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Sample records for x-linked amelogenesis imperfecta

  1. Amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Peter JM; Aldred, Michael; Bloch-Zupan, Agnes

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a group of developmental conditions, genomic in origin, which affect the structure and clinical appearance of enamel of all or nearly all the teeth in a more or less equal manner, and which may be associated with morphologic or biochemical changes elsewhere in the body. The prevalence varies from 1:700 to 1:14,000, according to the populations studied. The enamel may be hypoplastic, hypomineralised or both and teeth affected may be discoloured, sensitive or prone to disintegration. AI exists in isolation or associated with other abnormalities in syndromes. It may show autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, sex-linked and sporadic inheritance patterns. In families with an X-linked form it has been shown that the disorder may result from mutations in the amelogenin gene, AMELX. The enamelin gene, ENAM, is implicated in the pathogenesis of the dominant forms of AI. Autosomal recessive AI has been reported in families with known consanguinity. Diagnosis is based on the family history, pedigree plotting and meticulous clinical observation. Genetic diagnosis is presently only a research tool. The condition presents problems of socialisation, function and discomfort but may be managed by early vigorous intervention, both preventively and restoratively, with treatment continued throughout childhood and into adult life. In infancy, the primary dentition may be protected by the use of preformed metal crowns on posterior teeth. The longer-term care involves either crowns or, more frequently these days, adhesive, plastic restorations. PMID:17408482

  2. Amelogenin signal peptide mutation: Correlation between mutations in the amelogenin gene (AMGX) and manifestations of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Nilsson, M.; Pettersson, U.

    1995-03-01

    Formation of tooth enamel is a poorly understood biological process. In this study the authors describe a 9-bp deletion in exon 2 of the amelogenin gene (AMGX) causing X-linked hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta, a disease characterized by defective enamel. The mutation results in the loss of 3 amino acids and exchange of 1 in the signal peptide of the amelogenin protein. This deletion in the signal peptide probably interferes with translocation of the amelogenin protein during synthesis, resulting in the thin enamel observed in affected members of the family. The authors compare this mutation to a previously reported mutation in themore » amelogenin gene that causes a different disease phenotype. The study illustrates that molecular analysis can help explain the various manifestations of a tooth disorder and thereby provide insights into the mechanisms of tooth enamel formation. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.« less

  3. A mutation in the mouse Amelx tri-tyrosyl domain results in impaired secretion of amelogenin and phenocopies human X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J.; Brookes, Steven J.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Shore, Roger C.; Hunt, Charlotte; Mironov, Aleksandr; Kingswell, Nicola J.; Maycock, Joanne; Shuttleworth, C. Adrian; Dixon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a broad group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited defects of dental enamel bio-mineralization. Despite identification of a number of genetic mutations underlying AI, the precise causal mechanisms have yet to be determined. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, we describe here a mis-sense mutation in the mouse Amelx gene resulting in a Y → H substitution in the tri-tyrosyl domain of the enamel extracellular matrix protein amelogenin. The enamel in affected animals phenocopies human X-linked AI where similar mutations have been reported. Animals affected by the mutation have severe defects of enamel bio-mineralization associated with absence of full-length amelogenin protein in the developing enamel matrix, loss of ameloblast phenotype, increased ameloblast apoptosis and formation of multi-cellular masses. We present evidence to demonstrate that affected ameloblasts express but fail to secrete full-length amelogenin leading to engorgement of the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed accumulations of both amelogenin and ameloblastin in affected cells. Co-transfection of Ambn and mutant Amelx in a eukaryotic cell line also revealed intracellular abnormalities and increased cytotoxicity compared with cells singly transfected with wild-type Amelx, mutant Amelx or Ambn or co-transfected with both wild-type Amelx and Ambn. We hypothesize that intracellular protein–protein interactions mediated via the amelogenin tri-tyrosyl motif are a key mechanistic factor underpinning the molecular pathogenesis in this example of AI. This study therefore successfully links phenotype with underlying genetic lesion in a relevant murine model for human AI. PMID:20067920

  4. Enamel formation and amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jan C-C; Chun, Yong-Hee P; Al Hazzazzi, Turki; Simmer, James P

    2007-01-01

    Dental enamel is the epithelial-derived hard tissue covering the crowns of teeth. It is the most highly mineralized and hardest tissue in the body. Dental enamel is acellular and has no physiological means of repair outside of the protective and remineralization potential provided by saliva. Enamel is comprised of highly organized hydroxyapatite crystals that form in a defined extracellular space, the contents of which are supplied and regulated by ameloblasts. The entire process is under genetic instruction. The genetic control of amelogenesis is poorly understood, but requires the activities of multiple components that are uniquely important for dental enamel formation. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective designation for the variety of inherited conditions displaying isolated enamel malformations, but the designation is also used to indicate the presence of an enamel phenotype in syndromes. Recently, genetic studies have demonstrated the importance of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins in the etiology of isolated AI. Here we review the essential elements of dental enamel formation and the results of genetic analyses that have identified disease-causing mutations in genes encoding enamel matrix proteins. In addition, we provide a fresh perspective on the roles matrix proteins play in catalyzing the biomineralization of dental enamel. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Association of Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Bartter's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A C V; Alekya, V; Krishna, M S V V; Alekya, K; Aruna, M; Reddy, M H K; Sangeetha, B; Ram, R; Kumar, V S

    2017-01-01

    Bartter's syndrome is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemia, hypochloremia, metabolic alkalosis, and hyperreninemia with normal blood pressure. Bartter's syndrome is associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of hereditary disorders that affect dental enamel. AI could be part of several syndromes. The enamel renal syndrome is the association of AI and nephrocalcinosis. We report two patients of AI with Bartter's syndrome.

  6. Amelogenesis imperfecta: review of diagnostic findings and treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Sabandal, Martin M I; Schäfer, Edgar

    2016-09-01

    Mineralization defects like amelogenesis imperfecta are often of hereditary origin. This article reviews the diagnostic findings and summarizes the suggested treatment approaches. Currently, there are no defined therapy recommendations available for patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta. The mentioned therapies are more or less equal but no comprehensive therapy recommendation is evident. When treating patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta, a comprehensive therapy of almost every dental discipline has to be considered. The earlier the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta is confirmed, the better the outcome is. Optimal treatment approaches consist of early diagnosis and treatment approach and frequent dental recall appointments to prevent progressive occlusal wear or early destruction by caries. Full-mouth prosthetic treatment seems to be the best treatment option.

  7. Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Coronal Resorption: Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shannu K; Hunter, M Lindsay; Ashley, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    Intracoronal resorption of the permanent dentition in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a rare finding which poses an added complication to the already complex management of this condition. This paper presents three cases of AI associated with delayed eruption of permanent teeth in which asymptomatic intracoronal resorption occurred. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This paper highlights the fact that teeth affected with amelogenesis imperfecta may undergo asymptomatic intracoronal resorption which is only identifiable radiographically.

  8. Amelogenesis imperfecta and the treatment plan - interdisciplinary team approach.

    PubMed

    Suchancova, B; Holly, D; Janska, M; Stebel, J; Lysy, J; Thurzo, A; Sasinek, S

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a set of hereditary defects representing mainly the development defects of enamel without the presence of whole-body symptoms. Developmental disorders can manifest a complete absence of enamel, which is caused by improper differentiation of ameloblasts. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta, as well as the need for interdisciplinary cooperation to achieve the best possible morphological, skeletal, functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patients with this diagnosis. Furthermore, the article reviews literature dealing with other anomalies occurring in association with amelogenesis imperfect (Fig. 12, Ref. 20).

  9. Interradicular dentin dysplasia associated with amelogenesis imperfecta with taurodontism or trichodentoosseous syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Veda; Srikanth, K

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disorder with diverse clinical presentation, where enamel is the tissue that is primarily affected either quantitatively or qualitatively. Hypomaturation/hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with taurodontism is a rare variant of amelogenesis imperfecta which is often confused with trichodentoosseous syndrome. We report a rare case of hereditary enamel defect with taurodontism associated with interradicular dentin dysplasia.

