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Sample records for wound infection

  1. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  2. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  3. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (Vacuum Assisted Closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  4. [Infection, wounds and local treatments].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Baffie, Aurélie; Trad, Florence Rollot

    2011-06-01

    Infection is the result of complex interactions between bacteria, the host, treatments and the wound environment. The clinical signs and the diagnosis can be obvious, subclinical or relate to an intermediary situation rather than a confirmed infection. Suitable local treatments do not automatically involve the use of antibacterial drugs and consist in washing and draining the wound with appropriate dressings. The local treatment of the infected wound is set to develop further in order to be more effective with regard to both the biofilm as well as the circulating bacteria.

  5. [Prevention of chronic wound infection].

    PubMed

    Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja

    2013-10-01

    An integral follow-up of the patient starting with medical history, present status and the wound itself will lead us to decide which plan of prevention, care and treatment will be efficient. The interaction of host immune abnormalities and growth of the microbial population invading the wound have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and direction of the development of the wound. Infection of a chronic wound is a consequence of a large number and composition of microbe populations in the tissue, along with the presence of virulence factors depending on the type and representation in the biofilm as a factor of greatest importance, the synergy of various microbial communities of aerobes-anaerobes in various combinations, and the host immune response. The basic procedures in preventing the development of infection from the colonization status are reduction of the total mass of microbes along with necrotic tissue, removal or destruction of virulent factors such as the biofilm, destruction of the synergy of various microbial communities, and increasing the level and quality of the host immune response. Prevention of the chronic wound infection demands numerous strategies or procedures, which should be applied simultaneously, but must rapidly and frequently follow each other in succession. Therefore, various methods are being applied depending on the indications, such as mechanical washing and cleaning, application of antiseptics, debridement, vacuum-assisted closing of the wound, oxygenation, moist wound healing - active and passive compresses, methods of removal or destruction of the biofilm, application of specific cells, i.e. factors of growth, and removal of mechanical stress. Antibiotics are not used in the prevention of chronic wound infection. They are used only in a targeted fashion when infection has been proven and the agent identified, as well as its sensitivity to antibiotics obtained from target samples. An ideal prevention would be a method

  6. Approach to chronic wound infections.

    PubMed

    Leaper, D; Assadian, O; Edmiston, C E

    2015-08-01

    Infection is the likeliest single cause of delayed healing in healing of chronic open wounds by secondary intention. If neglected it can progress from contamination to colonization and local infection through to systemic infection, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and it can be life-threatening. Infection in chronic wounds is not as easy to define as in acute wounds, and is complicated by the presence of biofilms. There is, as yet, no diagnostic for biofilm presence, but it contributes to excessive inflammation - through excessive and prolonged stimulation of nitric oxide, inflammatory cytokines and free radicals - and activation of immune complexes and complement, leading to a delay in healing. Control of biofilm is a key part of chronic wound management. Maintenance debridement and use of topical antimicrobials (antiseptics) are more effective than antibiotics, which should be reserved for treating spreading local and systemic infection. The continuing rise of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics should lead us to reserve their use for these indications, as no new effective antibiotics are in the research pipeline. Antiseptics are effective through many mechanisms of action, unlike antibiotics, which makes the development of resistance to them unlikely. There is little evidence to support the theoretical risk that antiseptics select resistant pathogens. However, the use of antiseptic dressings for preventing and managing biofilm and infection progression needs further research involving well-designed, randomized controlled trials.

  7. Approach to chronic wound infections.

    PubMed

    Leaper, D; Assadian, O; Edmiston, C E

    2015-08-01

    Infection is the likeliest single cause of delayed healing in healing of chronic open wounds by secondary intention. If neglected it can progress from contamination to colonization and local infection through to systemic infection, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and it can be life-threatening. Infection in chronic wounds is not as easy to define as in acute wounds, and is complicated by the presence of biofilms. There is, as yet, no diagnostic for biofilm presence, but it contributes to excessive inflammation - through excessive and prolonged stimulation of nitric oxide, inflammatory cytokines and free radicals - and activation of immune complexes and complement, leading to a delay in healing. Control of biofilm is a key part of chronic wound management. Maintenance debridement and use of topical antimicrobials (antiseptics) are more effective than antibiotics, which should be reserved for treating spreading local and systemic infection. The continuing rise of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics should lead us to reserve their use for these indications, as no new effective antibiotics are in the research pipeline. Antiseptics are effective through many mechanisms of action, unlike antibiotics, which makes the development of resistance to them unlikely. There is little evidence to support the theoretical risk that antiseptics select resistant pathogens. However, the use of antiseptic dressings for preventing and managing biofilm and infection progression needs further research involving well-designed, randomized controlled trials. PMID:25772951

  8. Wound infection after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Valenton, M

    1996-01-01

    Nineteen patients were treated for bacterial and fungal infection of the sclerocorneal incision following cataract extraction during a 19-year period. The infections were caused by Staphylococcus aureus (2), Staphylococcus epidermis (2), Streptococcus pneumoniae (3), Streptococcus viridans (1), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1), Mycobacterium fortuitum (3), Aspergillus flavus (6), and Candida tropicalis (1). The predisposing factors involved were an obstructed nasolacrimal duct (S. pneumoniae, S. viridans), airborne contamination of the wound by fungal spores (A. flavus), and defective sterilization of instruments (M. fortuitum). Ten of the 19 infections resulted in complete loss of the eye from endophthalmitis. Early recognition of wound infection by frequent meticulous examination of the sclerocorneal incision for infectious infiltration is of utmost importance so that specific therapy can be instituted immediately to prevent the development of endophthalmitis. PMID:8988437

  9. Surgical wound infections after peripheral vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Turtiainen, J; Hakala, T

    2014-12-01

    Surgical wound infection is one of the most common complications after peripheral vascular surgery. It increases the affected patient's risk for major amputation as well as mortality. Furthermore, surgical wound infection is an additional cost. Wound infections after vascular surgery are of multifactorial nature and generally result from the interplay of patient- and procedure-related factors. The use of systemic antibiotic prophylaxis may be the most important method in preventing surgical wound infections. In this review article, we report the current literature of surgical wound infections after peripheral vascular surgery.

  10. Postoperative posterior spinal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Massie, J B; Heller, J G; Abitbol, J J; McPherson, D; Garfin, S R

    1992-11-01

    The incidence of postoperative spinal infections increases with the complexity of the procedure. Diskectomy is associated with less than a 1% risk of infection; spinal fusion without instrumentation is associated with a 1%-5% risk; and fusion with instrumentation may be associated with a risk of 6% or more. Twenty-two postoperative posterior spinal infections that occurred during a three-year period were reviewed for this report. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism cultured (more than 50% of the cases). Other recurring organisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Peptococcus, Enterobacter cloacae, and Bacteroides. Many patients had multiple organisms. Risk factors appeared to include advanced age, prolonged hospital bed rest, obesity, diabetes, immunosuppression, and infection at remote sites. Operative factors included prolonged surgery (greater than five hours), high volume of personnel moving through the operating room, and instrumentation. Postoperative contamination may occur and may be related to prolonged postoperative bed rest, skin maceration (thoracolumbosacral orthoses), and drainage tubes exiting distally from lumbar wounds (toward the rectum). Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, surgical debridement and irrigation, and parenteral antibiotics. Superficial infections were treated successfully with wound closure over outflow tubes, and deep infections with inflow-outflow systems. Maintaining the instrumentation in place was possible in most cases. Parenteral antibiotics were maintained for six weeks in every case. PMID:1395319

  11. Evidence-based surgical wound care on surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Jaqueline

    2002-09-01

    Surgical wound infection is an important outcome indicator in the postoperative period. A 3-year prospective cohort epidemiological study of 2202 surgical patients from seven surgical wards across two hospitals was carried out using gold standard surveillance methodology. This involved following patients up as inpatients and postdischarge surveillance to 30 days by an independent observer. The results led to the development of a mathematical model for risk of clean, elective surgical wound infection. Risk of surgical wound infection was increased by smoking, higher body mass index, presence of malignancy, haematoma formation, increasing numbers of people in theatre, adherent dressing usage, and higher times to suture removal (P<0.05). The results show that this type of surveillance is an effective way of collecting accurate data on wound infection rates. It was noted that patient care practices affected the surgical wound infection rate and the surveillance was used to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based practice, through recommendations for clean surgery, to reduce the risk from extrinsic risk factors for wound infection. As a result of the implementation of this evidence-based practice there was a significant reduction (P<0.05) in the clean wound infection rate.

  12. Flavimonas oryzihabitans infection of a surgical wound.

    PubMed

    Munro, R; Buckland, G; Neville, S

    1990-10-01

    An unusual case of a post operative wound infection involving Flavimonas oryzihabitans is described. This organism is rarely isolated from human sources. It can cause infections in patients having continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Our patient developed a wound infection 2 months after femoro-popliteal bypass grafting. The source of the organism was unknown.

  13. Flavimonas oryzihabitans infection of a surgical wound.

    PubMed

    Munro, R; Buckland, G; Neville, S

    1990-10-01

    An unusual case of a post operative wound infection involving Flavimonas oryzihabitans is described. This organism is rarely isolated from human sources. It can cause infections in patients having continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Our patient developed a wound infection 2 months after femoro-popliteal bypass grafting. The source of the organism was unknown. PMID:2091006

  14. Chronic wound infection: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Abdul R; Bernstein, Jack M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wound infections are responsible for considerable morbidity and significantly contribute to the escalation in the cost of health care. Wound infection may initially be manifest as bacterial colonization, and it is only when colonization is combined with other factors, such as decreased vascular supply, intrinsic virulence of specific bacteria (eg, Staphylococcus aureus), and host immune factors, that true infection occurs. The microbiology of chronic wounds is complex, and it is difficult to discern which bacteria are culpable. Deep cultures or quantitative biopsies of wound tissue may be necessary. In some instances, such as in the presence of certain mycobacteria, isolation of specific organisms confirms causation. In many instances, it is appropriate to treat these wounds empirically with a combination of topical antiseptics and systemic antibiotics, especially in the presence of invasive infections.

  15. Combined photoultrasonic treatment of infected wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Kalinin, Konstantin L.; Zmievskoy, Gregory N.; Velsher, Leonid Z.; Podkolzin, Alexander A.; Stakhanov, Mikhail L.; Gorchak, Yury Y.; Sarantsev, V. P.

    2001-05-01

    A new combined photoultrasonic (CPUS) technology for the treatment of infected wounds is suggested. The CPUS principal operation is based on the topical application of a photosensitizer followed by light irradiation in combination with low frequency ultrasonic (US) treatment of wounds. In CPUS, two methods - photodynamic (PDT) and ultrasonic therapies supplement each other beneficially and in conjunction provide a significant effect of deep suppurative inflammatory wounds treatment. The main advantages of the new technology are the combined application of an antibiotic solution and photodynamic therapy to destroy antibiotic- resistant microorganisms, an effective mixing of a photosensitizer in the wound, the US enhancement of photosensitizer impregnation into the membranes of bacteria, the US clearing of wound surface from necrotic products, an increased effective light dose exposure in the whole volume of the deep wound when the light does not penetrate totally inside the wound, an additional bactericidal effect under the US impact, and the combined effect of CPUS activation of the immune system.

  16. Topical antimicrobial toolkit for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Alam, Tarik; Marin, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Increased bacterial burden and formation of biofilm has been recognized as one of the key factors contributing to delayed wound healing. There is a toolbox of topical antimicrobial wound dressings that incorporate silver, iodine, polyhexamethylene biguanide, methylene blue/gentian violet, and honey. This article reviews a diverse range of evidence to discuss the advantages and disadvantage of topical antimicrobial dressings. Discussion will provide guidance on when and how to use topical antimicrobial dressings to achieve optimal outcomes and cost-effective wound care. Chronic wounds do not follow a predictable and expected healing trajectory, and they may persist for months or years due to underlying disease processes, recurrent injury, and comorbidities.1 With an aging population and increased prevalence of chronic diseases, the majority of wounds are refractory to healing, placing a significant burden on the health system and individual patients. Bacterial burden and biofilm have been recognized as key factors contributing to persistent inflammation, tissue destruction, delayed wound healing, and other serious complications (especially in individuals who are frail and immune-compromised).2 It has been demonstrated that when bacterial growth reaches a critical threshold of 105 bacteria per gram of tissue, bacterial toxins can cause tissue damage in the superficial wound compartment, delaying healing.2 In the literature, this phenomenon is referred to as critical colonization, increased bacterial burden, superficial infection, or localized infection. According to a recent review, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized infection.3.

  17. Microbiology of Animal Bite Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamian, Fredrick M.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans is often polymicrobial, with a broad mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Bacteria recovered from infected bite wounds are most often reflective of the oral flora of the biting animal, which can also be influenced by the microbiome of their ingested prey and other foods. Bacteria may also originate from the victim's own skin or the physical environment at the time of injury. Our review has focused on bite wound infections in humans from dogs, cats, and a variety of other animals such as monkeys, bears, pigs, ferrets, horses, sheep, Tasmanian devils, snakes, Komodo dragons, monitor lizards, iguanas, alligators/crocodiles, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, prairie dogs, swans, and sharks. The medical literature in this area has been made up mostly of small case series or case reports. Very few studies have been systematic and are often limited to dog or cat bite injuries. Limitations of studies include a lack of established or inconsistent criteria for an infected wound and a failure to utilize optimal techniques in pathogen isolation, especially for anaerobic organisms. There is also a lack of an understanding of the pathogenic significance of all cultured organisms. Gathering information and conducting research in a more systematic and methodical fashion through an organized research network, including zoos, veterinary practices, and rural clinics and hospitals, are needed to better define the microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans. PMID:21482724

  18. Microbiology of animal bite wound infections.

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Fredrick M; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2011-04-01

    The microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans is often polymicrobial, with a broad mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Bacteria recovered from infected bite wounds are most often reflective of the oral flora of the biting animal, which can also be influenced by the microbiome of their ingested prey and other foods. Bacteria may also originate from the victim's own skin or the physical environment at the time of injury. Our review has focused on bite wound infections in humans from dogs, cats, and a variety of other animals such as monkeys, bears, pigs, ferrets, horses, sheep, Tasmanian devils, snakes, Komodo dragons, monitor lizards, iguanas, alligators/crocodiles, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, prairie dogs, swans, and sharks. The medical literature in this area has been made up mostly of small case series or case reports. Very few studies have been systematic and are often limited to dog or cat bite injuries. Limitations of studies include a lack of established or inconsistent criteria for an infected wound and a failure to utilize optimal techniques in pathogen isolation, especially for anaerobic organisms. There is also a lack of an understanding of the pathogenic significance of all cultured organisms. Gathering information and conducting research in a more systematic and methodical fashion through an organized research network, including zoos, veterinary practices, and rural clinics and hospitals, are needed to better define the microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans. PMID:21482724

  19. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  20. Evaluating and managing open skin wounds: colonization versus infection.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Annette B

    2002-08-01

    Open skin wounds are colonized with bacteria, and optimal wound care is required to prevent progression to infection. Intact skin normally provides protection from external environmental assaults. Disruption of the skin or tissue creating an open skin wound can result in infection, dehydration, hypothermia, scarring, compromised immunity, and changes in body image. Biofilms and bacterial genomics are areas of intense scientific investigation in the face of the emerging threat of bacterial resistance. Optimal wound care to prevent progression from colonization to infection remains the foundation of good clinical practice. On the basis of wound conditions, cleansing, debridement, measures to increase oxygenation and perfusion, adequate nutrition, and appropriate use of topical agents and antibiotics, when indicated, are the keys to managing open skin wounds. This article provides a targeted review of normal skin flora, wound healing, prevention of skin infection, colonization versus infection, biofilms, genomics and infectious disease, and management of open skin wounds.

  1. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings. PMID:25530825

  2. Wound infection: a clinician's guide to assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2013-09-01

    Wound infection significantly increases the cost of wound care and has significant detrimental effects on patients' quality of life. It is imperative that all health-care professionals are able to promptly recognise and assess for wound infection and initiate effective management. Clinicians must be able to recognise the different levels of bacterial bioburden and to act accordingly. This article provides clear guidance for recognising an infected wound, understanding the different levels of wound bioburden and practical guidance on different forms and appropriateness of antimicrobial agents.

  3. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  4. Targeted photodynamic therapy for infected wounds in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Zahra, Touqir; Contag, Christopher H.; McManus, Albert T.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2002-06-01

    Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We report on the use of a targeted polycationic photosensitizer conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6) that can penetrate the Gram (-) outer membrane together with red laser light to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting excisional wounds in mice. We used genetically engineered luminescent bacteria that allowed the infection to be imaged in mouse wounds using a sensitive CCD camera. Wounds were infected with 5x106 bacteria, followed by application of the conjugate in solution and illumination. There was a light-dose dependent loss of luminescence as measured by image analysis in the wound treated with conjugate and light, not seen in control wounds. This strain of E coli is non-invasive and the infection in untreated wounds spontaneously resolved in a few days and all wounds healed equally well showing the photodynamic treatment did not damage the host tissue. P aeruginosa is highly invasive and mice with untreated or control wounds all died while 90% of PDT treated mice survived. PDT may have a role to play in the rapid treatment of infected wounds in view of the worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance.

  5. Polymicrobial wound infections: pathophysiology and current therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Bertesteanu, Serban; Triaridis, Stefanos; Stankovic, Milan; Lazar, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Vlad, Mihaela; Grigore, Raluca

    2014-03-25

    Acute and chronic wounds represent a very common health problem in the entire world. The dermal wounds are colonized by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial and fungal strains, most of them belonging to the resident microbiota of the surrounding skin, oral cavity and gut, or from the external environment, forming polymicrobial communities called biofilms, which are prevalent especially in chronic wounds. A better understanding of the precise mechanisms by which microbial biofilms delay repair processes together with optimizing methods for biofilm detection and prevention may enhance opportunities for chronic wounds healing. The purpose of this minireview is to assess the role of polymicrobial biofilms in the occurrence and evolution of wound infections, as well as the current and future preventive and therapeutic strategies used for the management of polymicrobial wound infections.

  6. [Atypical agents of wound infection and targeted samples].

    PubMed

    Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja

    2012-10-01

    All open wounds are primarily contaminated and subsequently colonized by microorganisms, predominantly bacteria. Only about 30% of chronic wounds are also infected. Factors which favor the development of infection are the following: large quantity of bacteria, presence of virulence factors, their quantity and number, predominantly the synergy of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and formation of biofilm. Common agents of infection of acute and chronic wounds are Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Streptococcus beta-haemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides spp., and Candida albicans. Difference between acute and chronic wound is in the predominance of individual agents, with an observation that Staphylococcus aureus is predominant in both cases. Atypical agents of chronic wound infection are rare, unusual, not found in the area in which we live, not proven by standard microbiological methods, but molecular methods are needed instead. They are predominantly opportunists, varying in the expression of virulence factors, or they have changed their phenotype characteristics and are not the agents of primary wound infections. They are the agents of secondary infections. Atypical agents of the chronic wound infection are diverse, from the anaerobe group, Peptoniphilus spp., Anaerococcus spp., Bacteroides ureolyticus, Finegoldia magma, the group of gram positive rods of the Corynebacterium genus, the group of bacteria from aquatic environment Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, and Vibrio alginolyticus. The targeted samples are biopsy sample as the "gold standard" and/or aspirate, when a significant quantity of exudate is present. Targeted samples are obligatory when there is a progression and decomposition of the base of the wound, increase in the size or depth of the wound, isolation of multiresistant microbes, or absence of clinical response to empirical antimicrobial therapy. In the diagnosis of opportunistic pathogens or atypical agents of chronic wound infection, it is

  7. Physicians' knowledge and attitudes in the management of wound infection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y

    2016-10-01

    Despite consensus on the assessment and management of wound infection, there exist deficiencies in its recognition and management. A survey study involving 85 physicians and 3 other clinicians from across Canada was completed to determine current knowledge and attitude towards learning about topics relating to wound infection and its management. The results of the survey describe knowledge gaps and interests to develop expertise in the management of wound infection, suggesting a need for education on this subject. Low levels of current knowledge were reported for all biofilm-related topics.

  8. Predictors of intraoperative-acquired surgical wound infections.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, R A; Cushing, D; Lerer, T

    1991-06-01

    During a 4-year period, we collected prospective epidemiological data and intraoperative wound cultures from 1852 surgery patients at a university-affiliated community hospital in order to identify the critical risk factors for postoperative wound infections and study the impact of perioperative antibiotics on the bacteriology of infected wounds. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed four risk factors that were independent of each other and highly predictive for subsequent wound infection. These were the surgical wound class, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status grouping, duration of surgery and results of intraoperative cultures. Addition of other variables to our model did not increase the predicted probability of infection. Even though patients with positive intraoperative cultures had an increased rate of infection, this information had limited clinical utility because of its low predictive value, high false-positive rate and poor concordance with isolates from infected wounds. Patients who had received perioperative antibiotics and who developed infections were frequently infected with organisms that were resistant to the perioperative drug regimen, compared with patients who had not received antibiotics.

  9. Wound infection: a knowledge deficit that needs addressing.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Maria A

    2016-03-01

    A survey was undertaken at a recent large wound-care exhibition, aimed at generalist nurses, podiatrists and other allied health professionals, to ascertain delegates' understanding of wound infection and its treatment options. The sample comprised 116 delegates, although not all of them answered every question. Results showed good knowledge in some areas, with most (90%) correctly identifying the symptoms of localised wound infection and the characteristics of an infected wound (97%). However, the results did reveal some alarming gaps in knowledge, with 64% unable to identify that it is the inability of the host to mount a robust immune response that can tip the balance between colonisation and infection. Similarly, over a third (38%) incorrectly considered that wounds should always be cleansed, regardless of the wound characteristics, while 5% stated that antimicrobial dressings should be used continuously until epithelialisation occurs. The results suggest that there is still a worrying trend for ritualistic wound care and that more ongoing education is needed on the core aspects of wound management.

  10. Postoperative infection of laparoscopic surgery wound due to Mycobacterium chelonae.

    PubMed

    Rajini, M; Prasad, S R; Reddy, R R; Bhat, R V; Vimala, K R

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of postoperative wound infection due to Mycobacterium chelonae. A 35-year-old woman presented with multiple erythematous nodules, plaques and discharging sinuses over the abdomen, 45 days after she had undergone laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy. The seropurulent discharge from the wound showed acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl- Neelsen stain and culture yielded Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient responded to clarithromycin and doxycycline. The source of infection was probably contaminated water or disinfectant solution used for sterilization of laparoscopic instruments.

  11. Development of biofilm-targeted antimicrobial wound dressing for the treatment of chronic wound infections.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Leow, Hon-Lunn

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that microbial biofilms are largely responsible for the recalcitrance of many wound infections to conventional antibiotics. It was proposed that the efficacy of antibiotics could be optimized via the inhibition of bacterial biofilm growth in wounds. The combination of antibiofilm agent and antibiotics into a wound dressing may be a plausible strategy in wound infection management. Xylitol is an antibiofilm agent that has been shown to inhibit the biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to develop an alginate film containing xylitol and gentamicin for the treatment of wound infection. Three films, i.e. blank alginate film (SA), alginate film with xylitol (F5) and alginate film with xylitol and gentamicin (AG), were prepared. The films were studied for their physical properties, swelling ratio, moisture absorption, moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR), mechanical and rheology properties, drug content uniformity as well as in vitro drug release properties. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm in vitro studies on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were also performed. The results showed that AG demonstrates superior mechanical properties, rheological properties and a higher MVTR compared with SA and F5. The drug flux of AG was higher than that of commercial gentamicin cream. Furthermore, antimicrobial studies showed that AG is effective against both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, and the antibiofilm assays demonstrated that the combination was effective against biofilm bacteria. In summary, alginate films containing xylitol and gentamicin may potentially be used as new dressings for the treatment of wound infection.

  12. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, N. V. Fomenko, A. N. Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  13. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5-3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  14. Prophylactic antibiotics in surgery and surgical wound infections.

    PubMed

    Polk, H C; Christmas, A B

    2000-02-01

    Wound infection remains a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality among surgical patients, despite the relative success of prophylactic antibiotics. In modern efforts to control healthcare costs while improving the quality of patient care, we must not overlook the basic principles of wound infections and their appropriate treatment. Predisposing factors for the development of surgical wound infection include the creation of a surgical wound, the presence of bacteria, and a susceptible host. The selection of an appropriate antimicrobial drug depends on the identification of the most likely pathogens associated with a given procedure, as well as the expected antibiotic susceptibility of those pathogens. Ideally, a prophylactic antibiotic should achieve high peak tissue concentration at the site of the wound before the first incision and should be maintained until the time of closure. Currently, the administration of prophylactic antibiotics is indicated for contaminated and clean-contaminated wounds. Despite the proven effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis, many researchers would argue that contemporary dosing regimens should be reevaluated. The debates concerning the dosage and timing of ideal prophylactic administration are likely to continue.

  15. Responsiveness of Experimental Surgical-Wound Infections to Topical Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McRipley, R. J.; Whitney, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    Topical agents freshly formulated in a cream base vehicle as well as commercial topical preparations were used to evaluate in mice the responsiveness of experimental surgical wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chemotherapy. The responsiveness of the infections to therapy or the efficacy of a topical agent was assessed primarily by means of wound counts of the infecting organism before and after the employment of an immediate (prophylactic) or delayed (therapeutic) treatment regimen. From tests of several concentrations of an agent formulated in the vehicle, a median effective dose could be determined. In the case of the lethal P. aeruginosa infection, a median protective dose could be determined. Both infections were found to be quite susceptible to treatment with those topical agents that demonstrated good activity in vitro against the test organisms. The results of the investigation indicated that the model infections were suitable for the screening of potential topical agents in vivo. PMID:984757

  16. Development of a diagnostic aid for bacterial infection in wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanelli, A. M.; Persaud, K. C.; Bailey, A.; Stuczen, M.; Duncan, R.; Dunn, K.

    2009-05-01

    Infection of wounds during hospitalisation often induces morbidity and sometimes mortality. The delay in patient recovery and subsequent increased length of hospital stay also has economic consequences. Standard techniques for microbiological detection are surface swabbing and wound biopsy culture. Surface swabbing is the most commonly used technique mainly because is quite inexpensive and is not invasive but can give only a representation of surface infection and analysis is also time consuming. Infected wounds are often characterised by an offensive odour that can be used as a diagnostic parameter. We report the results obtained by examining swabs and dressings taken from patients using a gas sensor array instrument developed as part of an EU funded project WOUNDMONITOR.

  17. Wound infections on board ship--prevention, pathogens, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are common in seafarers and they can easily become infected in the marine environment. Pre-sea tetanus immunization is essential. Without diagnostic facilities and only a limited range of antibiotics onboard, injury prevention and early treatment to reduce the likelihood of infection are important measures. Suturing clean cuts reduces healing time and risk of infection. Fresh, clean cuts, especially on the face or head, can be closed by adhesive tape or sutures, but if infection arises, then one or more sutures should be removed to enable drainage. Most wounds must be considered contaminated and should not be closed, just covered with sterile dressing after cleaning. Antibiotic treatment should be started immediately in seafarers with hand and puncture wounds. The primary treatment for a simple abscess is incision and drainage. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for abscesses if the infection spreads to the surrounding tissue (associated cellulitis), if there is lack of response to incision and drainage alone, or if the abscess is in an area difficult or dangerous to drain (e.g. face, palm, genitalia). Recommended therapy for cellulitis is 5-10 days of dicloxacillin, cephalexin, clindamycin, or erythromycin, but if there is no improvement after 2-3 days, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) should be suspected. Bites and burn wounds require special attention. Since wound infections can deteriorate rapidly, a telemedicine advice service (TMAS) should be consulted during the early stages, and serial digital photographs of the affected area, transmitted by e-mail to TMAS, are often useful during treatment at sea.

  18. Case 7: highly infected post-surgical wound.

    PubMed

    von Hallern, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Following treatment with antibiotics and surgical incision, which resulted in the release of putrid exudate, the wound was rinsed thoroughly with octenisept and covered with an antimicrobial dressing. This regimen successfully eradicated the infection, with full healing occurring in 6 weeks. PMID:26949851

  19. Antiseptic wound ventilation with a gas diffuser: a new intraoperative method to prevent surgical wound infection?

    PubMed

    Persson, M; Flock, J-I; van der Linden, J

    2003-08-01

    Postoperative wound infections are often a result of peri-operative contamination by Staphylococcus aureus. With a new insufflation device, a gas diffuser, it has become possible to establish a local micro-environment of almost 100% carbon dioxide in an open surgical wound. The device enables ventilation of the wound with an antiseptic agent, which in gaseous form can be delivered as a low uniform dose to all parts of the wound. The use of carbon dioxide (CO2) as a carrier gas eliminates possible inflammability of an antiseptic agent and helps to concentrate it to the site of interest by gravity. Using the above delivery system we have demonstrated the antibacterial effect of gaseous ethanol on S. aureus inoculated on sterile filter disks and blood agar plates, respectively. Ethanol is a very potent antiseptic agent with known properties, which makes it suitable for testing the maximal decontamination level. On filter disks, CO2 carrying vapour from a 95% ethanol solution decreased the number of colony-forming units after 5 min of exposure (P=0.04), and killed all bacteria within 10-15 min (P<0.001). In the presence of organic material, i.e. on exposed blood agar plates, the colony size decreased with exposure time, and no colonies were detected after 60 min of exposure (P<0.001). Antiseptic gas derived from 70% ethanol solution was less effective than that from 95% ethanol (P<0.001). CO2 humidified with water did not have a significant effect on number or size of the colonies. Our findings suggest that intraoperative wound antisepsis with a gas mixture of CO2 and an antiseptic agent delivered with a gas diffuser, may be a simple method to reduce the risk of postoperative wound infection.

  20. Topical Antimicrobials for Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hashmi, Javad T.; Kurup, Divya B.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout most of history, serious burns occupying a large percentage of body surface area were an almost certain death sentence because of subsequent infection. A number of factors such as disruption of the skin barrier, ready availability of bacterial nutrients in the burn milieu, destruction of the vascular supply to the burned skin, and systemic disturbances lead to immunosuppression combined together to make burns particularly susceptible to infection. In the 20th century the introduction of antibiotic and antifungal drugs, the use of topical antimicrobials that could be applied to burns, and widespread adoption of early excision and grafting all helped to dramatically increase survival. However the relentless increase in microbial resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobials has led to a renewed search for alternative approaches to prevent and combat burn infections. This review will cover patented strategies that have been issued or filed with regard to new topical agents, preparations, and methods of combating burn infections. Animal models that are used in preclinical studies are discussed. Various silver preparations (nanocrystalline and slow release) are the mainstay of many approaches but antimicrobial peptides, topical photodynamic therapy, chitosan preparations, new iodine delivery formulations, phage therapy and natural products such as honey and essential oils have all been tested. This active area of research will continue to provide new topical antimicrobials for burns that will battle against growing multi-drug resistance. PMID:20429870

  1. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. PMID:25972413

  2. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth.

  3. Surgical wound infection rates by wound class, operative procedure, and patient risk index. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Culver, D H; Horan, T C; Gaynes, R P; Martone, W J; Jarvis, W R; Emori, T G; Banerjee, S N; Edwards, J R; Tolson, J S; Henderson, T S

    1991-09-16

    To perform a valid comparison of rates among surgeons, among hospitals, or across time, surgical wound infection (SWI) rates must account for the variation in patients' underlying severity of illness and other important risk factors. From January 1987 through December 1990, 44 National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System hospitals reported data collected under the detailed option of the surgical patient surveillance component protocol, which includes definitions of eligible patients, operations, and nosocomial infections. Pooled mean SWI rates (number of infections per 100 operations) within each of the categories of the traditional wound classification system were 2.1, 3.3, 6.4, and 7.1, respectively. A risk index was developed to predict a surgical patient's risk of acquiring an SWI. The risk index score, ranging from 0 to 3, is the number of risk factors present among the following: (1) a patient with an American Society of Anesthesiologists preoperative assessment score of 3, 4, or 5, (2) an operation classified as contaminated or dirty-infected, and (3) an operation lasting over T hours, where T depends upon the operative procedure being performed. The SWI rates for patients with scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 1.5, 2.9, 6.8, and 13.0, respectively. The risk index is a significantly better predictor of SWI risk than the traditional wound classification system and performs well across a broad range of operative procedures.

  4. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years) were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery. PMID:26900139

  5. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy--Patient experiences.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Karin; Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61-87 years, median age 71 years) were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: "Managing postoperative complications," "Being independent," "Feeling safe," and "Accepting the situation." A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients' lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery.

  6. Delayed aortic rupture resulting from postoperative superficial sternal wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Wan; Chang, Jee Won

    2016-01-01

    While deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after cardiac surgery is a significant contributor to patient morbidity and mortality, superficial sternal wound infection (SSWI) mostly has a benign course. We report a mortality case of aortic rupture resulting from SSWI after cardiac surgery. A 50-year-old male underwent an aortic valve replacement (AVR). Three months after the valve operation, he presented with severe dyspnea, which had never before been observed, and chest computed tomography revealed an ascending aortic rupture with large hematoma compressing the main pulmonary artery. We performed an emergent operation for aortic rupture that possibly originated from the SSWI. Postoperatively, the patient died of hypovolemic shock due to recurrent aortic rupture despite efforts to resuscitate him. PMID:27499988

  7. Prevalence and clinical significance of postpartum endometritis and wound infection.

    PubMed Central

    Chaim, W; Bashiri, A; Bar-David, J; Shoham-Vardi, I; Mazor, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To correlate clinical variables (gestational age, severe pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, history of previous cesarean sections, fetal distress, perinatal mortality, postpartum anemia, Apgar score < or = 3 at 1 minute and < or = 7 at 5 minutes, and instrumental delivery) with postpartum endometritis (PPE) and wound infection. METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional study of the outcome of 75,947 term and preterm singleton deliveries; vaginally and by cesarean section from 1989-1997. RESULTS: The prevalence of PPE after vaginal deliveries was 0.17% (120/68,273). Gestational age of less than 37 weeks, severe pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal distress, instrumental deliveries, neonatal mortality, postpartum anemia, and Apgar scores of < 7 after 5 minutes were significantly associated with PPE. Gestational diabetes and an Apgar score of < 3 after 1 minute showed similar frequency with and without PPE. The prevalence of PPE after cesarean section was 2.63% (202/7,677). Preterm cesarean sections, history of previous cesarean sections, anemia, and low Apgar scores were seen more frequently with PPE than without. The incidence of cesarean delivery with gestational diabetes mellitus, fetal distress, and perinatal mortality was similar in presence and absence of PPE. The rate of wound infection after cesarean section was 3.97% (318/7,995). Gestational diabetes mellitus, history of previous cesarean deliveries, and low Apgar scores were significantly more frequent with than without wound infection. Gestational age, severe pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal distress, perinatal mortality, and postpartum anemia were not associated with wound infection. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness of the aforementioned associations may prevent and shorten hospital stay by early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:10805361

  8. Infected Median Sternotomy Wound: Successful Treatment by Muscle Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Jurkiewicz, M. J.; Bostwick, John; Hester, T. Roderick; Bishop, J. Barry; Craver, Joseph

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the experience at Emory University Hospital with the infected median sternotomy wound and to offer a treatment plan for those patients recalcitrant to the usual therapy of debridement and closed catheter irrigation with antimicrobial agents. When standard treatment fails, we proceed not only with the necessary thorough debridement to convert the wound to a relatively clean one but also concomitant closure by pectoralis major muscle flaps to completely obliterate dead space. Transposition flaps of rectus abdominus muscle or omentum are used when necessary to complete the closure. In the initial phase of this study, there were 3,239 patients who underwent open heart procedures through a median sternotomy approach in the years 1975 through 1978. In the 50 patients who had wound infections (1.54%), there were nine deaths. Three were thought to be unrelated to the sternal wound infection, four patients ruptured the ventricle or aorta, two patients died of generalized sepsis. Of these 50 patients, 22 responded to simple drainage; 28 had involvement of the mediastinum (0.86%). Of the 28 patients, 25 had debridement and closed mediastinal irrigation by catheter. Fourteen of these 25 did not respond. In these failing patients, 12 were treated by further debridement and closure by muscle flaps. Nine of these 12 were rescued. In the past nine months, an additional 1,052 patients had an open heart procedure. Of these, 11 had a median sternotomy infection. There have been no deaths in this latter group of patients, most of whom were treated by the muscle flap procedure. In addition to the improvement in mortality, morbidity has been reduced substantially. This procedure provides for a rational approach that we have found to permit salvage of a high percentage of patients who failed conventional closed irrigation techniques. ImagesFig. 1.Figs. 2a and b.Fig. 3(a).Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:7387236

  9. Wound infections caused by Vibrio vulnificus and other marine bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Infections caused by Vibrio vulnificus were first reported in 1979 by Blake et al. of the US Centers for Disease Control. At that time described as a 'rare, unnamed halophilic lactose-fermenting Vibrio species', V. vulnificus has emerged as the most virulent foodborne pathogen in the United States with a hospitalization rate of 0.910 and a case-fatality rate of 0.390. It is in addition a significant cause of potentially life-threatening wound infections. Infections following ingestion of raw or undercooked seafood, commonly raw oysters, can lead to a primary septicaemia with a fatality rate of 50-60%. An unusual symptom, occurring in 69% of 274 cases reviewed by Oliver, is the development of secondary lesions, typically on the extremities, which are generally severe (often a necrotizing fasciitis) and require tissue debridement or amputation. These cases occur almost exclusively in males over the age of 50 years. Interestingly, this gender specificity has been found to be due to the female hormone oestrogen, which in some manner provides protection against the lethal V. vulnificus endotoxin. Further, most cases occur in persons with certain underlying diseases which are either immunocompromising or which lead to elevated serum iron levels (e.g. liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, haemochromatosis). V. vulnificus infections resulting in primary septicaemia have been extensively studied, and the subject of several reviews. This review concentrates on the wound infections caused by this marine bacterial pathogen, including the more recently described biotypes 2 and 3, with brief discussions of those caused by other marine vibrios, and the increasingly reported wound/skin infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, and Aeromnonas hydrophila. PMID:15962544

  10. Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

    2012-12-01

    Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms.

  11. Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kabon, Barbara; Akça, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate. PMID:16244030

  12. Enterococcus in wound infections: virulence and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Dworniczek, Ewa; Piwowarczyk, Justyna; Bania, Jacek; Kowalska-Krochmal, Beata; Wałecka, Ewa; Seniuk, Alicja; Dolna, Izabela; Gościniak, Grażyna

    2012-06-01

    Enterococci, a complex group of facultative pathogens have become increasingly isolated in various hospital settings. They are considerable frequently cultured from traumatic and surgical wounds. We investigated 57 strains of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. casseliflavus isolated from infected wounds. Their ability to produce virulence factors and their sensitivity to antibiotics were evaluated using phenotypic and genotyping methods. In the phenotype studies, significant portion of the isolates produced biofilm (66.7%) and gelatinase (36.8%). Nearly 30% of the strains expressed hemolytic properties. Only a few produced DNAse (15.8%) and lipase (7.0%). The genes esp, gelE, cylA, cylB, cylM and agg were detected in most of the isolates (38.6-87.7%). All the isolated enterococci were susceptible to vancomycin and were characterized by their low resistance to antibiotics, except aminoglycosides (HLR).

  13. Novel models for bacterial colonization and infection of full-thickness wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mayumi; Nakagami, Gojiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Nagase, Takashi; Akase, Tomoko; Huang, Lijuan; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Sanada, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    An animal model is needed to study the pathophysiology of wound infections; however, an animal model that is reproducible and clinically relevant has not previously been available. In addition, an animal model of wound colonization generated in a manner similar to the wound infection model would be useful. Here, we describe new animal models of the wound infection continuum for the characterization of essential host-pathogen relationships. We determined the conditions needed to establish rat models of stable wound colonization and infection, without the use of disturbing factors (e.g., foreign bodies or induction of diabetes mellitus). We found that the age of the rats, bacterial inoculum size, and wound location were important elements in generating reproducible, obvious, spreading wound infections. We inoculated approximately 6-month-old rats with 2.06 × 10(9) or 4.12 × 10(9) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to generate the wound colonization and wound infection models, respectively. Wounds were made 2 cm cranial to the greater trochanter. These clinically relevant and highly reproducible animal models can be used to investigate the mechanisms of wound infection and monitor the effect of therapeutic agents in vivo.

  14. Antiseptics for treating infected wounds: Efficacy on biofilms and effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Percival, Steven L; Finnegan, Simon; Donelli, Gianfranco; Vuotto, Claudia; Rimmer, Steve; Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm recalcitrance is a persistent problem when managing difficult to heal and infected chronic wounds. The wound biofilm is a fundamental factor in the re-occurrence and delayed healing commonly observed in non-healing and infected chronic wounds. However, there is presently no single antimicrobial agent that is completely efficacious against both the planktonic and sessile polymicrobial communities evident in at risk or infected wounds. We will review currently available antimicrobials, with particular emphasis on silver and iodine, employed to help suppress biofilms in wounds. In addition, we will also review the effect of pH on antimicrobial efficacy. Available evidence suggests that it is best to take a multifactorial approach towards controlling biofilm in chronic, "at risk" and infected wounds. This highlights the growing importance of avoiding indiscriminate or inappropriate use of antimicrobials in the treatment of chronic wounds.

  15. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of

  16. [The use of exogenous nitrogen monoxide for the prophylaxis of postoperative wound infection].

    PubMed

    Larichev, A B; Shishlo, V K; Lisovskiĭ, A V; Chistiakov, A L

    2011-01-01

    The study covers treatment results of 220 patients operated on ventral hernia and in vivo experimental treatment of 36 rats proved the nitrogen monoxide (NO) to be the effective means of wound infection prophylaxis. NO potentiates antiseptic effects, minimizing intraoperative wound contamination. It, besides, stimulates endothelial and basal cells of epidermis proliferation. Wound infection was observed only in 9,8% of patients, treated with NO intraoperatively. All cases of infective complications were serous and infiltrative, but not purulent.

  17. Investigation of lysine acrylate containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogels as wound dressings in normal and infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Larson, Jeffery C; Drapala, Pawel W; Pérez-Luna, Víctor H; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J; Brey, Eric M

    2012-04-01

    The design of materials for cutaneous wound dressings has advanced from passive wound covers to bioactive materials that promote skin regeneration and prevent infection. Crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogels have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications. While these materials can be used for drug delivery, limited cell interactions restrict their biological activity. In this article, acryoyl-lysine (A-Lys) was incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol) crosslinked PNIPAAm to enhance biological activity. A-Lys could be incorporated into the hydrogels to improve cellular interaction in vitro, while maintaining swelling properties and thermoresponsive behavior. Polyhexamethylene biguanide, an antimicrobial agent, could be encapsulated and released from the hydrogels and resulted in decreased bacteria counts within 2 hours. Two in vivo animal wound models were used to evaluate the hydrogel wound dressing. First, application of the hydrogels to a rodent cutaneous wound healing model resulted in significant increase in healing rate when compared with controls. Moreover, the hydrogels were also able to decrease bacteria levels in an infected wound model. These results suggest that PNIPAAm hydrogels containing A-Lys are promising wound dressings due to their ability to promote healing and deliver active antimicrobial drugs to inhibit infection.

  18. An in vivo polymicrobial biofilm wound infection model to study interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Trevor; Dowd, Scot E; Wolcott, Randall D; Sun, Yan; Watters, Chase; Griswold, John A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wound infections are typically polymicrobial; however, most in vivo studies have focused on monospecies infections. This project was designed to develop an in vivo, polymicrobial, biofilm-related, infected wound model in order to study multispecies biofilm dynamics and in relation to wound chronicity. Multispecies biofilms consisting of both Gram negative and Gram positive strains, as well as aerobes and anaerobes, were grown in vitro and then transplanted onto the wounds of mice. These in vitro-to-in vivo multi-species biofilm transplants generated polymicrobial wound infections, which remained heterogeneous with four bacterial species throughout the experiment. We observed that wounded mice given multispecies biofilm infections displayed a wound healing impairment over mice infected with a single-species of bacteria. In addition, the bacteria in the polymicrobial wound infections displayed increased antimicrobial tolerance in comparison to those in single species infections. These data suggest that synergistic interactions between different bacterial species in wounds may contribute to healing delays and/or antibiotic tolerance.

  19. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: Evidences and controversies.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo; Barbero, Cristina; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Despite many advances in prevention and perioperative care, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) remains a pressing concern in cardiac surgery, with a still relevant incidence and with a considerable impact on in-hospital mortality and also on mid- and long-term survival. The permanent high impact of this complication is partially related to the increasing proportion of patients at high-risk for infection, as well as to the many patient and surgical risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of DSWI. The prophylactic antibiotic therapy is one of the most important tools in the prevention of DSWI. However, the choice of antibiotic, the dose, the duration, the adequate levels in serum and tissue, and the timing of antimicrobial prophylaxis are still controversial. The treatment of DSWI ranges from surgical revision with primary closure to surgical revision with open dressings or closed irrigation, from reconstruction with soft tissue flaps to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, to date, there have been no accepted recommendations regarding the best management of DSWI. Emerging evidence in the literature has validated the efficacy and safety of NPWT either as a single-line therapy, or as a "bridge" prior to final surgical closure. In conclusion, the careful control of patient and surgical risk factors - when possible, the proper antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the choice of validated techniques of treatment could contribute to keep DSWIs at a minimal rate. PMID:26557476

  20. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: Evidences and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Barbero, Cristina; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Despite many advances in prevention and perioperative care, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) remains a pressing concern in cardiac surgery, with a still relevant incidence and with a considerable impact on in-hospital mortality and also on mid- and long-term survival. The permanent high impact of this complication is partially related to the increasing proportion of patients at high-risk for infection, as well as to the many patient and surgical risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of DSWI. The prophylactic antibiotic therapy is one of the most important tools in the prevention of DSWI. However, the choice of antibiotic, the dose, the duration, the adequate levels in serum and tissue, and the timing of antimicrobial prophylaxis are still controversial. The treatment of DSWI ranges from surgical revision with primary closure to surgical revision with open dressings or closed irrigation, from reconstruction with soft tissue flaps to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, to date, there have been no accepted recommendations regarding the best management of DSWI. Emerging evidence in the literature has validated the efficacy and safety of NPWT either as a single-line therapy, or as a “bridge” prior to final surgical closure. In conclusion, the careful control of patient and surgical risk factors - when possible, the proper antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the choice of validated techniques of treatment could contribute to keep DSWIs at a minimal rate. PMID:26557476

  1. Factors predisposing to wound infection in cardiac surgery. A prospective study of 517 patients.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A P; Livesey, S A; Treasure, T; Grüneberg, R N; Sturridge, M F

    1987-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection can greatly prolong hospital stay after cardiac surgery, so the identification of predisposing factors may help in prevention or early institution of treatment. Transfer of organisms from the leg to the sternum during coronary artery surgery has been proposed as a major additional cause of sepsis. The definition of wound infection is not standardised and therefore makes comparison between centres difficult. In a prospective study of 517 patients, a wound scoring method (ASEPSIS) has been used to register all abnormal wounds to maximise the chances of identifying factors predisposing to infection. Abnormal healing was noted in 99 (19%) sternal wounds and 29 (8%) leg wounds. Obesity was the principal risk factor (P less than 0.005). Diabetes, reoperation, length of preoperative hospital stay, age, sex, or previous cardiac surgery had little effect on wound healing. The range of bacteria isolated from chest wounds after coronary artery surgery was similar to that after valvular surgery, but the rate of isolation was significantly greater. With careful attention to technique, leg wound infection rarely presented a clinical problem and did not appear to be a source of bacteria infecting the chest wound.

  2. Diagnosis and rehabilitation of deep wound infection and internal fixation rejection in elbow

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huiping; Song, Lin; Lin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims at diagnosis and rehabilitation of a rare case of deep wound infection and internal fixation rejection in elbow. The patient sustained a distal fracture in the humerus 1 year ago, which was internal fixed. The wound always effused and the elbow had pain and swelling; joint motion was limited. Blood sedimentation rate and C reactive protein level increased, bacterial culture suggested deep wound infection, and ultrasound indicated inflammation. The main diagnoses were deep wound infection and internal fixation rejection. Therapeutics interventions were antibiotic agents, physical therapy, operative debridement, incision, drainage, and exercise and physical therapy. One year later, the internal fixation was taken out. His elbow was fully mobilized and the fracture healed. He got back to his former job. When encountered deep wound infection again and again after internal fixation, rejection should be considered. Except for anti-infection treatment, rehabilitation cannot be neglected, or the healing process may be delayed. PMID:27281079

  3. Experimental phage therapy of burn wound infection: difficult first steps

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Thomas; Verbeken, Gilbert; Vos, Daniel De; Merabishvili, Maya; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; Zizi, Martin; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a major public health problem and the antibiotics pipeline is running dry. Bacteriophages (phages) may offer an ‘innovative’ means of infection treatment, which can be combined or alternated with antibiotic therapy and may enhance our abilities to treat bacterial infections successfully. Today, in the Queen Astrid Military Hospital, phage therapy is increasingly considered as part of a salvage therapy for patients in therapeutic dead end, particularly those with multidrug resistant infections. We describe the application of a well-defined and quality controlled phage cocktail, active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, on colonized burn wounds within a modest clinical trial (nine patients, 10 applications), which was approved by a leading Belgian Medical Ethical Committee. No adverse events, clinical abnormalities or changes in laboratory test results that could be related to the application of phages were observed. Unfortunately, this very prudent ‘clinical trial’ did not allow for an adequate evaluation of the efficacy of the phage cocktail. Nevertheless, this first ‘baby step’ revealed several pitfalls and lessons for future experimental phage therapy and helped overcome the psychological hurdles that existed to the use of viruses in the treatment of patients in our burn unit. PMID:25356373

  4. Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4) Stimulates Cell Proliferation and Wound Closure in MRSA-Infected Wounds in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hang-Ning; Chan, Yi-Lin; Wu, Chang-Jer; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are endogenous antibiotics that directly affect microorganisms, and also have a variety of receptor-mediated functions. One such AMP, Tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4), was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus); TP4 has antibacterial effects and regulates the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of TP4 in the regulation of wound closure in mice and proliferation of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and fibroblast cell line (Hs-68). In vitro, TP4 stimulated cell proliferation and activated collagen I, collagen III, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene expression in Hs-68 cells, which induces keratin production by HaCaT cells. This effect was detectable at TP4 concentrations of 6.25 µg/mL in both cell lines. In vivo, TP4 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis and wound infection caused by MRSA in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that TP4 enhances the survival rate of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen MRSA through both antimicrobial and wound closure activities mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The peptide is likely involved in antibacterial processes and regulation of tissue homeostasis in infected wounds in mice. Overall, these results suggest that TP4 may be suitable for development as a novel topical agent for wound dressing. PMID:25955756

  5. The quality of measurement of surgical wound infection as the basis for monitoring: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bruce, J; Russell, E M; Mollison, J; Krukowski, Z H

    2001-10-01

    Comparison of postoperative surgical wound infection rates between institutions and over time is only valid if standard, valid and reliable definitions are used. The aim of this review was to assess evidence of validity and reliability of the definition and measurement of surgical wound infection. A systematic review was undertaken of prospective studies of surgical wound infection published over a seven-year period; 1993-1999. The information extracted from individual studies included: definition of surgical wound infection; details of wound assessment scale, scoring or grading scale systems; and evidence of assessment of validity, reliability and feasibility of identified definitions and grading systems. Two independent reviewers appraised 112 prospective studies, 90 of which were eligible for inclusion; eight studies assessed validity and/or reliability. Forty-one different definitions of surgical wound infection were identified, five of which were 'standard' definitions proposed by multi-disciplinary groups. Presence of pus was the most frequently used single component of any definition; the CDC definitions of 1988 and 1992 were the most widely implemented standard definitions; and the ASEPSIS wound assessment scale was the most frequently used quantitative grading tool. Only two formal validations of a definition were found, and six studies of reliability. This review highlights the extent of variation in definition of surgical wound infection used in clinical practice, and the need for validation of both content and organization of a surveillance system. However, realistically, there will have to be a balance between the quality of the measurement and the practicality of surveillance.

