction methods require high-performance compute clusters for timely analysis of data. Here, time-sensitive analysis and processing of Advanced Photon Source data on geographically distributed resources are focused on. Two main challenges are considered: (i) modelingmore » of the performance of tomographic reconstruction workflows and (ii) transparent execution of these workflows on distributed resources. For the former, three main stages are considered: (i) data transfer between storage and computational resources, (i) wait/queue time of reconstruction jobs at compute resources, and (iii) computation of reconstruction tasks. These performance models allow evaluation and estimation of the execution time of any given iterative tomographic reconstruction workflow that runs on geographically distributed resources. For the latter challenge, a workflow management system is built, which can automate the execution of workflows and minimize the user interaction with the underlying infrastructure. The system utilizes Globus to perform secure and efficient data transfer operations. The proposed models and the workflow management system are evaluated by using three high-performance computing and two storage resources, all of which are geographically distributed. Workflows were created with different computational requirements using two compute-intensive tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Experimental evaluation shows that the proposed models and system can be used for selecting the optimum resources, which in

  12. Optimization of tomographic reconstruction workflows on geographically distributed resources

    PubMed Central

    Bicer, Tekin; Gürsoy, Doǧa; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; De Carlo, Francesco; Foster, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    New technological advancements in synchrotron light sources enable data acquisitions at unprecedented levels. This emergent trend affects not only the size of the generated data but also the need for larger computational resources. Although beamline scientists and users have access to local computational resources, these are typically limited and can result in extended execution times. Applications that are based on iterative processing as in tomographic reconstruction methods require high-performance compute clusters for timely analysis of data. Here, time-sensitive analysis and processing of Advanced Photon Source data on geographically distributed resources are focused on. Two main challenges are considered: (i) modeling of the performance of tomographic reconstruction workflows and (ii) transparent execution of these workflows on distributed resources. For the former, three main stages are considered: (i) data transfer between storage and computational resources, (i) wait/queue time of reconstruction jobs at compute resources, and (iii) computation of reconstruction tasks. These performance models allow evaluation and estimation of the execution time of any given iterative tomographic reconstruction workflow that runs on geographically distributed resources. For the latter challenge, a workflow management system is built, which can automate the execution of workflows and minimize the user interaction with the underlying infrastructure. The system utilizes Globus to perform secure and efficient data transfer operations. The proposed models and the workflow management system are evaluated by using three high-performance computing and two storage resources, all of which are geographically distributed. Workflows were created with different computational requirements using two compute-intensive tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Experimental evaluation shows that the proposed models and system can be used for selecting the optimum resources, which in turn can

  13. Optimization of tomographic reconstruction workflows on geographically distributed resources

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bicer, Tekin; Gursoy, Doga; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar

    New technological advancements in synchrotron light sources enable data acquisitions at unprecedented levels. This emergent trend affects not only the size of the generated data but also the need for larger computational resources. Although beamline scientists and users have access to local computational resources, these are typically limited and can result in extended execution times. Applications that are based on iterative processing as in tomographic reconstruction methods require high-performance compute clusters for timely analysis of data. Here, time-sensitive analysis and processing of Advanced Photon Source data on geographically distributed resources are focused on. Two main challenges are considered: (i) modelingmore » of the performance of tomographic reconstruction workflows and (ii) transparent execution of these workflows on distributed resources. For the former, three main stages are considered: (i) data transfer between storage and computational resources, (i) wait/queue time of reconstruction jobs at compute resources, and (iii) computation of reconstruction tasks. These performance models allow evaluation and estimation of the execution time of any given iterative tomographic reconstruction workflow that runs on geographically distributed resources. For the latter challenge, a workflow management system is built, which can automate the execution of workflows and minimize the user interaction with the underlying infrastructure. The system utilizes Globus to perform secure and efficient data transfer operations. The proposed models and the workflow management system are evaluated by using three high-performance computing and two storage resources, all of which are geographically distributed. Workflows were created with different computational requirements using two compute-intensive tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Experimental evaluation shows that the proposed models and system can be used for selecting the optimum resources, which in

  14. Hermes: Seamless delivery of containerized bioinformatics workflows in hybrid cloud (HTC) environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintsakis, Athanassios M.; Psomopoulos, Fotis E.; Symeonidis, Andreas L.; Mitkas, Pericles A.

    Hermes introduces a new "describe once, run anywhere" paradigm for the execution of bioinformatics workflows in hybrid cloud environments. It combines the traditional features of parallelization-enabled workflow management systems and of distributed computing platforms in a container-based approach. It offers seamless deployment, overcoming the burden of setting up and configuring the software and network requirements. Most importantly, Hermes fosters the reproducibility of scientific workflows by supporting standardization of the software execution environment, thus leading to consistent scientific workflow results and accelerating scientific output.

  15. Business intelligence tools for radiology: creating a prototype model using open-source tools.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Hanson, Richard; Kelly, Pauline; Khorasani, Ramin

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiology departments could benefit from the ability to integrate and visualize data (e.g. information reflecting complex workflow states) from all of their imaging and information management systems in one composite presentation view. Leveraging data warehousing tools developed in the business world may be one way to achieve this capability. In total, the concept of managing the information available in this data repository is known as Business Intelligence or BI. This paper describes the concepts used in Business Intelligence, their importance to modern Radiology, and the steps used in the creation of a prototype model of a data warehouse for BI using open-source tools.

  16. Optimizing high performance computing workflow for protein functional annotation

    PubMed Central

    Stanberry, Larissa; Rekepalli, Bhanu; Liu, Yuan; Giblock, Paul; Higdon, Roger; Montague, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Functional annotation of newly sequenced genomes is one of the major challenges in modern biology. With modern sequencing technologies, the protein sequence universe is rapidly expanding. Newly sequenced bacterial genomes alone contain over 7.5 million proteins. The rate of data generation has far surpassed that of protein annotation. The volume of protein data makes manual curation infeasible, whereas a high compute cost limits the utility of existing automated approaches. In this work, we present an improved and optmized automated workflow to enable large-scale protein annotation. The workflow uses high performance computing architectures and a low complexity classification algorithm to assign proteins into existing clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. On the basis of the Position-Specific Iterative Basic Local Alignment Search Tool the algorithm ensures at least 80% specificity and sensitivity of the resulting classifications. The workflow utilizes highly scalable parallel applications for classification and sequence alignment. Using Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment supercomputers, the workflow processed 1,200,000 newly sequenced bacterial proteins. With the rapid expansion of the protein sequence universe, the proposed workflow will enable scientists to annotate big genome data. PMID:25313296

  17. Optimizing high performance computing workflow for protein functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Stanberry, Larissa; Rekepalli, Bhanu; Liu, Yuan; Giblock, Paul; Higdon, Roger; Montague, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2014-09-10

    Functional annotation of newly sequenced genomes is one of the major challenges in modern biology. With modern sequencing technologies, the protein sequence universe is rapidly expanding. Newly sequenced bacterial genomes alone contain over 7.5 million proteins. The rate of data generation has far surpassed that of protein annotation. The volume of protein data makes manual curation infeasible, whereas a high compute cost limits the utility of existing automated approaches. In this work, we present an improved and optmized automated workflow to enable large-scale protein annotation. The workflow uses high performance computing architectures and a low complexity classification algorithm to assign proteins into existing clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. On the basis of the Position-Specific Iterative Basic Local Alignment Search Tool the algorithm ensures at least 80% specificity and sensitivity of the resulting classifications. The workflow utilizes highly scalable parallel applications for classification and sequence alignment. Using Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment supercomputers, the workflow processed 1,200,000 newly sequenced bacterial proteins. With the rapid expansion of the protein sequence universe, the proposed workflow will enable scientists to annotate big genome data.

  18. Deploying and sharing U-Compare workflows as web services.

    PubMed

    Kontonatsios, Georgios; Korkontzelos, Ioannis; Kolluru, Balakrishna; Thompson, Paul; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-02-18

    U-Compare is a text mining platform that allows the construction, evaluation and comparison of text mining workflows. U-Compare contains a large library of components that are tuned to the biomedical domain. Users can rapidly develop biomedical text mining workflows by mixing and matching U-Compare's components. Workflows developed using U-Compare can be exported and sent to other users who, in turn, can import and re-use them. However, the resulting workflows are standalone applications, i.e., software tools that run and are accessible only via a local machine, and that can only be run with the U-Compare platform. We address the above issues by extending U-Compare to convert standalone workflows into web services automatically, via a two-click process. The resulting web services can be registered on a central server and made publicly available. Alternatively, users can make web services available on their own servers, after installing the web application framework, which is part of the extension to U-Compare. We have performed a user-oriented evaluation of the proposed extension, by asking users who have tested the enhanced functionality of U-Compare to complete questionnaires that assess its functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency and maintainability. The results obtained reveal that the new functionality is well received by users. The web services produced by U-Compare are built on top of open standards, i.e., REST and SOAP protocols, and therefore, they are decoupled from the underlying platform. Exported workflows can be integrated with any application that supports these open standards. We demonstrate how the newly extended U-Compare enhances the cross-platform interoperability of workflows, by seamlessly importing a number of text mining workflow web services exported from U-Compare into Taverna, i.e., a generic scientific workflow construction platform.

  19. Deploying and sharing U-Compare workflows as web services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background U-Compare is a text mining platform that allows the construction, evaluation and comparison of text mining workflows. U-Compare contains a large library of components that are tuned to the biomedical domain. Users can rapidly develop biomedical text mining workflows by mixing and matching U-Compare’s components. Workflows developed using U-Compare can be exported and sent to other users who, in turn, can import and re-use them. However, the resulting workflows are standalone applications, i.e., software tools that run and are accessible only via a local machine, and that can only be run with the U-Compare platform. Results We address the above issues by extending U-Compare to convert standalone workflows into web services automatically, via a two-click process. The resulting web services can be registered on a central server and made publicly available. Alternatively, users can make web services available on their own servers, after installing the web application framework, which is part of the extension to U-Compare. We have performed a user-oriented evaluation of the proposed extension, by asking users who have tested the enhanced functionality of U-Compare to complete questionnaires that assess its functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency and maintainability. The results obtained reveal that the new functionality is well received by users. Conclusions The web services produced by U-Compare are built on top of open standards, i.e., REST and SOAP protocols, and therefore, they are decoupled from the underlying platform. Exported workflows can be integrated with any application that supports these open standards. We demonstrate how the newly extended U-Compare enhances the cross-platform interoperability of workflows, by seamlessly importing a number of text mining workflow web services exported from U-Compare into Taverna, i.e., a generic scientific workflow construction platform. PMID:23419017

  20. VIPER: Visualization Pipeline for RNA-seq, a Snakemake workflow for efficient and complete RNA-seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, MacIntosh; Vangala, Mahesh; Taing, Len; Herbert, Zachary; Köster, Johannes; Li, Bo; Sun, Hanfei; Li, Taiwen; Zhang, Jian; Qiu, Xintao; Pun, Matthew; Jeselsohn, Rinath; Brown, Myles; Liu, X Shirley; Long, Henry W

    2018-04-12

    RNA sequencing has become a ubiquitous technology used throughout life sciences as an effective method of measuring RNA abundance quantitatively in tissues and cells. The increase in use of RNA-seq technology has led to the continuous development of new tools for every step of analysis from alignment to downstream pathway analysis. However, effectively using these analysis tools in a scalable and reproducible way can be challenging, especially for non-experts. Using the workflow management system Snakemake we have developed a user friendly, fast, efficient, and comprehensive pipeline for RNA-seq analysis. VIPER (Visualization Pipeline for RNA-seq analysis) is an analysis workflow that combines some of the most popular tools to take RNA-seq analysis from raw sequencing data, through alignment and quality control, into downstream differential expression and pathway analysis. VIPER has been created in a modular fashion to allow for the rapid incorporation of new tools to expand the capabilities. This capacity has already been exploited to include very recently developed tools that explore immune infiltrate and T-cell CDR (Complementarity-Determining Regions) reconstruction abilities. The pipeline has been conveniently packaged such that minimal computational skills are required to download and install the dozens of software packages that VIPER uses. VIPER is a comprehensive solution that performs most standard RNA-seq analyses quickly and effectively with a built-in capacity for customization and expansion.

  1. Workflow4Metabolomics: a collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Giacomoni, Franck; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Monsoor, Misharl; Landi, Marion; Pericard, Pierre; Pétéra, Mélanie; Duperier, Christophe; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Martin, Jean-François; Jacob, Daniel; Goulitquer, Sophie; Thévenot, Etienne A; Caron, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    The complex, rapidly evolving field of computational metabolomics calls for collaborative infrastructures where the large volume of new algorithms for data pre-processing, statistical analysis and annotation can be readily integrated whatever the language, evaluated on reference datasets and chained to build ad hoc workflows for users. We have developed Workflow4Metabolomics (W4M), the first fully open-source and collaborative online platform for computational metabolomics. W4M is a virtual research environment built upon the Galaxy web-based platform technology. It enables ergonomic integration, exchange and running of individual modules and workflows. Alternatively, the whole W4M framework and computational tools can be downloaded as a virtual machine for local installation. http://workflow4metabolomics.org homepage enables users to open a private account and access the infrastructure. W4M is developed and maintained by the French Bioinformatics Institute (IFB) and the French Metabolomics and Fluxomics Infrastructure (MetaboHUB). contact@workflow4metabolomics.org. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Confidentiality Protection of User Data and Adaptive Resource Allocation for Managing Multiple Workflow Performance in Service-Based Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Ho

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive data is sent in…

  3. Detecting distant homologies on protozoans metabolic pathways using scientific workflows.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Sérgio Manuel Serra; Batista, Vanessa; Silva, Edno; Tosta, Frederico; Vilela, Clarissa; Cuadrat, Rafael; Tschoeke, Diogo; Dávila, Alberto M R; Campos, Maria Luiza Machado; Mattoso, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatics experiments are typically composed of programs in pipelines manipulating an enormous quantity of data. An interesting approach for managing those experiments is through workflow management systems (WfMS). In this work we discuss WfMS features to support genome homology workflows and present some relevant issues for typical genomic experiments. Our evaluation used Kepler WfMS to manage a real genomic pipeline, named OrthoSearch, originally defined as a Perl script. We show a case study detecting distant homologies on trypanomatids metabolic pathways. Our results reinforce the benefits of WfMS over script languages and point out challenges to WfMS in distributed environments.

  4. Report Central: quality reporting tool in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunice; Li, Qi; Mangalampalli, Anil; Greim, Julie; Eskin, Michael S; Housman, Dan; Isikoff, Jeremy; Abend, Aaron H; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2006-01-01

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records, can help clinicians and administrators understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. Report Central is a secure web report delivery tool built on Crystal Reports XItrade mark and ASP.NET technologies. Pilot evaluation of Report Central indicates that clinicians prefer a quality reporting tool that is integrated with our home-grown EHR to support clinical workflow.

  5. Report Central: Quality Reporting Tool in an Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eunice; Li, Qi; Mangalampalli, Anil; Greim, Julie; Eskin, Michael S.; Housman, Dan; Isikoff, Jeremy; Abend, Aaron H.; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records, can help clinicians and administrators understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. Report Central is a secure web report delivery tool built on Crystal Reports XI™ and ASP.NET technologies. Pilot evaluation of Report Central indicates that clinicians prefer a quality reporting tool that is integrated with our home-grown EHR to support clinical workflow. PMID:17238590

  6. Using Workflows to Explore and Optimise Named Entity Recognition for Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, BalaKrishna; Hawizy, Lezan; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tsujii, Junichi; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry text mining tools should be interoperable and adaptable regardless of system-level implementation, installation or even programming issues. We aim to abstract the functionality of these tools from the underlying implementation via reconfigurable workflows for automatically identifying chemical names. To achieve this, we refactored an established named entity recogniser (in the chemistry domain), OSCAR and studied the impact of each component on the net performance. We developed two reconfigurable workflows from OSCAR using an interoperable text mining framework, U-Compare. These workflows can be altered using the drag-&-drop mechanism of the graphical user interface of U-Compare. These workflows also provide a platform to study the relationship between text mining components such as tokenisation and named entity recognition (using maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM) and pattern recognition based classifiers). Results indicate that, for chemistry in particular, eliminating noise generated by tokenisation techniques lead to a slightly better performance than others, in terms of named entity recognition (NER) accuracy. Poor tokenisation translates into poorer input to the classifier components which in turn leads to an increase in Type I or Type II errors, thus, lowering the overall performance. On the Sciborg corpus, the workflow based system, which uses a new tokeniser whilst retaining the same MEMM component, increases the F-score from 82.35% to 84.44%. On the PubMed corpus, it recorded an F-score of 84.84% as against 84.23% by OSCAR. PMID:21633495

  7. Using workflows to explore and optimise named entity recognition for chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kolluru, Balakrishna; Hawizy, Lezan; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tsujii, Junichi; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry text mining tools should be interoperable and adaptable regardless of system-level implementation, installation or even programming issues. We aim to abstract the functionality of these tools from the underlying implementation via reconfigurable workflows for automatically identifying chemical names. To achieve this, we refactored an established named entity recogniser (in the chemistry domain), OSCAR and studied the impact of each component on the net performance. We developed two reconfigurable workflows from OSCAR using an interoperable text mining framework, U-Compare. These workflows can be altered using the drag-&-drop mechanism of the graphical user interface of U-Compare. These workflows also provide a platform to study the relationship between text mining components such as tokenisation and named entity recognition (using maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM) and pattern recognition based classifiers). Results indicate that, for chemistry in particular, eliminating noise generated by tokenisation techniques lead to a slightly better performance than others, in terms of named entity recognition (NER) accuracy. Poor tokenisation translates into poorer input to the classifier components which in turn leads to an increase in Type I or Type II errors, thus, lowering the overall performance. On the Sciborg corpus, the workflow based system, which uses a new tokeniser whilst retaining the same MEMM component, increases the F-score from 82.35% to 84.44%. On the PubMed corpus, it recorded an F-score of 84.84% as against 84.23% by OSCAR.

  8. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Decaf: Decoupled Dataflows for In Situ High-Performance Workflows

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dreher, M.; Peterka, T.

    Decaf is a dataflow system for the parallel communication of coupled tasks in an HPC workflow. The dataflow can perform arbitrary data transformations ranging from simply forwarding data to complex data redistribution. Decaf does this by allowing the user to allocate resources and execute custom code in the dataflow. All communication through the dataflow is efficient parallel message passing over MPI. The runtime for calling tasks is entirely message-driven; Decaf executes a task when all messages for the task have been received. Such a messagedriven runtime allows cyclic task dependencies in the workflow graph, for example, to enact computational steeringmore » based on the result of downstream tasks. Decaf includes a simple Python API for describing the workflow graph. This allows Decaf to stand alone as a complete workflow system, but Decaf can also be used as the dataflow layer by one or more other workflow systems to form a heterogeneous task-based computing environment. In one experiment, we couple a molecular dynamics code with a visualization tool using the FlowVR and Damaris workflow systems and Decaf for the dataflow. In another experiment, we test the coupling of a cosmology code with Voronoi tessellation and density estimation codes using MPI for the simulation, the DIY programming model for the two analysis codes, and Decaf for the dataflow. Such workflows consisting of heterogeneous software infrastructures exist because components are developed separately with different programming models and runtimes, and this is the first time that such heterogeneous coupling of diverse components was demonstrated in situ on HPC systems.« less

  10. geoKepler Workflow Module for Computationally Scalable and Reproducible Geoprocessing and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowart, C.; Block, J.; Crawl, D.; Graham, J.; Gupta, A.; Nguyen, M.; de Callafon, R.; Smarr, L.; Altintas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF-funded WIFIRE project has developed an open-source, online geospatial workflow platform for unifying geoprocessing tools and models for for fire and other geospatially dependent modeling applications. It is a product of WIFIRE's objective to build an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. geoKepler includes a set of reusable GIS components, or actors, for the Kepler Scientific Workflow System (https://kepler-project.org). Actors exist for reading and writing GIS data in formats such as Shapefile, GeoJSON, KML, and using OGC web services such as WFS. The actors also allow for calling geoprocessing tools in other packages such as GDAL and GRASS. Kepler integrates functions from multiple platforms and file formats into one framework, thus enabling optimal GIS interoperability, model coupling, and scalability. Products of the GIS actors can be fed directly to models such as FARSITE and WRF. Kepler's ability to schedule and scale processes using Hadoop and Spark also makes geoprocessing ultimately extensible and computationally scalable. The reusable workflows in geoKepler can be made to run automatically when alerted by real-time environmental conditions. Here, we show breakthroughs in the speed of creating complex data for hazard assessments with this platform. We also demonstrate geoKepler workflows that use Data Assimilation to ingest real-time weather data into wildfire simulations, and for data mining techniques to gain insight into environmental conditions affecting fire behavior. Existing machine learning tools and libraries such as R and MLlib are being leveraged for this purpose in Kepler, as well as Kepler's Distributed Data Parallel (DDP) capability to provide a framework for scalable processing. geoKepler workflows can be executed via an iPython notebook as a part of a Jupyter hub at UC San Diego for sharing and reporting of the scientific analysis and results from

  11. Enhancing population pharmacokinetic modeling efficiency and quality using an integrated workflow.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Henning; Radivojevic, Andrijana

    2014-08-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (popPK) analyses are at the core of Pharmacometrics and need to be performed regularly. Although these analyses are relatively standard, a large variability can be observed in both the time (efficiency) and the way they are performed (quality). Main reasons for this variability include the level of experience of a modeler, personal preferences and tools. This paper aims to examine how the process of popPK model building can be supported in order to increase its efficiency and quality. The presented approach to the conduct of popPK analyses is centered around three key components: (1) identification of most common and important popPK model features, (2) required information content and formatting of the data for modeling, and (3) methodology, workflow and workflow supporting tools. This approach has been used in several popPK modeling projects and a documented example is provided in the supplementary material. Efficiency of model building is improved by avoiding repetitive coding and other labor-intensive tasks and by putting the emphasis on a fit-for-purpose model. Quality is improved by ensuring that the workflow and tools are in alignment with a popPK modeling guidance which is established within an organization. The main conclusion of this paper is that workflow based approaches to popPK modeling are feasible and have significant potential to ameliorate its various aspects. However, the implementation of such an approach in a pharmacometric organization requires openness towards innovation and change-the key ingredient for evolution of integrative and quantitative drug development in the pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Development of a user customizable imaging informatics-based intelligent workflow engine system to enhance rehabilitation clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Martinez, Clarisa; Wang, Jing; Liu, Ye; Liu, Brent

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials usually have a demand to collect, track and analyze multimedia data according to the workflow. Currently, the clinical trial data management requirements are normally addressed with custom-built systems. Challenges occur in the workflow design within different trials. The traditional pre-defined custom-built system is usually limited to a specific clinical trial and normally requires time-consuming and resource-intensive software development. To provide a solution, we present a user customizable imaging informatics-based intelligent workflow engine system for managing stroke rehabilitation clinical trials with intelligent workflow. The intelligent workflow engine provides flexibility in building and tailoring the workflow in various stages of clinical trials. By providing a solution to tailor and automate the workflow, the system will save time and reduce errors for clinical trials. Although our system is designed for clinical trials for rehabilitation, it may be extended to other imaging based clinical trials as well.

  13. Taking advantage of HTML5 browsers to realize the concepts of session state and workflow sharing in web-tool applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suftin, I.; Read, J. S.; Walker, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists prefer not having to be tied down to a specific machine or operating system in order to analyze local and remote data sets or publish work. Increasingly, analysis has been migrating to decentralized web services and data sets, using web clients to provide the analysis interface. While simplifying workflow access, analysis, and publishing of data, the move does bring with it its own unique set of issues. Web clients used for analysis typically offer workflows geared towards a single user, with steps and results that are often difficult to recreate and share with others. Furthermore, workflow results often may not be easily used as input for further analysis. Older browsers further complicate things by having no way to maintain larger chunks of information, often offloading the job of storage to the back-end server or trying to squeeze it into a cookie. It has been difficult to provide a concept of "session storage" or "workflow sharing" without a complex orchestration of the back-end for storage depending on either a centralized file system or database. With the advent of HTML5, browsers gained the ability to store more information through the use of the Web Storage API (a browser-cookie holds a maximum of 4 kilobytes). Web Storage gives us the ability to store megabytes of arbitrary data in-browser either with an expiration date or just for a session. This allows scientists to create, update, persist and share their workflow without depending on the backend to store session information, providing the flexibility for new web-based workflows to emerge. In the DSASWeb portal ( http://cida.usgs.gov/DSASweb/ ), using these techniques, the representation of every step in the analyst's workflow is stored as plain-text serialized JSON, which we can generate as a text file and provide to the analyst as an upload. This file may then be shared with others and loaded back into the application, restoring the application to the state it was in when the session file

  14. REDLetr: Workflow and tools to support the migration of legacy clinical data capture systems to REDCap

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, William D; Cobb, Jake; Levey, Allan I; Gutman, David A

    2017-01-01

    Objective A memory clinic at an academic medical center has relied on several ad hoc data capture systems including Microsoft Access and Excel for cognitive assessments over the last several years. However these solutions are challenging to maintain and limit the potential of hypothesis-driven or longitudinal research. REDCap, a secure web application based on php and MySQL, is a practical solution for improving data capture and organization. Here, we present a workflow and toolset to facilitate legacy data migration and real-time clinical research data collection into REDCap as well as challenges encountered. Materials and Methods Legacy data consisted of neuropsychological tests stored in over 4,000 Excel workbooks. Functions for data extraction, norm scoring, converting to REDCap-compatible formats, accessing the REDCap API, and clinical report generation were developed and executed in Python. Results Over 400 unique data points for each workbook were migrated and integrated into our REDCap database. Moving forward, our REDCap-based system replaces the Excel-based data collection method as well as eases the integration to the Electronic Health Record. Conclusion In the age of growing data, efficient organization and storage of clinical and research data is critical for advancing research and providing efficient patient care. We believe that the tools and workflow described in this work to promote legacy data integration as well as real time data collection into REDCap ultimately facilitate these goals. PMID:27396629

  15. Wireless remote control clinical image workflow: utilizing a PDA for offsite distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Documet, Luis; Documet, Jorge; Huang, H. K.; Muldoon, Jean

    2004-04-01

    Last year we presented in RSNA an application to perform wireless remote control of PACS image distribution utilizing a handheld device such as a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA). This paper describes the clinical experiences including workflow scenarios of implementing the PDA application to route exams from the clinical PACS archive server to various locations for offsite distribution of clinical PACS exams. By utilizing this remote control application, radiologists can manage image workflow distribution with a single wireless handheld device without impacting their clinical workflow on diagnostic PACS workstations. A PDA application was designed and developed to perform DICOM Query and C-Move requests by a physician from a clinical PACS Archive to a CD-burning device for automatic burning of PACS data for the distribution to offsite. In addition, it was also used for convenient routing of historical PACS exams to the local web server, local workstations, and teleradiology systems. The application was evaluated by radiologists as well as other clinical staff who need to distribute PACS exams to offsite referring physician"s offices and offsite radiologists. An application for image workflow management utilizing wireless technology was implemented in a clinical environment and evaluated. A PDA application was successfully utilized to perform DICOM Query and C-Move requests from the clinical PACS archive to various offsite exam distribution devices. Clinical staff can utilize the PDA to manage image workflow and PACS exam distribution conveniently for offsite consultations by referring physicians and radiologists. This solution allows the radiologist to expand their effectiveness in health care delivery both within the radiology department as well as offisite by improving their clinical workflow.

  16. Building an efficient curation workflow for the Arabidopsis literature corpus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Muller, Robert J.; Huala, Eva

    2012-01-01

    TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource) is the model organism database (MOD) for Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant with a literature corpus of about 39 000 articles in PubMed, with over 4300 new articles added in 2011. We have developed a literature curation workflow incorporating both automated and manual elements to cope with this flood of new research articles. The current workflow can be divided into two phases: article selection and curation. Structured controlled vocabularies, such as the Gene Ontology and Plant Ontology are used to capture free text information in the literature as succinct ontology-based annotations suitable for the application of computational analysis methods. We also describe our curation platform and the use of text mining tools in our workflow. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org PMID:23221298

  17. Management Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Manugistics, Inc. (formerly AVYX, Inc.) has introduced a new programming language for IBM and IBM compatible computers called TREES-pls. It is a resource management tool originating from the space shuttle, that can be used in such applications as scheduling, resource allocation project control, information management, and artificial intelligence. Manugistics, Inc. was looking for a flexible tool that can be applied to many problems with minimal adaptation. Among the non-government markets are aerospace, other manufacturing, transportation, health care, food and beverage and professional services.

  18. The State of Cloud-Based Biospecimen and Biobank Data Management Tools.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shonali; Gade, Aditi; Mallipeddi, Sumani

    2017-04-01

    Biobanks are critical for collecting and managing high-quality biospecimens from donors with appropriate clinical annotation. The high-quality human biospecimens and associated data are required to better understand disease processes. Therefore, biobanks have become an important and essential resource for healthcare research and drug discovery. However, collecting and managing huge volumes of data (biospecimens and associated clinical data) necessitate that biobanks use appropriate data management solutions that can keep pace with the ever-changing requirements of research. To automate biobank data management, biobanks have been investing in traditional Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). However, there are a myriad of challenges faced by biobanks in acquiring traditional LIMS. Traditional LIMS are cost-intensive and often lack the flexibility to accommodate changes in data sources and workflows. Cloud technology is emerging as an alternative that provides the opportunity to small and medium-sized biobanks to automate their operations in a cost-effective manner, even without IT personnel. Cloud-based solutions offer the advantage of heightened security, rapid scalability, dynamic allocation of services, and can facilitate collaboration between different research groups by using a shared environment on a "pay-as-you-go" basis. The benefits offered by cloud technology have resulted in the development of cloud-based data management solutions as an alternative to traditional on-premise software. After evaluating the advantages offered by cloud technology, several biobanks have started adopting cloud-based tools. Cloud-based tools provide biobanks with easy access to biospecimen data for real-time sharing with clinicians. Another major benefit realized by biobanks by implementing cloud-based applications is unlimited data storage on the cloud and automatic backups for protecting any data loss in the face of natural calamities.

  19. Scheduling Multilevel Deadline-Constrained Scientific Workflows on Clouds Based on Cost Optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Malawski, Maciej; Figiela, Kamil; Bubak, Marian; ...

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a cost optimization model for scheduling scientific workflows on IaaS clouds such as Amazon EC2 or RackSpace. We assume multiple IaaS clouds with heterogeneous virtual machine instances, with limited number of instances per cloud and hourly billing. Input and output data are stored on a cloud object store such as Amazon S3. Applications are scientific workflows modeled as DAGs as in the Pegasus Workflow Management System. We assume that tasks in the workflows are grouped into levels of identical tasks. Our model is specified using mathematical programming languages (AMPL and CMPL) and allows us to minimize themore » cost of workflow execution under deadline constraints. We present results obtained using our model and the benchmark workflows representing real scientific applications in a variety of domains. The data used for evaluation come from the synthetic workflows and from general purpose cloud benchmarks, as well as from the data measured in our own experiments with Montage, an astronomical application, executed on Amazon EC2 cloud. We indicate how this model can be used for scenarios that require resource planning for scientific workflows and their ensembles.« less

  20. An architecture model for multiple disease management information systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lichin; Yu, Hui-Chu; Li, Hao-Chun; Wang, Yi-Van; Chen, Huang-Jen; Wang, I-Ching; Wang, Chiou-Shiang; Peng, Hui-Yu; Hsu, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chi-Huang; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Lee, Hung-Chang; Chung, Yufang; Lai, Feipei

    2013-04-01

    Disease management is a program which attempts to overcome the fragmentation of healthcare system and improve the quality of care. Many studies have proven the effectiveness of disease management. However, the case managers were spending the majority of time in documentation, coordinating the members of the care team. They need a tool to support them with daily practice and optimizing the inefficient workflow. Several discussions have indicated that information technology plays an important role in the era of disease management. Whereas applications have been developed, it is inefficient to develop information system for each disease management program individually. The aim of this research is to support the work of disease management, reform the inefficient workflow, and propose an architecture model that enhance on the reusability and time saving of information system development. The proposed architecture model had been successfully implemented into two disease management information system, and the result was evaluated through reusability analysis, time consumed analysis, pre- and post-implement workflow analysis, and user questionnaire survey. The reusability of the proposed model was high, less than half of the time was consumed, and the workflow had been improved. The overall user aspect is positive. The supportiveness during daily workflow is high. The system empowers the case managers with better information and leads to better decision making.

  1. Exploring Dental Providers’ Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment

    PubMed Central

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N.; Ye, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. Objective The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. Methods A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Results Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). Conclusions On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR. PMID:27437058

  2. Talkoot Portals: Discover, Tag, Share, and Reuse Collaborative Science Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Ramachandran, R.; Lynnes, C.

    2009-05-01

    A small but growing number of scientists are beginning to harness Web 2.0 technologies, such as wikis, blogs, and social tagging, as a transformative way of doing science. These technologies provide researchers easy mechanisms to critique, suggest and share ideas, data and algorithms. At the same time, large suites of algorithms for science analysis are being made available as remotely-invokable Web Services, which can be chained together to create analysis workflows. This provides the research community an unprecedented opportunity to collaborate by sharing their workflows with one another, reproducing and analyzing research results, and leveraging colleagues' expertise to expedite the process of scientific discovery. However, wikis and similar technologies are limited to text, static images and hyperlinks, providing little support for collaborative data analysis. A team of information technology and Earth science researchers from multiple institutions have come together to improve community collaboration in science analysis by developing a customizable "software appliance" to build collaborative portals for Earth Science services and analysis workflows. The critical requirement is that researchers (not just information technologists) be able to build collaborative sites around service workflows within a few hours. We envision online communities coming together, much like Finnish "talkoot" (a barn raising), to build a shared research space. Talkoot extends a freely available, open source content management framework with a series of modules specific to Earth Science for registering, creating, managing, discovering, tagging and sharing Earth Science web services and workflows for science data processing, analysis and visualization. Users will be able to author a "science story" in shareable web notebooks, including plots or animations, backed up by an executable workflow that directly reproduces the science analysis. New services and workflows of interest will be

  3. SU-F-T-251: The Quality Assurance for the Heavy Patient Load Department in the Developing Country: The Primary Experience of An Entire Workflow QA Process Management in Radiotherapy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Xie, J; Wang, J; Peng, J

    Purpose: To implement an entire workflow quality assurance (QA) process in the radiotherapy department and to reduce the error rates of radiotherapy based on the entire workflow management in the developing country. Methods: The entire workflow QA process management starts from patient registration to the end of last treatment including all steps through the entire radiotherapy process. Error rate of chartcheck is used to evaluate the the entire workflow QA process. Two to three qualified senior medical physicists checked the documents before the first treatment fraction of every patient. Random check of the treatment history during treatment was also performed.more » A total of around 6000 patients treatment data before and after implementing the entire workflow QA process were compared from May, 2014 to December, 2015. Results: A systemic checklist was established. It mainly includes patient’s registration, treatment plan QA, information exporting to OIS(Oncology Information System), documents of treatment QAand QA of the treatment history. The error rate derived from the chart check decreases from 1.7% to 0.9% after our the entire workflow QA process. All checked errors before the first treatment fraction were corrected as soon as oncologist re-confirmed them and reinforce staff training was accordingly followed to prevent those errors. Conclusion: The entire workflow QA process improved the safety, quality of radiotherapy in our department and we consider that our QA experience can be applicable for the heavily-loaded radiotherapy departments in developing country.« less

  4. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Brian D.; Yuen, Denis; Chung, Vincent; Duncan, Andrew G.; Liu, Xiang Kun; Patricia, Janice; Paten, Benedict; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG), the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore ( https://dockstore.org), a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH). PMID:28344774

  5. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Brian D; Yuen, Denis; Chung, Vincent; Duncan, Andrew G; Liu, Xiang Kun; Patricia, Janice; Paten, Benedict; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG), the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore ( https://dockstore.org), a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH).