  10. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire E. L.; Poulter, James A.; Antanaviciute, Agne; Kirkham, Jennifer; Brookes, Steven J.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX, encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/) containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and speculate on the

  11. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire E L; Poulter, James A; Antanaviciute, Agne; Kirkham, Jennifer; Brookes, Steven J; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX , encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/) containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and speculate on the

  12. Target gene analyses of 39 amelogenesis imperfecta kindreds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hui-Chen; Estrella, Ninna M. R. P.; Milkovich, Rachel N.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, mutational analyses identified six disease-causing mutations in 24 amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) kindreds. We have since expanded the number of AI kindreds to 39, and performed mutation analyses covering the coding exons and adjoining intron sequences for the six proven AI candidate genes [amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), family with sequence similarity 83, member H (FAM83H), WD repeat containing domain 72 (WDR72), enamelysin (MMP20), and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4)] and for ameloblastin (AMBN) (a suspected candidate gene). All four of the X-linked AI families (100%) had disease-causing mutations in AMELX, suggesting that AMELX is the only gene involved in the aetiology of X-linked AI. Eighteen families showed an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 12 (67%): eight in FAM83H, and four in ENAM. No FAM83H coding-region or splice-junction mutations were identified in three probands with autosomal-dominant hypocalcification AI (ADHCAI), suggesting that a second gene may contribute to the aetiology of ADHCAI. Six families showed an autosomal-recessive pattern of inheritance, and disease-causing mutations were identified in three (50%): two in MMP20, and one in WDR72. No disease-causing mutations were found in 11 families with only one affected member. We conclude that mutation analyses of the current candidate genes for AI have about a 50% chance of identifying the disease-causing mutation in a given kindred. PMID:22243262

  13. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  14. Oral Rehabilitation of a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cogulu, Dilsah; Becerik, Sema; Emingil, Gülnur; Hart, P. Suzanne; Hart, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disorder that causes defective enamel development in the primary and permanent teeth. Clinical treatment is important to address the esthetic appearance of affected teeth, reduce dentinal sensitivity, preserve tooth structure, and optimize masticatory function. The purpose of this case report was to describe the diagnosis, treatment planning, and dental rehabilitation of a patient with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta. The patient was followed for 5 years, and evaluation 3 years after restorations revealed no pathology associated with the rehabilitation. The patient’s esthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. PMID:20108745

  15. Amelogenesis imperfecta and anterior open bite: Etiological, classification, clinical and management interrelationships.

    PubMed

    Alachioti, Xanthippi Sofia; Dimopoulou, Eleni; Vlasakidou, Anatoli; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2014-01-01

    Although amelogenesis imperfecta is not a common dental pathological condition, its etiological, classification, clinical and management aspects have been addressed extensively in the scientific literature. Of special clinical consideration is the frequent co-existence of amelogenesis imperfecta with the anterior open bite. This paper provides an updated review on amelogenesis imperfecta as well as anterior open bite, in general, and documents the association of these two separate entities, in particular. Diagnosis and treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta patients presenting also with anterior open bite require a lengthy, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach, which should aim to successfully address all dental, occlusal, developmental, skeletal and soft tissue problems associated with these two serious clinical conditions.

  16. Noninvasive esthetic treatment for hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Silva, Luciana Mendonça da; Lima, Thiago Mendes de; Bertocco, Verônica Pereira de Lima; Chui, Fabíola Mendonça da Silva; Martins, Leandro de Moura

    2016-01-01

    Enamel alterations, such as amelogenesis imperfecta, can compromise the harmony of the smile and the patient's self-esteem and may cause tooth sensitivity. A simple and effective treatment approach uses the natural stratification of composite resins to mask deficient enamel formation and mimic the natural appearance of the substrate. The operative steps and principles for restorative success are described in this case report with 36-month follow-up.

  17. Novel FAM20A mutation causes autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Volodarsky, Michael; Zilberman, Uri; Birk, Ohad S

    2015-06-01

    To relate the peculiar phenotype of amelogenesis imperfecta in a large Bedouin family to the genotype determined by whole genome linkage analysis. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a broad group of inherited pathologies affecting enamel formation, characterized by variability in phenotypes, causing mutations and modes of inheritance. Autosomal recessive or compound heterozygous mutations in FAM20A, encoding sequence similarity 20, member A, have been shown to cause several AI phenotypes. Five members from a large consanguineous Bedouin family presented with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with unerupted and resorbed permanent molars. Following Soroka Medical Center IRB approval and informed consent, blood samples were obtained from six affected offspring, five obligatory carriers and two unaffected siblings. Whole genome linkage analysis was performed followed by Sanger sequencing of FAM20A. The sequencing unravelled a novel homozygous deletion mutation in exon 11 (c.1523delC), predicted to insert a premature stop codon (p.Thr508Lysfs*6). We provide an interesting case of novel mutation in this rare disorder, in which the affected kindred is unique in the large number of family members sharing a similar phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, James A.; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J.; Smith, Claire E. L.; Parry, David A.; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid. PMID:24858907

  19. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Smith, Claire E L; Parry, David A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-10-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Facial Esthetics and Snap-On Smile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee; Bradshaw, Jonathan P; Marks, Murray K

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary enamel protein disorder affecting deciduous and secondary crown formation. The prevalence ranges from 1:700 to 1:14,000 depending on the population. These teeth may be hypoplastic, hypomineralized, or hypermineralized and are often discolored, sensitive and caries vulnerable. Patients often present with psychosocial issues due to appearance. Primary teeth are often treated with stainless steel crowns while secondary teeth are treated with full coverage esthetic crowns. The presenting preteen male here was fitted with Snap-On Smile? (www.snaponsmile.com). This treatment option provided cosmetic enhancement of the patient's appearance besides stabilization without altering the primary and secondary dentition during adolescent development.

  1. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) to chromosome 4q

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Lind. L.; Westermark, E.

    1994-09-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disorder affecting the formation of enamel, is significantly more common in Northern Sweden than in other parts of the world. The disease is genetically and clinically heterogenous, and autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been recognized. Linkage analysis has identified two different loci for X-linked AI, one of which is identical to the gene encoding the enamel protein amelogenin. However, in families with an autosomal inheritance pattern for AI, the genetic basis of the disease still remains unknown. We report a linkage analysis study performed on three Swedish families where the affected membersmore » had an autosomal dominant variant of AI (ADAI) clinically characterized as local hypoplastic. Significant linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q were obtained, with a maximum lod score of 5.55 for the marker D4S428. Recombinations in the family localized the ADAI locus to the interval between D4S392 and D4S395. This chromosome region contains both a locus for the dental disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta and the albumin gene. Serum albumin has been suggested to play a role in enamel formation, and the albumin gene is therefore a candidate gene for this genetic disease.« less

  2. Amelogenesis imperfecta and anterior open bite: Etiological, classification, clinical and management interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Alachioti, Xanthippi Sofia; Dimopoulou, Eleni; Vlasakidou, Anatoli; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2014-01-01

    Although amelogenesis imperfecta is not a common dental pathological condition, its etiological, classification, clinical and management aspects have been addressed extensively in the scientific literature. Of special clinical consideration is the frequent co-existence of amelogenesis imperfecta with the anterior open bite. This paper provides an updated review on amelogenesis imperfecta as well as anterior open bite, in general, and documents the association of these two separate entities, in particular. Diagnosis and treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta patients presenting also with anterior open bite require a lengthy, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach, which should aim to successfully address all dental, occlusal, developmental, skeletal and soft tissue problems associated with these two serious clinical conditions. PMID:24987656

  3. Aesthetic composite veneers for an adult patient with amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brignall, Ian; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Millar, Brian J

    2011-11-01

    This case has been presented as part of the continual assessment requirement for the MSc in Aesthetic Dentistry, King's College Dental Institute. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary disorder of enamel formation, affecting both the permanent and deciduous dentitions. It can be classified into hypoplastic, hypomaturation and hypocalcified types and presents with different hereditary patterns. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of amelogenesis imperfecta, including a detailed case report for an aesthetically concerned adult patient presenting in general practice with a Witkop's Type IA defect managed with the placement of direct, layered resin composite veneers. Amelogenesis imperfecta patients are susceptible to the restorative cycle of replacement restorations like any other patient, but start with a distinct disadvantage.This case report demonstrates a minimally invasive, relatively simple and cost-effective option for the aesthetic correction of a case of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with layered composite veneers. Dent Update 2011; 38:594-603

  4. Assessment of restorative treatment of patients with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-Fen; Hu, Jan Ching Chun; Estrella, Maria Regina Padilla; Peters, Mathilde C; Bresciani, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess restorative treatment outcomes in the mixed dentition of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) patients and determine the postrehabilitation oral health status and satisfaction of the patients. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed on eight AI patients, who had 74 restorations placed in permanent incisors and molars, to allow evaluation of the integrity of the restorations and periodontal status post-treatment. Subjects completed a survey regarding esthetics, function, and sensitivity. Among the 74 restorations evaluated, seven were lost; of the remaining restorations, 31 were posterior, and 36 were anterior. Ten were rated clinically unacceptable. Teeth with stainless steel crowns had a moderate gingival index (mean=2.3) and plaque index (mean=2.0) scores. Widening of the periodontal ligament and pulp canal obliteration were common radiographic findings. Subject's recall of satisfaction regarding esthetics (P=.002) and sensitivity (brushing-P=.03; eating-P=.01) showed a statically significant difference before and after treatment. During mixed dentition, teeth with amelogenesis imperfecta may be restored with conventional treatment modalities. Direct restorations should be considered "interim" with multiple repairs anticipated. Post-treatment, gingival inflammation and plaque accumulation were observed. Subjects were satisfied with their appearance and reported a decrease of hypersensitivity.