  6. Wound infection rate and irrigation pressure of two potential new wound irrigation devices: the port and the cap.

    PubMed

    Morse, J W; Babson, T; Camasso, C; Bush, A C; Blythe, P A

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the speed of irrigation and the infection rate of two new irrigation devices. In the clinical portion of this two-part study, 208 patients with traumatic wounds were randomized to one of two new irrigation device groups, the cap/bottle or the port/bag, to determine irrigation times and infection/complication rates. Wounds were irrigated in less than 4 minutes in 97% of patients using a mean of 786 mL. The combined infection/complication rates were: port group, 1 of 99 (1%); cap group, 4 of 108 (4%), P = .356. In part II, 9 male and 8 female medical volunteers were timed in the delivery of 250 mL of saline into a graduated cylinder, using four different irrigation set-ups. Mean time for 250 mL and calculated stream pressures (psi) were: (1) cap/bottle, 12.9 seconds, 1.5 psi; (2) port/bag, 11.2 seconds, 2.0 psi; (3) syringe/catheter, 113.2 seconds, 8.2 psi; and (4) syringe/needle, 175.4 seconds, 7.3 psi (time and psi: P < .05 for all pairwise comparisons except cap versus port). Rapid irrigation and infection rates comparable with standard devices used in wound irrigation suggest that the new devices may prove to be valuable tools in emergent wound care. PMID:9451311

  7. Vibrio alginolyticus-associated wound infection acquired in British waters, Guernsey, July 2011.

    PubMed

    Reilly, G D; Reilly, C A; Smith, E G; Baker-Austin, C

    2011-10-20

    In July 2011, a Vibrio alginolyticus infection was diagnosed in a woman from Guernsey in the Channel Islands, British Isles after sea bathing and application of a natural seaweed dressing to a pre-existing leg wound. Microbiological investigation confirmed Vibrio in the wound and the species of seaweed used for the dressing. The washing of open wounds in seawater and use of unsterilised seaweed dressings should be discouraged, particularly in individuals with underlying risk conditions.

  8. Gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge for preventing sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kozioł, Małgorzata; Targońska, Sylwia; Stążka, Janusz; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-03-01

    The frequency of sternal wound infection (SWI) after cardiac surgery ranges from 0.5% to 8% and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not sufficient to fully prevent the contamination of the surgical access site. One of the most effective methods for the prevention of wound infection seems to be the use of gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge, which is successfully used in abdominal and orthopedic surgery. Surgically implantable topical antibiotics can reduce wound infection in cardiac patients as well, but the efficacy of SWI prevention in cardiac surgery still raises many questions.

  9. Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound as an effective therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected biofilm wounds.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Nguyen, Khang T; Geringer, Matthew R; Hong, Seok J; Leung, Kai P; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms, a critical chronic wound mediator, remain difficult to treat. Energy-based devices may potentially improve healing, but with no evidence of efficacy against biofilms. This study evaluates noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound (NLFU) in the treatment of biofilm-infected wounds. Six-millimeter dermal punch wounds in rabbit ears were inoculated with 10(7) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or left as sterile controls. A biofilm was established in vivo using our published model. NLFU treatment was carried out every other day or every day, with contralateral ear wounds acting as internal, untreated controls. Wounds were harvested for several quantitative endpoints and scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the biofilm structure. The P. aeruginosa biofilm consistently impaired wound epithelialization and granulation. NLFU, both every other day and every day, improved healing and reduced bacterial counts relative to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy confirmed a qualitative decrease in bacteria after both treatments. NLFU also reduced inflammatory cytokine expression (p < 0.05). Our study suggests that NLFU is an effective therapy against P. aeruginosa wound biofilm. This represents the first in vivo evidence of energy-based modalities' impact on wound biofilm, setting the foundation for future mechanistic studies. Continued wound care technology research is essential to improving our understanding, and treatment, of biofilm-infected chronic wounds.

  10. Parkin-mediated responses against infection and wound involve TSPO-VDAC complex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong Hyang; Chung, Chang Geon; Shim, Hyun-Jung; Jeon, Keun Hye; Yu, Seong-Woon; Lee, Sung Bae

    Parkin, an E3 ubuquitin ligase associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), has recently been implicated in mediating innate immunity. However, molecular details regarding parkin-mediated immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we identified mitochondrial TSPO-VDAC complex to genetically interact with parkin in mediating responses against infection and wound in Drosophila. The loss-of-function mutation in parkin results in defective immune response against bacterial infection. Additionally, parkin mutant larvae showed hypersensitivity against wound regardless of bacterial infection. Interestingly, the combinatorial trans-heterozygotic mutations in parkin and TSPO, or parkin and VDAC showed similar lethal tendency with parkin homozygous mutants. Furthermore, knockdown of TSPO alone also resulted in defective responses to infection and wound analogously to parkin mutants. Taken together, we propose that parkin cooperates with TSPO-VDAC complex to mediate responses against infection and wound.

  11. Combined treatment with chlorhexidine and 0·9% saline in a newborn infant with an infected surgical wound.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Kadir Şerafettin; Kepenekli, Eda; Demirelli, Yaşar; Caner, İbrahim; Kara, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    Newborns are more susceptible to infection; this makes proper wound care extremely important in them. Unfortunately, in spite of successful surgery, patients can die as a result of wound area infections. Herein, we report a case in which a combined therapy of chlorhexidine (a disinfectant) and saline (a cleansing agent used in wound care) was used effectively to treat the wound in a newborn infant with an antibiotic-resistant, Gram-negative, bacteria-related surgical site infection.

  12. [Advances in the research of an animal model of wound due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Jia, Chiyu

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis ranks as the second deadly infectious disease worldwide. The incidence of tuberculosis is high in China. Refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection ranks high in misdiagnosis, and it is accompanied by a protracted course, and its pathogenic mechanism is still not so clear. In order to study its pathogenic mechanism, it is necessary to reproduce an appropriate animal model. Up to now the study of the refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is just beginning, and there is still no unimpeachable model for study. This review describes two models which may reproduce a wound similar to the wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, so that they could be used to study the pathogenesis and characteristics of a tuberculosis wound in an animal.

  13. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicylic acid [MBS] cream, n = 119). Treatment continued until the wound healed (success), formed hypergranulation tissue (failure), or became infected (failure). Treatment was terminated after 6 months in all remaining animals. Ketanserin was successful in 88% of cases. Wounds treated with ketanserin were 2 and 5 times more likely to heal successfully than were those treated with MBS or ethacridin lactate, respectively. Ketanserin gel is thus more effective than these standard treatments in preventing hypergranulation tissue and infection of equine lower limb wounds. PMID:15025151

  14. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  15. First case of Chlorella wound infection in a human in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J; Mooney, L; Arthur, I; Inglis, T J J; Murray, R

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old man developed an infected knee wound 2 days after jumping his bicycle into a freshwater dam. He required repeated debridement and tissue grew bright green colonies typical of the alga Chlorella plus Aeromonas hydrophila. This, and one previously reported case, responded to surgical debridement and careful wound management. PMID:25356359

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection involves activation of its iron acquisition system in response to fascial contact

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M.; Christley, S.; Khodarev, N. N.; Fleming, I.; Huang, Y.; Chang, E.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wound infections are traditionally thought to occur when microbial burden exceeds the innate clearance capacity of host immune system. Here we introduce the idea that the wound environment itself plays a significant contributory role to wound infection. Methods We developed a clinically relevant murine model of soft tissue infection to explore the role of activation of microbial virulence in response to tissue factors as a mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria cause wound infections. Mice underwent abdominal skin incision and light muscle injury with a crushing forceps versus skin incision alone followed by topical inoculation of P. aeruginosa. Mice were sacrificed on postoperative day 6 and abdominal tissues analyzed for clinical signs of wound infection. To determine if specific wound tissues components induce bacterial virulence, P. aeruginosa was exposed to skin, fascia, and muscle. Results Gross wound infection due to P. aeruginosa was observed to be significantly increased in injured tissues vs non-injured (80% vs 10%) tissues (n=20/group, p<0.0001). Exposure of P. aeruginosa to individual tissue components demonstrated that fascia significantly induced bacterial virulence as judged by the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine compound known to kill immune cells. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of P. aeruginosa exposed to fascia demonstrated activation of multiple genes responsible for the synthesis of the iron scavenging molecule pyochelin. Conclusion We conclude that wound elements, in particular fascia, may play a significant role in enhancing the virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis of clinical wound infection. PMID:25807409

  17. Maggot therapy for repairing serious infective wound in a severely burned patient.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Cheng; Lu, Ren-Rong; Huo, Ran; Fu, Hong-Bin

    2012-01-01

    The larvae of musca domestica were put in use to discard the dead tissue of a case of severe burn. A total of 50 000 aseptic maggots were put onto the infective wound surface, and aseptic dressings overlaid the surface. Three days later, another 20 000 maggots were put onto the wound for the second therapy. After twice maggot debridement, most necrotic muscle tissues of the wound were cleaned up, and eventually fresh granulation tissue grew and later the wound was covered and healed by 3 times of skin grafting. The result demonstrates that maggot therapy is safe and effective with no adverse complications except pain.

  18. The Healing Effect of Scrophularia Striata on Experimental Burn Wounds Infected to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Rokni-Hosseini, Mohammad Hossein; Hossienzadeh, Masood; Mehrabani, Davood; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Koohi-Hossienabadi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cause of death in burn patients after 48 hours of hospitalization has been reported to be bacterial infections. Recently, due to the compounds accelerating the healing process and the intense reduction of treatment side effects, medicinal plants are used to cure burn wound infections. This study aims to investigate the medicinal effect of the ethanolic extract of Scrophularia striata on burn wound infection in in-vivo and in-vitro in comparison with silver sulfadiazine (SSD). METHODS One hundred and fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 equal groups. A hot plate of 1×1cm was used to create second degree burn wounds. The ethanolic extract of S. striata was provided through percolation method. Group 1 was treated with SSD, group 2 with S. striata, and group 3 was considered as control group. All animals were infected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On days 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after burn wound injury, the animals were euthanized and were evaluated histologically. The MIC and MBC were determined using the micro dilution method. RESULTS The rate of wound healing was significantly greater in S. striata group in comparison to SSD and control groups. CONCLUSION S. striata contains was shown to have anti-bacterial and wound healing effects while this effect was significantly more than SSD denoting to its use when needed for burn wounds infected to P. aeruginosa. PMID:25606472

  19. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  20. Triclosan-coated sutures and sternal wound infections: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Steingrimsson, S; Thimour-Bergström, L; Roman-Emanuel, C; Scherstén, H; Friberg, Ö; Gudbjartsson, T; Jeppsson, A

    2015-12-01

    Surgical site infection is a common complication following cardiac surgery. Triclosan-coated sutures have been shown to reduce the rate of infections in various surgical wounds, including wounds after vein harvesting in coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Our purpose was to compare the rate of infections in sternotomy wounds closed with triclosan-coated or conventional sutures. A total of 357 patients that underwent coronary artery bypass grafting were included in a prospective randomized double-blind single-center study. The patients were randomized to closure of the sternal wound with either triclosan-coated sutures (Vicryl Plus and Monocryl Plus, Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) (n = 179) or identical sutures without triclosan (n = 178). Patients were followed up after 30 days (clinical visit) and 60 days (telephone interview). The primary endpoint was the prevalence of sternal wound infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The demographics in both groups were comparable, including age, gender, body mass index, and rate of diabetes and smoking. Sternal wound infection was diagnosed in 43 patients; 23 (12.8%) sutured with triclosan-coated sutures compared to 20 (11.2%) sutured without triclosan (p = 0.640). Most infections were superficial (n = 36, 10.1%), while 7 (2.0%) were deep sternal wound infections. There were 16 positive cultures in the triclosan group and 17 in the non-coated suture group (p = 0.842). The most commonly identified main pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (45.4%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (36.4%). Skin closure with triclosan-coated sutures did not reduce the rate of sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass grafting. (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01212315).

  1. A review of studies that examine the impact of infection on the normal wound-healing process.

    PubMed

    Penhallow, K

    2005-03-01

    Wound infection disrupts the normal healing process, although to what extent is not proven. This review explores controversies in the literature surrounding the bacterial load of the chronic wound and its impact, if any, on this process.

  2. Factors which influence the risk of wound infection in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, J A; Haley, R W; Seibert, B

    1987-07-01

    Surgical wound infections following traumatic injury remain a source of morbidity and mortality. A simple system for estimating the risk of infectious complications was evaluated in 949 trauma patients requiring operative therapy. The majority of cases were caused by penetrating trauma (784). Truncal, neck, and extremity procedures were included. The overall wound infection rate was 7%. Infection rates were related to amount of bacterial contamination and mechanism of injury. Age, type of antibiotics, and delay time from injury to operation were not risk factors for any injury type. Wound classification, shock, blood loss, number of organs injured, and operative time were significant risk factors, but had different effects on infection rate related to injury type. Multivariate analysis revealed no significant infectious risk factors for stabwounds. Significant factors were wound class (p = 0.02) and shock (p = 0.001) for gunshot wounds, wound class (p = 0.03) and number of organs injured (p = 0.01) for blunt trauma, and blood loss (p = 0.01) for shotgun wounds. This classification system can be used to review outcome and compare trauma patient populations for infectious morbidity in a more uniform fashion.

  3. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  4. The Human Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 as a Potential Treatment for Polymicrobial Infected Wounds.

    PubMed

    Duplantier, Allen J; van Hoek, Monique L

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients often have ulcers on their lower-limbs that are infected by multiple biofilm-forming genera of bacteria, and the elimination of the biofilm has proven highly successful in resolving such wounds in patients. To that end, antimicrobial peptides have shown potential as a new anti-biofilm approach. The single human cathelicidin peptide LL-37 has been shown to have antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity against multiple Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens, and have wound-healing effects on the host. The combination of the anti-biofilm effect and wound-healing properties of LL-37 may make it highly effective in resolving polymicrobially infected wounds when topically applied. Such a peptide or its derivatives could be a platform from which to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat biofilm-mediated infections of wounds. This review summarizes known mechanisms that regulate the endogenous levels of LL-37 and discusses the anti-biofilm, antibacterial, and immunological effects of deficient vs. excessive concentrations of LL-37 within the wound environment. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the therapeutic potential of this peptide and other clinically advanced peptides as a potential topical treatment for polymicrobial infected wounds.

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a cause of nosocomial wound infections.

    PubMed

    Sisirak, Maida; Zvizdic, Amra; Hukic, Mirsada

    2010-02-01

    Postoperative wound infections represent about 16% of hospital-acquired infections. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of nosocomial wound infections. Increased frequency of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires permanent control of MRSA spread in the hospital.The purpose of this study was to analyse the frequency of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the swabs taken from the surgical wounds, the presence of MRSA infection in surgical departments and to examine antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates. Wound swabs were examined from January 2006 to December 2008. The isolates were identified by conventional methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method as per NCCLS guidelines.A total of 5755 wound swabs were examined: 938 (16,3%) swabs were sterile and 4817 (83,7%) were positive. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 1050 (22,0%) swabs and it was the most common cause of wound infections. MRSA was isolated from 12,4% samples in 2006, from 6,7% samples in 2007 and from 3,7% samples during 2008. Wound infections caused by MRSA dominated in the department of plastic surgery (24,4%) and in the department of orthopaedic surgery (24,1%). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 73% of MRSA isolates were with the same antibiotic sensitivity pattern (antibiotyp)-sensitive only to vancomycin, tetracycline, fucid acid and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxasole. Our results show decreasing of MRSA infection in the surgical wards. These results appear to be maintained with strategies for preventing nosocomial infection: permanent education, strong application of protocols and urging the implementation of strict infection control policy.

  6. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae uses proteasome inhibitor syringolin A to colonize from wound infection sites.

    PubMed

    Misas-Villamil, Johana C; Kolodziejek, Izabella; Crabill, Emerson; Kaschani, Farnusch; Niessen, Sherry; Shindo, Takayuki; Kaiser, Markus; Alfano, James R; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2013-03-01

    Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA), a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA). Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues. PMID:23555272

  7. In vivo modeling of biofilm-infected wounds: a review.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew R; Hong, Seok J; Leung, Kai P; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2012-11-01

    Chronic wounds continue to represent a difficult and complex problem for both patients and healthcare providers. Bacterial biofilms represent a critical component of nonhealing wounds, utilizing several different mechanisms to inhibit innate inflammatory pathways and resist traditional therapeutics. Although in vitro biofilm systems have been well described and studied, understanding the intricacies of wound biofilm pathology requires appropriate in vivo models to understand the interactions between bacteria and host. In an effort to clarify the available literature, this review describes and critically evaluates all of the in vivo wound biofilm models currently published to-date, including model advantages and clinical applicability. We will also address the need for continued therapeutic development and testing using these currently available in vivo models.

  8. Validation of a novel murine wound model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mitchell G; Black, Chad C; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Honnold, Cary L; Wise, Matthew C; Alamneh, Yonas A; Moon, Jay K; Kessler, Jennifer L; Si, Yuanzheng; Williams, Robert; Yildirim, Suleyman; Kirkup, Benjamin C; Green, Romanza K; Hall, Eric R; Palys, Thomas J; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2014-01-01

    Patients recovering from traumatic injuries or surgery often require weeks to months of hospitalization, increasing the risk for wound and surgical site infections caused by ESKAPE pathogens, which include A. baumannii (the ESKAPE pathogens are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species). As new therapies are being developed to counter A. baumannii infections, animal models are also needed to evaluate potential treatments. Here, we present an excisional, murine wound model in which a diminutive inoculum of a clinically relevant, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate can proliferate, form biofilms, and be effectively treated with antibiotics. The model requires a temporary, cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia to establish an infection that can persist. A 6-mm-diameter, full-thickness wound was created in the skin overlying the thoracic spine, and after the wound bed was inoculated, it was covered with a dressing for 7 days. Uninoculated control wounds healed within 13 days, whereas infected, placebo-treated wounds remained unclosed beyond 21 days. Treated and untreated wounds were assessed with multiple quantitative and qualitative techniques that included gross pathology, weight loss and recovery, wound closure, bacterial burden, 16S rRNA community profiling, histopathology, peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and scanning electron microscopy assessment of biofilms. The range of differences that we are able to identify with these measures in antibiotic- versus placebo-treated animals provides a clear window within which novel antimicrobial therapies can be assessed. The model can be used to evaluate antimicrobials for their ability to reduce specific pathogen loads in wounded tissues and clear biofilms. Ultimately, the mouse model approach allows for highly powered studies and serves as an initial multifaceted in vivo assessment prior to

  9. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. Methods The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Results Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore

  10. Chitosan based substrates for wound infection detection based on increased lysozyme activity.

    PubMed

    Tegl, Gregor; Rollett, Alexandra; Dopplinger, Jasmin; Gamerith, Clemens; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-20

    There is a strong need of point-of-care diagnostics for early detection of wound infection. In this study, substrates based on functionalized chitosan were developed for visual detection of elevated lysozyme activity, an infection biomarker in wound fluids. For efficient hydrolysis by lysozyme, N-acetyl chitosan with a final degree of acetylation of around 50% was synthesized. N-acetylated chitosan and a chitosan-starch composite were labeled with structurally different dyes resulting in lysozyme-responsive biomaterials. Incubation with lysozyme in buffer and artificial wound fluid lead to a release of colored hydrolysis products already after 2h incubation. Tests in human wound fluid from infected wounds indicated a clear visual color change after 2.5h compared to control samples. A higher degree of swelling of the chitosan/starch containing substrate led to faster hydrolysis by lysozyme. This study demonstrates the potential of the lysozyme-responsive materials for diagnosis of wound infection and provides different diagnostic substrates for potential incorporation in point-of-care devices. PMID:27474566

  11. Evolution of bacterial flora in burn wounds: key role of environmental disinfection in control of infection.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Neelam; Chari, Ps; Singh, Malkit; Singh, Gagandeep; Biswal, Manisha; Sharma, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial flora in burn patients undergoes change over period of time and is dependent upon many factors. Study of burn flora is not only helpful in locating entry of multidrug resistant bacterial strains into the unit's usual flora but also in determining current antibiotic susceptibilities. Since no studies are available from India that have studied sequential emergence of different microorganisms in burn wound, present study was carried out to study evolution of bacterial flora in burn wounds and its correlation with invasive wound infection. Environmental sampling was also carried out for possible sources of infection. Patients with 20-70% of total burn surface were enrolled and followed up for entire duration of stay. Clinical & treatment details were noted. Surface wound swabs were collected on first, third, seventh, tenth and fourteenth day post admission. Environmental sampling was done every three months. Of 215 wound swabs collected from 71 patients, 72 were sterile and 143 yielded 214 isolates. Colonization rates were 33% on first day, 94% on 7th day and 100% by 14th day. 42% swabs grew gram negative bacteria. Overall Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant isolate (45%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.9%), beta hemolytic Streptococci (9.4%). Maximum invasive infections were seen at the seventh day. A high level of environmental contamination was seen with S. aureus, a substantial portion being MRSA. Better control of environmental contamination and disinfection along with rigorous hand washing and barrier precautions are recommended to prevent infection of wounds. PMID:23638328

  12. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds - conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-11-03

    As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient.Bacterial counts above 10(5) to 10(6) cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated.The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness.The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects.DERIVED FROM THE GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF

  13. First case of a dog bite wound infection caused by Streptococcus minor in human.

    PubMed

    Tré-Hardy, M; Saussez, T; Yombi, J C; Rodriguez-Villalobos, H

    2016-11-01

    We report the first case of human infection caused by Streptococcus minor in a 51-year-old immunocompetent woman admitted for dog bite injuries. At present, the role of Streptococcus minor in bite wound infections is unknown. Further studies on virulence factors are needed to elucidate its pathogenicity mechanisms. PMID:27688883

  14. A Bioengineered Human Skin Tissue for the Treatment of Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Background Complex skin defects resulting from acute skin trauma and chronic, nonhealing wounds are life-threatening injuries. Infection is one of the most common obstacles to the healing of these types of wounds. Host defense peptides (HDPs) possessing a broad spectrum of activity against microorganisms and serving as innate immune modulators have emerged as potential treatment strategies for infected wounds. The Problem The increase in multidrug-resistant clinical bacterial isolates highlights the need for new and innovative anti-infective therapies for the treatment of both acute and chronic skin wounds. Basic/Clinical Science To address the critical need for new therapeutic options to reduce infection and improve wound healing, a bioengineered skin substitute (BSS) tissue has been created to act as an anti-infective living human skin tissue that provides enhanced expression of the endogenous HDP, cathelicidin. To generate a BSS exhibiting these antimicrobial properties, the clinically tested NIKS progenitor cells were employed to provide a source of genetically uniform, nontumorigenic, pathogen-free human keratinocytes that are amenable to genetic engineering using nonviral means. Clinical Care Relevance Pathogenic bacterial strains are increasingly developing antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing the clinician to use potent antibiotics with deleterious effects on keratinocyte viability and migration. Therefore, an urgent need exists for new wound therapies that can circumvent many of the problems associated with current antibiotic treatments. Conclusion Enhanced expression of cathelicidin in a genetically engineered human BSS has been shown to inhibit the bacterial growth of a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii in vivo, creating a new and innovative therapeutic option for combating these debilitating wound infections while also promoting healing. PMID:24527286

  15. Management of the infected median sternotomy wound with muscle flaps. The Emory 20-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G; Jurkiewicz, M J; Bostwick, J; Wood, R; Bried, J T; Culbertson, J; Howell, R; Eaves, F; Carlson, G; Nahai, F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study is to define those patient variables that contribute to morbidity and mortality of median sternotomy wound infection and the results of treatment by debridement and closure by muscle flaps. BACKGROUND: Infection of the median sternotomy wound after open heart surgery is a devastating complication associated with significant mortality. Twenty years ago, these wounds were treated with either open packing or antibiotic irrigation, with a mortality approaching 50% in some series. In 1975, the authors began treating these wounds with radical sternal debridement followed by closure using muscle or omental flaps. The mortality of sternal wound infection has dropped to < 10%. METHODS: The authors' total experience with 409 patients treated over 20 years is described in relation to flap choices, hospital days after sternal wound closure, and incidence rates of morbidity and mortality. One hundred eighty-six patients treated since January 1988 were studied to determine which patient variables had impact on rates of flap closure complications, recurrent sternal wound infection, or death. Variables included obesity, history of smoking, hypertension, diabetes, poststernotomy septicemia, internal mammary artery harvest, use of intra-aortic balloon pump, and perioperative myocardial infarction and were analyzed using chi square tests. Fisher's exact tests, and multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The mortality rate over 20 years was 8.1% (33/49). Additional procedures for recurrent sternal wound infection were necessary in 5.1% of patients. Thirty-one patients (7.6%) required treatment for hematoma, and 11 patients (2.7%) required hernia repair. Among patients treated since 1988, variables strongly associated with mortality were septicemia (p < 0.00001), perioperative myocardial infarction (p = 0.006), and intra-aortic balloon pump (p = 0.0168). Factors associated with wound closure complications were intra-aortic balloon pump

  16. Controlling methicillin resistant Staphyloccocus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infections with a novel biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Lucie; Davis, Stephen C; Peng, Henry T; Hung, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Wound infections, especially those associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, offer considerable challenges for clinicians. Our laboratory has recently developed novel composite biomaterials (DRDC) for wound dressing applications, and demonstrated their in vitro bactericidal efficacy. In the present study, we assessed the proliferation of planktonic and sessile Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in porcine full-thickness wounds covered for up to 48 h with either saline- or mafenide acetate-loaded DRDC puffs and meshes. All biomaterials were applied 4 h following bacterial inoculation of the wounds with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to allow colonization of the tissues and initiation of biofilm formation. The drug-loaded biomaterials eradicated both the planktonic and biofilm bacteria in the wounds within 24 h (p <. 05), irrespective of the bacterial strain or architecture of the dressing. While the wound bioburdens increased in the ensuing 24 h, they remained approximately 2 log(10) colony-forming units (CFU) below (p <. 05) their respective baseline values. Similarly, less than 4 log(10) CFU was recovered in the drug-loaded DRDC biomaterials throughout the study. These data show that the DRDC puffs and meshes are effective in delivering certain medications, such as antimicrobial agents, to the wound bed, suggesting considerable value of this material for treating wounds, especially those with irregular shapes, contours, and depths.

  17. Topical Nanoemulsion Therapy Reduces Bacterial Wound Infection and Inflammation Following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hemmila, Mark R.; Mattar, Aladdein; Taddonio, Michael A.; Arbabi, Saman; Hamouda, Tarek; Ward, Peter A.; Wang, Stewart C.; Baker, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanoemulsions are broadly antimicrobial oil-in-water emulsions containing nanometer-sized droplets stabilized with surfactants. We hypothesize that topical application of a nanoemulsion compound (NB-201) can attenuate burn wound infection. In addition to reducing infection, nanoemulsion therapy may modulate dermal inflammatory signaling and thereby lessen inflammation following thermal injury. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a 20% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn to create a partial thickness burn injury. Animals were resuscitated with Ringer’s lactate and the wound covered with an occlusive dressing. Eight hours after injury, the burn wound was inoculated with 1×106 CFU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. NB-201, NB-201 placebo, 5% mafenide acetate solution or 0.9% saline (control) was applied onto the wound at 16 and 24 hrs following burn injury. Skin was harvested 32 hrs post-burn for quantitative wound culture and determination of inflammatory mediators in tissue homogenates. Results NB-201 reduced mean bacterial growth in the burn wound by a thousand fold, with only 11% animals having P. aeruginosa counts greater than 105 CFU/g tissue versus 91% in the control group (p<0.0001). Treatment with NB-201 attenuated neutrophil sequestration in the treatment group as measured by myeloperoxidase assay and by histology. It also, significantly reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) and the degree of hair follicle cell apoptosis in skin when compared to saline-treated controls. Conclusions Topical NB-201 substantially reduced bacterial growth in a partial thickness burn model. This reduction in the level of wound infection was associated with an attenuation of the local dermal inflammatory response and diminished neutrophil sequestration. NB-201 represents a novel potent antimicrobial and antiinflammatory treatment for use in burn wounds. PMID:20189619

  18. Evaluation of healing of infected cutaneous wounds treated with different energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Nicole R. S.; Cangussú, Maria C. T.; N. dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    We aimed assess the effects of different energy densities of the association of red/IR laser light on the healing of cutaneous wounds infected Staphylococcus aureus. Background: Wound infection is the most common complication on healing wounds and cause both vascular and cellular responses on the tissue. Several therapeutics is used for improving wound healing including the use of different light sources, such as the Laser. Some energy densities present positive photobiological effects on the healing process. Material and Methods: 24 young adult male Wistar rats, under general anesthesia, had their dorsum shaven, cleaned and a 1 x 1cm cutaneous wound created with a scalpel and left without no suturing or dressings. The wounds were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and were randomly divided in 8 subgroups of 3 animals in each: Control, Group 10J/cm2, Group 20J/cm2, and Group 30J/cm2, 7 and 14 days each group. Laser phototherapy was carried out with a diode (λ680nm/790nm, P= 30mW/40mW, CW, Laser, Ø = 3mm, PD=424mW/cm2 and 566mW/cm2, t=11.8/ 8.8 sec, E=0.35J) and started immediately after surgery and repeated at every other day during 7 days. Laser light was applied on 4 points around wounded area. The animals were killed at either 8th or 15th day after contamination. Specimens were taken, routinely cut and processed to wax, stained and underwent histological analysis. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Both 20 and 30J/cm2 caused intense collagen deposition at the end of the experimental time. But, when 20 J/cm2 was used the fibers were also well organized. Conclusion: Our results indicate that irradiated subjects showed improved wound healing being the 20 J/cm2 the energy the caused better histological response.

  19. Nanoparticle-Based Therapies for Wound Biofilm Infection: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Clinical data from human chronic wounds implicates biofilm formation with the onset of wound chronicity. Despite the development of novel antimicrobial agents, the cost and complexity of treating chronic wound infections associated with biofilms remain a serious challenge, which necessitates the development of new and alternative approaches for effective anti-biofilm treatment. Recent advancement in nanotechnology for developing a new class of nanoparticles that exhibit unique chemical and physical properties holds promise for the treatment of biofilm infections. Over the last decade, nanoparticle-based approaches against wound biofilm infection have been directed toward developing nanoparticles with intrinsic antimicrobial properties, utilizing nanoparticles for controlled antimicrobials delivery, and applying nanoparticles for antibacterial hyperthermia therapy. In addition, a strategy to functionalize nanoparticles towards enhanced penetration through the biofilm matrix has been receiving considerable interest recently by means of achieving an efficient targeting to the bacterial cells within biofilm matrix. This review summarizes and highlights the recent development of these nanoparticle-based approaches as potential therapeutics for controlling wound biofilm infection, along with current challenges that need to be overcome for their successful clinical translation.

  20. Novel nitric oxide producing probiotic wound healing patch: preparation and in vivo analysis in a New Zealand white rabbit model of ischaemic and infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mitchell; Ganopolsky, Jorge G; Labbé, Alain; Gilardino, Mirko; Wahl, Christopher; Martoni, Christopher; Prakash, Satya

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of chronic wounds poses a significant challenge for clinicians and patients alike. Here we report design and preclinical efficacy of a novel nitric oxide gas (gNO)-producing probiotic patch for wound healing. Specifically, a wound healing patch using lactic acid bacteria in an adhesive gas permeable membrane has been designed and investigated for treating ischaemic and infected full-thickness dermal wounds in a New Zealand white rabbit model for ischaemic wound healing. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed increased wound closure with gNO-producing patch-treated wounds over 21 days of therapy (log-rank P = 0·0225 and Wilcoxon P = 0·0113). Cox proportional hazard regression showed that gNO-producing patch-treated wounds were 2·52 times more likely to close compared with control patches (hazard P = 0·0375, score P = 0·032 and likelihood ratio P = 0·0355), and histological analysis showed improved wound healing in gNO-producing patch-treated animals. This study may provide an effective, safe and less costly alternative for treating chronic wounds.

  1. Understanding the host inflammatory response to wound infection: an in vivo study of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew R; Gurjala, Anandev N; Abercrombie, Johnathan A; Chen, Ping; You, Tao; Hong, Seok J; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A; Leung, Kai P

    2012-01-01

    Wound infection development is critically dependent on the complex interactions between bacteria and host. Klebsiella pneumoniae has become an increasingly common wound pathogen, but its natural history within wounds has never been studied. Using a validated, in vivo rabbit ear model, wounds were inoculated with K. pneumoniae at different concentrations (10²-10⁷ colony-forming units) with measurement of viable and nonviable bacterial counts, histological wound-healing parameters, and host inflammatory gene expression at multiple time points postinoculation (48, 96, and 240 hours). Bacteria and wound morphologies were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Comparable experiments were performed in ischemic ears to model immune response impairment. All wounds, despite different inoculants, equilibrated to similar bacterial concentrations by 96 hours. With a 10⁶ colony-forming units inoculant, wounds at 240 hours showed decreased bacterial counts (p < 0.01), with a corresponding improvement in healing (p < 0.01) and a decrease in inflammatory response (p < 0.05). In contrast, ischemic wounds revealed impaired inflammatory gene expression (p < 0.05) resulting in higher steady-state bacterial concentrations (p < 0.01), impaired healing (p < 0.05), and biofilm formation on scanning electron microscopy. We conclude that a normal inflammatory response can effectively stabilize and overcome a K. pneumoniae wound infection. An impaired host cannot control this bacterial burden, preventing adequate healing while allowing bacteria to establish a chronic presence. Our novel study quantitatively validates the host immune response as integral to wound infection dynamics.

  2. Coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients – risk factors for sternal wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kristina; Brandt, Michael; Fraund-Cremer, Sandra; Cremer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of sternal wound infections (SWI) after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) as reported worldwide is low. However, it is associated with significant increase of postoperative mortality and treatment costs. The major risk factors discussed are diabetes mellitus and bilateral IMA harvesting of the internal mammary artery. This study analyses data of 590 patients receiving CABG concerning the risk factors for SWI. Sternal wound infections occur significantly more often in diabetic patients, one crucial and significant additional risk factor is obesity. PMID:27547690

  3. A Case of Wound Infection with Providencia rettgeri and Coincident Gout in a Patient from Guam.

    PubMed

    Washington, Michael A; Barnhill, Jason; Griffin, Jaclyn M

    2015-11-01

    Providencia rettgeri (P. rettgeri) is a ubiquitous organism that is infrequently associated with human disease. Here we report the isolation of this organism from a polymicrobial wound infection resulting from ruptured tophi on a 54-year-old male patient from Guam. We describe the identification and confirmation of this organism, and propose metabolic synergy as a possible mechanism of pathogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of a wound infection colonized by P. rettgeri from Guam, and the first report to speculate upon the role of bacterial synergy in P. rettgeri pathogenesis.

  4. A Case of Wound Infection with Providencia rettgeri and Coincident Gout in a Patient from Guam

    PubMed Central

    Barnhill, Jason; Griffin, Jaclyn M

    2015-01-01

    Providencia rettgeri (P. rettgeri) is a ubiquitous organism that is infrequently associated with human disease. Here we report the isolation of this organism from a polymicrobial wound infection resulting from ruptured tophi on a 54-year-old male patient from Guam. We describe the identification and confirmation of this organism, and propose metabolic synergy as a possible mechanism of pathogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of a wound infection colonized by P. rettgeri from Guam, and the first report to speculate upon the role of bacterial synergy in P. rettgeri pathogenesis. PMID:26568901

  5. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24–48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  6. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24-48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  7. Neutropenia exacerbates infection by Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in a murine wound model

    PubMed Central

    Grguric-Smith, Laryssa M.; Lee, Hiu H.; Gandhi, Jay A.; Brennan, Melissa B.; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Coelho, Carolina; Han, George; Martinez, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram negative coccobacillus Acinetobacter baumannii has become an increasingly prevalent cause of hospital-acquired infections in recent years. The majority of clinical A. baumannii isolates display high-level resistance to antimicrobials, which severely compromises our capacity to care for patients with A. baumannii disease. Neutrophils are of major importance in the host defense against microbial infections. However, the contribution of these cells of innate immunity in host resistance to cutaneous A. baumannii infection has not been directly investigated. Hence, we hypothesized that depletion of neutrophils increases severity of bacterial disease in an experimental A. baumannii murine wound model. In this study, the Ly-6G-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), 1A8, was used to generate neutropenic mice and the pathogenesis of several A. baumannii clinical isolates on wounded cutaneous tissue was investigated. We demonstrated that neutrophil depletion enhances bacterial burden using colony forming unit determinations. Also, mAb 1A8 reduces global measurements of wound healing in A. baumannii-infected animals. Interestingly, histological analysis of cutaneous tissue excised from A. baumannii-infected animals treated with mAb 1A8 displays enhanced collagen deposition. Furthermore, neutropenia and A. baumannii infection alter pro-inflammatory cytokine release leading to severe microbial disease. Our findings provide a better understanding of the impact of these innate immune cells in controlling A. baumannii skin infections. PMID:26528277

  8. Inflammatory and antimicrobial responses to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an in vitro wound infection model.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; Rietveld, Marion H; de Breij, Anna; van Dissel, Jaap T; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of patients with burn wound infections may become complicated by the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Herein, we demonstrate an in vitro thermal wound infection model using human skin equivalents (HSE) and biofilm-forming methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for the testing of agents to combat such infections. Application of a liquid nitrogen-cooled metal device on HSE produced reproducible wounds characterized by keratinocyte death, detachment of the epidermal layer from the dermis, and re-epithelialization. Thermal wounding was accompanied by up-regulation of markers for keratinocyte activation, inflammation, and antimicrobial responses. Exposure of thermal wounded HSEs to MRSA resulted in significant numbers of adherent MRSA/HSE after 1 hour, and multiplication of these bacteria over 24-48 hours. Exposure to MRSA enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators such as TLR2 (but not TLR3), IL-6 and IL-8, and antimicrobial proteins human β-defensin-2, -3 and RNAse7 by thermal wounded as compared to control HSEs. Moreover, locally applied mupirocin effectively reduced MRSA counts on (thermal wounded) HSEs by more than 99.9% within 24 hours. Together, these data indicate that this thermal wound infection model is a promising tool to study the initial phase of wound colonization and infection, and to assess local effects of candidate antimicrobial agents.

  9. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  10. Staphylococcal Scalded-Skin Syndrome Complicating Wound Infection in a Preterm Infant with Postoperative Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bjoern; Hentschel, Juliane; Mau, Harald; Halle, Elke; Witte, Wolfgang; Obladen, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The course of infection in a 3-week-old premature newborn suffering from extensive dermatitis with flaccid blisters is described. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from a local wound infection around a chest tube inserted to drain a postoperative chylothorax. The strain isolated tested positive for the eta gene for exfoliative toxin A, the causative agent of staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS). In this case, prematurity and loss of chylus with consecutive lymphopenia may have contributed to development of SSSS. PMID:9738069

  11. Combination of photodynamic and ultrasonic therapy for treatment of infected wounds in animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menyaev, Yulian A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2006-02-01

    One of the important problems of modern medicine is treatment of infected wounds. There are many diversified expedients of treatment, but none of them obey the modern physician completely. The aim of this study is to develop and test a new combined method of photodynamic ultrasonic therapy (PDUST) for treatment of infected wounds with focus on experimental trials. PDUST is based on a combination of two methods: photodynamic (PD) therapy (PDT) with photosensitizer and low frequency ultrasonic (US) therapy with antibiotic as tools for treatment of wounds and effectively killing bacteria. The main parameters are: US frequency - 26.5 kHz; US tip elongation - 40+/-20 μm wavelength of light emitting diodes (LED) array - 660+/-10 nm; light intensity on biotissue surface - 1-2 mW/cm2; photosensitizer - an aluminum disulfonated phtalocyanine dissolved in a physiological solution in concentration 10 mg/l. The experiments were carried out with 70 male chinchilla rabbits divided into 7 groups, thus the dynamics of wounds healing were studied in different modes of PDUST. The PD and US methods supplement each other and in conjunction provide additive and especially synergetic effects. The experimental data demonstrated advantages of new technology in comparison with conventional methods in cases of treatment of extended suppurative inflammatory and profound wounds. The more detailed study of PDUST method's mechanism, which is based on low intensity of LED light, PD therapy and US influence is required.

  12. Maggot Debridement Therapy of Infected Ulcers: Patient and Wound Factors Influencing Outcome – A Study on 101 Patients with 117 Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Steenvoorde, Pascal; Jacobi, Cathrien E; Van Doorn, Louk; Oskam, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION It has been known for centuries that maggots are potent debriding agents capable of removing necrotic tissue and slough. In January 2004, the US Food and Drug Administration decided to regulate maggot debridement therapy (MDT). As it is still not clear which wounds are likely or unlikely to benefit from MDT, we performed a prospective study to gain more insight in patient and wound characteristics influencing outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS In the period between August 2002 and December 2005, patients with infected wounds with signs of gangrenous or necrotic tissue who seemed suited for MDT were enrolled in the present study. In total, 101 patients with 117 ulcers were treated. Most wounds were worst-case scenarios, in which maggot therapy was a treatment of last resort. RESULTS In total, 72 patients (71%) were classified as ASA III or IV. In total, 78 of 116 wounds (67%) had a successful outcome. These wounds healed completely (n = 60), healed almost completely (n = 12) or were clean at least (n = 6) at last follow-up. These results seem to be in line with those in the literature. All wounds with a traumatic origin (n = 24) healed completely. All wounds with septic arthritis (n = 13), however, failed to heal and led in half of these cases to a major amputation. According to a multivariate analysis, chronic limb ischaemia (odds ratio [OR], 7.5), the depth of the wound (OR, 14.0), and older age (≥ 60 years; OR, 7.3) negatively influenced outcome. Outcome was not influenced by gender, obesity, diabetes mellitus, smoking, ASAclassification, location of the wound, wound size or wound duration. CONCLUSIONS Some patient characteristics (i.e. gender, obesity, smoking behaviour, presence of diabetes mellitus and ASA-classification at presentation) and some wound characteristics (i.e. location of the wound, wound duration and size) do not seem to contra-indicate eligibility for MDT. However, older patients and patients with chronic limb ischaemia or deep wounds

  13. Risk factors for wound infection in health care facilities in Buea, Cameroon: aerobic bacterial pathogens and antibiogram of isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kihla, Akoachere Jane-Francis Tatah; Ngunde, Palle John; Evelyn, Mbianda Soupsop; Gerard, Nkwelang; Ndip, Roland Ndip

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wound infection is a significant clinical challenge in hospitals in developing countries where proper healthcare delivery is hampered by limited resources. This study investigated the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacteria causing wound infection and risk factors for infection among hospitalized patients in Buea, Cameroon, to generate findings which could drive reformation of policies on infection control. Methods Aerobic bacteria were isolated from 212 swabs collected from patients with clinically diagnosed infected wounds. Risk factors for wound infection were investigated. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates was determined by disk diffusion technique. The Chi-square test was employed to determine significant differences in isolation and distribution of organisms in various specimens. Differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results Twelve bacteria species were isolated from 169 (79.7%) specimens. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, the predominant isolates in all wound types exhibited a high preponderance of multidrug resistant strains. High rate of infection was attributed to lack of constant water supply and breakdown of sterilization equipment during the study period. Highest diversity of pathogens occurred in open wounds. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in isolation of pathogens with respect to age, gender and wound type. Co-existing morbidity increased risk of wound infection. Isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and resistant to oxacillin. Conclusion Wound infection with resistant bacteria constitutes a significant cause of morbidity in the study area. Findings reiterate the need to strengthen infection control and drug dispensing policies, and greater collaboration between microbiologists and medical practioners to stem the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:25360190

  14. Increasing the presence of biofilm and healing delay in a porcine model of MRSA-infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Roche, Eric D; Renick, Paul J; Tetens, Shannon P; Ramsay, Sarah J; Daniels, Egeenee Q; Carson, Dennis L

    2012-01-01

    Data supporting the concept that microbial biofilms are a major cause of non-healing ulcers remain limited. A porcine model was established where delayed healing resulted from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in full-thickness wounds. At the end of one study a wound remaining open was sampled and a MRSA strain was isolated. This pig-passaged strain was used as the inoculating strain in several subsequent studies. The resulting MRSA wound infections exhibited a greater, more stable tissue bioburden than seen in studies using the parent strain. Furthermore, wounds infected with the passaged strain experienced a greater delay in healing. To understand whether these changes corresponded to an increased biofilm character of the wound infection, wound biopsy samples from studies using either the parent or passaged MRSA strains were examined microscopically. Evidence of biofilm was observed for both strains, as most samples at a minimum had multiple isolated, dense microcolonies of bacteria. However, the passaged MRSA resulted in bacterial colonies of greater frequency and size that occurred more often in concatenated fashion to generate extended sections of biofilm. These results provide a model case in which increasing biofilm character of a wound infection corresponded with a greater delay in wound healing.

  15. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references.

  16. Treatment of Burn Wound Infection Using Ultraviolet Light: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Numra Abdul; Aslam, Moaz; Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Rahman, Arshalooz Jamila; Rehman, Fazl Ur

    2014-01-01

    A 9 year old girl presented to us with complaints of fever and pain in burn wounds with deteriorating health for one month. According to Lund and Broder's chart, burns spanned the posterior trunk (13%), right arm (1.5%), left arm (1.5%), and buttocks (2.5%). The wounds showed improper healing. She had previously underwent split-thickness skin grafting, using skin harvests from thighs and antimicrobial therapy with vancomycin, fluconazole and colomycin with limited clinical improvement. Analgesia was administered. Blood cultures and tissue cultures from the burns indicated polymicrobial wound infection and sepsis, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite broad-spectrum antibiotics, fever persisted and condition deteriorated. Antifungals were also administered with no clinical improvement. Eventually another split-thickness skin grafting was done to provide fresh grafts. In due course, ultraviolet light exposure, of wavelength 32–40 nm/W/cm2, was considered for treatment. In prone position, the wounds were exposed to ultraviolet phototherapy 6–8 h daily for 8 days. Eventually, wound healing and sepsis improved. Antibiotics were optimized and high protein diet was started. Eventually the wounds showed fresh margins and visible signs of healing. With remarkable clinical improvement and no further fever spikes, the patient was eventually discharged. She was advised to shower regularly, apply bandages with acetic acid. On her last outpatient follow up, 2 weeks after discharge, she was doing well, with no complaints of pain or fever. Examination of burns showed clean wounds, with clear margins and good graft uptake. She did not require any further grafting or surgical procedures thereafter. PMID:26199885

  17. Human Wound Infection with Mannheimia glucosida following Lamb Bite

    PubMed Central

    Omaleki, Lida; Turni, Conny; Barber, Stuart Richard; Browning, Glenn Francis; Francis, Michelle J.; Graham, Maryza; Korman, Tony M.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia spp. are veterinary pathogens that can cause mastitis and pneumonia in domestic cattle and sheep. While Mannheimia glucosida can be found as normal flora in oral and respiratory mucosa in sheep, there have been no reported cases of human infection with this organism. PMID:26202121

  18. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation and Dwell Time Used to Treat Infected Orthopedic Implants: A 4-patient Case Series.