  6. Workflow in clinical trial sites & its association with near miss events for data quality: ethnographic, workflow & systems simulation.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Claudino, Wederson; Reis, Luiz Fernando Lima; Schmerling, Rafael A; Shah, Jatin; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    With the exponential expansion of clinical trials conducted in (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and VISTA (Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Turkey, and Argentina) countries, corresponding gains in cost and enrolment efficiency quickly outpace the consonant metrics in traditional countries in North America and European Union. However, questions still remain regarding the quality of data being collected in these countries. We used ethnographic, mapping and computer simulation studies to identify/address areas of threat to near miss events for data quality in two cancer trial sites in Brazil. Two sites in Sao Paolo and Rio Janeiro were evaluated using ethnographic observations of workflow during subject enrolment and data collection. Emerging themes related to threats to near miss events for data quality were derived from observations. They were then transformed into workflows using UML-AD and modeled using System Dynamics. 139 tasks were observed and mapped through the ethnographic study. The UML-AD detected four major activities in the workflow evaluation of potential research subjects prior to signature of informed consent, visit to obtain subject́s informed consent, regular data collection sessions following study protocol and closure of study protocol for a given project. Field observations pointed to three major emerging themes: (a) lack of standardized process for data registration at source document, (b) multiplicity of data repositories and (c) scarcity of decision support systems at the point of research intervention. Simulation with policy model demonstrates a reduction of the rework problem. Patterns of threats to data quality at the two sites were similar to the threats reported in the literature for American sites. The clinical trial site managers need to reorganize staff workflow by using information technology more efficiently, establish new standard procedures and manage professionals to reduce near miss events and save time/cost. Clinical trial

  7. Workflow in Clinical Trial Sites & Its Association with Near Miss Events for Data Quality: Ethnographic, Workflow & Systems Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo de Carvalho, Elias Cesar; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Claudino, Wederson; Lima Reis, Luiz Fernando; Schmerling, Rafael A.; Shah, Jatin; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background With the exponential expansion of clinical trials conducted in (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and VISTA (Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Turkey, and Argentina) countries, corresponding gains in cost and enrolment efficiency quickly outpace the consonant metrics in traditional countries in North America and European Union. However, questions still remain regarding the quality of data being collected in these countries. We used ethnographic, mapping and computer simulation studies to identify/address areas of threat to near miss events for data quality in two cancer trial sites in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sites in Sao Paolo and Rio Janeiro were evaluated using ethnographic observations of workflow during subject enrolment and data collection. Emerging themes related to threats to near miss events for data quality were derived from observations. They were then transformed into workflows using UML-AD and modeled using System Dynamics. 139 tasks were observed and mapped through the ethnographic study. The UML-AD detected four major activities in the workflow evaluation of potential research subjects prior to signature of informed consent, visit to obtain subject́s informed consent, regular data collection sessions following study protocol and closure of study protocol for a given project. Field observations pointed to three major emerging themes: (a) lack of standardized process for data registration at source document, (b) multiplicity of data repositories and (c) scarcity of decision support systems at the point of research intervention. Simulation with policy model demonstrates a reduction of the rework problem. Conclusions/Significance Patterns of threats to data quality at the two sites were similar to the threats reported in the literature for American sites. The clinical trial site managers need to reorganize staff workflow by using information technology more efficiently, establish new standard procedures and manage

  8. Online time and resource management based on surgical workflow time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Maktabi, M; Neumuth, T

    2017-02-01

    Hospitals' effectiveness and efficiency can be enhanced by automating the resource and time management of the most cost-intensive unit in the hospital: the operating room (OR). The key elements required for the ideal organization of hospital staff and technical resources (such as instruments in the OR) are an exact online forecast of both the surgeon's resource usage and the remaining intervention time. This paper presents a novel online approach relying on time series analysis and the application of a linear time-variant system. We calculated the power spectral density and the spectrogram of surgical perspectives (e.g., used instrument) of interest to compare several surgical workflows. Considering only the use of the surgeon's right hand during an intervention, we were able to predict the remaining intervention time online with an error of 21 min 45 s ±9 min 59 s for lumbar discectomy. Furthermore, the performance of forecasting of technical resource usage in the next 20 min was calculated for a combination of spectral analysis and the application of a linear time-variant system (sensitivity: 74 %; specificity: 75 %) focusing on just the use of surgeon's instrument in question. The outstanding benefit of these methods is that the automated recording of surgical workflows has minimal impact during interventions since the whole set of surgical perspectives need not be recorded. The resulting predictions can help various stakeholders such as OR staff and hospital technicians. Moreover, reducing resource conflicts could well improve patient care.

  9. MicroGen: a MIAME compliant web system for microarray experiment information and workflow management.

    PubMed

    Burgarella, Sarah; Cattaneo, Dario; Pinciroli, Francesco; Masseroli, Marco

    2005-12-01

    Improvements of bio-nano-technologies and biomolecular techniques have led to increasing production of high-throughput experimental data. Spotted cDNA microarray is one of the most diffuse technologies, used in single research laboratories and in biotechnology service facilities. Although they are routinely performed, spotted microarray experiments are complex procedures entailing several experimental steps and actors with different technical skills and roles. During an experiment, involved actors, who can also be located in a distance, need to access and share specific experiment information according to their roles. Furthermore, complete information describing all experimental steps must be orderly collected to allow subsequent correct interpretation of experimental results. We developed MicroGen, a web system for managing information and workflow in the production pipeline of spotted microarray experiments. It is constituted of a core multi-database system able to store all data completely characterizing different spotted microarray experiments according to the Minimum Information About Microarray Experiments (MIAME) standard, and of an intuitive and user-friendly web interface able to support the collaborative work required among multidisciplinary actors and roles involved in spotted microarray experiment production. MicroGen supports six types of user roles: the researcher who designs and requests the experiment, the spotting operator, the hybridisation operator, the image processing operator, the system administrator, and the generic public user who can access the unrestricted part of the system to get information about MicroGen services. MicroGen represents a MIAME compliant information system that enables managing workflow and supporting collaborative work in spotted microarray experiment production.

  10. Barriers to critical thinking: workflow interruptions and task switching among nurses.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Paul; Riordan, Monica; Townsend-Gervis, Mary; Mobley, Robin

    2011-10-01

    Nurses are increasingly called upon to engage in critical thinking. However, current workflow inhibits this goal with frequent task switching and unpredictable demands. To assess workflow's cognitive impact, nurses were observed at 2 hospitals with different patient loads and acuity levels. Workflow on a medical/surgical and pediatric oncology unit was observed, recording tasks, tools, collaborators, and locations. Nineteen nurses were observed for a total of 85.2 hours. Tasks were short with a mean duration of 62.4 and 81.6 seconds on the 2 units. More than 50% of the recorded tasks were less than 30 seconds in length. An analysis of task sequence revealed few patterns and little pairwise repetition. Performance on specific tasks differed between the 2 units, but the character of the workflow was highly similar. The nonrepetitive flow and high amount of switching indicate nurses experience a heavy cognitive load with little uninterrupted time. This implies that nurses rarely have the conditions necessary for critical thinking.

  11. Problem Management Module: An Innovative System to Improve Problem List Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Chad M.; Kuttler, Kathryn G.; Bowes, Watson A.; Narus, Scott P.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic problem lists are essential to modern health record systems, with a primary goal to serve as the repository of a patient’s current health issues. Additionally, coded problems can be used to drive downstream activities such as decision support, evidence-based medicine, billing, and cohort generation for research. Meaningful Use also requires use of a coded problem list. Over the course of three years, Intermountain Healthcare developed a problem management module (PMM) that provided innovative functionality to improve clinical workflow and boost problem list adoption, e.g. smart search, user customizable views, problem evolution, and problem timelines. In 23 months of clinical use, clinicians entered over 70,000 health issues, the percentage of free-text items dropped to 1.2%, completeness of problem list items increased by 14%, and more collaborative habits were initiated. PMID:25954372

  12. Program Management Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawadiak, Yuri; Wong, Alan; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Gurram, Mohana; Tran, Khai Peter; Hsu, Jennifer; Yagi, Kenji; Patel, Hemil

    2007-01-01

    The Program Management Tool (PMT) is a comprehensive, Web-enabled business intelligence software tool for assisting program and project managers within NASA enterprises in gathering, comprehending, and disseminating information on the progress of their programs and projects. The PMT provides planning and management support for implementing NASA programmatic and project management processes and requirements. It provides an online environment for program and line management to develop, communicate, and manage their programs, projects, and tasks in a comprehensive tool suite. The information managed by use of the PMT can include monthly reports as well as data on goals, deliverables, milestones, business processes, personnel, task plans, monthly reports, and budgetary allocations. The PMT provides an intuitive and enhanced Web interface to automate the tedious process of gathering and sharing monthly progress reports, task plans, financial data, and other information on project resources based on technical, schedule, budget, and management criteria and merits. The PMT is consistent with the latest Web standards and software practices, including the use of Extensible Markup Language (XML) for exchanging data and the WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) protocol for collaborative management of documents. The PMT provides graphical displays of resource allocations in the form of bar and pie charts using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Application (VBA) libraries. The PMT has an extensible architecture that enables integration of PMT with other strategic-information software systems, including, for example, the Erasmus reporting system, now part of the NASA Integrated Enterprise Management Program (IEMP) tool suite, at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PMT data architecture provides automated and extensive software interfaces and reports to various strategic information systems to eliminate duplicative human entries and minimize data integrity

  13. Development of an Excel-based laboratory information management system for improving workflow efficiencies in early ADME screening.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyan

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear requirement for enhancing laboratory information management during early absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) screening. The application of a commercial laboratory information management system (LIMS) is limited by complexity, insufficient flexibility, high costs and extended timelines. An improved custom in-house LIMS for ADME screening was developed using Excel. All Excel templates were generated through macros and formulae, and information flow was streamlined as much as possible. This system has been successfully applied in task generation, process control and data management, with a reduction in both labor time and human error rates. An Excel-based LIMS can provide a simple, flexible and cost/time-saving solution for improving workflow efficiencies in early ADME screening.

  14. GeneSeqToFamily: a Galaxy workflow to find gene families based on the Ensembl Compara GeneTrees pipeline.

    PubMed

    Thanki, Anil S; Soranzo, Nicola; Haerty, Wilfried; Davey, Robert P

    2018-03-01

    Gene duplication is a major factor contributing to evolutionary novelty, and the contraction or expansion of gene families has often been associated with morphological, physiological, and environmental adaptations. The study of homologous genes helps us to understand the evolution of gene families. It plays a vital role in finding ancestral gene duplication events as well as identifying genes that have diverged from a common ancestor under positive selection. There are various tools available, such as MSOAR, OrthoMCL, and HomoloGene, to identify gene families and visualize syntenic information between species, providing an overview of syntenic regions evolution at the family level. Unfortunately, none of them provide information about structural changes within genes, such as the conservation of ancestral exon boundaries among multiple genomes. The Ensembl GeneTrees computational pipeline generates gene trees based on coding sequences, provides details about exon conservation, and is used in the Ensembl Compara project to discover gene families. A certain amount of expertise is required to configure and run the Ensembl Compara GeneTrees pipeline via command line. Therefore, we converted this pipeline into a Galaxy workflow, called GeneSeqToFamily, and provided additional functionality. This workflow uses existing tools from the Galaxy ToolShed, as well as providing additional wrappers and tools that are required to run the workflow. GeneSeqToFamily represents the Ensembl GeneTrees pipeline as a set of interconnected Galaxy tools, so they can be run interactively within the Galaxy's user-friendly workflow environment while still providing the flexibility to tailor the analysis by changing configurations and tools if necessary. Additional tools allow users to subsequently visualize the gene families produced by the workflow, using the Aequatus.js interactive tool, which has been developed as part of the Aequatus software project.

  15. SIMBA: a web tool for managing bacterial genome assembly generated by Ion PGM sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Diego C B; Pereira, Felipe L; Aguiar, Edgar L; Oliveira, Letícia C; Benevides, Leandro; Guimarães, Luís C; Folador, Edson L; Sousa, Thiago J; Ghosh, Preetam; Barh, Debmalya; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J; Azevedo, Vasco A C

    2016-12-15

    The evolution of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) has considerably reduced the cost per sequenced-base, allowing a significant rise of sequencing projects, mainly in prokaryotes. However, the range of available NGS platforms requires different strategies and software to correctly assemble genomes. Different strategies are necessary to properly complete an assembly project, in addition to the installation or modification of various software. This requires users to have significant expertise in these software and command line scripting experience on Unix platforms, besides possessing the basic expertise on methodologies and techniques for genome assembly. These difficulties often delay the complete genome assembly projects. In order to overcome this, we developed SIMBA (SImple Manager for Bacterial Assemblies), a freely available web tool that integrates several component tools for assembling and finishing bacterial genomes. SIMBA provides a friendly and intuitive user interface so bioinformaticians, even with low computational expertise, can work under a centralized administrative control system of assemblies managed by the assembly center head. SIMBA guides the users to execute assembly process through simple and interactive pages. SIMBA workflow was divided in three modules: (i) projects: allows a general vision of genome sequencing projects, in addition to data quality analysis and data format conversions; (ii) assemblies: allows de novo assemblies with the software Mira, Minia, Newbler and SPAdes, also assembly quality validations using QUAST software; and (iii) curation: presents methods to finishing assemblies through tools for scaffolding contigs and close gaps. We also presented a case study that validated the efficacy of SIMBA to manage bacterial assemblies projects sequenced using Ion Torrent PGM. Besides to be a web tool for genome assembly, SIMBA is a complete genome assemblies project management system, which can be useful for managing of several

  16. Integrating text mining into the MGI biocuration workflow

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, K.G.; McAndrews-Hill, M.S.; Hill, D.P.; Drabkin, H.J.; Blake, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge for functional and comparative genomics resource development is the extraction of data from the biomedical literature. Although text mining for biological data is an active research field, few applications have been integrated into production literature curation systems such as those of the model organism databases (MODs). Not only are most available biological natural language (bioNLP) and information retrieval and extraction solutions difficult to adapt to existing MOD curation workflows, but many also have high error rates or are unable to process documents available in those formats preferred by scientific journals. In September 2008, Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) at The Jackson Laboratory initiated a search for dictionary-based text mining tools that we could integrate into our biocuration workflow. MGI has rigorous document triage and annotation procedures designed to identify appropriate articles about mouse genetics and genome biology. We currently screen ∼1000 journal articles a month for Gene Ontology terms, gene mapping, gene expression, phenotype data and other key biological information. Although we do not foresee that curation tasks will ever be fully automated, we are eager to implement named entity recognition (NER) tools for gene tagging that can help streamline our curation workflow and simplify gene indexing tasks within the MGI system. Gene indexing is an MGI-specific curation function that involves identifying which mouse genes are being studied in an article, then associating the appropriate gene symbols with the article reference number in the MGI database. Here, we discuss our search process, performance metrics and success criteria, and how we identified a short list of potential text mining tools for further evaluation. We provide an overview of our pilot projects with NCBO's Open Biomedical Annotator and Fraunhofer SCAI's ProMiner. In doing so, we prove the potential for the further incorporation of semi

  17. Integrating text mining into the MGI biocuration workflow.

    PubMed

    Dowell, K G; McAndrews-Hill, M S; Hill, D P; Drabkin, H J; Blake, J A

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge for functional and comparative genomics resource development is the extraction of data from the biomedical literature. Although text mining for biological data is an active research field, few applications have been integrated into production literature curation systems such as those of the model organism databases (MODs). Not only are most available biological natural language (bioNLP) and information retrieval and extraction solutions difficult to adapt to existing MOD curation workflows, but many also have high error rates or are unable to process documents available in those formats preferred by scientific journals.In September 2008, Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) at The Jackson Laboratory initiated a search for dictionary-based text mining tools that we could integrate into our biocuration workflow. MGI has rigorous document triage and annotation procedures designed to identify appropriate articles about mouse genetics and genome biology. We currently screen approximately 1000 journal articles a month for Gene Ontology terms, gene mapping, gene expression, phenotype data and other key biological information. Although we do not foresee that curation tasks will ever be fully automated, we are eager to implement named entity recognition (NER) tools for gene tagging that can help streamline our curation workflow and simplify gene indexing tasks within the MGI system. Gene indexing is an MGI-specific curation function that involves identifying which mouse genes are being studied in an article, then associating the appropriate gene symbols with the article reference number in the MGI database.Here, we discuss our search process, performance metrics and success criteria, and how we identified a short list of potential text mining tools for further evaluation. We provide an overview of our pilot projects with NCBO's Open Biomedical Annotator and Fraunhofer SCAI's ProMiner. In doing so, we prove the potential for the further incorporation of semi

  18. Disruption of Radiologist Workflow.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Akash P; Liu, Kevin; Yu, John-Paul J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of disruptions has been studied extensively in surgery and emergency medicine, and a number of solutions-such as preoperative checklists-have been implemented to enforce the integrity of critical safety-related workflows. Disruptions of the highly complex and cognitively demanding workflow of modern clinical radiology have only recently attracted attention as a potential safety hazard. In this article, we describe the variety of disruptions that arise in the reading room environment, review approaches that other specialties have taken to mitigate workflow disruption, and suggest possible solutions for workflow improvement in radiology. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DIaaS: Data-Intensive workflows as a service - Enabling easy composition and deployment of data-intensive workflows on Virtual Research Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, R.; Ferreira da Silva, R.; Deelman, E.; Atkinson, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the Data-Intensive workflows as a Service (DIaaS) model for enabling easy data-intensive workflow composition and deployment on clouds using containers. DIaaS model backbone is Asterism, an integrated solution for running data-intensive stream-based applications on heterogeneous systems, which combines the benefits of dispel4py with Pegasus workflow systems. The stream-based executions of an Asterism workflow are managed by dispel4py, while the data movement between different e-Infrastructures, and the coordination of the application execution are automatically managed by Pegasus. DIaaS combines Asterism framework with Docker containers to provide an integrated, complete, easy-to-use, portable approach to run data-intensive workflows on distributed platforms. Three containers integrate the DIaaS model: a Pegasus node, and an MPI and an Apache Storm clusters. Container images are described as Dockerfiles (available online at http://github.com/dispel4py/pegasus_dispel4py), linked to Docker Hub for providing continuous integration (automated image builds), and image storing and sharing. In this model, all required software (workflow systems and execution engines) for running scientific applications are packed into the containers, which significantly reduces the effort (and possible human errors) required by scientists or VRE administrators to build such systems. The most common use of DIaaS will be to act as a backend of VREs or Scientific Gateways to run data-intensive applications, deploying cloud resources upon request. We have demonstrated the feasibility of DIaaS using the data-intensive seismic ambient noise cross-correlation application (Figure 1). The application preprocesses (Phase1) and cross-correlates (Phase2) traces from several seismic stations. The application is submitted via Pegasus (Container1), and Phase1 and Phase2 are executed in the MPI (Container2) and Storm (Container3) clusters respectively. Although both phases could be executed

  20. Successful Completion of FY18/Q1 ASC L2 Milestone 6355: Electrical Analysis Calibration Workflow Capability Demonstration.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Copps, Kevin D.

    The Sandia Analysis Workbench (SAW) project has developed and deployed a production capability for SIERRA computational mechanics analysis workflows. However, the electrical analysis workflow capability requirements have only been demonstrated in early prototype states, with no real capability deployed for analysts’ use. This milestone aims to improve the electrical analysis workflow capability (via SAW and related tools) and deploy it for ongoing use. We propose to focus on a QASPR electrical analysis calibration workflow use case. We will include a number of new capabilities (versus today’s SAW), such as: 1) support for the XYCE code workflow component, 2) data managementmore » coupled to electrical workflow, 3) human-in-theloop workflow capability, and 4) electrical analysis workflow capability deployed on the restricted (and possibly classified) network at Sandia. While far from the complete set of capabilities required for electrical analysis workflow over the long term, this is a substantial first step toward full production support for the electrical analysts.« less

  1. A cognitive task analysis of a visual analytic workflow: Exploring molecular interaction networks in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Mirel, Barbara; Eichinger, Felix; Keller, Benjamin J; Kretzler, Matthias

    2011-03-21

    Bioinformatics visualization tools are often not robust enough to support biomedical specialists’ complex exploratory analyses. Tools need to accommodate the workflows that scientists actually perform for specific translational research questions. To understand and model one of these workflows, we conducted a case-based, cognitive task analysis of a biomedical specialist’s exploratory workflow for the question: What functional interactions among gene products of high throughput expression data suggest previously unknown mechanisms of a disease? From our cognitive task analysis four complementary representations of the targeted workflow were developed. They include: usage scenarios, flow diagrams, a cognitive task taxonomy, and a mapping between cognitive tasks and user-centered visualization requirements. The representations capture the flows of cognitive tasks that led a biomedical specialist to inferences critical to hypothesizing. We created representations at levels of detail that could strategically guide visualization development, and we confirmed this by making a trial prototype based on user requirements for a small portion of the workflow. Our results imply that visualizations should make available to scientific users “bundles of features” consonant with the compositional cognitive tasks purposefully enacted at specific points in the workflow. We also highlight certain aspects of visualizations that: (a) need more built-in flexibility; (b) are critical for negotiating meaning; and (c) are necessary for essential metacognitive support.

  2. Risk Management Implementation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Shayla L.

    2004-01-01

    Continuous Risk Management (CM) is a software engineering practice with processes, methods, and tools for managing risk in a project. It provides a controlled environment for practical decision making, in order to assess continually what could go wrong, determine which risk are important to deal with, implement strategies to deal with those risk and assure the measure effectiveness of the implemented strategies. Continuous Risk Management provides many training workshops and courses to teach the staff how to implement risk management to their various experiments and projects. The steps of the CRM process are identification, analysis, planning, tracking, and control. These steps and the various methods and tools that go along with them, identification, and dealing with risk is clear-cut. The office that I worked in was the Risk Management Office (RMO). The RMO at NASA works hard to uphold NASA s mission of exploration and advancement of scientific knowledge and technology by defining and reducing program risk. The RMO is one of the divisions that fall under the Safety and Assurance Directorate (SAAD). I worked under Cynthia Calhoun, Flight Software Systems Engineer. My task was to develop a help screen for the Continuous Risk Management Implementation Tool (RMIT). The Risk Management Implementation Tool will be used by many NASA managers to identify, analyze, track, control, and communicate risks in their programs and projects. The RMIT will provide a means for NASA to continuously assess risks. The goals and purposes for this tool is to provide a simple means to manage risks, be used by program and project managers throughout NASA for managing risk, and to take an aggressive approach to advertise and advocate the use of RMIT at each NASA center.

  3. Digitization workflows for flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gil; Sweeney, Patrick; Wallace, Lisa E.; Rabeler, Richard K.; Allard, Dorothy; Brown, Herrick; Carter, J. Richard; Denslow, Michael W.; Ellwood, Elizabeth R.; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C.; Gilbert, Ed; Gillespie, Emily; Goertzen, Leslie R.; Legler, Ben; Marchant, D. Blaine; Marsico, Travis D.; Morris, Ashley B.; Murrell, Zack; Nazaire, Mare; Neefus, Chris; Oberreiter, Shanna; Paul, Deborah; Ruhfel, Brad R.; Sasek, Thomas; Shaw, Joey; Soltis, Pamela S.; Watson, Kimberly; Weeks, Andrea; Mast, Austin R.

    2015-01-01

    Effective workflows are essential components in the digitization of biodiversity specimen collections. To date, no comprehensive, community-vetted workflows have been published for digitizing flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi, even though latest estimates suggest that only 33% of herbarium specimens have been digitally transcribed, 54% of herbaria use a specimen database, and 24% are imaging specimens. In 2012, iDigBio, the U.S. National Science Foundation’s (NSF) coordinating center and national resource for the digitization of public, nonfederal U.S. collections, launched several working groups to address this deficiency. Here, we report the development of 14 workflow modules with 7–36 tasks each. These workflows represent the combined work of approximately 35 curators, directors, and collections managers representing more than 30 herbaria, including 15 NSF-supported plant-related Thematic Collections Networks and collaboratives. The workflows are provided for download as Portable Document Format (PDF) and Microsoft Word files. Customization of these workflows for specific institutional implementation is encouraged. PMID:26421256

  4. Development of the workflow kine systems for support on KAIZEN.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuki; Ito, Toshihiko; Yoshikawa, Toru; Yomogida, Satoshi; Morio, Koji; Sakai, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the new workflow line system consisted of the location and image recording, which led to the acquisition of workflow information and the analysis display. From the results of workflow line investigation, we considered the anticipated effects and the problems on KAIZEN. Workflow line information included the location information and action contents information. These technologies suggest the viewpoints to help improvement, for example, exclusion of useless movement, the redesign of layout and the review of work procedure. Manufacturing factory, it was clear that there was much movement from the standard operation place and accumulation residence time. The following was shown as a result of this investigation, to be concrete, the efficient layout was suggested by this system. In the case of the hospital, similarly, it is pointed out that the workflow has the problem of layout and setup operations based on the effective movement pattern of the experts. This system could adapt to routine work, including as well as non-routine work. By the development of this system which can fit and adapt to industrial diversification, more effective "visual management" (visualization of work) is expected in the future.

  5. Talkoot Portals: Discover, Tag, Share, and Reuse Collaborative Science Workflows (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Ramachandran, R.; Lynnes, C.

    2009-12-01

    A small but growing number of scientists are beginning to harness Web 2.0 technologies, such as wikis, blogs, and social tagging, as a transformative way of doing science. These technologies provide researchers easy mechanisms to critique, suggest and share ideas, data and algorithms. At the same time, large suites of algorithms for science analysis are being made available as remotely-invokable Web Services, which can be chained together to create analysis workflows. This provides the research community an unprecedented opportunity to collaborate by sharing their workflows with one another, reproducing and analyzing research results, and leveraging colleagues’ expertise to expedite the process of scientific discovery. However, wikis and similar technologies are limited to text, static images and hyperlinks, providing little support for collaborative data analysis. A team of information technology and Earth science researchers from multiple institutions have come together to improve community collaboration in science analysis by developing a customizable “software appliance” to build collaborative portals for Earth Science services and analysis workflows. The critical requirement is that researchers (not just information technologists) be able to build collaborative sites around service workflows within a few hours. We envision online communities coming together, much like Finnish “talkoot” (a barn raising), to build a shared research space. Talkoot extends a freely available, open source content management framework with a series of modules specific to Earth Science for registering, creating, managing, discovering, tagging and sharing Earth Science web services and workflows for science data processing, analysis and visualization. Users will be able to author a “science story” in shareable web notebooks, including plots or animations, backed up by an executable workflow that directly reproduces the science analysis. New services and workflows of

  6. Reproducible Large-Scale Neuroimaging Studies with the OpenMOLE Workflow Management System.

    PubMed

    Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Reuillon, Romain; Leclaire, Mathieu; Makropoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Emma C; Parisot, Sarah; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    OpenMOLE is a scientific workflow engine with a strong emphasis on workload distribution. Workflows are designed using a high level Domain Specific Language (DSL) built on top of Scala. It exposes natural parallelism constructs to easily delegate the workload resulting from a workflow to a wide range of distributed computing environments. OpenMOLE hides the complexity of designing complex experiments thanks to its DSL. Users can embed their own applications and scale their pipelines from a small prototype running on their desktop computer to a large-scale study harnessing distributed computing infrastructures, simply by changing a single line in the pipeline definition. The construction of the pipeline itself is decoupled from the execution context. The high-level DSL abstracts the underlying execution environment, contrary to classic shell-script based pipelines. These two aspects allow pipelines to be shared and studies to be replicated across different computing environments. Workflows can be run as traditional batch pipelines or coupled with OpenMOLE's advanced exploration methods in order to study the behavior of an application, or perform automatic parameter tuning. In this work, we briefly present the strong assets of OpenMOLE and detail recent improvements targeting re-executability of workflows across various Linux platforms. We have tightly coupled OpenMOLE with CARE, a standalone containerization solution that allows re-executing on a Linux host any application that has been packaged on another Linux host previously. The solution is evaluated against a Python-based pipeline involving packages such as scikit-learn as well as binary dependencies. All were packaged and re-executed successfully on various HPC environments, with identical numerical results (here prediction scores) obtained on each environment. Our results show that the pair formed by OpenMOLE and CARE is a reliable solution to generate reproducible results and re-executable pipelines. A

  7. Reproducible Large-Scale Neuroimaging Studies with the OpenMOLE Workflow Management System

    PubMed Central

    Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Reuillon, Romain; Leclaire, Mathieu; Makropoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Emma C.; Parisot, Sarah; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    OpenMOLE is a scientific workflow engine with a strong emphasis on workload distribution. Workflows are designed using a high level Domain Specific Language (DSL) built on top of Scala. It exposes natural parallelism constructs to easily delegate the workload resulting from a workflow to a wide range of distributed computing environments. OpenMOLE hides the complexity of designing complex experiments thanks to its DSL. Users can embed their own applications and scale their pipelines from a small prototype running on their desktop computer to a large-scale study harnessing distributed computing infrastructures, simply by changing a single line in the pipeline definition. The construction of the pipeline itself is decoupled from the execution context. The high-level DSL abstracts the underlying execution environment, contrary to classic shell-script based pipelines. These two aspects allow pipelines to be shared and studies to be replicated across different computing environments. Workflows can be run as traditional batch pipelines or coupled with OpenMOLE's advanced exploration methods in order to study the behavior of an application, or perform automatic parameter tuning. In this work, we briefly present the strong assets of OpenMOLE and detail recent improvements targeting re-executability of workflows across various Linux platforms. We have tightly coupled OpenMOLE with CARE, a standalone containerization solution that allows re-executing on a Linux host any application that has been packaged on another Linux host previously. The solution is evaluated against a Python-based pipeline involving packages such as scikit-learn as well as binary dependencies. All were packaged and re-executed successfully on various HPC environments, with identical numerical results (here prediction scores) obtained on each environment. Our results show that the pair formed by OpenMOLE and CARE is a reliable solution to generate reproducible results and re-executable pipelines. A

  8. Workflow-enabled distributed component-based information architecture for digital medical imaging enterprises.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephen T C; Tjandra, Donny; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin

    2003-09-01

    Few information systems today offer a flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes, which provide clinical imaging services for the entire healthcare organization. Even fewer of them provide a coherent architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications and can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better clinical, operational, and business decisions. We describe an innovative enterprise architecture of image information management systems to fill the needs. Such a system is based on the interplay of production workflow management, distributed object computing, Java and Web techniques, and in-depth domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of "4+1" architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, the workflow-enabled digital radiology system would provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity. This paper will potentially lead to a new direction of image information management. We illustrate the innovative design with examples taken from an implemented system.

  9. Conceptual-level workflow modeling of scientific experiments using NMR as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Verdi, Kacy K; Ellis, Heidi JC; Gryk, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Background Scientific workflows improve the process of scientific experiments by making computations explicit, underscoring data flow, and emphasizing the participation of humans in the process when intuition and human reasoning are required. Workflows for experiments also highlight transitions among experimental phases, allowing intermediate results to be verified and supporting the proper handling of semantic mismatches and different file formats among the various tools used in the scientific process. Thus, scientific workflows are important for the modeling and subsequent capture of bioinformatics-related data. While much research has been conducted on the implementation of scientific workflows, the initial process of actually designing and generating the workflow at the conceptual level has received little consideration. Results We propose a structured process to capture scientific workflows at the conceptual level that allows workflows to be documented efficiently, results in concise models of the workflow and more-correct workflow implementations, and provides insight into the scientific process itself. The approach uses three modeling techniques to model the structural, data flow, and control flow aspects of the workflow. The domain of biomolecular structure determination using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the process. Specifically, we show the application of the approach to capture the workflow for the process of conducting biomolecular analysis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Conclusion Using the approach, we were able to accurately document, in a short amount of time, numerous steps in the process of conducting an experiment using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting models are correct and precise, as outside validation of the models identified only minor omissions in the models. In addition, the models provide an accurate visual description of the control flow for conducting biomolecular analysis using

  10. Conceptual-level workflow modeling of scientific experiments using NMR as a case study.

    PubMed

    Verdi, Kacy K; Ellis, Heidi Jc; Gryk, Michael R

    2007-01-30

    Scientific workflows improve the process of scientific experiments by making computations explicit, underscoring data flow, and emphasizing the participation of humans in the process when intuition and human reasoning are required. Workflows for experiments also highlight transitions among experimental phases, allowing intermediate results to be verified and supporting the proper handling of semantic mismatches and different file formats among the various tools used in the scientific process. Thus, scientific workflows are important for the modeling and subsequent capture of bioinformatics-related data. While much research has been conducted on the implementation of scientific workflows, the initial process of actually designing and generating the workflow at the conceptual level has received little consideration. We propose a structured process to capture scientific workflows at the conceptual level that allows workflows to be documented efficiently, results in concise models of the workflow and more-correct workflow implementations, and provides insight into the scientific process itself. The approach uses three modeling techniques to model the structural, data flow, and control flow aspects of the workflow. The domain of biomolecular structure determination using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the process. Specifically, we show the application of the approach to capture the workflow for the process of conducting biomolecular analysis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Using the approach, we were able to accurately document, in a short amount of time, numerous steps in the process of conducting an experiment using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting models are correct and precise, as outside validation of the models identified only minor omissions in the models. In addition, the models provide an accurate visual description of the control flow for conducting biomolecular analysis using NMR spectroscopy experiment.

  11. Automation in an addiction treatment research clinic: computerised contingency management, ecological momentary assessment and a protocol workflow system.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H; Preston, Kenzie L

    2009-01-01

    A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients' treatment needs and to accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with the provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining and querying the data. We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialised applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for the delivery of behavioural interventions, the transactional electronic diary (TED) system for the management of behavioural assessments and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerised workflow automation and guidance of each participant's daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorised staff. ACM and the TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80 patient capacity, having an annual average of 18,000 patient visits and 7300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarise participant safety data for research oversight. When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff and expansions in research methods.