  5. Oral Rehabilitation of Young Adult with Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Leung, Vincent Ws; Low, Bernard; Yang, Yanqi; Botelho, Michael G

    2018-05-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders that affect the enamel formation of the primary and permanent dentitions while the remaining tooth structure is normal. Appropriate patient care is necessary to prevent adverse effects on dental oral health, dental disfigurement, and psychological well-being. This clinical report presents a 27-year-old Chinese male with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) and his restorative management. This clinical report presents a 27-year-old Chinese male with AI and his restorative management. Extraoral examination showed a skeletal class III profile and increased lower facial proportion. Intraorally, all the permanent dentition was hypoplastic with noticeable tooth surface loss and a yellow-brown appearance. This was complicated with a mild maloc-clusion and food packing on his posterior teeth. The patient wanted to improve his appearance and masticatory efficiency. Orthodontic treatment was performed to treat the mild malocclu-sion and create physiological interproximal spacing to minimize tooth preparation and facilitate oral hygiene. This report demonstrates how a multidisciplinary approach for the management of AI can achieve a predictable, functional, and esthetic outcome. Orthodontic treatment facilitated a conservative prosthodontic treatment outcome by selectively increasing interproximal space, minimizing tooth preparation, correcting posterior bilateral cross-bite, as well as an anterior reverse overjet and derotation of the canines. This case report demonstrates the effective restoration of AI using a multidisciplinary approach to overcome crowding using a relatively conservative approach.

  6. Exonal deletion of SLC24A4 causes hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Tran Le, C G; Yildirim, M; Gencay, K; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2014-04-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions affecting enamel formation. Recently, mutations in solute carrier family 24 member 4 (SLC24A4) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We recruited a consanguineous family with hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta with generalized brown discoloration. Sequencing of the candidate genes identified a 10-kb deletion, including exons 15, 16, and most of the last exon of the SLC24A4 gene. Interestingly, this deletion was caused by homologous recombination between two 354-bp-long homologous sequences located in intron 14 and the 3' UTR. This is the first report of exonal deletion in SLC24A4 providing confirmatory evidence that the function of SLC24A4 in calcium transport has a crucial role in the maturation stage of amelogenesis.

  7. Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis: A Novel Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Misgar, R A; Hassan, Z; Wani, A I; Bashir, M I

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects. It has rarely been reported in association with multiorgan syndromes and metabolic disorders. The metabolic disorders that have been reported in association with AI include hypocalciuria, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and Bartter-like syndrome. In literature, only three cases of AI and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) have been described: two cases in adults and a solitary case in the pediatric age group. Here, we report a child with AI presenting with dRTA; to the best of our knowledge, our reported case is the only second such case in pediatric age group. Our case highlights the importance of recognizing the possibility of renal abnormalities in patients with AI as it will affect the long-term prognosis.

  8. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: 1 Family, 2 Phenotypes, and 2 Mutated Genes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M K; Laouina, S; El Alloussi, M; Dollfus, H; Bloch-Zupan, A

    2016-12-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by enamel defects. The authors have identified a large consanguineous Moroccan family segregating different clinical subtypes of hypoplastic and hypomineralized AI in different individuals within the family. Using targeted next-generation sequencing, the authors identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in COL17A1 (c.1873C>T, p.R625*) segregating with hypoplastic AI and a novel homozygous 8-bp deletion in C4orf26 (c.39_46del, p.Cys14Glyfs*18) segregating with hypomineralized-hypoplastic AI in this family. This study highlights the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of AI that can exist even within a single consanguineous family. Furthermore, the identification of novel mutations in COL17A1 and C4orf26 and their correlation with distinct AI phenotypes can contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of AI and the contribution of these genes to amelogenesis. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  9. A rare association--amelogenesis imperfecta, platispondyly and bicytopenia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Laouina, Samir; El Alaoui, Siham Chafai; Amezian, Rachida; Al Bouzidi, Abderrahmane; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; El Alloussi, Mustapha

    2015-10-28

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disease characterized by generalized structural abnormalities of the enamel on all teeth, including both primary and permanent dentition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a rare association of amelogenesis imperfecta, platyspondyly, and bicytopenia. A 5-year-old Moroccan boy was examined in the Centre for Dental Consultation and Treatment, Faculty of Dentistry, Rabat. He was a child of consanguineous parents (first degree). The child failed to thrive (-4 standard deviation score) and displayed delayed overall development. A dental examination revealed a hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with a bacterial biofilm deposit on tooth surfaces. A complete blood count revealed bicytopenia (normocytic-normochromic anemia with thrombocytopenia). A radiographic examination of the spinal column showed a deviation of the spine in the frontal plane in the form of thoracolumbar scoliosis. The interpedicular distance was not expanded; but a mild platyspondyly exists, especially pronounced in T11 and T12. No other family members presented amelogenesis imperfecta, bicytopenia, or platyspondyly. The consanguineous marriage suggested an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Further studies are necessary to clarify the genetic defect producing this syndrome, and the symptomatic associations of amelogenesis imperfecta, platyspondyly and bicytopenia.

  10. Enamelin/ameloblastin gene polymorphisms in autosomal amelogenesis imperfecta among Syrian families.

    PubMed

    Dashash, Mayssoon; Bazrafshani, Mohamed Riza; Poulton, Kay; Jaber, Saaed; Naeem, Emad; Blinkhorn, Anthony Stevenson

    2011-02-01

      This study was undertaken to investigate whether a single G deletion within a series of seven G residues (codon 196) at the exon 9-intron 9 boundary of the enamelin gene ENAM and a tri-nucleotide deletion at codon 180 in exon 7 (GGA vs deletion) of ameloblastin gene AMBN could have a role in autosomal amelogenesis imperfecta among affected Syrian families.   A new technique - size-dependent, deletion screening - was developed to detect nucleotide deletion in ENAM and AMBN genes. Twelve Syrian families with autosomal-dominant or -recessive amelogenesis imperfecta were included.   A homozygous/heterozygous mutation in the ENAM gene (152/152, 152/153) was identified in affected members of three families with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta and one family with autosomal-recessive amelogenesis imperfecta. A heterozygous mutation (222/225) in the AMBN gene was identified. However, no disease causing mutations was found. The present findings provide useful information for the implication of ENAM gene polymorphism in autosomal-dominant/-recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.   Further investigations are required to identify other genes responsible for the various clinical phenotypes. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Enamel renal syndrome with associated amelogenesis imperfecta, nephrolithiasis, and hypocitraturia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhesania, Dhvani; Arora, Ankit; Kapoor, Sonali

    2015-09-01

    Numerous cases of enamel renal syndrome have been previously reported. Various terms, such as enamel renal syndrome, amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome, and enamel-renal-gingival syndrome, have been used for patients presenting with the dental phenotype characteristic of this condition, nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis, and gingival findings. This report describes a case of amelogenesis imperfecta of the enamel agenesis variety with nephrolithiasis in a 21-year-old male patient who complained of small teeth. The imaging modalities employed were conventional radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, and renal sonography. Such cases are first encountered by dentists, as other organ or metabolic diseases are generally hidden. Hence, cases of amelogenesis imperfecta should be subjected to advanced diagnostic modalities, incorporating both dental and medical criteria, in order to facilitate comprehensive long-term management.