    PubMed

    Dettmers, Robert; Brekelmans, Wouter; Leijnen, Michiel; van der Burg, Boudewijn; Ritchie, Ewan

    2016-09-01

    Infection following orthopedic implants for bone fixation or joint replacement is always serious and may require removal of the osteosynthetic material. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of complex wounds, including infected wounds with osteosynthetic material. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the outcomes of 4 patients (1 man, 3 women; age range 49 to 71 years) with a postoperative wound infection (POWI) following fracture repair and internal fixation. All patients were at high risk for surgical complications, including infections. Standard infection treatments (antibiotics) had been unsuccessful. Based on the available literature, a NPWTi-d protocol was developed. Following surgical debridement, wounds were instilled with polyhexanide biguanide with a set dwell time of 15 minutes, followed by continuous NPWTi-d of -125 mm Hg for 4 hours. The system was changed every 3 to 4 days until sufficient granulation tissue was evident and negative pressure without instillation could be used. Systemic antibiotics were continued in all patients. Granulation tissue was found to be sufficient in 12 to 35 days in the 4 cases, no recurrence of infection was noted, and the osteosynthesis material remained in place. No adverse events were observed. Research is needed to compare the safety and effectiveness of this adjunct treatment in the management of challenging wounds to other patient and wound management approaches. PMID:27668478

  19. The Healing Effect of Licorice on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infected Burn Wounds in Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Rokhsari, Pedram; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi Samani, Soleiman; Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Koohi Hosseinabadi, Omid; Shamsian, Shahram; Ahmadi, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still one of the most devastating injuries in emergency medicine while improvements in wound healing knowledge and technology have resulted into development of new dressings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the healing effect of licorice in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected burn wounds of experimental rat model. METHODS One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 4 equal groups. Group A received silver sulfadiazine ointment, Group B received 10% licorice extract and Group C was considered as control group and received gel base as the base of medication. Group D did not receive any medication and just underwent burn injury. A standard 3rd degree burn wound was produced by a hot plate with similar size about 20% of total body surface area (TBSA) and at identical temperature. After 24 h of burn production, 108 colony forming units (CFU) of toxigenic strains of P. aeruginosa (PA 103) were inoculated subcutaneously into the burnt area. After 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of therapy, the animals were sacrificed and burn areas were macroscopically examined and histologically evaluated. RESULTS Decrease in size of the burn wounds, in inflammation and re-epithelialization were poor in groups B-D. Infection to P. aeruginosa was still visible in groups B-D but was absent in Group A. The mean histological score, tensile strength, maximum stress, yield strength and stiffness in groups B-D were lower compared with Group A. CONCLUSION Licorice extract in 10% concentration was shown not to be effective in healing of P. aeruginosa infected burn wounds. PMID:25489532

  20. Topical Bactroban (mupirocin): efficacy in treating burn wounds infected with methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Strock, L L; Lee, M M; Rutan, R L; Desai, M H; Robson, M C; Herndon, D N; Heggers, J P

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility predictors such as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and Nathans Agar Well Diffusion (NAWD) assay provide essential information relevant to the therapeutic approach in burn-wound sepsis. The susceptibilities of 68 gram-positive burn-wound isolates were tested against topical Bactroban (mupirocin) (Beecham Laboratories, Bristol, Tenn.) and compared with other topical antimicrobials such as mafenide acetate, silver sulfadiazine, and bacitracin/neomycin/polymyxin (BNP). Topical susceptibility data were obtained with a modification of NAWD assay. Bactroban's antimicrobial activity was greater than that of mafenide acetate (100% vs 97%), and significantly greater than that of silver sulfadiazine and that of BNP (p less than 0.001). Of the 68 isolates that were susceptible to Bactroban, 51 were predominately methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRSA). Bactroban showed in vitro activity against 71% of the 85 gram-negative isolates tested. Mafenide acetate showed activity against 89% of these isolates, a significant difference compared with Bactroban (p less than 0.02). In general, no significant difference was found between the activities of Bactroban and silver sulfadiazine against the gram-negative isolates. The activities of mafenide acetate and silver sulfadiazine against isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were significantly greater than that of Bactroban (p less than 0.05). Bactroban may be used in the treatment of documented staphylococcal burn-wound infections. On the basis of the in vitro data, 13 patients with MRSA burn-wound infections susceptible to Bactroban were evaluated. Quantitative wound biopsies were employed to determine the efficacy of this therapeutic approach. The outcome of these infections was correctly predicted by the NAWD assay in 92.3% of the patients treated (p less than 0.0005).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a point-of-care diagnostic for infection in wound effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In military medicine, one of the challenges in dealing with large combat-related injuries is the prevalence of bacterial infection, including multidrug resistant organisms. This can prolong the wound healing process and lead to wound dehiscence. Current methods of identifying bacterial infection rely on culturing microbes from patient material and performing biochemical tests, which together can take 2-3 days to complete. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that allows for highly sensitive structural detection of analytes adsorbed onto specially prepared metal surfaces. In the past, we have been able to discriminate between bacterial isolates grown on solid culture media using standard Raman spectroscopic methods. Here, SERS is utilized to assess the presence of bacteria in wound effluent samples taken directly from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt for the application of SERS directly to wound effluent. The utilization of SERS as a point-of-care diagnostic tool would enable physicians to determine course of treatment and drug administration in a matter of hours.

  2. Wound Chronicity, Inpatient Care, and Chronic Kidney Disease Predispose to MRSA Infection in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christopher; May, Kerry; Hale, Thomas; Allard, Bernard; Rowlings, Naomi; Freeman, Amy; Harrison, Jessica; McCann, Jane; Wraight, Paul

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the microbiological profile of diabetes-related foot infections (DRFIs) and the impact of wound duration, inpatient treatment, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Postdebridement microbiological samples were collected from individuals presenting with DRFIs from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2007. RESULTS A total of 653 specimens were collected from 379 individuals with 36% identifying only one isolate. Of the total isolates, 77% were gram-positive bacteria (staphylococci 43%, streptococci 13%). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from 23%; risk factors for MRSA included prolonged wound duration (odds ratio 2.31), inpatient management (2.19), and CKD (OR 1.49). Gram-negative infections were more prevalent with inpatient management (P = 0.002) and prolonged wound duration (P < 0.001). Pseudomonal isolates were more common in chronic wounds (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS DRFIs are predominantly due to gram-positive aerobes but are usually polymicrobial and increase in complexity with inpatient care and ulcer duration. In the presence of prolonged duration, inpatient management, or CKD, empiric MRSA antibiotic cover should be considered. PMID:19587371

  3. Local Application of Probiotic Bacteria Prophylaxes against Sepsis and Death Resulting from Burn Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Argenta, Anne; Satish, Latha; Gallo, Phillip; Liu, Fang; Kathju, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if local prophylactic application of probiotic bacteria to burn wounds will prevent death in a mouse model of burn wound sepsis. Background Infection remains the most common complication after burn injury and can result in sepsis and death, despite the use of topical and systemic antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequently implicated pathogen. Local application of probiotics directly to burn wounds is an attractive novel intervention that avoids the pitfalls of standard antibiotic therapies. Methods A burn-sepsis model was established using a sub-eschar injection of bioluminescent P. aeruginosa; infection was tracked using a charge-coupled camera. Full-thickness burn injuries were placed on the dorsums of adult mice; the injured sites were then treated with vehicle (burn wound control), probiotics (Lactobacillus plantarum only), pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa only), or probiotics plus pathogen (Lactobacillus plus Pseudomonas). Animals were monitored until death/moribundity or for one week, then sacrificed. Harvested tissues were subjected to imaging and molecular assays. Results Control and probiotic-only animals showed no mortality (100% survival) at one week. Pseudomonas-only animals showed > 90% mortality within 40 hours of infection. In contrast, animals treated with probiotics plus Pseudomonas showed less than 10% mortality. Use of bioluminescent Pseudomonas bacteria demonstrated that probiotic therapy inhibited septicemic accumulation of the pathogen in remote organs. In addition, probiotic therapy successfully suppressed the infection-dependent induction of TNF-α and interleukins 6 and 10 in the liver. Conclusions Local probiotic therapy shows great potential as a valuable adjunct in the management of complicated burn injury. PMID:27780258

  4. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from a wound infection after exposure to hurricane-related floodwater.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vernissia; Nayak, Seema

    2012-01-01

    A man in his early 80s presented to our emergency department with painless redness and swelling in his right leg. One week prior, he cleaned up floodwater in his basement after Hurricane Irene passed the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA in August 2011. Physical examination included large purple bullae and raised concern for necrotising fasciitis. Wound culture revealed a polymicrobial infection including Leclercia adecarboxylata.

  5. Towards understanding Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections by profiling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Piotr; Glik, Justyna; Kawecki, Marek; Martins dos Santos, Vítor A P

    2008-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing severe acute and chronic nosocomial infections in immunocompromised or catheterized patients. It is prevalent in burn wound infections and it is generally multi-drug resistant. Understanding the genetic programs underlying infection is essential to develop highly needed new strategies for prevention and therapy. This work reviews expression profiling efforts conducted worldwide towards gaining insights into pathogenesis by P. aeruginosa, in particular in burn wounds. Work on various infection models, including the burned mouse model, has identified several direct virulence factors and elucidated their mode of action. In vivo gene expression experiments using In vivo Expression Technology (IVET) ascertained distinct regulatory circuits and traits that have helped explain P. aeruginosa s success as a general pathogen. The sequencing of the whole genome from a number of P. aeruginosa strains and the construction of genome-wide microarrays have paved the road to the several insightful studies on the (interacting) traits underlying infection. A series of in vitro and initial in vivo gene expression studies revealed specific traits pivotal for infection, such as quorum sensing systems, iron acquisition and oxidative stress responses, and toxin production among others. The data sets obtained from global transcriptional profiling provide insights that will be essential for the development of new targets and options for prevention and intervention.

  6. Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Compounds in Controlling Infection by Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens through Pruning Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Rebeca; Mateos, Rosa María; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Olego, Miguel Angel; Sevillano, Silvia; González-García, Sandra; Garzón-Jimeno, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine trunk fungal pathogens, such as Diplodia seriata and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, can infect plants through pruning wounds. They cause grapevine trunk diseases and are involved in grapevine decline. Accordingly, the protection of pruning wounds is crucial for the management of grapevine trunk diseases. The efficacy of different natural antifungals in inhibiting the growth of several fungi causing grapevine trunk diseases was evaluated in vitro. The fungi showing greater in vitro efficacy were tested on autoclaved grape wood assays against D. seriata and P. chlamydospora. Based on results from these assays, chitosan oligosaccharide, vanillin, and garlic extract were selected for further evaluation on pruning wounds inoculated with D. seriata and P. chlamydospora in field trials. A significant decrease in plant mortality was observed after 2 years of growth in the plants treated with the different natural antifungals compared to the mortality rate observed in infected plants that were not treated with antifungals. Also, the infection rate for the inoculated pathogens was significantly reduced in plants treated with the selected natural antifungals. Therefore, natural antifungals represent a promising alternative for disease control and could provide significant economic benefits for the grape-growing industry. PMID:26162882

  7. Combat-Related Pythium aphanidermatum Invasive Wound Infection: Case Report and Discussion of Utility of Molecular Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Aaron R; Murray, Clinton K; Driscoll, Ian R; Wickes, Brian L; Wiederhold, Nathan; Sutton, Deanna A; Sanders, Carmita; Mende, Katrin; Enniss, Brent; Feig, James; Ganesan, Anuradha; Rini, Elizabeth A; Vento, Todd J

    2015-06-01

    We describe a 22-year-old soldier with 19% total body surface area burns, polytrauma, and sequence- and culture-confirmed Pythium aphanidermatum wound infection. Antemortem histopathology suggested disseminated Pythium infection, including brain involvement; however, postmortem PCR revealed Cunninghamella elegans, Lichtheimia corymbifera, and Saksenaea vasiformis coinfection. The utility of molecular diagnostics in invasive fungal infections is discussed. PMID:25832301

  8. Combat-Related Pythium aphanidermatum Invasive Wound Infection: Case Report and Discussion of Utility of Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Clinton K.; Driscoll, Ian R.; Wickes, Brian L.; Wiederhold, Nathan; Sutton, Deanna A.; Sanders, Carmita; Mende, Katrin; Enniss, Brent; Feig, James; Ganesan, Anuradha; Rini, Elizabeth A.; Vento, Todd J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 22-year-old soldier with 19% total body surface area burns, polytrauma, and sequence- and culture-confirmed Pythium aphanidermatum wound infection. Antemortem histopathology suggested disseminated Pythium infection, including brain involvement; however, postmortem PCR revealed Cunninghamella elegans, Lichtheimia corymbifera, and Saksenaea vasiformis coinfection. The utility of molecular diagnostics in invasive fungal infections is discussed. PMID:25832301

  9. Barrier materials. Their influence on surgical wound infections.

    PubMed

    Belkin, N L

    1992-06-01

    Aseptic technique can best be described as an aggregation of reasonable practices performed in the surgical suite as part of the overall methodology in controlling or minimizing the possibility of infection. The key words in this definition are aggregation and reasonable. The real question is whether the surgical nursing community is prepared to reconsider and reassess the importance of a theoretical and reasonable, but not proven, practice that it has been advocating for almost two decades. From the evidence, it appears that a departure from the universal application of the barrier principle would not compromise the quality of care rendered to the surgical patient while at the same time prove to be economically and environmentally advantageous.

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as additional treatment in deep sternal wound infections – a single center's experience

    PubMed Central

    Bryndza, Magdalena; Chrapusta, Anna; Kobielska, Ewa; Kapelak, Bogusław; Grudzień, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is one of the most serious complications after cardiac surgery procedures, observed in 5% of patients. Current standard medical therapy for DSWI includes antibiotics, surgical debridement, resuturing or negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Unfortunately, in some cases these methods are insufficient, and additional therapeutic options are needed. Aim To assess the effects and usefulness of additional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) in patients with DSWI after cardiac surgery procedures. Material and methods A retrospective analysis of 10 patients after cardiac surgery who developed DSWI in the period 2010–2012 was performed. After 3 months of ineffective conventional therapy including targeted antibiotic, surgical sternal debridement and NPWT, patients were qualified for additional HBO2 therapy. A total of 20 sessions of HBO2 therapy were performed, each 92 minutes long. Results After 4 weeks of HBO2 treatment, 7 patients presented complete wound healing with fibrous scar formation. One patient was qualified for the another cycle of HBO2 therapy with 20 additional sessions, and complete wound healing was observed. In 2 cases, after 5 and 19 sessions, HBO2 was interrupted because of improper qualifications. Conclusions The HBO2 as an additional therapy in DSWI was successful in 80% of cases, and no complications were observed. However, due to the small number of published studies with a small number of patients, randomized, clinical trials are needed to assess the clinical results of HBO2 in DSWI after cardiac surgery procedures. PMID:27785131

  11. Development of an infection-resistant, bioactive wound dressing surface.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf, Matthew D; Bide, Martin J; Hannel, Susan L; Platek, Michael J; Monahan, Thomas S; Contreras, Mauricio A; Phaneuf, Tina M; LoGerfo, Frank W

    2005-09-15

    Trauma, whether caused by an accident or in an intentional manner, results in significant morbidity and mortality. The goal of this study was to develop a novel biomaterial surface in vitro and ex vivo that provides both localized infection resistance nd hemostatic properties. Our hypothesis is that a combination of specific surface characteristics can be successfully incorporated into a single biomaterial. Functional groups were created with woven Dacron (Cntrl) material via exposure to ethylenediamine (C-EDA). The antibiotic ciprofloxacin (Cipro) was then applied to the C-EDA material using pad/autoclave technique (C-EDA-AB) followed by surface immobilization of the coagulation cascade enzyme thrombin (C-EDA-AB-Thrombin). Antimicrobial activity by the C-EDA-AB surface persisted for 5 days compared with Cntrl and dipped controls, which lasted <1 h. C-EDA-AB-Thrombin surfaces had 2.6- and 105-fold greater surface thrombin activity compared with nonspecifically bound thrombin and Cipro-dyed surfaces, respectively. Surface thrombus formation ex vivo was evident after 1 min of exposure, with thrombus organization evident by 2.5 min. In contrast, C-EDA-AB and Cntrl segments showed only blood protein adsorption on the fibers. Thus, this study demonstrated that Cipro and thrombin can be simultaneously incorporated onto a biomaterial surface while maintaining their respective biological activities.

  12. Superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in the treatment of the chronic, infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Białoszewski, Dariusz; Kowalewski, Michał

    2003-10-30

    Background. Ozone therapy - i.e. the treatment of patients by a mixture of oxygen and ozone - has been used for many years as a method ancillary to basic treatment, especially in those cases in which traditional treatment methods do not give satisfactory results, e.g. skin loss in non-healing wounds, ulcers, pressure sores, fistulae, etc. Material and methods. In the Department of Phisiotherapy of the Medical Faculty and the Department of the Orthopedics and Traumatology of the Locomotor System at the Medical University of Warsaw in the period from January 2001 until November 2002, 23 patients with heavy,chronic, antibiotic resistants septic complications after trauma, surgical procedures and secundary skin infetions were treated with ozone. The ozone therapy was administered using an authorial technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone application. Results. In the wounds of the all experienced patients the inhibition of septic processes and wound healing was much faster than normal. Conclusions. Our data confirm the advantages wich result from the technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in combined treatment for septic complications in the soft tissue, especially in the locomotor system. These technique makes posttraumatic infections and promotes quicker healing of post-surgical and post-traumal complications - chronic septic infections. This method also lowers the cost of antibiotic therapy and is sometimes the only available auxiliary technique to support surgical procedures.

  13. Can infected wounds be decontaminated with the use of the CO2 laser: An in vivo comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Verde Santos, Jose Z.; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio L.; Cavalcanti das Neves, Jerlucia; Ribeiro de Sena, Kesia X. d. F.; Matos de Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare microbiologically the effects of the CO2 Laser and Chlorohexidine Gluconate (4%) on Staphylococcus aureus infected cutaneous wounds. Wound infection constitutes a big risk for patients and it is usually associated to increased morbidity, mortality and hospital costs. It is accepted that local treatment of these infections is effective. Standardized wounds created on the dorsum of 36 rats were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated during six days as follows: Group I: Chlorohexidine Gluconate applied to the wound surface during one minute during six days; Group II: Single CO2 Laser irradiation (8W,CW, unfocused, 8cm focal distance, 81530W/cm2), maintaining surface debris; Group III: Single CO2 Laser irradiation (8W,CW, unfocused, 8cm focal distance, 81530W/cm2), removing the surface debris. Daily samples were taken for microbiological analysis. Seven days after wounding the animals were killed a final sample taken. The use of Chlorohexidine Gluconate solution and the CO2 laser with the removal of the surface debris result in a significant reduction on the infectability of the Staphylococcus aureus when compared to non-treated infected wounds (p=0.00 e p=0.02). However, if the debris is left on the wound surface the resolution of the infection is less significant and results in non-significant differences on the number of Staphylococcus aureus when compared to non treated controls (p=0.14). No difference on infectability of the Staphylococcus aureus was detectable when the debris was removed of the surface of the wounds and when the Chlorohexidine solution was used (p=0.05). Therefore, the use of the CO2 laser would improve the resolution of the infection without further irradiating the tissue and consequently without further impairing wound healing. The fact that significant differences were observed between the two modalities of CO2 treatment indicates that the surface debris acts as a culture medium for bacterial

  14. Peroxy Pyruvic Acid-Containing Topical Anti-Infective: A Potential Candidate for a Wound Instillation Solution

    PubMed Central

    Neas, Edwin D.; Dunn, Julie A.; Silva, Evelyn Dimaano; Chambers, A. Morgan; Luckasen, Gary J.; Jaskowiak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the therapeutic properties of a peroxy pyruvic acid (PPA)-containing topical anti-infective in a human ex-vivo model that replicates the natural conditions of a human chronic wound. Approach: Wound material was extracted from patients with nonhealing diabetic ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, and arterial wounds. Microbial species were identified, and wound colonization was quantified. Extracted samples were then exposed to a PPA-containing topical anti-infective as an instillation solution with negative pressure wound therapy NPWT at concentrations of 1,000, 1,500, or 2,500 ppm for a period of 1, 5, or 10 min to determine the effect of exposure on isolated pathogens, including effect on proteins. Results: A total of 32 samples were collected from patients. Samples presented with a range of bacteria and fungi representing 14 genera and 22 species, many of which are or are evolving to be resistant to many, if not most, current systemic antibiotics. Thirteen of twenty-three samples (57%) from chronic wounds had bacteria counts ≥105 and most were 6 logs or more. Seven of 10 samples (70%) from acute wounds had bacteria counts ≤105 and most were much lower. Exposure to PPA-containing topical anti-infective at 1,000 ppm killed all bacteria and fungi in all samples within 1 min of exposure. Innovation: PPA-containing topical anti-infective is a potentially valuable clinical option for NPWT. Conclusion: PPA-containing topical anti-infective is a potential candidate for use as an NPWT instillation solution for the treatment of wound infections caused by susceptible pathogens. PMID:27785377

  15. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL) it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group); whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group). We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2). Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039). Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly. PMID:21501461

  16. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe.

  17. Ultrasound scanning of post-operative wounds--the risks of cross-infection.

    PubMed

    Spencer, P; Spencer, R C

    1988-05-01

    Ultrasound scanning of surgical wounds is an established procedure for the detection of abscesses. The possible risks of cross-infection resulting from this technique were examined by testing the sterility of the ultrasound probes, the coupling gel and the stand-off medium Kitecko (3 M). The coupling gel was also assessed for any bactericidal properties. Sixty-six per cent of swabs taken from machines in constant use and 33% of the total number of swabs taken were contaminated with skin flora including Staphylococcus aureus. Sterility was achieved using a 70% alcohol wipe. The coupling gel was inherently sterile but had no bactericidal action. The solid stand-off medium Kitecko grew Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas species. The implications of these findings in relation to scanning post-operative wounds are discussed.

  18. Components and Quality Measures of DIME (Devitalized Tissue, Infection/Inflammation, Moisture Balance, and Edge Preparation) in Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert J.; Fife, Caroline; Moore, Zena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To discuss how patient considerations and the initial wound environment can affect wound treatment and summarize the way in which the initial US Wound Registry measures capture aspects of the DIME (Debridement/devitalized tissue, Infection or inflammation, Moisture balance, and wound Edge preparation/wound depth) principles. DISCUSSION: The treatment of chronic wounds often involves extended hospital stays and long-term outpatient follow-up visits with costly advanced therapeutic interventions. As complex care is required for chronic wounds, treatment guidelines such as DIME have evolved to include consideration of patient-centered concerns and etiology, as well as features of wound bed preparation. The US healthcare system is in the midst of transitioning to a quality-based system. However, as wound care is not yet a recognized specialty, it is poorly represented in the current approved quality-based measures. CONCLUSION: This article helps to identify the practice guidelines that are not currently represented by quality metrics. PMID:27089149

  19. Detection of Biofilm in Wounds as an Early Indicator for Risk for Tissue Infection and Wound Chronicity.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Krishna S; Wong, Lesley K

    2016-01-01

    Wounds are dynamic environments in which dead tissue, exudate, and the bacterial bioburden interact in a complex manner among themselves and with the tissue of the host. Bacteria organize into biofilms, reducing their susceptibility to elimination by the host immune response and antimicrobials. Early detection of biofilms in wounds is crucial to successful chronic wound management; and although many techniques have developed to identify planktonic counterparts in viable wounds, few have been able to quickly and accurately identify bacterial biofilms. Future studies are needed to find means of identifying and monitoring biofilm colonization at the bedside to permit timely initiation of treatment. In this review, we examine some promising new technologies that hope to identify and quantify the process of biofilm formation in chronic wounds.

  20. Treatment of hardware infection after osteosynthesis of lower leg using negative pressure wound therapy and transforming powder dressing.

    PubMed

    Marinović, Marin; Ivandcić, Aldo; Spanjol, Josip; Pina, Maja; Bakota, Bore; Bandalović, Ante; Cukeljs, Fabijan

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the distal part of the lower leg are more common in everyday practice and traumatology. In young and active patients these injuries are mainly caused by high energy trauma. They are treated with external fixator in first step, and in second step, after sanation of the soft tissue, with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). It is very safe and effective method of treatment. Treatment of the infections that occur in the early postoperative period after open reduction and internal fixation represents a great problem and challenge for surgeons. It is widely accepted that the presence of deep infection can't be cured in the presence of hardware. However, removal of hardware in the presence of unhealed fractures significantly complicates sanation of infection and fracture itself We have decided to present a 35-years-old patient with a hardware infection with present chronic wound with hardware exposed eight months after the first operation and six months after second operation. The wound measured one centimeter in diameter with cell detritus and bad granulations tissue inside the wound. Hardwre was exposed in the depth of the wound.The secretion was minimal. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applicated after debridemet and lavage performed in ambulatory conditions. The starting therapy was continuously -125 mm Hg of vacuum. After five days of NPWT the defect was partially filled with granula- tion tissue. For another five days we continue with NPWT with the same values of-125 mm Hg pressure but in the inter- mitent mode. After that period we used transforming powder dressing for covering and protection of the wound with was filled with granulation tissue. Five days later, wound was completely healed with epithelisation. After four months of patient follow-up, we found the wound is completely repaired. The patient denies pain and has continued orderly flow of fracture healing, with no signs of infection. PMID:25842766

  1. Antibiofilm and antimicrobial efficacy of DispersinB®-KSL-W peptide-based wound gel against chronic wound infection associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Purushottam V; Leung, Kai P; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2014-05-01

    The medical importance of bacterial biofilms has increased with the recognition of biofilms as one of the major contributors to the slow or non-healing chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous leg ulcers, and pressure ulcers. Being a protected community of microorganisms, biofilms are notoriously refractory to antibiotic treatments. As the conventional treatment modalities have proven ineffective, this study provides the in vitro evidence to support the use of a novel combination of DispersinB(®) antibiofilm enzyme that inhibits biofilm formation and disperses preformed biofilm, and thus making the biofilm bacteria more susceptible to a broad-spectrum KSL-W antimicrobial peptide. The combination of DispersinB(®) and KSL-W peptide showed synergistic antibiofilm and antimicrobial activity against chronic wound infection associated biofilm-embedded bacteria such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS), and Acinetobacter baumannii. In addition, the wound gel formulation comprising DispersinB(®), KSL-W peptide, and a gelling agent Pluronic F-127 showed a broad-spectrum and enduring antimicrobial activity against test organisms. Furthermore, as compared to commercial wound gel Silver-Sept™, DispersinB(®)-KSL-W peptide-based wound gel was significantly more effective in inhibiting the biofilm-embedded MRSA, S. epidermidis, CoNS, Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci, A. baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.05). Thus, this study provides promising evidence for the potential application of antibiofilm-antimicrobial DispersinB(®)-KSL-W wound gel in chronic wound management.

  2. Prevention of abdominal wound infection (PROUD trial, DRKS00000390): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Wound infection affects a considerable portion of patients after abdominal operations, increasing health care costs and postoperative morbidity and affecting quality of life. Antibacterial coating has been suggested as an effective measure to decrease postoperative wound infections after laparotomies. The INLINE metaanalysis has recently shown the superiority of a slowly absorbable continuous suture for abdominal closure; with PDS plus® such a suture has now been made available with triclosan antibacterial coating. Methods/Design The PROUD trial is designed as a randomised, controlled, observer, surgeon and patient blinded multicenter superiority trial with two parallel groups and a primary endpoint of wound infection during 30 days after surgery. The intervention group will receive triclosan coated polydioxanone sutures, whereas the control group will receive the standard polydioxanone sutures; abdominal closure will otherwise be standardized in both groups. Statistical analysis is based on intention-to-treat population via binary logistic regression analysis, the total sample size of n = 750 is sufficient to ensure alpha = 5% and power = 80%, an interim analysis will be carried out after data of 375 patients are available. Discussion The PROUD trial will yield robust data to determine the effectiveness of antibacterial coating in one of the standard sutures for abdominal closure and potentially lead to amendment of current guidelines. The exploration of clinically objective parameters as well as quality of life holds immediate relevance for clinical management and the pragmatic trial design ensures high external validity. Trial Registration The trial protocol has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000390). PMID:22103965

  3. [Advancement of maggot including living body to treat chronic infected wounds].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Shouyu; Diao, Yunpeng; Zhang, Houli; Huang, Shanshan; Lv, Decheng

    2009-12-01

    Human has used maggot to treat diseases for thousands of years. In recent years, with abuse of antibiotic and the rising incidence of antibiotic resistance, maggot therapy, as a surgical alternative, is mainly applied to treat chronic infected wounds on account of its low cost, efficacy and safety. Its mechanisms are disinfection, bio-debridement and enhancement of tissue regeneration. Maggot therapy which serves as a kind of biological therapy is promising. However, living maggot therapy could result in inevitable complications, so that we should apply traditional Chinese medicine theory to investigate and develop new delivery method of maggot. The review summarizes the past and present of maggot therapy.

  4. Surgical wound infection by mannitol-nonfermenting Staphylococcus aureus after lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Nigro, Raffaele; Marrollo, Roberta; Polilli, Ennio; Campitelli, Irma; Buonaguidi, Roberto; Fazii, Paolo; Carretto, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Purulent infection of a surgical wound developed after discectomy, and a mannitol-nonfermenting Staphylococcus aureus isolate was cultivated as the etiologic agent. Nonfermenting S. aureus strains are exceedingly rare and may be erroneously mistaken and dismissed as contaminants. This report then emphasizes that pure and massive cultures must be carefully evaluated, even if preliminary examination does not suggest a pathogenic organism. Also, although mannitol-negative, the studied strain was correctly detected as S. aureus by both the-FISH test (AdvanDx, USA) and the Liofilchem 'Chromatic Staph aureus', highlighting that additional diagnostic methods may support recognition of uncommon, nonfermenting S. aureus strains in the daily practice.

  5. Ultrastructure and bacterial infection of wounds in honey bee ( Apis mellifera) pupae punctured by Varroa mites.

    PubMed

    Kanbar, G; Engels, W

    2003-08-01

    The damage to western honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies caused by the originally Asian ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is mainly a consequence of the infestation of host bee pupae. In the capped brood cell, female mites puncture the host's integument at preferred sites in order to suck haemolymph. Due to repeated feeding by the mother mite and her progeny, these perforations are kept open until shortly before the imaginal moult of the bee. Thereafter scarring takes place, thus preventing microbial infection after the adult bee has emerged from the protected environment of the sealed brood cell. However, colonies of various bacteria were found in the open wounds of about 15-30% of all inspected host pupae with an abundance depended on the level of host brood cell infestation by the mite. The small punctures of the pupal integument are difficult to detect but, by vital staining with trypan blue, the wounds can be visualised. The ultrastructure of the pupal wounds, the bacterial colonies and the scarring process are documented by a series of scanning electron micrographs.

  6. Vacuum-assisted therapy accelerates wound healing in necrotizing soft tissue infections: our experience in two intravenous drug abuse patients.

    PubMed

    Marinis, Athanasios; Voultsos, Mavroudis; Grivas, Paraskevas; Dikeakos, Panagiotis; Liarmakopoulos, Emmanouil; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Rizos, Spyros

    2013-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) devices is currently a well established technique for managing complicated wounds. Such wounds occur after aggressive surgical debridement for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). In this report we present our experience in two intravenous drug abusers managed with VAC for NSTIs. The patients were 25 and 34 years old, HCV positive and presented with oedema of the upper femoral compartments and concomitant severe sepsis. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed severe cellulitis, fluid collection and necrosis of the affected fasciae and muscles. After emergent and subsequent aggressive surgical debridement during the first 48h, the VAC device was applied. Both patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a fast recovery from their multiorgan dysfunction. Suture closure of the wounds was achieved at the 25th and 38th postoperative days respectively and patients were discharged without any motor deficit. Negative pressure wound therapy is a modern therapeutic modality for treating complicated infected wounds. Moreover, it accelerates wound healing and primary closure, facilitating patient ambulation and recovery. A dedicated medical and nursing team is an important prerequisite for a successful outcome.

  7. Healing Potentials of Oral Moringa Oleifera Leaves Extract and Tetracycline on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infected Wounds of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Eyarefe, Oghenemega D; Idowu, Aderayo; Afolabi, Jeremiah M

    2015-01-01

    The effects of oral dose of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera and tetracycline antibiotics on cutaneous wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus were studied in eighteen adult wistar rats (159±31.5g) randomized into three groups: Group A, n = 6, Moringa oleifera-(300 mg/kg). Group B, n = 6, tetracycline (9.4 mg/kg) and Group C, n = 6, Sterile water (control). Six millimetres diameter nape wound, created on each rat under 2% xylazine (5 mg/kg) and 5% ketamine (35 mg/kg), was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (108 Colony Forming Unit (CFU). Following infection, treatment was commenced with daily oral dose of test preparations and the wounds were evaluated every other day i.e., day 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for wetness (wound exudation), wound edge oedema, hyperaemia, granulation tissues and contraction (diameter). Severe wound exudation existed in all the groups between days 0-3 (p = 1.00). A significantly less wound exudation was observed at days 3-5 (p = 0.000) and 5-9 (p = 0.003) (Control< Tetracycline Wound edge oedema was significantly less on days 5-9 (p = 0.000) and 9-15 (p = 0.001) (Controlwound granulation tissue was observed among the groups at days 5-9 (p = 0.002) and 9-15 (p = 0.001) (Control> Moringa> Tetracycline). Differences in wound diameter was not significant except at days 5-9 (p = 0.013) (Control> Moringa >Tetracycline). Oral doses of Moringa oleifera extract (300mg/kg) and tetracycline (9.4mg/kg) are not effective as antimicrobial or immune-boosting agents to enhance healing of wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and hence not recommended for rapid clearance of Staphylococcus aureus infected wounds.

  8. Effect of near-infrared diode laser and indocyanine green to treat infections on different wound models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Yuksel, Sahru; Gulsoy, Murat

    2014-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria causes significant increase in deaths due to wound infections around the world. Nowadays, it could be impossible to find appropriate antibiotics to treat some bacterial strains, especially multidrug resistant types. The aim of this study is to use photodynamic therapy that destroys these kinds of bacteria with the interaction of Indocyanine green (ICG) and 808-nm diode laser. In this study, antibacterial Photodynamic Therapy technique that we call ICG-IR Laser PDT was applied on antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus that infected two different types of wound model (excisional and abrasion wound model) in vivo. Wistar albino rats were used to create animal wound models. Excisional or abrasion wounds were formed on the dorsal skin of the rats. They were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. 300 mW and 500 mW of 808-nm diode laser were applied on the wounds for 30 minutes and 15 minutes of exposure duration, respectively. ICG concentrations applied topically were 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 μg/ml. Then the tissue was dissected properly and homogenized in buffer solution. From this solution, bacterial cell count was determined by serial dilution method. 1-2 log reduction in viable cell count was observed after these applications. The temperature increase in the tissue was between 6-8°C during these applications. From these findings, it was understood that this method with 808-nm and ICG is promising but it must be improved by further dosimetry studies.

  9. Deep wound infection following pediatric scoliosis surgery: incidence and analysis of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Aleissa, Sami; Parsons, David; Grant, John; Harder, James; Howard, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Background Deep wound infection after spinal surgery is a severe complication that often requires prolonged medical and surgical management. It can compromise the outcome of the deformity correction, especially in patients requiring surgical intervention with subsequent removal of implants. Ascertaining the incidence and risk factors leading to infection may help to prevent this problem. Methods We reviewed the hospital charts of all patients who underwent spinal deformity correction from 1996 to 2005. Results In all, 227 patients were identified (139 idiopathic, 57 neuromuscular, 8 syndromic, 6 congenital, 17 other); 191 patients were treated with posterior instrumentation and fusion, 11 with anterior-only procedures and 24 with combined anterior and posterior procedures. Final follow-up ranged from 1 to 9.5 years. Infection developed in 14 patients. The overall incidence of infection was 6.2%. Drainage and back pain were the most common presenting symptoms. The incidence of infection was higher among patients with nonidiopathic diagnoses (risk ratio [RR] 8.65, p < 0.001). Use of allograft bone was associated with a higher rate of infection (RR 9.66, p < 0.001) even when stratified by diagnosis (nonidiopathic diagnoses, RR 7.6, p = 0.012). Higher volume of instrumentation was also a risk factor for infection (p = 0.022). Coagulase-negative Staphyloccocus was the most commonly identified organism, followed by Propionibacterium acnes and Pseudomonas. Conclusion Development of infection following scoliosis surgery was found to be associated with several risk factors, including a nonidiopathic diagnosis, the use of allograft and a higher volume of instrumentation. Preventative measures addressing these factors may decrease the rate of infection. PMID:21658334

  10. [Investigation of the effect of ibuprofen on wound healing in experimental Staphylococcus aureus soft tissue infections].

    PubMed

    Çitil, M Uğur; Mete, Ergun; Oğuz, E Oğuzhan; Abban Mete, Gülçin; Şahin, Barbaros; Kaleli, İlknur

    2015-04-01

    Soft tissue infections (STIs) occur as a result of the colonization of pathogenic bacteria upon the destruction of normal skin microbial flora and the skin integrity. Streptococci and staphylococci are the most frequent causes of bacterial STIs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen are often used in STIs because of their analgesic and antipyretic effects. However, evidence suggests that these drugs might delay both epithelization and angiogenesis in the early phases of wound healing because of an antiproliferative effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ibuprofen on the wound healing in STIs caused by Staphylococcus aureus in immunosuppressed mice. A total of 120 female Balb/c mice were used in the study and the mice were assigned to four test groups and two control groups. The test groups were defined as follows; B (Bacteria group, n= 23), BI (Bacteria + Ibuprofen group, n= 23), BA (Bacteria + Ampicillin group, n= 23), BIA (Bacteria + Ampicillin + Ibuprofen group, n= 21); and the control groups were defined as follows; S1B2 (only immunosuppressed controls, n= 15) and S2B2 (Sham group). Immunosupression was induced with cyclophosphamide and the experimental infection was generated by subcutaneous inoculation of bacterial suspension (2 x 10(8) cfu/ml) of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus ATCC 25923 to the right hind leg. Ibuprofen was given to the mice by gastric gavage (50 mg/kg/day), and ampicillin (100 mg/kg/day) by intramuscular injection. Wound sizes that appear in the animals were measured on a daily basis. Serum and tissue (epithelial tissue, connective tissue, sebaceous glands, sweat glands) samples were obtained on the first, third and seventh days. The tissue samples were examined histopathologically by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining method and IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) levels were determined in serum samples by ELISA method. The tissue cytokine reactions were also

  11. Perioperative hypothermia and incidence of surgical wound infection: a bibliographic study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aline Batista; Peniche, Aparecida de Cassia Giani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review article was to understand and analyze the scientific production related to the occurrence of perioperative hypothermia and the incidence of infection on the surgical site. For this purpose, a search was conducted in the databases LILACS, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane, using the health science descriptors DECS, from 2004 to 2009. A total of 91 articles were found. After eliminating duplicate items and using selection criteria for inclusion, six manuscripts remained for analysis. The studies were classified as retrospective, prospective, case studies, and clinical trials. After analysis, the majority of studies showed that hypothermia must be prevented during the perioperative period to reduce complications in the healing process of the surgical incision. Therefore, unadverted hypothermia directly influences in surgical site healing, increasing the incidence of infection in the surgical wound. PMID:25628208

  12. Role of Arginine and Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Wound Healing and Infection.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J Wesley; Supp, Dorothy M

    2014-11-01

    Significance: Only a few decades ago, the primary focus of nutritional supplementation was to prevent deficiencies of essential nutrients. It is now recognized that, at higher than essential levels, selected nutrients can have a pharmacologic effect to prevent or treat disease. Recent Advances: Two of the most important pharmaconutrients, arginine, and the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil, have been shown to have profound effects on wound healing and infections. Critical Issues: Both arginine and fish oils have independent benefits, but the combination appears to be much more effective. This combination has been shown to affect outcomes involving wound healing and infections, as reviewed here, and can also affect incidence and outcomes in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and other inflammatory conditions. These possibilities have not yet progressed to widespread clinical application. Future Directions: The optimal combinations of immunonutrients, timing of administration, and the doses needed for best results need to be determined in preclinical and clinical studies. Also, the mechanisms involved in the administration of pharmaconutrients need to be established.

  13. Antibacterial activity of honey against strains of Staphylococcus aureus from infected wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, R A; Molan, P C; Harding, K G

    1999-01-01

    The antibacterial action of honey in infected wounds does not depend wholly on its high osmolarity. We tested the sensitivity of 58 strains of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from infected wounds, to a pasture honey and a manuka honey. There was little variation between the isolates in their sensitivity to honey: minimum inhibitory concentrations were all between 2 and 3% (v/v) for the manuka honey and between 3 and 4% for the pasture honey. Thus, these honeys would prevent growth of S. aureus if diluted by body fluids a further seven-fold to fourteen-fold beyond the point where their osmolarity ceased to be completely inhibitory. The antibacterial action of the pasture honey relied on release of hydrogen peroxide, which in vivo might be reduced by catalase activity in tissues or blood. The action of manuka honey stems partly from a phytochemical component, so this type of honey might be more effective in vivo. Comparative clinical trials with standardized honeys are needed. PMID:10472280

  14. Impaired Wound Healing Predisposes Obese Mice to Severe Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kevin B.; Vogel, Peter; Duan, Susu; Govorkova, Elena A.; Webby, Richard J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Beck, on pages 172–3, and the article by Kim et al, on pages 244–51.) For the first time, obesity appeared as a risk factor for developing severe 2009 pandemic influenza infection. Given the increase in obesity, there is a need to understand the mechanisms underlying poor outcomes in this population. In these studies, we examined the severity of pandemic influenza virus in obese mice and evaluated antiviral effectiveness. We found that genetically and diet-induced obese mice challenged with either 2009 influenza A virus subtype H1N1 or 1968 subtype H3N2 strains were more likely to have increased mortality and lung pathology associated with impaired wound repair and subsequent pulmonary edema. Antiviral treatment with oseltamivir enhanced survival of obese mice. Overall, these studies demonstrate that impaired wound lung repair in the lungs of obese animals may result in severe influenza virus infection. Alternative approaches to prevention and control of influenza may be needed in the setting of obesity. PMID:22147799

  15. Rational Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acids to Combat Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Jue

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been raised as a promising strategy to combat bacterial infection in burn wounds. Here, we attempted to rationally design small antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acids by integrating in silico analysis and in vitro assay. Predictive quantitative sequence-activity models were established and validated rigorously based on a large panel of nonamer antimicrobial peptides with known antibacterial activity. The best quantitative sequence-activity model predictor was employed to guide genetic evolution of a peptide population. In the evolution procedure, a number of unnatural amino acids with desired physicochemical properties were introduced, resulting in a genetic evolution-improved population, from which seven peptide candidates with top scores, containing 1-3 unnatural amino acids, and having diverse structures were successfully identified, and their antibacterial potencies against two antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains isolated from infected burn wounds were measured using in vitro susceptibility test. Consequently, four (WL-Orn-LARKIV-NH2 , ARKRWF-Dab-FL-NH2 , KFI-Hag-IWR-Orn-R-NH2 and YW-Hag-R-Cit-RF-Orn-N-NH2 ) of the seven tested peptides were found to be more potent than reference Bac2A, the smallest naturally occurring broad spectrum antimicrobial peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the designed peptides can fold into amphipathic helical structure that allows them to interact directly with microbial membranes. PMID:27062533

  16. The effect of clary sage oil on staphylococci responsible for wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Głowacka, Anna; Poznańska-Kurowska, Katarzyna; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Urbaniak, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The spreading of bacterial antibiotic resistance among clinical strains of pathogenic bacteria has made investigators to search for other active antibacterial agents which could provide a valuable complement to the existing therapies. Aim To determine the antibacterial activity of clary sage oil (Salvia sclarea L.) against Staphylococcus clinical strains which were isolated from patients with wound infections. Material and methods A comprehensive evaluation of Staphylococcus clinical strain resistance to antibiotics was performed. The constituents of clary sage oil were assayed by GC-FID-MS analysis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the tested essential oil against staphylococci by the micro-dilution broth method was determined. Results The clary sage oil was active against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and S. xylosus with MIC values ranging from 3.75 to 7.00 µl/ml. Conclusions The results of the in vitro tests encourage to use formulations containing sage oil as the active natural antimicrobial agent. Because of its antimicrobial properties clary sage oil may be applied to treat wounds and skin infections. PMID:25821423

  17. Chitosan-hyaluronic acid/nano silver composite sponges for drug resistant bacteria infected diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Anisha, B S; Biswas, Raja; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an antimicrobial sponge composed of chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA) and nano silver (nAg) as a wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) infected with drug resistant bacteria. nAg (5-20 nm) was prepared and characterized. The nanocomposite sponges were prepared by homogenous mixing of chitosan, HA and nAg followed by freeze drying to obtain a flexible and porous structure. The prepared sponges were characterized using SEM and FT-IR. The porosity, swelling, biodegradation and haemostatic potential of the sponges were also studied. Antibacterial activity of the prepared sponges was analysed using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Chitosan-HA/nAg composite sponges showed potent antimicrobial property against the tested organisms. Sponges containing higher nAg (0.005%, 0.01% and 0.02%) concentrations showed antibacterial activity against MRSA. Cytotoxicity and cell attachment studies were done using human dermal fibroblast cells. The nanocomposite sponges showed a nAg concentration dependent toxicity towards fibroblast cells. Our results suggest that this nanocomposite sponges could be used as a potential material for wound dressing for DFU infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria if the optimal concentration of nAg exhibiting antibacterial action with least toxicity towards mammalian cells is identified.

  18. Chitosan-hyaluronic acid/nano silver composite sponges for drug resistant bacteria infected diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Anisha, B S; Biswas, Raja; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an antimicrobial sponge composed of chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA) and nano silver (nAg) as a wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) infected with drug resistant bacteria. nAg (5-20 nm) was prepared and characterized. The nanocomposite sponges were prepared by homogenous mixing of chitosan, HA and nAg followed by freeze drying to obtain a flexible and porous structure. The prepared sponges were characterized using SEM and FT-IR. The porosity, swelling, biodegradation and haemostatic potential of the sponges were also studied. Antibacterial activity of the prepared sponges was analysed using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Chitosan-HA/nAg composite sponges showed potent antimicrobial property against the tested organisms. Sponges containing higher nAg (0.005%, 0.01% and 0.02%) concentrations showed antibacterial activity against MRSA. Cytotoxicity and cell attachment studies were done using human dermal fibroblast cells. The nanocomposite sponges showed a nAg concentration dependent toxicity towards fibroblast cells. Our results suggest that this nanocomposite sponges could be used as a potential material for wound dressing for DFU infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria if the optimal concentration of nAg exhibiting antibacterial action with least toxicity towards mammalian cells is identified. PMID:24060281

  19. Gentamicin-Impregnated Collagen Sponge: Effectiveness in Preventing Sternal Wound Infection in High-Risk Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rapetto, Filippo; Bruno, Vito D.; Guida, Gustavo; Marsico, Roberto; Chivasso, Pierpaolo; Zebele, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Sternal wound infections represent one of the most frequent complications after cardiac surgery and are associated with high postoperative mortality. Several preventive methods have been introduced, and recently, gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponges (GICSs) have shown a promising effect in reducing the incidence of this type of complications. Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that has been widely used to treat infections caused by multiresistant bacteria; despite its effectiveness, its systemic use carries a risk of toxicity. GICSs appear to overcome this side effect, topically delivering high antibiotic concentrations to the wound and thus reducing the toxic-related events. Although several retrospective analyses and randomized controlled trials have studied the use of GICSs in cardiac surgery, conclusions regarding their efficacy in preventing sternal wound infection are inconsistent. We have reviewed the current literature focusing on high-risk patients. PMID:27279734

  20. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Regeimbal, James M.; Jacobs, Anna C.; Corey, Brendan W.; Henry, Matthew S.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Pavlicek, Rebecca L.; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M.; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C.; Hall, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe. PMID:27431214

  1. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe. PMID:27431214

  2. Dual delivery of chlorhexidine and platelet-derived growth factor-BB for enhanced wound healing and infection control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Gehan; Brey, Eric M

    2013-02-01

    Wound treatment can require molecules that both enhance healing and control infection. As in many biomedical applications, the options for therapeutic molecules may include both hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules. The goal of this study was to investigate a polymer system for drug delivery that simultaneously delivers platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, a hydrophilic protein known to promote wound healing, and chlorhexidine (CHX), a hydrophobic antimicrobial agent for infection treatment. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were prepared using different polymer formulations in a double emulsion process. CHX encapsulation efficiency was 19.6±0.8% and 28.9±1.5% for PLGA 50:50 and 85:15, respectively. The presence of CHX significantly increased PDGF-BB encapsulation efficiency relative to PDGF-BB alone. Both molecules could be released for up to 50 days and exhibited bioactivity for greater than 3 (PLGA 85:15) or 8 (PLGA 50:50) weeks using in vitro bacteria and cellular assays. An infected wound model was used to evaluate the system in vivo. Wounds treated with the dual delivery system showed decreased levels of infection and increased healing. Vascular analysis of wound tissues also showed higher levels of mature vasculature with the delivery of PDGF-BB. In conclusion, we have evaluated a drug delivery system for simultaneous delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules and have shown that this system can improve healing and reduce bacteria levels in an infected wound model. This system could be applied to other therapeutic applications where sustained delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules is required. PMID:23063555

  3. The Relationship between Preoperative Wound Classification and Postoperative Infection: A Multi-Institutional Analysis of 15,289 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mioton, Lauren M; Jordan, Sumanas W; Hanwright, Philip J; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in surgical techniques, sterile protocols, and perioperative antibiotic regimens, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a significant problem. We investigated the relationship between wound classification (i.e., clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, dirty) and SSI rates in plastic surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a multi-institutional, surgical outcomes database for all patients undergoing plastic surgery procedures from 2006-2010. Patient demographics, wound classification, and 30-day outcomes were recorded and analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results A total of 15,289 plastic surgery cases were analyzed. The overall SSI rate was 3.00%, with superficial SSIs occurring at comparable rates across wound classes. There were similar rates of deep SSIs in the clean and clean/contaminated groups (0.64%), while rates reached over 2% in contaminated and dirty cases. Organ/space SSIs occurred in less than 1% of each wound classification. Contaminated and dirty cases were at an increased risk for deep SSIs (odds ratios, 2.81 and 2.74, respectively); however, wound classification did not appear to be a significant predictor of superficial or organ/space SSIs. Clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty cases were at increased risk for a postoperative complication, and contaminated and dirty cases also had higher odds of reoperation and 30-day mortality. Conclusions Analyzing a multi-center database, we found that wound classification was a significant predictor of overall complications, reoperation, and mortality, but not an adequate predictor of surgical site infections. When comparing infections for a given wound classification, plastic surgery had lower overall rates than the surgical population at large. PMID:24086804

  4. Evaluation of Mannosidase and Trypsin Enzymes Effects on Biofilm Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banar, Maryam; Emaneini, Mohammad; Satarzadeh, Mhboubeh; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Beigverdi, Reza; van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial agents, are required. In this study, the effects of α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase and trypsin enzymes on the degradation of P. aeruginosa biofilms and on the reduction of ceftazidime minimum biofilm eliminating concentrations (MBEC) were evaluated. All tested enzymes, destroyed the biofilms and reduced the ceftazidime MBECs. However, only trypsin had no cytotoxic effect on A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, since trypsin had better features than mannosidase enzymes, it can be a promising agent in combatting P. aeruginosa burn wound infections. PMID:27736961

  5. Enhanced efficacy and anti-biofilm activity of novel nanoemulsions against skin burn wound multi-drug resistant MRSA infections.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhen; Sun, Hongwu; Yang, Yun; Jing, Haiming; Yang, Liuyang; Tong, Yanan; Wei, Chao; Wang, Zelin; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Multi-drug resistant MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is a global problem for human health, especially skin burn wound patients. Therefore, we estimated the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of a chlorhexidine acetate nanoemulsion (CNE) by previously ourselves designed against skin burn wound MRSA infections. Compared with its water solution (CHX), CNE showed a better and faster action against MRSA both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, CNE was more effective at inhibiting biofilm formation and clearing the biofilm. We also found that the cell walls and membranes of MRSA were severely disrupted after treatment with CNE. Moreover, the relative electrical conductivity and the leakage of alkaline phosphates, K(+), Mg(2+), DNA and protein obviously increased because the cell wall and membrane were damaged. These data show that novel CNE is a promising potential antimicrobial candidate, especially for skin burn wound MRSA infections.