  12. XML schemas for common bioinformatic data types and their application in workflow systems.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Philipp N; Krüger, Jan; Hartmeier, Sven; Schwarzer, Knut; Löwenthal, Kai; Mersch, Henning; Dandekar, Thomas; Giegerich, Robert

    2006-11-06

    Today, there is a growing need in bioinformatics to combine available software tools into chains, thus building complex applications from existing single-task tools. To create such workflows, the tools involved have to be able to work with each other's data--therefore, a common set of well-defined data formats is needed. Unfortunately, current bioinformatic tools use a great variety of heterogeneous formats. Acknowledging the need for common formats, the Helmholtz Open BioInformatics Technology network (HOBIT) identified several basic data types used in bioinformatics and developed appropriate format descriptions, formally defined by XML schemas, and incorporated them in a Java library (BioDOM). These schemas currently cover sequence, sequence alignment, RNA secondary structure and RNA secondary structure alignment formats in a form that is independent of any specific program, thus enabling seamless interoperation of different tools. All XML formats are available at http://bioschemas.sourceforge.net, the BioDOM library can be obtained at http://biodom.sourceforge.net. The HOBIT XML schemas and the BioDOM library simplify adding XML support to newly created and existing bioinformatic tools, enabling these tools to interoperate seamlessly in workflow scenarios.

  13. XML schemas for common bioinformatic data types and their application in workflow systems

    PubMed Central

    Seibel, Philipp N; Krüger, Jan; Hartmeier, Sven; Schwarzer, Knut; Löwenthal, Kai; Mersch, Henning; Dandekar, Thomas; Giegerich, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background Today, there is a growing need in bioinformatics to combine available software tools into chains, thus building complex applications from existing single-task tools. To create such workflows, the tools involved have to be able to work with each other's data – therefore, a common set of well-defined data formats is needed. Unfortunately, current bioinformatic tools use a great variety of heterogeneous formats. Results Acknowledging the need for common formats, the Helmholtz Open BioInformatics Technology network (HOBIT) identified several basic data types used in bioinformatics and developed appropriate format descriptions, formally defined by XML schemas, and incorporated them in a Java library (BioDOM). These schemas currently cover sequence, sequence alignment, RNA secondary structure and RNA secondary structure alignment formats in a form that is independent of any specific program, thus enabling seamless interoperation of different tools. All XML formats are available at , the BioDOM library can be obtained at . Conclusion The HOBIT XML schemas and the BioDOM library simplify adding XML support to newly created and existing bioinformatic tools, enabling these tools to interoperate seamlessly in workflow scenarios. PMID:17087823

  14. A framework for service enterprise workflow simulation with multi-agents cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wenan; Xu, Wei; Yang, Fujun; Xu, Lida; Jiang, Chuanqun

    2013-11-01

    Process dynamic modelling for service business is the key technique for Service-Oriented information systems and service business management, and the workflow model of business processes is the core part of service systems. Service business workflow simulation is the prevalent approach to be used for analysis of service business process dynamically. Generic method for service business workflow simulation is based on the discrete event queuing theory, which is lack of flexibility and scalability. In this paper, we propose a service workflow-oriented framework for the process simulation of service businesses using multi-agent cooperation to address the above issues. Social rationality of agent is introduced into the proposed framework. Adopting rationality as one social factor for decision-making strategies, a flexible scheduling for activity instances has been implemented. A system prototype has been developed to validate the proposed simulation framework through a business case study.

  15. Developing integrated workflows for the digitisation of herbarium specimens using a modular and scalable approach.

    PubMed

    Haston, Elspeth; Cubey, Robert; Pullan, Martin; Atkins, Hannah; Harris, David J

    2012-01-01

    Digitisation programmes in many institutes frequently involve disparate and irregular funding, diverse selection criteria and scope, with different members of staff managing and operating the processes. These factors have influenced the decision at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh to develop an integrated workflow for the digitisation of herbarium specimens which is modular and scalable to enable a single overall workflow to be used for all digitisation projects. This integrated workflow is comprised of three principal elements: a specimen workflow, a data workflow and an image workflow.The specimen workflow is strongly linked to curatorial processes which will impact on the prioritisation, selection and preparation of the specimens. The importance of including a conservation element within the digitisation workflow is highlighted. The data workflow includes the concept of three main categories of collection data: label data, curatorial data and supplementary data. It is shown that each category of data has its own properties which influence the timing of data capture within the workflow. Development of software has been carried out for the rapid capture of curatorial data, and optical character recognition (OCR) software is being used to increase the efficiency of capturing label data and supplementary data. The large number and size of the images has necessitated the inclusion of automated systems within the image workflow.

  16. Integrative workflows for metagenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ladoukakis, Efthymios; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis A.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of all sequencing technologies, described by the term Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), have revolutionized metagenomic analysis. They constitute a combination of high-throughput analytical protocols, coupled to delicate measuring techniques, in order to potentially discover, properly assemble and map allelic sequences to the correct genomes, achieving particularly high yields for only a fraction of the cost of traditional processes (i.e., Sanger). From a bioinformatic perspective, this boils down to many GB of data being generated from each single sequencing experiment, rendering the management or even the storage, critical bottlenecks with respect to the overall analytical endeavor. The enormous complexity is even more aggravated by the versatility of the processing steps available, represented by the numerous bioinformatic tools that are essential, for each analytical task, in order to fully unveil the genetic content of a metagenomic dataset. These disparate tasks range from simple, nonetheless non-trivial, quality control of raw data to exceptionally complex protein annotation procedures, requesting a high level of expertise for their proper application or the neat implementation of the whole workflow. Furthermore, a bioinformatic analysis of such scale, requires grand computational resources, imposing as the sole realistic solution, the utilization of cloud computing infrastructures. In this review article we discuss different, integrative, bioinformatic solutions available, which address the aforementioned issues, by performing a critical assessment of the available automated pipelines for data management, quality control, and annotation of metagenomic data, embracing various, major sequencing technologies and applications. PMID:25478562

  17. Science Gateways, Scientific Workflows and Open Community Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, M. E.; Marru, S.

    2014-12-01

    Science gateways and scientific workflows occupy different ends of the spectrum of user-focused cyberinfrastructure. Gateways, sometimes called science portals, provide a way for enabling large numbers of users to take advantage of advanced computing resources (supercomputers, advanced storage systems, science clouds) by providing Web and desktop interfaces and supporting services. Scientific workflows, at the other end of the spectrum, support advanced usage of cyberinfrastructure that enable "power users" to undertake computational experiments that are not easily done through the usual mechanisms (managing simulations across multiple sites, for example). Despite these different target communities, gateways and workflows share many similarities and can potentially be accommodated by the same software system. For example, pipelines to process InSAR imagery sets or to datamine GPS time series data are workflows. The results and the ability to make downstream products may be made available through a gateway, and power users may want to provide their own custom pipelines. In this abstract, we discuss our efforts to build an open source software system, Apache Airavata, that can accommodate both gateway and workflow use cases. Our approach is general, and we have applied the software to problems in a number of scientific domains. In this talk, we discuss our applications to usage scenarios specific to earth science, focusing on earthquake physics examples drawn from the QuakSim.org and GeoGateway.org efforts. We also examine the role of the Apache Software Foundation's open community model as a way to build up common commmunity codes that do not depend upon a single "owner" to sustain. Pushing beyond open source software, we also see the need to provide gateways and workflow systems as cloud services. These services centralize operations, provide well-defined programming interfaces, scale elastically, and have global-scale fault tolerance. We discuss our work providing

  18. DEWEY: the DICOM-enabled workflow engine system.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Bradley J; Langer, Steve G; Blezek, Daniel J; Ryan, William J; French, Todd L

    2014-06-01

    Workflow is a widely used term to describe the sequence of steps to accomplish a task. The use of workflow technology in medicine and medical imaging in particular is limited. In this article, we describe the application of a workflow engine to improve workflow in a radiology department. We implemented a DICOM-enabled workflow engine system in our department. We designed it in a way to allow for scalability, reliability, and flexibility. We implemented several workflows, including one that replaced an existing manual workflow and measured the number of examinations prepared in time without and with the workflow system. The system significantly increased the number of examinations prepared in time for clinical review compared to human effort. It also met the design goals defined at its outset. Workflow engines appear to have value as ways to efficiently assure that complex workflows are completed in a timely fashion.

  19. Formalizing an integrative, multidisciplinary cancer therapy discovery workflow

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Mary F.; Enderling, Heiko; Wallace, Dorothy I.; Batra, Jaspreet; Jordan, Marie; Kumar, Sushil; Panetta, John C.; Pasquier, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Although many clinicians and researchers work to understand cancer, there has been limited success to effectively combine forces and collaborate over time, distance, data and budget constraints. Here we present a workflow template for multidisciplinary cancer therapy that was developed during the 2nd Annual Workshop on Cancer Systems Biology sponsored by Tufts University, Boston, MA in July 2012. The template was applied to the development of a metronomic therapy backbone for neuroblastoma. Three primary groups were identified: clinicians, biologists, and scientists (mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists and engineers). The workflow described their integrative interactions; parallel or sequential processes; data sources and computational tools at different stages as well as the iterative nature of therapeutic development from clinical observations to in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials. We found that theoreticians in dialog with experimentalists could develop calibrated and parameterized predictive models that inform and formalize sets of testable hypotheses, thus speeding up discovery and validation while reducing laboratory resources and costs. The developed template outlines an interdisciplinary collaboration workflow designed to systematically investigate the mechanistic underpinnings of a new therapy and validate that therapy to advance development and clinical acceptance. PMID:23955390

  20. Using bio.tools to generate and annotate workbench tool descriptions

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Kenzo-Hugo; Kuzmin, Ivan; Khodak, Anton; Rasche, Eric; Crusoe, Michael; Peterson, Hedi; Ison, Jon; Ménager, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Workbench and workflow systems such as Galaxy, Taverna, Chipster, or Common Workflow Language (CWL)-based frameworks, facilitate the access to bioinformatics tools in a user-friendly, scalable and reproducible way. Still, the integration of tools in such environments remains a cumbersome, time consuming and error-prone process. A major consequence is the incomplete or outdated description of tools that are often missing important information, including parameters and metadata such as publication or links to documentation. ToolDog (Tool DescriptiOn Generator) facilitates the integration of tools - which have been registered in the ELIXIR tools registry (https://bio.tools) - into workbench environments by generating tool description templates. ToolDog includes two modules. The first module analyses the source code of the bioinformatics software with language-specific plugins, and generates a skeleton for a Galaxy XML or CWL tool description. The second module is dedicated to the enrichment of the generated tool description, using metadata provided by bio.tools. This last module can also be used on its own to complete or correct existing tool descriptions with missing metadata. PMID:29333231

  1. Potential of knowledge discovery using workflows implemented in the C3Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Thomas; Fink, Andreas; Ulbrich, Uwe; Schartner, Thomas; Dobler, Andreas; Fritzsch, Bernadette; Hiller, Wolfgang; Bräuer, Benny

    2013-04-01

    With the increasing number of climate simulations, reanalyses and observations, new infrastructures to search and analyse distributed data are necessary. In recent years, the Grid architecture became an important technology to fulfill these demands. For the German project "Collaborative Climate Community Data and Processing Grid" (C3Grid) computer scientists and meteorologists developed a system that offers its users a webinterface to search and download climate data and use implemented analysis tools (called workflows) to further investigate them. In this contribution, two workflows that are implemented in the C3Grid architecture are presented: the Cyclone Tracking (CT) and Stormtrack workflow. They shall serve as an example on how to perform numerous investigations on midlatitude winterstorms on a large amount of analysis and climate model data without having an insight into the data source, program code and a low-to-moderate understanding of the theortical background. CT is based on the work of Murray and Simmonds (1991) to identify and track local minima in the mean sea level pressure (MSLP) field of the selected dataset. Adjustable thresholds for the curvature of the isobars as well as the minimum lifetime of a cyclone allow the distinction of weak subtropical heat low systems and stronger midlatitude cyclones e.g. in the Northern Atlantic. The user gets the resulting track data including statistics about the track density, average central pressure, average central curvature, cyclogenesis and cyclolysis as well as pre-built visualizations of these results. Stormtrack calculates the 2.5-6 day bandpassfiltered standard deviation of the geopotential height on a selected pressure level. Although this workflow needs much less computational effort compared to CT it shows structures that are in good agreement with the track density of the CT workflow. To what extent changes in the mid-level tropospheric storm track are reflected in trough density and intensity

  2. Applying Content Management to Automated Provenance Capture

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Gibson, Tara D.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-04-10

    Workflows and data pipelines are becoming increasingly valuable in both computational and experimen-tal sciences. These automated systems are capable of generating significantly more data within the same amount of time than their manual counterparts. Automatically capturing and recording data prove-nance and annotation as part of these workflows is critical for data management, verification, and dis-semination. Our goal in addressing the provenance challenge was to develop and end-to-end system that demonstrates real-time capture, persistent content management, and ad-hoc searches of both provenance and metadata using open source software and standard protocols. We describe our prototype, which extends the Kepler workflow toolsmore » for the execution environment, the Scientific Annotation Middleware (SAM) content management software for data services, and an existing HTTP-based query protocol. Our implementation offers several unique capabilities, and through the use of standards, is able to pro-vide access to the provenance record to a variety of commonly available client tools.« less

  3. Classical workflow nets and workflow nets with reset arcs: using Lyapunov stability for soundness verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clempner, Julio B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel analytical method for soundness verification of workflow nets and reset workflow nets, using the well-known stability results of Lyapunov for Petri nets. We also prove that the soundness property is decidable for workflow nets and reset workflow nets. In addition, we provide evidence of several outcomes related with properties such as boundedness, liveness, reversibility and blocking using stability. Our approach is validated theoretically and by a numerical example related to traffic signal-control synchronisation.

  4. Biocuration workflows and text mining: overview of the BioCreative 2012 Workshop Track II.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiyong; Hirschman, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    Manual curation of data from the biomedical literature is a rate-limiting factor for many expert curated databases. Despite the continuing advances in biomedical text mining and the pressing needs of biocurators for better tools, few existing text-mining tools have been successfully integrated into production literature curation systems such as those used by the expert curated databases. To close this gap and better understand all aspects of literature curation, we invited submissions of written descriptions of curation workflows from expert curated databases for the BioCreative 2012 Workshop Track II. We received seven qualified contributions, primarily from model organism databases. Based on these descriptions, we identified commonalities and differences across the workflows, the common ontologies and controlled vocabularies used and the current and desired uses of text mining for biocuration. Compared to a survey done in 2009, our 2012 results show that many more databases are now using text mining in parts of their curation workflows. In addition, the workshop participants identified text-mining aids for finding gene names and symbols (gene indexing), prioritization of documents for curation (document triage) and ontology concept assignment as those most desired by the biocurators. DATABASE URL: http://www.biocreative.org/tasks/bc-workshop-2012/workflow/.

  5. Task Delegation Based Access Control Models for Workflow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaaloul, Khaled; Charoy, François

    e-Government organisations are facilitated and conducted using workflow management systems. Role-based access control (RBAC) is recognised as an efficient access control model for large organisations. The application of RBAC in workflow systems cannot, however, grant permissions to users dynamically while business processes are being executed. We currently observe a move away from predefined strict workflow modelling towards approaches supporting flexibility on the organisational level. One specific approach is that of task delegation. Task delegation is a mechanism that supports organisational flexibility, and ensures delegation of authority in access control systems. In this paper, we propose a Task-oriented Access Control (TAC) model based on RBAC to address these requirements. We aim to reason about task from organisational perspectives and resources perspectives to analyse and specify authorisation constraints. Moreover, we present a fine grained access control protocol to support delegation based on the TAC model.

  6. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Wilter da Silva, Alan; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S.; Stuart, David I.; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service. PMID:21460443

  7. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M; da Silva, Alan Wilter; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S; Stuart, David I; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  8. Improving data collection, documentation, and workflow in a dementia screening study.

    PubMed

    Read, Kevin B; LaPolla, Fred Willie Zametkin; Tolea, Magdalena I; Galvin, James E; Surkis, Alisa

    2017-04-01

    A clinical study team performing three multicultural dementia screening studies identified the need to improve data management practices and facilitate data sharing. A collaboration was initiated with librarians as part of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) informationist supplement program. The librarians identified areas for improvement in the studies' data collection, entry, and processing workflows. The librarians' role in this project was to meet needs expressed by the study team around improving data collection and processing workflows to increase study efficiency and ensure data quality. The librarians addressed the data collection, entry, and processing weaknesses through standardizing and renaming variables, creating an electronic data capture system using REDCap, and developing well-documented, reproducible data processing workflows. NLM informationist supplements provide librarians with valuable experience in collaborating with study teams to address their data needs. For this project, the librarians gained skills in project management, REDCap, and understanding of the challenges and specifics of a clinical research study. However, the time and effort required to provide targeted and intensive support for one study team was not scalable to the library's broader user community.

  9. Developing integrated workflows for the digitisation of herbarium specimens using a modular and scalable approach

    PubMed Central

    Haston, Elspeth; Cubey, Robert; Pullan, Martin; Atkins, Hannah; Harris, David J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Digitisation programmes in many institutes frequently involve disparate and irregular funding, diverse selection criteria and scope, with different members of staff managing and operating the processes. These factors have influenced the decision at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh to develop an integrated workflow for the digitisation of herbarium specimens which is modular and scalable to enable a single overall workflow to be used for all digitisation projects. This integrated workflow is comprised of three principal elements: a specimen workflow, a data workflow and an image workflow. The specimen workflow is strongly linked to curatorial processes which will impact on the prioritisation, selection and preparation of the specimens. The importance of including a conservation element within the digitisation workflow is highlighted. The data workflow includes the concept of three main categories of collection data: label data, curatorial data and supplementary data. It is shown that each category of data has its own properties which influence the timing of data capture within the workflow. Development of software has been carried out for the rapid capture of curatorial data, and optical character recognition (OCR) software is being used to increase the efficiency of capturing label data and supplementary data. The large number and size of the images has necessitated the inclusion of automated systems within the image workflow. PMID:22859881

  10. Galaxy-M: a Galaxy workflow for processing and analyzing direct infusion and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Robert L; Weber, Ralf J M; Liu, Haoyu; Sharma-Oates, Archana; Viant, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is increasingly recognized as an invaluable tool in the biological, medical and environmental sciences yet lags behind the methodological maturity of other omics fields. To achieve its full potential, including the integration of multiple omics modalities, the accessibility, standardization and reproducibility of computational metabolomics tools must be improved significantly. Here we present our end-to-end mass spectrometry metabolomics workflow in the widely used platform, Galaxy. Named Galaxy-M, our workflow has been developed for both direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics. The range of tools presented spans from processing of raw data, e.g. peak picking and alignment, through data cleansing, e.g. missing value imputation, to preparation for statistical analysis, e.g. normalization and scaling, and principal components analysis (PCA) with associated statistical evaluation. We demonstrate the ease of using these Galaxy workflows via the analysis of DIMS and LC-MS datasets, and provide PCA scores and associated statistics to help other users to ensure that they can accurately repeat the processing and analysis of these two datasets. Galaxy and data are all provided pre-installed in a virtual machine (VM) that can be downloaded from the GigaDB repository. Additionally, source code, executables and installation instructions are available from GitHub. The Galaxy platform has enabled us to produce an easily accessible and reproducible computational metabolomics workflow. More tools could be added by the community to expand its functionality. We recommend that Galaxy-M workflow files are included within the supplementary information of publications, enabling metabolomics studies to achieve greater reproducibility.

  11. Automation of lidar-based hydrologic feature extraction workflows using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlongan, Noel Jerome B.; de la Cruz, Roel M.; Olfindo, Nestor T.; Perez, Anjillyn Mae C.

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of LiDAR technology, higher resolution datasets become available for use in different remote sensing and GIS applications. One significant application of LiDAR datasets in the Philippines is in resource features extraction. Feature extraction using LiDAR datasets require complex and repetitive workflows which can take a lot of time for researchers through manual execution and supervision. The Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys (PHD), a project under the Nationwide Detailed Resources Assessment Using LiDAR (Phil-LiDAR 2) program, created a set of scripts, the PHD Toolkit, to automate its processes and workflows necessary for hydrologic features extraction specifically Streams and Drainages, Irrigation Network, and Inland Wetlands, using LiDAR Datasets. These scripts are created in Python and can be added in the ArcGIS® environment as a toolbox. The toolkit is currently being used as an aid for the researchers in hydrologic feature extraction by simplifying the workflows, eliminating human errors when providing the inputs, and providing quick and easy-to-use tools for repetitive tasks. This paper discusses the actual implementation of different workflows developed by Phil-LiDAR 2 Project 4 in Streams, Irrigation Network and Inland Wetlands extraction.

  12. Automation in an Addiction Treatment Research Clinic: Computerized Contingency Management, Ecological Momentary Assessment, and a Protocol Workflow System

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H.; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2009-01-01

    Issues A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients’ treatment needs and accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining, and querying the data. Approach We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialized applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for delivery of behavioral interventions, the Transactional Electronic Diary (TED) system for management of behavioral assessments, and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerized workflow automation and guidance of each participant’s daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorized staff. Key Findings ACM and TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80-patient capacity having an annual average of 18,000 patient-visits and 7,300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarize participant-safety data for research oversight. Implications and conclusion When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment-research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff, and expansions in research methods. PMID:19320669

  13. Enabling Smart Workflows over Heterogeneous ID-Sensing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Pau; Cetina, Carlos; Lacuesta, Raquel; Palacios, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Sensing technologies in mobile devices play a key role in reducing the gap between the physical and the digital world. The use of automatic identification capabilities can improve user participation in business processes where physical elements are involved (Smart Workflows). However, identifying all objects in the user surroundings does not automatically translate into meaningful services to the user. This work introduces Parkour, an architecture that allows the development of services that match the goals of each of the participants in a smart workflow. Parkour is based on a pluggable architecture that can be extended to provide support for new tasks and technologies. In order to facilitate the development of these plug-ins, tools that automate the development process are also provided. Several Parkour-based systems have been developed in order to validate the applicability of the proposal. PMID:23202193

  14. Errors detected in pediatric oral liquid medication doses prepared in an automated workflow management system.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Sarah; Van Buskirk, Alex; Falconer, R James; Hollon, Andrew; Hoebing, Wendy; Jokic, Sladan

    2018-02-01

    The effectiveness of barcode-assisted medication preparation (BCMP) technology on detecting oral liquid dose preparation errors. From June 1, 2013, through May 31, 2014, a total of 178,344 oral doses were processed at Children's Mercy, a 301-bed pediatric hospital, through an automated workflow management system. Doses containing errors detected by the system's barcode scanning system or classified as rejected by the pharmacist were further reviewed. Errors intercepted by the barcode-scanning system were classified as (1) expired product, (2) incorrect drug, (3) incorrect concentration, and (4) technological error. Pharmacist-rejected doses were categorized into 6 categories based on the root cause of the preparation error: (1) expired product, (2) incorrect concentration, (3) incorrect drug, (4) incorrect volume, (5) preparation error, and (6) other. Of the 178,344 doses examined, 3,812 (2.1%) errors were detected by either the barcode-assisted scanning system (1.8%, n = 3,291) or a pharmacist (0.3%, n = 521). The 3,291 errors prevented by the barcode-assisted system were classified most commonly as technological error and incorrect drug, followed by incorrect concentration and expired product. Errors detected by pharmacists were also analyzed. These 521 errors were most often classified as incorrect volume, preparation error, expired product, other, incorrect drug, and incorrect concentration. BCMP technology detected errors in 1.8% of pediatric oral liquid medication doses prepared in an automated workflow management system, with errors being most commonly attributed to technological problems or incorrect drugs. Pharmacists rejected an additional 0.3% of studied doses. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PGen: large-scale genomic variations analysis workflow and browser in SoyKB.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Khan, Saad M; Wang, Juexin; Rynge, Mats; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zeng, Shuai; Chen, Shiyuan; Maldonado Dos Santos, Joao V; Valliyodan, Babu; Calyam, Prasad P; Merchant, Nirav; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong; Joshi, Trupti

    2016-10-06

    With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and significant reductions in sequencing costs, it is now possible to sequence large collections of germplasm in crops for detecting genome-scale genetic variations and to apply the knowledge towards improvements in traits. To efficiently facilitate large-scale NGS resequencing data analysis of genomic variations, we have developed "PGen", an integrated and optimized workflow using the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) high-performance computing (HPC) virtual system, iPlant cloud data storage resources and Pegasus workflow management system (Pegasus-WMS). The workflow allows users to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletions (indels), perform SNP annotations and conduct copy number variation analyses on multiple resequencing datasets in a user-friendly and seamless way. We have developed both a Linux version in GitHub ( https://github.com/pegasus-isi/PGen-GenomicVariations-Workflow ) and a web-based implementation of the PGen workflow integrated within the Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB), ( http://soykb.org/Pegasus/index.php ). Using PGen, we identified 10,218,140 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,398,982 indels from analysis of 106 soybean lines sequenced at 15X coverage. 297,245 non-synonymous SNPs and 3330 copy number variation (CNV) regions were identified from this analysis. SNPs identified using PGen from additional soybean resequencing projects adding to 500+ soybean germplasm lines in total have been integrated. These SNPs are being utilized for trait improvement using genotype to phenotype prediction approaches developed in-house. In order to browse and access NGS data easily, we have also developed an NGS resequencing data browser ( http://soykb.org/NGS_Resequence/NGS_index.php ) within SoyKB to provide easy access to SNP and downstream analysis results for soybean researchers. PGen workflow has been optimized for the most

  16. Technology in the OR: AORN Members' Perceptions of the Effects on Workflow Efficiency and Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Sipes, Carolyn; Baker, Joy Don

    2015-09-01

    This collaborative study sought to describe technology used by AORN members at work, inclusive of radio-frequency identification or barcode scanning (RFID), data collection tools (DATA), workflow or dashboard management tools (DASHBOARD), and environmental services/room decontamination technologies (ENVIRON), and to identify the perceived effects of each technology on workflow efficiency (WFE) and quality patient care (QPC). The 462 respondents to the AORN Technology in the OR survey reported use of technology (USE) in all categories. Eleven of 17 RFID items had a strong positive correlation between the designated USE item and the perceived effect on WFE and QPC. Five of the most-used technology items were found in the DATA category. Two of the five related to Intraoperative Nursing Documentation and the use of the Perioperative Nursing Data Set. The other three related to Imaging Integration for Radiology Equipment, Video Camera Systems, and Fiber-optic Systems. All three elements explored in the DASHBOARD category (ie, Patient Update, OR Case, OR Efficiency) demonstrated approximately 50% or greater perceived effectiveness in WFE and QPC. There was a low reported use of ENVIRON technologies, resulting in limited WFE and QPC data for this category. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A virtual data language and system for scientific workflow management in data grid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong

    With advances in scientific instrumentation and simulation, scientific data is growing fast in both size and analysis complexity. So-called Data Grids aim to provide high performance, distributed data analysis infrastructure for data- intensive sciences, where scientists distributed worldwide need to extract information from large collections of data, and to share both data products and the resources needed to produce and store them. However, the description, composition, and execution of even logically simple scientific workflows are often complicated by the need to deal with "messy" issues like heterogeneous storage formats and ad-hoc file system structures. We show how these difficulties can be overcome via a typed workflow notation called virtual data language, within which issues of physical representation are cleanly separated from logical typing, and by the implementation of this notation within the context of a powerful virtual data system that supports distributed execution. The resulting language and system are capable of expressing complex workflows in a simple compact form, enacting those workflows in distributed environments, monitoring and recording the execution processes, and tracing the derivation history of data products. We describe the motivation, design, implementation, and evaluation of the virtual data language and system, and the application of the virtual data paradigm in various science disciplines, including astronomy, cognitive neuroscience.

  18. Enabling Efficient Climate Science Workflows in High Performance Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, H.; Byna, S.; Wehner, M. F.; Gu, J.; O'Brien, T. A.; Loring, B.; Stone, D. A.; Collins, W.; Prabhat, M.; Liu, Y.; Johnson, J. N.; Paciorek, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A typical climate science workflow often involves a combination of acquisition of data, modeling, simulation, analysis, visualization, publishing, and storage of results. Each of these tasks provide a myriad of challenges when running on a high performance computing environment such as Hopper or Edison at NERSC. Hurdles such as data transfer and management, job scheduling, parallel analysis routines, and publication require a lot of forethought and planning to ensure that proper quality control mechanisms are in place. These steps require effectively utilizing a combination of well tested and newly developed functionality to move data, perform analysis, apply statistical routines, and finally, serve results and tools to the greater scientific community. As part of the CAlibrated and Systematic Characterization, Attribution and Detection of Extremes (CASCADE) project we highlight a stack of tools our team utilizes and has developed to ensure that large scale simulation and analysis work are commonplace and provide operations that assist in everything from generation/procurement of data (HTAR/Globus) to automating publication of results to portals like the Earth Systems Grid Federation (ESGF), all while executing everything in between in a scalable environment in a task parallel way (MPI). We highlight the use and benefit of these tools by showing several climate science analysis use cases they have been applied to.

  19. From Provenance Standards and Tools to Queries and Actionable Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludaescher, B.

    2017-12-01

    The W3C PROV standard provides a minimal core for sharing retrospective provenance information for scientific workflows and scripts. PROV extensions such as DataONE's ProvONE model are necessary for linking runtime observables in retrospective provenance records with conceptual-level prospective provenance information, i.e., workflow (or dataflow) graphs. Runtime provenance recorders, such as DataONE's RunManager for R, or noWorkflow for Python capture retrospective provenance automatically. YesWorkflow (YW) is a toolkit that allows researchers to declare high-level prospective provenance models of scripts via simple inline comments (YW-annotations), revealing the computational modules and dataflow dependencies in the script. By combining and linking both forms of provenance, important queries and use cases can be supported that neither provenance model can afford on its own. We present existing and emerging provenance tools developed for the DataONE and SKOPE (Synthesizing Knowledge of Past Environments) projects. We show how the different tools can be used individually and in combination to model, capture, share, query, and visualize provenance information. We also present challenges and opportunities for making provenance information more immediately actionable for the researchers who create it in the first place. We argue that such a shift towards "provenance-for-self" is necessary to accelerate the creation, sharing, and use of provenance in support of transparent, reproducible computational and data science.

  20. Understanding the dispensary workflow at the Birmingham Free Clinic: a proposed framework for an informatics intervention.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Arielle M; Herbert, Mary I; Douglas, Gerald P

    2016-02-19

    The Birmingham Free Clinic (BFC) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA is a free, walk-in clinic that serves medically uninsured populations through the use of volunteer health care providers and an on-site medication dispensary. The introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) has improved several aspects of clinic workflow. However, pharmacists' tasks involving medication management and dispensing have become more challenging since EMR implementation due to its inability to support workflows between the medical and pharmaceutical services. To inform the design of a systematic intervention, we conducted a needs assessment study to identify workflow challenges and process inefficiencies in the dispensary. We used contextual inquiry to document the dispensary workflow and facilitate identification of critical aspects of intervention design specific to the user. Pharmacists were observed according to contextual inquiry guidelines. Graphical models were produced to aid data and process visualization. We created a list of themes describing workflow challenges and asked the pharmacists to rank them in order of significance to narrow the scope of intervention design. Three pharmacists were observed at the BFC. Observer notes were documented and analyzed to produce 13 themes outlining the primary challenges pharmacists encounter during dispensation at the BFC. The dispensary workflow is labor intensive, redundant, and inefficient when integrated with the clinical service. Observations identified inefficiencies that may benefit from the introduction of informatics interventions including: medication labeling, insufficient process notification, triple documentation, and inventory control. We propose a system for Prescription Management and General Inventory Control (RxMAGIC). RxMAGIC is a framework designed to mitigate workflow challenges and improve the processes of medication management and inventory control. While RxMAGIC is described in the context of the BFC

  1. Digital Workflows for Restoration and Management of the Museum Affandi - a Case Study in Challenging Circumstances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, U.; Styhler-Aydın, G.; Grandits, D.; Stampfer, L.; Pont, U.; Mayer, I.

    2017-08-01

    The appropriate restoration of architectural heritage needs a careful and comprehensive documentation of the existing structures, which even elaborates, if the function of the building needs special attention, like in museums. In a collaborative project between the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and two universities in Austria (TU Wien and the Danube University Krems) a restoration and adaptation concept of the Affandi Museum in Yogyakarta is currently in progress. It provides a perfect case study for the development of a workflow to combine data from a building survey, architectural research, indoor climate measurements and the documentation of artwork in a challenging environment, from hot and humid tropical climate to continuous threads by natural hazards like earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. The Affandi Museum houses the collection of Affandi, who is considered to be Indonesia's foremost Expressionist painter and partly designed and constructed the museum by himself. With the spirit of the artist still perceptible in the complex the Affandi Museum is an important part of the Indonesian cultural heritage. Thus its preservation takes special attention and adds to the complexity of the development of a monitoring and maintenance concept. This paper describes the ongoing development of an approach to a workflow from the measurement and research of the objects, both architectural and artwork, to the semantically enriched BIM Model as the base for a sustainable monitoring tool for the Affandi Museum.

  2. WRF4SG: A Scientific Gateway for climate experiment workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Carlos; Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernandez-Quiruelas, Valvanuz

    2013-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is a community-driven and public domain model widely used by the weather and climate communities. As opposite to other application-oriented models, WRF provides a flexible and computationally-efficient framework which allows solving a variety of problems for different time-scales, from weather forecast to climate change projection. Furthermore, WRF is also widely used as a research tool in modeling physics, dynamics, and data assimilation by the research community. Climate experiment workflows based on Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) are nowadays among the one of the most cutting-edge applications. These workflows are complex due to both large storage and the huge number of simulations executed. In order to manage that, we have developed a scientific gateway (SG) called WRF for Scientific Gateway (WRF4SG) based on WS-PGRADE/gUSE and WRF4G frameworks to ease achieve WRF users needs (see [1] and [2]). WRF4SG provides services for different use cases that describe the different interactions between WRF users and the WRF4SG interface in order to show how to run a climate experiment. As WS-PGRADE/gUSE uses portlets (see [1]) to interact with users, its portlets will support these use cases. A typical experiment to be carried on by a WRF user will consist on a high-resolution regional re-forecast. These re-forecasts are common experiments used as input data form wind power energy and natural hazards (wind and precipitation fields). In the cases below, the user is able to access to different resources such as Grid due to the fact that WRF needs a huge amount of computing resources in order to generate useful simulations: * Resource configuration and user authentication: The first step is to authenticate on users' Grid resources by virtual organizations. After login, the user is able to select which virtual organization is going to be used by the experiment. * Data assimilation: In order to assimilate the data sources

  3. Workflows for Full Waveform Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Christian; Krischer, Lion; Afanasiev, Michael; van Driel, Martin; May, Dave A.; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Despite many theoretical advances and the increasing availability of high-performance computing clusters, full seismic waveform inversions still face considerable challenges regarding data and workflow management. While the community has access to solvers which can harness modern heterogeneous computing architectures, the computational bottleneck has fallen to these often manpower-bounded issues that need to be overcome to facilitate further progress. Modern inversions involve huge amounts of data and require a tight integration between numerical PDE solvers, data acquisition and processing systems, nonlinear optimization libraries, and job orchestration frameworks. To this end we created a set of libraries and applications revolving around Salvus (http://salvus.io), a novel software package designed to solve large-scale full waveform inverse problems. This presentation focuses on solving passive source seismic full waveform inversions from local to global scales with Salvus. We discuss (i) design choices for the aforementioned components required for full waveform modeling and inversion, (ii) their implementation in the Salvus framework, and (iii) how it is all tied together by a usable workflow system. We combine state-of-the-art algorithms ranging from high-order finite-element solutions of the wave equation to quasi-Newton optimization algorithms using trust-region methods that can handle inexact derivatives. All is steered by an automated interactive graph-based workflow framework capable of orchestrating all necessary pieces. This naturally facilitates the creation of new Earth models and hopefully sparks new scientific insights. Additionally, and even more importantly, it enhances reproducibility and reliability of the final results.