  12. Novel ITGB6 mutation in autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Koruyucu, M; Gencay, K; Bayram, M; Tuna, E B; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary defects in tooth enamel formation, amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), can be non-syndromic or syndromic phenotype. Integrins are signaling proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix communication, and their involvement in tooth development is well known. The purposes of this study were to identify genetic cause of an AI family and molecular pathogenesis underlying defective enamel formation. We recruited a Turkish family with isolated AI and performed mutational analyses to clarify the underlying molecular genetic etiology. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 transversion mutation in exon 4 (c.517G>C, p.Gly173Arg). The glycine at this position in the middle of the βI-domain is conserved among a wide range of vertebrate orthologs and human paralogs. Clinically, the enamel was generally thin and pitted with pigmentation. Thicker enamel was noted at the cervical area of the molars. In this study, we identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 mutation causing isolated AI, and this advances the understanding of normal and pathologic enamel development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Novel ITGB6 mutation in autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Koruyucu, M; Gencay, K; Bayram, M; Tuna, EB; Lee, ZH; Kim, J-W

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hereditary defects in tooth enamel formation, amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), can be non-syndromic or syndromic phenotype. Integrins are signaling proteins that mediate cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix communication, and their involvement in tooth development is well known. The purposes of this study were to identify genetic cause of an AI family and molecular pathogenesis underlying defective enamel formation. Materials and Methods We recruited a Turkish family with isolated AI and performed mutational analyses to clarify the underlying molecular genetic etiology. Results Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 transversion mutation in exon 4 (c.517G>C, p.Gly173Arg). The glycine at this position in the middle of the βI-domain is conserved among a wide range of vertebrate orthologs and human paralogs. Clinically, the enamel was generally thin and pitted with pigmentation. Thicker enamel was noted at the cervical area of the molars. Conclusions In this study, we identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 mutation causing isolated AI, and this advances the understanding of normal and pathologic enamel development. PMID:25431241

  14. A novel AMELX mutation causes hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Youn Jung; Kang, Jenny; Shin, Teo Jeon; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2017-04-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary genetic defect affecting tooth enamel. AI is heterogeneous in clinical phenotype as well as in genetic etiology. To date, more than 10 genes have been associated with the etiology of AI. Amelogenin is the most abundant enamel matrix protein, most of which is encoded by the amelogenin gene in the X-chromosome (AMELX). More than 16 alternative splicing transcripts have been identified in the murine Amelx gene. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic cause of an AI family. We recruited a family with hypoplastic AI and performed mutational analysis on the candidate gene based on the clinical phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a missense mutation in exon 6 (NM_182680.1; c.242C > T), which changes a sequence in a highly conserved amino acid (NP_872621.1; p.Pro81Leu). Furthermore, a splicing assay using a minigene displayed that the mutation changed the mRNA splicing repertory. In this study, we identified a novel AMELX missense mutation causing hypoplastic AI, and this mutation also resulted in altered mRNA splicing. These results will not only expand the mutation spectrum causing AI but also broaden our understanding of the biological mechanism of enamel formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Amelogenesis imperfecta: therapeutic strategy from primary to permanent dentition across case reports.

    PubMed

    Toupenay, Steve; Fournier, Benjamin Philippe; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Ifi-Naulin, Chantal; Berdal, Ariane; de La Dure-Molla, Muriel

    2018-06-15

    Hereditary enamel defect diseases are regrouped under the name "Amelogenesis Imperfecta" (AIH). Both dentitions are affected. Clinical expression is heterogeneous and varies between patients. Mutations responsible for this multigene disease may alter various genes and the inheritance can be either autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. Until now, no therapeutic consensus has emerged for this rare disease. The purpose of this article was to report treatments of AIH patients from childhood to early adulthood. Treatment of three patients of 3, 8 16 years old are described. Each therapeutic option was discussed according to patients' age and type of enamel alteration. Paediatric crowns and resin based bonding must be preferred in primary teeth. In permanent teeth, non-invasive or minimally invasive dentistry should be the first choice in order to follow a therapeutic gradient from the less invasive options to prosthodontic treatments. Functional and aesthetic issues require patients to be treated; this clinical care should be provided as early as possible to enable a harmonious growth of the maxillofacial complex and to prevent pain.

  16. Alternative prosthodontic-based treatment of a patient with hypocalcified type Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Jivanescu, Anca; Miglionico, Antonio; Barua, Souman; Hategan, Simona Ioana

    2017-07-01

    The Amelogenesis Imperfecta is associated with malocclusion and usually requires an interdisciplinary treatment. Due to the patient's refusal of orthodontic treatment, prosthodontics-based treatments alternative was considered and planned. The patient was treated with zirconia-based fixed partial dentures, which resulted in improved occlusion, better oral health, and improved esthetic appearance.

  17. Dental management of amelogenesis imperfecta patients: a primer on genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Ng, F K; Messer, L B

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a group of hereditary conditions which affects enamel formation in the primary and permanent dentitions. Mutations in genes critical for amelogenesis result in diverse phenotypes characterized by variably thin and/or defective enamel. To date, mutations in 5 genes are known to cause AI in humans. Understanding the molecular etiologies and associated inheritance patterns can assist in the early diagnosis of this condition. Recognition of genotype-phenotype correlations will allow clinicians to guide genetic testing and select appropriate management strategies for patients who express different phenotypes. The purpose of this paper was to provide a narrative review of the current literature on amelogenesis imperfecta, particularly regarding recent advances in the identification of candidate genes and the patterns of inheritance.

  18. Missense Mutation in Fam83H Gene in Iranian Patients with Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Pourhashemi, S Jalal; Ghandehari Motlagh, Mehdi; Meighani, Ghasem; Ebrahimi Takaloo, Azadeh; Mansouri, Mahsa; Mohandes, Fatemeh; Mirzaii, Maryam; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Moshtaghi, Faranak; Abedkhojasteh, Hoda; Heidari, Mansour

    2014-12-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is a disorder of tooth development where there is an abnormal formation of enamel or the external layer of teeth. The aim of this study was to screen mutations in the four most important candidate genes, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20 and FAM83H responsible for amelogenesis imperfect. Geneomic DNA was isolated from five Iranian families with 22 members affected with enamel malformations. The PCR amplifications were typically carried out for amplification the coding regions for AI patients and unaffected family members. The PCR products were subjected to direct sequencing. The pedigree analysis was performed using Cyrillic software. One family had four affected members with autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta (ADHPCAI); pedigree analysis revealed four consanguineous families with 18 patients with autosomal recessive hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (ARHPAI). One non-synonymous single-nucleotide substitution, c.1150T>A, p. Ser 342Thr was identified in the FAM83H, which resulted in ADHCAI. Furthermore, different polymorphisms or unclassified variants were detected in MMP20, ENAM and KLK4. Our results are consistent with other studies and provide further evidence for pathogenic mutations of FAM83H gene. These findings suggest different loci and genes could be implicated in the pathogenesis of AI.

  19. Oral rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using removable overlay denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, S; Rasaeipour, S; Vojdani, M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was oral rehabilitation of 17-year old patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using removable overlay denture in order to satisfy her esthetic and functional expectations and enhance her self-image. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of genetic disorders that primarily affect the quality and quantity of amelogenesis in both primary and permanent dentitions. The main clinical characteristics are severe attrition, tooth sensitivity and unesthetic appearance. This clinical report illustrates the oral rehabilitation of a 17-year-old girl with hypoplastic-hypomature type of AI with cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) overlay removable partial denture (ORPD) that is one of the most economical and biocompatible replacements for noble metal and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy. The presented case report suggests that Co-Cr ORPD can be a good temporary or even permanent treatment option for AI patients with limited budget, low esthetic concerns or medical limitations. There are major advantages in cast metal ORPDs; they are simpler, less traumatic and less expensive than fixed prosthetic options. This case report supports their use in patients with amelogenesis imperfecta.

  20. Analyses of MMP20 Missense Mutations in Two Families with Hypomaturation Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Jung; Kang, Jenny; Seymen, Figen; Koruyucu, Mine; Gencay, Koray; Shin, Teo Jeon; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Zang Hee; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of rare inherited disorders that affect tooth enamel formation, quantitatively and/or qualitatively. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic etiologies of two families presenting with hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood samples obtained from participating family members. Whole exome sequencing was performed using DNA samples from the two probands. Sequencing data was aligned to the NCBI human reference genome (NCBI build 37.2, hg19) and sequence variations were annotated with the dbSNP build 138. Mutations in MMP20 were identified in both probands. A homozygous missense mutation (c.678T>A; p.His226Gln) was identified in the consanguineous Family 1. Compound heterozygous MMP20 mutations (c.540T>A, p.Tyr180 * and c.389C>T, p.Thr130Ile) were identified in the non-consanguineous Family 2. Affected persons in Family 1 showed hypomaturation AI with dark brown discoloration, which is similar to the clinical phenotype in a previous report with the same mutation. However, the dentition of the Family 2 proband exhibited slight yellowish discoloration with reduced transparency. Functional analysis showed that the p.Thr130Ile mutant protein had reduced activity of MMP20, while there was no functional MMP20 in the Family 1 proband. These results expand the mutational spectrum of the MMP20 and broaden our understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in amelogenesis imperfecta.