  6. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series.

  7. Healing of Deep Wound Infection without Removal of Non-Absorbable Dura Mater (Neuro-Patch®): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Nan-Xiang; Tan, Daisong Albert; Fu, Peng; Huang, Yi-Zhi; Tong, Song; Yu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    We report on a female patient who received microvascular decompression due to hemifacial spasm. Neuro-Patch® was used during the operation to repair and replace damaged dura mater. Six days after the operation, the incision wound was found to be infected. Abscesses were present deep in the incision. However, because the artificial dura mater was attached so tightly to the original dura mater, the infection was not able to spread inside the skull. After 3 months of meticulous wound cleaning and drug treatment to promote the growth of granulation tissue, we were able to gradually achieve healing of the infection without having to remove the non-absorbable artificial dura mater. By describing this case and the results of a review of the pertinent literature, we discuss the possibility of recovery of an infection without removal of artificial dura mater. PMID:27649762

  8. Tyrothricin--An underrated agent for the treatment of bacterial skin infections and superficial wounds?

    PubMed

    Lang, C; Staiger, C

    2016-06-01

    The antimicrobial agent tyrothricin is a representative of the group of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). It is produced by Bacillus brevis and consists of tyrocidines and gramicidins. The compound mixture shows activity against bacteria, fungi and some viruses. A very interesting feature of AMPs is the fact, that even in vitro it is almost impossible to induce resistances. Therefore, this class of molecules is discussed as one group that could serve as next generation antibiotics and overcome the increasing problem of bacterial resistances. In daily practice, the application of tyrothricin containing formulations is relatively limited: It is used in sore throat medications and in agents for the healing of infected superficial and small-area wounds. However, due to the broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and the low risk of resistance development it is worth to consider further fields of application. PMID:27455547

  9. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  10. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  11. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system.

  12. Evidence-based management of deep wound infection after spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Lall, Rishi R; Wong, Albert P; Lall, Rohan R; Lawton, Cort D; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-02-01

    In this study, evidence-based medicine is used to assess optimal surgical and medical management of patients with post-operative deep wound infection following spinal instrumentation. A computerized literature search of the PubMed database was performed. Twenty pertinent studies were identified. Studies were separated into publications addressing instrumentation retention versus removal and publications addressing antibiotic therapy regimen. The findings were classified based on level of evidence (I-III) and findings were summarized into evidentiary tables. No level I or II evidence was identified. With regards to surgical management, five studies support instrumentation retention in the setting of early deep infection. In contrast, for delayed infection, the evidence favors removal of instrumentation at the time of initial debridement. Surgeons should be aware that for deformity patients, even if solid fusion is observed, removal of instrumentation may be associated with significant loss of correction. A course of intravenous antibiotics followed by long-term oral suppressive therapy should be pursued if instrumentation is retained. A shorter treatment course may be appropriate if hardware is removed.

  13. The use of desiccation to treat Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Eugene; Long, Sarah A; Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew; Xu, Wei; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Leung, Kai; Hong, Seok Jong; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wounds colonized with biofilm present a major burden to our healthcare system. While the current paradigm for wound healing is to maintain a moist environment, we sought to evaluate the effects of desiccation, and the ability of honey to desiccate wounds, on wound healing characteristics in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm wounds. In vivo biofilm wound healing after exposure to open-air desiccation, honey, molasses, and saline was analyzed using a rabbit ear model of S. aureus biofilm wounds previously developed by our group. Wound morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy and granulation tissue deposition was measured using light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Viable bacterial counts in rabbit ear biofilm wounds and scabs were measured using a drop dilution method. In vitro S. aureus growth curves were established using tryptic soy broth containing honey and glycerol. Gene expression analysis of rabbit ear wounds was performed using reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Rabbit ear S. aureus biofilm wounds exposed to open-air desiccation, honey, and molasses developed a dry scab, which displaced the majority of biofilm bacteria off of the wound bed. Wounds treated with open-air desiccation, honey, and molasses expressed lower levels of the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β at postoperative day 12 compared with wounds treated with saline, and had increased levels of granulation tissue formation. In vitro growth of S. aureus in tryptic soy broth was inhibited by the presence of honey to a greater extent than by the presence of osmolality-matched glycerol. Desiccation of chronic wounds colonized with biofilm via exposure to open air or honey leads to improved wound healing by decreasing bacterial burden and inflammation, and increasing granulation tissue formation. The ability of honey to help heal chronic wounds is at least in part due to its ability to desiccate bacterial biofilm, but other

  14. Effects of phosphate supplementation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasive behavior in burn wound infections: A simple approach to a big problem.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Kouroshfard, Shahriyar; Azarpira, Negar

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of inorganic phosphate supplementation on invasive behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wound infections. An emulsion-based lotion containing sodium dihydrogen phosphate was formulated and then 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats with burn wounds were used to assess the effect of phosphate supplementation on swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. On the second day after burn, four groups of rats were inoculated with P. aeruginosa and one group was left as negative control. The treatment was started on day 3 and the animals were followed up for 4 weeks. Significant improvement in wound healing was observed in the phosphate-receiving group after the 4-week follow-up, compared to the negative control, positive control, and silver sulfadiazine-receiving groups. Histopathological assessment of the tissue samples also indicated the healing process in phosphate-enriched lotion receiving group. The results showed that inorganic phosphate supplementation results in alteration of the virulence behavior of P. aeruginosa and improvement in the wound healing process. In conclusion, phosphate supplementation would be a rational strategy in the eradication of P. aeruginosa wound infection.

  15. Effects of phosphate supplementation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasive behavior in burn wound infections: A simple approach to a big problem.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Kouroshfard, Shahriyar; Azarpira, Negar

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of inorganic phosphate supplementation on invasive behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wound infections. An emulsion-based lotion containing sodium dihydrogen phosphate was formulated and then 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats with burn wounds were used to assess the effect of phosphate supplementation on swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. On the second day after burn, four groups of rats were inoculated with P. aeruginosa and one group was left as negative control. The treatment was started on day 3 and the animals were followed up for 4 weeks. Significant improvement in wound healing was observed in the phosphate-receiving group after the 4-week follow-up, compared to the negative control, positive control, and silver sulfadiazine-receiving groups. Histopathological assessment of the tissue samples also indicated the healing process in phosphate-enriched lotion receiving group. The results showed that inorganic phosphate supplementation results in alteration of the virulence behavior of P. aeruginosa and improvement in the wound healing process. In conclusion, phosphate supplementation would be a rational strategy in the eradication of P. aeruginosa wound infection. PMID:26787129

  16. Polyvinyl alcohol nanofiber formulation of the designer antimicrobial peptide APO sterilizes Acinetobacter baumannii-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Istvan; Ostorhazi, Eszter; Fekete, Aron; Kovacs, Krisztian N; Zelko, Romana; Kovalszky, Ilona; Li, Wenyi; Wade, John D; Szabo, Dora; Otvos, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Native and designer cationic antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as host defense molecules rather than true antimicrobials. Due to their ability to activate the innate immune system, these structures are used to treat uninfected and bacterially-infected wounds, including those harboring Acinetobacter baumannii. Previously we documented that when administered intramuscularly or topically in liquid formulations, the proline-rich host defense peptide dimer A3-APO accelerates uninfected wound re-epithelization and eliminates systemic and local A. baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other pathogen load from infected lesions better than conventional antibiotics. In the current study we sought to produce and characterize a novel delivery system, suitable for immediate and convenient application in non-hospital environments. The APO monomer was incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers and the complex was polymerized into a solid patch dressing. Mice were subjected to skin abrasion where the wounds were either left uninfected or were inoculated with a near lethal dose of multidrug resistant A. baumannii strain. Analyzed after 3 days, APO monomer-containing patches improved wound appearance significantly better than polymer patches without antibiotics. When compared to colistin, the APO patches accelerated wound healing, and statistically significantly reduced wound size and wound bacterial load. The in vivo antimicrobial effect was more extensive than after intramuscular administration of the peptide drug, by using only one tenth of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. These data suggest that the APO monomer-impregnated nanofiber dressing can be developed as an economical first-line treatment option to skin injuries in general and battlefield burn and blast injuries in particular. PMID:26319645

  17. Polyvinyl alcohol nanofiber formulation of the designer antimicrobial peptide APO sterilizes Acinetobacter baumannii-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Istvan; Ostorhazi, Eszter; Fekete, Aron; Kovacs, Krisztian N; Zelko, Romana; Kovalszky, Ilona; Li, Wenyi; Wade, John D; Szabo, Dora; Otvos, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Native and designer cationic antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as host defense molecules rather than true antimicrobials. Due to their ability to activate the innate immune system, these structures are used to treat uninfected and bacterially-infected wounds, including those harboring Acinetobacter baumannii. Previously we documented that when administered intramuscularly or topically in liquid formulations, the proline-rich host defense peptide dimer A3-APO accelerates uninfected wound re-epithelization and eliminates systemic and local A. baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other pathogen load from infected lesions better than conventional antibiotics. In the current study we sought to produce and characterize a novel delivery system, suitable for immediate and convenient application in non-hospital environments. The APO monomer was incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers and the complex was polymerized into a solid patch dressing. Mice were subjected to skin abrasion where the wounds were either left uninfected or were inoculated with a near lethal dose of multidrug resistant A. baumannii strain. Analyzed after 3 days, APO monomer-containing patches improved wound appearance significantly better than polymer patches without antibiotics. When compared to colistin, the APO patches accelerated wound healing, and statistically significantly reduced wound size and wound bacterial load. The in vivo antimicrobial effect was more extensive than after intramuscular administration of the peptide drug, by using only one tenth of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. These data suggest that the APO monomer-impregnated nanofiber dressing can be developed as an economical first-line treatment option to skin injuries in general and battlefield burn and blast injuries in particular.

  18. Ozonated saline shows activity against planktonic and biofilm growing Staphylococcus aureus in vitro: a potential irrigant for infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Al-Saadi, Hayder; Potapova, Inga; Rochford, Edward Tj; Moriarty, Thomas F; Messmer, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Infections associated with deep wounds require extensive surgical and medical care. New adjunctive treatments are required to aid in the eradication of the bacterial biofilms found on infected wounds and, in particular, any underlying hardware. Ozone has been used as a safe and efficient disinfectant in water treatment plants for many years. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-biofilm potential of ozonated saline against biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, a microorganism commonly implicated in wound infections. A custom-made bacterial biofilm bioreactor was used to grow S. aureus biofilms on discs of medical grade titanium alloy. An ozone generator was connected in-line and biofilms and planktonic bacteria were exposed to ozone in saline. Cytotoxicity was assessed against primary ovine osteoblasts in the same system. In tests against planktonic S. aureus, a 99% reduction in bacterial numbers was detected within 15 minutes of exposure. S. aureus biofilms were significantly more resistant to ozone, although complete eradication of the biofilm was eventually achieved within 5 hours. Ozonated saline was not found to be cytotoxic to primary ovine osteoblasts. Ozonated saline may be suitable as an adjuvant therapy to treat patients as an instillation fluid for wound irrigation and sterilisation.

  19. Enzyme-responsive nanocomposites for wound infection prophylaxis in burn management: in vitro evaluation of their compatibility with healing processes.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Baier, Grit; Choritz, Lars; Freese, Christian; Böse, Thomas; Landfester, Katharina; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Responsive, theranostic nanosystems, capable of both signaling and treating wound infections, is a sophisticated approach to reduce the most common and potentially traumatizing side effects of burn wound treatment: slowed wound healing due to prophylactic anti-infective drug exposure as well as frequent painful dressing changes. Antimicrobials as well as dye molecules have been incorporated into biodegradable nanosystems that release their content only in the presence of pathogens. Following nanocarrier degradation by bacterial enzymes, any infection will thus emit a visible signal and be effectively treated at its source. In this study, we investigated the effect of fluorescent-labeled hyaluronan nanocapsules containing polyhexanide biguanide and poly-L-lactic acid nanoparticles loaded with octenidine on primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, which play a major role in cutaneous wound healing. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis indicated a time-dependent uptake of both the nanocapsules and the nanoparticles. However, enzyme immunoassays showed no significant influence on the expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and cytokines by the endothelial cells. Under angiogenic-stimulating conditions, the potential to form capillary-like structures in co-culture with dermal fibroblasts was not inhibited. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies (the MTS and crystal violet assay) after short- and long-term exposure to the materials demonstrated that both systems exhibited less toxicity than solutions of the antiseptic agents alone in comparable concentrations. The results indicate that responsive antimicrobial nanocomposites could be used as an advanced drug delivery system and a promising addition to current best practice wound infection prophylaxis with few side effects. PMID:26150717

  20. Enzyme-responsive nanocomposites for wound infection prophylaxis in burn management: in vitro evaluation of their compatibility with healing processes

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Baier, Grit; Choritz, Lars; Freese, Christian; Böse, Thomas; Landfester, Katharina; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Responsive, theranostic nanosystems, capable of both signaling and treating wound infections, is a sophisticated approach to reduce the most common and potentially traumatizing side effects of burn wound treatment: slowed wound healing due to prophylactic anti-infective drug exposure as well as frequent painful dressing changes. Antimicrobials as well as dye molecules have been incorporated into biodegradable nanosystems that release their content only in the presence of pathogens. Following nanocarrier degradation by bacterial enzymes, any infection will thus emit a visible signal and be effectively treated at its source. In this study, we investigated the effect of fluorescent-labeled hyaluronan nanocapsules containing polyhexanide biguanide and poly-L-lactic acid nanoparticles loaded with octenidine on primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, which play a major role in cutaneous wound healing. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis indicated a time-dependent uptake of both the nanocapsules and the nanoparticles. However, enzyme immunoassays showed no significant influence on the expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and cytokines by the endothelial cells. Under angiogenic-stimulating conditions, the potential to form capillary-like structures in co-culture with dermal fibroblasts was not inhibited. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies (the MTS and crystal violet assay) after short- and long-term exposure to the materials demonstrated that both systems exhibited less toxicity than solutions of the antiseptic agents alone in comparable concentrations. The results indicate that responsive antimicrobial nanocomposites could be used as an advanced drug delivery system and a promising addition to current best practice wound infection prophylaxis with few side effects. PMID:26150717

  1. Enzyme-responsive nanocomposites for wound infection prophylaxis in burn management: in vitro evaluation of their compatibility with healing processes.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Baier, Grit; Choritz, Lars; Freese, Christian; Böse, Thomas; Landfester, Katharina; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Responsive, theranostic nanosystems, capable of both signaling and treating wound infections, is a sophisticated approach to reduce the most common and potentially traumatizing side effects of burn wound treatment: slowed wound healing due to prophylactic anti-infective drug exposure as well as frequent painful dressing changes. Antimicrobials as well as dye molecules have been incorporated into biodegradable nanosystems that release their content only in the presence of pathogens. Following nanocarrier degradation by bacterial enzymes, any infection will thus emit a visible signal and be effectively treated at its source. In this study, we investigated the effect of fluorescent-labeled hyaluronan nanocapsules containing polyhexanide biguanide and poly-L-lactic acid nanoparticles loaded with octenidine on primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, which play a major role in cutaneous wound healing. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis indicated a time-dependent uptake of both the nanocapsules and the nanoparticles. However, enzyme immunoassays showed no significant influence on the expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and cytokines by the endothelial cells. Under angiogenic-stimulating conditions, the potential to form capillary-like structures in co-culture with dermal fibroblasts was not inhibited. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies (the MTS and crystal violet assay) after short- and long-term exposure to the materials demonstrated that both systems exhibited less toxicity than solutions of the antiseptic agents alone in comparable concentrations. The results indicate that responsive antimicrobial nanocomposites could be used as an advanced drug delivery system and a promising addition to current best practice wound infection prophylaxis with few side effects.

  2. Microbiological study of pathogenic bacteria isolated from paediatric wound infections following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ran, Ying-Chun; Ao, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Lan; Fu, Yi-Long; Tuo, Hui; Xu, Feng

    2010-05-01

    On 12 May 2008, the Wenchuan earthquake struck in Sichuan, China. Within 1 month after the earthquake, 98 injured children were admitted to the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. According to clinical manifestations, 50 children were diagnosed with wound infections. Wound secretions were cultured for bacteria. Pathogen distribution and drug resistance were analyzed. A total of 99 pathogens were isolated; 16 (16%) were Gram-positive bacteria and 81 (82%) were Gram-negative bacteria. The distribution of pathogens isolated within 1 month after the earthquake was different to the distribution of pathogens in 546 general hospitalized cases in the y before the earthquake. The pathogens most frequently isolated 1 month after the earthquake were Acinetobacter baumannii (27%), Enterobacter cloacae (18%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13%). The pathogens most frequently isolated in the y prior to the earthquake were Escherichia coli (27%), Staphylococcus aureus (23%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (9%). The rate of isolated drug-resistant bacteria was higher in the earthquake cases than in the general hospitalized cases. In the cases injured in the earthquake, the rates of isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. cloacae, E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were higher than in the cases from before the earthquake. Multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant A. baumannii were isolated at a higher rate in cases after the earthquake than in those before the earthquake. These changes in the spectrum of pathogens and in the drug resistance of the pathogens isolated following an earthquake will provide the basis for emergency treatment after earthquakes. PMID:20095936

  3. Microbial Profiling of Combat Wound Infection through Detection Microarray and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jonathan E.; Brown, Trevor S.; Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Chromy, Brett A.; Luciw, Paul A.; Elster, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Combat wound healing and resolution are highly affected by the resident microbial flora. We therefore sought to achieve comprehensive detection of microbial populations in wounds using novel genomic technologies and bioinformatics analyses. We employed a microarray capable of detecting all sequenced pathogens for interrogation of 124 wound samples from extremity injuries in combat-injured U.S. service members. A subset of samples was also processed via next-generation sequencing and metagenomic analysis. Array analysis detected microbial targets in 51% of all wound samples, with Acinetobacter baumannii being the most frequently detected species. Multiple Pseudomonas species were also detected in tissue biopsy specimens. Detection of the Acinetobacter plasmid pRAY correlated significantly with wound failure, while detection of enteric-associated bacteria was associated significantly with successful healing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed broad microbial biodiversity between samples. The total wound bioburden did not associate significantly with wound outcome, although temporal shifts were observed over the course of treatment. Given that standard microbiological methods do not detect the full range of microbes in each wound, these data emphasize the importance of supplementation with molecular techniques for thorough characterization of wound-associated microbes. Future application of genomic protocols for assessing microbial content could allow application of specialized care through early and rapid identification and management of critical patterns in wound bioburden. PMID:24829242

  4. Microbial profiling of combat wound infection through detection microarray and next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Allen, Jonathan E; Brown, Trevor S; Gardner, Shea N; McLoughlin, Kevin S; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Kirkup, Benjamin C; Chromy, Brett A; Luciw, Paul A; Elster, Eric A; Jaing, Crystal J

    2014-07-01

    Combat wound healing and resolution are highly affected by the resident microbial flora. We therefore sought to achieve comprehensive detection of microbial populations in wounds using novel genomic technologies and bioinformatics analyses. We employed a microarray capable of detecting all sequenced pathogens for interrogation of 124 wound samples from extremity injuries in combat-injured U.S. service members. A subset of samples was also processed via next-generation sequencing and metagenomic analysis. Array analysis detected microbial targets in 51% of all wound samples, with Acinetobacter baumannii being the most frequently detected species. Multiple Pseudomonas species were also detected in tissue biopsy specimens. Detection of the Acinetobacter plasmid pRAY correlated significantly with wound failure, while detection of enteric-associated bacteria was associated significantly with successful healing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed broad microbial biodiversity between samples. The total wound bioburden did not associate significantly with wound outcome, although temporal shifts were observed over the course of treatment. Given that standard microbiological methods do not detect the full range of microbes in each wound, these data emphasize the importance of supplementation with molecular techniques for thorough characterization of wound-associated microbes. Future application of genomic protocols for assessing microbial content could allow application of specialized care through early and rapid identification and management of critical patterns in wound bioburden.

  5. Ability of bacteriophage in resolving wound infection caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in uncontrolled diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Shivaswamy, VinodKumar Chickmangalure; Kalasuramath, Suneeta Basavaraj; Sadanand, Chethan Kumar; Basavaraju, Abhishek Kilagere; Ginnavaram, Varsha; Bille, Sumanth; Ukken, Sanjay Saju; Pushparaj, Usha Nandini

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a substantial nosocomial pathogen, has developed resistance to almost all available antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a possible alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections. In this study, we have successfully isolated bacteriophage active against clinical strains of A. baumannii by enrichment from hospital sewage sludge using representatives of those strains. The bacteriophage isolated against A. baumannii formed plaques against beta-lactamases producing strains of A. baumannii. The utility of bacteriophage specific for A. baumannii to resolve wound infection in uncontrolled diabetic rats was evaluated. Five groups of uncontrolled diabetic rats were used. Group I was noninfected (Control), Group II was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with bacteriophage, Group III was infected with MDR A. baumannii, Group IV was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with antibiotic colistin, and Group V consisted of noninfected rats and sprayed with phage (Phage control). A significant decrease in infection, period of epithelization, and wound contraction was observed in the phage-challenged group when compared with antibiotic-treated uncontrolled diabetic rats and the control group. To conclude the study, new insights are provided into the biology of the broad host range of A. baumannii phage, demonstrating that A. baumannii phage has prospects for the treatment of infections caused by the MDR A. baumannii.

  6. Wound Edge Protectors in Open Abdominal Surgery to Reduce Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljevic, André L.; Müller, Tara C.; Kehl, Victoria; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Importance Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality. Objective To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections. Evidence Review A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted. Findings We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51–0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%). The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44–0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%). Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15–0.55) than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54–0.92), but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28–0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23%) than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57–0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46%) and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24–0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%). Conclusions and Relevance Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of

  7. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Yang, Tianbao; Jurick, Wayne M.

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs) in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event. PMID:27135512

  8. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. PMID:26491317

  9. Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Melanie; Bartlett, David C; Gheorghe, Adrian; Redman, Val; Dowswell, George; Hawkins, William; Mak, Tony; Youssef, Haney; Richardson, Caroline; Hornby, Steven; Magill, Laura; Haslop, Richard; Wilson, Sue; Morton, Dion

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of wound edge protection devices in reducing surgical site infection after abdominal surgery. Design Multicentre observer blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients undergoing laparotomy at 21 UK hospitals. Interventions Standard care or the use of a wound edge protection device during surgery. Main outcome measures Surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, assessed by blinded clinicians at seven and 30 days and by patient’s self report for the intervening period. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, duration of stay in hospital, and the effect of characteristics of the patient and operation on the efficacy of the device. Results 760 patients were enrolled with 382 patients assigned to the device group and 378 to the control group. Six patients in the device group and five in the control group did not undergo laparotomy. Fourteen patients, seven in each group, were lost to follow-up. A total of 184 patients experienced surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, 91/369 (24.7%) in the device group and 93/366 (25.4%) in the control group (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 1.36; P=0.85). This lack of benefit was consistent across wound assessments performed by clinicians and those reported by patients and across all secondary outcomes. In the secondary analyses no subgroup could be identified in which there was evidence of clinical benefit associated with use of the device. Conclusions Wound edge protection devices do not reduce the rate of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparotomy, and therefore their routine use for this role cannot be recommended. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 40402832 PMID:23903454

  10. Update and validation of the Society for Vascular Surgery wound, ischemia, and foot infection threatened limb classification system.

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a patient cohort with a threatened limb and at risk for amputation due to severe peripheral arterial disease. The influence of diabetes and its associated neuropathy on the pathogenesis-threatened limb was an excluded comorbidity, despite its known contribution to amputation risk. The Fontaine and Rutherford classifications of limb ischemia severity have also been used to predict amputation risk and the likelihood of tissue healing. The dramatic increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the expanding techniques of arterial revascularization has prompted modification of peripheral arterial disease classification schemes to improve outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs. The diabetic patient with foot ulceration and infection is at risk for limb loss, with abnormal arterial perfusion as only one determinant of outcome. The wound extent and severity of infection also impact the likelihood of limb loss. To better predict amputation risk, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee developed a classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important clinical considerations. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: wound, ischemia, and foot infection. This classification scheme is relevant to the patient with critical limb ischemia because many are also diabetic. Implementation of the wound, ischemia, and foot infection classification system in critical limb ischemia patients is recommended and should assist the clinician in more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of wound and arterial revascularizations procedures required in this challenging, patient population.

  11. Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections: Bacterial Cultures from Negative-Pressure-Wound-Therapy Foams Do Not Improve Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Alexandra U; Bloemberg, Guido; Zbinden, Reinhard; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Fuchs, Claudio; Frauenfelder, Sandra; Rancic, Zoran; Mayer, Dieter; Hasse, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the diagnostic value of microorganisms cultured from negative-pressure-wound-therapy (NPWT) foam samples compared to that of microorganisms cultured from deep tissue samples from patients with vascular graft infections. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 58%, 86%, 81%, and 66%, respectively. The diagnostic value of microbiological cultures from NPWT foams was poor. PMID:27252462

  12. A genetic approach to the development of new therapeutic phages to fight pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent ("lytic") and temperate ("lysogenic") bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  13. Antibiotic sensitivity profile of bacterial pathogens in postoperative wound infections at a tertiary care hospital in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Nutanbala N.; Trivedi, Hiren R.; Goswami, Alpesh Puri P.; Patel, Tejas K.; Tripathi, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To find out the most common bacterial pathogens responsible for post-operative wound infection and their antibiotic sensitivity profile. Materials and Methods: This prospective, observational study was carried out in patients of postoperative wound infection. Samples from wound discharge were collected using a sterile swab and studied for identification of isolates by Gram stains and culture growth followed by in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing performed by disc diffusion method on Mueller Hinton agar. Results: Out of 183 organisms, 126 (68.85%) isolated organisms were gram negative. Staphylococcus aureus, 48 (26.23%), was the predominant organism. S. aureus was sensitive to rifampicin (89.58%), levofloxacin (60.42%), and vancomycin (54.17%). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to ciprofloxacin (83.78%), gatifloxacin (51.35%), and meropenem (51.35%). Escherichia coli was sensitive to levofloxacin (72.41%) and ciprofloxacin (62.07%). Klebsiella pneumoniae was sensitive to ciprofloxacin (63.16%), levofloxacin (63.16%), gatifloxacin (63.16%), and linezolid (56.52%). Proteus mirabilis was sensitive to ciprofloxacin (75%) and linezolid (62.50). Proteus vulgaris was sensitive to ampicillin+sulbactam (57.14%) followed by levofloxacin (50%). Conclusions: There is an alarming increase of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly in the emergence of VRSA/VISA, meropenem, and third generation cephalosporin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Linezolid showing sensitivity against Gram negative bacteria. PMID:21897707

  14. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic”) and temperate (“lysogenic”) bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  15. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Mairs, Rachel; Gallo, Luigi; Stewart, Sarah A.; Brady, Aaron J.; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT). In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs) are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL) and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96%, were achieved for

  16. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds.

    PubMed

    Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Mairs, Rachel; Gallo, Luigi; Stewart, Sarah A; Brady, Aaron J; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed "photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy" (PACT). In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs) are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez(®) AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1-2.5 mg/mL) and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96%, were achieved for S

  17. An in vitro model of bacterial infections in wounds and other soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Werthén, Maria; Henriksson, Lina; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Sternberg, Claus; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    There is growing evidence that bacteria play a crucial role in the persistence of chronic wounds. These bacteria are most probably present in polymer-embedded aggregates that represent the biofilm mode of growth. Much work has been carried out to study the development of biofilms in vitro, in particular in attachment to solid surfaces. The observations from the chronic wounds indicate that the bacteria are not attached to a solid surface. Consequently, a new in vitro model is required to investigate biofilms in more wound-like settings. This study describes such a novel in vitro model, with bacteria growing as biofilm aggregates in a collagen gel matrix with serum protein mimicking the wound bed of chronic wounds. The model was verified to comprise important hallmarks of biofilms such as the bacterial embedment in a matrix and increased antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, we have verified the relevance of the model by comparing the organization of the bacteria in the model with the organization of the bacteria in a real chronic wound. We believe that we have developed an important new model for investigating bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds. This model may be used to study biofilm development in chronic wounds and to develop novel diagnostic tools as well as treatment strategies.

  18. Bactericidal effects of non-thermal argon plasma in vitro, in biofilms and in the animal model of infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Ermolaeva, Svetlana A; Varfolomeev, Alexander F; Chernukha, Marina Yu; Yurov, Dmitry S; Vasiliev, Mikhail M; Kaminskaya, Anastasya A; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Romanova, Julia M; Murashev, Arcady N; Selezneva, Irina I; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sysolyatina, Elena V; Shaginyan, Igor A; Petrov, Oleg F; Mayevsky, Evgeny I; Fortov, Vladimir E; Morfill, Gregor E; Naroditsky, Boris S; Gintsburg, Alexander L

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal (low-temperature) physical plasma is under intensive study as an alternative approach to control superficial wound and skin infections when the effectiveness of chemical agents is weak due to natural pathogen or biofilm resistance. The purpose of this study was to test the individual susceptibility of pathogenic bacteria to non-thermal argon plasma and to measure the effectiveness of plasma treatments against bacteria in biofilms and on wound surfaces. Overall, Gram-negative bacteria were more susceptible to plasma treatment than Gram-positive bacteria. For the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Escherichia coli, there were no survivors among the initial 10(5) c.f.u. after a 5 min plasma treatment. The susceptibility of Gram-positive bacteria was species- and strain-specific. Streptococcus pyogenes was the most resistant with 17 % survival of the initial 10(5) c.f.u. after a 5 min plasma treatment. Staphylococcus aureus had a strain-dependent resistance with 0 and 10 % survival from 10(5) c.f.u. of the Sa 78 and ATCC 6538 strains, respectively. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecium had medium resistance. Non-ionized argon gas was not bactericidal. Biofilms partly protected bacteria, with the efficiency of protection dependent on biofilm thickness. Bacteria in deeper biofilm layers survived better after the plasma treatment. A rat model of a superficial slash wound infected with P. aeruginosa and the plasma-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus strain Sa 78 was used to assess the efficiency of argon plasma treatment. A 10 min treatment significantly reduced bacterial loads on the wound surface. A 5-day course of daily plasma treatments eliminated P. aeruginosa from the plasma-treated animals 2 days earlier than from the control ones. A statistically significant increase in the rate of wound closure was observed in plasma-treated animals after the third day of the course. Wound healing in plasma

  19. The incidence and consequences of early wound infection after internal fixation for trauma in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Bates, J; Mkandawire, N; Harrison, W J

    2012-09-01

    We report a prospective single-blind controlled study of the incidence of early wound infection after internal fixation for trauma in 609 patients, of whom 132 were HIV-positive. Wounds were assessed for healing using the ASEPSIS score. There was no significant difference in the rate of infection between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients undergoing clean surgery (4.2% vs 6%, respectively; p = 0.65). HIV-positive patients did not receive additional antibiotic prophylaxis or antiretroviral therapy as part of their management. The difference in the rate of infection between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with an open fracture or other contamination was not significant (33% vs 15%, respectively; p = 0.064). There was no relationship between CD4 count and infection rate. HIV status did not significantly influence the number of secondary surgical procedures (p = 0.183) or the likelihood of developing chronic osteomyelitis (p = 0.131). Although previous contamination from the time of injury was a risk factor for infection in mal- and nonunions, it was not significantly increased in HIV-positive patients (p = 0.144). We conclude that clean implant surgery in HIV-positive patients is safe, with no need for additional prophylaxis.

  20. Beneficial effects of silver foam dressing on healing of wounds with ulcers and infection control of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xudong; Li, Zhonghua; Qu, Qi; Qiu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the beneficial effects of silver foam dressing on the healing of wounds with ulcers and infection control of burn patients. Methods: Eighty-four second-degree burn patients were selected and divided into a study group and a control group (n=42). After disinfection and cleaning, wound beds of the study group were covered with silver-containing soft-silicone foam dressing, and wound surfaces of the control group were wiped with 1% silver sulfadiazine cream (60 g/100 cm2). The two groups were checked weekly to observe wound healing progress and adverse reactions of the skin around wounds. Wound secretions were collected and subjected to bacterial culture. Related indices were recorded and quantified. Results: Thirty seven cases of the study group (88.1%) and 36 cases of the control group (85.7%) recovered to normal, and 3 (7.1%) and 2 cases (4.8%) in the two groups failed to recover. The recovery rates of the two groups were similar (P>0.05), but unrecovered patients in the study group had significantly higher proportions of repaired wounds (P<0.05). Wounds of the study group were healed significantly more rapidly than those of the control group (22.3±3.1 vs. 25.1±4.4, P<0.05). The study group had significantly higher proportions of repaired wounds from Day 7 to Day 21 (P<0.05), but the difference became less obvious with extended time to Day 28. The bacterial culture-positive (exceeding 105 organisms per gram of tissue) rates of both groups significantly reduced after treatment (Day 7 for the study group and Day 14 for the control group), and the rate of the study group was significantly lower at last (P<0.05). The study and control groups were observed 134 and 149 person-times respectively, with the normal wound-surrounding skin rates of 96.3% (129/134) and 88.6% (132/149) (P>0.05 except for on Day 14). Except for on Day 28, the study group had significantly lower pain scores than those of the control group (P<0.05), especially on Day 7 and

  1. Chronic equine wounds: what is the role of infection and biofilms?.

    PubMed

    Westgate, Samantha J; Percival, Steven L; Knottenbelt, Derek C; Clegg, Peter D; Cochrane, Christine A

    2010-06-01

    Wound research is an evolving science in the equine species. In particular, interest is growing regarding the role that microorganisms play in delaying both acute and chronic wound healing. Equine wounds, particularly lower limb wounds, frequently display delayed healing and infection is commonly the underlying reason. This review will summarize the current research and knowledge surrounding equine wound healing and wound care. Particular focus is placed on the role that microbes play in chronic equine wounds and the significance of associated bacterial biofilms. .

  2. Charts versus Discharge ICD-10 Coding for Sternal Wound Infection Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Danielle A.; Doherty, Christopher; De Souza, Michael A.; Quan, Hude; Harrop, A. Robertson; Nickerson, Duncan; Rabi, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Background Sternal wound infection (SWI) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) can carry a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this work is to describe the methods used to identify cases of SWI in an administrative database and to demonstrate the effectiveness of using an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) coding algorithm for this purpose. Methods ICD-10 codes were used to identify cases of SWI within one year of CABG between April 2002 and November 2009. We randomly chose 200 charts for detailed chart review (100 from each of the groups coded as having SWI and not having SWI) to determine the utility of the ICD-10 coding algorithm. Results There were 2,820 patients undergoing CABG. Of these, 264 (9.4 percent) were coded as having SWI. Thirty-eight cases of SWI were identified by chart review. The ICD-10 coding algorithm of T81.3 or T81.4 was able to identify incident SWI with a positive predictive value of 35 percent and a negative predictive value of 97 percent. The agreement between the ICD-10 coding algorithm and presence of SWI remained fair, with an overall kappa coefficient of 0.32 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.22–0.43). The effectiveness of identifying deep SWI cases is also presented. Conclusions This article describes an effective algorithm for identifying a cohort of patients with SWI following open sternotomy in large databases using ICD-10 coding. In addition, alternative search strategies are presented to suit researchers' needs. PMID:26396556

  3. Topical “Soft Candle” Applications for Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Harnarayan, Patrick; Islam, Shariful; Nahmorah J., Bobb; Budhooram, Steve; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Ramdass, Michael J.; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: There is a cultural barrier to early medical intervention for diabetic foot infections in Trinidad & Tobago, stemming from the strong cultural belief in “soft candle” as effective treatment. We carried out a case-control study to evaluate the outcomes of “soft candle” to treat diabetic foot infections. Methods: All consecutive patients admitted with diabetic foot infections were interviewed to collect data on: demographics, medical history, unhealthy lifestyle markers (exposure to risk factors for chronic diseases), chosen treatment and details of “soft candle” use. The hospital records were accessed on discharge to records the main outcome measures: HbA1c readings, duration of hospitalization, amputation and in-hospital mortality. Two groups were defined: The control group included patients who sought medical attention after detecting a foot infection. The study group included patients who recognized their infection but voluntarily chose to utilize “soft candle” regimens. We excluded patients who voluntarily chose to use other forms of non-traditional treatment or sought no treatment at all. Outcomes were compared using SPSS ver 19. A two-tailed P value was calculated for variables of interest in each group using Fisher’s exact test. The duration of hospitalization between the groups was compared using paired T-Test. A P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There were 442 patients who met inclusion criteria: There were 60 patients in the study group at an average age of 55.2 years (SD ± 11.4; range 43-88): 63% had HBA1c readings >7.0% at presentation and 95% had unhealthy lifestyle habits. There were 382 patients in the control group at an average age of 59.1 years (SD ± 12.6, Range 37-89): 74% with HBA1c readings >7.0% at presentation and 48% with unhealthy lifestyle habits. Patients who used “soft candle” had significantly longer duration of hospitalization (15.5 ± 10.2 vs 9.2 ± 3.9 days; P<0.001) and

  4. Post-bariatric abdominoplasty resulting in wound infection and dehiscence—Conservative treatment with medical grade honey: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dina Jarjis, Reem; Thomas Crewe, Bjørn; Henrik Matzen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound complications in post-bariatric patients undergoing body-contouring surgery after massive weight loss are not uncommon and often, surgical debridement or conservative management is necessary. Honey is one of the most ancient remedies for wound care and it is also considered to possess debriding effects. Current research has demonstrated promising results showing that honey can improve wound granulation and epithelialization, reduce exudate and shorten healing times. Methods This case report has been reported in line with the CARE criteria. Presentation of case A 40 year-old female suffered wound infection and dehiscence after undergoing post-bariatric abdominoplasty. The patient was not interested in surgical revision and split skin grafting. Therefore, conservative wound treatment with topical Manuka honey was instituted resulting in significant clinical improvement and effective healing concurrently with good patient satisfaction. Discussion Surgical wound complications in post-bariatric patients undergoing abdominoplasty are common and often require surgical revision or conservative wound treatment. No previous publication has addressed outpatient treatment of post-bariatric abdominoplasty wound complications with medical grade honey. Conclusion Although more research is needed for definitive conclusions of honey’s efficacy, it is safe and as presented in our case, it may under certain circumstances reduce the need of surgical wound debridement and serve as a remedy for conservative treatment. PMID:26773204

  5. [Importance of modern treatment procedures for infected and colonized wounds in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, G; Lutze, S; Arnold, A; von Podewils, S; Jünger, M

    2014-11-01

    In the coming years increasing numbers of patients with chronic ulcers and tumor wounds are to be expected, both of which are typically multifaceted diseases requiring complex and increasingly long-term ambulatory therapy. Therefore, in recent years special medical emphasis has been placed on efficacious therapies with good tolerability and also suitability regarding feasibility for outpatient treatment. Some of these methods, such as cold plasma therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), water-filtered infrared therapy (wIRA), electrostimulation (ES) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) have a good chance of success when applied as an adjuvant method in the multimodal treatment concept for patients with recalcitrant wounds. All of these methods have at least indirect antimicrobial properties which can be advantageous in cases of microbial infiltration of wounds. As for all other methods for treating recalcitrant wounds, the promising application of the aforementioned methods requires great expertise in wound healing together with a broad and continuous interdisciplinary diagnostics and therapy (wound center).

  6. Debridement of the noninfected wound.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Rhonda S; Meyr, Andrew J; Steinberg, John S; Attinger, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    The utility of wound debridement has expanded to include the management of all chronic wounds, even in the absence of infection and gross necrosis. Biofilms, metalloproteases on the wound base, and senescent cells at the wound edge irreversibly change the physiologic features of wound healing and contribute to a pathologic, chronic inflammatory environment. The objective of this review is to provide surgeons with a basic understanding of the processes of debridement in the noninfected wound.

  7. Synergistic Antibacterial Activity of Plant Peptide MBP-1 and Silver Nanoparticles Combination on Healing of Infected Wound Due to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Salouti, Mojtaba; Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Shapouri, Reza; Ahangari, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wound infection is a common problem in hospitals and is typically caused by the antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is a major pathogen for skin and soft tissue infections worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic antibacterial effect of plant peptide MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles on infected wounds caused by S. aureus. Materials and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles both on their own and in combination form were determined against S. aureus via macrodilution and microdilution methods. The synergistic antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and MBP-1 was investigated on infected wounds caused by S. aureus in a mouse model. Results: The MIC and MBC of MBP-1 were found to be 0.6 and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. MIC and MBC of silver nanoparticles were determined to be 6.25 and 12.5 mg/L, respectively. MIC and MBC of the silver nanoparticles and MBP-1 combination were found to be 3.125 mg/mL, 0.5 mg/L; and 6.25 mg/mL, 0.6 mg/L, respectively. The infected wound healed properly after the combined use of MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles. Conclusions: The synergistic effect was found on the healing of infected wounds caused by S. aureus by using an MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles combination in a mouse model. PMID:27099683

  8. Severe Wound Infection with Photobacterium damselae ssp. damselae and Vibrio harveyi, following a Laceration Injury in Marine Environment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hundenborn, Jörg; Thurig, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are uncommon etiologies of skin and skin structure infections, that is, wound infections. We report a case of severe wound infection, caused by the marine Photobacterium damselae (Vibrionaceae), in a 64-year-old male patient, returning from Australia. The isolate tested positive for pPHDD1, a plasmid conferring high-level virulence. Furthermore, the wound was coinfected with Vibrio harveyi, a halophile bacterium, which has never been reported from human infections before. Identification was achieved by use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and confirmed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Data retrieval from bibliography was complicated since P. damselae has been renamed often with a number of synonyms present in the literature: Photobacterium damsela, Vibrio damselae, Vibrio damsela, Pasteurella damselae, and Listonella damsela. With all synonyms used as query terms, a literature search provided less than 20 cases published worldwide. A majority of those cases presenting as severe wound infection are even fatal following progression into necrotizing fasciitis. Management with daily wound dressing and antibiotic therapy (ofloxacin empirically, followed by doxycycline after availability of microbiology) led in the reported case to a favorable outcome, which seems to be, however, the exception based on a review of the available literature. PMID:24171004

  9. Microbial biofilms: impact on the pathogenesis of periodontitis, cystic fibrosis, chronic wounds and medical device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Mara Madalina; Holban, Alina Maria; Giurcaneanu, Calin; Popa, Liliana Gabriela; Oanea, Raluca Mihaela; Lazar, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Popa, Marcela; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The majority of chronic infections are associated with mono- or polymicrobial biofilms, having a significant impact on the patients' quality of life and survival rates. Although the use of medical devices revolutionized health care services and significantly improved patient outcomes, it also led to complications associated with biofilms and to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria. Immunocompromised patients, institutionalized or hospitalized individuals, elderly people are at greater risk due to life-threatening septic complications, but immunocompetent individuals with predisposing genetic or acquired diseases can also be affected, almost any body part being able to shelter persistent biofilms. Moreover, chronic biofilm-related infections can lead to the occurrence of systemic diseases, as in the case of chronic periodontitis, linked to atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The more researchers discover, new unknown issues add up to the complexity of biofilm infections, in which microbial species establish relationships of cooperation and competition, and elaborate phenotypic differentiation into functional, adapted communities. Their interaction with the host's immune system or with therapeutic agents contributes to the complex puzzle that still misses a lot of pieces. In this comprehensive review we aimed to highlight the microbial composition, developmental stages, architecture and properties of medical biofilms, as well as the diagnostic tools used in the management of biofilm related infections. Also, we present recently acquired knowledge on the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of four chronic diseases associated with biofilm development in tissues (chronic periodontitis, chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis, chronic wounds) and artificial substrata (medical devices-related infections).

  10. Comparison of the effects of the CO2 laser and chlorohexidine on the sterilization of infected cutaneous wounds: a histologic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; das Neves, Jerlucia C.; de Castro, Jurema F. L.; Santos, Jose Z. L. V.; Ribeiro de Sena, Kesia X. d. F.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.

    2001-04-01

    Wound infection constitutes a big risk for patients and it is usually associated to increased morbidity, mortality and hospital costs. It is accepted that local treatment of these infections is effective. The aim of this study was to compare histologically the effects of the CO2 laser and Chlorohexidine Gluconate on Staphylococcus aureus infected cutaneous wounds. Standardized wounds were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated during six days as follows: Group I: Chlorohexidine Gluconate, 1 min, six days; Group II: CO2 Laser, one day, maintaining surface debris; Group III: CO2 Laser, one day, removing the surface debris. Seven days after wounding the animals were killed and specimens taken for light microscopy. On control wounds, it was observed epithelial ulceration, and neutrophylic and lymphoplasmocitary inflammatory infiltrate. On group II, there was epithelial hyperplasia, areas of ulceration and intense neutrophylic and lymphoplasmocitary inflammatory infiltrate. On the other hand, on group III, there was a neutrophylic inflammatory infiltrate underneath the surface debris and below that intense lymphoplasmocitary inflammatory infiltrate. When the surface debris was removed, there was epithelial ulceration and mild lymphoplasmocitary inflammatory infiltrate and fibroblasts and collagen fibers. The result of this study shows that infected wounds treated with 4 percent Chlorohexidine shows a more pronounced inflammatory reaction when compared to that observed when the CO2 Laser is used, especially when surface debris are removed; Surface debris removal on Laser treated wounds results ona better and quicker healing; the surface debris may act as a culture medium for bacterial growth, or because of its characteristics, it may act as local irritant and delay healing.

  11. Study of photodynamic therapy in the control of isolated microorganisms from infected wounds--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Lima Carvalho, Denise; Guerra Pinto, Juliana; Di Paula Costa Sorge, Camila; Rodrigues Benedito, Fabiana Regis; Khouri, Sonia; Ferreira Strixino, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    The effective treatment of infected wounds continues to be a serious challenge, mainly due to the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) refers to the topical or systemic administration of a non-toxic, photosensitizing agent (PS), followed by irradiation with visible light of a suitable wavelength. The possibility of applying the PDT locally is what makes it so favorable to the treatment of infected wounds. The goal of this study was to evaluate the action of the PDT in the inactivation in vitro of microorganisms coming from infected wounds, using methylene blue (MB) and photodithazine (PDZ) as the PS and comparing the efficacy of these two compounds for PDT on bacteria. For the application of PDT, isolated microorganisms identified from material collected from wounds were suspended in a saline solution containing 10(6) viable cells/ml. Each isolated microorganism was submitted to PDT with MB and with PDZ in accordance with the following treatment groups: N/T--no treatment; T1--PDT with PDZ; T2--PDT with MB; T3--irradiation without PS; T4--treatment with PDZ without light; and T5--treatment with MB without light. As a light source, an LED-based device was used (Biopdi/Irrad-Lead 660), composed of 54 LEDs, each with 70 mW of power in the 660 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Each tray of 96 wells was irradiated with an intensity of 25 mW/cm(2) and a dose of light of 50 J/cm(3) for 33 min. All the tests were made in duplicate. It was then concluded that the PDT with PDZ was capable of inhibiting the growth of gram-positive bacteria samples, however it did not have the same effect on gram-negative bacteria, which showed growth greater than 100,000 CFU; the PDT with MB showed an effectiveness on gram-positive as well as gram-negative bacteria, for it was able to inhibit bacterial growth in both cases. PMID:23455656

  12. Investigating the antimicrobial activity of natural honey and its effects on the pathogenic bacterial infections of surgical wounds and conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Noori S

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities of 10-100% (wt/vol) concentrations of new honey, stored honey, heated honey, ultraviolet-exposed honey, and heated stored honey were tested against common human pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Entrobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella dysenteriae, Klebsiella sp., Haemophilus influenzae, Proteus sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus hemolyticus group B, and Candida albicans. Antimicrobial activity of honey was tested in acidic, neutral, or alkaline media. These were compared with similar concentrations of glucose in nutrient broth. Surgical wounds were made on the dorsum of mice and infected with S. aureus or Klebsiella sp. The wounds were treated with local application of honey four times a day or appropriate antibiotics and compared with control values. Bacterial conjunctivitis due to E. coli, Proteus sp., S. aureus, Klebsiella sp., and P. aeruginosa was induced in rats. Conjunctival application of honey four times a day or appropriate antibiotics was used for treatment and compared with control values. Growth of all the isolates was completely inhibited by 30-100% honey concentrations. The most sensitive microbes were E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and H. influenzae. Glucose showed less antimicrobial activity than honey, and many microbes showed positive culture even in 100% glucose. Heating to 80 degrees C for 1 hour decreased antimicrobial activity of both new and stored honey. Storage of honey for 5 years decreased its antimicrobial activity, while ultraviolet light exposure increased its activity against some of the microorganisms. Antimicrobial activity of honey was stronger in acidic media than in neutral or alkaline media. Single doses of honey used to prepare the 60% concentration in nutrient broth were bacteriocidal for P. aeruginosa and bacteriostatic for S. aureus and Klebsiella sp. during certain periods. Local application of raw honey on infected wounds reduced redness, swelling, time for complete resolution

  13. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26266047

  14. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  15. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents.