  4. The Project Manager's Tool Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. Scott

    2003-01-01

    Project managers are rarely described as being funny. Moreover, a good sense of humor rarely seems to be one of the deciding factors in choosing someone to be a project manager, or something that pops up as a major discussion point at an annual performance review. Perhaps this is because people think you aren't serious about your work if you laugh. I disagree with this assessment, but that's not really my point. As I talk to people either pursuing a career in project management, or broadening their assignment to include project management, I encourage them to consider what tools they need to be successful. I suggest that they consider any strength they have to be part of their Project Management (PM) Tool Kit, and being funny could be one of the tools they need.

  5. Semantic Document Library: A Virtual Research Environment for Documents, Data and Workflows Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwani, K.; Liu, Y.; Myers, J.; Futrelle, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Semantic Document Library (SDL) was driven by use cases from the environmental observatory communities and is designed to provide conventional document repository features of uploading, downloading, editing and versioning of documents as well as value adding features of tagging, querying, sharing, annotating, ranking, provenance, social networking and geo-spatial mapping services. It allows users to organize a catalogue of watershed observation data, model output, workflows, as well publications and documents related to the same watershed study through the tagging capability. Users can tag all relevant materials using the same watershed name and find all of them easily later using this tag. The underpinning semantic content repository can store materials from other cyberenvironments such as workflow or simulation tools and SDL provides an effective interface to query and organize materials from various sources. Advanced features of the SDL allow users to visualize the provenance of the materials such as the source and how the output data is derived. Other novel features include visualizing all geo-referenced materials on a geospatial map. SDL as a component of a cyberenvironment portal (the NCSA Cybercollaboratory) has goal of efficient management of information and relationships between published artifacts (Validated models, vetted data, workflows, annotations, best practices, reviews and papers) produced from raw research artifacts (data, notes, plans etc.) through agents (people, sensors etc.). Tremendous scientific potential of artifacts is achieved through mechanisms of sharing, reuse and collaboration - empowering scientists to spread their knowledge and protocols and to benefit from the knowledge of others. SDL successfully implements web 2.0 technologies and design patterns along with semantic content management approach that enables use of multiple ontologies and dynamic evolution (e.g. folksonomies) of terminology. Scientific documents involved with

  6. Lessons from Implementing a Combined Workflow–Informatics System for Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Zai, Adrian H.; Grant, Richard W.; Estey, Greg; Lester, William T.; Andrews, Carl T.; Yee, Ronnie; Mort, Elizabeth; Chueh, Henry C.

    2008-01-01

    Shortcomings surrounding the care of patients with diabetes have been attributed largely to a fragmented, disorganized, and duplicative health care system that focuses more on acute conditions and complications than on managing chronic disease. To address these shortcomings, we developed a diabetes registry population management application to change the way our staff manages patients with diabetes. Use of this new application has helped us coordinate the responsibilities for intervening and monitoring patients in the registry among different users. Our experiences using this combined workflow-informatics intervention system suggest that integrating a chronic disease registry into clinical workflow for the treatment of chronic conditions creates a useful and efficient tool for managing disease. PMID:18436907

  7. A Hybrid Task Graph Scheduler for High Performance Image Processing Workflows.

    PubMed

    Blattner, Timothy; Keyrouz, Walid; Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S; Halem, Milton; Brady, Mary

    2017-12-01

    Designing applications for scalability is key to improving their performance in hybrid and cluster computing. Scheduling code to utilize parallelism is difficult, particularly when dealing with data dependencies, memory management, data motion, and processor occupancy. The Hybrid Task Graph Scheduler (HTGS) improves programmer productivity when implementing hybrid workflows for multi-core and multi-GPU systems. The Hybrid Task Graph Scheduler (HTGS) is an abstract execution model, framework, and API that increases programmer productivity when implementing hybrid workflows for such systems. HTGS manages dependencies between tasks, represents CPU and GPU memories independently, overlaps computations with disk I/O and memory transfers, keeps multiple GPUs occupied, and uses all available compute resources. Through these abstractions, data motion and memory are explicit; this makes data locality decisions more accessible. To demonstrate the HTGS application program interface (API), we present implementations of two example algorithms: (1) a matrix multiplication that shows how easily task graphs can be used; and (2) a hybrid implementation of microscopy image stitching that reduces code size by ≈ 43% compared to a manually coded hybrid workflow implementation and showcases the minimal overhead of task graphs in HTGS. Both of the HTGS-based implementations show good performance. In image stitching the HTGS implementation achieves similar performance to the hybrid workflow implementation. Matrix multiplication with HTGS achieves 1.3× and 1.8× speedup over the multi-threaded OpenBLAS library for 16k × 16k and 32k × 32k size matrices, respectively.

  8. Describing and Modeling Workflow and Information Flow in Chronic Disease Care

    PubMed Central

    Unertl, Kim M.; Weinger, Matthew B.; Johnson, Kevin B.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The goal of the study was to develop an in-depth understanding of work practices, workflow, and information flow in chronic disease care, to facilitate development of context-appropriate informatics tools. Design The study was conducted over a 10-month period in three ambulatory clinics providing chronic disease care. The authors iteratively collected data using direct observation and semi-structured interviews. Measurements The authors observed all aspects of care in three different chronic disease clinics for over 150 hours, including 157 patient-provider interactions. Observation focused on interactions among people, processes, and technology. Observation data were analyzed through an open coding approach. The authors then developed models of workflow and information flow using Hierarchical Task Analysis and Soft Systems Methodology. The authors also conducted nine semi-structured interviews to confirm and refine the models. Results The study had three primary outcomes: models of workflow for each clinic, models of information flow for each clinic, and an in-depth description of work practices and the role of health information technology (HIT) in the clinics. The authors identified gaps between the existing HIT functionality and the needs of chronic disease providers. Conclusions In response to the analysis of workflow and information flow, the authors developed ten guidelines for design of HIT to support chronic disease care, including recommendations to pursue modular approaches to design that would support disease-specific needs. The study demonstrates the importance of evaluating workflow and information flow in HIT design and implementation. PMID:19717802

  9. Automation and workflow considerations for embedding Digimarc Barcodes at scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Tony; Haaga, Don; Calhoon, Sean

    2015-03-01

    The Digimarc® Barcode is a digital watermark applied to packages and variable data labels that carries GS1 standard GTIN-14 data traditionally carried by a 1-D barcode. The Digimarc Barcode can be read with smartphones and imaging-based barcode readers commonly used in grocery and retail environments. Using smartphones, consumers can engage with products and retailers can materially increase the speed of check-out, increasing store margins and providing a better experience for shoppers. Internal testing has shown an average of 53% increase in scanning throughput, enabling 100's of millions of dollars in cost savings [1] for retailers when deployed at scale. To get to scale, the process of embedding a digital watermark must be automated and integrated within existing workflows. Creating the tools and processes to do so represents a new challenge for the watermarking community. This paper presents a description and an analysis of the workflow implemented by Digimarc to deploy the Digimarc Barcode at scale. An overview of the tools created and lessons learned during the introduction of technology to the market are provided.

  10. Automation is key to managing a population's health.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Michael B; Hodach, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Online tools for automating population health management can help healthcare organizations meet their patients' needs both during and between encounters with the healthcare system. These tools can facilitate: The use of registries to track patients' health status and care gaps. Outbound messaging to notify patients when they need care. Care team management of more patients at different levels of risk. Automation of workflows related to case management and transitions of care. Online educational and mobile health interventions to engage patients in their care. Analytics programs to identify opportunities for improvement.

  11. Performing statistical analyses on quantitative data in Taverna workflows: an example using R and maxdBrowse to identify differentially-expressed genes from microarray data.

    PubMed

    Li, Peter; Castrillo, Juan I; Velarde, Giles; Wassink, Ingo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Owen, Stuart; Withers, David; Oinn, Tom; Pocock, Matthew R; Goble, Carole A; Oliver, Stephen G; Kell, Douglas B

    2008-08-07

    There has been a dramatic increase in the amount of quantitative data derived from the measurement of changes at different levels of biological complexity during the post-genomic era. However, there are a number of issues associated with the use of computational tools employed for the analysis of such data. For example, computational tools such as R and MATLAB require prior knowledge of their programming languages in order to implement statistical analyses on data. Combining two or more tools in an analysis may also be problematic since data may have to be manually copied and pasted between separate user interfaces for each tool. Furthermore, this transfer of data may require a reconciliation step in order for there to be interoperability between computational tools. Developments in the Taverna workflow system have enabled pipelines to be constructed and enacted for generic and ad hoc analyses of quantitative data. Here, we present an example of such a workflow involving the statistical identification of differentially-expressed genes from microarray data followed by the annotation of their relationships to cellular processes. This workflow makes use of customised maxdBrowse web services, a system that allows Taverna to query and retrieve gene expression data from the maxdLoad2 microarray database. These data are then analysed by R to identify differentially-expressed genes using the Taverna RShell processor which has been developed for invoking this tool when it has been deployed as a service using the RServe library. In addition, the workflow uses Beanshell scripts to reconcile mismatches of data between services as well as to implement a form of user interaction for selecting subsets of microarray data for analysis as part of the workflow execution. A new plugin system in the Taverna software architecture is demonstrated by the use of renderers for displaying PDF files and CSV formatted data within the Taverna workbench. Taverna can be used by data analysis

  12. Performing statistical analyses on quantitative data in Taverna workflows: An example using R and maxdBrowse to identify differentially-expressed genes from microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peter; Castrillo, Juan I; Velarde, Giles; Wassink, Ingo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Owen, Stuart; Withers, David; Oinn, Tom; Pocock, Matthew R; Goble, Carole A; Oliver, Stephen G; Kell, Douglas B

    2008-01-01

    Background There has been a dramatic increase in the amount of quantitative data derived from the measurement of changes at different levels of biological complexity during the post-genomic era. However, there are a number of issues associated with the use of computational tools employed for the analysis of such data. For example, computational tools such as R and MATLAB require prior knowledge of their programming languages in order to implement statistical analyses on data. Combining two or more tools in an analysis may also be problematic since data may have to be manually copied and pasted between separate user interfaces for each tool. Furthermore, this transfer of data may require a reconciliation step in order for there to be interoperability between computational tools. Results Developments in the Taverna workflow system have enabled pipelines to be constructed and enacted for generic and ad hoc analyses of quantitative data. Here, we present an example of such a workflow involving the statistical identification of differentially-expressed genes from microarray data followed by the annotation of their relationships to cellular processes. This workflow makes use of customised maxdBrowse web services, a system that allows Taverna to query and retrieve gene expression data from the maxdLoad2 microarray database. These data are then analysed by R to identify differentially-expressed genes using the Taverna RShell processor which has been developed for invoking this tool when it has been deployed as a service using the RServe library. In addition, the workflow uses Beanshell scripts to reconcile mismatches of data between services as well as to implement a form of user interaction for selecting subsets of microarray data for analysis as part of the workflow execution. A new plugin system in the Taverna software architecture is demonstrated by the use of renderers for displaying PDF files and CSV formatted data within the Taverna workbench. Conclusion Taverna can

  13. Improving data collection, documentation, and workflow in a dementia screening study

    PubMed Central

    Read, Kevin B.; LaPolla, Fred Willie Zametkin; Tolea, Magdalena I.; Galvin, James E.; Surkis, Alisa

    2017-01-01

    Background A clinical study team performing three multicultural dementia screening studies identified the need to improve data management practices and facilitate data sharing. A collaboration was initiated with librarians as part of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) informationist supplement program. The librarians identified areas for improvement in the studies’ data collection, entry, and processing workflows. Case Presentation The librarians’ role in this project was to meet needs expressed by the study team around improving data collection and processing workflows to increase study efficiency and ensure data quality. The librarians addressed the data collection, entry, and processing weaknesses through standardizing and renaming variables, creating an electronic data capture system using REDCap, and developing well-documented, reproducible data processing workflows. Conclusions NLM informationist supplements provide librarians with valuable experience in collaborating with study teams to address their data needs. For this project, the librarians gained skills in project management, REDCap, and understanding of the challenges and specifics of a clinical research study. However, the time and effort required to provide targeted and intensive support for one study team was not scalable to the library’s broader user community. PMID:28377680

  14. Managing Epilepsy Well: Emerging e-Tools for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A; Patel, Archna; Kakacek, Jody; Escoffery, Cam; Johnson, Erica K; Ilozumba, Ukwuoma O

    2013-10-01

    The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network was established in 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epilepsy Program to expand epilepsy self-management research. The network has employed collaborative research strategies to develop, test, and disseminate evidence-based, community-based, and e-Health interventions (e-Tools) for epilepsy self-management for people with epilepsy, caregivers, and health-care providers. Since its inception, MEW Network collaborators have conducted formative studies (n=7) investigating the potential of e-Health to support epilepsy self-management and intervention studies evaluating e-Tools (n=5). The MEW e-Tools (the MEW website, WebEase, UPLIFT, MINDSET, and PEARLS online training) and affiliated e-Tools (Texting 4 Control) are designed to complement self-management practices in each phase of the epilepsy care continuum. These tools exemplify a concerted research agenda, shared methodological principles and models for epilepsy self-management, and a communal knowledge base for implementing e-Health to improve quality of life for people with epilepsy. © 2013.

  15. Structuring Clinical Workflows for Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Lasierra, N.; Oberbichler, S.; Toma, I.; Fensel, A.; Hoerbst, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Electronic health records (EHRs) play an important role in the treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Although the interoperability and selected functionality of EHRs are already addressed by a number of standards and best practices, such as IHE or HL7, the majority of these systems are still monolithic from a user-functionality perspective. The purpose of the OntoHealth project is to foster a functionally flexible, standards-based use of EHRs to support clinical routine task execution by means of workflow patterns and to shift the present EHR usage to a more comprehensive integration concerning complete clinical workflows. Objectives The goal of this paper is, first, to introduce the basic architecture of the proposed OntoHealth project and, second, to present selected functional needs and a functional categorization regarding workflow-based interactions with EHRs in the domain of diabetes. Methods A systematic literature review regarding attributes of workflows in the domain of diabetes was conducted. Eligible references were gathered and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Subsequently, a functional workflow categorization was derived from diabetes-specific raw data together with existing general workflow patterns. Results This paper presents the design of the architecture as well as a categorization model which makes it possible to describe the components or building blocks within clinical workflows. The results of our study lead us to identify basic building blocks, named as actions, decisions, and data elements, which allow the composition of clinical workflows within five identified contexts. Conclusions The categorization model allows for a description of the components or building blocks of clinical workflows from a functional view. PMID:25024765

  16. Computational Tools for Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Wilbert B.; Bartley, Bryan A.; Chandran, Deepak; Galdzicki, Michal; Kim, Kyung H.; Sleight, Sean C.; Maranas, Costas D.; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2012-01-01

    A great variety of software applications are now employed in the metabolic engineering field. These applications have been created to support a wide range of experimental and analysis techniques. Computational tools are utilized throughout the metabolic engineering workflow to extract and interpret relevant information from large data sets, to present complex models in a more manageable form, and to propose efficient network design strategies. In this review, we present a number of tools that can assist in modifying and understanding cellular metabolic networks. The review covers seven areas of relevance to metabolic engineers. These include metabolic reconstruction efforts, network visualization, nucleic acid and protein engineering, metabolic flux analysis, pathway prospecting, post-structural network analysis and culture optimization. The list of available tools is extensive and we can only highlight a small, representative portion of the tools from each area. PMID:22629572

  17. Astronomical large projects managed with MANATEE: management tool for effective engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vargas, M. L.; Mujica-Alvarez, E.; Pérez-Calpena, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes MANATEE, which is the Management project web tool developed by FRACTAL, specifically designed for managing large astronomical projects. MANATEE facilitates the management by providing an overall view of the project and the capabilities to control the three main projects parameters: scope, schedule and budget. MANATEE is one of the three tools of the FRACTAL System & Project Suite, which is composed also by GECO (System Engineering Tool) and DOCMA (Documentation Management Tool). These tools are especially suited for those Consortia and teams collaborating in a multi-discipline, complex project in a geographically distributed environment. Our Management view has been applied successfully in several projects and currently is being used for Managing MEGARA, the next instrument for the GTC 10m telescope.

  18. Introducing W.A.T.E.R.S.: a workflow for the alignment, taxonomy, and ecology of ribosomal sequences.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amber L; Riddle, Sean; McPhillips, Timothy; Ludäscher, Bertram; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2010-06-12

    For more than two decades microbiologists have used a highly conserved microbial gene as a phylogenetic marker for bacteria and archaea. The small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16 S rRNA, is encoded by ribosomal DNA, 16 S rDNA, and has provided a powerful comparative tool to microbial ecologists. Over time, the microbial ecology field has matured from small-scale studies in a select number of environments to massive collections of sequence data that are paired with dozens of corresponding collection variables. As the complexity of data and tool sets have grown, the need for flexible automation and maintenance of the core processes of 16 S rDNA sequence analysis has increased correspondingly. We present WATERS, an integrated approach for 16 S rDNA analysis that bundles a suite of publicly available 16 S rDNA analysis software tools into a single software package. The "toolkit" includes sequence alignment, chimera removal, OTU determination, taxonomy assignment, phylogentic tree construction as well as a host of ecological analysis and visualization tools. WATERS employs a flexible, collection-oriented 'workflow' approach using the open-source Kepler system as a platform. By packaging available software tools into a single automated workflow, WATERS simplifies 16 S rDNA analyses, especially for those without specialized bioinformatics, programming expertise. In addition, WATERS, like some of the newer comprehensive rRNA analysis tools, allows researchers to minimize the time dedicated to carrying out tedious informatics steps and to focus their attention instead on the biological interpretation of the results. One advantage of WATERS over other comprehensive tools is that the use of the Kepler workflow system facilitates result interpretation and reproducibility via a data provenance sub-system. Furthermore, new "actors" can be added to the workflow as desired and we see WATERS as an initial seed for a sizeable and growing repository of interoperable

  19. Making Sense of Complexity with FRE, a Scientific Workflow System for Climate Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenhorst, A. R.; Balaji, V.; Yakovlev, A.

    2010-12-01

    A workflow is a description of a sequence of activities that is both precise and comprehensive. Capturing the workflow of climate experiments provides a record which can be queried or compared, and allows reproducibility of the experiments - sometimes even to the bit level of the model output. This reproducibility helps to verify the integrity of the output data, and enables easy perturbation experiments. GFDL's Flexible Modeling System Runtime Environment (FRE) is a production-level software project which defines and implements building blocks of the workflow as command line tools. The scientific, numerical and technical input needed to complete the workflow of an experiment is recorded in an experiment description file in XML format. Several key features add convenience and automation to the FRE workflow: ● Experiment inheritance makes it possible to define a new experiment with only a reference to the parent experiment and the parameters to override. ● Testing is a basic element of the FRE workflow: experiments define short test runs which are verified before the main experiment is run, and a set of standard experiments are verified with new code releases. ● FRE is flexible enough to support short runs with mere megabytes of data, to high-resolution experiments that run on thousands of processors for months, producing terabytes of output data. Experiments run in segments of model time; after each segment, the state is saved and the model can be checkpointed at that level. Segment length is defined by the user, but the number of segments per system job is calculated to fit optimally in the batch scheduler requirements. FRE provides job control across multiple segments, and tools to monitor and alter the state of long-running experiments. ● Experiments are entered into a Curator Database, which stores query-able metadata about the experiment and the experiment's output. ● FRE includes a set of standardized post-processing functions as well as the ability

  20. Seamless online science workflow development and collaboration using IDL and the ENVI Services Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. T.; Ramachandran, R.; Maskey, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Exelis-developed IDL and ENVI software are ubiquitous tools in Earth science research environments. The IDL Workbench is used by the Earth science community for programming custom data analysis and visualization modules. ENVI is a software solution for processing and analyzing geospatial imagery that combines support for multiple Earth observation scientific data types (optical, thermal, multi-spectral, hyperspectral, SAR, LiDAR) with advanced image processing and analysis algorithms. The ENVI & IDL Services Engine (ESE) is an Earth science data processing engine that allows researchers to use open standards to rapidly create, publish and deploy advanced Earth science data analytics within any existing enterprise infrastructure. Although powerful in many ways, the tools lack collaborative features out-of-box. Thus, as part of the NASA funded project, Collaborative Workbench to Accelerate Science Algorithm Development, researchers at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and Exelis have developed plugins that allow seamless research collaboration from within IDL workbench. Such additional features within IDL workbench are possible because IDL workbench is built using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP). RCP applications allow custom plugins to be dropped in for extended functionalities. Specific functionalities of the plugins include creating complex workflows based on IDL application source code, submitting workflows to be executed by ESE in the cloud, and sharing and cloning of workflows among collaborators. All these functionalities are available to scientists without leaving their IDL workbench. Because ESE can interoperate with any middleware, scientific programmers can readily string together IDL processing tasks (or tasks written in other languages like C++, Java or Python) to create complex workflows for deployment within their current enterprise architecture (e.g. ArcGIS Server, GeoServer, Apache ODE or SciFlo from JPL). Using the collaborative IDL

  1. Low Latency Workflow Scheduling and an Application of Hyperspectral Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P. T.; Chapman, D. R.; Halem, M.

    2012-12-01

    New system analytics for Big Data computing holds the promise of major scientific breakthroughs and discoveries from the exploration and mining of the massive data sets becoming available to the science community. However, such data intensive scientific applications face severe challenges in accessing, managing and analyzing petabytes of data. While the Hadoop MapReduce environment has been successfully applied to data intensive problems arising in business, there are still many scientific problem domains where limitations in the functionality of MapReduce systems prevent its wide adoption by those communities. This is mainly because MapReduce does not readily support the unique science discipline needs such as special science data formats, graphic and computational data analysis tools, maintaining high degrees of computational accuracies, and interfacing with application's existing components across heterogeneous computing processors. We address some of these limitations by exploiting the MapReduce programming model for satellite data intensive scientific problems and address scalability, reliability, scheduling, and data management issues when dealing with climate data records and their complex observational challenges. In addition, we will present techniques to support the unique Earth science discipline needs such as dealing with special science data formats (HDF and NetCDF). We have developed a Hadoop task scheduling algorithm that improves latency by 2x for a scientific workflow including the gridding of the EOS AIRS hyperspectral Brightness Temperatures (BT). This workflow processing algorithm has been tested at the Multicore Computing Center private Hadoop based Intel Nehalem cluster, as well as in a virtual mode under the Open Source Eucalyptus cloud. The 55TB AIRS hyperspectral L1b Brightness Temperature record has been gridded at the resolution of 0.5x1.0 degrees, and we have computed a 0.9 annual anti-correlation to the El Nino Southern oscillation in

  2. Experimental evaluation of a flexible I/O architecture for accelerating workflow engines in ultrascale environments

    DOE PAGES

    Duro, Francisco Rodrigo; Blas, Javier Garcia; Isaila, Florin; ...

    2016-10-06

    The increasing volume of scientific data and the limited scalability and performance of storage systems are currently presenting a significant limitation for the productivity of the scientific workflows running on both high-performance computing (HPC) and cloud platforms. Clearly needed is better integration of storage systems and workflow engines to address this problem. This paper presents and evaluates a novel solution that leverages codesign principles for integrating Hercules—an in-memory data store—with a workflow management system. We consider four main aspects: workflow representation, task scheduling, task placement, and task termination. As a result, the experimental evaluation on both cloud and HPC systemsmore » demonstrates significant performance and scalability improvements over existing state-of-the-art approaches.« less

  3. Scientific Workflows and the Sensor Web for Virtual Environmental Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonis, I.; Vahed, A.

    2008-12-01

    interfaces. All data sets and sensor communication follow well-defined abstract models and corresponding encodings, mostly developed by the OGC Sensor Web Enablement initiative. Scientific progress is currently accelerated by an emerging new concept called scientific workflows, which organize and manage complex distributed computations. A scientific workflow represents and records the highly complex processes that a domain scientist typically would follow in exploration, discovery and ultimately, transformation of raw data to publishable results. The challenge is now to integrate the benefits of scientific workflows with those provided by the Sensor Web in order to leverage all resources for scientific exploration, problem solving, and knowledge generation. Scientific workflows for the Sensor Web represent the next evolutionary step towards efficient, powerful, and flexible earth observation frameworks and platforms. Those platforms support the entire process from capturing data, sharing and integrating, to requesting additional observations. Multiple sites and organizations will participate on single platforms and scientists from different countries and organizations interact and contribute to large-scale research projects. Simultaneously, the data- and information overload becomes manageable, as multiple layers of abstraction will free scientists to deal with underlying data-, processing or storage peculiarities. The vision are automated investigation and discovery mechanisms that allow scientists to pose queries to the system, which in turn would identify potentially related resources, schedules processing tasks and assembles all parts in workflows that may satisfy the query.

  4. A computational workflow for designing silicon donor qubits

    DOE PAGES

    Humble, Travis S.; Ericson, M. Nance; Jakowski, Jacek; ...

    2016-09-19

    Developing devices that can reliably and accurately demonstrate the principles of superposition and entanglement is an on-going challenge for the quantum computing community. Modeling and simulation offer attractive means of testing early device designs and establishing expectations for operational performance. However, the complex integrated material systems required by quantum device designs are not captured by any single existing computational modeling method. We examine the development and analysis of a multi-staged computational workflow that can be used to design and characterize silicon donor qubit systems with modeling and simulation. Our approach integrates quantum chemistry calculations with electrostatic field solvers to performmore » detailed simulations of a phosphorus dopant in silicon. We show how atomistic details can be synthesized into an operational model for the logical gates that define quantum computation in this particular technology. In conclusion, the resulting computational workflow realizes a design tool for silicon donor qubits that can help verify and validate current and near-term experimental devices.« less

  5. Lowering the Barriers to Integrative Aquatic Ecosystem Science: Semantic Provenance, Open Linked Data, and Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, T.; Hofmann, A. F.; Utz, R.; Deelman, E.; Hanson, P. C.; Szekely, P.; Villamizar, S. R.; Knoblock, C.; Guo, Q.; Crichton, D. J.; McCann, M. P.; Gil, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Environmental cyber-observatory (ECO) planning and implementation has been ongoing for more than a decade now, and several major efforts have recently come online or will soon. Some investigators in the relevant research communities will use ECO data, traditionally by developing their own client-side services to acquire data and then manually create custom tools to integrate and analyze it. However, a significant portion of the aquatic ecosystem science community will need more custom services to manage locally collected data. The latter group represents enormous intellectual capacity when one envisions thousands of ecosystems scientists supplementing ECO baseline data by sharing their own locally intensive observational efforts. This poster summarizes the outcomes of the June 2011 Workshop for Aquatic Ecosystem Sustainability (WAES) which focused on the needs of aquatic ecosystem research on inland waters and oceans. Here we advocate new approaches to support scientists to model, integrate, and analyze data based on: 1) a new breed of software tools in which semantic provenance is automatically created and used by the system, 2) the use of open standards based on RDF and Linked Data Principles to facilitate sharing of data and provenance annotations, 3) the use of workflows to represent explicitly all data preparation, integration, and processing steps in a way that is automatically repeatable. Aquatic ecosystems workflow exemplars are provided and discussed in terms of their potential broaden data sharing, analysis and synthesis thereby increasing the impact of aquatic ecosystem research.

  6. Enabling Big Geoscience Data Analytics with a Cloud-Based, MapReduce-Enabled and Service-Oriented Workflow Framework

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenlong; Yang, Chaowei; Jin, Baoxuan; Yu, Manzhu; Liu, Kai; Sun, Min; Zhan, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Geoscience observations and model simulations are generating vast amounts of multi-dimensional data. Effectively analyzing these data are essential for geoscience studies. However, the tasks are challenging for geoscientists because processing the massive amount of data is both computing and data intensive in that data analytics requires complex procedures and multiple tools. To tackle these challenges, a scientific workflow framework is proposed for big geoscience data analytics. In this framework techniques are proposed by leveraging cloud computing, MapReduce, and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Specifically, HBase is adopted for storing and managing big geoscience data across distributed computers. MapReduce-based algorithm framework is developed to support parallel processing of geoscience data. And service-oriented workflow architecture is built for supporting on-demand complex data analytics in the cloud environment. A proof-of-concept prototype tests the performance of the framework. Results show that this innovative framework significantly improves the efficiency of big geoscience data analytics by reducing the data processing time as well as simplifying data analytical procedures for geoscientists. PMID:25742012

  7. Enabling big geoscience data analytics with a cloud-based, MapReduce-enabled and service-oriented workflow framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlong; Yang, Chaowei; Jin, Baoxuan; Yu, Manzhu; Liu, Kai; Sun, Min; Zhan, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Geoscience observations and model simulations are generating vast amounts of multi-dimensional data. Effectively analyzing these data are essential for geoscience studies. However, the tasks are challenging for geoscientists because processing the massive amount of data is both computing and data intensive in that data analytics requires complex procedures and multiple tools. To tackle these challenges, a scientific workflow framework is proposed for big geoscience data analytics. In this framework techniques are proposed by leveraging cloud computing, MapReduce, and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Specifically, HBase is adopted for storing and managing big geoscience data across distributed computers. MapReduce-based algorithm framework is developed to support parallel processing of geoscience data. And service-oriented workflow architecture is built for supporting on-demand complex data analytics in the cloud environment. A proof-of-concept prototype tests the performance of the framework. Results show that this innovative framework significantly improves the efficiency of big geoscience data analytics by reducing the data processing time as well as simplifying data analytical procedures for geoscientists.

  8. A comprehensive quality control workflow for paired tumor-normal NGS experiments.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Christopher M; Hilke, Franz J; Löffler, Markus W; Bitzer, Michael; Lenz, Florian; Sturm, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Quality control (QC) is an important part of all NGS data analysis stages. Many available tools calculate QC metrics from different analysis steps of single sample experiments (raw reads, mapped reads and variant lists). Multi-sample experiments, as sequencing of tumor-normal pairs, require additional QC metrics to ensure validity of results. These multi-sample QC metrics still lack standardization. We therefore suggest a new workflow for QC of DNA sequencing of tumor-normal pairs. With this workflow well-known single-sample QC metrics and additional metrics specific for tumor-normal pairs can be calculated. The segmentation into different tools offers a high flexibility and allows reuse for other purposes. All tools produce qcML, a generic XML format for QC of -omics experiments. qcML uses quality metrics defined in an ontology, which was adapted for NGS. All QC tools are implemented in C ++ and run both under Linux and Windows. Plotting requires python 2.7 and matplotlib. The software is available under the 'GNU General Public License version 2' as part of the ngs-bits project: https://github.com/imgag/ngs-bits. christopher.schroeder@med.uni-tuebingen.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. A Workflow-based Intelligent Network Data Movement Advisor with End-to-end Performance Optimization

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhu, Michelle M.; Wu, Chase Q.

    2013-11-07

    Next-generation eScience applications often generate large amounts of simulation, experimental, or observational data that must be shared and managed by collaborative organizations. Advanced networking technologies and services have been rapidly developed and deployed to facilitate such massive data transfer. However, these technologies and services have not been fully utilized mainly because their use typically requires significant domain knowledge and in many cases application users are even not aware of their existence. By leveraging the functionalities of an existing Network-Aware Data Movement Advisor (NADMA) utility, we propose a new Workflow-based Intelligent Network Data Movement Advisor (WINDMA) with end-to-end performance optimization formore » this DOE funded project. This WINDMA system integrates three major components: resource discovery, data movement, and status monitoring, and supports the sharing of common data movement workflows through account and database management. This system provides a web interface and interacts with existing data/space management and discovery services such as Storage Resource Management, transport methods such as GridFTP and GlobusOnline, and network resource provisioning brokers such as ION and OSCARS. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed transport-support workflow system in several use cases based on its implementation and deployment in DOE wide-area networks.« less

  10. Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) version 2 is a decision support tool designed to facilitate integrated water management by communities at the small watershed scale. WMOST allows users to look across management options in stormwater (including green infrastructure), wastewater, drinking water, and land conservation programs to find the least cost solutions. The pdf version of these presentations accompany the recorded webinar with closed captions to be posted on the WMOST web page. The webinar was recorded at the time a training workshop took place for EPA's Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST, v2).

  11. A framework for streamlining research workflow in neuroscience and psychology

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Successful accumulation of knowledge is critically dependent on the ability to verify and replicate every part of scientific conduct. However, such principles are difficult to enact when researchers continue to resort on ad-hoc workflows and with poorly maintained code base. In this paper I examine the needs of neuroscience and psychology community, and introduce psychopy_ext, a unifying framework that seamlessly integrates popular experiment building, analysis and manuscript preparation tools by choosing reasonable defaults and implementing relatively rigid patterns of workflow. This structure allows for automation of multiple tasks, such as generated user interfaces, unit testing, control analyses of stimuli, single-command access to descriptive statistics, and publication quality plotting. Taken together, psychopy_ext opens an exciting possibility for a faster, more robust code development and collaboration for researchers. PMID:24478691

  12. Routine Digital Pathology Workflow: The Catania Experience.

    PubMed

    Fraggetta, Filippo; Garozzo, Salvatore; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Pantanowitz, Liron; Rossi, Esther Diana

    2017-01-01

    Successful implementation of whole slide imaging (WSI) for routine clinical practice has been accomplished in only a few pathology laboratories worldwide. We report the transition to an effective and complete digital surgical pathology workflow in the pathology laboratory at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania, Italy. All (100%) permanent histopathology glass slides were digitized at ×20 using Aperio AT2 scanners. Compatible stain and scanning slide racks were employed to streamline operations. eSlide Manager software was bidirectionally interfaced with the anatomic pathology laboratory information system. Virtual slide trays connected to the two-dimensional (2D) barcode tracking system allowed pathologists to confirm that they were correctly assigned slides and that all tissues on these glass slides were scanned. Over 115,000 glass slides were digitized with a scan fail rate of around 1%. Drying glass slides before scanning minimized them sticking to scanner racks. Implementation required introduction of a 2D barcode tracking system and modification of histology workflow processes. Our experience indicates that effective adoption of WSI for primary diagnostic use was more dependent on optimizing preimaging variables and integration with the laboratory information system than on information technology infrastructure and ensuring pathologist buy-in. Implementation of digital pathology for routine practice not only leveraged the benefits of digital imaging but also creates an opportunity for establishing standardization of workflow processes in the pathology laboratory.