  1. A multidisciplinary approach for the diagnosis of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta in two Chilean families.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Farias, Daniela Adorno; Franco, Eugenia; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Moncada, Gustavo; Escobar-Pezoa, Nicolás; Scholz, Ursula; Cifuentes, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a multidisciplinary analysis of a specific type of tooth enamel disturbance (amelogenesis imperfecta) affecting two Chilean families to obtain a precise diagnosis and to investigate possible underlying mutations. Two non-related families affected with amelogenesis imperfecta were evaluated with clinical, radiographic and histopathological methods. Furthermore, pedigrees of both families were constructed and the presence of eight mutations in the enamelin gene (ENAM) and three mutations in the enamelysin gene (MMP-20) were investigated by PCR and direct sequencing. In the two affected patients, the dental malformation presented as soft and easily disintegrated enamel and exposed dark dentin. Neither of the affected individuals presented with a dental and skeletal open bite. Histologically, a high level of an organic matrix with prismatic organization was found. Genetic analysis indicated that the condition is autosomal recessive in one family and either autosomal recessive or due to a new mutation in the other family. Molecular mutational analysis revealed that none of the eight mutations previously described in the ENAM gene or the three mutations in the MMP-20 gene were present in the probands. A multidisciplinary analysis allowed for a diagnosis of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta, Witkop type III, which was unrelated to previously described mutations in the ENAM or MMP-20 genes.

  2. Further evidence for causal FAM20A mutations and first case of amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival hyperplasia syndrome in Morocco: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui Jaouad, Imane; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Chafai El Alaoui, Siham; Laarabi, Fatima Zahra; Lyahyai, Jaber; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2015-01-30

    Amelogenesis imperfecta represents a group of developmental conditions, clinically and genetically heterogeneous, that affect the structure and clinical appearance of enamel. Amelogenesis imperfecta occurred as an isolated trait or as part of a genetic syndrome. Recently, disease-causing mutations in the FAM20A gene were identified, in families with an autosomal recessive syndrome associating amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis. We report, the first description of a Moroccan patient with amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis, in whom we performed Sanger sequencing of the entire coding sequence of FAM20A and identified a homozygous mutation in the FAM20A gene (c.34_35delCT), already reported in a family with this syndrome. Our finding confirms that the mutations of FAM20A gene are causative for amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis and underlines the recurrent character of the c.34_35delCT in two different ethnic groups.

  3. Isolation and characterization of dental epithelial cells derived from amelogenesis imperfecta rat.

    PubMed

    Adiningrat, A; Tanimura, A; Miyoshi, K; Hagita, H; Yanuaryska, R D; Arinawati, D Y; Horiguchi, T; Noma, T

    2016-03-01

    Disruption of the third zinc finger domain of specificity protein 6 (SP6) presents an enamel-specific defect in a rat model of amelogenesis imperfecta (AMI rats). To understand the molecular basis of amelogenesis imperfecta caused by the Sp6 mutation, we established and characterized AMI-derived rat dental epithelial (ARE) cells. ARE cell clones were isolated from the mandibular incisors of AMI rats, and amelogenesis-related gene expression was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Localization of wild-type SP6 (SP6WT) and mutant-type SP6 (SP6AMI) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. SP6 transcriptional activity was monitored by rho-associated protein kinase 1 (Rock1) promoter activity with its specific binding to the promoter region in dental (G5 and ARE) and non-dental (COS-7) epithelial cells. Isolated ARE cells were varied in morphology and gene expression. Both SP6WT and SP6AMI were mainly detected in nuclei. The promoter analysis revealed that SP6WT and SP6AMI enhanced Rock1 promoter activity in G5 cells but that enhancement by SP6AMI was weaker, whereas no enhancement was observed in the ARE and COS-7 cells, even though SP6WT and SP6AMI bound to the promoter in all instances. ARE cell clones can provide a useful in vitro model to study the mechanism of SP6-mediated amelogenesis imperfecta. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  5. Recessive Mutations in ACPT, Encoding Testicular Acid Phosphatase, Cause Hypoplastic Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, Figen; Kim, Youn Jung; Lee, Ye Ji; Kang, Jenny; Kim, Tak-Heun; Choi, Hwajung; Koruyucu, Mine; Kasimoglu, Yelda; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Gencay, Koray; Shin, Teo Jeon; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Zang Hee; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P; Cho, Eui-Sic; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2016-11-03

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting tooth enamel. The affected enamel can be hypoplastic and/or hypomineralized. In this study, we identified ACPT (testicular acid phosphatase) biallelic mutations causing non-syndromic, generalized hypoplastic autosomal-recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in individuals from six apparently unrelated Turkish families. Families 1, 4, and 5 were affected by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.713C>T (p.Ser238Leu), family 2 by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111Cys), family 3 by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.226C>T (p.Arg76Cys), and family 6 by the compound heterozygous ACPT mutations c.382G>C (p.Ala128Pro) and 397G>A (p.Glu133Lys). Analysis of the ACPT crystal structure suggests that these mutations damaged the activity of ACPT by altering the sizes and charges of key amino acid side chains, limiting accessibility of the catalytic core, and interfering with homodimerization. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed localization of ACPT in secretory-stage ameloblasts. The study results provide evidence for the crucial function of ACPT during amelogenesis. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chairside treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta, including establishment of a new vertical dimension with resin nanoceramic and intraoral scanning.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Koller, Christina; Hickel, Reinhard; Kühnisch, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disease affecting the structural development of tooth substance. This clinical report describes a 1-visit chairside treatment of an 8-year-old patient with amelogenesis imperfecta, using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. Intraoral scanning was performed using the Cerec Omnicam. Thirteen resin nanoceramic crowns (Lava Ultimate) were fabricated chairside by using a Cerec MCXL milling unit and seated adhesively. The patient's treatment included establishing a new occlusal vertical dimension and new centric relationship. Reevaluation after 6 months showed a stable situation. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional and esthetic rehabilitation of a child with amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moura, Carmem Dolores Vilarinho Soares de; Pontes, Alessandra Silva; Lopes, Teresinha Soares Pereira; Moura, Lúcia Fátima Almeida de Deus; Lima, Marina Deus Moura de

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a tooth disorder characterized by the abnormal development of the enamel in response to mutations in the genes involved in amelogenesis. The objective of this article is to present the clinical case of a child with AI in the primary dentition phase. A 4-year-old boy was presented to a clinic by his mother, who complained that her son's smile esthetics were compromised by "weak and yellow teeth." All the teeth showed yellowish discoloration as well as crumbling or missing enamel. Due to the absence of carious lesions and the presence of normal pulp in the teeth, it was decided to restore the dentition with indirect crowns of ceramic-optimized polymer, also known as ceromer. No preparations were performed on the teeth. For this patient, indirect ceromer restorations presented a good treatment option for the rehabilitation of primary teeth affected by AI.

  8. Defects in the acid phosphatase ACPT cause recessive hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire El; Whitehouse, Laura LE; Poulter, James A; Brookes, Steven J; Day, Peter F; Soldani, Francesca; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2017-08-01

    We identified two homozygous missense variants (c.428C>T, p.(T143M) and c.746C>T, p.(P249L)) in ACPT, the gene encoding acid phosphatase, testicular, which segregates with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta in two unrelated families. ACPT is reported to play a role in odontoblast differentiation and mineralisation by supplying phosphate during dentine formation. Analysis by computerised tomography and scanning electron microscopy of a primary molar tooth from an individual homozygous for the c.746C>T variant revealed an enamel layer that was hypoplastic, but mineralised with prismatic architecture. These findings implicate variants in ACPT as a cause of early failure of amelogenesis during the secretory phase.

  9. Mineral features of connective dental hard tissues in hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kammoun, R; Behets, C; Mansour, L; Ghoul-Mazgar, S

    2018-04-01

    To explore the mineral features of dentin and cementum in hypoplastic Amelogenesis imperfecta AI teeth. Forty-four (44) teeth cleaned and free of caries were used: 20 control and 24 affected by hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. Thirty-two teeth were studied by pQCT, cut in sections, and analyzed under microradiography, polarized light microscopy, and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Eight teeth were observed under scanning electron microscope. Four teeth were used for an X-ray diffraction. The mineral density data were analyzed statistically with the Mann-Whitney U test, using GraphPad InStat software. Both coronal dentin and radicular dentin were less mineralized in AI teeth when compared to control (respectively 6.2% and 6.8%; p < .001). Root dentinal walls were thin and irregular, while the cellular cementum layers were thick, reaching sometimes the cervical region of the tooth. Regular dentinal tubules and sclerotic dentin areas were noticed. Partially tubular or cellular dysplastic dentin and hyper-, normo-, or hypomineralized areas were noticed in the inter-radicular areas of hypoplastic AI teeth. The main mineral component was carbonate hydroxyapatite as explored by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dentin and cementum in hypoplastic AI teeth are (i) hypomineralized, (ii) constituted of carbonate hydroxyapatite, and (iii) of non-homogenous structure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Exclusion of known gene for enamel development in two Brazilian families with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Maria CLG; Hart, P Suzanne; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Kanno, Cláudia M; Hart, Thomas C; Line, Sergio RP