  16. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  17. In vitro study of bacterial growth inhibition in concentrated sugar solutions: microbiological basis for the use of sugar in treating infected wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Chirife, J; Herszage, L; Joseph, A; Kohn, E S

    1983-01-01

    The use of sugar for the treatment of infected wounds was investigated in in vitro experiments with bacteria pathogenic to humans, such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Studies showed that solutions of appropriate sugar concentration incubated at pH 7.0 and 35 degrees C were lethal to the bacterial species studied. On the basis of these results, it is proposed that an important function of sugar in the treatment of infected wounds is to create an environment of low water activity (aw), which inhibits or stresses bacterial growth. Images PMID:6870223

  18. Chloramphenicol encapsulated in poly-ε-caprolactone–pluronic composite: nanoparticles for treatment of MRSA-infected burn wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Devi, Banasmita; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Sharma, Arup; Kalita, Kasturi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Kotoky, Jibon

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has increased precipitously over the past several decades, with far-reaching health care and societal costs. MRSA infections in the context of burn wounds lead to invasive disease that could potentially cause mortality. Chloramphenicol is a well-known broad-spectrum bacteriostatic antibiotic that has been used since 1949, but due to its hydrophobicity, poor penetration in skin, fast degradation, and toxicity, its application has been hindered. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that old antibiotics such as chloramphenicol remained active against a large number of currently prevalent resistant bacterial isolates due to their low-level use in the past. Recently, the novel nanoparticulate drug-delivery system has been used and reported to be exceptionally useful for topical therapeutics, due to its distinctive physical characteristics such as a high surface-to-volume ratio and minuscule size. It helps to achieve better hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and controlled delivery with enhanced therapeutic index, which has resulted in decreased toxicity levels compared to the crude drug. Here, we report a novel chloramphenicol loaded with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-pluronic composite nanoparticles (CAM-PCL-P NPs), physicochemical characterizations, and its bioactivity evaluation in a MRSA-infected burn-wound animal model. CAM-PCL-P NPs could encapsulate 98.3% of the drug in the nanoparticles and release 81% of the encapsulated drug over 36 days with a time to 50% drug release of 72 hours (51%). Nanoparticle suspensions maintained the initial properties with respect to size and encapsulation efficiency, even after 6 months of storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively (P>0.05). Significant reduction in the level of toxicity was observed for CAM-PCL-P NPs compared with that of free drug as confirmed from hemolytic activity against human blood erythrocytes and cytotoxicity assay against an MCF-7

  19. Human wound infections caused by Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and EF-4b

    PubMed Central

    Heydecke, Anna; Andersson, Birgitta; Holmdahl, Torsten; Melhus, Åsa

    2013-01-01

    Background Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and -4b, are considered to be rare zoonotic pathogens, usually associated with dog or cat bites. The aim of the study was to phenotypicaly characterize 13 EF-4 isolates from wound infections, determine their antibiotic susceptibility and to follow the clinical outcome of the patients. Methods 13 of the EF-4 isolates were cultured on agar plates. Conventional biochemical tests and the Biolog system were used for phenotypical identification. An arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) was carried out to determine the genetic profiles. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for different antibiotics were determined. According to this, clinical data for the patients were recorded. Results 11 isolates were identified as N. animaloris and 2 as N. zoodegmatis due to the production of arginine dihydrolase. A majority of the patients had a history of dog bite. In 6 cases only grewth of N. animaloris or zoodegmatis was registered. When a patient received antibiotic treatment the most common drug of choice was penicillin V. Only 3 patients received treatment for which the isolated EF-4 bacterium was fully susceptible. Conclusion Human infections involving N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis usually present themselves as local wound infection, but severe complications can occur. Despite their pathogenic potentia, l N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are often misidentified, dismissed as skin contaminants or not recognized at all. Due to the fact that N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are significant pathogens in animal bites, physicians should keep these bacteria in mind when choosing antibiotic therapy. PMID:23919115

  20. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation (NPWTi) Better Reduces Post-debridement Bioburden in Chronically Infected Lower Extremity Wounds Than NPWT Alone

    PubMed Central

    Goss, S.G.; Schwartz, J.A.; Facchin, F.; Avdagic, E.; Gendics, C.; Lantis, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective An overabundance of bacteria in the chronic wound plays a significant role in the decreased ability for primary closure. One means of decreasing the bioburden in a wound is to operatively debride the wound for wound bed optimization prior to application of other therapy, such as Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT). We undertook a prospective pilot study to assess the efficacy of wound bed preparation for a standard algorithm (sharp surgical debridement followed by NPWT) versus one employing sharp surgical debridement followed by Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation (NPWTi). Methods Thirteen patients, corresponding to 16 chronic lower leg and foot wounds were taken to the operating room for debridement. The patients were sequentially enrolled in 2 treatment groups: the first receiving treatment with operative debridement followed by 1 week of NPWT with the instillation of quarter strength bleach solution; the other receiving a standard algorithm consisting of operative debridement and 1 week of NPWT. Quantitative cultures were taken pre-operatively after sterile preparation and draping of the wound site (POD # 0, pre-op), post-operatively once debridement was completed (POD # 0, post-op), and on post-operative day 7 after operative debridement (POD # 7, post-op). Results After operative debridement (post-operative day 0) there was a mean of 3 (±1) types of bacteria per wound. The mean CFU/gram tissue culture was statistically greater – 3.7 × 106 (±4 × 106) in the NPWTi group, while in the standard group (NPWT) the mean was 1.8 × 106 (±2.36 × 106) CFU/gram tissue culture (p = 0.016); at the end of therapy there was no statistical difference between the two groups (p = 0.44). Wounds treated with NPWTi had a mean of 2.6 × 105 (±3 × 105) CFU/gram of tissue culture while wounds treated with NPWT had a mean of 2.79 × 106 (±3.18 × 106) CFU/gram of tissue culture (p = 0.43). The mean absolute reduction in

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from wound infection and their sensitivity to alternative topical agents at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, South-West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound infection is one of the health problems that are caused and aggravated by the invasion of pathogenic organisms. Information on local pathogens and sensitivity to antimicrobial agents, and topical agents like acetic acid is crucial for successful treatment of wounds. Objectives To determine antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from wound infection and their sensitivity to alternative topical agents at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among patients with wound infection visiting Jimma University Specialized Hospital, from May to September 2013. Wound swab was collected using sterile cotton swabs and processed for bacterial isolation and susceptibility testing to antimicrobial agents, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and dabkin solution following standard bacteriological techniques. Biochemical tests were done to identify the species of the organisms. Sensitivity testing was done using Kirby- Baur disk diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentration was done using tube dilution method. Results In this study 145 bacterial isolates were recovered from 150 specimens showing an isolation rate of 87.3%. The predominant bacteria isolated from the infected wounds were Staphylococcus aureus 47 (32.4%) followed by Escherichia coli 29 (20%), Proteus species 23 (16%), Coagulase negative Staphylococci 21 (14.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 14 (10%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 11 (8%). All isolates showed high frequency of resistance to ampicillin, penicillin, cephalothin and tetracycline. The overall multiple drug resistance patterns were found to be 85%. Acetic acid (0.5%), Dabkin solution (1%) and 3% hydrogen peroxide were bactericidal to all isolated bacteria and lethal effect observed when applied for 10 minutes. Conclusions On in vitro sensitivity testing, ampicillin, penicillin, cephalothin and tetracycline were the least effective. Gentamicin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin

  2. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  3. Biofilm in wound care.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus infection on cut wounds in the mouse skin: experimental staphylococcal botryomycosis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, H; Kanzaki, H; Tada, J; Arata, J

    1996-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus cells were inoculated on the cut wounds in the skin of cyclophosphamide-treated mice. Biopsy specimens were taken from three mice at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 h after the inoculation and were examined by light and electron microscopies. One hour after the inoculation Staphylococcus aureus cells were seen around the cut wound and deeper into the subcutaneous tissue. By 6 h after the inoculation, Staphylococcus aureus cells formed clusters of bacterial colonies. By 36 h after the inoculation inflammatory cells, mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, were seen around the clusters. Electron microscopic examination revealed fibril-like structures around the Staphylococcus aureus cells at 1 h. The Staphylococcus aureus cells were enclosed in membrane-like structures at 3 h. The membrane-like structures and the fibril-like structures were positive for Ruthenium red. By 12 h after the inoculation, the membrane-like structures increased in thickness and in electron density. Inflammatory cells were seen around but outside of the membrane-like structures at 24, 36 and 48 h. At 60 h the tissues around the membrane-like structures were degenerated and almost necrotic. These results suggest that Staphylococcus aureus cells may form biofilm in dermal or subcutaneous tissues in a neutropenic condition.

  5. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  6. Multiple actions of Lucilia sericata larvae in hard-to-heal wounds: larval secretions contain molecules that accelerate wound healing, reduce chronic inflammation and inhibit bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Pritchard, David I; Nigam, Yamni; Jung, Willi; Nibbering, Peter H

    2013-12-01

    In Europe ≈15,000 patients receive larval therapy for wound treatment annually. Over the past few years, clinical studies have demonstrated the success of larvae of Lucilia sericata as debridement agents. This is based on a combination of physical and biochemical actions. Laboratory investigations have advanced our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of larval secretions, including removal of dead tissue, reduction of the bacterial burden, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the microbiological, immunological, and wound healing actions of larval therapy, and the molecules involved in these beneficial effects. Future studies will focus on the isolation, identification, and (pre)clinical testing of the effective molecules of L. sericata larvae. These molecules may be candidates for the development of new agents for the treatment of several infectious and inflammatory diseases, including chronic wounds.

  7. Bacterial Inactivation of Wound Infection in a Human Skin Model by Liquid-Phase Discharge Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Paul Y.; Kim, Yoon-Sun; Koo, Il Gyo; Jung, Jae Chul; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Myeong Yeol; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigate disinfection of a reconstructed human skin model contaminated with biofilm-formative Staphylococcus aureus employing plasma discharge in liquid. Principal Findings We observed statistically significant 3.83-log10 (p<0.001) and 1.59-log10 (p<0.05) decreases in colony forming units of adherent S. aureus bacteria and 24 h S. aureus biofilm culture with plasma treatment. Plasma treatment was associated with minimal changes in histological morphology and tissue viability determined by means of MTT assay. Spectral analysis of the plasma discharge indicated the presence of highly reactive atomic oxygen radicals (777 nm and 844 nm) and OH bands in the UV region. The contribution of these and other plasma-generated agents and physical conditions to the reduction in bacterial load are discussed. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the potential of liquid plasma treatment as a potential adjunct therapy for chronic wounds. PMID:21897870

  8. Notes from the field: rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium wound infections among medical tourists undergoing cosmetic surgeries in the Dominican Republic--multiple states, March 2013-February 2014.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, David; Gaines, Joanna; Nguyen, Duc B; Esposito, Douglas H; Ridpath, Alison; Yacisin, Kari; Poy, Joe A; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Lijewski, Virginia; McElroy, Nora P; Ahmad, Nina; Harrison, Cassandra; Parinelli, Ellen J; Beaudoin, Amanda L; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Pritchard, Scott; Jensen, Bette J; Toney, Nadege C; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Nyangoma, Edith N; Barry, Anita M; Feldman, Katherine A; Blythe, David; Perz, Joseph F; Morgan, Oliver W; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Brunette, Gary W; Sotir, Mark

    2014-03-01

    In August 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (MDHMH) was notified of two persons with rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (RG-NTM) surgical-site infections. Both patients had undergone surgical procedures as medical tourists at the same private surgical clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic the previous month. Within 7 days of returning to the United States, both sought care for symptoms that included surgical wound abscesses, clear fluid drainage, pain, and fever. Initial antibiotic therapy was ineffective. Material collected from both patients' wounds grew Mycobacterium abscessus exhibiting a high degree of antibiotic resistance characteristic of this organism.

  9. Common questions about wound care.

    PubMed

    Worster, Brooke; Zawora, Michelle Q; Hsieh, Christine

    2015-01-15

    Lacerations, abrasions, burns, and puncture wounds are common in the outpatient setting. Because wounds can quickly become infected, the most important aspect of treating a minor wound is irrigation and cleaning. There is no evidence that antiseptic irrigation is superior to sterile saline or tap water. Occlusion of the wound is key to preventing contamination. Suturing, if required, can be completed up to 24 hours after the trauma occurs, depending on the wound site. Tissue adhesives are equally effective for low-tension wounds with linear edges that can be evenly approximated. Although patients are often instructed to keep their wounds covered and dry after suturing, they can get wet within the first 24 to 48 hours without increasing the risk of infection. There is no evidence that prophylactic antibiotics improve outcomes for most simple wounds. Tetanus toxoid should be administered as soon as possible to patients who have not received a booster in the past 10 years. Superficial mild wound infections can be treated with topical agents, whereas deeper mild and moderate infections should be treated with oral antibiotics. Most severe infections, and moderate infections in high-risk patients, require initial parenteral antibiotics. Severe burns and wounds that cover large areas of the body or involve the face, joints, bone, tendons, or nerves should generally be referred to wound care specialists.

  10. Analysis of Healing Effect of Alginate Sulfate Hydrogel Dressing Containing Antimicrobial Peptide on Wound Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Babavalian, Hamid; Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin; Mohammadi, Sajjad; Moosazadeh Moghaddam, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wound infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are a health problem worldwide; therefore, it is necessary to develop new antimicrobial compounds. Considering broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and low probability of drug resistance to peptides, applications these peptides are being studied extensively. Objectives: In this study, to control drug release over time, an alginate sulfate-based hydrogel impregnated with the CM11 peptide as the antimicrobial agent was developed, and its healing effects were tested on skin infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains in a mouse model. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the CM11 peptide and alginate hydrogel in combination with the peptide were determined. Forty mice were divided into 4 groups: 1 group as a negative control (without treatment; however, 5 mice received hydrogel dressing without peptide), 1 group as a positive control (2% mupirocin treatment), and 2 groups as test groups. To establish skin infection, 200 μL of bacterial suspension with 3 × 108 CFU/mL concentration was subcutaneously injected in the scapular region of the mice. On the basis of the in vitro minimal bactericidal concentration of the alginate hydrogel containing peptide for 15 clinical isolates, hydrogel containing 128 mg/L of peptide was used for wound dressing over an 8-day period. Results: The highest and lowest numbers of wounds were observed on day 2 in the negative and positive control groups, respectively. During the 8-day period, the positive control and hydrogel containing peptide treatment groups showed similar levels of wound healing. Conclusions: This study showed that compared to standard drug treatment, treatment with hydrogel containing peptide had substantial antibacterial effects on S. aureus wound infections in mice. PMID:26487923

  11. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  12. Evaluation of Gallium Citrate Formulations against a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Murine Wound Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mitchell G.; Truong-Le, Vu; Alamneh, Yonas A.; Black, Chad C.; Anderl, Jeff; Honnold, Cary L.; Pavlicek, Rebecca L.; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Wise, Matthew C.; Hall, Eric R.; Wagar, Eric J.; Patzer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common occurrence in health care facilities with a heightened risk for immunocompromised patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae has been increasingly implicated as the bacterial agent responsible for SSTIs, and treatment can be challenging as more strains become multidrug resistant (MDR). Therefore, new treatments are needed to counter this bacterial pathogen. Gallium complexes exhibit antimicrobial activity and are currently being evaluated as potential treatment for bacterial infections. In this study, we tested a topical formulation containing gallium citrate (GaCi) for the treatment of wounds infected with K. pneumoniae. First, the MIC against K. pneumoniae ranged from 0.125 to 2.0 μg/ml GaCi. After this in vitro efficacy was established, two topical formulations with GaCi (0.1% [wt/vol] and 0.3% [wt/vol]) were tested in a murine wound model of MDR K. pneumoniae infection. Gross pathology and histopathology revealed K. pneumoniae-infected wounds appeared to close faster with GaCi treatment and were accompanied by reduced inflammation compared to those of untreated controls. Similarly, quantitative indications of infection remediation, such as reduced weight loss and wound area, suggested that treatment improved outcomes compared to those of untreated controls. Bacterial burdens were measured 1 and 3 days following inoculation, and a 0.5 to 1.5 log reduction of CFU was observed. Lastly, upon scanning electron microscopy analysis, GaCi treatment appeared to prevent biofilm formation on dressings compared to those of untreated controls. These results suggest that with more preclinical testing, a topical application of GaCi may be a promising alternative treatment strategy for K. pneumoniae SSTI. PMID:26239978

  13. Evaluation of Gallium Citrate Formulations against a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Murine Wound Model of Infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mitchell G; Truong-Le, Vu; Alamneh, Yonas A; Black, Chad C; Anderl, Jeff; Honnold, Cary L; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Wise, Matthew C; Hall, Eric R; Wagar, Eric J; Patzer, Eric; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2015-10-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common occurrence in health care facilities with a heightened risk for immunocompromised patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae has been increasingly implicated as the bacterial agent responsible for SSTIs, and treatment can be challenging as more strains become multidrug resistant (MDR). Therefore, new treatments are needed to counter this bacterial pathogen. Gallium complexes exhibit antimicrobial activity and are currently being evaluated as potential treatment for bacterial infections. In this study, we tested a topical formulation containing gallium citrate (GaCi) for the treatment of wounds infected with K. pneumoniae. First, the MIC against K. pneumoniae ranged from 0.125 to 2.0 μg/ml GaCi. After this in vitro efficacy was established, two topical formulations with GaCi (0.1% [wt/vol] and 0.3% [wt/vol]) were tested in a murine wound model of MDR K. pneumoniae infection. Gross pathology and histopathology revealed K. pneumoniae-infected wounds appeared to close faster with GaCi treatment and were accompanied by reduced inflammation compared to those of untreated controls. Similarly, quantitative indications of infection remediation, such as reduced weight loss and wound area, suggested that treatment improved outcomes compared to those of untreated controls. Bacterial burdens were measured 1 and 3 days following inoculation, and a 0.5 to 1.5 log reduction of CFU was observed. Lastly, upon scanning electron microscopy analysis, GaCi treatment appeared to prevent biofilm formation on dressings compared to those of untreated controls. These results suggest that with more preclinical testing, a topical application of GaCi may be a promising alternative treatment strategy for K. pneumoniae SSTI.

  14. Débridement of the noninfected wound.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Rhonda S; Meyr, Andrew J; Steinberg, John S; Attinger, Christopher E

    2010-09-01

    The utility of wound débridement has expanded to include the management of all chronic wounds, even in the absence of infection and gross necrosis. Biofilm, metalloproteases on the wound base, and senescent cells at the wound edge irreversibly change the physiology of wound healing and contribute to a pathologic, chronic inflammatory environment. The objective of this review is to provide surgeons with a baseline understanding of the processes of débridement in the noninfected wound.

  15. Exploration of alginate hydrogel/nano zinc oxide composite bandages for infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Annapoorna; Kumar P T, Sudheesh; Raja, Biswas; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Jayakumar, Rangasamy

    2015-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel/zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) composite bandage was developed by freeze-dry method from the mixture of nZnO and alginate hydrogel. The developed composite bandage was porous with porosity at a range of 60%-70%. The swelling ratios of the bandages decreased with increasing concentrations of nZnO. The composite bandages with nZnO incorporation showed controlled degradation profile and faster blood clotting ability when compared to the KALTOSTAT® and control bandages without nZnO. The prepared composite bandages exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Cytocompatibility evaluation of the prepared composite bandages done on human dermal fibroblast cells by Alamar assay and infiltration studies proved that the bandages have a non-toxic nature at lower concentrations of nZnO whereas slight reduction in viability was seen with increasing nZnO concentrations. The qualitative analysis of ex-vivo re-epithelialization on porcine skin revealed keratinocyte infiltration toward wound area for nZnO alginate bandages.

  16. Exploration of alginate hydrogel/nano zinc oxide composite bandages for infected wounds

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, Annapoorna; PT, Sudheesh Kumar; Raja, Biswas; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Jayakumar, Rangasamy

    2015-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel/zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) composite bandage was developed by freeze-dry method from the mixture of nZnO and alginate hydrogel. The developed composite bandage was porous with porosity at a range of 60%–70%. The swelling ratios of the bandages decreased with increasing concentrations of nZnO. The composite bandages with nZnO incorporation showed controlled degradation profile and faster blood clotting ability when compared to the KALTOSTAT® and control bandages without nZnO. The prepared composite bandages exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Cytocompatibility evaluation of the prepared composite bandages done on human dermal fibroblast cells by Alamar assay and infiltration studies proved that the bandages have a non-toxic nature at lower concentrations of nZnO whereas slight reduction in viability was seen with increasing nZnO concentrations. The qualitative analysis of ex-vivo re-epithelialization on porcine skin revealed keratinocyte infiltration toward wound area for nZnO alginate bandages. PMID:26491307

  17. Symbiosis theory-directed green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their application in infected wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lu; Zeng, Pei; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Wenli; Wang, Hui; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized for the first time using an antibacterial endophytic fungus of Chinese medicinal herb Orchidantha chinensis, which has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. The AgNPs were analyzed by various characterization techniques to reveal their morphology, chemical composition, and stability. Also, the relationship between Chinese medicinal herbs, endophytic fungi, and the property of AgNPs was investigated for the first time. Interestingly, an experiment performed in this study revealed the proteins produced by the endophytic fungus to be capped on the nanoparticles, which led to an increase in the stability of spherical and polydispersed AgNPs with low aggregation for over 6 months. More importantly, further study demonstrated that the AgNPs possessed superior antibacterial activity and effectively promoted wound healing. Altogether, the biosynthesis of active AgNPs using the endophytic fungus from Chinese medicinal herb based on the symbiosis theory is simple, eco-friendly, and promising. PMID:27358563

  18. Efficacy of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor FS10 Alone and in Combination with Tigecycline in an Animal Model of Staphylococcal Infected Wound

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Ivana; Baldassarre, Leonardo; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Lucarini, Guendalina; Orsetti, Elena; Provinciali, Mauro; Fornasari, Erika; Di Stefano, Antonio; Giacometti, Andrea; Offidani, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    In staphylococci, quorum sensing regulates both biofilm formation and toxin production, moreover it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by RNAIII inhibiting peptide (RIP). Aim our study was to evaluate the in vitro activity and its in vivo efficacy of the combined administration of FS10, a novel RIP derivative, and tigecycline in an animal model of methicillin-resistant (MR) and methicillin-sensitive (MS) Staphylococcus aureus wound infection. Using a 1.x2 cm template, one full thickness wound was established through the panniculus carnosus on the back subcutaneous tissue of each animal. Infection was determined by inoculation of 5x107 CFU/ml of bacteria, that produced an abscess within 24 h, after this, treatment was initiated. The study included, for each strain, a control group without infection, a control infected group that did not receive any treatment and a control infected group with drug-free foam dressing, and three infected groups treated, respectively, with: FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10), daily intraperitoneal tigecycline (7 mg/Kg), FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10) and daily intraperitoneal injections of tigecycline (7 mg/Kg). The main outcome measures were quantitative culture and histological examination of tissue repair. The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received FS10-soaked and parenteral tigecycline reducing the bacterial load from 107 CFU/ml to about 103 CFU/g for MSSA and to about 104 CFU/g for MRSA. The group treated with FS10-soaked foam dressing associated with parenteral tigecycline showed, histologically, better overall healing with epithelialization and collagen scores significantly higher than those of the other groups in both strains. In conclusion, the combined use of topical FS10 with i.p. tigecycline induced positive interaction in vivo, resulting in an enhanced therapeutic benefit versus staphylococcal infections in murine wound models. PMID:27253706

  19. Efficacy of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor FS10 Alone and in Combination with Tigecycline in an Animal Model of Staphylococcal Infected Wound.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Oriana; Cirioni, Oscar; Cacciatore, Ivana; Baldassarre, Leonardo; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Lucarini, Guendalina; Orsetti, Elena; Provinciali, Mauro; Fornasari, Erika; Di Stefano, Antonio; Giacometti, Andrea; Offidani, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    In staphylococci, quorum sensing regulates both biofilm formation and toxin production, moreover it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by RNAIII inhibiting peptide (RIP). Aim our study was to evaluate the in vitro activity and its in vivo efficacy of the combined administration of FS10, a novel RIP derivative, and tigecycline in an animal model of methicillin-resistant (MR) and methicillin-sensitive (MS) Staphylococcus aureus wound infection. Using a 1.x2 cm template, one full thickness wound was established through the panniculus carnosus on the back subcutaneous tissue of each animal. Infection was determined by inoculation of 5x107 CFU/ml of bacteria, that produced an abscess within 24 h, after this, treatment was initiated. The study included, for each strain, a control group without infection, a control infected group that did not receive any treatment and a control infected group with drug-free foam dressing, and three infected groups treated, respectively, with: FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10), daily intraperitoneal tigecycline (7 mg/Kg), FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10) and daily intraperitoneal injections of tigecycline (7 mg/Kg). The main outcome measures were quantitative culture and histological examination of tissue repair. The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received FS10-soaked and parenteral tigecycline reducing the bacterial load from 107 CFU/ml to about 103 CFU/g for MSSA and to about 104 CFU/g for MRSA. The group treated with FS10-soaked foam dressing associated with parenteral tigecycline showed, histologically, better overall healing with epithelialization and collagen scores significantly higher than those of the other groups in both strains. In conclusion, the combined use of topical FS10 with i.p. tigecycline induced positive interaction in vivo, resulting in an enhanced therapeutic benefit versus staphylococcal infections in murine wound models.

  20. [Standardized wound documentation of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Deutschle, G; Coerper, S; Witte, M; Becker, H D

    1999-01-01

    Owing to the long periods of treatment and multi-factoral etiology of chronic wounds, standardized wound documentation is necessary to enable judgement of the course of healing. We have developed a documentation system which permits a standardized assessment of chronic wounds by means of defined parameters and graded divisions. Besides containing the diagnostic and therapeutic measures which have been carried out, the documentation should also contain parameters of wound healing. These are the following: wound localisation, size of wound, degree of injury, infection, and wound morphology. Planimetry and photographic documentation complete the documentation. Thus a documented course of healing can be presented, which enables rapid retrospective analysis and, if needed, a change in therapeutic approach at an early stage. This complete, exact documentation is required by modern administration of justice and is a protection against the reversal of the onus of proof in lawsuits. The extent of documentation can be adapted to the individual needs of the institution responsible for treatment. However, a minimal amount of documentation should always include localisation of the wound, size, the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, and complications if any. PMID:10436529

  1. Wet wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Jan J; Slama, Jaromir; Preuss, Stefan; Perez, Norvin; Svensjö, Tor; Visovatti, Scott; Breuing, Karl; Bartlett, Richard; Pribaz, Julian; Weiss, Denton; Eriksson, Elof

    2002-12-01

    after application, 20 percent or more of the original antibiotic concentration was present in the wound chamber fluid. In conclusion, the wound chamber provides a safe, powerful tool in the treatment of difficult infected wounds.

  2. An autophagy gene, HoATG5, is involved in sporulation, cell wall integrity and infection of wounded barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Ning, Guo-Ao; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Mao, Li-Juan; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Chu-Long; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    The endophytic fungus Harpophora oryzae is a beneficial endosymbiont isolated from wild rice. H. oryzae can not only promote rice growth and biomass accumulation but also protect rice roots from invasion by its close relative Magnaporthe oryzae. Autophagy is a highly evolutionary conserved process from lower to higher eukaryotic organisms, and is involved in the maintenance of normal cell differentiation and development. In this study, we isolated a gene (HoATG5) which encodes an essential protein required for autophagy from the beneficial endophyte fungus H. oryzae. Using targeted gene replacement, a ΔHoATG5 mutant was generated and used to investigate the biological functions of autophagy in H. oryzae. We found that the autophagic process was blocked in the HoATG5 deletion mutant. The mutant showed increased vegetative growth and sporulation, and was sensitive to nutrient starvation. The ΔHoATG5 mutant lost its ability to penetrate and infect the wounded barley leaves. These results provide new knowledge to elaborate the molecular machinery of autophagy in endophytic fungi. PMID:27664751

  3. An autophagy gene, HoATG5, is involved in sporulation, cell wall integrity and infection of wounded barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Ning, Guo-Ao; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Mao, Li-Juan; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Chu-Long; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    The endophytic fungus Harpophora oryzae is a beneficial endosymbiont isolated from wild rice. H. oryzae can not only promote rice growth and biomass accumulation but also protect rice roots from invasion by its close relative Magnaporthe oryzae. Autophagy is a highly evolutionary conserved process from lower to higher eukaryotic organisms, and is involved in the maintenance of normal cell differentiation and development. In this study, we isolated a gene (HoATG5) which encodes an essential protein required for autophagy from the beneficial endophyte fungus H. oryzae. Using targeted gene replacement, a ΔHoATG5 mutant was generated and used to investigate the biological functions of autophagy in H. oryzae. We found that the autophagic process was blocked in the HoATG5 deletion mutant. The mutant showed increased vegetative growth and sporulation, and was sensitive to nutrient starvation. The ΔHoATG5 mutant lost its ability to penetrate and infect the wounded barley leaves. These results provide new knowledge to elaborate the molecular machinery of autophagy in endophytic fungi.

  4. Snakin-2, an Antimicrobial Peptide from Potato Whose Gene Is Locally Induced by Wounding and Responds to Pathogen Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Segura, Ana; Moreno, Manuel; López, Gemma; García-Olmedo, Francisco; Molina, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The peptide snakin-2 (StSN2) has been isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Jaerla) tubers and found to be active (EC50 = 1–20 μm) against fungal and bacterial plant pathogens. It causes a rapid aggregation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The corresponding StSN2 cDNA encodes a signal sequence followed by a 15-residue acidic sequence that precedes the mature StSN2 peptide, which is basic (isoelectric point = 9.16) and 66 amino acid residues long (molecular weight of 7,025). The StSN2 gene is developmentally expressed in tubers, stems, flowers, shoot apex, and leaves, but not in roots, or stolons, and is locally up-regulated by wounding and by abscisic acid treatment. Expression of this gene is also up-regulated after infection of potato tubers with the compatible fungus Botritys cinerea and down-regulated by the virulent bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Erwinia chrysanthemi. These observations are congruent with the hypothesis that the StSN2 is a component of both constitutive and inducible defense barriers. PMID:11891250

  5. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids

  6. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids

  7. Streptococcus hongkongensis sp. nov., isolated from a patient with an infected puncture wound and from a marine flatfish.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Curreem, Shirly O T; Lin, Cherry C N; Fung, Ami M Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2013-07-01

    A bacterium, HKU30(T), was isolated from the infected tissue of a patient with wound infection after puncture by a fish fin. Cells are facultative anaerobic, non-spore-forming, non-motile, Gram-positive cocci arranged in chains. Colonies were non-haemolytic. The strain was catalase, oxidase, urease and Voges-Proskauer test negative. It reacted with Lancefield's group G antisera and was resistant to optochin. It grew on bile aesculin agar and in 5 % NaCl. It was unidentified by three commercial identification systems. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the bacterium shared 98.2, 97.7, 97.4 and 97.1 % nucleotide identities with Streptococcus iniae, Streptococcus pseudoporcinus, Streptococcus parauberis and Streptococcus uberis, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 35.6 ± 0.9 mol% (mean ± sd). In view of the occupational exposure of the patient, an epidemiological study was performed to isolate the bacterium from marine fish. Two strains, with similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics to those of HKU30(T), were isolated from a three-lined tongue sole (Cynoglossus abbreviatus) and an olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of four additional housekeeping genes, groEL, gyrB, sodA and rpoB, showed that the three isolates formed a distinct branch among known species of the genus Streptococcus, being most closely related to S. parauberis (CCUG 39954(T)). DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated ≤ 53.8 % DNA relatedness between the three isolates and related species of the genus Streptococcus. A novel species, Streptococcus hongkongensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is HKU30(T) ( = DSM 26014(T) = CECT 8154(T)).

  8. IL-15 Superagonist Expands mCD8+ T, NK and NKT Cells after Burn Injury but Fails to Improve Outcome during Burn Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Naeem K.; Luan, Liming; Bohannon, Julia K.; Guo, Yin; Hernandez, Antonio; Fensterheim, Benjamin; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Severely burned patients are highly susceptible to opportunistic infections and sepsis, owing to the loss of the protective skin barrier and immunological dysfunction. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) belongs to the IL-2 family of common gamma chain cytokines and stimulates the proliferation and activation of T (specifically memory CD8), NK and NKT cells. It has been shown to preserve T cell function and improve survival during cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. However, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-15 or IL-15 superagonist (SA) during infection after burn injury has not been evaluated. Moreover, very few, if any, studies have examined, in detail, the effect of burn injury and infection on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we examined the effect of burn and sepsis on adaptive immune cell populations and the effect of IL-15 SA treatment on the host response to infection. Methods Mice were subjected to a 35% total body surface area burn, followed by wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In some experiments, IL-15 SA was administered after burn injury, but before infection. Leukocytes in spleen, liver and peritoneal cavity were characterized using flow cytometry. Bacterial clearance, organ injury and survival were also assessed. Results Burn wound infection led to a significant decline in total white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and induced organ injury and sepsis. Burn injury caused decline in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen, which was worsened by infection. IL-15 treatment inhibited this decline and significantly increased cell numbers and activation, as determined by CD69 expression, of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells in the spleen and liver after burn injury. However, IL-15 SA treatment failed to prevent burn wound sepsis-induced loss of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells and failed to improve bacterial clearance and survival. Conclusion Cutaneous burn injury and infection cause significant adaptive immune dysfunction. IL-15

  9. Antipathogenic properties of Lactobacillus plantarum on Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the potential use of its supernatants in the treatment of infected chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alberto N; Cabral, María E Sesto; Noseda, Diego; Bosch, Alejandra; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Valdez, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria delay wound healing through several different mechanisms such as persistent production of inflammatory mediators or maintenance of necrotic neutrophils, which release cytolytic enzymes and free oxygen radicals. One of the most frequent pathogens isolated from infections in chronic wounds is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium is extremely refractory to therapy and to host immune attack when it forms biofilms. Therefore, antibiotics and antiseptics are becoming useless in the treatment of these infections. In previous works, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum has an important antipathogenic capacity on P. aeruginosa. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the mechanism involved in the control of growth of P. aeruginosa on different surfaces by L. plantarum. For this purpose, we investigated the effects of L. plantarum supernatants on pathogenic properties of P. aeruginosa, such as adhesion, viability, virulence factors, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing signal expression. L. plantarum supernatants were able to inhibit pathogenic properties of P. aeruginosa by a quorum quenching mechanism. The antipathogenic properties mentioned above, together with the immunomodulatory, tissue repair, and angiogenesis properties in the supernatants of L. plantarum, make them an attractive option in infected chronic wound treatment.

  10. Effects of inoculum density and wounding on stem infection of three Eastern U.S. forest species by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedlings of three Eastern US forest species (red maple, northern red oak, and chestnut oak) were inoculated by applying Phytophthora ramorum sporangia to stems at different inoculum densities with and without wounding. Disease occurred in all treatments involving wounds, and no disease was observe...

  11. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  12. Possible healthcare-associated transmission as a cause of secondary infection and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two wound treatment centres in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kpeli, G; Darko Otchere, I; Lamelas, A; Buultjens, A L; Bulach, D; Baines, S L; Seemann, T; Giulieri, S; Nakobu, Z; Aboagye, S Y; Owusu-Mireku, E; Pluschke, G; Stinear, T P; Yeboah-Manu, D

    2016-09-01

    We have previously shown that secondary infections of Buruli ulcer wounds were frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus. To gain understanding into possible routes of secondary infection, we characterized S. aureus isolates from patient lesions and surrounding environments across two Ghanaian health centres. One hundred and one S. aureus isolates were isolated from wounds (n = 93, 92.1%) and the hospital environment (n = 8, 7.9%) and characterized by the spa gene, mecA and the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin followed by spa sequencing and whole genome sequencing of a subset of 49 isolates. Spa typing and sequencing of the spa gene from 91 isolates identified 29 different spa types with t355 (ST152), t186 (ST88), and t346 dominating. Although many distinct strains were isolated from both health centres, genotype clustering was identified within centres. In addition, we identified a cluster consisting of isolates from a healthcare worker, patients dressed that same day and forceps used for dressing, pointing to possible healthcare-associated transmission. These clusters were confirmed by phylogenomic analysis. Twenty-four (22.8%) isolates were identified as methicillin-resistant S. aureus and lukFS genes encoding Panton-Valentine leucocidin were identified in 67 (63.8%) of the isolates. Phenotype screening showed widespread resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin, rifampicin, amikacin and streptomycin. Genomics confirmed the widespread presence of antibiotic resistance genes to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, quinolone, streptomycin and tetracycline. Our findings indicate that the healthcare environment probably contributes to the superinfection of Buruli ulcer wounds and calls for improved training in wound management and infection control techniques. PMID:27547406

  13. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial efficacy of peptide A3-APO in mouse models of multidrug-resistant wound and lung infections cannot be explained by in vitro activity against the pathogens involved.

    PubMed

    Ostorhazi, Eszter; Holub, Marianna Csilla; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Harmos, Ferenc; Cassone, Marco; Wade, John D; Otvos, Laszlo

    2011-05-01

    Although the designer proline-rich antimicrobial peptide A3-APO has only modest activity against Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii in vitro, in mouse models of systemic and wound infections it shows superior efficacy compared with conventional antibiotics. In this study, the efficacy of A3-APO in several additional mouse models was investigated, including Staphylococcus aureus wound infection, mixed Klebsiella pneumoniae-A. baumannii-Proteus mirabilis wound infection and K. pneumoniae lung infection, mimicking blast wound infections, foot ulcers and ventilator-induced nosocomial infections, respectively. Whilst the peptide practically did not kill the strains in vitro, when administered intramuscularly or as an aerosol it significantly improved mouse survival and reduced bacterial counts at the infection site and in blood. In the lung infection study, the blood bacterial counts following A3-APO treatment were as low as after treatment with colistin and were lower than after treatment with imipenem or amikacin. The wounds of treated animals, unlike their untreated counterparts, lacked pus and signs of inflammation. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, A3-APO upregulated the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 by four- to six-fold. One of the mechanisms mediating the in vivo protective effects might be the prevention of inflammation around bacterial infiltration.

  14. Wound Management: The Occlusive Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Rheinecker, Scot B.

    1995-01-01

    Superficial wounds resulting from athletic injury are common in sports medicine. Although such wounds can be quite painful, they are usually merely inconvenient to the athlete. If improperly managed, however, superficial wounds may heal slowly and cause unnecessary scar tissue proliferation at the wound site. Scar formation causes the wound to break open frequently and puts the athlete at risk of cross-contamination by pathogenic organisms. New advances in the science of wound management strongly favor the use of occlusive dressings to increase patient comfort, increase patient compliance, decrease the risk of infection, and decrease overall healing time. Occlusion has clearly been proven to aid in the healing of superficial wounds and should be considered as a treatment alternative for wounds in the sports medicine setting. In this paper, I discuss three of the most widely used types of occlusive dressings: 1) films, 2) hydrogels, and 3) hydrocolloids. PMID:16558325

  15. Incidence of wound infection in three different departments and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the isolates in a Saudi Arabian hospital.

    PubMed

    Abussaud, M J

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of wound infection in three different departments: general surgery (GS), interdisciplinary intensive care (IIC) and pediatric intensive care (PIC) in King Khalid Hospital in Hail was studied during the hot months June-October. A total of 2,331 wounds were examined. One hundred and ninety-three of them were infected (8%). The overall monthly infection rates in these departments were significantly different. They were 18, 9 and 4% in the IIC, GS, and PIC respectively. The monthly infection rates varied, the highest rates occurred in July. Two hundred and eighty three strains were isolated from the infected wounds. Seventy ones were isolated during June, and 69, 60, 42 and 41 strains were isolated during July, October, August and September, respectively- Thirty five per cent of these strains were identified as Staphylococcus aureus, 31% as Escherichia coli, 25% as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 10% as Klebsiella. S. aureus was the predominant organism during July; while E. coli predominated during August and October. S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains were isolated in equal numbers during June. The sensitivity of these bacteria to ampicillin, cephalotin, cefotaxime, cefoxitin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and gentamicin was tested by the standard disk diffusion technique. The most effective antibiotic against S. aureus was chloramphenicol (78%) followed by gentamicin (63%) and tetracycline (57%); against E. coli cefotaxime (82%) followed by cefoxitin (77%), cephalitin (62%) and chloramphenicol (53%); against Klebsiella cefotaxime (95%) followed by chloramphenicol (90%), tetracycline (70%), cephalotin and gentamicin (each 66%); and cefoxitin (60%); against P. aeruginosa cefotaxime (56%), gentamicin (33%) and chloramphenicol (29%).

  16. New Is Old, and Old Is New: Recent Advances in Antibiotic-Based, Antibiotic-Free and Ethnomedical Treatments against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Xie, Jun-Qiu; Zhang, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen of wound infections. Thus far, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become the major causative agent in wound infections, especially for nosocomial infections. MRSA infections are seldom eradicated by routine antimicrobial therapies. More concerning, some strains have become resistant to the newest antibiotics of last resort. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of a polymyxin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae, by which resistance to the last group of antibiotics will likely spread rapidly. The worst-case scenario, “a return to the pre-antibiotic era”, is likely in sight. A perpetual goal for antibiotic research is the discovery of an antibiotic that lacks resistance potential, such as the recent discovery of teixobactin. However, when considering the issue from an ecological and evolutionary standpoint, it is evident that it is insufficient to solve the antibiotic dilemma through the use of antibiotics themselves. In this review, we summarized recent advances in antibiotic-based, antibiotic-free and ethnomedical treatments against MRSA wound infections to identify new clues to solve the antibiotic dilemma. One potential solution is to use ethnomedical drugs topically. Some ethnomedical drugs have been demonstrated to be effective antimicrobials against MRSA. A decline in antibiotic resistance can therefore be expected, as has been demonstrated when antibiotic-free treatments were used to limit the use of antibiotics. It is also anticipated that these drugs will have low resistance potential, although there is only minimal evidence to support this claim to date. More clinical trials and animal tests should be conducted on this topic. PMID:27120596

  17. New Is Old, and Old Is New: Recent Advances in Antibiotic-Based, Antibiotic-Free and Ethnomedical Treatments against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Xie, Jun-Qiu; Zhang, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen of wound infections. Thus far, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become the major causative agent in wound infections, especially for nosocomial infections. MRSA infections are seldom eradicated by routine antimicrobial therapies. More concerning, some strains have become resistant to the newest antibiotics of last resort. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of a polymyxin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae, by which resistance to the last group of antibiotics will likely spread rapidly. The worst-case scenario, "a return to the pre-antibiotic era", is likely in sight. A perpetual goal for antibiotic research is the discovery of an antibiotic that lacks resistance potential, such as the recent discovery of teixobactin. However, when considering the issue from an ecological and evolutionary standpoint, it is evident that it is insufficient to solve the antibiotic dilemma through the use of antibiotics themselves. In this review, we summarized recent advances in antibiotic-based, antibiotic-free and ethnomedical treatments against MRSA wound infections to identify new clues to solve the antibiotic dilemma. One potential solution is to use ethnomedical drugs topically. Some ethnomedical drugs have been demonstrated to be effective antimicrobials against MRSA. A decline in antibiotic resistance can therefore be expected, as has been demonstrated when antibiotic-free treatments were used to limit the use of antibiotics. It is also anticipated that these drugs will have low resistance potential, although there is only minimal evidence to support this claim to date. More clinical trials and animal tests should be conducted on this topic.

  18. Wound bed preparation: ultrasonic-assisted debridement.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Gillian; Pinnuck, Loreto

    Wound bed preparation is essential for the healing of wounds. The TIME framework (tissue, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, edge of wound) for wound bed preparation shows the importance of debridement in the treatment of chronic wounds. Debridement involves the removal of devitalised tissue from the wound bed. It also facilitates the removal of biofilms-complex microbial communities that are known to contribute to delayed wound healing and chronicity of wounds. Ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement (UAWD) is a lesser known debridement method that uses low-frequency ultrasound waves. There is evidence to show that the three clinical effects of atraumatic selective tissue debridement, wound stimulatory effects and antibacterial activity facilitate early healing of wounds, reducing the cost to the healthcare system and improving the patient's quality of life.

  19. Skin tissue engineering for the infected wound site: biodegradable PLA nanofibers and a novel approach for silver ion release evaluated in a 3D coculture system of keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-10-01

    Wound infection presents a challenging and growing problem. With the increased prevalence and growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is a mounting need to reduce and eliminate wound infections using methodologies that limit the ability of bacteria to evolve into further drug-resistant strains. A well-known strategy for combating bacterial infection and preventing wound sepsis is through the delivery of silver ions to the wound site. High surface area silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) allowing extensive silver ion release have therefore been explored in different wound dressings and/or skin substitutes. However, it has been recently shown that AgNPs can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin or diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane, and may interfere with a variety of cellular mechanisms. The goal of this study was to introduce and evaluate a new type of high surface area metallic silver in the form of highly porous silver microparticles (AgMPs). Polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers were successfully loaded with either highly porous AgMPs or AgNPs and the antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity of the two silver-based wound dressings were assessed and compared. To better mimic the physiological environment in vivo where both human cells and bacteria are present, a novel coculture system combining human epidermal keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was designed to simultaneously evaluate human skin cell cytotoxicity with antimicrobial efficacy in a three-dimensional environment. We found that highly porous AgMPs could be successfully incorporated in nanofibrous wound dressings, and exhibited comparable antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity to AgNPs. Further, PLA nanofibers containing highly porous AgMPs exhibited steady silver ion release, at a greater rate of release, than nanofibers containing AgNPs. The replacement of AgNPs with the newly introduced AgMPs overcomes concerns regarding the use of nanoparticles and holds great promise as skin

  20. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pharmacist to recommend a nonperfumed, pH-balanced lotion. Wash anything that comes into contact with your ... check manufacturer’s instructions). Do not use alcohol-based lotions on your skin, as it dries it out ...

  1. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described.

  2. Choosing a Wound Dressing Based on Common Wound Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Phillips, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a major healthcare burden.The practitioner should have an appropriate understanding of both the etiology of the wound as well as the optimal type of dressings to use. Fundamental wound characteristics may be used to guide the practitioner's choice of dressings. The identification of optimal dressings to use for a particular wound type is an important element in facilitating wound healing. Recent Advances: Researchers have sought to design wound dressings that aim to optimize each stage in the healing process. In addition, dressings have been designed to target and kill infection-causing bacteria, with the incorporation of antimicrobial agents. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are frequently dynamic in presentation, and the numerous wound dressings available make dressing selection challenging for the practitioner. Choosing the correct dressing decreases time to healing, provides cost-effective care, and improves patient quality of life. Future Directions: Research into the mechanisms of wound healing has enhanced our ability to heal chronic wounds at a faster rate through the use of moisture-retentive dressings. Newer dressings are incorporating the use of nanotechnology by incorporating miniature electrical sensors into the dressing. These dressings are engineered to detect changes in a wound environment and alert the patient or practitioner by altering the color of the dressing or sending a message to a smartphone. Additional investigations are underway that incorporate biologic material such as stem cells into dressings. PMID:26858913

  3. A novel technique for the treatment of infected metalwork in orthopaedic patients using skin closure over irrigated negative pressure wound therapy dressings

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, AWP; Krikler, S; Krkovic, M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There has been recent interest in the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NWPT) as an adjunct to parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of infection in orthopaedic patients with metalwork in situ. To address some of the limitations of standard NPWT in this situation, the senior author has developed a modified method of treatment for infected metalwork (excluding arthroplasty) in orthopaedic patients that includes irrigation and skin closure over the standard NPWT dressing. Methods This retrospective study examined the outcome of a case series of 16 trauma and orthopaedic patients with deep infection involving metalwork in whom this modified form of NPWT was used. In conjunction with standard parenteral antibiotic therapy and a multidisciplinary approach, this modified technique included serial debridements in theatre, irrigation and negative pressure dressings over a white polyvinyl alcohol foam (KCI, Kidlington, UK) as well as closure of the skin over the foam. Results Among the 16 patients, there was a variety of upper and lower limb as well as spinal trauma and elective cases. In all 16 patients, there was successful resolution of the infection with no early or unplanned removal of any metalwork required. Conclusions Patients with infected metalwork are a heterogeneous group, and often suffer high morbidity and mortality. The modified NPWT technique shows potential as an adjunct in the treatment of complex orthopaedic patients with infected metalwork. PMID:23484994

  4. Office management of minor wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, S.; Patel, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review office interventions for minor wounds not requiring sutures, such as abrasions, bites, and lacerations. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most information on minor wound management comes from descriptive studies. Few comparative studies examine the effectiveness of topical antisepsis for minor wounds. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that tissue adhesives produce short- and long-term cosmetic results equivalent to those achieved with suture materials. MAIN MESSAGE: Sterile saline is the least toxic solution for wound irrigation. Chlorhexidine (2%) and povidone iodine (10%) have been the most investigated antiseptic solutions. Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary for wounds unlikely to be infected. All bite wounds require special attention. Primary closure of bite wounds is indicated in certain circumstances: less than 12-hour-old nonpuncture wounds, uninfected wounds, and low-risk lesions (such as on the face). In spite of their many advantages, skin tapes should be used for low-tension wounds only. The popularity of tissue adhesives has greatly increased. Since the advent of newer products (with increased bonding strength and flexibility), adhesives are used to manage most lacerations except those in areas of high tension (e.g., joints) and on mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSION: Minor wounds not requiring sutures can be managed easily in the office. PMID:11340758

  5. Wound cleansing by high pressure irrigation.

    PubMed

    Rodeheaver, G T; Pettry, D; Thacker, J G; Edgerton, M T; Edlich, R F

    1975-09-01

    All traumatic wounds are contaminated to some degree by both soil and bacteria. Specific infection potentiating factors in soil impair the defenses of the tissue and invite infection. These factors are small in size and resist removal by low pressure irrigation. The efficiency of wound irrigation is markedly improved by delivering the irrigant to the wound under continuous high pressure. Irrigation of the wound with saline solution delivered at 15 pounds per square inch removed 84.8 per cent of the soil infection potentiating factors from the wound. The residual infection potentiating factors remaining in the wound did not significantly impair tissue defenses. On the basis of these experimental studies, clinical studies are now being initiated to test the therapeutic value of high pressure irrigation in traumatic wounds in humans.

  6. Coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery: attachment to and accumulation on sternal fixation stainless steel wires.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Emma; Friberg, Orjan; Venizelos, Nikolaos; Koskela, Anita; Källman, Jan; Söderquist, Bo

    2007-02-01

    Sternal wound infection (SWI) is a serious complication after cardiac surgery. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have been found to be the most common pathogen involved in this postoperative infection related to implanted foreign materials, i.e. sternal fixation wires made from stainless steel. In this study a rapid and simple assay was developed for studying attachment and accumulation of CoNS on stainless steel wires in vitro using [(3)H] thymidine. The method showed a potential to detect differences in the dynamics of the adherence patterns among various CoNS isolates. However, no differences in attachment and accumulation were found between isolates causing deep SWI after cardiac surgery and contaminant isolates. In addition, there were no differences in the distribution of the ica operon between the two groups, as determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Nevertheless, the ability to produce biofilm was found to be present significantly more frequently among SWI isolates than among contaminants.

  7. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population. PMID:24126108

  8. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population.