  13. Improved compliance by BPM-driven workflow automation.

    PubMed

    Holzmüller-Laue, Silke; Göde, Bernd; Fleischer, Heidi; Thurow, Kerstin

    2014-12-01

    Using methods and technologies of business process management (BPM) for the laboratory automation has important benefits (i.e., the agility of high-level automation processes, rapid interdisciplinary prototyping and implementation of laboratory tasks and procedures, and efficient real-time process documentation). A principal goal of the model-driven development is the improved transparency of processes and the alignment of process diagrams and technical code. First experiences of using the business process model and notation (BPMN) show that easy-to-read graphical process models can achieve and provide standardization of laboratory workflows. The model-based development allows one to change processes quickly and an easy adaption to changing requirements. The process models are able to host work procedures and their scheduling in compliance with predefined guidelines and policies. Finally, the process-controlled documentation of complex workflow results addresses modern laboratory needs of quality assurance. BPMN 2.0 as an automation language to control every kind of activity or subprocess is directed to complete workflows in end-to-end relationships. BPMN is applicable as a system-independent and cross-disciplinary graphical language to document all methods in laboratories (i.e., screening procedures or analytical processes). That means, with the BPM standard, a communication method of sharing process knowledge of laboratories is also available. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  14. Characterizing Strain Variation in Engineered E. coli Using a Multi-Omics-Based Workflow

    DOE PAGES

    Brunk, Elizabeth; George, Kevin W.; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; ...

    2016-05-19

    Understanding the complex interactions that occur between heterologous and native biochemical pathways represents a major challenge in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. We present a workflow that integrates metabolomics, proteomics, and genome-scale models of Escherichia coli metabolism to study the effects of introducing a heterologous pathway into a microbial host. This workflow incorporates complementary approaches from computational systems biology, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology; provides molecular insight into how the host organism microenvironment changes due to pathway engineering; and demonstrates how biological mechanisms underlying strain variation can be exploited as an engineering strategy to increase product yield. As a proofmore » of concept, we present the analysis of eight engineered strains producing three biofuels: isopentenol, limonene, and bisabolene. Application of this workflow identified the roles of candidate genes, pathways, and biochemical reactions in observed experimental phenomena and facilitated the construction of a mutant strain with improved productivity. The contributed workflow is available as an open-source tool in the form of iPython notebooks.« less

  15. Radiology Workflow Dynamics: How Workflow Patterns Impact Radiologist Perceptions of Workplace Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew H; Schemmel, Andrew J; Pooler, B Dustin; Hanley, Taylor; Kennedy, Tabassum; Field, Aaron; Wiegmann, Douglas; Yu, John-Paul J

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to assess perceptions of reading room workflow and the impact separating image-interpretive and nonimage-interpretive task workflows can have on radiologist perceptions of workplace disruptions, workload, and overall satisfaction. A 14-question survey instrument was developed to measure radiologist perceptions of workplace interruptions, satisfaction, and workload prior to and following implementation of separate image-interpretive and nonimage-interpretive reading room workflows. The results were collected over 2 weeks preceding the intervention and 2 weeks following the end of the intervention. The results were anonymized and analyzed using univariate analysis. A total of 18 people responded to the preintervention survey: 6 neuroradiology fellows and 12 attending neuroradiologists. Fifteen people who were then present for the 1-month intervention period responded to the postintervention survey. Perceptions of workplace disruptions, image interpretation, quality of trainee education, ability to perform nonimage-interpretive tasks, and quality of consultations (P < 0.0001) all improved following the intervention. Mental effort and workload also improved across all assessment domains, as did satisfaction with quality of image interpretation and consultative work. Implementation of parallel dedicated image-interpretive and nonimage-interpretive workflows may improve markers of radiologist perceptions of workplace satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Management Tools in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a teaching model that applies management tools such as delegation, total quality management, time management, teamwork, and Deming rules. Promotes the advantages of efficiency, reporting, independent scheduling, and quality. (SK)

  17. Connecting proteins with drug-like compounds: Open source drug discovery workflows with BindingDB and KNIME

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, Michael R.; Hedrick, Michael P.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Today’s large, public databases of protein–small molecule interaction data are creating important new opportunities for data mining and integration. At the same time, new graphical user interface-based workflow tools offer facile alternatives to custom scripting for informatics and data analysis. Here, we illustrate how the large protein-ligand database BindingDB may be incorporated into KNIME workflows as a step toward the integration of pharmacological data with broader biomolecular analyses. Thus, we describe a collection of KNIME workflows that access BindingDB data via RESTful webservices and, for more intensive queries, via a local distillation of the full BindingDB dataset. We focus in particular on the KNIME implementation of knowledge-based tools to generate informed hypotheses regarding protein targets of bioactive compounds, based on notions of chemical similarity. A number of variants of this basic approach are tested for seven existing drugs with relatively ill-defined therapeutic targets, leading to replication of some previously confirmed results and discovery of new, high-quality hits. Implications for future development are discussed. Database URL: www.bindingdb.org PMID:26384374

  18. Using telephony data to facilitate discovery of clinical workflows.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Donald W

    2017-04-19

    Discovery of clinical workflows to target for redesign using methods such as Lean and Six Sigma is difficult. VoIP telephone call pattern analysis may complement direct observation and EMR-based tools in understanding clinical workflows at the enterprise level by allowing visualization of institutional telecommunications activity. To build an analytic framework mapping repetitive and high-volume telephone call patterns in a large medical center to their associated clinical units using an enterprise unified communications server log file and to support visualization of specific call patterns using graphical networks. Consecutive call detail records from the medical center's unified communications server were parsed to cross-correlate telephone call patterns and map associated phone numbers to a cost center dictionary. Hashed data structures were built to allow construction of edge and node files representing high volume call patterns for display with an open source graph network tool. Summary statistics for an analysis of exactly one week's call detail records at a large academic medical center showed that 912,386 calls were placed with a total duration of 23,186 hours. Approximately half of all calling called number pairs had an average call duration under 60 seconds and of these the average call duration was 27 seconds. Cross-correlation of phone calls identified by clinical cost center can be used to generate graphical displays of clinical enterprise communications. Many calls are short. The compact data transfers within short calls may serve as automation or re-design targets. The large absolute amount of time medical center employees were engaged in VoIP telecommunications suggests that analysis of telephone call patterns may offer additional insights into core clinical workflows.

  19. An end-to-end workflow for engineering of biological networks from high-level specifications.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob; Weiss, Ron; Densmore, Douglas; Adler, Aaron; Appleton, Evan; Babb, Jonathan; Bhatia, Swapnil; Davidsohn, Noah; Haddock, Traci; Loyall, Joseph; Schantz, Richard; Vasilev, Viktor; Yaman, Fusun

    2012-08-17

    We present a workflow for the design and production of biological networks from high-level program specifications. The workflow is based on a sequence of intermediate models that incrementally translate high-level specifications into DNA samples that implement them. We identify algorithms for translating between adjacent models and implement them as a set of software tools, organized into a four-stage toolchain: Specification, Compilation, Part Assignment, and Assembly. The specification stage begins with a Boolean logic computation specified in the Proto programming language. The compilation stage uses a library of network motifs and cellular platforms, also specified in Proto, to transform the program into an optimized Abstract Genetic Regulatory Network (AGRN) that implements the programmed behavior. The part assignment stage assigns DNA parts to the AGRN, drawing the parts from a database for the target cellular platform, to create a DNA sequence implementing the AGRN. Finally, the assembly stage computes an optimized assembly plan to create the DNA sequence from available part samples, yielding a protocol for producing a sample of engineered plasmids with robotics assistance. Our workflow is the first to automate the production of biological networks from a high-level program specification. Furthermore, the workflow's modular design allows the same program to be realized on different cellular platforms simply by swapping workflow configurations. We validated our workflow by specifying a small-molecule sensor-reporter program and verifying the resulting plasmids in both HEK 293 mammalian cells and in E. coli bacterial cells.

  20. Strategic Planning for Electronic Resources Management: A Case Study at Gustavus Adolphus College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulseberg, Anna; Monson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Electronic resources, the tools we use to manage them, and the needs and expectations of our users are constantly evolving; at the same time, the roles, responsibilities, and workflow of the library staff who manage e-resources are also in flux. Recognizing a need to be more intentional and proactive about how we manage e-resources, the…

  1. Usability test of an internet-based informatics tool for diabetes care providers: the comprehensive diabetes management program.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Stephanie J; Paulsen, Christine A; Perkins, Joan; Kedziora, Richard J; Rodbard, David; Bursell, Sven-Erik

    2008-02-01

    Research suggests Internet-based care management tools are associated with improvements in care and patient outcomes. However, although such tools change workflow, rarely is their usability addressed and reported. This article presents a usability study of an Internet-based informatics application called the Comprehensive Diabetes Management Program (CDMP), developed by content experts and technologists. Our aim is to demonstrate a process for conducting a usability study of such a tool and to report results. We conducted the usability test with six diabetes care providers under controlled conditions. Each provider worked with the CDMP in a single session using a "think aloud" process. Providers performed standardized tasks with fictitious patient data, and we observed how they approached these tasks, documenting verbalizations and subjective ratings. The providers then completed a usability questionnaire and interviews. Overall, the scores on the usability questionnaire were neutral to favorable. For specific subdomains of the questionnaire, the providers' reported problems with the application's ease of use, performance, and support features, but were satisfied with its visual appeal and content. The results from the observational and interview data indicated areas for improvement, particularly in navigation and terminology. The usability study identified several issues for improvement, confirming the need for usability testing of Internet-based informatics applications, even those developed by experts. To our knowledge, there have been no other usability studies of an Internet-based informatics application with the functionality of the CDMP. Such studies can form the foundation for translation of Internet-based medical informatics tools into clinical practice.

  2. Occupational health management: an audit tool.

    PubMed

    Shelmerdine, L; Williams, N

    2003-03-01

    Organizations must manage occupational health risks in the workplace and the UK Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has published guidance on successful health and safety management. This paper describes a method of using the published guidance to audit the management of occupational health and safety, first at an organizational level and, secondly, to audit an occupational health service provider's role in the management of health risks. The paper outlines the legal framework in the UK for health risk management and describes the development and use of a tool for qualitative auditing of the efficiency, effectiveness and reliability of occupational health service provision within an organization. The audit tool is presented as a question set and the paper concludes with discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of using this tool, and recommendations on its use.

  3. Software Tools Streamline Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Three innovative software inventions from Ames Research Center (NETMARK, Program Management Tool, and Query-Based Document Management) are finding their way into NASA missions as well as industry applications. The first, NETMARK, is a program that enables integrated searching of data stored in a variety of databases and documents, meaning that users no longer have to look in several places for related information. NETMARK allows users to search and query information across all of these sources in one step. This cross-cutting capability in information analysis has exponentially reduced the amount of time needed to mine data from days or weeks to mere seconds. NETMARK has been used widely throughout NASA, enabling this automatic integration of information across many documents and databases. NASA projects that use NETMARK include the internal reporting system and project performance dashboard, Erasmus, NASA s enterprise management tool, which enhances organizational collaboration and information sharing through document routing and review; the Integrated Financial Management Program; International Space Station Knowledge Management; Mishap and Anomaly Information Reporting System; and management of the Mars Exploration Rovers. Approximately $1 billion worth of NASA s projects are currently managed using Program Management Tool (PMT), which is based on NETMARK. PMT is a comprehensive, Web-enabled application tool used to assist program and project managers within NASA enterprises in monitoring, disseminating, and tracking the progress of program and project milestones and other relevant resources. The PMT consists of an integrated knowledge repository built upon advanced enterprise-wide database integration techniques and the latest Web-enabled technologies. The current system is in a pilot operational mode allowing users to automatically manage, track, define, update, and view customizable milestone objectives and goals. The third software invention, Query

  4. Purdue ionomics information management system. An integrated functional genomics platform.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Ivan; Ouzzani, Mourad; Orcun, Seza; Kennedy, Brad; Jandhyala, Shrinivas S; Salt, David E

    2007-02-01

    The advent of high-throughput phenotyping technologies has created a deluge of information that is difficult to deal with without the appropriate data management tools. These data management tools should integrate defined workflow controls for genomic-scale data acquisition and validation, data storage and retrieval, and data analysis, indexed around the genomic information of the organism of interest. To maximize the impact of these large datasets, it is critical that they are rapidly disseminated to the broader research community, allowing open access for data mining and discovery. We describe here a system that incorporates such functionalities developed around the Purdue University high-throughput ionomics phenotyping platform. The Purdue Ionomics Information Management System (PiiMS) provides integrated workflow control, data storage, and analysis to facilitate high-throughput data acquisition, along with integrated tools for data search, retrieval, and visualization for hypothesis development. PiiMS is deployed as a World Wide Web-enabled system, allowing for integration of distributed workflow processes and open access to raw data for analysis by numerous laboratories. PiiMS currently contains data on shoot concentrations of P, Ca, K, Mg, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn, Co, Ni, B, Se, Mo, Na, As, and Cd in over 60,000 shoot tissue samples of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), including ethyl methanesulfonate, fast-neutron and defined T-DNA mutants, and natural accession and populations of recombinant inbred lines from over 800 separate experiments, representing over 1,000,000 fully quantitative elemental concentrations. PiiMS is accessible at www.purdue.edu/dp/ionomics.

  5. Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool v3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a decision support tool that facilitates integrated water management at the local or small watershed scale. WMOST models the environmental effects and costs of management decisions in a watershed context that is, accou...

  6. Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) Workshop.

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) version 2 is a decision support tool designed to facilitate integrated water management by communities at the small watershed scale. WMOST allows users to look across management options in stormwater (including green i...

  7. Development of a novel imaging informatics-based system with an intelligent workflow engine (IWEIS) to support imaging-based clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ximing; Liu, Brent J; Martinez, Clarisa; Zhang, Xuejun; Winstein, Carolee J

    2015-01-01

    Imaging based clinical trials can benefit from a solution to efficiently collect, analyze, and distribute multimedia data at various stages within the workflow. Currently, the data management needs of these trials are typically addressed with custom-built systems. However, software development of the custom- built systems for versatile workflows can be resource-consuming. To address these challenges, we present a system with a workflow engine for imaging based clinical trials. The system enables a project coordinator to build a data collection and management system specifically related to study protocol workflow without programming. Web Access to DICOM Objects (WADO) module with novel features is integrated to further facilitate imaging related study. The system was initially evaluated by an imaging based rehabilitation clinical trial. The evaluation shows that the cost of the development of system can be much reduced compared to the custom-built system. By providing a solution to customize a system and automate the workflow, the system will save on development time and reduce errors especially for imaging clinical trials. PMID:25870169

  8. Routine Digital Pathology Workflow: The Catania Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fraggetta, Filippo; Garozzo, Salvatore; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Pantanowitz, Liron; Rossi, Esther Diana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Successful implementation of whole slide imaging (WSI) for routine clinical practice has been accomplished in only a few pathology laboratories worldwide. We report the transition to an effective and complete digital surgical pathology workflow in the pathology laboratory at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania, Italy. Methods: All (100%) permanent histopathology glass slides were digitized at ×20 using Aperio AT2 scanners. Compatible stain and scanning slide racks were employed to streamline operations. eSlide Manager software was bidirectionally interfaced with the anatomic pathology laboratory information system. Virtual slide trays connected to the two-dimensional (2D) barcode tracking system allowed pathologists to confirm that they were correctly assigned slides and that all tissues on these glass slides were scanned. Results: Over 115,000 glass slides were digitized with a scan fail rate of around 1%. Drying glass slides before scanning minimized them sticking to scanner racks. Implementation required introduction of a 2D barcode tracking system and modification of histology workflow processes. Conclusion: Our experience indicates that effective adoption of WSI for primary diagnostic use was more dependent on optimizing preimaging variables and integration with the laboratory information system than on information technology infrastructure and ensuring pathologist buy-in. Implementation of digital pathology for routine practice not only leveraged the benefits of digital imaging but also creates an opportunity for establishing standardization of workflow processes in the pathology laboratory. PMID:29416914

  9. PATHA: Performance Analysis Tool for HPC Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Wucherl; Koo, Michelle; Cao, Yi; ...

    2016-02-18

    Large science projects rely on complex workflows to analyze terabytes or petabytes of data. These jobs are often running over thousands of CPU cores and simultaneously performing data accesses, data movements, and computation. It is difficult to identify bottlenecks or to debug the performance issues in these large workflows. In order to address these challenges, we have developed Performance Analysis Tool for HPC Applications (PATHA) using the state-of-art open source big data processing tools. Our framework can ingest system logs to extract key performance measures, and apply the most sophisticated statistical tools and data mining methods on the performance data.more » Furthermore, it utilizes an efficient data processing engine to allow users to interactively analyze a large amount of different types of logs and measurements. To illustrate the functionality of PATHA, we conduct a case study on the workflows from an astronomy project known as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). This study processed 1.6 TB of system logs collected on the NERSC supercomputer Edison. Using PATHA, we were able to identify performance bottlenecks, which reside in three tasks of PTF workflow with the dependency on the density of celestial objects.« less

  10. SYRMEP Tomo Project: a graphical user interface for customizing CT reconstruction workflows.

    PubMed

    Brun, Francesco; Massimi, Lorenzo; Fratini, Michela; Dreossi, Diego; Billé, Fulvio; Accardo, Agostino; Pugliese, Roberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    When considering the acquisition of experimental synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray CT data, the reconstruction workflow cannot be limited to the essential computational steps of flat fielding and filtered back projection (FBP). More refined image processing is often required, usually to compensate artifacts and enhance the quality of the reconstructed images. In principle, it would be desirable to optimize the reconstruction workflow at the facility during the experiment (beamtime). However, several practical factors affect the image reconstruction part of the experiment and users are likely to conclude the beamtime with sub-optimal reconstructed images. Through an example of application, this article presents SYRMEP Tomo Project (STP), an open-source software tool conceived to let users design custom CT reconstruction workflows. STP has been designed for post-beamtime (off-line use) and for a new reconstruction of past archived data at user's home institution where simple computing resources are available. Releases of the software can be downloaded at the Elettra Scientific Computing group GitHub repository https://github.com/ElettraSciComp/STP-Gui.

  11. The impact of using an intravenous workflow management system (IVWMS) on cost and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Lin, Alex C; Deng, Yihong; Thaibah, Hilal; Hingl, John; Penm, Jonathan; Ivey, Marianne F; Thomas, Mark

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the financial costs associated with wasted and missing doses before and after the implementation of an intravenous workflow management system (IVWMS) and to quantify the number and the rate of detected intravenous (IV) preparation errors. A retrospective analysis of the sample hospital information system database was conducted using three months of data before and after the implementation of an IVWMS System (DoseEdge ® ) which uses barcode scanning and photographic technologies to track and verify each step of the preparation process. The financial impact associated with wasted and missing >IV doses was determined by combining drug acquisition, labor, accessory, and disposal costs. The intercepted error reports and pharmacist detected error reports were drawn from the IVWMS to quantify the number of errors by defined error categories. The total number of IV doses prepared before and after the implementation of the IVWMS system were 110,963 and 101,765 doses, respectively. The adoption of the IVWMS significantly reduced the amount of wasted and missing IV doses by 14,176 and 2268 doses, respectively (p < 0.001). The overall cost savings of using the system was $144,019 over 3 months. The total number of errors detected was 1160 (1.14%) after using the IVWMS. The implementation of the IVWMS facilitated workflow changes that led to a positive impact on cost and patient safety. The implementation of the IVWMS increased patient safety by enforcing standard operating procedures and bar code verifications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Structured recording of intraoperative surgical workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumuth, T.; Durstewitz, N.; Fischer, M.; Strauss, G.; Dietz, A.; Meixensberger, J.; Jannin, P.; Cleary, K.; Lemke, H. U.; Burgert, O.

    2006-03-01

    Surgical Workflows are used for the methodical and scientific analysis of surgical interventions. The approach described here is a step towards developing surgical assist systems based on Surgical Workflows and integrated control systems for the operating room of the future. This paper describes concepts and technologies for the acquisition of Surgical Workflows by monitoring surgical interventions and their presentation. Establishing systems which support the Surgical Workflow in operating rooms requires a multi-staged development process beginning with the description of these workflows. A formalized description of surgical interventions is needed to create a Surgical Workflow. This description can be used to analyze and evaluate surgical interventions in detail. We discuss the subdivision of surgical interventions into work steps regarding different levels of granularity and propose a recording scheme for the acquisition of manual surgical work steps from running interventions. To support the recording process during the intervention, we introduce a new software architecture. Core of the architecture is our Surgical Workflow editor that is intended to deal with the manifold, complex and concurrent relations during an intervention. Furthermore, a method for an automatic generation of graphs is shown which is able to display the recorded surgical work steps of the interventions. Finally we conclude with considerations about extensions of our recording scheme to close the gap to S-PACS systems. The approach was used to record 83 surgical interventions from 6 intervention types from 3 different surgical disciplines: ENT surgery, neurosurgery and interventional radiology. The interventions were recorded at the University Hospital Leipzig, Germany and at the Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., USA.

  13. The equivalency between logic Petri workflow nets and workflow nets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yu, ShuXia; Du, YuYue

    2015-01-01

    Logic Petri nets (LPNs) can describe and analyze batch processing functions and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems. Logic Petri workflow nets (LPWNs) are proposed based on LPNs in this paper. Process mining is regarded as an important bridge between modeling and analysis of data mining and business process. Workflow nets (WF-nets) are the extension to Petri nets (PNs), and have successfully been used to process mining. Some shortcomings cannot be avoided in process mining, such as duplicate tasks, invisible tasks, and the noise of logs. The online shop in electronic commerce in this paper is modeled to prove the equivalence between LPWNs and WF-nets, and advantages of LPWNs are presented.

  14. The Equivalency between Logic Petri Workflow Nets and Workflow Nets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, ShuXia; Du, YuYue

    2015-01-01

    Logic Petri nets (LPNs) can describe and analyze batch processing functions and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems. Logic Petri workflow nets (LPWNs) are proposed based on LPNs in this paper. Process mining is regarded as an important bridge between modeling and analysis of data mining and business process. Workflow nets (WF-nets) are the extension to Petri nets (PNs), and have successfully been used to process mining. Some shortcomings cannot be avoided in process mining, such as duplicate tasks, invisible tasks, and the noise of logs. The online shop in electronic commerce in this paper is modeled to prove the equivalence between LPWNs and WF-nets, and advantages of LPWNs are presented. PMID:25821845

  15. Ab initio chemical safety assessment: A workflow based on exposure considerations and non-animal methods.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Elisabet; White, Andrew; Ouedraogo, Gladys; Paini, Alicia; Richarz, Andrea-Nicole; Bois, Frederic Y; Exner, Thomas; Leite, Sofia; Grunsven, Leo A van; Worth, Andrew; Mahony, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    We describe and illustrate a workflow for chemical safety assessment that completely avoids animal testing. The workflow, which was developed within the SEURAT-1 initiative, is designed to be applicable to cosmetic ingredients as well as to other types of chemicals, e.g. active ingredients in plant protection products, biocides or pharmaceuticals. The aim of this work was to develop a workflow to assess chemical safety without relying on any animal testing, but instead constructing a hypothesis based on existing data, in silico modelling, biokinetic considerations and then by targeted non-animal testing. For illustrative purposes, we consider a hypothetical new ingredient x as a new component in a body lotion formulation. The workflow is divided into tiers in which points of departure are established through in vitro testing and in silico prediction, as the basis for estimating a safe external dose in a repeated use scenario. The workflow includes a series of possible exit (decision) points, with increasing levels of confidence, based on the sequential application of the Threshold of Toxicological (TTC) approach, read-across, followed by an "ab initio" assessment, in which chemical safety is determined entirely by new in vitro testing and in vitro to in vivo extrapolation by means of mathematical modelling. We believe that this workflow could be applied as a tool to inform targeted and toxicologically relevant in vitro testing, where necessary, and to gain confidence in safety decision making without the need for animal testing.

  16. Evaluation of user interface and workflow design of a bedside nursing clinical decision support system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Finley, George Mike; Long, Ju; Mills, Christy; Johnson, Ron Kim

    2013-01-31

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are important tools to improve health care outcomes and reduce preventable medical adverse events. However, the effectiveness and success of CDSS depend on their implementation context and usability in complex health care settings. As a result, usability design and validation, especially in real world clinical settings, are crucial aspects of successful CDSS implementations. Our objective was to develop a novel CDSS to help frontline nurses better manage critical symptom changes in hospitalized patients, hence reducing preventable failure to rescue cases. A robust user interface and implementation strategy that fit into existing workflows was key for the success of the CDSS. Guided by a formal usability evaluation framework, UFuRT (user, function, representation, and task analysis), we developed a high-level specification of the product that captures key usability requirements and is flexible to implement. We interviewed users of the proposed CDSS to identify requirements, listed functions, and operations the system must perform. We then designed visual and workflow representations of the product to perform the operations. The user interface and workflow design were evaluated via heuristic and end user performance evaluation. The heuristic evaluation was done after the first prototype, and its results were incorporated into the product before the end user evaluation was conducted. First, we recruited 4 evaluators with strong domain expertise to study the initial prototype. Heuristic violations were coded and rated for severity. Second, after development of the system, we assembled a panel of nurses, consisting of 3 licensed vocational nurses and 7 registered nurses, to evaluate the user interface and workflow via simulated use cases. We recorded whether each session was successfully completed and its completion time. Each nurse was asked to use the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index to self

  17. Evaluation of User Interface and Workflow Design of a Bedside Nursing Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Finley, George Mike; Mills, Christy; Johnson, Ron Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are important tools to improve health care outcomes and reduce preventable medical adverse events. However, the effectiveness and success of CDSS depend on their implementation context and usability in complex health care settings. As a result, usability design and validation, especially in real world clinical settings, are crucial aspects of successful CDSS implementations. Objective Our objective was to develop a novel CDSS to help frontline nurses better manage critical symptom changes in hospitalized patients, hence reducing preventable failure to rescue cases. A robust user interface and implementation strategy that fit into existing workflows was key for the success of the CDSS. Methods Guided by a formal usability evaluation framework, UFuRT (user, function, representation, and task analysis), we developed a high-level specification of the product that captures key usability requirements and is flexible to implement. We interviewed users of the proposed CDSS to identify requirements, listed functions, and operations the system must perform. We then designed visual and workflow representations of the product to perform the operations. The user interface and workflow design were evaluated via heuristic and end user performance evaluation. The heuristic evaluation was done after the first prototype, and its results were incorporated into the product before the end user evaluation was conducted. First, we recruited 4 evaluators with strong domain expertise to study the initial prototype. Heuristic violations were coded and rated for severity. Second, after development of the system, we assembled a panel of nurses, consisting of 3 licensed vocational nurses and 7 registered nurses, to evaluate the user interface and workflow via simulated use cases. We recorded whether each session was successfully completed and its completion time. Each nurse was asked to use the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  18. The Symbiotic Relationship between Scientific Workflow and Provenance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to describe the symbiotic nature of scientific workflows and provenance. We will also discuss the current trends and real world challenges facing these two distinct research areas. Although motivated differently, the needs of the international science communities are the glue that binds this relationship together. Understanding and articulating the science drivers to these communities is paramount as these technologies evolve and mature. Originally conceived for managing business processes, workflows are now becoming invaluable assets in both computational and experimental sciences. These reconfigurable, automated systems provide essential technology to perform complex analyses by coupling together geographically distributed disparate data sources and applications. As a result, workflows are capable of higher throughput in a shorter amount of time than performing the steps manually. Today many different workflow products exist; these could include Kepler and Taverna or similar products like MeDICI, developed at PNNL, that are standardized on the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). Provenance, originating from the French term Provenir “to come from”, is used to describe the curation process of artwork as art is passed from owner to owner. The concept of provenance was adopted by digital libraries as a means to track the lineage of documents while standards such as the DublinCore began to emerge. In recent years the systems science community has increasingly expressed the need to expand the concept of provenance to formally articulate the history of scientific data. Communities such as the International Provenance and Annotation Workshop (IPAW) have formalized a provenance data model. The Open Provenance Model, and the W3C is hosting a provenance incubator group featuring the Proof Markup Language. Although both workflows and provenance have risen from different communities and operate independently, their mutual

  19. From Civil Protection Plan to Disaster Management. PETer evolution from GIS tool to multi-area Emergency Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigerio, Simone; Sterlacchini, Simone; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Glade, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    information was managed at different levels, linking all people in decision-making roles: crews in the field, the mobile command post and the control room. The tool automatically performs organizational and operational activities within a Civil Protection plan, in line with enforceable regulations. It couples: data processing capabilities by GIS; workflow management modules by DSS and communication systems by the ICT. More specifically, the work presents the overall concept and the system architecture of a generic decision-support system in progress of development, displaying the aims of emergency management and then shows a DSS first of all for Civil Protection Plan within Disaster Preparedness and Response framework in a Consortium of Mountain Municipalities (Valtellina di Tirano, Central Alps, Northern Italy). A multi-area approach (involving the management of disaster scenarios at the La Valette landslide in the Barcelonnette Basin, South French Alps) has been introduced to calibrate the platform, to compare available dataset, information details, laws in force in different countries, stakeholders' responsibility and end-users' background. Work in progress involves multi-task tools useful in emergency situation, to enforce open-communication devices (SMS automatic platform, SKYPE interface, visual video), integrate existing monitoring system and web-service to tailor open-sharing information with emergency management demand.

  20. Designing Health Information Technology Tools to Prevent Gaps in Public Health Insurance.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer D; Harding, Rose L; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Angier, Heather; Sumic, Aleksandra; Nelson, Christine A; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Cohen, Deborah J

    2017-06-23

    Changes in health insurance policies have increased coverage opportunities, but enrollees are required to annually reapply for benefits which, if not managed appropriately, can lead to insurance gaps. Electronic health records (EHRs) can automate processes for assisting patients with health insurance enrollment and re-enrollment. We describe community health centers' (CHC) workflow, documentation, and tracking needs for assisting families with insurance application processes, and the health information technology (IT) tool components that were developed to meet those needs. We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and observation of clinic operations and insurance application assistance processes. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. We diagramed workflows and shared information with a team of developers who built the EHR-based tools. Four steps to the insurance assistance workflow were common among CHCs: 1) Identifying patients for public health insurance application assistance; 2) Completing and submitting the public health insurance application when clinic staff met with patients to collect requisite information and helped them apply for benefits; 3) Tracking public health insurance approval to monitor for decisions; and 4) assisting with annual health insurance reapplication. We developed EHR-based tools to support clinical staff with each of these steps. CHCs are uniquely positioned to help patients and families with public health insurance applications. CHCs have invested in staff to assist patients with insurance applications and help prevent coverage gaps. To best assist patients and to foster efficiency, EHR based insurance tools need comprehensive, timely, and accurate health insurance information.