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that result in defective development of tooth enamel. Mutations in several enamel proteins and proteinases have been associated with AI. The object of this study was to evaluate evidence of etiology for the six major candidate gene loci in two Brazilian families with AI. Genomic DNA was obtained from family members and all exons and exon-intron boundaries of the ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, MMP20, KLK4 and Amelotin gene were amplified and sequenced. Each family was also evaluated for linkage to chromosome regions known to contain genes important in enamel development. The present study indicates that the AI in these two families is not caused by any of the known loci for AI or any of the major candidate genes proposed in the literature. These findings indicate extensive genetic heterogeneity for non-syndromic AI. PMID:17266769

  11. Exclusion of known gene for enamel development in two Brazilian families with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria C L G; Hart, P Suzanne; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Kanno, Cláudia M; Hart, Thomas C; Line, Sergio R P

    2007-01-31

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that result in defective development of tooth enamel. Mutations in several enamel proteins and proteinases have been associated with AI. The object of this study was to evaluate evidence of etiology for the six major candidate gene loci in two Brazilian families with AI. Genomic DNA was obtained from family members and all exons and exon-intron boundaries of the ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, MMP20, KLK4 and Amelotin gene were amplified and sequenced. Each family was also evaluated for linkage to chromosome regions known to contain genes important in enamel development. The present study indicates that the AI in these two families is not caused by any of the known loci for AI or any of the major candidate genes proposed in the literature. These findings indicate extensive genetic heterogeneity for non-syndromic AI.

  12. Novel ENAM and LAMB3 mutations in Chinese families with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Yuming; Yang, Yuan; Qin, Man

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of inherited diseases affecting the quality and quantity of dental enamel. To date, mutations in more than ten genes have been associated with non-syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Among these, ENAM and LAMB3 mutations are known to be parts of the etiology of hypoplastic AI in human cases. When both alleles of LAMB3 are defective, it could cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), while with only one mutant allele in the C-terminus of LAMB3, it could result in severe hypoplastic AI without skin fragility. We enrolled three Chinese families with hypoplastic autosomal-dominant AI. Despite the diagnosis falling into the same type, the characteristics of their enamel hypoplasia were different. Screening of ENAM and LAMB3 genes was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA from blood samples. Disease-causing mutations were identified and perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in three families: a 19-bp insertion mutation in the exon 7 of ENAM (c.406_407insTCAAAAAAGCCGACCACAA, p.K136Ifs*16) in Family 1, a single-base deletion mutation in the exon 5 of ENAM (c. 139delA, p. M47Cfs*11) in Family 2, and a LAMB3 nonsense mutation in the last exon (c.3466C>T, p.Q1156X) in Family 3. Our results suggest that heterozygous mutations in ENAM and LAMB3 genes can cause hypoplastic AI with markedly different phenotypes in Chinese patients. And these findings extend the mutation spectrum of both genes and can be used for mutation screening of AI in the Chinese population.

  13. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Non-Invasive Approach to Improve Esthetics in Young Patients. Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Cagetti, Maria Grazia; Cattaneo, Stefano; Hu, Ye Qing; Campus, Guglielmo

    Objective-Evaluate esthetic and functional efficacy of infiltrant resin (Icon, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) in Amelogenesis Imperfecta's treatment. Two adolescent patients, G.S. (13 years old) and C.M. (15 years old), affected by the hypomaturation type of Amelogenesis Imperfecta, were treated with Icon resin and were followed for twelve months. Treated teeth show an excellent aesthetical result immediately after the resin application, effect that lasts in the long-term (six and twelve months follow-up examinations); the dental wear's progression seems to be clinically arrested. Resin infiltration has proven to be a minimal invasive treatment for dental discoloration, less aggressive than conventional procedures. This approach might be recommended for a stable esthetical improvement in moderate AI's lesions especially in children and adolescents.

  14. Rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using porcelain veneers and CAD/CAM polymer restorations: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Saeidi Pour, Reza; Edelhoff, Daniel; Prandtner, Otto; Liebermann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The complete dental rehabilitation of patients with a vertical dimension loss (VDL) caused by structural enamel deficits associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a difficult challenge for restorative teams. Accurate analysis and treatment planning that includes esthetic and functional evaluations and adequate material selection are important prerequisites for successful results. Long-term provisional restorations play an important role in exploring and elucidating the patients' esthetic demands and functional needs. Restorative treatment options can vary from requiring only oral hygiene instructions to extensive dental restorations that include composite fillings, ceramic veneers, metal-ceramic, or all-ceramic crowns. This case report describes a full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta including the case planning, bite replacement, preparation, and restoration setting steps with an experimental CAD/CAM polymer and porcelain veneers.

  15. Impact of moderate and severe hypodontia and amelogenesis imperfecta on quality of life and self-esteem of adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Atef; Kelly, Alan; O'Connell, Brian; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of moderate and severe hypodontia and amelogenesis imperfecta on the quality of life and self-esteem of affected adult patients. Forty one adult patients (aged 18-45 years) with clinical and radiological diagnoses of moderate to severe hypodontia and twenty seven patients diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta were age and gender matched with a control group of patients attending for routine dental care. Subjects completed the Oral Health Impact Profile [OHIP-49] and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale. A paired t-test was used to analyse data; the test alpha level was set at P ≤ 0.05. The results for hypodontia patients were significantly different from controls in six out of the seven OHIP-49 domains, the exception being the Handicap domain. Total scores were also significantly different between the two groups (P=0.003). Self-esteem was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.98). For amelogenesis imperfecta patients the results were significantly different from control patients in four out of the seven domains of the OHIP-49 and also in the total scores (P=0.01). When self-esteem was investigated there was no significant differences between the two groups (P=0.92). Moderate to severe hypodontia and amelogenesis imperfecta have marked negative impacts on the Oral Health Related quality of life of this patient population relative to controls. However, self-esteem was not significantly affected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutations in the pH-Sensing G-protein-Coupled Receptor GPR68 Cause Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A; Smith, Claire E L; El-Sayed, Walid; Poulter, James A; Shore, Roger C; Logan, Clare V; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Harada, Akihiro; Zhang, Hong; Koruyucu, Mine; Seymen, Figen; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jafri, Hussain; Johnson, Colin A; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2016-10-06

    Amelogenesis is the process of dental enamel formation, leading to the deposition of the hardest tissue in the human body. This process requires the intricate regulation of ion transport and controlled changes to the pH of the developing enamel matrix. The means by which the enamel organ regulates pH during amelogenesis is largely unknown. We identified rare homozygous variants in GPR68 in three families with amelogenesis imperfecta, a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of inherited conditions associated with abnormal enamel formation. Each of these homozygous variants (a large in-frame deletion, a frameshift deletion, and a missense variant) were predicted to result in loss of function. GPR68 encodes a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor with sensitivity in the pH range that occurs in the developing enamel matrix during amelogenesis. Immunohistochemistry of rat mandibles confirmed localization of GPR68 in the enamel organ at all stages of amelogenesis. Our data identify a role for GPR68 as a proton sensor that is required for proper enamel formation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Amelogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tooth development disorder. It causes the tooth enamel to be thin and abnormally formed. Enamel is the outer layer of teeth. ... The enamel of the tooth is soft and thin. The teeth appear yellow and are easily damaged. Both baby ...