  9. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies. Recent Advances: Encouraged by the results of NPWT in noncombat-related wounds, the military surgeons during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom used this novel method in a large percentage of combat wounds, with gratifying results. The mechanism of NPWT in wound healing is multifactorial and often complex reconstructive procedure can be avoided in a combat trauma setting. Critical Issues: Wounds sustained in military trauma are heavily contaminated with dirt, patient clothing, and frequently associated with extensive soft tissue loss and osseous destruction. Delay in evacuation during an ongoing conflict carries the risk of systemic infection. Early debridement is indicated followed by delayed closure of wounds. NPWT helps to provide temporary wound cover during the interim period of debridement and wound closure. Future Directions: Future area of research in combat wounds is related to abdominal trauma with loss of abdominal wall. The concept of negative pressure incisional management system in patients with a high risk of wound breakdown following surgery is under review, and may be of relevance in combat wounds. PMID:27679749

  10. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies. Recent Advances: Encouraged by the results of NPWT in noncombat-related wounds, the military surgeons during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom used this novel method in a large percentage of combat wounds, with gratifying results. The mechanism of NPWT in wound healing is multifactorial and often complex reconstructive procedure can be avoided in a combat trauma setting. Critical Issues: Wounds sustained in military trauma are heavily contaminated with dirt, patient clothing, and frequently associated with extensive soft tissue loss and osseous destruction. Delay in evacuation during an ongoing conflict carries the risk of systemic infection. Early debridement is indicated followed by delayed closure of wounds. NPWT helps to provide temporary wound cover during the interim period of debridement and wound closure. Future Directions: Future area of research in combat wounds is related to abdominal trauma with loss of abdominal wall. The concept of negative pressure incisional management system in patients with a high risk of wound breakdown following surgery is under review, and may be of relevance in combat wounds.

  11. A new flexible DBD device for treating infected wounds: in vitro and ex vivo evaluation and comparison with a RF argon plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekema, B. K. H. L.; Vlig, M.; Guijt, D.; Hijnen, K.; Hofmann, S.; Smits, P.; Sobota, A.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P.; Middelkoop, E.

    2016-02-01

    Cold plasma has been shown to provide a promising alternative antimicrobial treatment for wound healing. We developed and tested a flexible surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and compared it to an argon gas based plasma jet operated remotely with a distance between plasma plume and sample of 8 mm. Tests were conducted using different models: on cultured cells, on ex vivo human skin and on bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (on agar, in suspension, in collagen/elastin matrix or on ex vivo human skin), allowing us to directly compare bactericidal with safety aspects under identical conditions. Both plasma devices were highly efficient when used on bacteria in non-buffered solutions, but DBD was faster in reaching the maximum bacterial reduction. Treatment of bacteria on intact skin with DBD resulted in up to 6 log reductions in 3 min. The jet was far less efficient on intact skin. Even after 8 min treatment no more than 2 log reductions were obtained with the jet. Treatment of bacteria in burn wound models with DBD for 6 min resulted in a 4.5 log reduction. Even when using DBD for 6 min on infected burn wound models with colonizing or biofilm phase bacteria, the log reductions were 3.8 or 3.2 respectively. DBD plasma treatment for 6 min did not affect fibroblast viability, whereas a treatment for 8 min was detrimental. Similarly, treatment with DBD or plasma jet for 6 min did also not affect the metabolic activity of skin biopsies. After treatment for 8 min with DBD or plasma jet, 78% or 60% of activity in skin biopsies remained, respectively. Multiple treatments of in vitro burn wound models with surface DBD for 6 min or with plasma jet for 8 min did not affect re-epithelialization. With the flexible surface DBD plasma strip we were able to quickly inactivate large numbers of bacteria on and in skin. Under the same conditions, viability of skin cells or re-epithelialization was not affected. The DBD source has potential for treating

  12. [Modification of postoperative wound healing by showering].

    PubMed

    Neues, C; Haas, E

    2000-02-01

    Usually postoperative wounds are kept dry until the stitches are removed. In a prospective randomized study early water contact was allowed in order to test postoperative wound healing in 817 patients operated on for varicose veins. Regardless of whether the wounds were kept dry or had water contact with or without shower foam from the second postoperative day, no infection was registered.

  13. A clinical algorithm for wound biofilm identification.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, D G; Bowler, P G; Hurlow, J

    2014-03-01

    Recognition of the existence of biofilm in chronic wounds is increasing among wound care practitioners, and a growing body of evidence indicates that biofilm contributes significantly to wound recalcitrance. While clinical guidelines regarding the involvement of biofilm in human bacterial infections have been proposed, there remains uncertainty and lack of guidance towards biofilm presence in wounds. The intention of this report is to collate knowledge and evidence of the visual and indirect clinical indicators of wound biofilm, and propose an algorithm designed to facilitate clinical recognition of biofilm and subsequent wound management practices.

  14. A clinical algorithm for wound biofilm identification.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, D G; Bowler, P G; Hurlow, J

    2016-03-01

    Recognition of the existence of biofilm in chronic wounds is increasing among wound care practitioners, and a growing body of evidence indicates that biofilm contributes significantly to wound recalcitrance. While clinical guidelines regarding the involvement of biofilm in human bacterial infections have been proposed, there remains uncertainty and lack of guidance towards biofilm presence in wounds. The intention of this report is to collate knowledge and evidence of the visual and indirect clinical indicators of wound biofilm, and propose an algorithm designed to facilitate clinical recognition of biofilm and subsequent wound management practices.

  15. Influence of oxygen on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yip, Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen has an important role in normal wound healing. This article reviews the evidence concerning the role of oxygen in wound healing and its influence on the different stages of wound healing. The evidence reviewed has demonstrated that improving oxygenation may be helpful in limiting wound infection, although there is a lack of good quality studies on the role of oxygen in the proliferative phase and in reepithelialisation. Overall, the relationship between oxygen and wound healing is complex. Knowledge of this aspect is important as many treatment modalities for refractory wounds are based on these principles.

  16. Clinician perceptions of wound biofilm.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel G; Bowler, Philip G

    2016-10-01

    In wound care today, biofilm is a subject area of great interest and debate. There is an increasing awareness that biofilm exists in the majority of non-healing wounds, and that it is implicated in both recalcitrance and infection. Together with the presence of devitalised host tissue, biofilm is recognised as a component of the wound environment that requires removal to enable wound progression. However, uncertainty exists among wound care practitioners regarding confirmation of the presence of biofilm, and how best to remove biofilm from a non-healing wound. While recent efforts have been taken to assist practitioners in signs and symptoms of wound biofilm, continuing research is required to characterise and confirm wound biofilm. This research was conducted as part of a market research process to better understand the knowledge levels, experiences, clinical awareness and impact of biofilm in wound care, which was undertaken across the USA and Europe. While knowledge levels and experiences vary from country to country, certain wound characteristics were consistently associated with the presence of biofilm.

  17. Wound bed preparation: TIME for an update.

    PubMed

    Harries, Rhiannon L; Bosanquet, David C; Harding, Keith G

    2016-09-01

    While the overwhelming majority of wounds heal rapidly, a significant proportion fail to progress through the wound-healing process. These resultant chronic wounds cause considerable morbidity and are costly to treat. Wound bed preparation, summarised by the TIME (Tissue, Inflammation/infection, Moisture imbalance, Epithelial edge advancement) concept, is a systematic approach for assessing chronic wounds. Each of these components needs to be addressed and optimised to improve the chances of successful wound closure. We present an up-to-date literature review of the most important recent aspects of wound bed preparation. While there are many novel therapies that are available to the treating clinician, often, there are limited data on which to assess their clinical value, and a lack of appreciation for adequate wound bed preparation needed before expensive therapy is used to heal a wound. PMID:27547958

  18. In vivo wound-healing effects of novel benzalkonium chloride-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Dong-Wuk; Li, Dong Xun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing effects of a novel benzalkonium chloride (BC)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD). A BC-loaded HCD was prepared with various constituents using a hot melting method, and its mechanical properties and antimicrobial activities were assessed. The in vivo wound healings of the BC-loaded HCD in various would models were evaluated in rats compared with a commercial wound dressing, Duoderm™. This BC-loaded HCD gave better skin adhesion, swelling, mechanical strength, and flexibility compared with the commercial wound dressing. It showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, as compared with the commercial wound dressing, it showed more improved wound healings and tissue restoration effect on the excision, infection, and abrasion wounds in rats. Thus, this novel BC-loaded HCD would be an excellent alternative to the commercial wound dressing for treatment of various wounds.

  19. Identification of a putative Solanum tuberosum transcriptional coactivator up-regulated in potato tubers by Fusarium solani f. sp. eumartii infection and wounding.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Andrea V.; Zanetti, María Eugenia; San Segundo, Blanca; Casalongué, Claudia A.

    2001-06-01

    Coadaptors or coactivators are a new class of transcription factors capable of interconnecting a regulator DNA-binding protein with a component of the basal transcription machinery allowing transcriptional activation to proceed. We report the identification of a novel Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum putative transcription coactivator, named StMBF1 (Solanum tuberosum multiprotein bridging factor 1). The StMBF1 cDNA was isolated from a Fusarium solani f. sp. eumartii-infected potato tuber cDNA library, using a differential screening approach. StMBF1 is up-regulated during fungal attack as well as on wounding. A Fusarium elicitor source and ethylene precursor and salicylic acid also regulate StMBF1 expression. The precise role of StMBF1 during the plant response against environmental stresses remains to be elucidated.

  20. Recent advances in topical wound care

    PubMed Central

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no ‘magical dressings’. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention. PMID:23162238

  1. Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Wound Management Strategies for Dirty Abdominal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Stephen M.; Giannotti, Giovanni; Ong, Adrian W.; Esteban Varela, J.; Shatz, David V.; McKenney, Mark G.; Sleeman, Danny; Ginzburg, Enrique; Augenstein, Jeffrey S.; Byers, Patricia M.; Sands, Laurence R.; Hellinger, Michael D.; Namias, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal method of wound closure for dirty abdominal wounds. Summary Background Data The rate of wound infection for dirty abdominal wounds is approximately 40%, but the optimal method of wound closure remains controversial. Three randomized studies comparing delayed primary closure (DPC) with primary closure (PC) have not conclusively shown any advantage of one method over the other in terms of wound infection. Methods Fifty-one patients with dirty abdominal wounds related to perforated appendicitis, other perforated viscus, traumatic injuries more than 4 hours old, or intraabdominal abscesses were enrolled. Patients were stratified by cause (appendicitis vs. all other causes) and prospectively randomized to one of two wound management strategies: E/DPC (wound packed with saline-soaked gauze, evaluated 3 days after surgery for closure the next day if appropriate) or PC. In the E/DPC group, wounds that were not pristine when examined on postoperative day 3 were not closed and daily dressing changes were instituted. Wounds were considered infected if purulence discharged from the wound, or possibly infected if signs of inflammation or a serous discharge developed. Results Two patients were withdrawn because they died less than 72 hours after surgery. The wound infection rate was greater in the PC group than in the E/DPC group. Lengths of hospital stay and hospital charges were similar between the two groups. Conclusion A strategy of DPC for appropriate dirty abdominal wounds 4 days after surgery produced a decreased wound infection rate compared with PC without increasing the length of stay or cost. PMID:11224630

  2. Delivery of Methylene Blue and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate from cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels: a potential means of photodynamic therapy of infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Cassidy, Corona M; Loughlin, Ryan G; Brown, Anthony; Tunney, Michael M; Jenkins, Mark G; McCarron, Paul A

    2009-09-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol)-borate complexes were evaluated as a potentially novel drug delivery platform suitable for in vivo use in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) of wound infections. An optimised formulation (8.0%w/w PVA, 2.0%w/w borax) was loaded with 1.0 mg ml(-1) of the photosensitisers Methylene Blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Both drugs were released to yield receiver compartment concentrations (>5.0 microg ml(-1)) found to be phototoxic to both planktonic and biofilm-grown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common cause of wound infections in hospitals. Newborn calf serum, used to simulate the conditions prevalent in an exuding wound, did not adversely affect the properties of the hydrogels and had no significant effect on the rate of TMP-mediated photodynamic kill of MRSA, despite appreciably reducing the fluence rate of incident light. However, MB-mediated photodynamic kill of MRSA was significantly reduced in the presence of calf serum and when the clinical isolate was grown in a biofilm. Results support the contention that delivery of MB or TMP using gel-type vehicles as part of PACT could make a contribution to the photodynamic eradication of MRSA from infected wounds.

  3. Risk of wound infection and safety profile of amoxicillin in healthy patients which required third molar surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Isiordia-Espinoza, M A; Aragon-Martinez, O H; Martínez-Morales, J F; Zapata-Morales, J R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the risk of surgical wound infection and the adverse effects of amoxicillin in healthy patients who required excision of third molars. We identified eligible reports from searches of PubMed, Medline®, the Cochrane Library, Imbiomed, LILACS, and Google Scholar. Studies that met our minimum requirements were evaluated using inclusion and exclusion criteria and the Oxford Quality Scale. Those with a score of 3 or more on this Scale were included and their data were extracted and analysed. For evaluation of the risk of infection the absolute risk reduction, number needed to treat, and 95% CI were calculated. For evaluation of the risk of an adverse effect the absolute risk increase, number needed to harm, and 95% CI were calculated using the Risk Reduction Calculator. Each meta-analysis was made with the help of the Mantel-Haenszel random effects model, and estimates of risk (OR) and 95% CI were calculated using the Review Manager 5.3, from the Cochrane Library. A significant risk was assumed when the lower limit of the 95% CI was greater than 1. Probabilities of less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. The results showed that there was no reduction in the risk of infection when amoxicillin was given before or after operation compared with an untreated group or placebo. In conclusion, this study suggests that amoxicillin given prophylactically or postoperatively does not reduce the risk of infection in healthy patients having their third molars extracted.

  4. Low level laser therapy (AlGaInP) applied at 5J/cm2 reduces the proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in infected wounds and intact skin of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela Conceição Gomes Gonçalves e; Plapler, Helio; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Silva, Silvio Romero Gonçalves e; de Sá, Maria da Conceição Aquino; Silva, Benedito Sávio Lima e

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laser therapy is a low cost, non-invasive procedure with good healing results. Doubts exist as to whether laser therapy action on microorganisms can justify research aimed at investigating its possible effects on bacteria-infected wounds. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of low intensity laser on the rate of bacterial contamination in infected wounds in the skin of rats. METHODS An experimental study using 56 male Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into eight groups of seven each. Those in the "infected" groups were infected by Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in the dorsal region. Red laser diode (AlGaInP) 658nm, 5J/cm2 was used to treat the animals in the "treated" groups in scan for 3 consecutive days. Samples were drawn before inoculating bacteria and following laser treatment. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Wilcoxon (paired data) method with a significance level of p <0.05. RESULTS The statistical analysis of median values showed that the groups submitted to laser treatment had low bacterial proliferation. CONCLUSION The laser (AlGaInP), with a dose of 5J/cm2 in both intact skin and in wounds of rats infected with Staphylococcus aureus MRSA, is shown to reduce bacterial proliferation. PMID:23539003

  5. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46 days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P = 0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P = 0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P = 0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P = 0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P = 0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention.

  6. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-ethyl cellulose based bio-composites with novel characteristics for infection free wound healing application.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Kyazze, Godfrey; Locke, Ian Charles; Tron, Thierry; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2015-11-01

    A series of bio-composites including poly3-hydroxybutyrate [P(3HB)] grafted ethyl cellulose (EC) stated as P(3HB)-EC were successfully synthesised. Furthermore, natural phenols e.g., p-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) and ferulic acid (FA) were grafted onto the newly developed P(3HB)-EC-based bio-composites under laccase-assisted environment without the use of additional initiators or crosslinking agents. The phenol grafted bio-composites were critically evaluated for their antibacterial and biocompatibility features as well as their degradability in soil. In particular, the results of the antibacterial evaluation for the newly developed bio-composites indicated that 20HBA-g-P(3HB)-EC and 15FA-g-P(3HB)-EC bio-composites exerted strong bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity against Gram(-)E. coli NTCT 10418 as compared to the Gram(+)B. subtilis NCTC 3610. This study shows further that at various phenolic concentrations the newly synthesised bio-composites remained cytocompatible with human keratinocyte-like HaCaT skin cells, as 100% cell viability was recorded, in vitro. As for the degradation, an increase in the degradation rate was recorded during the soil burial analyses over a period of 42 days. These findings suggest that the reported bio-composites have great potential for use in wound healing; covering the affected skin area which may favour tissue repair over shorter periods.

  7. Fungus gnat (Bradysia impatiens) feeding and mechanical wounding inhibit Pythium aphanidermatum infection of geranium seedlings (Pelargonium x hortorum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to investigate potential effects of fungus gnat (Bradysia impatiens) feeding damage on susceptibility of geranium seedlings (Pelargonium x hortorum) to infection by the root rot pathogen Pythium aphanidermatum. Effects were compared to those from similar t...

  8. Management of minor acute cutaneous wounds: importance of wound healing in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Schöllmann, C; White, R J

    2011-02-01

    Moist wound care has been established as standard therapy for chronic wounds with impaired healing. Healing in acute wounds, in particular in minor superficial acute wounds - which indeed are much more numerous than chronic wounds - is often taken for granted because it is assumed that in those wounds normal phases of wound healing should run per se without any problems. But minor wounds such as small cuts, scraps or abrasions also need proper care to prevent complications, in particular infections. Local wound care with minor wounds consists of thorough cleansing with potable tap water or normal saline followed by the application of an appropriate dressing corresponding to the principles of moist wound treatment. In the treatment of smaller superficial wounds, it appears advisable to limit the choice of dressing to just a few products that fulfil the principles of moist wound management and are easy to use. Hydroactive colloid gels combining the attributes of hydrocolloids and hydrogels thus being appropriate for dry and exuding wounds appear especially suitable for this purpose - although there is still a lack of data from systematic studies on the effectiveness of these preparations.

  9. Chronic wound bed preparation using a cleansing solution.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin Tapiwa; Hughes, Maria; Hilston, Keith; Sparke, Ann; Jandrisits, Johanna M

    Chronic wound management remains challenging in clinical practice, especially in the presence of bacterial bioburden and slough. To resolve these clinical challenges, it is essential clinicians implement the TIME framework (tissue, inflammation/infection, moisture, edge of wound) as a model of effective wound bed preparation. As a result of advances in technology and wound care therapies, on the market today are products that can help reduce the wound bed clinical challenges recommended by the TIME framework. This article looks at a wound cleansing solution that reduces the wound bed bioburden by breaking down biofilms and debriding slough.

  10. Antimicrobial and antiseptic strategies in wound management.

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Wounds, especially chronic wounds, represent a global problem costing millions of dollars per year in developed countries and are characterised by microbial complications including local or overt infection, delayed healing and spread of multiresistant germs. Therefore, antimicrobial wound management is a major challenge that continues to require new solutions against microbes and their biofilms. As systemic antibiotics can barely penetrate into wound biofilms and topically applied ones can easily lead to sensitisation, antisepsis is the method of choice to treat germs in wounds. This brief review discusses the role of antiseptics in reducing bioburden in chronic wounds. Balancing antimicrobial potency and tolerability of antiseptic procedures is critical in wound therapy. However, antiseptics alone may not be able to achieve wound healing without addressing other factors regarding the patient's general health or the wound's physical environment. Although the precise role of bioburden in chronic wounds remains to be evaluated, planktonic as well as biofilm-bound microbes are indications for antiseptic intervention. Octenidine dihydrochloride and polyhexanide are the most effective, as well as best tolerated, antiseptics in wound management today, and new strategies to reduce bacterial wound burden and support the body's immune response are being developed.

  11. Duplicate maize 13-lipoxygenase genes are differentially regulated by circadian rhythm, cold stress, wounding, pathogen infection, and hormonal treatments.

    PubMed

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Kunze, Susan; Feussner, Ivo; Kolomiets, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Most plant oxylipins, a large class of diverse oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives, are produced through the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway. Recent progress in dicots has highlighted the biological roles of oxylipins in plant defence responses to pathogens and pests. By contrast, the physiological function of LOXs and their metabolites in monocots is poorly understood. Two maize LOXs, ZmLOX10 and ZmLOX11 that share >90% amino acid sequence identity but are localized on different chromosomes, were cloned and characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ZmLOX10 and ZmLOX11 cluster together with well-characterized plastidic type 2 linoleate 13-LOXs from diverse plant species. Regio-specificity analysis of recombinant ZmLOX10 protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli proved it to be a linoleate 13-LOX with a pH optimum at approximately pH 8.0. Both predicted proteins contain putative transit peptides for chloroplast import. ZmLOX10 was preferentially expressed in leaves and was induced in response to wounding, cold stress, defence-related hormones jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and inoculation with an avirulent strain of Cochliobolus carbonum. These data suggested a role for this gene in maize adaptation to abiotic stresses and defence responses against pathogens and pests. ZmLOX11 was preferentially expressed in silks and was induced in leaves only by ABA, indicating its possible involvement in responses to osmotic stress. In leaves, mRNA accumulation of ZmLOX10 is strictly regulated by a circadian rhythm, with maximal expression coinciding temporally with the highest photosynthetic activity. This study reveals the evolutionary divergence of physiological roles for relatively recently duplicated genes. Possible physiological functions of these 13-LOXs are suggested.

  12. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  13. Gingival Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M.; Martínez, C.; Oyarzún, A.; Martínez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Gingival wound healing comprises a series of sequential responses that allow the closure of breaches in the masticatory mucosa. This process is of critical importance to prevent the invasion of microbes or other agents into tissues, avoiding the establishment of a chronic infection. Wound healing may also play an important role during cell and tissue reaction to long-term injury, as it may occur during inflammatory responses and cancer. Recent experimental data have shown that gingival wound healing is severely affected by the aging process. These defects may alter distinct phases of the wound-healing process, including epithelial migration, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and molecular defects that may explain these deficiencies include several biological responses such as an increased inflammatory response, altered integrin signaling, reduced growth factor activity, decreased cell proliferation, diminished angiogenesis, reduced collagen synthesis, augmented collagen remodeling, and deterioration of the proliferative and differentiation potential of stem cells. In this review, we explore the cellular and molecular basis of these defects and their possible clinical implications. PMID:25527254

  14. [Pneumonia in wounded].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Kharitonov, M A; Sadykov, R R; Shelukhin, V A; Gaĭduk, S V; Bogomolov, A B; Ivanov, V V; Dobrovol'skaia, L M

    2015-02-01

    Pneumonia is one of the common complications of wounds of any localization. Therapists are involved into the treatment of lung lesions in wounded in the ICU, in the surgical and if the patient arrives "on follow-up care,"--in the medical ward. The article analyzes the main statistical indicators reflecting the prevalence and clinical and pathogenetic characteristics of lung pathology in wounded during the Great Patriotic War, during the fighting Soviet troops in the Republic of Afghanistan, the 1st and 2nd Chechen campaign. Pneumonia as a manifestation of traumatic disease can occur in two ways. Primary pneumonia is in close connection with the pathogenetic traumatic injury. Secondary lung lesions complicate the injury at a later date and are due to the introduction of a nosocomial infection process flora. We describe the clinical picture of pneumonia in the affected, the basic pathogenesis, principles of therapy. Successful treatment of lung pathology in wounded depends on the performance of a complex of activities involving a wide range of doctors of various specialties. PMID:25920173

  15. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  16. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  17. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  18. The prevalence, management and outcome for acute wounds identified in a wound care survey within one English health care district.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports the characteristics and local management of 826 acute wounds identified during an audit across all health care providers serving the population of Bradford, UK. Of the wounds encountered 303 were traumatic wounds and 237 primary closures with smaller numbers of other acute wound types. Of the 303 traumatic wounds 174 occurred in women (57.4%). Men predominated in the under 45s (65M:26F), this being largely accounted for by hand and finger trauma (n = 62) particularly in patients of working age (M32:F12). Women predominated in the over 65s (50M:130F), this being largely accounted for by lower limb traumatic wounds (M24:F91), the majority of these being in patients 65 and over (M14:F82). In this sub-group of 96 patients 25 had wounds of 6 weeks or longer duration, only 3 had undergone Doppler assessment and only 2 received compression bandaging. Typically these wounds were of recent origin and small in size (under 1 week and less than 5 cm2 in surface area) however exceptions occurred where 10 people had wounds over 25 cm2 in area while 3 wounds had been present for over 5 years. 101 (12.2%) of the encountered wounds were considered to be infected although the practice of wound swabbing in the presence of presumed infection seemed inadequate with 37.6% of all infected acute wounds not being swabbed while 97 non-infected wounds were swabbed. Where wounds were swabbed 4.5% were found to be MRSA positive. Across all acute wound types (with the sole exception of primary closures) antimicrobial wound dressings were the most prevalent form of dressing and covered 56 (55.4%) of all infected wounds.

  19. [Local treatment of chronic skin wounds in a Swiss out-patient wound centre 2010].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Marc; Tanner, Daniel; Hunziker, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In Switzerland around 30,000 patients suffer from chronic skin wounds. Appropriate topical wound care along with treatment of the causes of the wounds enables to heal a lot of these patients and to avoid secondary disease such as infections. Thereby, the final goal of wound care is stable reepithelisation. Based on experience with chronic leg ulcers mainly in our out-patient wound centre, we give a survey of the wound dressings we actually use and discuss their wound-phase adapted application. Furthermore, we address the two tissue engineering products reimbursed in Switzerland, Apligraf and EpiDex, as well as the biological matrix product Oasis. The crucial question, which treatment options will be offered in future to the wound patients by our health regulatory and insurance systems, is open to debate.

  20. The Cost-Effectiveness of Wound-Edge Protection Devices Compared to Standard Care in Reducing Surgical Site Infection after Laparotomy: An Economic Evaluation alongside the ROSSINI Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, Adrian; Roberts, Tracy E.; Pinkney, Thomas D.; Bartlett, David C.; Morton, Dion; Calvert, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound-edge protection devices (WEPDs) have been used in surgery for more than 40 years to reduce surgical site infection (SSI). No economic evaluation of WEPDs against any comparator has ever been conducted. The aim of the paper was to assess whether WEPDs are cost-effective in reducing SSI compared to standard care alone in the United Kingdom. Methods and Findings An economic evaluation was conducted alongside the ROSSINI trial. The study perspective was that of the UK National Health Service and the time horizon was 30 days post-operatively. The study was conducted in 21 UK hospitals. 760 patients undergoing laparotomy were randomised to either WEPD or standard care and 735 were included in the primary analysis. The main economic outcome was cost-effectiveness based on incremental cost (£) per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Patients in the WEPD arm accessed health care worth £5,420 on average and gained 0.02131 QALYs, compared to £5,130 and 0.02133 QALYs gained in the standard care arm. The WEPD strategy was more costly and equally effective compared to standard care, but there was significant uncertainty around incremental costs and QALYs. The findings were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions There is no evidence to suggest that WEPDs can be considered a cost effective device to reduce SSI. Their continued use is a waste of limited health care resources. PMID:24748154

  1. Combination of Silver Nanoparticles and Drosera binata Extract as a Possible Alternative for Antibiotic Treatment of Burn Wound Infections Caused by Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Krychowiak, Marta; Grinholc, Mariusz; Banasiuk, Rafal; Krauze-Baranowska, Miroslawa; Głód, Daniel; Kawiak, Anna; Królicka, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common infectious agent involved in the development of skin infections that are associated with antibiotic resistance, such as burn wounds. As drug resistance is a growing problem it is essential to establish novel antimicrobials. Currently, antibiotic resistance in bacteria is successfully controlled by multi-drug therapies. Here we demonstrate that secondary metabolites present in the extract obtained from Drosera binata in vitro cultures are effective antibacterial agents against S. aureus grown in planktonic culture and in biofilm. Moreover, this is the first report demonstrating the synergistic interaction between the D. binata extract and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which results in the spectacular enhancement of the observed bactericidal activity, while having no cytotoxic effects on human keratinocytes. Simultaneous use of these two agents in significantly reduced quantities produces the same effect, i.e. by killing 99.9% of bacteria in inoculum or eradicating the staphylococcal biofilm, as higher amounts of the agents used individually. Our data indicates that combining AgNPs with either the D. binata extract or with its pure compound (3-chloroplumbagin) may provide a safe and highly effective alternative to commonly used antibiotics, which are ineffective towards the antibiotic-resistant S. aureus. PMID:25551660

  2. Combination of silver nanoparticles and Drosera binata extract as a possible alternative for antibiotic treatment of burn wound infections caused by resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Krychowiak, Marta; Grinholc, Mariusz; Banasiuk, Rafal; Krauze-Baranowska, Miroslawa; Głód, Daniel; Kawiak, Anna; Królicka, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common infectious agent involved in the development of skin infections that are associated with antibiotic resistance, such as burn wounds. As drug resistance is a growing problem it is essential to establish novel antimicrobials. Currently, antibiotic resistance in bacteria is successfully controlled by multi-drug therapies. Here we demonstrate that secondary metabolites present in the extract obtained from Drosera binata in vitro cultures are effective antibacterial agents against S. aureus grown in planktonic culture and in biofilm. Moreover, this is the first report demonstrating the synergistic interaction between the D. binata extract and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which results in the spectacular enhancement of the observed bactericidal activity, while having no cytotoxic effects on human keratinocytes. Simultaneous use of these two agents in significantly reduced quantities produces the same effect, i.e. by killing 99.9% of bacteria in inoculum or eradicating the staphylococcal biofilm, as higher amounts of the agents used individually. Our data indicates that combining AgNPs with either the D. binata extract or with its pure compound (3-chloroplumbagin) may provide a safe and highly effective alternative to commonly used antibiotics, which are ineffective towards the antibiotic-resistant S. aureus.

  3. Effectiveness of a gentamicin impregnated collagen sponge on reducing sternal wound infections following cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Creanor, S

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gentamicin impregnated collagen sponges are licensed for use after cardiac surgery in over 50 countries but their effectiveness at preventing sternal wound infections (SWIs) remains uncertain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the current evidence for effectiveness of such sponges at preventing SWIs in patients after cardiac surgery. METHODS A systematic search of the literature was undertaken and meta-analyses were performed on the results of the identified, eligible studies. Using random effects models, odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (Cl) were calculated for all SWIs and deep SWIs for: a) all participants, and b) participants deemed as high risk. RESULTS Three unique randomised controlled trials (published between 2005 and 2010) involving 3,994 participants met the inclusion criteria. There was insufficient evidence of a significant difference between intervention and control groups for all SWIs (all participants: OR: 0.66, 95% Cl: 0.39–1.14; high risk participants: OR: 0.60, 95% Cl: 0.24–1.52). There was insufficient evidence of a significant benefit of the sponge in deep SWIs across all participants (OR: 0.72, 95% Cl: 0.47–1.10) but some evidence of benefit in terms of reducing the incidence of deep SWIs in high risk participants (OR: 0.62, 95% Cl: 0.39–0.98). CONCLUSIONS There is insufficient evidence of the effectiveness (or otherwise) of gentamicin impregnated sponges in preventing SWIs following cardiac surgery. However, some evidence does exist that such sponges can reduce the incidence of deep infections in high risk patients. PMID:22613298

  4. [Traumatic wound botulism].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Emilia; Pannocchia, Cecilia; Carricondo, Concepción

    2014-04-01

    Botulism is a rare illness caused by a potent neurotoxin produced by the bacterium of the Clostridium family. Clostridium botulinum is the most frequent one, but Clostridium baratti and Clostridium butyricum are also neurotoxins producers. There are seven neurotoxins types, A to G; A, B, E, F and G cause human botulism. Every neurotoxin type blocks cholinergic transmission at the myoneural junction. The least frequent syndrome results from Clostridium botulinum colonization of a wound and it is clinically similar to the other botulism syndromes, but with fever due to an infected wound. Disease should be suspected in lucid patient with a symmetric descending, flaccid paralysis. This syndrome appears within the first twenty days, but it could be present for weeks or months before the disease is diagnosed. This disease is poorly known, so to be diagnosed it requires a high index of suspicion. The treatment is a supportive one; administration of the specific antitoxin must be early in order to neutralize the toxin before the debridement and cleaning of the infected wound.

  5. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  6. Postoperative washing of sutured wounds.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Conrad; Wade, Cian; Gore, Sinclair

    2016-11-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The three part question addressed was: [In patients undergoing closure of surgical wounds with sutures] does [keeping the wound dry for the first 48 h after closure] [reduce the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs)]? 4 relevant papers were culled from the literature and appraised. The authors, date, country, population, study type, main outcomes, key results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Current NICE guidelines recommend cleaning surgical wounds with sterile saline only for the first 48 h following skin closure. We found no evidence that washing wounds with tap water during this period increases the incidence of SSIs compared to keeping them dry. Further randomised controlled trials will enable the construction of conclusive systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:27668079

  7. [Explant test with skin and peritoneum of the neonatal rat as a predictive test of tolerance of local anti-infective agents in wounds and body cavities].

    PubMed

    Kramer, A; Adrian, V; Rudolph, P; Wurster, S; Lippert, H

    1998-08-01

    In vitro culture of peritoneal explants of neonatal rats after previous application of agents simulating wound antisepsis is a sensitive screening method for the determination of the tissue compatibility of local wound antiinfectives. Two test models are differentiated: (1) separated peritoneal explants as a model for chronic or deep wounds and (2) peritoneum in situ in the experimental animal with subsequent extraction and cultivation of the explants. Considering the present state of knowledge the following conclusions can be drawn regarding antisepsis of wounds: Lavasept (0.1%) may be classified as the agent of choice for deep and chronic wounds, for drip-suck irrigation and for antiinfective lavage of body cavities inclusively for peritoneal lavage (0.05%). Taurolidin is antiseptically effective in long term application (> 6 h), and because of its antitoxic effect as well as lack of cytotoxicity it is especially suitable for peritoneal lavage. Betaisodona solution is very well suited for superficial contaminated wounds and can be used in a dilution of 1:10 for short-term rinsing of deep wounds, including body cavities but not for peritoneal lavage. Ethanol causes no inhibition of explant growth and therefore retains its importance in wound antisepsis.

  8. Management of Sports-Induced Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Danny T.; Rowedder, Laura J.; Reese, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Skin wounds are common in sports but are rarely documented by the certified athletic trainer. The literature is unclear about wound types, and none of the articles reviewed reported frequencies. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the frequency of common athletic skin wounds and their specific management. Management of skin wounds can sometimes be problematic. Hydrogen peroxide has been used on wounds since 1947, yet some researchers report that hydrogen peroxide and iodophor solution can delay or interfere with wound healing, or cause damage to the wounded area if use is intense and prolonged. Occlusive dressings have been reported to have considerable advantage in maintaining a moist wound bed and in decreasing healing time. Infection rates beneath occlusive dressings, however, are similar to those associated with other types of dressings. Complications to wounds, with or without the use of occlusive dressings, such as keloids and seborrheic dermatitis, occur in low frequencies. Due to a lack of specific information about sports-induced skin wounds and their management, we recommend that standardized documentation for common wounds be developed along with further study of techniques for management. PMID:16558324

  9. "Inert" vehicles do affect wound healing.

    PubMed

    Eaglstein, W H; Mertz, P M

    1980-02-01

    The effect of a single daily application of U.S.P. petrolatum, an oil-in-water vanishing cream or a lotion on the rate of epidermal wound healing was determined in domestic white pigs. The superficial wounds were made with a dermatome and were not infected. In these studies, applications of U.S.P. white petrolatum retarded the rate of epidermal healing by 17% compared to untreated control wounds. Applications of an oil-in-water vanishing cream increased the rate of epidermal healing by 24% and a lotion increased the rate 15% compared to untreated control wounds.

  10. Wound botulism after traumatic open fracture in Italy.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Stella, Maria Laura; Astegiano, Sara; Corcione, Silvia; Motta, Ilaria; Decastelli, Lucia; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Seventeen days after a traumatic open fracture, a Clostridium botulinum wound infection was diagnosed, with self-limiting symptoms. This is the first report of wound botulism in Italy and the authors discuss the possible role of aerosolized contamination of the wound prior to hospital admission. PMID:26397301

  11. Wound bed preparation and a brief history of TIME.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Gregory S; Barillo, David J; Mozingo, David W; Chin, Gloria A

    2004-04-01

    Management of chronic wounds has progressed from merely assessing the status of a wound to understanding the underlying molecular and cellular abnormalities that prevent the wound from healing. The concept of wound bed preparation has simultaneously evolved to provide a systematic approach to removing these barriers to natural healing and enhancing the effects of advanced therapies. This brief review of wound bed preparation traces the development of these concepts and explains how to apply systematic wound management using the TIME acronym - tissue (non viable or deficient), infection/inflammation, moisture (imbalance) and edge (non advancing or undermined).

  12. Chronic Wound Biofilms: Pathogenesis and Potential Therapies.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Allie; Carter, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a growing medical problem that cause high rates of morbidity and mortality, costing the healthcare industry in the United States millions of dollars annually. Chronic wound healing is hampered by the presence of bacterial infections that form biofilms, in which the bacteria are encased in exopolysaccharide (EPS) and are less metabolically active than their free-living counterparts. Bacterial biofilms make chronic wounds more refractory to treatment and slow tissue repair by stimulating chronic inflammation at the wound site. Bacterial species communicate through a mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS) to regulate and coordinate the gene expression that is important for virulence-factor production, including biofilm formation. This review focuses on the relationships between chronic wounds, biofilms, and QS in the virulence of chronic-wound pathogens.

  13. A systematic review and meta-analysis including GRADE qualification of the risk of surgical site infections after prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy compared with conventional dressings in clean and contaminated surgery

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, Fleur E.E.; Wallert, Elon D.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Systematically review and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) studies on prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy (pNPWT) to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs). Introduction: pNPWT has been suggested as a new method to prevent wound complications, specifically SSIs, by its application on closed incisional wounds. Methods: This review was conducted as part of the development of the Global Guidelines for prevention of SSIs commissioned by World Health Organization in Geneva. PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and the World Health Organization database between January 1, 1990 and October 7, 2015 were searched. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing pNPWT with conventional wound dressings and reporting on the incidence of SSI. Meta-analyses were performed with a random effect model. GRADE Pro software was used to qualify the evidence. Results: Nineteen articles describing 21 studies (6 randomized controlled trials and 15 observational) were included in the review. Summary estimate showed a significant benefit of pNPWT over conventional wound dressings in reducing SSIs in both randomized controlled trials and observational studies, odds ratio of 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.32–0.96; P = 0.04) and odds ratio of 0.30 (95% confidence interval, 0.22–0.42; P < 0.00001), respectively. This translates into lowering the SSI rate from 140 to 83 (49–135) per 1000 patients and from 106 to 34 (25–47) per 1000 patients, respectively. In stratified analyses, these results were consistent in both clean and clean-contaminated procedures and in different types of surgery, however results were no longer significant for orthopaedic/trauma surgery. The level of evidence as qualified with GRADE was however low. Conclusions: Low-quality evidence indicates that prophylactic NPWT significantly reduces the risk of SSIs. PMID:27603360

  14. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... How scrapes heal; How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... from germs. Not all wounds bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores do not ...

  15. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency.

  16. The Efficacy of Continuous Negative Pressure and Irrigation Treatment Inside the Wound by a Closed System in Reconstruction of All Layers of the Cranium Accompanying Infection and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Mai; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Migita, Hisashi; Sakata, Kensuke; Kiyokawa, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    There have been many reports to date with respect to treatments on reconstruction of the cranium without accompanying infections following trauma and tumor resection. The morality is, however, high in patients observed with generation of cranial bone defect of all layers accompanying infection and cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and moreover, there are barely any reports on such cases because of the reconstruction thereof being very difficult. In this study, the authors were able to cure such 2 cases by carrying out continuous negative pressure and irrigation treatment inside the wound by a closed system following transplant of free latissimus dorsi muscle flap. This method is believed to be very effective for cranial bone defect of all layers accompanying infection and cerebrospinal fluid leakage, in which treatment was determined to be very difficult. PMID:26674903

  17. Wound-induced suberization genes are differentially expressed during closing layer and wound periderm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuber wounds incurred at harvest and upon seed cutting require rapid suberization as a major part of the healing process to prevent infection and desiccation. The first stage of this healing process is referred to as closing layer development and is followed by the second stage, wound periderm deve...

  18. Practices in wound healing studies of plants.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  19. Practices in Wound Healing Studies of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  20. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  1. A review of the scientific evidence for biofilms in wounds.

    PubMed

    Percival, Steven L; Hill, Katja E; Williams, David W; Hooper, Samuel J; Thomas, Dave W; Costerton, John W

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic and acute dermal wounds are susceptible to infection due to sterile loss of the innate barrier function of the skin and dermal appendages, facilitating the development of microbial communities, referred to as biofilms, within the wound environment. Microbial biofilms are implicated in both the infection of wounds and failure of those wounds to heal. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of published papers detailing biofilms in wounds, the effect they have on infection and wound healing, and detailing methods employed for their detection. The studies highlighted within this paper provide evidence that biofilms reside within the chronic wound and represent an important mechanism underlying the observed, delayed healing and infection. The reasons for this include both protease activity and immunological suppression. Furthermore, a lack of responsiveness to an array of antimicrobial agents has been due to the biofilms' ability to inherently resist antimicrobial agents. It is imperative that effective strategies are developed, tested prospectively, and employed in chronic wounds to support the healing process and to reduce infection rates. It is increasingly apparent that adoption of a biofilm-based management approach to wound care, utilizing the "antibiofilm tool box" of therapies, to kill and prevent reattachment of microorganisms in the biofilm is producing the most positive clinical outcomes and prevention of infection.

  2. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  3. [The wound care center in surgery: an interdisciplinary concept for diagnostic and treatment of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Coerper, S; Schäffer, M; Enderle, M; Schott, U; Köveker, G; Becker, H D

    1999-04-01

    In Germany there is no standardized wound care for patients with chronic wounds in specialized centers. We have established a wound care unit for the past 6 years. The principal concept of therapy was characterized by standardized local surgery, moist wound dressings and concomitant treatment of the underlying disease. We performed local therapy, coordinated the interdisciplinary treatment and developed a new wound documentation system for quality control. We established a close network, integrating general practitioners and home care organizations to realize a mainly outpatient treatment supported by short hospital therapy. Exclusive outpatient treatment was performed in 42% of all patients. According to our prospective data, we achieved an improvement in wound care: 69% of the wounds resistant to therapy for a mean of 30 months healed within 12 months after therapy according to our protocol. Our data strongly supported the importance of local surgery: neither wound depth nor wound infection had any influence on the healing rate, presumably due to radical excisional debridement of necrotic tissue. The presented data justify on medical and economic grounds the establishment of such wound care centers in Germany. PMID:10354850

  4. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  5. Addressing the challenge of wound cleansing in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Keith F

    Over the past two decades a body of evidence has been generated to support the traditional use of water in cleansing wounds, with studies showing that the use of clean water does not increase the risk of infection or delay healing. However, recent advances in the understanding of wound management have encouraged reforms and led to the development of wound cleansing agents that have the potential to improve clinical outcomes. This article draws on in vitro and in vivo evidence including comparative studies of patients with acute and chronic wounds to consider the evidence supporting alternatives to water in wound cleansing.

  6. Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic (db/db) Mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Challenge – A Model for the Study of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C.; Usui, Marcia L.; Underwood, Robert A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by application of bacterial biofilm. Six millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms two days post-wounding, and covered with semi-occlusive dressings for two weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days post-wounding. In contrast, none of biofilm challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds- all indicators of an inflammatory non-healing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality and demonstrated delayed wound healing following biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing. PMID:20731798

  7. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment.

  8. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  9. Biofilms and Wounds: An Overview of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; McCarty, Sara M.; Lipsky, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Microorganisms can exist both in the planktonic and biofilm state. Each phenotypic state has a role to play in delaying healing and causing infections of both acute and chronic wounds. However, the virulent biofilm state is the fundamental reason that chronic wounds do not heal in a timely manner. We hypothesize that because microorganisms attach to any surface, biofilms can be found in all chronic wounds. However, it is not the biofilm per se that represents the greatest obstacle to the healing of a chronic wound, but its virulence and pathogenicity. Recent Advances: Numerous studies with animals and humans have identified biofilms in wounds. In particular, these studies have highlighted how biofilms impede host fibroblast development, inflammatory responses, and the efficacy of antimicrobial therapy. Despite this, the role biofilms play in affecting the healing of wounds is still vigorously debated. Critical Issues: Clinicians must understand the role that pathogenic biofilms play in impairing the healing of chronic wounds and in increasing the risk for wound infection, with its potentially catastrophic outcomes. The composition of the biofilm, its physiochemical properties, the climaxed indigenous microbiota and their virulence/pathogenicity, microbial numbers and the host's pathophysiology, and immunological fitness will govern the sustainability of a pathogenic biofilm in a wound and its resistance to interventions. Future Directions: Establishing which specific pathogenic biofilms delay wound healing should help guide better wound care practices. PMID:26155379

  10. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  11. [Advances in the effects of pH value of micro-environment on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruirui; Li, Na; Wei, Li

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is affected by lots of endogenous and exogenous factors. Researches have confirmed that acid environment could prevent wound infection and accelerate wound healing by inhibiting bacteria proliferation, promoting oxygen release, affecting keratinocyte proliferation and migration, etc. In this article, we review the literature to identify the potential relationship between the pH value of wound micro-environment and the progress of wound healing, and summarize the clinical application of variation of pH value of micro-environment in wound healing, thereby to provide new treatment strategy for wound healing.

  12. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  13. Deficient cytokine expression and neutrophil oxidative burst contribute to impaired cutaneous wound healing in diabetic, biofilm-containing chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khang T; Seth, Akhil K; Hong, Seok J; Geringer, Matthew R; Xie, Ping; Leung, Kai P; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients exhibit dysregulated inflammatory and immune responses that predispose them to chronic wound infections and the threat of limb loss. The molecular underpinnings responsible for this have not been well elucidated, particularly in the setting of wound biofilms. This study evaluates host responses in biofilm-impaired wounds using the TallyHo mouse, a clinically relevant polygenic model of type 2 diabetes. No differences in cytokine or Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression were noted in unwounded skin or noninoculated wounds of diabetic and wild-type mice. However, diabetic biofilm-containing wounds had significantly less TLR 2, TLR 4, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α expression than wild-type wounds with biofilm (all p < 0.001). Both groups had similar bacterial burden and neutrophil infiltration after development of biofilms at 3 days postwounding, but diabetic wounds had significantly less neutrophil oxidative burst activity. This translated into a log-fold greater bacterial burden and significant delay of wound epithelization for biofilm-impaired diabetic wounds at 10 days postwounding. These results suggest that impaired recognition of bacterial infection via the TLR pathway leading to inadequate cytokine stimulation of antimicrobial host responses may represent a potential mechanism underlying diabetic susceptibility to wound infection and ulceration.

  14. Evaluation of a new liquid occlusive dressing for excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Nable, Maria; Cameau, Paul; Singer, Daniel D; McClain, Steve A

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated a novel octylcyanoacrylate-based liquid occlusive dressing for partial-thickness wounds. One hundred and fifteen standardized wounds were created with an electric dermatome set at a depth of 600 micro on the flanks of three pigs and randomly treated with liquid occlusive dressing, a hydrocolloid dressing, or gauze. In one pig, wounds were swabbed with Staphylococcus aureus. Biopsies were taken after 4, 5, 6, and 21 days. Hemostasis was obtained in all wounds treated with the liquid occlusive. The percent reepithelialization of wounds treated with the liquid occlusive and hydrocolloid dressings were significantly greater at days 4 and 5 than control wounds (78% and 82% vs. 40%, p < 0.001 and 99% and 100% vs. 72%, p < 0.001, respectively). None of the liquid occlusive-treated wounds challenged with bacteria became infected. Foreign body reactions were least common in wounds treated with the liquid occlusive (p < 0.001). Scar depth was less for liquid occlusive- and hydrocolloid-treated wounds than controls (285 micro and 303 micro vs. 490 micro, p < 0.001). We conclude that excisional wounds treated with the liquid occlusive dressing reepithelialize as quickly as hydrocolloid-treated wounds. The liquid occlusive dressing is an effective microbial barrier and hemostatic agent resulting in fewer foreign body reactions than hydrocolloid-treated wounds or controls.

  15. Elements affecting wound healing time: An evidence based analysis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hanan; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Carroll, Matthew; Walker, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant client factors and comorbidities that affected the time taken for wounds to heal. A prospective study design used the Mobile Wound Care (MWC) database to capture and collate detailed medical histories, comorbidities, healing times and consumable costs for clients with wounds in Gippsland, Victoria. There were 3,726 wounds documented from 2,350 clients, so an average of 1.6 wounds per client. Half (49.6%) of all clients were females, indicating that there were no gender differences in terms of wound prevalence. The clients were primarily older people, with an average age of 64.3 years (ranging between 0.7 and 102.9 years). The majority of the wounds (56%) were acute and described as surgical, crush and trauma. The MWC database categorized the elements that influenced wound healing into 3 groups--factors affecting healing (FAH), comorbidities, and medications known to affect wound healing. While there were a multitude of significant associations, multiple linear regression identified the following key elements: age over 65 years, obesity, nonadherence to treatment plan, peripheral vascular disease, specific wounds associated with pressure/friction/shear, confirmed infection, and cerebrovascular accident (stroke). Wound healing is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of influencing elements to improve healing times.© 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  16. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  17. Biofilms and bacterial imbalances in chronic wounds: anti-Koch.

    PubMed

    Percival, Steven L; Thomas, John G; Williams, David W

    2010-06-01

    Microbial imbalances and synergistic relationships between bacteria in medically important biofilms are poorly researched. Consequently, little is known about how synergy between bacteria may increase the net pathogenic effect of a biofilm in many diseases and infections, including chronic wounds. Microbial synergy in chronic wounds may increase virulence and pathogenicity, leading to enhanced tissue degradation, malodour and in some cases, an impairment of the host immune response. Microbial synergy and growth within a biofilm provide a competitive advantage to the microorganisms cohabiting in a wound, thereby promoting their survival and tolerance and resistance to antimicrobial agents. The aim of this article was to provide greater insight into microbial imbalances found within wound biofilms and the significance they may have on non healing and infected wounds. We also present two possible hypotheses which could explain the role microorganisms play in non healing chronic wounds and offer possible strategies for combating harmful and detrimental biofilms.

  18. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management

  19. [Wound management for cuts and lacerations].