  1. Teaching Workflow Analysis and Lean Thinking via Simulation: A Formative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Robert James; Gantt, Laura; Congdon, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the rationale for the design and development of a video simulation used to teach lean thinking and workflow analysis to health services and health information management students enrolled in a course on the management of health information. The discussion includes a description of the design process, a brief history of the use of simulation in healthcare, and an explanation of how video simulation can be used to generate experiential learning environments. Based on the results of a survey given to 75 students as part of a formative evaluation, the video simulation was judged effective because it allowed students to visualize a real-world process (concrete experience), contemplate the scenes depicted in the video along with the concepts presented in class in a risk-free environment (reflection), develop hypotheses about why problems occurred in the workflow process (abstract conceptualization), and develop solutions to redesign a selected process (active experimentation). PMID:19412533

  2. A tutorial of diverse genome analysis tools found in the CoGe web-platform using Plasmodium spp. as a model

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Andreina I; Nelson, Andrew D L; Haug-Baltzell, Asher K; Lyons, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Integrated platforms for storage, management, analysis and sharing of large quantities of omics data have become fundamental to comparative genomics. CoGe (https://genomevolution.org/coge/) is an online platform designed to manage and study genomic data, enabling both data- and hypothesis-driven comparative genomics. CoGe’s tools and resources can be used to organize and analyse both publicly available and private genomic data from any species. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of CoGe through three example workflows using 17 Plasmodium genomes as a model. Plasmodium genomes present unique challenges for comparative genomics due to their rapidly evolving and highly variable genomic AT/GC content. These example workflows are intended to serve as templates to help guide researchers who would like to use CoGe to examine diverse aspects of genome evolution. In the first workflow, trends in genome composition and amino acid usage are explored. In the second, changes in genome structure and the distribution of synonymous (Ks) and non-synonymous (Kn) substitution values are evaluated across species with different levels of evolutionary relatedness. In the third workflow, microsyntenic analyses of multigene families’ genomic organization are conducted using two Plasmodium-specific gene families—serine repeat antigen, and cytoadherence-linked asexual gene—as models. In general, these example workflows show how to achieve quick, reproducible and shareable results using the CoGe platform. We were able to replicate previously published results, as well as leverage CoGe’s tools and resources to gain additional insight into various aspects of Plasmodium genome evolution. Our results highlight the usefulness of the CoGe platform, particularly in understanding complex features of genome evolution. Database URL: https://genomevolution.org/coge/

  3. Use of contextual inquiry to understand anatomic pathology workflow: Implications for digital pathology adoption

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jonhan; Aridor, Orly; Parwani, Anil V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: For decades anatomic pathology (AP) workflow have been a highly manual process based on the use of an optical microscope and glass slides. Recent innovations in scanning and digitizing of entire glass slides are accelerating a move toward widespread adoption and implementation of a workflow based on digital slides and their supporting information management software. To support the design of digital pathology systems and ensure their adoption into pathology practice, the needs of the main users within the AP workflow, the pathologists, should be identified. Contextual inquiry is a qualitative, user-centered, social method designed to identify and understand users’ needs and is utilized for collecting, interpreting, and aggregating in-detail aspects of work. Objective: Contextual inquiry was utilized to document current AP workflow, identify processes that may benefit from the introduction of digital pathology systems, and establish design requirements for digital pathology systems that will meet pathologists’ needs. Materials and Methods: Pathologists were observed and interviewed at a large academic medical center according to contextual inquiry guidelines established by Holtzblatt et al. 1998. Notes representing user-provided data were documented during observation sessions. An affinity diagram, a hierarchal organization of the notes based on common themes in the data, was created. Five graphical models were developed to help visualize the data including sequence, flow, artifact, physical, and cultural models. Results: A total of six pathologists were observed by a team of two researchers. A total of 254 affinity notes were documented and organized using a system based on topical hierarchy, including 75 third-level, 24 second-level, and five main-level categories, including technology, communication, synthesis/preparation, organization, and workflow. Current AP workflow was labor intensive and lacked scalability. A large number of processes that

  4. Tavaxy: Integrating Taverna and Galaxy workflows with cloud computing support

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past decade the workflow system paradigm has evolved as an efficient and user-friendly approach for developing complex bioinformatics applications. Two popular workflow systems that have gained acceptance by the bioinformatics community are Taverna and Galaxy. Each system has a large user-base and supports an ever-growing repository of application workflows. However, workflows developed for one system cannot be imported and executed easily on the other. The lack of interoperability is due to differences in the models of computation, workflow languages, and architectures of both systems. This lack of interoperability limits sharing of workflows between the user communities and leads to duplication of development efforts. Results In this paper, we present Tavaxy, a stand-alone system for creating and executing workflows based on using an extensible set of re-usable workflow patterns. Tavaxy offers a set of new features that simplify and enhance the development of sequence analysis applications: It allows the integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows in a single environment, and supports the use of cloud computing capabilities. The integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows is supported seamlessly at both run-time and design-time levels, based on the concepts of hierarchical workflows and workflow patterns. The use of cloud computing in Tavaxy is flexible, where the users can either instantiate the whole system on the cloud, or delegate the execution of certain sub-workflows to the cloud infrastructure. Conclusions Tavaxy reduces the workflow development cycle by introducing the use of workflow patterns to simplify workflow creation. It enables the re-use and integration of existing (sub-) workflows from Taverna and Galaxy, and allows the creation of hybrid workflows. Its additional features exploit recent advances in high performance cloud computing to cope with the increasing data size and complexity of analysis. The system

  5. Tavaxy: integrating Taverna and Galaxy workflows with cloud computing support.

    PubMed

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Issa, Shadi Alaa; Ghanem, Moustafa

    2012-05-04

    Over the past decade the workflow system paradigm has evolved as an efficient and user-friendly approach for developing complex bioinformatics applications. Two popular workflow systems that have gained acceptance by the bioinformatics community are Taverna and Galaxy. Each system has a large user-base and supports an ever-growing repository of application workflows. However, workflows developed for one system cannot be imported and executed easily on the other. The lack of interoperability is due to differences in the models of computation, workflow languages, and architectures of both systems. This lack of interoperability limits sharing of workflows between the user communities and leads to duplication of development efforts. In this paper, we present Tavaxy, a stand-alone system for creating and executing workflows based on using an extensible set of re-usable workflow patterns. Tavaxy offers a set of new features that simplify and enhance the development of sequence analysis applications: It allows the integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows in a single environment, and supports the use of cloud computing capabilities. The integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows is supported seamlessly at both run-time and design-time levels, based on the concepts of hierarchical workflows and workflow patterns. The use of cloud computing in Tavaxy is flexible, where the users can either instantiate the whole system on the cloud, or delegate the execution of certain sub-workflows to the cloud infrastructure. Tavaxy reduces the workflow development cycle by introducing the use of workflow patterns to simplify workflow creation. It enables the re-use and integration of existing (sub-) workflows from Taverna and Galaxy, and allows the creation of hybrid workflows. Its additional features exploit recent advances in high performance cloud computing to cope with the increasing data size and complexity of analysis.The system can be accessed either through a

  6. MBAT: a scalable informatics system for unifying digital atlasing workflows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daren; Ruffins, Seth; Ng, Queenie; Sane, Nikhil; Anderson, Steve; Toga, Arthur

    2010-12-22

    Digital atlases provide a common semantic and spatial coordinate system that can be leveraged to compare, contrast, and correlate data from disparate sources. As the quality and amount of biological data continues to advance and grow, searching, referencing, and comparing this data with a researcher's own data is essential. However, the integration process is cumbersome and time-consuming due to misaligned data, implicitly defined associations, and incompatible data sources. This work addressing these challenges by providing a unified and adaptable environment to accelerate the workflow to gather, align, and analyze the data. The MouseBIRN Atlasing Toolkit (MBAT) project was developed as a cross-platform, free open-source application that unifies and accelerates the digital atlas workflow. A tiered, plug-in architecture was designed for the neuroinformatics and genomics goals of the project to provide a modular and extensible design. MBAT provides the ability to use a single query to search and retrieve data from multiple data sources, align image data using the user's preferred registration method, composite data from multiple sources in a common space, and link relevant informatics information to the current view of the data or atlas. The workspaces leverage tool plug-ins to extend and allow future extensions of the basic workspace functionality. A wide variety of tool plug-ins were developed that integrate pre-existing as well as newly created technology into each workspace. Novel atlasing features were also developed, such as supporting multiple label sets, dynamic selection and grouping of labels, and synchronized, context-driven display of ontological data. MBAT empowers researchers to discover correlations among disparate data by providing a unified environment for bringing together distributed reference resources, a user's image data, and biological atlases into the same spatial or semantic context. Through its extensible tiered plug-in architecture, MBAT

  7. Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kamper, Lars, E-mail: lars.kamper@helios-kliniken.de; Meyn, Hannes; Rybacki, Konrad

    2012-06-15

    Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients' outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admissionmore » until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.« less

  8. Ergonomics: CTD management evaluation tool.

    PubMed

    Ostendorf, J S; Rogers, B; Bertsche, P K

    2000-01-01

    Cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) occurrences peaked in number in 1994 and although decreasing in 1995, still accounted for 62% of all illness cases reported. A CTD Management Evaluation Tool was developed to assist Occupational Safety and Health Compliance Officers (CSHOs) in program evaluation and documentation of the occupational health management component and the need for an ergonomics program. Occupational and environmental health nurses may use the tool not only to reduce and prevent CTD occurrences, but also as a benchmark for program evaluation.

  9. An integrated workflow for analysis of ChIP-chip data.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Karin; Moehle, Christoph; Stempfl, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard; Langmann, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Although ChIP-chip is a powerful tool for genome-wide discovery of transcription factor target genes, the steps involving raw data analysis, identification of promoters, and correlation with binding sites are still laborious processes. Therefore, we report an integrated workflow for the analysis of promoter tiling arrays with the Genomatix ChipInspector system. We compare this tool with open-source software packages to identify PU.1 regulated genes in mouse macrophages. Our results suggest that ChipInspector data analysis, comparative genomics for binding site prediction, and pathway/network modeling significantly facilitate and enhance whole-genome promoter profiling to reveal in vivo sites of transcription factor-DNA interactions.

  10. Data partitioning enables the use of standard SOAP Web Services in genome-scale workflows.

    PubMed

    Sztromwasser, Pawel; Puntervoll, Pål; Petersen, Kjell

    2011-07-26

    Biological databases and computational biology tools are provided by research groups around the world, and made accessible on the Web. Combining these resources is a common practice in bioinformatics, but integration of heterogeneous and often distributed tools and datasets can be challenging. To date, this challenge has been commonly addressed in a pragmatic way, by tedious and error-prone scripting. Recently however a more reliable technique has been identified and proposed as the platform that would tie together bioinformatics resources, namely Web Services. In the last decade the Web Services have spread wide in bioinformatics, and earned the title of recommended technology. However, in the era of high-throughput experimentation, a major concern regarding Web Services is their ability to handle large-scale data traffic. We propose a stream-like communication pattern for standard SOAP Web Services, that enables efficient flow of large data traffic between a workflow orchestrator and Web Services. We evaluated the data-partitioning strategy by comparing it with typical communication patterns on an example pipeline for genomic sequence annotation. The results show that data-partitioning lowers resource demands of services and increases their throughput, which in consequence allows to execute in-silico experiments on genome-scale, using standard SOAP Web Services and workflows. As a proof-of-principle we annotated an RNA-seq dataset using a plain BPEL workflow engine.

  11. The Perfect Neuroimaging-Genetics-Computation Storm: Collision of Petabytes of Data, Millions of Hardware Devices and Thousands of Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Zamanyan, Alen; Torri, Federica; Macciardi, Fabio; Hobel, Sam; Moon, Seok Woo; Sung, Young Hee; Jiang, Zhiguo; Labus, Jennifer; Kurth, Florian; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Mayer, Emeran; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The volume, diversity and velocity of biomedical data are exponentially increasing providing petabytes of new neuroimaging and genetics data every year. At the same time, tens-of-thousands of computational algorithms are developed and reported in the literature along with thousands of software tools and services. Users demand intuitive, quick and platform-agnostic access to data, software tools, and infrastructure from millions of hardware devices. This explosion of information, scientific techniques, computational models, and technological advances leads to enormous challenges in data analysis, evidence-based biomedical inference and reproducibility of findings. The Pipeline workflow environment provides a crowd-based distributed solution for consistent management of these heterogeneous resources. The Pipeline allows multiple (local) clients and (remote) servers to connect, exchange protocols, control the execution, monitor the states of different tools or hardware, and share complete protocols as portable XML workflows. In this paper, we demonstrate several advanced computational neuroimaging and genetics case-studies, and end-to-end pipeline solutions. These are implemented as graphical workflow protocols in the context of analyzing imaging (sMRI, fMRI, DTI), phenotypic (demographic, clinical), and genetic (SNP) data. PMID:23975276

  12. Interplay between Clinical Guidelines and Organizational Workflow Systems. Experience from the MobiGuide Project.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Amnon; Peleg, Mor; Parimbelli, Enea; Quaglini, Silvana; Napolitano, Carlo

    2016-12-07

    Implementing a decision-support system within a healthcare organization requires integration of clinical domain knowledge with resource constraints. Computer-interpretable guidelines (CIG) are excellent instruments for addressing clinical aspects while business process management (BPM) languages and Workflow (Wf) engines manage the logistic organizational constraints. Our objective is the orchestration of all the relevant factors needed for a successful execution of patient's care pathways, especially when spanning the continuum of care, from acute to community or home care. We considered three strategies for integrating CIGs with organizational workflows: extending the CIG or BPM languages and their engines, or creating an interplay between them. We used the interplay approach to implement a set of use cases arising from a CIG implementation in the domain of Atrial Fibrillation. To provide a more scalable and standards-based solution, we explored the use of Cross-Enterprise Document Workflow Integration Profile. We describe our proof-of-concept implementation of five use cases. We utilized the Personal Health Record of the MobiGuide project to implement a loosely-coupled approach between the Activiti BPM engine and the Picard CIG engine. Changes in the PHR were detected by polling. IHE profiles were used to develop workflow documents that orchestrate cross-enterprise execution of cardioversion. Interplay between CIG and BPM engines can support orchestration of care flows within organizational settings.

  13. Data Integration Tool: Permafrost Data Debugging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, H.; Schaefer, K. M.; Jafarov, E. E.; Pulsifer, P. L.; Strawhacker, C.; Yarmey, L.; Basak, R.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Data Integration Tool (DIT) to significantly speed up the time of manual processing needed to translate inconsistent, scattered historical permafrost data into files ready to ingest directly into the Global Terrestrial Network-Permafrost (GTN-P). The United States National Science Foundation funded this project through the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) with the GTN-P to improve permafrost data access and discovery. We leverage this data to support science research and policy decisions. DIT is a workflow manager that divides data preparation and analysis into a series of steps or operations called widgets (https://github.com/PermaData/DIT). Each widget does a specific operation, such as read, multiply by a constant, sort, plot, and write data. DIT allows the user to select and order the widgets as desired to meet their specific needs, incrementally interact with and evolve the widget workflows, and save those workflows for reproducibility. Taking ideas from visual programming found in the art and design domain, debugging and iterative design principles from software engineering, and the scientific data processing and analysis power of Fortran and Python it was written for interactive, iterative data manipulation, quality control, processing, and analysis of inconsistent data in an easily installable application. DIT was used to completely translate one dataset (133 sites) that was successfully added to GTN-P, nearly translate three datasets (270 sites), and is scheduled to translate 10 more datasets ( 1000 sites) from the legacy inactive site data holdings of the Frozen Ground Data Center (FGDC). Iterative development has provided the permafrost and wider scientific community with an extendable tool designed specifically for the iterative process of translating unruly data.

  14. Traversing the many paths of workflow research: developing a conceptual framework of workflow terminology through a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Laurie L; Johnson, Kevin B; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review was to describe methods used to study and model workflow. The authors included studies set in a variety of industries using qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. Of the 6221 matching abstracts, 127 articles were included in the final corpus. The authors collected data from each article on researcher perspective, study type, methods type, specific methods, approaches to evaluating quality of results, definition of workflow and dependent variables. Ethnographic observation and interviews were the most frequently used methods. Long study durations revealed the large time commitment required for descriptive workflow research. The most frequently discussed technique for evaluating quality of study results was triangulation. The definition of the term “workflow” and choice of methods for studying workflow varied widely across research areas and researcher perspectives. The authors developed a conceptual framework of workflow-related terminology for use in future research and present this model for use by other researchers. PMID:20442143

  15. Modernizing Earth and Space Science Modeling Workflows in the Big Data Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinter, J. L.; Feigelson, E.; Walker, R. J.; Tino, C.

    2017-12-01

    automation in the near term, and longer term investments in virtualized environments for improved scalability, tolerance for lossy data compression, novel data-centric memory and storage technologies, and tools for peer reviewing, preserving and sharing workflows, as well as fundamental statistical and machine learning algorithms.

  16. End-to-end interoperability and workflows from building architecture design to one or more simulations

    DOEpatents

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-02-10

    An end-to-end interoperability and workflows from building architecture design to one or more simulations, in one aspect, may comprise establishing a BIM enablement platform architecture. A data model defines data entities and entity relationships for enabling the interoperability and workflows. A data definition language may be implemented that defines and creates a table schema of a database associated with the data model. Data management services and/or application programming interfaces may be implemented for interacting with the data model. Web services may also be provided for interacting with the data model via the Web. A user interface may be implemented that communicates with users and uses the BIM enablement platform architecture, the data model, the data definition language, data management services and application programming interfaces to provide functions to the users to perform work related to building information management.

  17. CONNJUR Workflow Builder: A software integration environment for spectral reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Matthew; Weatherby, Gerard; Vyas, Jay; Sesanker, Colbert; Martyn, Timothy O.; Ellis, Heidi J.C.; Gryk, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    CONNJUR Workflow Builder (WB) is an open-source software integration environment that leverages existing spectral reconstruction tools to create a synergistic, coherent platform for converting biomolecular NMR data from the time domain to the frequency domain. WB provides data integration of primary data and metadata using a relational database, and includes a library of pre-built workflows for processing time domain data. WB simplifies maximum entropy reconstruction, facilitating the processing of non-uniformly sampled time domain data. As will be shown in the paper, the unique features of WB provide it with novel abilities to enhance the quality, accuracy, and fidelity of the spectral reconstruction process. WB also provides features which promote collaboration, education, parameterization, and non-uniform data sets along with processing integrated with the Rowland NMR Toolkit (RNMRTK) and NMRPipe software packages. WB is available free of charge in perpetuity, dual-licensed under the MIT and GPL open source licenses. PMID:26066803

  18. CONNJUR Workflow Builder: a software integration environment for spectral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Matthew; Weatherby, Gerard; Vyas, Jay; Sesanker, Colbert; Martyn, Timothy O; Ellis, Heidi J C; Gryk, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    CONNJUR Workflow Builder (WB) is an open-source software integration environment that leverages existing spectral reconstruction tools to create a synergistic, coherent platform for converting biomolecular NMR data from the time domain to the frequency domain. WB provides data integration of primary data and metadata using a relational database, and includes a library of pre-built workflows for processing time domain data. WB simplifies maximum entropy reconstruction, facilitating the processing of non-uniformly sampled time domain data. As will be shown in the paper, the unique features of WB provide it with novel abilities to enhance the quality, accuracy, and fidelity of the spectral reconstruction process. WB also provides features which promote collaboration, education, parameterization, and non-uniform data sets along with processing integrated with the Rowland NMR Toolkit (RNMRTK) and NMRPipe software packages. WB is available free of charge in perpetuity, dual-licensed under the MIT and GPL open source licenses.

  19. Scenario Tools For Efficient Eutrophication Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, B.; Vastra SP3 Team

    Several possible measures are available to reduce diffuse (non-point source) nutri- ent load to surface water and thereby reduce eutrophication. Such measures include changed arable practices and constructions of wetlands and buffer zones in the land- scape, as well as managing lake ecosystems. In some cases, such as for wetlands, there is an intense debate regarding the efficiency of their nutrient reducing capability. In ad- dition, the combined effect of several measures in a catchment is not necessarily equal to their sum. It is therefore important to apply a holistic and integrated catchment approach when applying and evaluating different management strategies. To facili- tate such catchment analyses, the Swedish water management research programme (VASTRA) develop modelling tools addressing both phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in catchments. During the last three years decision support tools for N man- agement in rivers and lakes have been developed (e.g., HBV-N, BIOLA) and applied in scenarios to demonstrate the effect of various reducing measures. At present, similar tools for P are under development. This presentation will demonstrate the VASTRA tool-box and its applications for efficient eutrophication management.

  20. PyDBS: an automated image processing workflow for deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    D'Albis, Tiziano; Haegelen, Claire; Essert, Caroline; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Lalys, Florent; Jannin, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure for treating motor-related neurological disorders. DBS clinical efficacy hinges on precise surgical planning and accurate electrode placement, which in turn call upon several image processing and visualization tasks, such as image registration, image segmentation, image fusion, and 3D visualization. These tasks are often performed by a heterogeneous set of software tools, which adopt differing formats and geometrical conventions and require patient-specific parameterization or interactive tuning. To overcome these issues, we introduce in this article PyDBS, a fully integrated and automated image processing workflow for DBS surgery. PyDBS consists of three image processing pipelines and three visualization modules assisting clinicians through the entire DBS surgical workflow, from the preoperative planning of electrode trajectories to the postoperative assessment of electrode placement. The system's robustness, speed, and accuracy were assessed by means of a retrospective validation, based on 92 clinical cases. The complete PyDBS workflow achieved satisfactory results in 92 % of tested cases, with a median processing time of 28 min per patient. The results obtained are compatible with the adoption of PyDBS in clinical practice.

  1. JUICE: a data management system that facilitates the analysis of large volumes of information in an EST project workflow.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mariano; Silva, Herman; Saba, Juan; Guziolowski, Carito; Vizoso, Paula; Martinez, Veronica; Maldonado, Jonathan; Morales, Andrea; Caroca, Rodrigo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Gonzalez, Mauricio; Orellana, Ariel; Retamales, Julio; Meisel, Lee A

    2006-11-23

    Expressed sequence tag (EST) analyses provide a rapid and economical means to identify candidate genes that may be involved in a particular biological process. These ESTs are useful in many Functional Genomics studies. However, the large quantity and complexity of the data generated during an EST sequencing project can make the analysis of this information a daunting task. In an attempt to make this task friendlier, we have developed JUICE, an open source data management system (Apache + PHP + MySQL on Linux), which enables the user to easily upload, organize, visualize and search the different types of data generated in an EST project pipeline. In contrast to other systems, the JUICE data management system allows a branched pipeline to be established, modified and expanded, during the course of an EST project. The web interfaces and tools in JUICE enable the users to visualize the information in a graphical, user-friendly manner. The user may browse or search for sequences and/or sequence information within all the branches of the pipeline. The user can search using terms associated with the sequence name, annotation or other characteristics stored in JUICE and associated with sequences or sequence groups. Groups of sequences can be created by the user, stored in a clipboard and/or downloaded for further analyses. Different user profiles restrict the access of each user depending upon their role in the project. The user may have access exclusively to visualize sequence information, access to annotate sequences and sequence information, or administrative access. JUICE is an open source data management system that has been developed to aid users in organizing and analyzing the large amount of data generated in an EST Project workflow. JUICE has been used in one of the first functional genomics projects in Chile, entitled "Functional Genomics in nectarines: Platform to potentiate the competitiveness of Chile in fruit exportation". However, due to its ability to

  2. JUICE: a data management system that facilitates the analysis of large volumes of information in an EST project workflow

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Mariano; Silva, Herman; Saba, Juan; Guziolowski, Carito; Vizoso, Paula; Martinez, Veronica; Maldonado, Jonathan; Morales, Andrea; Caroca, Rodrigo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Gonzalez, Mauricio; Orellana, Ariel; Retamales, Julio; Meisel, Lee A

    2006-01-01

    Background Expressed sequence tag (EST) analyses provide a rapid and economical means to identify candidate genes that may be involved in a particular biological process. These ESTs are useful in many Functional Genomics studies. However, the large quantity and complexity of the data generated during an EST sequencing project can make the analysis of this information a daunting task. Results In an attempt to make this task friendlier, we have developed JUICE, an open source data management system (Apache + PHP + MySQL on Linux), which enables the user to easily upload, organize, visualize and search the different types of data generated in an EST project pipeline. In contrast to other systems, the JUICE data management system allows a branched pipeline to be established, modified and expanded, during the course of an EST project. The web interfaces and tools in JUICE enable the users to visualize the information in a graphical, user-friendly manner. The user may browse or search for sequences and/or sequence information within all the branches of the pipeline. The user can search using terms associated with the sequence name, annotation or other characteristics stored in JUICE and associated with sequences or sequence groups. Groups of sequences can be created by the user, stored in a clipboard and/or downloaded for further analyses. Different user profiles restrict the access of each user depending upon their role in the project. The user may have access exclusively to visualize sequence information, access to annotate sequences and sequence information, or administrative access. Conclusion JUICE is an open source data management system that has been developed to aid users in organizing and analyzing the large amount of data generated in an EST Project workflow. JUICE has been used in one of the first functional genomics projects in Chile, entitled "Functional Genomics in nectarines: Platform to potentiate the competitiveness of Chile in fruit exportation

  3. Engineering a mobile health tool for resource-poor settings to assess and manage cardiovascular disease risk: SMARThealth study.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Arvind; Praveen, Devarsetty; Peiris, David; Tarassenko, Lionel; Clifford, Gari

    2015-04-29

    The incidence of chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries is rapidly increasing both in urban and rural regions. A major challenge for health systems globally is to develop innovative solutions for the prevention and control of these diseases. This paper discusses the development and pilot testing of SMARTHealth, a mobile-based, point-of-care Clinical Decision Support (CDS) tool to assess and manage cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in resource-constrained settings. Through pilot testing, the preliminary acceptability, utility, and efficiency of the CDS tool was obtained. The CDS tool was part of an mHealth system comprising a mobile application that consisted of an evidence-based risk prediction and management algorithm, and a server-side electronic medical record system. Through an agile development process and user-centred design approach, key features of the mobile application that fitted the requirements of the end users and environment were obtained. A comprehensive analytics framework facilitated a data-driven approach to investigate four areas, namely, system efficiency, end-user variability, manual data entry errors, and usefulness of point-of-care management recommendations to the healthcare worker. A four-point Likert scale was used at the end of every risk assessment to gauge ease-of-use of the system. The system was field-tested with eleven village healthcare workers and three Primary Health Centre doctors, who screened a total of 292 adults aged 40 years and above. 34% of participants screened by health workers were identified by the CDS tool to be high CVD risk and referred to a doctor. In-depth analysis of user interactions found the CDS tool feasible for use and easily integrable into the workflow of healthcare workers. Following completion of the pilot, further technical enhancements were implemented to improve uptake of the mHealth platform. It will then be evaluated for effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in a cluster randomized

  4. Optimization of business processes in banks through flexible workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postolache, V.

    2017-08-01

    This article describes an integrated business model of a commercial bank. There are examples of components that go into its composition: wooden models and business processes, strategic goals, organizational structure, system architecture, operational and marketing risk models, etc. The practice has shown that the development and implementation of the integrated business model of the bank significantly increase operating efficiency and its management, ensures organizational and technology stable development. Considering the evolution of business processes in the banking sector, should be analysed their common characteristics. From the author’s point of view, a business process is a set of various activities of a commercial bank in which “Input” is one or more financial and material resources, as a result of this activity and “output” is created by banking product, which is some value to consumer. Using workflow technology, management business process efficiency issue is a matter of managing the integration of resources and sequence of actions aimed at achieving this goal. In turn, it implies management of jobs or functions’ interaction, synchronizing of the assignments periods, reducing delays in the transmission of the results etc. Workflow technology is very important for managers at all levels, as they can use it to easily strengthen the control over what is happening in a particular unit, and in the bank as a whole. The manager is able to plan, to implement rules, to interact within the framework of the company’s procedures and tasks entrusted to the system of the distribution function and execution control, alert on the implementation and issuance of the statistical data on the effectiveness of operating procedures. Development and active use of the integrated bank business model is one of the key success factors that contribute to long-term and stable development of the bank, increase employee efficiency and business processes, implement the

  5. Workflow and web application for annotating NCBI BioProject transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Medeiros Vidal, Newton; Garzón-Martínez, Gina A.; Barrero, Luz S.; Landsman, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The volume of transcriptome data is growing exponentially due to rapid improvement of experimental technologies. In response, large central resources such as those of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) are continually adapting their computational infrastructure to accommodate this large influx of data. New and specialized databases, such as Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly Sequence Database (TSA) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), have been created to aid the development and expansion of centralized repositories. Although the central resource databases are under continual development, they do not include automatic pipelines to increase annotation of newly deposited data. Therefore, third-party applications are required to achieve that aim. Here, we present an automatic workflow and web application for the annotation of transcriptome data. The workflow creates secondary data such as sequencing reads and BLAST alignments, which are available through the web application. They are based on freely available bioinformatics tools and scripts developed in-house. The interactive web application provides a search engine and several browser utilities. Graphical views of transcript alignments are available through SeqViewer, an embedded tool developed by NCBI for viewing biological sequence data. The web application is tightly integrated with other NCBI web applications and tools to extend the functionality of data processing and interconnectivity. We present a case study for the species Physalis peruviana with data generated from BioProject ID 67621. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/physalis/ PMID:28605765

  6. Identifying Cost-Effective Water Resources Management Strategies: Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a public-domain software application designed to aid decision makers with integrated water resources management. The tool allows water resource managers and planners to screen a wide-range of management practices for c...

  7. Research on a dynamic workflow access control model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiliang; Deng, Jinxia

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, the access control technology has been researched widely in workflow system, two typical technologies of that are RBAC (Role-Based Access Control) and TBAC (Task-Based Access Control) model, which has been successfully used in the role authorizing and assigning in a certain extent. However, during the process of complicating a system's structure, these two types of technology can not be used in minimizing privileges and separating duties, and they are inapplicable when users have a request of frequently changing on the workflow's process. In order to avoid having these weakness during the applying, a variable flow dynamic role_task_view (briefly as DRTVBAC) of fine-grained access control model is constructed on the basis existed model. During the process of this model applying, an algorithm is constructed to solve users' requirements of application and security needs on fine-grained principle of privileges minimum and principle of dynamic separation of duties. The DRTVBAC model is implemented in the actual system, the figure shows that the task associated with the dynamic management of role and the role assignment is more flexible on authority and recovery, it can be met the principle of least privilege on the role implement of a specific task permission activated; separated the authority from the process of the duties completing in the workflow; prevented sensitive information discovering from concise and dynamic view interface; satisfied with the requirement of the variable task-flow frequently.

  8. Advantages and Disadvantages of 1-Incision, 2-Incision, 3-Incision, and 4-Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Workflow Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Bartnicka, Joanna; Zietkiewicz, Agnieszka A; Kowalski, Grzegorz J

    2016-08-01

    A comparison of 1-port, 2-port, 3-port, and 4-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy techniques from the point of view of workflow criteria was made to both identify specific workflow components that can cause surgical disturbances and indicate good and bad practices. As a case study, laparoscopic cholecystectomies, including manual tasks and interactions within teamwork members, were video-recorded and analyzed on the basis of specially encoded workflow information. The parameters for comparison were defined as follows: surgery time, tool and hand activeness, operator's passive work, collisions, and operator interventions. It was found that 1-port cholecystectomy is the worst technique because of nonergonomic body position, technical complexity, organizational anomalies, and operational dynamism. The differences between laparoscopic techniques are closely linked to the costs of the medical procedures. Hence, knowledge about the surgical workflow can be used for both planning surgical procedures and balancing the expenses associated with surgery.

  9. Development of an Electronic Medical Record-Based Clinical Decision Support Tool to Improve HIV Symptom Management

    PubMed Central

    Tsevat, Joel; Justice, Amy C.; Mrus, Joseph M.; Levin, Forrest; Kozal, Michael J.; Mattocks, Kristin; Farber, Steven; Rogers, Michelle; Erdos, Joseph; Brandt, Cynthia; Kudel, Ian; Braithwaite, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Common symptoms associated with HIV disease and its management are often underrecognized and undertreated. A clinical decision support tool for symptom management was developed within the Veterans Health Administration electronic medical record (EMR), aiming at increasing provider awareness of and response to common HIV symptoms. Its feasibility was studied in March to May 2007 by implementing it within a weekly HIV clinic, comparing a 4-week intervention period with a 4-week control period. Fifty-six patients and their providers participated in the study. Patients' perceptions of providers' awareness of their symptoms, proportion of progress notes mentioning any symptom(s) and proportion of care plans mentioning any symptom(s) were measured. The clinical decision support tool used portable electronic “tablets” to elicit symptom information at the time of check-in, filtered, and organized that information into a concise and clinically relevant EMR note available at the point of care, and facilitated clinical responses to that information. It appeared to be well accepted by patients and providers and did not substantially impact workflow. Although this pilot study was not powered to detect effectiveness, 25 (93%) patients in the intervention group reported that their providers were very aware of their symptoms versuas 27 (75%) control patients (p = 0.07). The proportion of providers' notes listing symptoms was similar in both periods; however, there was a trend toward including a greater number of symptoms in intervention period progress notes. The symptom support tool seemed to be useful in clinical HIV care. The Veterans Health Administration EMR may be an effective “laboratory” for developing and testing decision supports. PMID:19538046

  10. MetaboTools: A comprehensive toolbox for analysis of genome-scale metabolic models

    DOE PAGES

    Aurich, Maike K.; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Thiele, Ines

    2016-08-03

    Metabolomic data sets provide a direct read-out of cellular phenotypes and are increasingly generated to study biological questions. Previous work, by us and others, revealed the potential of analyzing extracellular metabolomic data in the context of the metabolic model using constraint-based modeling. With the MetaboTools, we make our methods available to the broader scientific community. The MetaboTools consist of a protocol, a toolbox, and tutorials of two use cases. The protocol describes, in a step-wise manner, the workflow of data integration, and computational analysis. The MetaboTools comprise the Matlab code required to complete the workflow described in the protocol. Tutorialsmore » explain the computational steps for integration of two different data sets and demonstrate a comprehensive set of methods for the computational analysis of metabolic models and stratification thereof into different phenotypes. The presented workflow supports integrative analysis of multiple omics data sets. Importantly, all analysis tools can be applied to metabolic models without performing the entire workflow. Taken together, the MetaboTools constitute a comprehensive guide to the intra-model analysis of extracellular metabolomic data from microbial, plant, or human cells. In conclusion, this computational modeling resource offers a broad set of computational analysis tools for a wide biomedical and non-biomedical research community.« less

  11. Real-Time System for Water Modeling and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Zhao, T.; David, C. H.; Minsker, B.

    2012-12-01

    Cyberintegrator workflow system provides RESTful web services for users to provide inputs, execute workflows, and retrieve outputs. Along with REST endpoints, PAW (Publishable Active Workflows) provides the web user interface toolkit for us to develop web applications with scientific workflows. The prototype web application is built on top of workflows with PAW, so that users will have a user-friendly web environment to provide input parameters, execute the model, and visualize/retrieve the results using geospatial mapping tools. In future work the optimization model will be developed and integrated into the workflow.; Real-Time System for Water Modeling and Management

  12. Enhanced reproducibility of SADI web service workflows with Galaxy and Docker.

    PubMed

    Aranguren, Mikel Egaña; Wilkinson, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Semantic Web technologies have been widely applied in the life sciences, for example by data providers such as OpenLifeData and through web services frameworks such as SADI. The recently reported OpenLifeData2SADI project offers access to the vast OpenLifeData data store through SADI services. This article describes how to merge data retrieved from OpenLifeData2SADI with other SADI services using the Galaxy bioinformatics analysis platform, thus making this semantic data more amenable to complex analyses. This is demonstrated using a working example, which is made distributable and reproducible through a Docker image that includes SADI tools, along with the data and workflows that constitute the demonstration. The combination of Galaxy and Docker offers a solution for faithfully reproducing and sharing complex data retrieval and analysis workflows based on the SADI Semantic web service design patterns.

  13. The View from a Few Hundred Feet : A New Transparent and Integrated Workflow for UAV-collected Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, F. S.; Barbieri, L.; Wyngaard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) allow scientists and civilians to monitor earth and atmospheric conditions in remote locations. To keep up with the rapid evolution of UAV technology, data workflows must also be flexible, integrated, and introspective. Here, we present our data workflow for a project to assess the feasibility of detecting threshold levels of methane, carbon-dioxide, and other aerosols by mounting consumer-grade gas analysis sensors on UAV's. Particularly, we highlight our use of Project Jupyter, a set of open-source software tools and documentation designed for developing "collaborative narratives" around scientific workflows. By embracing the GitHub-backed, multi-language systems available in Project Jupyter, we enable interaction and exploratory computation while simultaneously embracing distributed version control. Additionally, the transparency of this method builds trust with civilians and decision-makers and leverages collaboration and communication to resolve problems. The goal of this presentation is to provide a generic data workflow for scientific inquiries involving UAVs and to invite the participation of the AGU community in its improvement and curation.

  14. Reproducible Bioconductor workflows using browser-based interactive notebooks and containers.

    PubMed

    Almugbel, Reem; Hung, Ling-Hong; Hu, Jiaming; Almutairy, Abeer; Ortogero, Nicole; Tamta, Yashaswi; Yeung, Ka Yee

    2018-01-01

    Bioinformatics publications typically include complex software workflows that are difficult to describe in a manuscript. We describe and demonstrate the use of interactive software notebooks to document and distribute bioinformatics research. We provide a user-friendly tool, BiocImageBuilder, that allows users to easily distribute their bioinformatics protocols through interactive notebooks uploaded to either a GitHub repository or a private server. We present four different interactive Jupyter notebooks using R and Bioconductor workflows to infer differential gene expression, analyze cross-platform datasets, process RNA-seq data and KinomeScan data. These interactive notebooks are available on GitHub. The analytical results can be viewed in a browser. Most importantly, the software contents can be executed and modified. This is accomplished using Binder, which runs the notebook inside software containers, thus avoiding the need to install any software and ensuring reproducibility. All the notebooks were produced using custom files generated by BiocImageBuilder. BiocImageBuilder facilitates the publication of workflows with a point-and-click user interface. We demonstrate that interactive notebooks can be used to disseminate a wide range of bioinformatics analyses. The use of software containers to mirror the original software environment ensures reproducibility of results. Parameters and code can be dynamically modified, allowing for robust verification of published results and encouraging rapid adoption of new methods. Given the increasing complexity of bioinformatics workflows, we anticipate that these interactive software notebooks will become as necessary for documenting software methods as traditional laboratory notebooks have been for documenting bench protocols, and as ubiquitous. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. BioInfra.Prot: A comprehensive proteomics workflow including data standardization, protein inference, expression analysis and data publication.