  18. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S.; Reid, Bryan M.; Lin, Brent P.; Wang, Susan J.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell–ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance–Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell–matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects. PMID:24305999

  19. Amelogenesis imperfecta in familial hypomagnesaemia and hypercalciuria with nephrocalcinosis caused by CLDN19 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Paulo Marcio; Neves, Francisco de Assis Rocha; Hotton, Dominique; Bardet, Claire; de La Dure-Molla, Muriel; Castro, Luiz Claudio; Scher, Maria do Carmo; Barbosa, Maristela Estevão; Ditsch, Christophe; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; de La Faille, Renaud; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine; Babajko, Sylvie; Berdal, Ariane; Acevedo, Ana Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of genetic diseases characterised by tooth enamel defects. AI was recently described in patients with familial hypercalciuria and hypomagnesaemia with nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) caused by CLDN16 mutations. In the kidney, claudin-16 interacts with claudin-19 to control the paracellular passage of calcium and magnesium. FHHNC can be linked to mutations in both genes. Claudin-16 was shown to be expressed during amelogenesis; however, no data are available on claudin-19. Moreover, the enamel phenotype of patients with CLDN19 mutations has never been described. In this study, we describe the clinical and genetic features of nine patients with FHHNC carrying CLDN19 mutations and the claudin-19 expression profile in rat ameloblasts. Six FHHNC Brazilian patients were subjected to mutational analysis. Three additional French patients were recruited for orodental characterisation. The expression profile of claudin-19 was evaluated by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence using enamel epithelium from rat incisors. All patients presented AI at different degrees of severity. Two new likely pathogenic variations in CLDN19 were found: p.Arg200Gln and p.Leu90Arg. RT-qPCR revealed low Cldn19 expression in ameloblasts. Confocal analysis indicated that claudin-19 was immunolocalised at the distal poles of secretory and maturing ameloblasts. For the first time, it was demonstrated that AI is associated with FHHNC in patients carrying CLDN19 mutations. The data suggest claudin-19 as an additional determinant in enamel formation. Indeed, the coexistence of hypoplastic and hypomineralised AI in the patients was consistent with claudin-19 expression in both secretory and maturation stages. Additional indirect systemic effects cannot be excluded. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  1. Novel genetic linkage of rat Sp6 mutation to Amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormal formation of tooth enamel. Although several genes responsible for AI have been reported, not all causative genes for human AI have been identified to date. AMI rat has been reported as an autosomal recessive mutant with hypoplastic AI isolated from a colony of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat strain, but the causative gene has not yet been clarified. Through a genetic screen, we identified the causative gene of autosomal recessive AI in AMI and analyzed its role in amelogenesis. Methods cDNA sequencing of possible AI-candidate genes so far identified using total RNA of day 6 AMI rat molars identified a novel responsible mutation in specificity protein 6 (Sp6). Genetic linkage analysis was performed between Sp6 and AI phenotype in AMI. To understand a role of SP6 in AI, we generated the transgenic rats harboring Sp6 transgene in AMI (Ami/Ami + Tg). Histological analyses were performed using the thin sections of control rats, AMI, and Ami/Ami + Tg incisors in maxillae, respectively. Results We found the novel genetic linkage between a 2-bp insertional mutation of Sp6 gene and the AI phenotype in AMI rats. The position of mutation was located in the coding region of Sp6, which caused frameshift mutation and disruption of the third zinc finger domain of SP6 with 11 cryptic amino acid residues and a stop codon. Transfection studies showed that the mutant protein can be translated and localized in the nucleus in the same manner as the wild-type SP6 protein. When we introduced the CMV promoter-driven wild-type Sp6 transgene into AMI rats, the SP6 protein was ectopically expressed in the maturation stage of ameloblasts associated with the extended maturation stage and the shortened reduced stage without any other phenotypical changes. Conclusion We propose the addition of Sp6 mutation as a new molecular diagnostic criterion for the autosomal recessive AI patients

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in amelogenesis imperfecta and phenotypic rescue using 4-phenylbutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Steven J.; Barron, Martin J.; Boot-Handford, Ray; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited diseases caused by genetic mutations can arise due to loss of protein function. Alternatively, mutated proteins may mis-fold, impairing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trafficking, causing ER stress and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR attempts to restore proteostasis but if unsuccessful drives affected cells towards apoptosis. Previously, we reported that in mice, the p.Tyr64His mutation in the enamel extracellular matrix (EEM) protein amelogenin disrupts the secretory pathway in the enamel-forming ameloblasts, resulting in eruption of malformed tooth enamel that phenocopies human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Defective amelogenin post-secretory self-assembly and processing within the developing EEM has been suggested to underlie the pathogenesis of X chromosome-linked AI. Here, we challenge this concept by showing that AI pathogenesis associated with the p.Tyr64His amelogenin mutation involves ameloblast apoptosis induced by ER stress. Furthermore, we show that 4-phenylbutyrate can rescue the enamel phenotype in affected female mice by promoting cell survival over apoptosis such that they are able to complete enamel formation despite the presence of the mutation, offering a potential therapeutic option for patients with this form of AI and emphasizing the importance of ER stress in the pathogenesis of this inherited conformational disease. PMID:24362885

  3. Multidisciplinary Approach for Restoring Function and Esthetics in a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is a genetically determined and enamel mineralization defect reported, depicted as “Hereditary brown teeth.” AI is characterized as a clinical entity and its clinical manifestations, histological appearance, and genetic pattern are characterized by their heterogeneity. The need for prosthodontic management of this group of patients varies. Some patients need oral hygiene instructions only, whereas others need extensive dental treatment that includes composite restorations, metal ceramic crowns, all ceramic crowns, porcelain veneers. A 20-year-old male patient presented with sensitive, discoloured, and mutilated teeth, with a decreased vertical dimension of occlusion. The 4-year recall examination revealed no pathology associated with the full mouth rehabilitation, and the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations were satisfied. The rehabilitation included all-ceramic crowns on anterior teeth and metal-ceramic crowns on posterior teeth following endodontic treatment and a crown-lengthening procedure for eliminating tooth sensitivity, improving the aesthetics and occlusion, and for restoring function. PMID:24551735

  4. Aesthetic and Functional Rehabilitation of the Primary Dentition Affected by Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Zancopé, Bruna Raquel; Pacheco, Larissa Ferreira; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Pascon, Fernanda Miori

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child's psychosocial development. PMID:25705526

  5. Deletion of amelotin exons 3-6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire E L; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Poulter, James A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2016-08-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions that result in defective dental enamel formation. Amelotin (AMTN) is a secreted protein thought to act as a promoter of matrix mineralization in the final stage of enamel development, and is strongly expressed, almost exclusively, in maturation stage ameloblasts. Amtn overexpression and Amtn knockout mouse models have defective enamel with no other associated phenotypes, highlighting AMTN as an excellent candidate gene for human AI. However, no AMTN mutations have yet been associated with human AI. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified an 8,678 bp heterozygous genomic deletion encompassing exons 3-6 of AMTN in a Costa Rican family segregating dominant hypomineralised AI. The deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 92 amino acids, shortening the protein from 209 to 117 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth from an affected family member had enamel that was of a lower mineral density compared to control enamel and exhibited structural defects at least some of which appeared to be associated with organic material as evidenced using elemental analysis. This study demonstrates for the first time that AMTN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and explores the human phenotype, comparing it with that of mice with disrupted Amtn function. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Unexpected identification of a recurrent mutation in the DLX3 gene causing amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y-J; Seymen, F; Koruyucu, M; Kasimoglu, Y; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Hyun, H-K; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2016-05-01

    To identify the molecular genetic aetiology of a family with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). DNA samples were collected from a six-generation family, and the candidate gene approach was used to screen for the enamelin (ENAM) gene. Whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis with SNP array data identified linked regions, and candidate gene screening was performed. Mutational analysis revealed a mutation (c.561_562delCT and p.Tyr188Glnfs*13) in the DLX3 gene. After finding a recurrent DLX3 mutation, the clinical phenotype of the family members was re-examined. The proband's mother had pulp elongation in the third molars. The proband had not hair phenotype, but her cousin had curly hair at birth. In this study, we identified a recurrent 2-bp deletional DLX3 mutation in a new family. The clinical phenotype was the mildest one associated with the DLX3 mutations. These results will advance the understanding of the functional role of DLX3 in developmental processes. © 2016 The Authors. Oral Diseases Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nephrocalcinosis in Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused by the FAM20A Mutation.

    PubMed

    Koruyucu, Mine; Seymen, Figen; Gencay, Genco; Gencay, Koray; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Shin, Teo Jeon; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2018-01-01

    Enamel-renal syndrome is characterized by nephrocalcinosis, enamel defects, gingival hyperplasia and eruption failures. It has been recently identified that recessive mutations in the FAM20A gene result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI)-gingival fibromatosis. The aim of this research to determine whether AI patients with known -FAM20A mutations also have nephrocalcinosis. Complete oral and radiological examinations were performed for all participating family members. Renal examinations were performed using ultrasound. The teeth were evaluated for severe loss, and multiple eruption failures were evident from the clinical and radiological examinations. Unexpected extensive and fast crown resorption was found by radiological examination. Renal ultrasound revealed bilateral nephrocalcinosis in both affected individuals. Recessive FAM20A mutations can cause nephrocalcinosis in addition to the oral phenotype. AI patients with similar clinical phenotypes and FAM20A mutations should be examined for nephropathy even if they lack pertinent symptoms. Nephrology referral is warranted for patients who have clinical phenotypes related to AI-gingival fibromatosis even if they are not symptomatic. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in amelogenesis imperfecta and phenotypic rescue using 4-phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Boot-Handford, Ray; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Inherited diseases caused by genetic mutations can arise due to loss of protein function. Alternatively, mutated proteins may mis-fold, impairing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trafficking, causing ER stress and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR attempts to restore proteostasis but if unsuccessful drives affected cells towards apoptosis. Previously, we reported that in mice, the p.Tyr64His mutation in the enamel extracellular matrix (EEM) protein amelogenin disrupts the secretory pathway in the enamel-forming ameloblasts, resulting in eruption of malformed tooth enamel that phenocopies human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Defective amelogenin post-secretory self-assembly and processing within the developing EEM has been suggested to underlie the pathogenesis of X chromosome-linked AI. Here, we challenge this concept by showing that AI pathogenesis associated with the p.Tyr64His amelogenin mutation involves ameloblast apoptosis induced by ER stress. Furthermore, we show that 4-phenylbutyrate can rescue the enamel phenotype in affected female mice by promoting cell survival over apoptosis such that they are able to complete enamel formation despite the presence of the mutation, offering a potential therapeutic option for patients with this form of AI and emphasizing the importance of ER stress in the pathogenesis of this inherited conformational disease.