    PubMed

    Kluwe, Wolfram

    2015-02-01

    Skin cuts and lacerations are frequent injuries. A perfect result of the treatment is going without saying for the patient and its relatives. But there are some aspects to note for an adequate wound management. The main aims of wound management are clear: assist in hemostasis, to avoid infection and pain, and to ensure an esthetically pleasing scar. For these we have to treat not only the wound. Taking care for the hole patient and treating the sore pain and preventing painfull manipulations is the goal for the patients satisfaction. The basic aspects of wound healing and wound management will be described. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be also more cost-effective. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. Please do not forget in every case to ask for the tetanus immunization and to think about an antibiotic therapy in case of human or animal bites and for wounds in risk areas and with contamination.

  20. Curcumin as a wound healing agent.

    PubMed

    Akbik, Dania; Ghadiri, Maliheh; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2014-10-22

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a popular Indian spice that has been used for centuries in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety of ailments such as rheumatism, diabetic ulcers, anorexia, cough and sinusitis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid present in turmeric and responsible for its yellow color. Curcumin has been shown to possess significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, anti-coagulant and anti-infective effects. Curcumin has also been shown to have significant wound healing properties. It acts on various stages of the natural wound healing process to hasten healing. This review summarizes and discusses recently published papers on the effects of curcumin on skin wound healing. The highlighted studies in the review provide evidence of the ability of curcumin to reduce the body's natural response to cutaneous wounds such as inflammation and oxidation. The recent literature on the wound healing properties of curcumin also provides evidence for its ability to enhance granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, tissue remodeling and wound contraction. It has become evident that optimizing the topical application of curcumin through altering its formulation is essential to ensure the maximum therapeutical effects of curcumin on skin wounds.

  1. Fluorescence Technology for Point of Care Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Ersilia L; Falola, Reuben A; Kim, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    As the prevalence of chronic wounds continues to rise, the need for point of care wound assessment has also increased. While a variety of technologies have been developed to improve diagnostic abilities and monitoring of wounds, none have proven completely effective in all settings. Further, many of the stalwart wound management techniques remain costly, time consuming, and technically challenging. The two key pivotal events of ischemia and infection can lead to limb loss. A relatively new crop of fluorescence-based technologies, including devices that measure pathogenic auto-fluorescence, fluorescence angiography, or map cutaneous oxygenation, are increasingly being utilized for adjunct wound assessment-both clinical and operative settings can address these events. These technologies offer rapid, efficient, visual, and quantitative data that can aid the wound provider in evaluating the viability of tissues, ensuring adequate perfusion, and optimizing wound bed preparation. In the following review, pathogenic auto-fluorescence is compared to gross evaluation of wound infection and culture based diagnostics, indocyanine green fluorescence angiography is compared to various methods of visual and physical assessments of tissue perfusion by the practitioner, and cutaneous oxygenation is compared to clinical signs of ischemia. We focus on the current applications of fluorescence technologies in wound management, with emphasis placed on the evidence for clinical and operative implementation, a safety analyses, procedural limitations, and the future direction of this growing field of wound assessment. PMID:27175815

  2. Do nutritional markers in wound fluid reflect pressure ulcer status?

    PubMed

    Iizaka, Shinji; Sanada, Hiromi; Minematsu, Takeo; Oba, Miho; Nakagami, Gojiro; Koyanagi, Hiroe; Nagase, Takashi; Konya, Chizuko; Sugama, Junko

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of wound fluid characteristics for pressure ulcer (PU) assessment in clinical settings remains subjective, requiring considerable expertise. This cross-sectional study focused on nutritional markers in wound fluid as possible objective tools and investigated whether they reflect the PU status according to the healing phase, infection, and granulation, especially after adjusting for serum values. Twenty-eight patients with 32 full-thickness PUs were studied. The concentration of albumin, total protein, glucose, and zinc in wound fluid were measured. For PU status, the healing phases and infection were evaluated by clinical signs, and the degree of granulation tissue formation was determined as the hydroxyproline concentration. The wound fluid/serum ratio for albumin was significantly lower during the inflammatory phase than during the proliferative phase (p=0.020). Infected wound fluid contained less glucose (0.3-1.0 mmol/L) than noninfected ones did (5.0-7.6 mmol/L) in an intraindividual comparison of three cases. The wound fluid/serum ratio for glucose was negatively correlated with hydroxyproline level in the proliferative phase (rho=-0.73, p=0.007), while zinc level in wound fluid showed a positive correlation (rho=0.61, p=0.028). Our results suggest that these traditional nutritional markers in wound fluid, especially wound fluid/serum ratio may be useful to evaluate local PU status.

  3. Treatment of chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Cierny, George; DiPasquale, Doreen

    2006-01-01

    Failure of an acute inflammatory response to resolve a wound infection heralds a cascade of events that affects the host and pathogens, culminating in a chronic, refractory condition. The factors contributing to this outcome include immune compromise of the host, antimicrobial resistance, wound-healing deficiencies, and the adherence of pathogens to themselves and wound surfaces via an impenetrable, resistant biofilm. To eradicate chronic infection, the pathogens, biofilm, surfaces available for adherence, and compromised tissue must be removed.

  4. Delayed wound healing in diabetic (db/db) mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm challenge: a model for the study of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C; Usui, Marcia L; Underwood, Robert A; Singh, Pradeep K; James, Garth A; Stewart, Philip S; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that lead to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by the application of bacterial biofilm. Six-millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms 2 days postwounding, and covered with semiocclusive dressings for 2 weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days postwounding. In contrast, none of biofilm-challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis, and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds-all indicators of an inflammatory nonhealing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality, and demonstrated delayed wound healing following a biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing.

  5. [Experimental stab wound].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Miroslav; Vorel, František; Zelený, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Stab wounds caused by knives and daggers are usually of different appearances. The knife wound has one edge sharp while the second one is blunt. The wound caused by blow of dagger has both edges sharp. The forensic expert must very often decide whether the knife or dagger was used. The aim of this experimental work was to show how a single-edged knife penetrates the skin and causes the wound typical for the double-edged dagger. The fact was verified. The wound typical for dagger can be found if the knife is used only according to the scheme. The forensic expert can say that a one cutting edge knife was used if the one edge of wound is squared and the other one is sharp. If the both of them are sharp, forensic expert must be very careful in his decision.Key words: stab wounds - knife - dagger - forensic expertise. PMID:25671417

  6. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45 days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided) and sample size (n = 258 per group) is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010 PMID:22587425

  7. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing--A Review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care.

  8. Clinical experience with wound biofilm and management: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hurlow, Jennifer; Bowler, Philip G

    2009-04-01

    Biofilm is a relatively new concept in the fields of infectious disease, wound infection, and healing. Although scientific research and "noise" regarding wound biofilm is increasing, little is known about the presentation, diagnosis, potential implications, and management strategies regarding wound biofilms. A series of four clinical cases is utilized to demonstrate the existence of wound biofilm. All patients presented with or developed a film on the wound bed that appeared to be distinct from slough; wounds also were failing to progress. Although the slough in some of the wounds was easily removed with traditional debridement methods, removal of the film required physical disruption with a curette or dry gauze. All wounds eventually progressed to healing. Considering the biofilm concept and available preclinical research, it is evident from this small case series that the appearance of biofilm in wounds is quite different from slough and requires different management strategies for its control. The evolving biofilm paradigm could profoundly change approaches to wound management. Additional research is needed in this evolving aspect of wound management.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEXT-GENERATION ANTIMICROBIAL WOUND DRESSING.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel; Parsons, David; Bowler, I Philip

    2016-03-01

    Delayed wound healing due to infection is a burden on healthcare systems, and the patient and caregiver alike. An emerging factor in infection and delayed healing is the presence development of biofilm in wounds. Biofilm is communities of microorganisms, protected by an extracellular matrix of slime in the wound, which can tolerate host defences and applied antimicrobials such as antibiotics or antimicrobial dressings. A growing evidence base exists suggesting that biofilm exists in a majority of chronic wounds, and can be a precursor to infection while causing delayed healing itself. In vivo models have demonstrated that the inflammatory, granulation and epithelialization processes of normal wound healing are impaired by biofilm presence. The challenge in the development of a new antimicrobial wound dressing was to make standard antimicrobial agents more effective against biofilm, and this was answered following extensive biofilm research and testing. A combination of metal chelator, surfactant and pH control displayed highly synergistic anti-biofilm action with 1.2% ionic silver in a carboxymethylcellulose dressing. Its effectiveness was challenged and proven in complex in vitro and in vivo wound biofilm models, followed by clinical safety and performance demonstrations in a 42-patient study and 113 clinical evaluations. Post-market surveillance was conducted on the commercially available dressing, and in a 112-case evaluation, the dressing was shown to effectively manage exudate and suspected biofilm while shifting difficult-to-heal wounds onto healing trajectories, after an average of 4 weeks of new dressing use in otherwise standard wound care protocols. This was accompanied by a low frequency of dressing related adverse events. In a second evaluation, clinical signs of infection and wound dimension data, before and after the evaluations, were also available. Following an average of 5.4 weeks of dressing use, all signs of clinical infection were reduced, from

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEXT-GENERATION ANTIMICROBIAL WOUND DRESSING.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel; Parsons, David; Bowler, I Philip

    2016-03-01

    Delayed wound healing due to infection is a burden on healthcare systems, and the patient and caregiver alike. An emerging factor in infection and delayed healing is the presence development of biofilm in wounds. Biofilm is communities of microorganisms, protected by an extracellular matrix of slime in the wound, which can tolerate host defences and applied antimicrobials such as antibiotics or antimicrobial dressings. A growing evidence base exists suggesting that biofilm exists in a majority of chronic wounds, and can be a precursor to infection while causing delayed healing itself. In vivo models have demonstrated that the inflammatory, granulation and epithelialization processes of normal wound healing are impaired by biofilm presence. The challenge in the development of a new antimicrobial wound dressing was to make standard antimicrobial agents more effective against biofilm, and this was answered following extensive biofilm research and testing. A combination of metal chelator, surfactant and pH control displayed highly synergistic anti-biofilm action with 1.2% ionic silver in a carboxymethylcellulose dressing. Its effectiveness was challenged and proven in complex in vitro and in vivo wound biofilm models, followed by clinical safety and performance demonstrations in a 42-patient study and 113 clinical evaluations. Post-market surveillance was conducted on the commercially available dressing, and in a 112-case evaluation, the dressing was shown to effectively manage exudate and suspected biofilm while shifting difficult-to-heal wounds onto healing trajectories, after an average of 4 weeks of new dressing use in otherwise standard wound care protocols. This was accompanied by a low frequency of dressing related adverse events. In a second evaluation, clinical signs of infection and wound dimension data, before and after the evaluations, were also available. Following an average of 5.4 weeks of dressing use, all signs of clinical infection were reduced, from

  11. Retained wound vacuum foam in non-healing wounds: a real possibility.

    PubMed

    Mazoch, M; Montgomery, C

    2015-06-01

    Negative pressure wound therpay (NPWT) has revolutionised the management of chronic wounds, particularly pressure ulcers (PU). Frequently, PUs are too large to close primarily, so NPWT is used to assist in management on an outpatient basis. If not closely monitored, NPWT closure foam can be accidentally left in patients. Here we describe two cases where NPWT closure foam was left in patients resulting in persistent infections. Additionally, some suggestions of how to help avoid these should be 'never' events are provided.

  12. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

  13. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

  14. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment

    PubMed Central

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-01-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

  15. A unified framework for automatic wound segmentation and analysis with deep convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhan; Yan, Xinchen; Smith, Max; Kochhar, Kanika; Rubin, Marcie; Warren, Stephen M; Wrobel, James; Lee, Honglak

    2015-08-01

    Wound surface area changes over multiple weeks are highly predictive of the wound healing process. Furthermore, the quality and quantity of the tissue in the wound bed also offer important prognostic information. Unfortunately, accurate measurements of wound surface area changes are out of reach in the busy wound practice setting. Currently, clinicians estimate wound size by estimating wound width and length using a scalpel after wound treatment, which is highly inaccurate. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system to automatically segment wound regions and analyze wound conditions in wound images. Different from previous segmentation techniques which rely on handcrafted features or unsupervised approaches, our proposed deep learning method jointly learns task-relevant visual features and performs wound segmentation. Moreover, learned features are applied to further analysis of wounds in two ways: infection detection and healing progress prediction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to automate long-term predictions of general wound healing progress. Our method is computationally efficient and takes less than 5 seconds per wound image (480 by 640 pixels) on a typical laptop computer. Our evaluations on a large-scale wound database demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed system. PMID:26736781

  16. Wound care in horses.

    PubMed

    Caston, Stephanie S

    2012-04-01

    Care of equine wounds in the field can be a challenging endeavor. Many times, wound care is complicated by chronicity or by prior inappropriate care in addition to the great degree of tissue trauma that occurred when the horse was wounded. Recognizing involvement of synovial structures, loss of skin, and damage to bone are critical in the initial examination of wounds and will guide future care. Education of clients is also important in that preparing them for possible outcomes during healing may help improve compliance and proper treatment of wound. Owners and trainers often perform much of the daily care and monitoring of equine wounds and thus can greatly assist or impede the progress. Bandaging is important to management of equine wounds-especially on the limbs-and is sometimes overlooked because of its labor-intensive nature and the desire for a spray, ointment, or salve that will heal the wound. The practitioner that improves and utilizes his or her understanding of the wound-healing process in concert with his or her knowledge of local anatomy will be the one who is best equipped to care for wounds in ambulatory practice.

  17. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  18. New Developments in Smart Bandage Technologies for Wound Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    McLister, Anna; McHugh, Jolene; Cundell, Jill; Davis, James

    2016-07-01

    The pH of wound fluid has long been recognized as an important diagnostic for assessing wound condition, but as yet there are few technological options available to the clinician. The availability of sensors that can measure wound pH, either in the clinic or at home could significantly improve clinical outcome - particularly in the early identification of complications such as infection. New material designs and electrochemical research strategies that are being targeted at wound diagnostics are identified and a critical overview of emerging research that could be pivotal in setting the direction for future devices is provided.

  19. Burn wound management.

    PubMed

    Davies, M R; Rode, H; Cywes, S; van der Riet, R L

    1981-01-01

    In this chapter the local therapy for burns is discussed. Between 400 and 500 children with burns are treated every year at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town, but in only 10% of them do the burns affect over 20% of the body surface. These latter patients are treated in special rooms equipped for intensive therapy. Open and closed methods of treatment for burns used in addition to early excision are compared. The first aim is early skin cover for areas with skin loss preserving as much function as possible and achieving the best possible cosmetic result. Local therapy must be atraumatic to prevent extension of the skin lesion. Bacterial contamination must be prevented as far as possible by keeping the wound clean. Emergency treatment and the course of wound healing up to the third week after the injury using the appropriate dressings are described. Early excision until the fifth day after the accident should be used mainly for burns of the hand, deep second degree burns of up to 10% of the body surface, deep second degree burns over the joints and deep second degree burns of the neck. It must be admitted that the depth of the burn can only be definitely estimated between the seventh and tenth day after the accident. If no autografts are available homografts or grafts from animals are used. The age of the patient, associated injuries, associated diseases and the extent of the burn all play a role in determining the prognosis. Furthermore endogenous bacterial infections, absorption of local therapeutic agents and the state of the surrounding skin do also influence the healing process. Finally the various local therapeutic agents like sulphamylon, silver sulphadiazine and betadine are discussed. A 0.05% solution of silver nitrate is also active against gram-negative infections. Skin transplants are disinfected with a solution containing one third 0.25% acetic acid, one third 3% cent hydrogen peroxide and one third saline. Hydrogen peroxide

  20. Postoperative infections: general principles and considerations.

    PubMed

    Downey, M S; Lamy, C J

    1990-07-01

    Every surgeon should have a thorough knowledge and awareness of the general principles of postoperative infections. The key to postoperative infections is in their prevention. Even with the most prudent and ardent regimens, however, postoperative wound infections will occasionally occur. Thus, the aforementioned knowledge will allow an improved clinical acumen and permit the early diagnosis of postoperative infection. Early and vigorous local wound care combined with systemic antibiotics are necessary to minimize the potentially debilitating sequelae of the postoperative wound infection.

  1. Topical antimicrobials in the control of wound bioburden.

    PubMed

    White, Richard J; Cutting, Keith; Kingsley, Andrew

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and infection are important factors in compromised wound healing, particularly in chronic wounds. Although "best practice" for controlling these factors currently is not defined, systemic antibiotics are generally accepted as the preferred choice for treating infection, provided ischemia does not reduce their bioavailability. However, widespread use of systemic and topical antibiotics is associated with the emergence of resistant bacterial strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Colonization of wounds presents a double problem--potentially delayed healing and a potential source for cross-contamination. The judicious use of dressings, notably those containing certain antiseptic agents, can be a valuable option to control infection and promote healing. A review of the literature underscores the importance of considering the antiseptic route as part of a concerted approach to wound management and infection control.

  2. Epithelial mechanobiology, skin wound healing, and the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Healy, Eugene; Thurner, Philipp J; Man, Yu Hin

    2013-12-01

    Skin wound healing is a vital process that is important for re-establishing the epithelial barrier following disease or injury. Aberrant or delayed skin wound healing increases the risk of infection, causes patient morbidity, and may lead to the formation of scar tissue. One of the most important events in wound healing is coverage of the wound with a new epithelial layer. This occurs when keratinocytes at the wound periphery divide and migrate to re-populate the wound bed. Many approaches are under investigation to promote and expedite this process, including the topical application of growth factors and the addition of autologous and allogeneic tissue or cell grafts. The mechanical environment of the wound site is also of fundamental importance for the rate and quality of wound healing. It is known that mechanical stress can influence wound healing by affecting the behaviour of cells within the dermis, but it remains unclear how mechanical forces affect the healing epidermis. Tensile forces are known to affect the behaviour of cells within epithelia, however, and the material properties of extracellular matrices, such as substrate stiffness, have been shown to affect the morphology, proliferation, differentiation and migration of many different cell types. In this review we will introduce the structure of the skin and the process of wound healing. We will then discuss the evidence for the effect of tissue mechanics in re-epithelialisation and, in particular, on stem cell behaviour in the wound microenvironment and in intact skin. We will discuss how the elasticity, mechanical heterogeneity and topography of the wound extracellular matrix impact the rate and quality of wound healing, and how we may exploit this knowledge to expedite wound healing and mitigate scarring. PMID:23746929

  3. Epithelial mechanobiology, skin wound healing, and the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Healy, Eugene; Thurner, Philipp J; Man, Yu Hin

    2013-12-01

    Skin wound healing is a vital process that is important for re-establishing the epithelial barrier following disease or injury. Aberrant or delayed skin wound healing increases the risk of infection, causes patient morbidity, and may lead to the formation of scar tissue. One of the most important events in wound healing is coverage of the wound with a new epithelial layer. This occurs when keratinocytes at the wound periphery divide and migrate to re-populate the wound bed. Many approaches are under investigation to promote and expedite this process, including the topical application of growth factors and the addition of autologous and allogeneic tissue or cell grafts. The mechanical environment of the wound site is also of fundamental importance for the rate and quality of wound healing. It is known that mechanical stress can influence wound healing by affecting the behaviour of cells within the dermis, but it remains unclear how mechanical forces affect the healing epidermis. Tensile forces are known to affect the behaviour of cells within epithelia, however, and the material properties of extracellular matrices, such as substrate stiffness, have been shown to affect the morphology, proliferation, differentiation and migration of many different cell types. In this review we will introduce the structure of the skin and the process of wound healing. We will then discuss the evidence for the effect of tissue mechanics in re-epithelialisation and, in particular, on stem cell behaviour in the wound microenvironment and in intact skin. We will discuss how the elasticity, mechanical heterogeneity and topography of the wound extracellular matrix impact the rate and quality of wound healing, and how we may exploit this knowledge to expedite wound healing and mitigate scarring.

  4. Microbiology of equine wounds and evidence of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Westgate, S J; Percival, S L; Knottenbelt, D C; Clegg, P D; Cochrane, C A

    2011-05-12

    Horse wounds have a high risk of becoming infected due to their environment. Infected wounds harbour diverse populations of microorganisms, however in some cases these microorganisms can be difficult to identify and fail to respond to antibiotic treatment, resulting in chronic non-healing wounds. In human wounds this has been attributed to the ability of bacteria to survive in a biofilm phenotypic state. Biofilms are known to delay wound healing, principally due to their recalcitrance towards antimicrobial therapies and components of the innate immune response. This study describes the presence of bacterial biofilms within equine wounds. Thirteen 8-mm diameter tissue samples were collected from (n=18) chronic wounds. Following histological staining, samples were observed for evidence of biofilms. Fifty one wounds and control skin sites were sampled using sterile swabs. Control skin sites were on the uninjured side of the horse at the same anatomical location as the wound. The isolated bacteria were cultured aerobically and anaerobically. The biofilm forming potential of all the isolated bacteria was determined using a standard crystal violet microtitre plate assay. Stained tissue samples provided evidence of biofilms within 61.5% (8 out of 13) equine wounds. In total 340 bacterial isolates were identified from all the equine wound and skin samples. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium were the most predominantly isolated bacterial species from equine wound and skin samples respectively. Staphylococcus was the most commonly isolated genus in both environments. Bacteria cultured from chronic and acute wounds showed significantly (P<0.05) higher biofilm forming potential than bacteria isolated from skin. This paper highlights preliminary evidence supporting the presence of biofilms and a high microbial diversity in equine chronic wounds. The presence of biofilms in equine wounds partly explains the reluctance of many lower limb wounds to heal. Non

  5. [Advances in wound care].

    PubMed

    Raffoul, Wassim

    2008-03-01

    Wound care made great progress during last years related to several factors. The first is an awakening of the importance of wounds. The progress made in the comprehension of the physiopathology of wounds led to innovations in all stages of this complex process which is the wound healing. Autologus platelet concentrate producing growth factors are in use to stimulate the first phase of the healing. The second phase which is the phase of proliferation and secretion is currently better managed with new categories of bandages which are true local treatments. The nutrition became one of the pillars of wound treatments especially among old patients. The reconstructive surgery took great steps since the physiology and the vascular anatomy of the skin and soft tissues are better known. Finally the bio-engineering has entered the treatment of the wound there is more than 20 years ago and methods have improved and become more reliable.

  6. Dressings for chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner; Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2013-01-01

    Covering wounds, acute and chronic, is one of the most fundamental activities of any medical practitioner. Although wound dressings primarily serve to contain the "good" and keep out the "bad," research has characterized more specifically the sophisticated interaction between the human wound bed and its dressing counterpart. Wound dressings for today's chronic wounds come in many flavors, ranging from the classic types of moisture-retentive dressings to silver-coated varieties to biologic dressings serving as skin substitutes. Moisture-retentive dressing types include foams, films, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and alginates. Appropriate use of these dressings can help to keep the wound bed moist, which allows for epithelial migration, angiogenesis, retention of growth factors, autolytic debridement, and maintenance of electrical gradients. PMID:23742280

  7. The First Cut Is the Deepest: The History and Development of Safe Treatments for Wound Healing and Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Hobson, David W; Schuh, JoAnn C L; Zurawski, Daniel V; Wang, Jianyong; Arbabi, Sam; McVean, Maralee; Funk, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    As the skin is the primary barrier to infection, the importance of wound healing has been understood since ancient times. This article provides a synopsis on the symposium presentations focusing on how wounds were traditionally treated, what models and pathology endpoints exist to study wound healing, special considerations for wound healing studies, an overview of regulatory aspects of new pharmaceutical and medical device development, and the clinical relevance of such models. The clinical treatment of small and large wounds is also considered.

  8. Infection.

    PubMed

    Miclau, Theodore; Schmidt, Andrew H; Wenke, Joseph C; Webb, Lawrence X; Harro, Janette M; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-09-01

    Musculoskeletal infection is a clinical problem with significant direct healthcare costs. The prevalence of infection after closed, elective surgery is frequently estimated to be less than 2%, but in severe injuries, posttraumatic infection rates have been reported as 10% or greater. Although clinical infections are found outside the realm of medical devices, it is clear that the enormous increase of infections associated with the use of implants presents a major challenge worldwide. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections.

  9. A Chronic, Nonhealing Wound of the Finger Caused by Polypropylene Suture Material.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kun-Yong; Lee, Sang-Yeul

    2015-07-01

    Chronic wounds usually result from poor peripheral circulation, neuropathy, pressure, radiation, or infection. Such common types of chronic wounds are easily diagnosed and managed with traditional wound care techniques. In contrast, chronic nonhealing wounds caused by cancerous skin lesions, mycobacterial infections, and foreign-body reactions that are refractory to traditional wound therapy present a particular diagnostic challenge, resulting in erroneous or delayed diagnosis. Therefore, an unusual presentation of a chronic wound should be taken into account when establishing differential diagnosis. In an effort to enhance recognition of chronic wounds caused by foreign-body reactions and facilitate their proper management, the authors report a case of a chronic nonhealing wound on the dorsum of a finger that was associated with the use of polypropylene suture and lasted for 3 years. PMID:26214386

  10. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  11. Potential implications of biofilm in chronic wounds: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hurlow, J; Bowler, P G

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial biofilm is increasingly suspected as being a significant barrier to wound healing. Bacteria predominantly attach to surfaces in their natural habitats and form biofilm; in this state they adapt to, and tolerate, the hostilities in their surrounding environment. The purpose of this clinical observational study was to consider chronic wound biofilm in relation to other factors that are implicated in wound recalcitrance, such as peripheral arterial disease, wound infection, osteomyelitis and moisture imbalance. Based on our clinical observations, it is possible that links exist between wound biofilm and other underlying pathophysiological factors, and that biofilm may also provide clues to the involvement of such factors. Recognising and managing these factors collectively may be important in addressing recalcitrance and facilitating wound progression.

  12. Nanofibre Based Smart Pharmaceutical Scaffolds for Wound Repair and Regenerations.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Charu; Pandey, Himanshu; Pandey, Avinash C; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds and ulcers are posing a devastating manifestation on the socioeconomic status across the globe along with the patient compliance. It reinforces a need for the development of successful alternative treatments for the chronic wound care and ulcer management practices. This review explores the progressive developments being made in the fabrication of electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds towards elimination of microbial infection from chronic wounds to accelerate the wound healing process. Functional three dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds produced by electrospinning have great potential in a wide spectrum of biomedical practices, such as tissue engineering, drug/gene delivery and wound dressing. Moreover, this review also highlights the materials and post modification methods, such as the functionaliation of electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds using growth factors, so that such smart and bioactive nanofibrous scaffolds could be made suitable for wound healing applications. PMID:26666999

  13. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  14. Telemedicine for wound management.

    PubMed

    Chittoria, Ravi K

    2012-05-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

  15. Effect of medicinal plants on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Budovsky, Arie; Yarmolinsky, Ludmila; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    In the United States alone, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. It is expected that the number of chronic wounds will increase worldwide due to the increase in age-related conditions and pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. An estimated excess of US$25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds, and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing healthcare costs, an aging population, and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide. While current therapeutic agents have generally inadequate efficacy and number of serious adverse effects, the medicinal plants have been used in medicine since ancient times and are well known for their abilities to promote wound healing and prevent infection without grave side effects. Thus, herbal therapy may be an alternative strategy for treatment of wounds. The purpose of this review is to provide the verified data on the medicinal plants of the world flora with wound healing activity including the biologically active substances belonging to these herbal preparations and describe in detail the various cellular and molecular mechanisms of their actions.

  16. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Joseph C; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes.

  17. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  18. Effect of medicinal plants on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Budovsky, Arie; Yarmolinsky, Ludmila; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    In the United States alone, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. It is expected that the number of chronic wounds will increase worldwide due to the increase in age-related conditions and pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. An estimated excess of US$25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds, and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing healthcare costs, an aging population, and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide. While current therapeutic agents have generally inadequate efficacy and number of serious adverse effects, the medicinal plants have been used in medicine since ancient times and are well known for their abilities to promote wound healing and prevent infection without grave side effects. Thus, herbal therapy may be an alternative strategy for treatment of wounds. The purpose of this review is to provide the verified data on the medicinal plants of the world flora with wound healing activity including the biologically active substances belonging to these herbal preparations and describe in detail the various cellular and molecular mechanisms of their actions. PMID:25703533

  19. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Joseph C; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  20. French national wound management survey: choice criteria of dressings.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Barrois, Brigitte; Faucher, Nathalie

    Across Europe, wound care management is organized differently, and in some countries such as the UK or Denmark, wound healing centres have been implemented. In France, a large number of health professionals are not sufficiently educated in wound care management during their vocational training. The rapid evolution of dressings has changed wound management practices and has given rise to new professional recommendations. This national survey was carried out in France in 2009, including 465 health professionals, to determine the criteria they use to choose a dressing and their habits of care with acute or chronic wounds. Around 73% of respondents were nurses and, on average, participants took care of 43 wounds per month. It was also found that 89% of the health professionals who took part prefer the sequential treatment of the wound based on its appearance. Regardless of whether the wound is acute or chronic, the priorities for wound care and the choice of dressing are the management of the exudate and the prevention or treatment of infection. These results put into evidence the adequacy of the recommendations by these practitioners and the good correlation between the choice of dressing and the local therapeutic goal. To reach the same level of expertise, the professional training for health professionals who are less frequently involved in wound care is necessary.

  1. Biosurgery in wound healing--the renaissance of maggot therapy.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Karte, K; Herold, C; Looks, A

    2000-07-01

    Chronic wounds are a challenge for modern health care. A basic principle of treatment is the removal of sloughy, necrotic, devitalized tissue to prevent wound infection and delayed healing. Biosurgery (syn. maggot or larval therapy) is a promising adjunct to the whole spectrum of topical treatment methods, in particular for debridement. The term 'biosurgery' describes the use of living maggots on wounds to remove devitalized tissue, decrease the risk of infection and improve wound healing. The present paper gives a brief review of history, entomology, biochemistry and medical indications of biosurgery and the practical handling of maggots. We also provide some clinical data from the literature and our own experience in a wound care unit. Biosurgery is an effective and safe treatment option for debridement and disinfection. PMID:11204517

  2. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shou-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    According to previous research, adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) can help manage infected wounds when applied along with appropriate debridement and antibiotic therapy as deemed clinically relevant. NPWT not only removes fluid, and reduces oedema, but also promotes perfusion around the wounds. In addition, NPWT may lead to improved graft fixation when used as a bolster, especially in patients who are less compliant or have poor graft fixation that result from using traditional methods. NPWT is a good choice to bolster skin grafts in young, active and less-compliant patients. We propose an enhanced segmental compartment-covered technique, which uses NPWT adjunctively as first-line wound treatment to help manage postoperative infection. Moreover, NPWT promotes granulation tissue formation to prepare the wound bed for subsequent skin graft and may be used as a bolster over the graft, which helps to attain skin graft viability. PMID:27547959

  3. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  4. Biofilm formation on rat skin wounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying the green fluorescent protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Emi; Toriyabe, Souhachi; Zhang, Lianbo; Imai, Yoshimichi; Tachi, Masahiro

    2010-02-01

    Most chronic wounds are covered by biofilms. However, questions remain about whether biofilms are a causative factor in delayed wound healing and whether the biofilm state contributes to this pathology. The purpose of this study was to develop an experimental model for convenient observation of biofilm formation on skin wounds. Full-thickness wounds were created on the backs of SD rats. Suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying the gene encoding green fluorescent protein were then applied to the wounds. The wounds were harvested at 8 h, and at 1, 3 and 7 days postwounding for histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of a biofilm as early as 8 h. Comparing with non-infected wounds, epithelialization was not delayed. In conclusion, wound healing of rat acute wounds was unaffected by biofilm formation.

  5. A model for evaluating topical antimicrobial efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in superficial murine wounds.

    PubMed

    Roche, Eric D; Renick, Paul J; Tetens, Shannon P; Carson, Dennis L

    2012-08-01

    A wound biofilm model was created by adapting a superficial infection model. Partial-thickness murine wounds were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dense biofilm communities developed at the wound surface after 24 h as demonstrated by microscopy and quantitative microbiology. Common topical antimicrobial agents had reduced efficacy when treatment was initiated 24 h after inoculation compared to 4 h after inoculation. This model provides a rapid in vivo test for new agents to treat wound biofilm infections.

  6. Understanding methods of wound debridement.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Leanne

    Autolytic debridement describes the body's natural method of wound-bed cleansing, helping it to prepare the wound bed for healing. In acute wounds, autolytic debridement occurs automatically and often does not require intervention, as during the inflammatory stage of a wound, neutrophils and macrophages digest and removes devitalised tissue, cell debris and contaminants, clearing the wound of any cellular barriers to healing. In chronic wounds, by contrast, healing is often delayed, frequently because of inadequate debridement. The autolytic process becomes overwhelmed by high levels of endotoxins released from damaged tissue (Broadus, 2013). Therefore wound debridement becomes an integral part of chronic-wound management and practitioners involved in wound care must be fully competent at wound-bed assessment and have an awareness of the options available for debridement. This article will review wound-bed assessment, highlighting variations in devitalised tissue, and explore options available for wound debridement, taking into consideration patients’ pain and quality of life.

  7. Chitosan preparations for wounds and burns: antimicrobial and wound-healing effects

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery approximately 200 years ago, chitosan, as a cationic natural polymer, has been widely used as a topical dressing in wound management owing to its hemostatic, stimulation of healing, antimicrobial, nontoxic, biocompatible and biodegradable properties. This article covers the antimicrobial and wound-healing effects of chitosan, as well as its derivatives and complexes, and its use as a vehicle to deliver biopharmaceuticals, antimicrobials and growth factors into tissue. Studies covering applications of chitosan in wounds and burns can be classified into in vitro, animal and clinical studies. Chitosan preparations are classified into native chitosan, chitosan formulations, complexes and derivatives with other substances. Chitosan can be used to prevent or treat wound and burn infections not only because of its intrinsic antimicrobial properties, but also by virtue of its ability to deliver extrinsic antimicrobial agents to wounds and burns. It can also be used as a slow-release drug-delivery vehicle for growth factors to improve wound healing. The large number of publications in this area suggests that chitosan will continue to be an important agent in the management of wounds and burns. PMID:21810057

  8. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    Surgical incision care; Open wound care ... your wound again with sutures, you need to care for it at home, since it may take ... Your health care provider will tell you how often to change your dressing . To prepare for the dressing change: Clean your ...

  9. Saliva and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Veerman, Enno C I

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. Furthermore, saliva contains a variety of proteins that play a role in the various stages of the intraoral wound healing. Tissue factor, present in salivary exosomes, accelerates the clotting of blood dramatically. The subsequent proliferation of epithelial cells is promoted by growth factors in saliva, especially epidermal growth factor. The importance of secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor is demonstrated by the observation that in the absence of this salivary protein, oral wound healing is considerably delayed. Members of the salivary histatin family promote wound closure in vitro by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration. Cell proliferation is not enhanced by histatin. Cyclization of histatin increased its biological activity approximately 1,000-fold compared to linear histatin. These studies suggest that histatins could potentially be used for the development of new wound healing medications.

  10. Interference of Lactobacillus plantarum with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in infected burns: the potential use of probiotics in wound treatment.

    PubMed

    Valdéz, J C; Peral, M C; Rachid, M; Santana, M; Perdigón, G

    2005-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum to inhibit the pathogenic activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and investigated the mechanisms involved in such protection. L. plantarum whole cultures, culture filtrates (acid filtrate and neutralised acid filtrate) and isolated, washed cells were tested in vitro for their effects on the production of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules, acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHLs), and two virulence factors controlled by these signal molecules, elastase and biofilm. All were inhibited by L. plantarum cultures and filtrates, but not by isolated, washed cells. The acid L. plantarum growth medium itself had some inhibitory activity, but the greatest activity was exerted by the whole culture. To test the in-vivo activity of L. plantarum, a burned-mouse model was used in which burns infected with P. aeruginosa were treated with L. plantarum at 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 days post-infection. Samples from skin, liver and spleen taken after 5, 10 and 15 days demonstrated inhibition of P. aeruginosa colonisation by L. plantarum. There was also an improvement in tissue repair, enhanced phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa by tissue phagocytes, and a decrease in apoptosis at 10 days. These results indicate that L. plantarum and/or its by-products are potential therapeutic agents for the local treatment of P. aeruginosa burn infections.

  11. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.

  12. Wound care in the geriatric client.

    PubMed

    Gist, Steve; Tio-Matos, Iris; Falzgraf, Sharon; Cameron, Shirley; Beebe, Michael

    2009-01-01

    With our aging population, chronic diseases that compromise skin integrity such as diabetes, peripheral vascular disease (venous hypertension, arterial insufficiency) are becoming increasingly common. Skin breakdown with ulcer and chronic wound formation is a frequent consequence of these diseases. Types of ulcers include pressure ulcers, vascular ulcers (arterial and venous hypertension), and neuropathic ulcers. Treatment of these ulcers involves recognizing the four stages of healing: coagulation, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Chronic wounds are frequently stalled in the inflammatory stage. Moving past the inflammation stage requires considering the bacterial burden, necrotic tissue, and moisture balance of the wound being treated. Bacterial overgrowth or infection needs to be treated with topical or systemic agents. In most cases, necrotic tissue needs to be debrided and moisture balance needs to be addressed by wetting dry tissue and drying wet tissue. Special dressings have been developed to accomplish these tasks. They include films, hydrocolloids, hydrogel dressings, foams, hydrofibers, composite and alginate dressings.

  13. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mancl, Kimberly A; Kirsner, Robert S; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque, are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible; thus, biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attention to the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction, and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields and future therapies are also discussed.

  14. Wound care in the geriatric client

    PubMed Central

    Gist, Steve; Tio-Matos, Iris; Falzgraf, Sharon; Cameron, Shirley; Beebe, Michael

    2009-01-01

    With our aging population, chronic diseases that compromise skin integrity such as diabetes, peripheral vascular disease (venous hypertension, arterial insufficiency) are becoming increasingly common. Skin breakdown with ulcer and chronic wound formation is a frequent consequence of these diseases. Types of ulcers include pressure ulcers, vascular ulcers (arterial and venous hypertension), and neuropathic ulcers. Treatment of these ulcers involves recognizing the four stages of healing: coagulation, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Chronic wounds are frequently stalled in the inflammatory stage. Moving past the inflammation stage requires considering the bacterial burden, necrotic tissue, and moisture balance of the wound being treated. Bacterial overgrowth or infection needs to be treated with topical or systemic agents. In most cases, necrotic tissue needs to be debrided and moisture balance needs to be addressed by wetting dry tissue and drying wet tissue. Special dressings have been developed to accomplish these tasks. They include films, hydrocolloids, hydrogel dressings, foams, hydrofibers, composite and alginate dressings. PMID:19554098

  15. Multidrug-resistant organisms, wounds and topical antimicrobial protection.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Philip G; Welsby, Sarah; Towers, Victoria; Booth, Rebecca; Hogarth, Andrea; Rowlands, Victoria; Joseph, Alexis; Jones, Samantha A

    2012-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) are increasingly implicated in both acute and chronic wound infections. The limited therapeutic options are further compromised by the fact that wound bacteria often co-exist within a biofilm community which enhances bacterial tolerance to antibiotics. As a consequence, topical antiseptics may be an important consideration for minimising the opportunity for wound infections involving MDROs. The objective of this research was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a silver-containing gelling fibre dressing against a variety of MDROs in free-living and biofilm states, using stringent in vitro models designed to simulate a variety of wound conditions. MDROs included Acinetobacter baumannii, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria. Clostridium difficile was also included in the study because it carries many of the characteristics seen in MDROs and evidence of multidrug resistance is emerging. Sustained in vitro antimicrobial activity of the silver-containing dressing was shown against 10 MDROs in a simulated wound fluid over 7 days, and inhibitory and bactericidal effects against both free-living and biofilm phenotypes were also consistently shown in simulated colonised wound surface models. The in vitro data support consideration of the silver-containing gelling fibre dressing as part of a protocol of care in the management of wounds colonised or infected with MDROs.

  16. Superficial Wound Swabbing

    PubMed Central

    Schmohl, Michael; Beckert, Stefan; Joos, Thomas O.; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Löffler, Markus W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In diabetic foot ulcers, wound fluid inflammatory mediators have previously been proposed as surrogate markers for nonhealing. However, currently available wound fluid sampling techniques are not suitable for clinical practice due to low levels of exudate and a high logistical effort. The aim of this investigation was to assess 1) the technique of superficial wound swabbing for harvesting wound fluid; and 2) the quality of the collected fluid for immunoassay analysis of inflammatory mediators. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both nylon-flocked swabs and film dressings were used to collect wound fluid from foot ulcers of diabetic patients. In randomly selected patients, levels of wound fluid inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteases were determined using multiplexed bead-based sandwich immunoassays with respect to both sampling methods. Wound fluid spike-in experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of different sample processing protocols on subsequent immunoassay analysis. RESULTS Using the swabbing technique, a median amount of 40 µL (2–120 µL) wound exudate was collected, which allowed the measurement of several multiplex panels. Comparing both sampling methods, a similar qualitative protein recovery was observed with a trend to analyte enrichment by swabbing. Sample processing using swabs did not affect analyte recovery, with the exception of interleukin (IL)-8, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, IL-17A, interferon-γ–induced protein 10, and IL-4. CONCLUSIONS The quality of wound fluid collected by superficial swabbing is not inferior to the current standard technique. Combined with subsequent bead-based sandwich immunoassay analysis, this new method offers a noninvasive technique, suitable for daily clinical routines, for assessment of inflammatory activity in diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22837363

  17. A brief retrospective review of medical records comparing outcomes for inpatients treated via telehealth versus in-person protocols: is telehealth equally effective as in-person visits for treating neutropenic fever, bacterial pneumonia, and infected bacterial wounds?

    PubMed

    Assimacopoulos, Aristides; Alam, Rabiul; Arbo, Manuel; Nazir, Jawad; Chen, Ding-Geng; Weaver, Susan; Dahler-Penticoff, Marilyn; Knobloch, Karla; DeVany, Mary; Ageton, Cheryl

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of infectious diseases in the United States has been increasing since 1980. Re-emergent conditions, multidrug-resistant bacteria, newly identified infections, and bioterrorism have prompted public health surveillance and control initiatives, including the use of telehealth technology. Infectious diseases, such as West Nile Virus, pose a particular threat to rural areas, where access to infectious disease specialists (IDS) is limited. Initial, in-patient IDS consultations are reimbursed by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for in-person and for telehealth services. Follow-up consultation and subsequent care visits are reimbursed when delivered via in-person care, but not reimbursed when delivered via telehealth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of telehealth technology (interactive videoconferencing) in providing timely, efficient, and prudent infectious disease care for rural patients. We conducted a retrospective, comparative review of medical records (n = 107) from inpatients at a metropolitan hospital (n = 59) in a rural state who received in-person IDS treatment, with records from inpatients at nonmetropolitan, rural, and frontier hospitals (n = 48) in the same state who received telehealth IDS treatment. Outcome measures, including number of days hospitalized, number of days receiving intravenous antibiotic, survival, and transfer to another hospital, were compared for three commonly occurring infectious diseases: neutropenic fever, bacterial pneumonia, or bacterial wound infection. Patients treated via telehealth had fewer days on antibiotics and fewer days hospitalized than patients treated via in-person intervention. Survival rates did not differ significantly between groups, but were lower for telehealth patients. Fewer in-person patients required transfer to hospitals offering a higher level of care. Ninety percent of telehealth patients were able to remain at their local hospital for treatment. Results were

  18. Negative pressure wound therapy with saline instillation: 131 patient case series.

    PubMed

    Brinkert, David; Ali, Mazen; Naud, Magali; Maire, Nicolas; Trial, Chloé; Téot, Luc

    2013-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy combined with timed, cyclical instillation (NPWTi) of topical wound solutions has been recently presented as a new adjunctive modality for treating wounds with signs of infection. Normal saline, antiseptics and antimicrobials all have been proposed in scientific and clinical studies as potentially effective when used with NPWTi for treating heavily infected wounds. This is a prospective clinical study of 131 patients with 131 wounds treated with NPWTi using saline between January 2012 and December 2012 in two orthopaedic centres and one surgical wound healing centre in France. Saline was exclusively used. Results were favourable: in 98% of the cases, the wounds could be closed after debridement and following the use of NPWTi. Mean duration of NPWTi was 12·19 days. This does not preclude the need for treating the biofilm appropriately with more active antibacterial products when biofilm has been documented.

  19. Antimicrobial tolerance and the significance of persister cells in recalcitrant chronic wound biofilms.

    PubMed

    Percival, Steven L; Hill, Katja E; Malic, Sladjana; Thomas, David W; Williams, David W

    2011-01-01

    The application of antimicrobials in the management of wounds is a complex procedure requiring appropriate clinical decision making, judgment and a thorough understanding of antimicrobial therapies, together with their potential disadvantages. There is considerable direct and indirect evidence for the presence of bacterial biofilms in the chronic wound bed, and it has been demonstrated that bacteria within these biofilms may exhibit both specific and nonspecific antimicrobial tolerance. The antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms is a major concern in the treatment of both infected and nonhealing chronic wounds and an understanding of the mechanisms involved is of fundamental importance in managing wound infections and developing future wound management strategies. The aim of this review is therefore to provide an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria in wound biofilms can resist conventional antibiotic and antibacterial therapies which is very important to wound healing.

  20. [Effect of wound to growth of larva of host to Ophiocordyceps sinensis during artificial breeding].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, De-li; Zeng, Wei; Li, Li; Luo, Qing-ming; Tu, Yong-qin; Chen, Shi-jiang; Yin, Ding-hua

    2015-01-01

    To clear the effect of the wound to the growth of the larva of the host to the Ophiocordyceps sinensis, the wounds of same severity at the same position were made artificially to the larva and which were artificial fed at the same environment and condition. The results indicated that, over the winter, the survival rate of the wounded of the infection larva was lower than that of the healthy larva, but the weight had no significant difference between the wounded and the healthy larva. The survival rate of the wounded of the no infection larva was lower than that of the healthy larva, but except with black skin, the wounded larva with offwhite and dusty red had no influence on the variety of the weight. In summery, wound had no advantage to the survival rate, but had no influence to the weight. The result had provided theoretical basis to the reforming of the system of the artificial culture O. sinensis.

  1. Best practice in wound assessment.

    PubMed

    Benbow, Maureen

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and considered wound assessment is essential to fulfil professional nursing requirements and ensure appropriate patient and wound management. This article describes the main aspects of holistic assessment of the patient and the wound, including identifying patient risk factors and comorbidities, and factors affecting wound healing to ensure optimal outcomes.

  2. Slough and biofilm: removal of barriers to wound healing by desloughing.

    PubMed

    Percival, S L; Suleman, L

    2015-11-01

    The presence of non-viable tissue in a chronic wound presents a barrier against effective wound healing, hence removal facilitates healing and reduces areas where microorganisms can attach and form biofilms, effectively reducing the risk of infection. Wound debridement is a necessary process in those wounds that have evidence of cellular debris and non-viable tissue. As slough is a form of non-viable tissue we hypothesise that it will support the attachment and development of biofilms. Biofilms are entities that have serious implications in raising the risk of infection and delaying wound healing. In those wounds that contain only slough, high-risk debridement methods are not considered necessary for its removal. The use of mechanical techniques for removing the slough is regarded as posing a much lower risk to the patient and the wound bed. The process of removing slough from a wound is referred to as 'desloughing'. We propose that mechanical desloughing is a low-risk method of debridement to aid the specific removal of slough. Slough in a wound is a recurrent issue for a large majority of patients. Consequently, desloughing should not be deemed a one-off process but an on-going procedure referred to as 'maintenance desloughing'. Maintenance desloughing will help to achieve and maintain a healthy wound bed and aid the removal of wound biofilms, facilitating wound healing. PMID:26551642

  3. Slough and biofilm: removal of barriers to wound healing by desloughing.

    PubMed

    Percival, S L; Suleman, L

    2015-11-01

    The presence of non-viable tissue in a chronic wound presents a barrier against effective wound healing, hence removal facilitates healing and reduces areas where microorganisms can attach and form biofilms, effectively reducing the risk of infection. Wound debridement is a necessary process in those wounds that have evidence of cellular debris and non-viable tissue. As slough is a form of non-viable tissue we hypothesise that it will support the attachment and development of biofilms. Biofilms are entities that have serious implications in raising the risk of infection and delaying wound healing. In those wounds that contain only slough, high-risk debridement methods are not considered necessary for its removal. The use of mechanical techniques for removing the slough is regarded as posing a much lower risk to the patient and the wound bed. The process of removing slough from a wound is referred to as 'desloughing'. We propose that mechanical desloughing is a low-risk method of debridement to aid the specific removal of slough. Slough in a wound is a recurrent issue for a large majority of patients. Consequently, desloughing should not be deemed a one-off process but an on-going procedure referred to as 'maintenance desloughing'. Maintenance desloughing will help to achieve and maintain a healthy wound bed and aid the removal of wound biofilms, facilitating wound healing.

  4. Evaluation of wound healing activity of ferulic acid in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghaisas, Mahesh M; Kshirsagar, Shashank B; Sahane, Rajkumari S

    2014-10-01

    In diabetic patients, there is impairment in angiogenesis, neovascularisation and failure in matrix metalloproteineases (MMPs), keratinocyte and fibroblast functions, which affects wound healing mechanism. Hence, diabetic patients are more prone to infections and ulcers, which finally result in gangrene. Ferulic acid (FA) is a natural antioxidant found in fruits and vegetables, such as tomatoes, rice bran and sweet corn. In this study, wound healing activity of FA was evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using excision wound model. FA-treated wounds were found to epithelise faster as compared with diabetic wound control group. The hydroxyproline and hexosamine content increased significantly when compared with diabetic wound control. FA effectively inhibited the lipid peroxidation and elevated the catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and nitric oxide levels along with the increase in the serum zinc and copper levels probably aiding the wound healing process. Hence, the results indicate that FA significantly promotes wound healing in diabetic rats.

  5. Effectively managing wound exudate.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The management of wound exudate remains a clinical challenge despite technological advances in products with better exudate-handling capacities. This clinical challenge is occasionally encountered when thick exudate (viscous exudate) is present, and when most modern dressings do not possess the capabilities to manage the viscosity while enabling exudate absorption. Maceration to the peri-wound area poses another challenge, irrespective of the number of topical barrier application products on the market and the innovation of dressing products that lock exudate away or those that encourage vertical wicking. In addition to all the above, in clinical practice, the assessment and documentation of wound exudate remains sporadic, leading to the challenges of effective wound exudate dressing selection and cost-effective dressings.

  6. [Saliva and wound healing].