    PubMed

    Turewicz, Michael; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Mayer, Gerhard; Uszkoreit, Julian; Naboulsi, Wael; Bracht, Thilo; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Marcus, Katrin; Eisenacher, Martin

    2017-11-10

    The analysis of high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics data must address the specific challenges of this technology. To this end, the comprehensive proteomics workflow offered by the de.NBI service center BioInfra.Prot provides indispensable components for the computational and statistical analysis of this kind of data. These components include tools and methods for spectrum identification and protein inference, protein quantification, expression analysis as well as data standardization and data publication. All particular methods of the workflow which address these tasks are state-of-the-art or cutting edge. As has been shown in previous publications, each of these methods is adequate to solve its specific task and gives competitive results. However, the methods included in the workflow are continuously reviewed, updated and improved to adapt to new scientific developments. All of these particular components and methods are available as stand-alone BioInfra.Prot services or as a complete workflow. Since BioInfra.Prot provides manifold fast communication channels to get access to all components of the workflow (e.g., via the BioInfra.Prot ticket system: bioinfraprot@rub.de) users can easily benefit from this service and get support by experts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Parametric Workflow (BIM) for the Repair Construction of Traditional Historic Architecture in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.-P.; Hsu, C. C.; Lin, M.-C.; Tsai, Z.-W.; Chen, J.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    In Taiwan, numerous existing traditional buildings are constructed with wooden structures, brick structures, and stone structures. This paper will focus on the Taiwan traditional historic architecture and target the traditional wooden structure buildings as the design proposition and process the BIM workflow for modeling complex wooden combination geometry, integrating with more traditional 2D documents and for visualizing repair construction assumptions within the 3D model representation. The goal of this article is to explore the current problems to overcome in wooden historic building conservation, and introduce the BIM technology in the case of conserving, documenting, managing, and creating full engineering drawings and information for effectively support historic conservation. Although BIM is mostly oriented to current construction praxis, there have been some attempts to investigate its applicability in historic conservation projects. This article also illustrates the importance and advantages of using BIM workflow in repair construction process, when comparing with generic workflow.

  17. Purdue Ionomics Information Management System. An Integrated Functional Genomics Platform1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ivan; Ouzzani, Mourad; Orcun, Seza; Kennedy, Brad; Jandhyala, Shrinivas S.; Salt, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput phenotyping technologies has created a deluge of information that is difficult to deal with without the appropriate data management tools. These data management tools should integrate defined workflow controls for genomic-scale data acquisition and validation, data storage and retrieval, and data analysis, indexed around the genomic information of the organism of interest. To maximize the impact of these large datasets, it is critical that they are rapidly disseminated to the broader research community, allowing open access for data mining and discovery. We describe here a system that incorporates such functionalities developed around the Purdue University high-throughput ionomics phenotyping platform. The Purdue Ionomics Information Management System (PiiMS) provides integrated workflow control, data storage, and analysis to facilitate high-throughput data acquisition, along with integrated tools for data search, retrieval, and visualization for hypothesis development. PiiMS is deployed as a World Wide Web-enabled system, allowing for integration of distributed workflow processes and open access to raw data for analysis by numerous laboratories. PiiMS currently contains data on shoot concentrations of P, Ca, K, Mg, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn, Co, Ni, B, Se, Mo, Na, As, and Cd in over 60,000 shoot tissue samples of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), including ethyl methanesulfonate, fast-neutron and defined T-DNA mutants, and natural accession and populations of recombinant inbred lines from over 800 separate experiments, representing over 1,000,000 fully quantitative elemental concentrations. PiiMS is accessible at www.purdue.edu/dp/ionomics. PMID:17189337

  18. An Efficient Workflow Environment to Support the Collaborative Development of Actionable Climate Information Using the NCAR Climate Risk Management Engine (CRMe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, C. M.; Vigh, J. L.; Lee, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Society's growing needs for robust and relevant climate information have fostered an explosion in tools and frameworks for processing climate projections. Many top-down workflows might be employed to generate sets of pre-computed data and plots, frequently served in a "loading-dock style" through a metadata-enabled search and discovery engine. Despite these increasing resources, the diverse needs of applications-driven projects often result in data processing workflow requirements that cannot be fully satisfied using past approaches. In parallel to the data processing challenges, the provision of climate information to users in a form that is also usable represents a formidable challenge of its own. Finally, many users do not have the time nor the desire to synthesize and distill massive volumes of climate information to find the relevant information for their particular application. All of these considerations call for new approaches to developing actionable climate information. CRMe seeks to bridge the gap between the diversity and richness of bottom-up needs of practitioners, with discrete, structured top-down workflows typically implemented for rapid delivery. Additionally, CRMe has implemented web-based data services capable of providing focused climate information in usable form for a given location, or as spatially aggregated information for entire regions or countries following the needs of users and sectors. Making climate data actionable also involves summarizing and presenting it in concise and approachable ways. CRMe is developing the concept of dashboards, co-developed with the users, to condense the key information into a quick summary of the most relevant, curated climate data for a given discipline, application, or location, while still enabling users to efficiently conduct deeper discovery into rich datasets on an as-needed basis.

  19. MAAMD: a workflow to standardize meta-analyses and comparison of affymetrix microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mandatory deposit of raw microarray data files for public access, prior to study publication, provides significant opportunities to conduct new bioinformatics analyses within and across multiple datasets. Analysis of raw microarray data files (e.g. Affymetrix CEL files) can be time consuming, complex, and requires fundamental computational and bioinformatics skills. The development of analytical workflows to automate these tasks simplifies the processing of, improves the efficiency of, and serves to standardize multiple and sequential analyses. Once installed, workflows facilitate the tedious steps required to run rapid intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. Results We developed a workflow to facilitate and standardize Meta-Analysis of Affymetrix Microarray Data analysis (MAAMD) in Kepler. Two freely available stand-alone software tools, R and AltAnalyze were embedded in MAAMD. The inputs of MAAMD are user-editable csv files, which contain sample information and parameters describing the locations of input files and required tools. MAAMD was tested by analyzing 4 different GEO datasets from mice and drosophila. MAAMD automates data downloading, data organization, data quality control assesment, differential gene expression analysis, clustering analysis, pathway visualization, gene-set enrichment analysis, and cross-species orthologous-gene comparisons. MAAMD was utilized to identify gene orthologues responding to hypoxia or hyperoxia in both mice and drosophila. The entire set of analyses for 4 datasets (34 total microarrays) finished in ~ one hour. Conclusions MAAMD saves time, minimizes the required computer skills, and offers a standardized procedure for users to analyze microarray datasets and make new intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. PMID:24621103

  20. The TimeStudio Project: An open source scientific workflow system for the behavioral and brain sciences.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Pär; Falck-Ytter, Terje; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a new open source scientific workflow system, the TimeStudio Project, dedicated to the behavioral and brain sciences. The program is written in MATLAB and features a graphical user interface for the dynamic pipelining of computer algorithms developed as TimeStudio plugins. TimeStudio includes both a set of general plugins (for reading data files, modifying data structures, visualizing data structures, etc.) and a set of plugins specifically developed for the analysis of event-related eyetracking data as a proof of concept. It is possible to create custom plugins to integrate new or existing MATLAB code anywhere in a workflow, making TimeStudio a flexible workbench for organizing and performing a wide range of analyses. The system also features an integrated sharing and archiving tool for TimeStudio workflows, which can be used to share workflows both during the data analysis phase and after scientific publication. TimeStudio thus facilitates the reproduction and replication of scientific studies, increases the transparency of analyses, and reduces individual researchers' analysis workload. The project website ( http://timestudioproject.com ) contains the latest releases of TimeStudio, together with documentation and user forums.

  1. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP) miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM) v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf) results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p<0.05) gene targets in BRM indicates that nicotine exposure disrupts genes involved in neurogenesis, possibly through misregulation of nicotine-sensitive miRNAs. Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis

  2. Vehicle Thermal Management Models and Tools | Transportation Research |

    Science.gov Websites

    NREL Models and Tools Vehicle Thermal Management Models and Tools The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) vehicle thermal management modeling tools allow researchers to assess the trade-offs and calculate the potential benefits of thermal design options. image of three models of semi truck cabs. Truck

  3. An Adaptable Seismic Data Format for Modern Scientific Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Podhorszki, N.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Data storage, exchange, and access play a critical role in modern seismology. Current seismic data formats, such as SEED, SAC, and SEG-Y, were designed with specific applications in mind and are frequently a major bottleneck in implementing efficient workflows. We propose a new modern parallel format that can be adapted for a variety of seismic workflows. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) features high-performance parallel read and write support and the ability to store an arbitrary number of traces of varying sizes. Provenance information is stored inside the file so that users know the origin of the data as well as the precise operations that have been applied to the waveforms. The design of the new format is based on several real-world use cases, including earthquake seismology and seismic interferometry. The metadata is based on the proven XML schemas StationXML and QuakeML. Existing time-series analysis tool-kits are easily interfaced with this new format so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages, such as ObsPy and the SAC library. ADIOS, netCDF4, and HDF5 can be used as the underlying container format. At Princeton University, we have chosen to use ADIOS as the container format because it has shown superior scalability for certain applications, such as dealing with big data on HPC systems. In the context of high-performance computing, we have implemented ASDF into the global adjoint tomography workflow on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's supercomputer Titan.

  4. ESO Reflex: a graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Richard; Ullgrén, Marko; Romaniello, Martino; Maisala, Sami; Oittinen, Tero; Solin, Otto; Savolainen, Ville; Järveläinen, Pekka; Tyynelä, Jani; Péron, Michèle; Ballester, Pascal; Gabasch, Armin; Izzo, Carlo

    ESO Reflex is a prototype software tool that provides a novel approach to astronomical data reduction by integrating a modern graphical workflow system (Taverna) with existing legacy data reduction algorithms. Most of the raw data produced by instruments at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile are reduced using recipes. These are compiled C applications following an ESO standard and utilising routines provided by the Common Pipeline Library (CPL). Currently these are run in batch mode as part of the data flow system to generate the input to the ESO/VLT quality control process and are also exported for use offline. ESO Reflex can invoke CPL-based recipes in a flexible way through a general purpose graphical interface. ESO Reflex is based on the Taverna system that was originally developed within the UK life-sciences community. Workflows have been created so far for three VLT/VLTI instruments, and the GUI allows the user to make changes to these or create workflows of their own. Python scripts or IDL procedures can be easily brought into workflows and a variety of visualisation and display options, including custom product inspection and validation steps, are available. Taverna is intended for use with web services and experiments using ESO Reflex to access Virtual Observatory web services have been successfully performed. ESO Reflex is the main product developed by Sampo, a project led by ESO and conducted by a software development team from Finland as an in-kind contribution to joining ESO. The goal was to look into the needs of the ESO community in the area of data reduction environments and to create pilot software products that illustrate critical steps along the road to a new system. Sampo concluded early in 2008. This contribution will describe ESO Reflex and show several examples of its use both locally and using Virtual Observatory remote web services. ESO Reflex is expected to be released to the community in early 2009.

  5. ESO Reflex: A Graphical Workflow Engine for Data Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, R.; Romaniello, M.; Péron, M.; Ballester, P.; Gabasch, A.; Izzo, C.; Ullgrén, M.; Maisala, S.; Oittinen, T.; Solin, O.; Savolainen, V.; Järveläinen, P.; Tyynelä, J.

    2008-08-01

    Sampo {http://www.eso.org/sampo} (Hook et al. 2005) is a project led by ESO and conducted by a software development team from Finland as an in-kind contribution to joining ESO. The goal is to assess the needs of the ESO community in the area of data reduction environments and to create pilot software products that illustrate critical steps along the road to a new system. Those prototypes will not only be used to validate concepts and understand requirements but will also be tools of immediate value for the community. Most of the raw data produced by ESO instruments can be reduced using CPL {http://www.eso.org/cpl} recipes: compiled C programs following an ESO standard and utilizing routines provided by the Common Pipeline Library. Currently reduction recipes are run in batch mode as part of the data flow system to generate the input to the ESO VLT/VLTI quality control process and are also made public for external users. Sampo has developed a prototype application called ESO Reflex {http://www.eso.org/sampo/reflex/} that integrates a graphical user interface and existing data reduction algorithms. ESO Reflex can invoke CPL-based recipes in a flexible way through a dedicated interface. ESO Reflex is based on the graphical workflow engine Taverna {http://taverna.sourceforge.net} that was originally developed by the UK eScience community, mostly for work in the life sciences. Workflows have been created so far for three VLT/VLTI instrument modes ( VIMOS/IFU {http://www.eso.org/instruments/vimos/}, FORS spectroscopy {http://www.eso.org/instruments/fors/} and AMBER {http://www.eso.org/instruments/amber/}), and the easy-to-use GUI allows the user to make changes to these or create workflows of their own. Python scripts and IDL procedures can be easily brought into workflows and a variety of visualisation and display options, including custom product inspection and validation steps, are available.

  6. Differential gene expression in the siphonophore Nanomia bijuga (Cnidaria) assessed with multiple next-generation sequencing workflows.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Stefan; Robinson, Mark D; Tintori, Sophia C; Goetz, Freya; Helm, Rebecca R; Smith, Stephen A; Shaner, Nathan; Haddock, Steven H D; Dunn, Casey W

    2011-01-01

    We investigated differential gene expression between functionally specialized feeding polyps and swimming medusae in the siphonophore Nanomia bijuga (Cnidaria) with a hybrid long-read/short-read sequencing strategy. We assembled a set of partial gene reference sequences from long-read data (Roche 454), and generated short-read sequences from replicated tissue samples that were mapped to the references to quantify expression. We collected and compared expression data with three short-read expression workflows that differ in sample preparation, sequencing technology, and mapping tools. These workflows were Illumina mRNA-Seq, which generates sequence reads from random locations along each transcript, and two tag-based approaches, SOLiD SAGE and Helicos DGE, which generate reads from particular tag sites. Differences in expression results across workflows were mostly due to the differential impact of missing data in the partial reference sequences. When all 454-derived gene reference sequences were considered, Illumina mRNA-Seq detected more than twice as many differentially expressed (DE) reference sequences as the tag-based workflows. This discrepancy was largely due to missing tag sites in the partial reference that led to false negatives in the tag-based workflows. When only the subset of reference sequences that unambiguously have tag sites was considered, we found broad congruence across workflows, and they all identified a similar set of DE sequences. Our results are promising in several regards for gene expression studies in non-model organisms. First, we demonstrate that a hybrid long-read/short-read sequencing strategy is an effective way to collect gene expression data when an annotated genome sequence is not available. Second, our replicated sampling indicates that expression profiles are highly consistent across field-collected animals in this case. Third, the impacts of partial reference sequences on the ability to detect DE can be mitigated through

  7. Differential Gene Expression in the Siphonophore Nanomia bijuga (Cnidaria) Assessed with Multiple Next-Generation Sequencing Workflows

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Stefan; Robinson, Mark D.; Tintori, Sophia C.; Goetz, Freya; Helm, Rebecca R.; Smith, Stephen A.; Shaner, Nathan; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Dunn, Casey W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated differential gene expression between functionally specialized feeding polyps and swimming medusae in the siphonophore Nanomia bijuga (Cnidaria) with a hybrid long-read/short-read sequencing strategy. We assembled a set of partial gene reference sequences from long-read data (Roche 454), and generated short-read sequences from replicated tissue samples that were mapped to the references to quantify expression. We collected and compared expression data with three short-read expression workflows that differ in sample preparation, sequencing technology, and mapping tools. These workflows were Illumina mRNA-Seq, which generates sequence reads from random locations along each transcript, and two tag-based approaches, SOLiD SAGE and Helicos DGE, which generate reads from particular tag sites. Differences in expression results across workflows were mostly due to the differential impact of missing data in the partial reference sequences. When all 454-derived gene reference sequences were considered, Illumina mRNA-Seq detected more than twice as many differentially expressed (DE) reference sequences as the tag-based workflows. This discrepancy was largely due to missing tag sites in the partial reference that led to false negatives in the tag-based workflows. When only the subset of reference sequences that unambiguously have tag sites was considered, we found broad congruence across workflows, and they all identified a similar set of DE sequences. Our results are promising in several regards for gene expression studies in non-model organisms. First, we demonstrate that a hybrid long-read/short-read sequencing strategy is an effective way to collect gene expression data when an annotated genome sequence is not available. Second, our replicated sampling indicates that expression profiles are highly consistent across field-collected animals in this case. Third, the impacts of partial reference sequences on the ability to detect DE can be mitigated through

  8. Supporting the annotation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) phenotypes with text mining workflows.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Rak, Rafal; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-threatening lung disorder whose recent prevalence has led to an increasing burden on public healthcare. Phenotypic information in electronic clinical records is essential in providing suitable personalised treatment to patients with COPD. However, as phenotypes are often "hidden" within free text in clinical records, clinicians could benefit from text mining systems that facilitate their prompt recognition. This paper reports on a semi-automatic methodology for producing a corpus that can ultimately support the development of text mining tools that, in turn, will expedite the process of identifying groups of COPD patients. A corpus of 30 full-text papers was formed based on selection criteria informed by the expertise of COPD specialists. We developed an annotation scheme that is aimed at producing fine-grained, expressive and computable COPD annotations without burdening our curators with a highly complicated task. This was implemented in the Argo platform by means of a semi-automatic annotation workflow that integrates several text mining tools, including a graphical user interface for marking up documents. When evaluated using gold standard (i.e., manually validated) annotations, the semi-automatic workflow was shown to obtain a micro-averaged F-score of 45.70% (with relaxed matching). Utilising the gold standard data to train new concept recognisers, we demonstrated that our corpus, although still a work in progress, can foster the development of significantly better performing COPD phenotype extractors. We describe in this work the means by which we aim to eventually support the process of COPD phenotype curation, i.e., by the application of various text mining tools integrated into an annotation workflow. Although the corpus being described is still under development, our results thus far are encouraging and show great potential in stimulating the development of further automatic COPD phenotype extractors.

  9. Integrate Data into Scientific Workflows for Terrestrial Biosphere Model Evaluation through Brokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Cook, R. B.; Du, F.; Dasgupta, A.; Poco, J.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Schwalm, C. R.; Boldrini, E.; Santoro, M.; Pearlman, J.; Pearlman, F.; Nativi, S.; Khalsa, S.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become integral tools for extrapolating local observations and process-level understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. Model-model and model-observation intercomparisons are critical to understand the uncertainties within model outputs, to improve model skill, and to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange. The DataONE Exploration, Visualization, and Analysis (EVA) working group is evaluating TBMs using scientific workflows in UV-CDAT/VisTrails. This workflow-based approach promotes collaboration and improved tracking of evaluation provenance. But challenges still remain. The multi-scale and multi-discipline nature of TBMs makes it necessary to include diverse and distributed data resources in model evaluation. These include, among others, remote sensing data from NASA, flux tower observations from various organizations including DOE, and inventory data from US Forest Service. A key challenge is to make heterogeneous data from different organizations and disciplines discoverable and readily integrated for use in scientific workflows. This presentation introduces the brokering approach taken by the DataONE EVA to fill the gap between TBMs' evaluation scientific workflows and cross-organization and cross-discipline data resources. The DataONE EVA started the development of an Integrated Model Intercomparison Framework (IMIF) that leverages standards-based discovery and access brokers to dynamically discover, access, and transform (e.g. subset and resampling) diverse data products from DataONE, Earth System Grid (ESG), and other data repositories into a format that can be readily used by scientific workflows in UV-CDAT/VisTrails. The discovery and access brokers serve as an independent middleware that bridge existing data repositories and TBMs evaluation scientific workflows but introduce little overhead to either component. In the initial work, an OpenSearch-based discovery broker

  10. Multi-level meta-workflows: new concept for regularly occurring tasks in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Junaid; Hoffmann, Alexander; Gesing, Sandra; Grunzke, Richard; Krüger, Jens; Kiss, Tamas; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja; Terstyanszky, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    In Quantum Chemistry, many tasks are reoccurring frequently, e.g. geometry optimizations, benchmarking series etc. Here, workflows can help to reduce the time of manual job definition and output extraction. These workflows are executed on computing infrastructures and may require large computing and data resources. Scientific workflows hide these infrastructures and the resources needed to run them. It requires significant efforts and specific expertise to design, implement and test these workflows. Many of these workflows are complex and monolithic entities that can be used for particular scientific experiments. Hence, their modification is not straightforward and it makes almost impossible to share them. To address these issues we propose developing atomic workflows and embedding them in meta-workflows. Atomic workflows deliver a well-defined research domain specific function. Publishing workflows in repositories enables workflow sharing inside and/or among scientific communities. We formally specify atomic and meta-workflows in order to define data structures to be used in repositories for uploading and sharing them. Additionally, we present a formal description focused at orchestration of atomic workflows into meta-workflows. We investigated the operations that represent basic functionalities in Quantum Chemistry, developed the relevant atomic workflows and combined them into meta-workflows. Having these workflows we defined the structure of the Quantum Chemistry workflow library and uploaded these workflows in the SHIWA Workflow Repository.Graphical AbstractMeta-workflows and embedded workflows in the template representation.

  11. Integrating advanced visualization technology into the planetary Geoscience workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, John; Forsberg, Andrew; Loomis, Andrew; Head, James; Dickson, James; Fassett, Caleb

    2011-09-01

    Recent advances in computer visualization have allowed us to develop new tools for analyzing the data gathered during planetary missions, which is important, since these data sets have grown exponentially in recent years to tens of terabytes in size. As part of the Advanced Visualization in Solar System Exploration and Research (ADVISER) project, we utilize several advanced visualization techniques created specifically with planetary image data in mind. The Geoviewer application allows real-time active stereo display of images, which in aggregate have billions of pixels. The ADVISER desktop application platform allows fast three-dimensional visualization of planetary images overlain on digital terrain models. Both applications include tools for easy data ingest and real-time analysis in a programmatic manner. Incorporation of these tools into our everyday scientific workflow has proved important for scientific analysis, discussion, and publication, and enabled effective and exciting educational activities for students from high school through graduate school.

  12. An access control model with high security for distributed workflow and real-time application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ruo-Fei; Wang, Hou-Xiang

    2007-11-01

    The traditional mandatory access control policy (MAC) is regarded as a policy with strict regulation and poor flexibility. The security policy of MAC is so compelling that few information systems would adopt it at the cost of facility, except some particular cases with high security requirement as military or government application. However, with the increasing requirement for flexibility, even some access control systems in military application have switched to role-based access control (RBAC) which is well known as flexible. Though RBAC can meet the demands for flexibility but it is weak in dynamic authorization and consequently can not fit well in the workflow management systems. The task-role-based access control (T-RBAC) is then introduced to solve the problem. It combines both the advantages of RBAC and task-based access control (TBAC) which uses task to manage permissions dynamically. To satisfy the requirement of system which is distributed, well defined with workflow process and critically for time accuracy, this paper will analyze the spirit of MAC, introduce it into the improved T&RBAC model which is based on T-RBAC. At last, a conceptual task-role-based access control model with high security for distributed workflow and real-time application (A_T&RBAC) is built, and its performance is simply analyzed.

  13. AutoDrug: fully automated macromolecular crystallography workflows for fragment-based drug discovery

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tsai, Yingssu; Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Mudd Building, Stanford, CA 94305-5080; McPhillips, Scott E.

    New software has been developed for automating the experimental and data-processing stages of fragment-based drug discovery at a macromolecular crystallography beamline. A new workflow-automation framework orchestrates beamline-control and data-analysis software while organizing results from multiple samples. AutoDrug is software based upon the scientific workflow paradigm that integrates the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource macromolecular crystallography beamlines and third-party processing software to automate the crystallography steps of the fragment-based drug-discovery process. AutoDrug screens a cassette of fragment-soaked crystals, selects crystals for data collection based on screening results and user-specified criteria and determines optimal data-collection strategies. It then collects and processes diffraction data,more » performs molecular replacement using provided models and detects electron density that is likely to arise from bound fragments. All processes are fully automated, i.e. are performed without user interaction or supervision. Samples can be screened in groups corresponding to particular proteins, crystal forms and/or soaking conditions. A single AutoDrug run is only limited by the capacity of the sample-storage dewar at the beamline: currently 288 samples. AutoDrug was developed in conjunction with RestFlow, a new scientific workflow-automation framework. RestFlow simplifies the design of AutoDrug by managing the flow of data and the organization of results and by orchestrating the execution of computational pipeline steps. It also simplifies the execution and interaction of third-party programs and the beamline-control system. Modeling AutoDrug as a scientific workflow enables multiple variants that meet the requirements of different user groups to be developed and supported. A workflow tailored to mimic the crystallography stages comprising the drug-discovery pipeline of CoCrystal Discovery Inc. has been deployed and

  14. Workflow and web application for annotating NCBI BioProject transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Medeiros Vidal, Newton; Garzón-Martínez, Gina A; Barrero, Luz S; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    The volume of transcriptome data is growing exponentially due to rapid improvement of experimental technologies. In response, large central resources such as those of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) are continually adapting their computational infrastructure to accommodate this large influx of data. New and specialized databases, such as Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly Sequence Database (TSA) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), have been created to aid the development and expansion of centralized repositories. Although the central resource databases are under continual development, they do not include automatic pipelines to increase annotation of newly deposited data. Therefore, third-party applications are required to achieve that aim. Here, we present an automatic workflow and web application for the annotation of transcriptome data. The workflow creates secondary data such as sequencing reads and BLAST alignments, which are available through the web application. They are based on freely available bioinformatics tools and scripts developed in-house. The interactive web application provides a search engine and several browser utilities. Graphical views of transcript alignments are available through SeqViewer, an embedded tool developed by NCBI for viewing biological sequence data. The web application is tightly integrated with other NCBI web applications and tools to extend the functionality of data processing and interconnectivity. We present a case study for the species Physalis peruviana with data generated from BioProject ID 67621. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/physalis/. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Understanding and Visualizing Multitasking and Task Switching Activities: A Time Motion Study to Capture Nursing Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Po-Yin; Kelley, Marjorie; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Rosado, Amber L.; Migliore, Elaina M.; Chipps, Esther M.; Buck, Jacalyn

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of multitasking within nursing workflow is important in today’s dynamic and complex healthcare environment. We conducted a time motion study to understand nursing workflow, specifically multitasking and task switching activities. We used TimeCaT, a comprehensive electronic time capture tool, to capture observational data. We established inter-observer reliability prior to data collection. We completed 56 hours of observation of 10 registered nurses. We found, on average, nurses had 124 communications and 208 hands-on tasks per 4-hour block of time. They multitasked (having communication and hands-on tasks simultaneously) 131 times, representing 39.48% of all times; the total multitasking duration ranges from 14.6 minutes to 109 minutes, 44.98 minutes (18.63%) on average. We also reviewed workflow visualization to uncover the multitasking events. Our study design and methods provide a practical and reliable approach to conducting and analyzing time motion studies from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. PMID:28269924

  16. Understanding and Visualizing Multitasking and Task Switching Activities: A Time Motion Study to Capture Nursing Workflow.

    PubMed

    Yen, Po-Yin; Kelley, Marjorie; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Rosado, Amber L; Migliore, Elaina M; Chipps, Esther M; Buck, Jacalyn

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of multitasking within nursing workflow is important in today's dynamic and complex healthcare environment. We conducted a time motion study to understand nursing workflow, specifically multitasking and task switching activities. We used TimeCaT, a comprehensive electronic time capture tool, to capture observational data. We established inter-observer reliability prior to data collection. We completed 56 hours of observation of 10 registered nurses. We found, on average, nurses had 124 communications and 208 hands-on tasks per 4-hour block of time. They multitasked (having communication and hands-on tasks simultaneously) 131 times, representing 39.48% of all times; the total multitasking duration ranges from 14.6 minutes to 109 minutes, 44.98 minutes (18.63%) on average. We also reviewed workflow visualization to uncover the multitasking events. Our study design and methods provide a practical and reliable approach to conducting and analyzing time motion studies from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives.

  17. Software management tools: Lessons learned from use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifer, D. J.; Valett, J.; Knight, J.; Wenneson, G.

    1985-01-01

    Experience in inserting software project planning tools into more than 100 projects producing mission critical software are discussed. The problems the software project manager faces are listed along with methods and tools available to handle them. Experience is reported with the Project Manager's Workstation (PMW) and the SoftCost-R cost estimating package. Finally, the results of a survey, which looked at what could be done in the future to overcome the problems experienced and build a set of truly useful tools, are presented.

  18. Metagenomics workflow analysis of endophytic bacteria from oil palm fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjung, Z. A.; Aditama, R.; Sudania, W. M.; Utomo, C.; Liwang, T.

    2017-05-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) has become a powerful sequencing tool for microbial study especially to lead the establishment of the field area of metagenomics. This study described a workflow to analyze metagenomics data of a Sequence Read Archive (SRA) file under accession ERP004286 deposited by University of Sao Paulo. It was a direct sequencing data generated by 454 pyrosequencing platform originated from oil palm fruits endophytic bacteria which were cultured using oil-palm enriched medium. This workflow used SortMeRNA to split ribosomal reads sequence, Newbler (GS Assembler and GS Mapper) to assemble and map reads into genome reference, BLAST package to identify and annotate contigs sequence, and QualiMap for statistical analysis. Eight bacterial species were identified in this study. Enterobacter cloacae was the most abundant species followed by Citrobacter koseri, Seratia marcescens, Latococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter amalonaticus, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Pseudomonas sp. respectively. All of these species have been reported as endophyte bacteria in various plant species and each has potential as plant growth promoting bacteria or another application in agricultural industries.

  19. Improving adherence to the Epic Beacon ambulatory workflow.

    PubMed

    Chackunkal, Ellen; Dhanapal Vogel, Vishnuprabha; Grycki, Meredith; Kostoff, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Computerized physician order entry has been shown to significantly improve chemotherapy safety by reducing the number of prescribing errors. Epic's Beacon Oncology Information System of computerized physician order entry and electronic medication administration was implemented in Henry Ford Health System's ambulatory oncology infusion centers on 9 November 2013. Since that time, compliance to the infusion workflow had not been assessed. The objective of this study was to optimize the current workflow and improve the compliance to this workflow in the ambulatory oncology setting. This study was a retrospective, quasi-experimental study which analyzed the composite workflow compliance rate of patient encounters from 9 to 23 November 2014. Based on this analysis, an intervention was identified and implemented in February 2015 to improve workflow compliance. The primary endpoint was to compare the composite compliance rate to the Beacon workflow before and after a pharmacy-initiated intervention. The intervention, which was education of infusion center staff, was initiated by ambulatory-based, oncology pharmacists and implemented by a multi-disciplinary team of pharmacists and nurses. The composite compliance rate was then reassessed for patient encounters from 2 to 13 March 2015 in order to analyze the effects of the determined intervention on compliance. The initial analysis in November 2014 revealed a composite compliance rate of 38%, and data analysis after the intervention revealed a statistically significant increase in the composite compliance rate to 83% ( p < 0.001). This study supports a pharmacist-initiated educational intervention can improve compliance to an ambulatory, oncology infusion workflow.

  20. BGDMdocker: a Docker workflow for data mining and visualization of bacterial pan-genomes and biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Lu, Quan; Ma, Ling; Zhang, Guocai; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Zongshan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Docker technology has received increasing attention throughout the bioinformatics community. However, its implementation has not yet been mastered by most biologists; accordingly, its application in biological research has been limited. In order to popularize this technology in the field of bioinformatics and to promote the use of publicly available bioinformatics tools, such as Dockerfiles and Images from communities, government sources, and private owners in the Docker Hub Registry and other Docker-based resources, we introduce here a complete and accurate bioinformatics workflow based on Docker. The present workflow enables analysis and visualization of pan-genomes and biosynthetic gene clusters of bacteria. This provides a new solution for bioinformatics mining of big data from various publicly available biological databases. The present step-by-step guide creates an integrative workflow through a Dockerfile to allow researchers to build their own Image and run Container easily.

  1. BGDMdocker: a Docker workflow for data mining and visualization of bacterial pan-genomes and biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Guocai; Xu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Docker technology has received increasing attention throughout the bioinformatics community. However, its implementation has not yet been mastered by most biologists; accordingly, its application in biological research has been limited. In order to popularize this technology in the field of bioinformatics and to promote the use of publicly available bioinformatics tools, such as Dockerfiles and Images from communities, government sources, and private owners in the Docker Hub Registry and other Docker-based resources, we introduce here a complete and accurate bioinformatics workflow based on Docker. The present workflow enables analysis and visualization of pan-genomes and biosynthetic gene clusters of bacteria. This provides a new solution for bioinformatics mining of big data from various publicly available biological databases. The present step-by-step guide creates an integrative workflow through a Dockerfile to allow researchers to build their own Image and run Container easily. PMID:29204317

  2. The standard-based open workflow system in GeoBrain (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, L.; Yu, G.; Zhao, P.; Deng, M.

    2013-12-01

    GeoBrain is an Earth science Web-service system developed and operated by the Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems, George Mason University. In GeoBrain, a standard-based open workflow system has been implemented to accommodate the automated processing of geospatial data through a set of complex geo-processing functions for advanced production generation. The GeoBrain models the complex geoprocessing at two levels, the conceptual and concrete. At the conceptual level, the workflows exist in the form of data and service types defined by ontologies. The workflows at conceptual level are called geo-processing models and cataloged in GeoBrain as virtual product types. A conceptual workflow is instantiated into a concrete, executable workflow when a user requests a product that matches a virtual product type. Both conceptual and concrete workflows are encoded in Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). A BPEL workflow engine, called BPELPower, has been implemented to execute the workflow for the product generation. A provenance capturing service has been implemented to generate the ISO 19115-compliant complete product provenance metadata before and after the workflow execution. The generation of provenance metadata before the workflow execution allows users to examine the usability of the final product before the lengthy and expensive execution takes place. The three modes of workflow executions defined in the ISO 19119, transparent, translucent, and opaque, are available in GeoBrain. A geoprocessing modeling portal has been developed to allow domain experts to develop geoprocessing models at the type level with the support of both data and service/processing ontologies. The geoprocessing models capture the knowledge of the domain experts and are become the operational offering of the products after a proper peer review of models is conducted. An automated workflow composition has been experimented successfully based on ontologies and artificial

  3. Safety and feasibility of STAT RAD: Improvement of a novel rapid tomotherapy-based radiation therapy workflow by failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan T; Handsfield, Lydia; Read, Paul W; Wilson, David D; Van Ausdal, Ray; Schlesinger, David J; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Chen, Quan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical challenge of radiation therapy (RT) for painful bone metastases requires clinicians to consider both treatment efficacy and patient prognosis when selecting a radiation therapy regimen. The traditional RT workflow requires several weeks for common palliative RT schedules of 30 Gy in 10 fractions or 20 Gy in 5 fractions. At our institution, we have created a new RT workflow termed "STAT RAD" that allows clinicians to perform computed tomographic (CT) simulation, planning, and highly conformal single fraction treatment delivery within 2 hours. In this study, we evaluate the safety and feasibility of the STAT RAD workflow. A failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was performed on the STAT RAD workflow, including development of a process map, identification of potential failure modes, description of the cause and effect, temporal occurrence, and team member involvement in each failure mode, and examination of existing safety controls. A risk probability number (RPN) was calculated for each failure mode. As necessary, workflow adjustments were then made to safeguard failure modes of significant RPN values. After workflow alterations, RPN numbers were again recomputed. A total of 72 potential failure modes were identified in the pre-FMEA STAT RAD workflow, of which 22 met the RPN threshold for clinical significance. Workflow adjustments included the addition of a team member checklist, changing simulation from megavoltage CT to kilovoltage CT, alteration of patient-specific quality assurance testing, and allocating increased time for critical workflow steps. After these modifications, only 1 failure mode maintained RPN significance; patient motion after alignment or during treatment. Performing the FMEA for the STAT RAD workflow before clinical implementation has significantly strengthened the safety and feasibility of STAT RAD. The FMEA proved a valuable evaluation tool, identifying potential problem areas so that we could create a safer workflow

  4. Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) Webinar

    EPA Science Inventory

    This webinar will highlight version 3 of EPA’s Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST). WMOST facilitates implementation of integrated water management by communities, utilities, watershed management organizations, consultants, and others. There can be many o...

  5. Impact of digital radiography on clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    May, G A; Deer, D D; Dackiewicz, D

    2000-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that digital radiography (DR) improves workflow and patient throughput compared with traditional film radiography or computed radiography (CR). DR eliminates the film development step and the time to acquire the image from a CR reader. In addition, the wide dynamic range of DR is such that the technologist can perform the quality-control (QC) step directly at the modality in a few seconds, rather than having to transport the newly acquired image to a centralized QC station for review. Furthermore, additional workflow efficiencies can be achieved with DR by employing tight radiology information system (RIS) integration. In the DR imaging environment, this provides for patient demographic information to be automatically downloaded from the RIS to populate the DR Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image header. To learn more about this workflow efficiency improvement, we performed a comparative study of workflow steps under three different conditions: traditional film/screen x-ray, DR without RIS integration (ie, manual entry of patient demographics), and DR with RIS integration. This study was performed at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (Cleveland, OH) using a newly acquired amorphous silicon flat-panel DR system from Canon Medical Systems (Irvine, CA). Our data show that DR without RIS results in substantial workflow savings over traditional film/screen practice. There is an additional 30% reduction in total examination time using DR with RIS integration.

  6. A web accessible scientific workflow system for vadoze zone performance monitoring: design and implementation examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, E.; Versteeg, R.; Ankeny, M.; Stormberg, G.

    2005-12-01

    Long term performance monitoring has been identified by DOE, DOD and EPA as one of the most challenging and costly elements of contaminated site remedial efforts. Such monitoring should provide timely and actionable information relevant to a multitude of stakeholder needs. This information should be obtained in a manner which is auditable, cost effective and transparent. Over the last several years INL staff has designed and implemented a web accessible scientific workflow system for environmental monitoring. This workflow environment integrates distributed, automated data acquisition from diverse sensors (geophysical, geochemical and hydrological) with server side data management and information visualization through flexible browser based data access tools. Component technologies include a rich browser-based client (using dynamic javascript and html/css) for data selection, a back-end server which uses PHP for data processing, user management, and result delivery, and third party applications which are invoked by the back-end using webservices. This system has been implemented and is operational for several sites, including the Ruby Gulch Waste Rock Repository (a capped mine waste rock dump on the Gilt Edge Mine Superfund Site), the INL Vadoze Zone Research Park and an alternative cover landfill. Implementations for other vadoze zone sites are currently in progress. These systems allow for autonomous performance monitoring through automated data analysis and report generation. This performance monitoring has allowed users to obtain insights into system dynamics, regulatory compliance and residence times of water. Our system uses modular components for data selection and graphing and WSDL compliant webservices for external functions such as statistical analyses and model invocations. Thus, implementing this system for novel sites and extending functionality (e.g. adding novel models) is relatively straightforward. As system access requires a standard webbrowser

  7. An Internet supported workflow for the publication process in UMVF (French Virtual Medical University).

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-Marie; Bourde, Annabel; Cuggia, Marc; Garcelon, Nicolas; Souf, Nathalie; Darmoni, Stephan; Beuscart, Régis; Brunetaud, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    The " Université Médicale Virtuelle Francophone" (UMVF) is a federation of French medical schools. Its main goal is to share the production and use of pedagogic medical resources generated by academic medical teachers. We developed an Open-Source application based upon a workflow system, which provides an improved publication process for the UMVF. For teachers, the tool permits easy and efficient upload of new educational resources. For web masters it provides a mechanism to easily locate and validate the resources. For librarian it provide a way to improve the efficiency of indexation. For all, the utility provides a workflow system to control the publication process. On the students side, the application improves the value of the UMVF repository by facilitating the publication of new resources and by providing an easy way to find a detailed description of a resource and to check any resource from the UMVF to ascertain its quality and integrity, even if the resource is an old deprecated version. The server tier of the application is used to implement the main workflow functionalities and is deployed on certified UMVF servers using the PHP language, an LDAP directory and an SQL database. The client tier of the application provides both the workflow and the search and check functionalities. A unique signature for each resource, was needed to provide security functionality and is implemented using a Digest algorithm. The testing performed by Rennes and Lille verified the functionality and conformity with our specifications.

  8. Conventions and workflows for using Situs

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wriggers, Willy, E-mail: wriggers@biomachina.org

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments of the Situs software suite for multi-scale modeling are reviewed. Typical workflows and conventions encountered during processing of biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering are described. Situs is a modular program package for the multi-scale modeling of atomic resolution structures and low-resolution biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering. This article provides an overview of recent developments in the Situs package, with an emphasis on workflows and conventions that are important for practical applications. The modular design of the programs facilitates scripting in the bash shell that allows specific programs tomore » be combined in creative ways that go beyond the original intent of the developers. Several scripting-enabled functionalities, such as flexible transformations of data type, the use of symmetry constraints or the creation of two-dimensional projection images, are described. The processing of low-resolution biophysical maps in such workflows follows not only first principles but often relies on implicit conventions. Situs conventions related to map formats, resolution, correlation functions and feature detection are reviewed and summarized. The compatibility of the Situs workflow with CCP4 conventions and programs is discussed.« less

  9. Standardizing clinical trials workflow representation in UML for international site comparison.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Jayanti, Madhav Kishore; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Kozan, Andreia M O; Rodrigues, Maria J; Shah, Jatin; Loures, Marco R; Patil, Sunita; Payne, Philip; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-11-09

    With the globalization of clinical trials, a growing emphasis has been placed on the standardization of the workflow in order to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the overall trial. Despite the importance of workflow evaluation, to our knowledge no previous studies have attempted to adapt existing modeling languages to standardize the representation of clinical trials. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a computational language that can be used to model operational workflow, and a UML profile can be developed to standardize UML models within a given domain. This paper's objective is to develop a UML profile to extend the UML Activity Diagram schema into the clinical trials domain, defining a standard representation for clinical trial workflow diagrams in UML. Two Brazilian clinical trial sites in rheumatology and oncology were examined to model their workflow and collect time-motion data. UML modeling was conducted in Eclipse, and a UML profile was developed to incorporate information used in discrete event simulation software. Ethnographic observation revealed bottlenecks in workflow: these included tasks requiring full commitment of CRCs, transferring notes from paper to computers, deviations from standard operating procedures, and conflicts between different IT systems. Time-motion analysis revealed that nurses' activities took up the most time in the workflow and contained a high frequency of shorter duration activities. Administrative assistants performed more activities near the beginning and end of the workflow. Overall, clinical trial tasks had a greater frequency than clinic routines or other general activities. This paper describes a method for modeling clinical trial workflow in UML and standardizing these workflow diagrams through a UML profile. In the increasingly global environment of clinical trials, the standardization of workflow modeling is a necessary precursor to conducting a comparative analysis of international clinical trials

  10. Standardizing Clinical Trials Workflow Representation in UML for International Site Comparison

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Jayanti, Madhav Kishore; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Kozan, Andreia M. O.; Rodrigues, Maria J.; Shah, Jatin; Loures, Marco R.; Patil, Sunita; Payne, Philip; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Background With the globalization of clinical trials, a growing emphasis has been placed on the standardization of the workflow in order to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the overall trial. Despite the importance of workflow evaluation, to our knowledge no previous studies have attempted to adapt existing modeling languages to standardize the representation of clinical trials. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a computational language that can be used to model operational workflow, and a UML profile can be developed to standardize UML models within a given domain. This paper's objective is to develop a UML profile to extend the UML Activity Diagram schema into the clinical trials domain, defining a standard representation for clinical trial workflow diagrams in UML. Methods Two Brazilian clinical trial sites in rheumatology and oncology were examined to model their workflow and collect time-motion data. UML modeling was conducted in Eclipse, and a UML profile was developed to incorporate information used in discrete event simulation software. Results Ethnographic observation revealed bottlenecks in workflow: these included tasks requiring full commitment of CRCs, transferring notes from paper to computers, deviations from standard operating procedures, and conflicts between different IT systems. Time-motion analysis revealed that nurses' activities took up the most time in the workflow and contained a high frequency of shorter duration activities. Administrative assistants performed more activities near the beginning and end of the workflow. Overall, clinical trial tasks had a greater frequency than clinic routines or other general activities. Conclusions This paper describes a method for modeling clinical trial workflow in UML and standardizing these workflow diagrams through a UML profile. In the increasingly global environment of clinical trials, the standardization of workflow modeling is a necessary precursor to conducting a comparative

  11. A case study on the impacts of computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system on hospital clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    Mominah, Maher; Yunus, Faisel; Househ, Mowafa S

    2013-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) is a health informatics system that helps health care providers create and manage orders for medications and other health care services. Through the automation of the ordering process, CPOE has improved the overall efficiency of hospital processes and workflow. In Saudi Arabia, CPOE has been used for years, with only a few studies evaluating the impacts of CPOE on clinical workflow. In this paper, we discuss the experience of a local hospital with the use of CPOE and its impacts on clinical workflow. Results show that there are many issues related to the implementation and use of CPOE within Saudi Arabia that must be addressed, including design, training, medication errors, alert fatigue, and system dep Recommendations for improving CPOE use within Saudi Arabia are also discussed.

  12. A workflow to process 3D+time microscopy images of developing organisms and reconstruct their cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Emmanuel; Savy, Thierry; Rizzi, Barbara; Melani, Camilo; Stašová, Olga; Fabrèges, Dimitri; Špir, Róbert; Hammons, Mark; Čúnderlík, Róbert; Recher, Gaëlle; Lombardot, Benoît; Duloquin, Louise; Colin, Ingrid; Kollár, Jozef; Desnoulez, Sophie; Affaticati, Pierre; Maury, Benoît; Boyreau, Adeline; Nief, Jean-Yves; Calvat, Pascal; Vernier, Philippe; Frain, Monique; Lutfalla, Georges; Kergosien, Yannick; Suret, Pierre; Remešíková, Mariana; Doursat, René; Sarti, Alessandro; Mikula, Karol; Peyriéras, Nadine; Bourgine, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative and systematic analysis of embryonic cell dynamics from in vivo 3D+time image data sets is a major challenge at the forefront of developmental biology. Despite recent breakthroughs in the microscopy imaging of living systems, producing an accurate cell lineage tree for any developing organism remains a difficult task. We present here the BioEmergences workflow integrating all reconstruction steps from image acquisition and processing to the interactive visualization of reconstructed data. Original mathematical methods and algorithms underlie image filtering, nucleus centre detection, nucleus and membrane segmentation, and cell tracking. They are demonstrated on zebrafish, ascidian and sea urchin embryos with stained nuclei and membranes. Subsequent validation and annotations are carried out using Mov-IT, a custom-made graphical interface. Compared with eight other software tools, our workflow achieved the best lineage score. Delivered in standalone or web service mode, BioEmergences and Mov-IT offer a unique set of tools for in silico experimental embryology. PMID:26912388

  13. Workflow Dynamics and the Imaging Value Chain: Quantifying the Effect of Designating a Nonimage-Interpretive Task Workflow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew H; Schemmel, Andrew J; Pooler, B Dustin; Hanley, Taylor; Kennedy, Tabassum A; Field, Aaron S; Wiegmann, Douglas; Yu, John-Paul J

    To assess the impact of separate non-image interpretive task and image-interpretive task workflows in an academic neuroradiology practice. A prospective, randomized, observational investigation of a centralized academic neuroradiology reading room was performed. The primary reading room fellow was observed over a one-month period using a time-and-motion methodology, recording frequency and duration of tasks performed. Tasks were categorized into separate image interpretive and non-image interpretive workflows. Post-intervention observation of the primary fellow was repeated following the implementation of a consult assistant responsible for non-image interpretive tasks. Pre- and post-intervention data were compared. Following separation of image-interpretive and non-image interpretive workflows, time spent on image-interpretive tasks by the primary fellow increased from 53.8% to 73.2% while non-image interpretive tasks decreased from 20.4% to 4.4%. Mean time duration of image interpretation nearly doubled, from 05:44 to 11:01 (p = 0.002). Decreases in specific non-image interpretive tasks, including phone calls/paging (2.86/hr versus 0.80/hr), in-room consultations (1.36/hr versus 0.80/hr), and protocoling (0.99/hr versus 0.10/hr), were observed. The consult assistant experienced 29.4 task switching events per hour. Rates of specific non-image interpretive tasks for the CA were 6.41/hr for phone calls/paging, 3.60/hr for in-room consultations, and 3.83/hr for protocoling. Separating responsibilities into NIT and IIT workflows substantially increased image interpretation time and decreased TSEs for the primary fellow. Consolidation of NITs into a separate workflow may allow for more efficient task completion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. TCGA Workflow: Analyze cancer genomics and epigenomics data using Bioconductor packages

    PubMed Central

    Bontempi, Gianluca; Ceccarelli, Michele; Noushmehr, Houtan

    2016-01-01

    Biotechnological advances in sequencing have led to an explosion of publicly available data via large international consortia such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), and The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Mapping Consortium (Roadmap). These projects have provided unprecedented opportunities to interrogate the epigenome of cultured cancer cell lines as well as normal and tumor tissues with high genomic resolution. The Bioconductor project offers more than 1,000 open-source software and statistical packages to analyze high-throughput genomic data. However, most packages are designed for specific data types (e.g. expression, epigenetics, genomics) and there is no one comprehensive tool that provides a complete integrative analysis of the resources and data provided by all three public projects. A need to create an integration of these different analyses was recently proposed. In this workflow, we provide a series of biologically focused integrative analyses of different molecular data. We describe how to download, process and prepare TCGA data and by harnessing several key Bioconductor packages, we describe how to extract biologically meaningful genomic and epigenomic data. Using Roadmap and ENCODE data, we provide a work plan to identify biologically relevant functional epigenomic elements associated with cancer. To illustrate our workflow, we analyzed two types of brain tumors: low-grade glioma (LGG) versus high-grade glioma (glioblastoma multiform or GBM). This workflow introduces the following Bioconductor packages: AnnotationHub, ChIPSeeker, ComplexHeatmap, pathview, ELMER, GAIA, MINET, RTCGAToolbox,  TCGAbiolinks. PMID:28232861

  15. TCGA Workflow: Analyze cancer genomics and epigenomics data using Bioconductor packages.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago C; Colaprico, Antonio; Olsen, Catharina; D'Angelo, Fulvio; Bontempi, Gianluca; Ceccarelli, Michele; Noushmehr, Houtan

    2016-01-01

    Biotechnological advances in sequencing have led to an explosion of publicly available data via large international consortia such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), and The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Mapping Consortium (Roadmap). These projects have provided unprecedented opportunities to interrogate the epigenome of cultured cancer cell lines as well as normal and tumor tissues with high genomic resolution. The Bioconductor project offers more than 1,000 open-source software and statistical packages to analyze high-throughput genomic data. However, most packages are designed for specific data types (e.g. expression, epigenetics, genomics) and there is no one comprehensive tool that provides a complete integrative analysis of the resources and data provided by all three public projects. A need to create an integration of these different analyses was recently proposed. In this workflow, we provide a series of biologically focused integrative analyses of different molecular data. We describe how to download, process and prepare TCGA data and by harnessing several key Bioconductor packages, we describe how to extract biologically meaningful genomic and epigenomic data. Using Roadmap and ENCODE data, we provide a work plan to identify biologically relevant functional epigenomic elements associated with cancer. To illustrate our workflow, we analyzed two types of brain tumors: low-grade glioma (LGG) versus high-grade glioma (glioblastoma multiform or GBM). This workflow introduces the following Bioconductor packages: AnnotationHub, ChIPSeeker, ComplexHeatmap, pathview, ELMER, GAIA, MINET, RTCGAToolbox,  TCGAbiolinks.

  16. The complete digital workflow in fixed prosthodontics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joda, Tim; Zarone, Fernando; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-09-19

    generation, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting, and other bias using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. A judgment of risk of bias was assigned if one or more key domains had a high or unclear risk of bias. An official registration of the systematic review was not performed. The systematic search identified 67 titles, 32 abstracts thereof were screened, and subsequently, three full-texts included for data extraction. Analysed RCTs were heterogeneous without follow-up. One study demonstrated that fully digitally produced dental crowns revealed the feasibility of the process itself; however, the marginal precision was lower for lithium disilicate (LS2) restorations (113.8 μm) compared to conventional metal-ceramic (92.4 μm) and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) crowns (68.5 μm) (p < 0.05). Another study showed that leucite-reinforced glass ceramic crowns were esthetically favoured by the patients (8/2 crowns) and clinicians (7/3 crowns) (p < 0.05). The third study investigated implant crowns. The complete digital workflow was more than twofold faster (75.3 min) in comparison to the mixed analog-digital workflow (156.6 min) (p < 0.05). No RCTs could be found investigating multi-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDP). The number of RCTs testing complete digital workflows in fixed prosthodontics is low. Scientifically proven recommendations for clinical routine cannot be given at this time. Research with high-quality trials seems to be slower than the industrial progress of available digital applications. Future research with well-designed RCTs including follow-up observation is compellingly necessary in the field of complete digital processing.

  17. Usability evaluation of a clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Monika; Lottridge, Danielle; Marquez, Christine; Newton, David; Straus, Sharon E

    2010-12-10

    Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems. Although guidelines are available, patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions and a series of focus groups were used to develop a functional multifaceted tool that can support clinical decision-making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. The objective of our study was to assess how well the prototype met functional goals and usability needs. We conducted a usability study for each component of the tool--the Best Practice Recommendation Prompt (BestPROMPT), the Risk Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ), and the Customised Osteoporosis Education (COPE) sheet--using the framework described by Kushniruk and Patel. All studies consisted of one-on-one sessions with a moderator using a standardised worksheet. Sessions were audio- and video-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of a combination of qualitative and quantitative analyses. In study 1, physicians liked that the BestPROMPT can provide customised recommendations based on risk factors identified from the RAQ. Barriers included lack of time to use the tool, the need to alter clinic workflow to enable point-of-care use, and that the tool may disrupt the real reason for the visit. In study 2, patients completed the RAQ in a mean of 6 minutes, 35 seconds. Of the 42 critical incidents, 60% were navigational and most occurred when the first nine participants were using the stylus pen; no critical incidents were observed with the last six participants that used the touch screen. Patients thought that the RAQ questions were easy to read and understand, but they found it difficult to initiate the questionnaire. Suggestions for improvement included improving aspects of the interface and navigation. The results of study 3 showed that most patients were able to understand and describe sections of the COPE sheet

  18. Usability evaluation of a clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems. Although guidelines are available, patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions and a series of focus groups were used to develop a functional multifaceted tool that can support clinical decision-making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. The objective of our study was to assess how well the prototype met functional goals and usability needs. Methods We conducted a usability study for each component of the tool--the Best Practice Recommendation Prompt (BestPROMPT), the Risk Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ), and the Customised Osteoporosis Education (COPE) sheet--using the framework described by Kushniruk and Patel. All studies consisted of one-on-one sessions with a moderator using a standardised worksheet. Sessions were audio- and video-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of a combination of qualitative and quantitative analyses. Results In study 1, physicians liked that the BestPROMPT can provide customised recommendations based on risk factors identified from the RAQ. Barriers included lack of time to use the tool, the need to alter clinic workflow to enable point-of-care use, and that the tool may disrupt the real reason for the visit. In study 2, patients completed the RAQ in a mean of 6 minutes, 35 seconds. Of the 42 critical incidents, 60% were navigational and most occurred when the first nine participants were using the stylus pen; no critical incidents were observed with the last six participants that used the touch screen. Patients thought that the RAQ questions were easy to read and understand, but they found it difficult to initiate the questionnaire. Suggestions for improvement included improving aspects of the interface and navigation. The results of study 3 showed that most patients were able to understand and describe

  19. Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) Webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s WMOST is a publicly available tool that can be used by state and local managers to screen a wide-range of options for cost-effective management of water resources, and it supports a broader integrated watershed management approach.

  20. CyberShake: Running Seismic Hazard Workflows on Distributed HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Graves, R. W.; Gill, D.; Olsen, K. B.; Milner, K. R.; Yu, J.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    As part of its program of earthquake system science research, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed a simulation platform, CyberShake, to perform physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) using 3D deterministic wave propagation simulations. CyberShake performs PSHA by simulating a tensor-valued wavefield of Strain Green Tensors, and then using seismic reciprocity to calculate synthetic seismograms for about 415,000 events per site of interest. These seismograms are processed to compute ground motion intensity measures, which are then combined with probabilities from an earthquake rupture forecast to produce a site-specific hazard curve. Seismic hazard curves for hundreds of sites in a region can be used to calculate a seismic hazard map, representing the seismic hazard for a region. We present a recently completed PHSA study in which we calculated four CyberShake seismic hazard maps for the Southern California area to compare how CyberShake hazard results are affected by different SGT computational codes (AWP-ODC and AWP-RWG) and different community velocity models (Community Velocity Model - SCEC (CVM-S4) v11.11 and Community Velocity Model - Harvard (CVM-H) v11.9). We present our approach to running workflow applications on distributed HPC resources, including systems without support for remote job submission. We show how our approach extends the benefits of scientific workflows, such as job and data management, to large-scale applications on Track 1 and Leadership class open-science HPC resources. We used our distributed workflow approach to perform CyberShake Study 13.4 on two new NSF open-science HPC computing resources, Blue Waters and Stampede, executing over 470 million tasks to calculate physics-based hazard curves for 286 locations in the Southern California region. For each location, we calculated seismic hazard curves with two different community velocity models and two different SGT codes, resulting in over

  1. Workflow Challenges of Enterprise Imaging: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Towbin, Alexander J; Roth, Christopher J; Bronkalla, Mark; Cram, Dawn

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of digital cameras, there has been an explosion in the number of medical specialties using images to diagnose or document disease and guide interventions. In many specialties, these images are not added to the patient's electronic medical record and are not distributed so that other providers caring for the patient can view them. As hospitals begin to develop enterprise imaging strategies, they have found that there are multiple challenges preventing the implementation of systems to manage image capture, image upload, and image management. This HIMSS-SIIM white paper will describe the key workflow challenges related to enterprise imaging and offer suggestions for potential solutions to these challenges.

  2. Benchmarking quantitative label-free LC-MS data processing workflows using a complex spiked proteomic standard dataset.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Claire; Hovasse, Agnès; Marcellin, Marlène; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Bouyssié, David; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Chaoui, Karima; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Cianférani, Sarah; Ferro, Myriam; Van Dorssaeler, Alain; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Schaeffer, Christine; Couté, Yohann; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne

    2016-01-30

    Proteomic workflows based on nanoLC-MS/MS data-dependent-acquisition analysis have progressed tremendously in recent years. High-resolution and fast sequencing instruments have enabled the use of label-free quantitative methods, based either on spectral counting or on MS signal analysis, which appear as an attractive way to analyze differential protein expression in complex biological samples. However, the computational processing of the data for label-free quantification still remains a challenge. Here, we used a proteomic standard composed of an equimolar mixture of 48 human proteins (Sigma UPS1) spiked at different concentrations into a background of yeast cell lysate to benchmark several label-free quantitative workflows, involving different software packages developed in recent years. This experimental design allowed to finely assess their performances in terms of sensitivity and false discovery rate, by measuring the number of true and false-positive (respectively UPS1 or yeast background proteins found as differential). The spiked standard dataset has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange repository with the identifier PXD001819 and can be used to benchmark other label-free workflows, adjust software parameter settings, improve algorithms for extraction of the quantitative metrics from raw MS data, or evaluate downstream statistical methods. Bioinformatic pipelines for label-free quantitative analysis must be objectively evaluated in their ability to detect variant proteins with good sensitivity and low false discovery rate in large-scale proteomic studies. This can be done through the use of complex spiked samples, for which the "ground truth" of variant proteins is known, allowing a statistical evaluation of the performances of the data processing workflow. We provide here such a controlled standard dataset and used it to evaluate the performances of several label-free bioinformatics tools (including MaxQuant, Skyline, MFPaQ, IRMa-hEIDI and Scaffold) in

  3. Customized workflow development and data modularization concepts for RNA-Sequencing and metatranscriptome experiments.

    PubMed

    Lott, Steffen C; Wolfien, Markus; Riege, Konstantin; Bagnacani, Andrea; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Hoffmann, Steve; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2017-11-10

    RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) has become a widely used approach to study quantitative and qualitative aspects of transcriptome data. The variety of RNA-Seq protocols, experimental study designs and the characteristic properties of the organisms under investigation greatly affect downstream and comparative analyses. In this review, we aim to explain the impact of structured pre-selection, classification and integration of best-performing tools within modularized data analysis workflows and ready-to-use computing infrastructures towards experimental data analyses. We highlight examples for workflows and use cases that are presented for pro-, eukaryotic and mixed dual RNA-Seq (meta-transcriptomics) experiments. In addition, we are summarizing the expertise of the laboratories participating in the project consortium "Structured Analysis and Integration of RNA-Seq experiments" (de.STAIR) and its integration with the Galaxy-workbench of the RNA Bioinformatics Center (RBC). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Managing expectations when publishing tools and methods for computational proteomics.

    PubMed

    Martens, Lennart; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Weintraub, Susan T

    2015-05-01

    Computational tools are pivotal in proteomics because they are crucial for identification, quantification, and statistical assessment of data. The gateway to finding the best choice of a tool or approach for a particular problem is frequently journal articles, yet there is often an overwhelming variety of options that makes it hard to decide on the best solution. This is particularly difficult for nonexperts in bioinformatics. The maturity, reliability, and performance of tools can vary widely because publications may appear at different stages of development. A novel idea might merit early publication despite only offering proof-of-principle, while it may take years before a tool can be considered mature, and by that time it might be difficult for a new publication to be accepted because of a perceived lack of novelty. After discussions with members of the computational mass spectrometry community, we describe here proposed recommendations for organization of informatics manuscripts as a way to set the expectations of readers (and reviewers) through three different manuscript types that are based on existing journal designations. Brief Communications are short reports describing novel computational approaches where the implementation is not necessarily production-ready. Research Articles present both a novel idea and mature implementation that has been suitably benchmarked. Application Notes focus on a mature and tested tool or concept and need not be novel but should offer advancement from improved quality, ease of use, and/or implementation. Organizing computational proteomics contributions into these three manuscript types will facilitate the review process and will also enable readers to identify the maturity and applicability of the tool for their own workflows.

  5. Performance Analysis Tool for HPC and Big Data Applications on Scientific Clusters

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yoo, Wucherl; Koo, Michelle; Cao, Yu

    Big data is prevalent in HPC computing. Many HPC projects rely on complex workflows to analyze terabytes or petabytes of data. These workflows often require running over thousands of CPU cores and performing simultaneous data accesses, data movements, and computation. It is challenging to analyze the performance involving terabytes or petabytes of workflow data or measurement data of the executions, from complex workflows over a large number of nodes and multiple parallel task executions. To help identify performance bottlenecks or debug the performance issues in large-scale scientific applications and scientific clusters, we have developed a performance analysis framework, using state-ofthe-more » art open-source big data processing tools. Our tool can ingest system logs and application performance measurements to extract key performance features, and apply the most sophisticated statistical tools and data mining methods on the performance data. It utilizes an efficient data processing engine to allow users to interactively analyze a large amount of different types of logs and measurements. To illustrate the functionality of the big data analysis framework, we conduct case studies on the workflows from an astronomy project known as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and the job logs from the genome analysis scientific cluster. Our study processed many terabytes of system logs and application performance measurements collected on the HPC systems at NERSC. The implementation of our tool is generic enough to be used for analyzing the performance of other HPC systems and Big Data workows.« less

  6. Primary care physicians' perspectives on computer-based health risk assessment tools for chronic diseases: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Voruganti, Teja R; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Straus, Sharon E; McLaughlin, John R; Grunfeld, Eva

    2015-09-24

    Health risk assessment tools compute an individual's risk of developing a disease. Routine use of such tools by primary care physicians (PCPs) is potentially useful in chronic disease prevention. We sought physicians' awareness and perceptions of the usefulness, usability and feasibility of performing assessments with computer-based risk assessment tools in primary care settings. Focus groups and usability testing with a computer-based risk assessment tool were conducted with PCPs from both university-affiliated and community-based practices. Analysis was derived from grounded theory methodology. PCPs (n = 30) were aware of several risk assessment tools although only select tools were used routinely. The decision to use a tool depended on how use impacted practice workflow and whether the tool had credibility. Participants felt that embedding tools in the electronic medical records (EMRs) system might allow for health information from the medical record to auto-populate into the tool. User comprehension of risk could also be improved with computer-based interfaces that present risk in different formats. In this study, PCPs chose to use certain tools more regularly because of usability and credibility. Despite there being differences in the particular tools a clinical practice used, there was general appreciation for the usefulness of tools for different clinical situations. Participants characterised particular features of an ideal tool, feeling strongly that embedding risk assessment tools in the EMR would maximise accessibility and use of the tool for chronic disease management. However, appropriate practice workflow integration and features that facilitate patient understanding at point-of-care are also essential.

  7. Improving Clinical Workflow in Ambulatory Care: Implemented Recommendations in an Innovation Prototype for the Veteran’s Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily S.; Lowry, Svetlana Z.; Ramaiah, Mala; Gibbons, Michael C.; Brick, David; Calco, Robert; Matton, Greg; Miller, Anne; Makar, Ellen; Ferrer, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    NIST recommendations to improve workflow in ambulatory care using an EHR provide a first step in moving from a billing-centered perspective on how to maintain accurate, comprehensive, and up-to-date information about a group of patients to a clinician-centered perspective. These recommendations point the way towards a “patient visit management system,” which incorporates broader notions of supporting workload management, supporting flexible flow of patients and tasks, enabling accountable distributed work across members of the clinical team, and supporting dynamic tracking of steps in tasks that have longer time distributions. PMID:26290887

  8. Workflow and Electronic Health Records in Small Medical Practices

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Mala; Subrahmanian, Eswaran; Sriram, Ram D; Lide, Bettijoyce B

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the workflow and implementation of electronic health record (EHR) systems across different functions in small physician offices. We characterize the differences in the offices based on the levels of computerization in terms of workflow, sources of time delay, and barriers to using EHR systems to support the entire workflow. The study was based on a combination of questionnaires, interviews, in situ observations, and data collection efforts. This study was not intended to be a full-scale time-and-motion study with precise measurements but was intended to provide an overview of the potential sources of delays while performing office tasks. The study follows an interpretive model of case studies rather than a large-sample statistical survey of practices. To identify time-consuming tasks, workflow maps were created based on the aggregated data from the offices. The results from the study show that specialty physicians are more favorable toward adopting EHR systems than primary care physicians are. The barriers to adoption of EHR systems by primary care physicians can be attributed to the complex workflows that exist in primary care physician offices, leading to nonstandardized workflow structures and practices. Also, primary care physicians would benefit more from EHR systems if the systems could interact with external entities. PMID:22737096

  9. Short-term Forecasting Tools for Agricultural Nutrient Management.

    PubMed

    Easton, Zachary M; Kleinman, Peter J A; Buda, Anthony R; Goering, Dustin; Emberston, Nichole; Reed, Seann; Drohan, Patrick J; Walter, M Todd; Guinan, Pat; Lory, John A; Sommerlot, Andrew R; Sharpley, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The advent of real-time, short-term farm management tools is motivated by the need to protect water quality above and beyond the general guidance offered by existing nutrient management plans. Advances in high-performance computing and hydrologic or climate modeling have enabled rapid dissemination of real-time information that can assist landowners and conservation personnel with short-term management planning. This paper reviews short-term decision support tools for agriculture that are under various stages of development and implementation in the United States: (i) Wisconsin's Runoff Risk Advisory Forecast (RRAF) System, (ii) New York's Hydrologically Sensitive Area Prediction Tool, (iii) Virginia's Saturated Area Forecast Model, (iv) Pennsylvania's Fertilizer Forecaster, (v) Washington's Application Risk Management (ARM) System, and (vi) Missouri's Design Storm Notification System. Although these decision support tools differ in their underlying model structure, the resolution at which they are applied, and the hydroclimates to which they are relevant, all provide forecasts (range 24-120 h) of runoff risk or soil moisture saturation derived from National Weather Service Forecast models. Although this review highlights the need for further development of robust and well-supported short-term nutrient management tools, their potential for adoption and ultimate utility requires an understanding of the appropriate context of application, the strategic and operational needs of managers, access to weather forecasts, scales of application (e.g., regional vs. field level), data requirements, and outreach communication structure. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. The development and implementation of MOSAIQ Integration Platform (MIP) based on the radiotherapy workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; He, Zhen-yu; Jiang, Xiao-bo; Lin, Mao-sheng; Zhong, Ning-shan; Hu, Jiang; Qi, Zhen-yu; Bao, Yong; Li, Qiao-qiao; Li, Bao-yue; Hu, Lian-ying; Lin, Cheng-guang; Gao, Yuan-hong; Liu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-yan; Deng, Xiao-wu; Xia, Yun-fei; Liu, Meng-zhong; Sun, Ying

    2017-03-01

    To meet the special demands in China and the particular needs for the radiotherapy department, a MOSAIQ Integration Platform CHN (MIP) based on the workflow of radiation therapy (RT) has been developed, as a supplement system to the Elekta MOSAIQ. The MIP adopts C/S (client-server) structure mode, and its database is based on the Treatment Planning System (TPS) and MOSAIQ SQL Server 2008, running on the hospital local network. Five network servers, as a core hardware, supply data storage