    PubMed

    Veerman, E C I; Oudhoff, M J; Brand, H S

    2011-05-01

    The oral mucosa is frequently exposed to mechanical forces, which may result in tissue damage. Saliva contributes to the repair of the oral mucosa in several ways. In the first place, it creates a humid environment to improve the function of inflammatory cells. During the last few years, it has been shown that saliva also contains a large number of proteins with a role in wound healing. Saliva contains growth factors, especially Epidermal Growth FACTOR, which promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Trefoil factor 3 and histatin promote the process of wound closure. The importance of Secretory Leucocyte Protease Inhibitor is demonstrated by the fact that in the absence of this salivary protein, oral wound healing is considerably delayed. Understanding these salivary proteins opens the way for the development of new wound healing medications.

  7. The effect of topical negative pressure on wound biofilms using an in vitro wound model.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quan D; Vickery, Karen; Deva, Anand K

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds affect a significant number of patients worldwide. Although the etiologies of these wounds are varied, bacterial infection has been suggested as a major factor responsible for the perpetual inflammation and tissue destruction observed in such wounds. Recent evidence has emerged suggesting that bacterial biofilms in particular may have a significant role in this process. At the same time, topical negative pressure dressing is gaining acceptance as a therapy which promotes healing in recalcitrant wounds. In this study an in vitro Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model was developed to mimic potential surface wound biofilms. Topical negative pressure dressing was applied to the model and the effects of topical negative pressure dressing on the in vitro wound biofilms were examined using both quantitative microbiological counting technique and imaging studies. The results demonstrated a small but statistically significant reduction in biofilm bacteria at 2 weeks when exposed to topical negative pressure. When this was combined with silver impregnated foam, the reduction was far more significant and was observable within 24 hours. Microscopically, it was also noted that topical negative pressure compressed the biofilm architecture with a reduction in thickness and diffusion distance.

  8. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  9. Functional T lymphocytes infiltrate implanted polyvinyl alcohol foams during surgical wound closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Gouttefangeas, C; Eberle, M; Ruck, P; Stark, M; Müller, J E; Becker, H D; Rammensee, H G; Pinocy, J

    2001-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure involving the implantation of polyvinyl alcohol foam is a technique recently developed for the treatment of patients suffering from either wound infection or chronic wounds. This method has been shown to improve and accelerate wound healing. However, little is known about the cell populations that infiltrate the foam, and their potential role in resolving the infection and promoting granulation tissue formation. Our study demonstrates that wound-implanted foams are mainly infiltrated with granulocytes, but that mononuclear cells, including macrophages and minor populations of T, B and natural killer lymphocytes, are also present. We show that foam-infiltrating T cells, especially CD4(+) T cells, constitute a phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous population influenced by wound-infecting bacteria. Thus, T lymphocytes could play a role in wound cleansing. In addition, our data indicate that implanted polyvinyl alcohol foams might be suitable microenvironments for manipulating T cell-mediated immune responses in patients.

  10. Wound healing potential of methanol extract of Spathodea campanulata stem bark formulated into a topical preparation.

    PubMed

    Ofori-Kwakye, Kwabena; Kwapong, Awo Afi; Bayor, Marcel Tunkumgnen

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing potential of Spathodea campanulata stem bark in Sprague Dawley rats using the excision wound model. The methanol extract contained glycosides, flavonoids and tannins, and was relatively stable when stored at the room temperature for six (6) months. Solvent-free, semi-solid extract of S. campanulata was incorporated into an aqueous cream and applied (10 % w/w and 20 % w/w) on excision wounds of thirty two (32) rats. Cicatrin(®) cream was used as a standard wound healing agent. Prior to the remedial cream application, done later on twice daily, sixteen (16) rats had their wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus, while in the remaining sixteen the wounds were kept clean. The surface area of the excision wounds was monitored planimetrically every four (4) days until a complete wound closure or healing took place. Excision wounds treated with 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream showed a rapid and comparable decrease (p > 0.05) in wound size. In uninfected wounds, both 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream application resulted in ∼ 95 %-wound closure seen on Day 20, and a complete closure seen on Day 24. In infected wounds, both 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream administration led to ∼ 91 %-wound closure on Day 24 and a complete wound contraction on Day 28. The results of this study justify the folkloric use of S. campanulata stem bark to the effect of wound treatment.

  11. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  12. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  13. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D.

  14. Combat Wound Initiative program.

    PubMed

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Elster, Eric; Potter, Benjamin K; Davis, Thomas A; Tadaki, Doug K; Brown, Trevor S; Ahlers, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher E; Andersen, Romney C; Burris, David; Centeno, Jose; Champion, Hunter; Crumbley, David R; Denobile, John; Duga, Michael; Dunne, James R; Eberhardt, John; Ennis, William J; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Hawksworth, Jason; Helling, Thomas S; Lazarus, Gerald S; Milner, Stephen M; Mullick, Florabel G; Owner, Christopher R; Pasquina, Paul F; Patel, Chirag R; Peoples, George E; Nissan, Aviram; Ring, Michael; Sandberg, Glenn D; Schaden, Wolfgang; Schultz, Gregory S; Scofield, Tom; Shawen, Scott B; Sheppard, Forest R; Stannard, James P; Weina, Peter J; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2010-07-01

    The Combat Wound Initiative (CWI) program is a collaborative, multidisciplinary, and interservice public-private partnership that provides personalized, state-of-the-art, and complex wound care via targeted clinical and translational research. The CWI uses a bench-to-bedside approach to translational research, including the rapid development of a human extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) study in complex wounds after establishing the potential efficacy, biologic mechanisms, and safety of this treatment modality in a murine model. Additional clinical trials include the prospective use of clinical data, serum and wound biomarkers, and wound gene expression profiles to predict wound healing/failure and additional clinical patient outcomes following combat-related trauma. These clinical research data are analyzed using machine-based learning algorithms to develop predictive treatment models to guide clinical decision-making. Future CWI directions include additional clinical trials and study centers and the refinement and deployment of our genetically driven, personalized medicine initiative to provide patient-specific care across multiple medical disciplines, with an emphasis on combat casualty care. PMID:23634474

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Biofilm Wound Models and Their Application.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are wounds which are detained in one or more phases of normal wound healing. It is estimated that 1-2 % of the population of developed countries will experience a chronic wound during their lifetime and this number is expected to increase given the growing world population, increase in age, body mass index and associated diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Although several factors contribute to wound healing, presence of bacterial biofilms significantly affects healing and success of wound treatment. This indicates that wound-care therapies should be directed towards targeting biofilms within chronic wounds. Despite this, the role of biofilms in chronic wound pathogenesis and the effect of wound-care therapies against biofilms within wounds are not well understood. In order to address these issues, appropriate biofilm models are necessary. To this end, several model systems mimicking the conditions observed in a biofilm infected chronic wound have been developed. In this review we present an overview of these different in vitro and in vivo biofilm wound model systems and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

  16. Wound healing complications in brain tumor patients on Bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark R; Mandel, Jacob; O-Brien, Barbara; Conrad, Charles; Fields, Margaret; Hanna, Teresa; Loch, Carolyn; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-09-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is commonly used for treating recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), and wound healing is a well-established adverse event. Retrospective analysis of GBM patients with and without wound healing complications while on BEV treatment is reported. 287 patients identified, majority were males (60 %) with median age of 52.5 years. 14 cases identified with wound healing problems, related to either craniotomy (n = 8) or other soft tissue wounds (n = 6). Median duration of BEV treatment to complication was 62 days (range 6-559). Majority received 10 mg/kg (n = 11) and nine (64.3 %) were on corticosteroids, with median daily dose of 6 mg (range 1-16 mg) for median of 473 days before starting BEV. For dehisced craniotomy wounds, median time for starting BEV from last surgery was 29 days (range 27-345). Median time from starting BEV to developing wound complication was 47 days (range 16-173). Seven (87.5 %) had infected wounds requiring antibiotics, hospitalization. Four (50 %) required plastic surgery. BEV stopped and safely resumed in 6 (75 %) patients; median delay was 70 days (range 34-346). Soft tissue wounds included decubitus ulcer, dehisced striae, herpes simplex, trauma to hand and back, and abscess. Median time from starting BEV to wound issues was 72 days (range 6-559). Five (83.3 %) were infected, requiring antibiotics. While three (50 %) required hospitalization, none required plastic surgery. Treatment stopped in five (83.3 %) and restarted in two (median delay 48 days, range 26-69). Wound healing complications are uncommon but associated with significant morbidity. Identifying those at risk and contributing factors warrants further investigation. PMID:26298437

  17. Prontosan wound irrigation and gel: management of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Ann

    Chronic wounds present a challenge that is costly in terms of quality of life to the patient and in financial terms for the NHS. Several factors contribute to the development of a chronic wound, in particular the influence of bacteria as a biofilm within the wound environment. Irrigating a wound with normal saline has long been advocated as the most appropriate method of wound irrigation but biofilms are now known to be resistant to this method of cleansing. A small (10 patient) evaluation of the use of Prontosan in patients whose duration of chronic wounds exceeded 1 year has demonstrated that Prontosan wound irrigation and Prontosan gel are an appropriate alternative for cleaning, moistening and decontaminating encrusted, contaminated and chronic skin wounds, and can have a dramatic influence of the quality of life for such patients. This article discusses the cause of chronicity within a wound and discusses in depth three of the ten patients in the evaluation.

  18. Stan scheller: the forerunner of clinical studies on using propolis for poor and chronic nonhealing wounds.

    PubMed

    Kucharzewski, M; Kubacka, S; Urbanek, T; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K; Morawiec, T

    2013-01-01

    For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds.

  19. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    PubMed Central

    Builders, P. F.; Kabele-Toge, B.; Builders, M.; Chindo, B. A.; Anwunobi, Patricia A.; Isimi, Yetunde C.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chromatographic fingerprints of the extract were also evaluated. The extract demonstrated antioxidant properties with a total flavonoid content of 12.30±0.09 mg/g. Six reproducible spots were obtained using methanol:water (95:5) as the mobile phase. The extract showed no antimicrobial activity on the selected microorganisms, which are known to infect and retard wound healing. Creams containing H. sabdariffa extract showed significant (P<0.05) and concentration dependent wound healing activities. There was also evidence of synergism with creams containing a combination of gentamicin and H. sabdariffa extract. This study, thus, provides evidence of the wound healing potentials of the formulated extract of the calyces of H. sabdariffa and synergism when co-formulated with gentamicin. PMID:23901160

  20. Bioburden-responsive antimicrobial PLGA ultrafine fibers for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Said, Somiraa S; El-Halfawy, Omar M; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Aloufy, Affaf K; Boraei, Nabila A; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2012-01-01

    Despite innovation in the design and functionalization of polymer nanofiber wound healing materials, information on their interaction with the biochemical wound environment is lacking. In an earlier study, we have reported the interaction of fusidic acid-loaded PLGA ultrafine fibers (UFs) with wound bacteria. Massive bacterial colonization and the formation of a dense biofilm throughout the mat were demonstrated. This was associated with a marked enhancement of initial drug release at concentrations allowing eradication of planktonic bacteria and considerable suppression of biofilm. The present study aimed at extending earlier findings to gain more mechanistic insights into the potential response of the fusidic acid-laden UFs under study to controlled microbial bioburden. Initial drug release enhancement was shown to involve surface erosion of the ultrafibrous mats likely mediated by microbial esterase activity determined in the study. Release data could be correlated with microbial bioburden over the inoculum size range 10³-10⁷ CFU/ml, suggesting a bioburden-triggered drug release enhancement mechanism. Moreover, the effectiveness of fusidic acid-laden UFs in the healing of either lightly contaminated or Staphylococcus aureus heavily infected wounds in a rat model suggested in-use relevant antimicrobial release patterns. Findings indicated active participation of polymer ultrafine wound dressings in a dynamic interaction with the wound milieu, which affects their structure-function relationship. Understanding such an interaction is fundamental to the characterization and performance assessment of wound materials under biorelevant conditions and the design of polymer-based infection-responsive biomaterials.

  1. Optimizing Wound Bed Preparation With Collagenase Enzymatic Debridement

    PubMed Central

    McCallon, Stanley K.; Weir, Dorothy; Lantis, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Difficult-to-heal and chronic wounds affect tens of millions of people worldwide. In the U.S. alone, the direct cost for their treatment exceeds $25 billion. Yet despite advances in wound research and treatment that have markedly improved patient care, wound healing is often delayed for weeks or months. For venous and diabetic ulcers, complete wound closure is achieved in as few as 25%–50% of chronic or hard-to-heal wounds. Wound bed preparation and the consistent application of appropriate and effective debridement techniques are recommended for the optimized treatment of chronic wounds. The TIME paradigm (Tissue, Inflammation/infection, Moisture balance and Edge of wound) provides a model to remove barriers to healing and optimize the healing process. While we often think of debridement as an episodic event that occurs in specific care giver/patient interface. There is the possibility of a maintenance debridement in which the chronic application of a medication can assist in both the macroscopic and microscopic debridement of a wound. We review the various debridement therapies available to clinicians in the United States, and explore the characteristics and capabilities of clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO), a type of enzymatic debridement, that potentially allows for epithelialization while debriding. It appears that in the case of CCO it may exert this influences by removal of the necrotic plug while promoting granulation and sustaining epithelialization. It is also easily combined with other methods of debridement, is selective to necrotic tissue, and has been safely used in various populations. We review the body of evidence has indicated that this concept of maintenance debridement, especially when combined episodic debridement may add a cost an efficacious, safe and cost-effective choice for debridement of cutaneous ulcers and burn wounds and it will likely play an expanding role in all phases of wound bed preparation. PMID:26442207

  2. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  3. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  4. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the growth of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Mughal, Mohamed R; Okun, Eitan; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; McCaffery, Michael; Seal, Sudipta; Mattson, Mark P

    2013-03-01

    Rapid and effective wound healing requires a coordinated cellular response involving fibroblasts, keratinocytes and vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Impaired wound healing can result in multiple adverse health outcomes and, although antibiotics can forestall infection, treatments that accelerate wound healing are lacking. We now report that topical application of water soluble cerium oxide nanoparticles (Nanoceria) accelerates the healing of full-thickness dermal wounds in mice by a mechanism that involves enhancement of the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts, keratinocytes and VECs. The Nanoceria penetrated into the wound tissue and reduced oxidative damage to cellular membranes and proteins, suggesting a therapeutic potential for topical treatment of wounds with antioxidant nanoparticles.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides and wound healing: biological and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Maria Luisa; McDermott, Alison M; Zasloff, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Repair of tissue wounds is a fundamental process to re-establish tissue integrity and regular function. Importantly, infection is a major factor that hinders wound healing. Multicellular organisms have evolved an arsenal of host-defense molecules, including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), aimed at controlling microbial proliferation and at modulating the host's immune response to a variety of biological or physical insults. In this brief review, we provide the evidence for a role of AMPs as endogenous mediators of wound healing and their promising therapeutic potential for the treatment of non-life-threatening skin and other epithelial injuries. PMID:26738772

  6. Activity of antibiotics in contaminated wounds containing clay soil.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A H; Rye, D G; Edgerton, M T; Rodeheaver, G T; Edlich, R F

    1979-03-01

    Most traumatic wounds are contaminated to some degree by soil and run a high risk of infection. The presence of soil in wounds interferes with natural tissue defenses, which include phagocytosis and serum bactericidal capacity. The experimental studies reported herein clearly demonstrate that soil also limits the antibacterial effects of specific antibiotics. This inactivation appears to be the result of a chemical reaction between the charged antibiotics and the soil particles. PMID:434335

  7. An overview of Acticoat dressing in wound management.

    PubMed

    Dowsett, Caroline

    2003-10-01

    This article reviews the in vitro and in vivo studies available on a new nanocrystalline silver dressing, Acticoat (Smith & Nephew), and discusses their relevance to the availability of this product on the Drug Tariff. The addition of nanocrystalline silver dressings will make a valuable contribution to wound care in the community, in terms of providing continuity of care for patients who are discharged from hospital and also in preventing admission to hospital with non-manageable wound infection.

  8. Ultrasonographic assessment of standing laparotomy wound healing in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Buczinski, S; Bourel, C; Bélanger, A M

    2012-08-01

    The surgical wounds of 40 cows with a standing clean laparotomy were assessed 10-15 days after surgery. The abdominal wall thickness on the upper (w1), the middle (w2) and the lower (w3) third of the wound (and the contralateral flank n1, n2, and n3), the presence of edema, cavitary lesion, capsulated lesion, or visualization of shadow artifact in the wound were assessed ultrasonographically. On day 30, wound healing status (normal or surgical site infection (SSI)) was determined. Five out of 39 cows (12.8%) had SSI. A significant positive correlation was found between w3 and edema (p<0.01; r=0.44), w3/n3 and edema (p<0.05; r=0.32), w3 and pain on wound palpation (p<0.01; r=0.41); w3/n3 and the presence of pain (p<0.002; r=0.49) and w2/n2 and pain when palpating the wound (p<0.05; r=0.33). No association was found between the ultrasonographic evidence of edema and SSI (p=0.10), cavitary lesion and SSI (p=0.65), encapsulated lesion and SSI (p=1), and shadow artefact and SSI (p=1). The wound ultrasonography 10-15 days after surgery was not predictive of abnormal wound healing.

  9. Extrafloral nectar secretion from wounds of Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Lortzing, Tobias; Calf, Onno W; Böhlke, Marlene; Schwachtje, Jens; Kopka, Joachim; Geuß, Daniel; Kosanke, Susanne; van Dam, Nicole M; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Plants usually close wounds rapidly to prevent infections and the loss of valuable resources such as assimilates(1). However, herbivore-inflicted wounds on the bittersweet nightshade Solanum dulcamara appear not to close completely and produce sugary wound secretions visible as droplets. Many plants across the plant kingdom secrete sugary nectar from extrafloral nectaries(2) to attract natural enemies of herbivores for indirect defence(3,4). As ants forage on wound edges of S. dulcamara in the field, we hypothesized that wound secretions are a form of extrafloral nectar (EFN). We show that, unlike EFN from known nectaries, wound secretions are neither associated with any specific structure nor restricted to certain locations. However, similar to EFN, they are jasmonate-inducible and the plant controls their chemical composition. Wound secretions are attractive for ants, and application of wound secretion mimics increases ant attraction and reduces herbivory on S. dulcamara plants in a natural population. In greenhouse experiments, we reveal that ants can defend S. dulcamara from two of its native herbivores, slugs and flea beetle larvae. Since nectar is defined by its ecological function as a sugary secretion involved in interactions with animals(5), such 'plant bleeding' could be a primitive mode of nectar secretion exemplifying an evolutionary origin of structured extrafloral nectaries. PMID:27243650

  10. Wound Care Management: Proper Protocol Differs From Athletic Trainers' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    As research techniques in wound care management improve, treatment protocols for the care of wounds must also change to ensure safe and optimal healing. In this study, I surveyed current practices of athletic trainers regarding the care of athletic wounds and compared the findings to current literature. I contacted 501 athletic trainers, including all NATA curricular undergraduate directors. Overall response rate was 58%; 78% of the athletic trainers from the curricular schools responded. Wet-to-dry, irrigation, and soaks were the three most common methods used to debride and cleanse a wound. Povidone-iodine (Betadine) and hydrogen peroxide were the two most popular cleansing agents. Conventional gauze was the primary dressing used by 67% of the athletic trainers, while 20% of those surveyed used occlusive dressings. Although povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide are commonly used, both are toxic to cells involved in the wound-healing process and delay healing. Research indicates that the best method of cleansing and debriding a wound is to irrigate it with saline. Occlusive dressings have a lower infection rate, are viral barriers, and are associated with faster wound healing and less pain than gauze dressings. Athletic trainers need to assess their wound care protocols so that they give the best possible care to their athletes. PMID:16558365

  11. Use of Urgotul SSD to reduce bacteria and promote healing in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Downe, Annette

    2013-03-01

    This product focus seeks to give an overview of the management of wound bioburden in relation to the use of antimicrobial dressings, according to recent guidelines and best practice statements. Identification of critical colonisation/localised infection and the role of biofilms is a key aspect of effective wound management. Silver antimicrobial dressings are efficient in reducing bacteria in wounds, but must be used appropriately to prevent overuse. Silver sulphadiazine has traditionally been used for the treatment of burns or Pseudomonas infection in leg ulceration, often in a cream formation. This article will be looking specifically at the effective use of Urgotul SSD in three critically colonised/non healing wounds.

  12. Cavity wounds management: a multicentre pilot study.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Facy, Olivier; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Ribemont, Annie-Claude; Sigal, Michele-Lea; Couffinhal, Jean-Claude; Trial, Chloe; Tacca, Olivier; Bohbot, Serge

    The objective of this study was to assess acceptability (based on pain at removal), efficacy and tolerance of an absorbent and cohesive rope(UrgoClean Rope, Laboratoires Urgo) in the local management of deep cavity wounds. This study was a prospective, multicentre (13), non comparative clinical study. Patients presenting with an acute or chronic non-infected cavity wound were followed up for four weeks and assessed weekly with a physical examination, in addition to volumetric,planimetric and photographic evaluations. Pain at removal was the primary criterion, assessed on a Visual Analogic Scale. The percentage of the wound surface area reduction and volumetric reduction were considered as secondary efficacy criteria. Forty three patients were included in this study. After one week of treatment dressing removal was painless and continued to be so throughout the period of the trial(four weeks). Median surface area at baseline was 7.74 cm2 and was reduced by 54.5% at week 4 (relative area reduction). Median wound volumetric value was noted 12 ml at baseline and was reduced by 72.7% by the end of treatment. The cohesiveness of the new rope was considered very good by health professionals. No residue was observed on the wound bed during the dressing change with the new rope. There were no adverse events related to the tested rope, during this trial.Pain-free removal associated with good efficacy and tolerance were observed with this new cohesive rope in the healing process of deep cavity wounds and could represent a therapeutic alternative to the usual ropes used in such indications. PMID:24180023

  13. Gunshot wound to the frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Key, J M; Tami, T; Donald, P J

    1990-01-01

    Immediate treatment of this patient, evaluation of the wound, the use of antibiotics, and eventual reconstruction are all concerns in this complicated gunshot wound to the frontal sinus. The consultants agree that the first priority in this patient is to assess and stabilize the airway, examine the wound, and obtain a CT scan to ascertain the extent of the defect. Dr. Key feels that these wounds are contaminated and would prophylactically order a broad-spectrum cephalosporin and/or chloramphenicol. Dr. Tami would use antibiotics aimed at Staphylococcus and oral flora; Dr. Donald prefers to treat specific infections as they develop. They also agree that initial reconstruction should be conservative, aimed at covering exposed bone and minimizing local/regional flaps; however, Dr. Donald suggests using an arch bar on the intact side and eyelet wires on the injured side to address the maxillary defect. Drs. Key and Donald feel that it was a mistake to close this wound primarily and use a skin graft, because there was an inadequate soft tissue bed. Dr. Tami states that the initial management of the wound was reasonable. All agree on a basic approach to frontal sinus fractures. CT scanning is the imaging modality of choice. Nondisplaced fractures may be observed. Disruption of the posterior wall or the nasofrontal duct usually require exploration and obliteration of the sinus. Dr. Key would ablate the sinus only in cases where the anterior table is completely lost. Drs. Tami and Donald agree that cranialization should be reserved for comminuted posterior table fractures. After recognizing a CSF leak, Dr. Key would begin a broad-spectrum antibiotic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The Presence of Oxygen in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Howard M; Grant, Anthony; Ditata, James

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen must be tightly governed in all phases of wound healing to produce viable granulation tissue. This idea of tight regulation has yet to be disputed; however, the role of oxygen at the cellular and molecular levels still is not fully understood as it pertains to its place in healing wounds. In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of oxygen on living tissue and its potential role as a therapy in wound healing, a substantial literature review of the role of oxygen in wound healing was performed and the following key points were extrapolated: 1) During energy metabolism, oxygen is needed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase as it produces high-energy phosphates that are needed for many cellular functions, 2) oxygen is also involved in the hydroxylation of proline and lysine into procollagen, which leads to collagen maturation, 3) in angiogenesis, hypoxia is required to start the process of wound healing, but it has been shown that if oxygen is administered it can accelerate and sustain vessel growth, 4) the antimicrobial action of oxygen occurs when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-linked oxygenase acts as a catalyst for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a superoxide ion which kills bacteria, and 5) the level of evidence is moderate for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcers, crush injuries, and soft-tissue infections. The authors hypothesized that HBOT would be beneficial to arterial insufficiency wounds and other ailments, but at this time further study is needed before HBOT would be indicated. PMID:27560469

  15. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K

    2015-05-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is a novel treatment option that provides the combination of negative pressure with intermittent instillation of a solution. Standard Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is an established adjunctive treatment option that offers the ability to promote granulation tissue in wounds. However, there is limited evidence for its utility in the environment of active or senescent infection. Wounds that are acutely infected or that contain deleterious biofilm are a challenging problem, which require an intensive multimodal approach including antibiosis, surgical intervention, and local wound care. Adjunctive application of NPWTi can potentially expedite clearance of infection and wound closure. Although this technology has been commercially available for over a decade, its adoption has been limited. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this therapy with emerging evidence from animal models as well as human clinical studies. There are remaining questions regarding NPWTi including the selection of the optimal instillation solution and device settings. This article discusses the past development, current knowledge, and future direction of NPWTi.

  16. Multispecies biofilm in an artificial wound bed--A novel model for in vitro assessment of solid antimicrobial dressings.

    PubMed

    Kucera, J; Sojka, M; Pavlik, V; Szuszkiewicz, K; Velebny, V; Klein, P

    2014-08-01

    Wound infections represent a major problem, particularly in patients with chronic wounds. Bacteria in the wound exist mainly in the form of biofilms and are thus resistant to most antibiotics and antimicrobials. A simple and cost-effective in vitro model of chronic wound biofilms applied for testing treatments and solid devices, especially wound dressings, is presented in this work. The method is based on the well-established Lubbock chronic wound biofilm transferred onto an artificial agar wound bed. The biofilm formed by four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was stable for up to 48h post-transplant. The applicability of the model was evaluated by testing two common iodine wound treatments. These observations indicate that this method enables assessing the effects of treatments on established resilient wound biofilms and is clinically highly relevant.

  17. [Liver gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G; Blăjan, I; Nemeş, S

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the 6 cases of liver shot wounds that were in supervision of the general surgery unit, County Hospital of Baia Mare, between the years 1990-1997. The patients were males, most of them being 20 to 30 years old. In 3 situations hunting rifles were involved, all followed by retention of metal foreign body. The wounds were plurivisceral in 5 of the 6 cases, the most frequently wounded was the right liver lobe. All the patients presented serious traumatic shock and haemorrhagic shock. Livertectomy was used in 40% of the cases being imposed by the dilacerant and transfixiant character of the wounds and also by the retention of foreign bodies in parenchime. We registered 2 demises, both in the first postoperatory hours. The paper proposes a few criteria that allow the application of a conservatory treatment:rapid favourable answer at deshocking therapy; hemodynamic stability; minimal hemoperitoneus (echographical and tomographical); absence of associated visceral wounds or, when they exist, of serious physiopathological consequences; access to performant means of imagistics.

  18. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Remain the Gold Standard for the Closure of Large Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Phavixay, Laemthong

    2012-01-01

    Healing large chronic and acute wounds is a challenging task for wound care providers. It requires numerous visits and frequent dressing changes and often involves expensive therapeutic modalities. Our primary and ultimate goal is to heal these wounds as quickly as possible. In a prepared wound bed, covered with granulation tissue and free of infection, skin graft is the gold standard procedure to achieve this goal. One should keep in mind that not all patients are good candidates for surgery. PMID:24525612

  19. Wound cleaning and wound healing: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Robert G; Unverdorben, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic wounds present a significant societal burden in their cost of care, and they reduce patient quality of life. Key components of wound care include such measures as debridement, irrigation, and wound cleaning. Appropriate care removes necrotic tissue and reduces wound bioburden to enhance wound healing. Physical cleaning with debridement and irrigation is of documented efficacy. Wounds may be washed with water, saline, or Ringer's solution or cleaned with active ingredients, such as hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, alcohol, ionized silver preparations, chlorhexidine, polyhexanide/betaine solution, or povidone-iodine--the majority of which are locally toxic and of limited or no proven efficacy in enhancing wound healing. Although the consensus opinion is that these topical cleaning agents should not be routinely used, recent clinical evidence suggests that polyhexanide/betaine may be nontoxic and effective in enhancing wound healing. Further well-designed studies are needed. PMID:23507692

  20. Wound cleaning and wound healing: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Robert G; Unverdorben, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic wounds present a significant societal burden in their cost of care, and they reduce patient quality of life. Key components of wound care include such measures as debridement, irrigation, and wound cleaning. Appropriate care removes necrotic tissue and reduces wound bioburden to enhance wound healing. Physical cleaning with debridement and irrigation is of documented efficacy. Wounds may be washed with water, saline, or Ringer's solution or cleaned with active ingredients, such as hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, alcohol, ionized silver preparations, chlorhexidine, polyhexanide/betaine solution, or povidone-iodine--the majority of which are locally toxic and of limited or no proven efficacy in enhancing wound healing. Although the consensus opinion is that these topical cleaning agents should not be routinely used, recent clinical evidence suggests that polyhexanide/betaine may be nontoxic and effective in enhancing wound healing. Further well-designed studies are needed.

  1. Applications of modern sensors and wireless technology in effective wound management.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Nasir; Hariz, Alex; Fitridge, Robert; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-05-01

    The management of chronic wounds has emerged as a major health care challenge during the 21st century consuming, significant portions of health care budgets. Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, leg ulcers, and pressure sores have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. Covering wounds with suitable dressings facilitates the healing process and is common practice in wound management plans. However, standard dressings do not provide insights into the status of the wound underneath. Parameters such as moisture, pressure, temperature and pH inside the dressings are indicative of the healing rate, infection, and wound healing phase. But owing to the lack of information available from within the dressings, these are often changed to inspect the wound, disturbing the normal healing process of wounds in addition to causing pain to the patient. Sensors embedded in the dressing would provide clinicians and nurses with important information that would aid in wound care decision making, improve patient comfort, and reduce the frequency of dressing changes. The potential benefits of this enabling technology would be seen in terms of a reduction in hospitalization time and health care cost. Modern sensing technology along with wireless radio frequency communication technology is poised to make significant advances in wound management. This review discusses issues related to the design and implementation of sensor technology and telemetry systems both incorporated in wound dressings to devise an automated wound monitoring technology, and also surveys the literature available on current sensor and wireless telemetry systems. PMID:24142514

  2. Wound healing and treating wounds: Differential diagnosis and evaluation of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds are an excellent example of how the field of dermatology represents a cross-section of many medical disciplines. For instance, wounds may be caused by trauma, vascular insufficiency, and underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatologic and inflammatory disease. This continuing medical education article provides an overview of wound healing and the pathophysiology of chronic wounds and reviews the broad differential diagnosis of chronic wounds. It also describes the initial steps necessary in evaluating a chronic wound and determining its underlying etiology.

  3. Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing. PMID:25396174

  4. Therapeutic utility of antibacterial peptides in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo; Ostorhazi, Eszter

    2015-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides were first thought to fight infection in animal models by disintegrating bacterial peptides and later by inhibiting bacteria-specific intracellular processes. However, ever increasing evidences indicate that cationic peptides accumulate around and modulate the immune system both systemically and in cutaneous and mucosal surfaces where injuries and infections occur. Native and designer antibacterial peptides as well as cationic peptides, never considered as antibiotics, promote wound healing at every step of cutaneous tissue regeneration. This article provides an introductory list of examples of how cationic peptides are involved in immunostimulation and epithelial tissue repair, eliminating wound infections and promoting wound healing in potential therapeutic utility in sight. Although a few antimicrobial peptides reached the Phase II clinical trial stage, toxicity concerns limit the potential administration routes. Resistance induction to both microbiology actions and the integrity of the innate immune system has to be carefully monitored.

  5. A review of maggot debridement therapy to treat chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sarah

    This literature review aims to clarify whether using maggot debridement therapy (MDT) for the removal of devitalized and infected tissue in chronic wounds is a valuable tool for healing. To undertake a literature review, the British Nursing Index, Ovid-Medline and the CINAHL databases were searched from January 1960 to June 2010 using the following terms: maggot debridement therapy, chronic wounds, granulation, infection, and cost-effective. The evidence suggests that MDT is more effective than other methods of debridement for wound bed preparation, although it has not been proven to eliminate problems associated with recurrent infections. This therapy has also not been proven to accelerate the healing process; however, more research needs to be undertaken into this and the cost-effectiveness of treatment.

  6. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  7. Biofilms in wounds: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D D; Wolcott, R D; Percival, S L

    2008-11-01

    Biofilms probably induce a chronic and/or 'quiet' inflammation in the chronic wound and so delay healing. This paper reviews current strategies that can be used to suppress biofilms in chronic wounds until better options are available.

  8. The use of urinary bladder matrix in the treatment of trauma and combat casualty wound care.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Ian L; Campbell, Paul; Sabino, Jennifer; Dearth, Christopher L; Fleming, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of combat injuries and resulting wounds can be difficult to treat due to compromised and evolving tissue necrosis, environmental contaminants, multidrug resistant microbacterial and/or fungal infections, coupled with microvascular damage and/or hypovascularized exposed vital structures. Our group has developed surgical care algorithms with identifiable salvage techniques to achieve stable, definitive wound coverage often with the aid of certain regenerative medicine biologic scaffold materials and advanced wound care to facilitate tissue coverage and healing. This case series reports on the role of urinary bladder matrix scaffolds in the wound care and reconstruction of traumatic and combat wounds. Urinary bladder matrix was found to facilitate definitive soft tissue reconstruction by establishing a neovascularized soft tissue base acceptable for second stage wound and skin coverage options within traumatic and combat-related wounds. PMID:26237704

  9. Assessing the impact of engineered nanoparticles on wound healing using a novel in vitro bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Enhua H; Watson, Christa; Pizzo, Richard; Cohen, Joel; Dang, Quynh; de Barros, Pedro Macul Ferreira; Park, Chan Young; Chen, Cheng; Brain, Joseph D; Butler, James P; Ruberti, Jeffrey W; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Demokritout, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Aim As engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) increasingly enter consumer products, humans become increasingly exposed. The first line of defense against ENPs is the epithelium, the integrity of which can be compromised by wounds induced by trauma, infection, or surgery, but the implications of ENPs on wound healing are poorly understood. Materials & methods Herein, we developed an in vitro assay to assess the impact of ENPs on the wound healing of cells from human cornea. Results & discussion We show that industrially relevant ENPs impeded wound healing and cellular migration in a manner dependent on the composition, dose and size of the ENPs as well as cell type. CuO and ZnO ENPs impeded both viability and wound healing for both fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene ENPs retarded wound healing of corneal fibroblasts without affecting viability. Conclusion Our results highlight the impact of ENPs on cellular wound healing and provide useful tools for studying the physiological impact of ENPs. PMID:24823434

  10. The use of urinary bladder matrix in the treatment of trauma and combat casualty wound care.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Ian L; Campbell, Paul; Sabino, Jennifer; Dearth, Christopher L; Fleming, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of combat injuries and resulting wounds can be difficult to treat due to compromised and evolving tissue necrosis, environmental contaminants, multidrug resistant microbacterial and/or fungal infections, coupled with microvascular damage and/or hypovascularized exposed vital structures. Our group has developed surgical care algorithms with identifiable salvage techniques to achieve stable, definitive wound coverage often with the aid of certain regenerative medicine biologic scaffold materials and advanced wound care to facilitate tissue coverage and healing. This case series reports on the role of urinary bladder matrix scaffolds in the wound care and reconstruction of traumatic and combat wounds. Urinary bladder matrix was found to facilitate definitive soft tissue reconstruction by establishing a neovascularized soft tissue base acceptable for second stage wound and skin coverage options within traumatic and combat-related wounds.

  11. Biofilms and Wounds: An Identification Algorithm and Potential Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The presence of a “pathogenic” or “highly virulent” biofilm is a fundamental risk factor that prevents a chronic wound from healing and increases the risk of the wound becoming clinically infected. There is presently no unequivocal gold standard method available for clinicians to confirm the presence of biofilms in a wound. Thus, to help support clinician practice, we devised an algorithm intended to demonstrate evidence of the presence of a biofilm in a wound to assist with wound management. Recent Advances: A variety of histological and microscopic methods applied to tissue biopsies are currently the most informative techniques available for demonstrating the presence of generic (not classified as pathogenic or commensal) biofilms and the effect they are having in promoting inflammation and downregulating cellular functions. Critical Issues: Even as we rely on microscopic techniques to visualize biofilms, they are entities which are patchy and dispersed rather than confluent, particularly on biotic surfaces. Consequently, detection of biofilms by microscopic techniques alone can lead to frequent false-negative results. Furthermore, visual identification using the naked eye of a pathogenic biofilm on a macroscopic level on the wound will not be possible, unlike with biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Future Direction: Lacking specific biomarkers to demonstrate microscopic, nonconfluent, virulent biofilms in wounds, the present focus on biofilm research should be placed on changing clinical practice. This is best done by utilizing an anti-biofilm toolbox approach, rather than speculating on unscientific approaches to identifying biofilms, with or without staining, in wounds with the naked eye. The approach to controlling biofilm should include initial wound cleansing, periodic debridement, followed by the application of appropriate antimicrobial wound dressings. This approach appears to be effective in removing pathogenic biofilms. PMID:26155381

  12. Chemical Composition and Anti-Candidiasis Mediated Wound Healing Property of Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oil on Chronic Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Poor wound healing is one of the major complication of diabetic patients which arises due to different factors like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, vascular insufficiency and microbial infections. Candidiasis of diabetic wounds is a difficult to treat condition and potentially can lead to organ amputation. There are a few number of medications available in market to treat this chronic condition; which demands for alternative treatment options. In traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda, essential oil extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae) has been using for the treatment of microbial infections, inflammation and pain. In this regard, we have evaluated anti-Candida and anti-inflammatory activity mediated wound healing property of C. nardus essential oil (EO-CN) on candidiasis of diabetic wounds. EO-CN was obtained through hydro-distillation and subjected to Gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) analysis for chemical profiling. Anti-Candida activity of EO-CN was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis by in vitro zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Anti-candidiasis ability of EO-CN was evaluated on C. albicans infected diabetic wounds of mice through measuring candida load on the 7th, 14th, and 21st day of treatment. Further progression in wound healing was confirmed by measuring the inflammatory marker levels and histopathology of wounded tissues on last day of EO-CN treatment. A total of 95 compounds were identified through GC–MS analysis, with major compounds like citral, 2,6-octadienal-, 3,7-dimethyl-, geranyl acetate, citronellal, geraniol, and citronellol. In vitro test results demonstrated strong anti-Candida activity of EO-CN with a MIC value of 25 μg/ml against C. albicans, 50 μg/ml against C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. EO-CN treatment resulted in significant reduction of candida load on diabetic wounds. Acceleration in wound healing was indicated by declined

  13. Chemical Composition and Anti-Candidiasis Mediated Wound Healing Property of Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oil on Chronic Diabetic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Poor wound healing is one of the major complication of diabetic patients which arises due to different factors like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, vascular insufficiency and microbial infections. Candidiasis of diabetic wounds is a difficult to treat condition and potentially can lead to organ amputation. There are a few number of medications available in market to treat this chronic condition; which demands for alternative treatment options. In traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda, essential oil extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae) has been using for the treatment of microbial infections, inflammation and pain. In this regard, we have evaluated anti-Candida and anti-inflammatory activity mediated wound healing property of C. nardus essential oil (EO-CN) on candidiasis of diabetic wounds. EO-CN was obtained through hydro-distillation and subjected to Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis for chemical profiling. Anti-Candida activity of EO-CN was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis by in vitro zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Anti-candidiasis ability of EO-CN was evaluated on C. albicans infected diabetic wounds of mice through measuring candida load on the 7th, 14th, and 21st day of treatment. Further progression in wound healing was confirmed by measuring the inflammatory marker levels and histopathology of wounded tissues on last day of EO-CN treatment. A total of 95 compounds were identified through GC-MS analysis, with major compounds like citral, 2,6-octadienal-, 3,7-dimethyl-, geranyl acetate, citronellal, geraniol, and citronellol. In vitro test results demonstrated strong anti-Candida activity of EO-CN with a MIC value of 25 μg/ml against C. albicans, 50 μg/ml against C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. EO-CN treatment resulted in significant reduction of candida load on diabetic wounds. Acceleration in wound healing was indicated by declined levels of

  14. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Wolvos, Tom A

    2014-03-01

    Traditional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the treatment of complex wounds for nearly 20 years. A decade ago, a modification of the original system added intermittent automated instillation of topical wound irrigation solutions to traditional negative pressure wound therapy. This combined therapy, termed negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi), has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a variety of complex wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation has been shown to reduce bioburden and biofilms present in wounds helping heal clinically infected wounds. It has also been used with success to jump-start stalled wounds, in relieving wound pain and treating infected foreign bodies including infected orthopedic hardware and some types of exposed abdominal wall mesh. The system includes a foam dressing placed in the wound covered by a semi-occlusive drape. A tubing placed over a hole cut in the drape connects the foam dressing to a pump run by a computerized microprocessor that delivers negative pressure to the dressing and wound. A preset volume of instillation fluid is automatically delivered via the instillation tubing to the wound. The fluid is held in the foam to bathe the wound for a predetermined time period. Negative pressure is then re-started draining the irrigation fluid and any wound exudate into a collection canister. The entire sequence is automated and consists of three phases: (1) fluid instillation; (2) holding for a period of time in the wound, which is fully expanded since the negative pressure is off during this phase; and then (3) a cycle of continuous negative pressure. The entire sequence repeats itself automatically. Typically the dressing is changed three times a week. The variables involved in treating patients with negative pressure wound therapy with instillation included: the indicated wound types; the system settings; the choice of the irrigation solution and the duration

  15. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Manuel R.; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the

  16. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound

  17. Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Wound Drainage Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Wound Drainage Culture Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de heridas What It Is A wound drainage culture is a test to detect germs such as ...

  18. The History of Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jayesh B.

    2012-01-01

    The history of wound healing is, in a sense, the history of humankind. This brief history of wound healing has been compiled for the benefit of readers. It is amazing to see that some of the basic principles of wound healing have been known since 2000 bc. PMID:24525756

  19. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  20. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

  1. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  2. Wound care centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a time as it heals. Negative pressure therapy -- pulling the air out of a closed dressing, creating a vacuum. The negative pressure improves blood flow and pulls out excess fluid. Growth factor therapy -- materials produced by the body that helps wound- ...

  3. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, Eric E.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  4. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  5. The Wounded Spirit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretti, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This article offers a glimpse into the life of Frank Peretti, who as a child suffered abuse because of his physical disfigurement. He was bullied and physically assaulted by peers and sometimes adults. Now well known for his novels, Peretti suggests that people who cause others to suffer also suffer from a wounded spirit. (Author)

  6. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feet Footwear & Products Products by Company Products by Type Foot Health Awareness Diabetes Awareness What is a Podiatrist? Today's Podiatrist Print Share RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? ...

  7. In vitro and in vivo assays on egg white/polyvinyl alcohol/clay nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Sirousazar, Mohammad; Jahani-Javanmardi, Azinsadat; Kheiri, Farshad; Hassan, Zuhair Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Novel nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings on the basis of egg white and polyvinyl alcohol, as matrix, and natural Na-montmorillonite clay, as reinforcing agent, were prepared and their performances on wound healing investigated in vitro and in vivo. In vitro cytotoxicity assay revealed non-cytotoxic activity and excellent biocompatibility level of prepared nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings. The bacterial penetration assay showed the prepared nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings are excellent barriers against microorganisms and could protect the wound from infection during the wound healing. In vivo animal study showed that the wound healing process was considerably faster in wounds covered with nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings compared to the conventional wound dressing, i.e. sterile gauze, due to creation of a moist environment on the wound surface and faster migration rate of the epidermal cells. The mechanical properties of healed wounds with nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings were better than those control wounds covered with sterile gauze due to their better collagen formation ability as a result of created moist healing condition as well as the presence of egg white, as a source of proteins, in their structures. PMID:27472819

  8. The application of new biosynthetic artificial skin for long-term temporary wound coverage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsian-Jenn; Chou, Trong-Duo; Tsou, Tai-Li; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shao-Liang; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Wei, Lin-Gwei; Yeh, Kuan-Jeh; Ko, Yao-Huang; Wang, Chi-Shyran; Lee, Wei-Hwa

    2005-12-01

    Temporary dressings protect wounds from desiccation and infection. In our previous study, we used meshed acellular porcine dermis (APD) to enhance wound healing and decrease wound contraction; however, the wounds showed meshed scar. In this study, we produced an artificial skin composed of a cross-linked silicon sheet on the surface of APD which we have called silicone acellular porcine dermis (SAPD). This new artificial skin can protect the wound long enough to promote wound healing either by second intention or covered long enough until cultured epithelium autograft (CEA) or autologous skin graft can be harvested for permanent coverage. We delivered 4 cm x 5 cm full-thickness wound on the back of 350 g Sprague-Dawley rats. Thirty-six rats were divided into two groups. Eighteen rats had SAPD and the other 18 were covered with Biobrane. The wounds were first examined 2 weeks after grafting and followed weekly for an additional 4 weeks to evaluate the wound and study pathological changes by using H.E. and Masson's stains. Wound size was calculated by ruler and analyzed by Student's t-test. At the 2-week inspection, both SAPD and Biobrane showed tight adherence to the wound with no change of wound size. Both the SAPD and Biobrane dermal templates were pink. In the Biobrane-covered group, the wounds contracted soon after the tie-over dressing was removed. Its dermal layer is a layer of thin porcine dermal substance, which was promptly digested by tissue hyaluronidase and provides no real dermal template. In the SAPD-covered group however, the wound size was maintained significantly from third to sixth week after grafting (p<0.001). SAPD was designed with thick epidermal silicone and a well-organized porcine dermis so that it incorporates into the recipient wound. Clinically the silicone layer of SAPD dislodged from APD about 6-7 weeks after grafting and was followed by dermal matrix exposure and infection. In pathological examination, much like a human skin graft, new

  9. [Physiology and pathophysiology of wound healing of wound defects].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W

    2012-09-01

    Understanding wound healing involves more than simply stating that there are the three phases of inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Wound healing is a complex series of actions, reactions and interactions among cells and mediators in a sequential and simultaneously ongoing temporal process within a spatial frame. At first this article will attempt to provide a concise summary of the events, cellular components and main influential mediators of wound healing over time. Secondly, the pathophysiology of chronic non-healing wounds is described where an imbalance of stimulating and inhibiting factors causes failure of healing. The most relevant extrinsic and intrinsic determinants are described and related to the cellular and molecular level of disturbed wound healing. A basic understanding of wound healing is a prerequisite for any prophylactic or therapeutic maneuver to maintain or re-establish wound equilibrium to give a satisfactory healing trajectory.

  10. [The incidence of wound healing disorders in heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, D; Krakor, R; Widera, R; Lindenau, K F

    1992-01-01

    In a five-year retrospective study we investigated the wound infection rate after median sternotomy in 2805 adult patients on whom elective surgery had been performed with extracorporeal circulation. On the basis of 14,700 apparently relevant data from 101 patients with wound healing disturbances at the sternotomy site, both the significance of predisposing risk profiles and the prevalence of nosocomial pathogens were evaluated. The control group was formed by 100 patients selected at random. The results were checked for statistical significance using the X2 test for alternative characters; the significance level was set at alpha = 5%. The infection rate observed in our group was 3.6%, which was assigned to 5 internally defined degrees of severity. Cases of healing by second intention were caused to 93% by coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Factors leading to a decrease in oxygenation of the wound area (low-output syndrome, rethoracotomy), diabetes, obesity and the duration of wound drainage were accompanied by a significantly more frequent occurrence of wound healing disturbances. On the other hand, perfusion-technical parameters, operation duration, revascularisation techniques (IMA/ACVB), pulmonary conditioned hypoxemias and the end-of-year desinfection usual in our clinic had no influence on wound healing. Seasonal fluctuation of the epidermal microclimate appear to be responsible for the prevalence and virulence of the pathogen strains in the clinic environment. The preventive measures used in cardiosurgical clinics do not yet represent a fully developed prophylaxis against exposure to nosocomial pathogens.

  11. Effects of Topically Applied Vitamin D during Corneal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Reins, Rose Y.; Hanlon, Samuel D.; Magadi, Sri; McDermott, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important regulator of immune function and largely acts to dampen chronic inflammatory events in a variety of tissues. There is also accumulating evidence that vitamin D acts to enhance initial inflammation, beneficial during both infection and wound healing, and then promotes resolution and prevention of chronic, damaging inflammation. The current study examines the effect of topical vitamin D in a mouse of model of corneal epithelial wound healing, where acute inflammation is necessary for efficient wound closure. At 12 and 18 hours post-wounding, vitamin D treatment significantly delayed wound closure by ~17% and increased infiltration of neutrophils into the central cornea. Basal epithelial cell division, corneal nerve density, and levels of VEGF, TGFβ, IL-1β, and TNFα were unchanged. However, vitamin D increased the production of the anti-microbial peptide CRAMP 12 hours after wounding. These data suggest a possible role for vitamin D in modulating corneal wound healing and have important implications for therapeutic use of vitamin D at the ocular surface. PMID:27035345

  12. Biofilms in wounds: a review of present knowledge.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, T; Alhede, M

    2014-11-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth century by Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch. Although this approach still provides valuable information with which to help diagnose acute infections and to select appropriate antibiotic therapies, it is evident that those organisms isolated from clinical specimens with the conditions normally used in diagnostic laboratories are mainly in a planktonic form that is unrepresentative of the way in which most microbial species exist naturally. Usually microbial species adhere to each other, as well as to living and non-living surfaces, where they form complex communities surrounded by collectively secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery of biofilms in chronic wounds has provided new insight into the reasons why. Increased tolerance of biofilms to antimicrobial agents explains the limited efficacy of antimicrobial agents in chronic wounds and illustrates the need to develop new management strategies. This review aims to explain the nature of biofilms, with a view to explaining their impact on wounds.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms perturb wound resolution and antibiotic tolerance in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Watters, Chase; DeLeon, Katrina; Trivedi, Urvish; Griswold, John A; Lyte, Mark; Hampel, Ken J; Wargo, Matthew J; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic patients are more susceptible to the development of chronic wounds than non-d