  9. Management of Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A 15-Year Case History of Two Siblings.

    PubMed

    Dursun, E; Savard, E; Vargas, C; Loison-Robert, L; Cherifi, H; Bdeoui, F; Landru, M-M

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogenous genetic disorder that interferes with normal enamel formation in the absence of systemic disorders. The patients' main concerns are caries susceptibility, poor esthetics, and generalized sensitivity. There is a broad clinical spectrum, from discolorations to consequent enamel alterations. This case report describes the 15-year case study and the full-mouth rehabilitation of two siblings affected by a hypocalcified AI. Clinical Considerations: In these two patients, conservative care with stainless steel crowns and direct composite restorations was undertaken to restore function and esthetics and to reduce sensitivities in primary and mixed dentitions. The difficulties in monitoring resulted in severe infectious complications (dental abscess with cutaneous fistula), important dental defects, and loss of spaces with subsequent malocclusion. In the young adult dentition, they were treated by extractions, root canal therapies, and new restorations: stainless steel crowns for permanent molars, direct composite restorations (with strip crowns) for incisors and maxillary canines (to improve the crown morphology as well as to mask the discolorations and the malpositions), and adjusted composite crown molds using a thermoforming procedure for premolars and the mandibular canines. The main difficulties were rapid tooth surface loss, bonding to atypical enamel, developing dentition, long-term follow-up. Restoring function and esthetics in AI-affected patients is a challenge from primary to adult dentition. Early corrections are essential to avoid dental damage and for psychological benefits. This clinical report highlights the adhesive rehabilitation for anterior and premolar areas and the difficulty of patient follow-up.

  10. Identification of the first multi-exonic WDR72 deletion in isolated amelogenesis imperfecta, and generation of a WDR72-specific copy number screening tool.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Julia; Tatun, Dana; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Kurth, Ingo; Schimmel, Bettina; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Bertzbach, Sabine; Peters, Hartmut; Beetz, Christian

    2016-09-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of tooth development which is due to aberrant deposition or composition of enamel. Both syndromic and isolated forms exist; they may be inherited in an X-linked, autosomal recessive, or autosomal dominant manner. WDR72 is one of ten currently known genes for recessive isolated AI; nine WDR72 mutations affecting single nucleotides have been described to date. Based on whole exome sequencing in a large consanguineous AI pedigree, we obtained evidence for presence of a multi-exonic WDR72 deletion. A home-made multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to confirm the aberration, to narrow its extent, and to identify heterozygous carriers. Our study extends the mutational spectrum for WDR72 to include large deletions, and supports a relevance of the previously proposed loss-of-function mechanism. It also introduces an easy-to-use and highly sensitive tool for detecting WDR72 copy number alterations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta (Jalili syndrome): phenotypes and environs.

    PubMed

    Jalili, I K

    2010-11-01

    To report a new phenotype with additional data on the oculo-dental syndrome of cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) caused by mutations on CNNM4, a metal transporter, with linkage at achromatopsia locus 2q11 (Jalili syndrome). Three siblings aged 5, 6, and 10 years from a six-generation Arab family in Gaza City underwent full systemic, ophthalmic, and dental examinations, investigations and detailed genealogy. Subjects presented at early childhood with visual impairment and abnormal dentition together with photophobia and fine nystagmus increasing under photopic conditions, in the presence of normal fundi. Electrophysiologically, photopic flicker responses were impaired; scotopic responses were extinguished at the age of 10 years. Anterior open bite accompanied AI in all siblings. The syndrome formed 83% of CRD cases in the Gaza Strip, which has a prevalence of 1 : 10,000. On the basis of clinical features and electrophysiology, two phenotypes exist: an infancy onset form with progressive macular lesion and an early childhood onset form with normal fundi. More prevalent than previously thought, Jalili syndrome presents a model of the effect of different mutations of the same genetic defect, observations of the same phenotype at different stages of the natural history of the disease, and the influence of epigenetic and tissue-specific factors as causes of phenotypic variability. The paper calls for action to tackle consanguinity in endogamous communities, addresses the possible role of high fluoride levels in groundwater as a trigger for genetic mutations, and the use of red-tinted filter in cone disorders.

  12. Unusual extrinsic staining following microabrasion in a girl with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H J; Yesudian, G; Rodd, H D

    2016-08-01

    Developmental defects of enamel (DDE), such as amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), may present with tooth discolouration that is of aesthetic concern to the affected individual. Children and young people with DDE may therefore seek dental interventions to improve their dental appearance. The most commonly employed approaches include microabrasion, bleaching and/or placement of composite resin veneers. A 13-year-old girl with hypomature AI requested treatment for the 'marks' on her teeth which were having a negative impact on her social interactions. Clinical examination revealed generalised dense white opacities, and a microabrasion approach was performed on 11, 12 and 13 using a commercial preparation of 6.6 % hydrochloric acid. Concerningly, the girl's father phoned the next day reporting that his daughter's teeth had turned 'orange'. An urgent review revealed that the treated teeth had indeed become an orange colour. Further enquiry found that the patient had eaten a tomato pizza immediately after her dental treatment and this was believed to have caused the severe extrinsic staining. The patient was provided with a 16 % carbamide peroxide preparation for night-time use in a laboratory-made tray. A 2-week review revealed complete resolution of the staining. Direct composite resin restorations were subsequently provided for the girl's maxillary anterior teeth to achieve an optimal cosmetic result and she has remained pleased with her dental appearance. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for extrinsic staining following microabrasion or tooth bleaching. Patients should be advised against consuming coloured food and drink for at least 48 h after their treatment.

  13. Abrogation of epithelial BMP2 and BMP4 causes Amelogenesis Imperfecta by reducing MMP20 and KLK4 expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Jani, Priyam H; Lu, Yongbo; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-05-05

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) can be caused by the deficiencies of enamel matrix proteins, molecules responsible for the transportation and secretion of enamel matrix components, and proteases processing enamel matrix proteins. In the present study, we discovered the double deletion of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the dental epithelium by K14-cre resulted in hypoplastic enamel and reduced density in X-ray radiography as well as shortened enamel rods under scanning electron microscopy. Such enamel phenotype was consistent with the diagnosis of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. Histological and molecular analyses revealed that the removal of matrix proteins in the mutant enamel was drastically delayed, which was coincided with the greatly reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4). Although the expression of multiple enamel matrix proteins was down-regulated in the mutant ameloblasts, the cleavage of ameloblastin was drastically impaired. Therefore, we attributed the AI primarily to the reduction of MMP20 and KLK4. Further investigation found that BMP/Smad4 signaling pathway was down-regulated in the K14-cre;Bmp2(f/f);Bmp4(f/f)ameloblasts, suggesting that the reduced MMP20 and KLK4 expression may be due to the attenuated epithelial BMP/Smad4 signaling.

  14. Abrogation of epithelial BMP2 and BMP4 causes Amelogenesis Imperfecta by reducing MMP20 and KLK4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Jani, Priyam H.; Lu, Yongbo; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) can be caused by the deficiencies of enamel matrix proteins, molecules responsible for the transportation and secretion of enamel matrix components, and proteases processing enamel matrix proteins. In the present study, we discovered the double deletion of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the dental epithelium by K14-cre resulted in hypoplastic enamel and reduced density in X-ray radiography as well as shortened enamel rods under scanning electron microscopy. Such enamel phenotype was consistent with the diagnosis of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. Histological and molecular analyses revealed that the removal of matrix proteins in the mutant enamel was drastically delayed, which was coincided with the greatly reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4). Although the expression of multiple enamel matrix proteins was down-regulated in the mutant ameloblasts, the cleavage of ameloblastin was drastically impaired. Therefore, we attributed the AI primarily to the reduction of MMP20 and KLK4. Further investigation found that BMP/Smad4 signaling pathway was down-regulated in the K14-cre;Bmp2f/f;Bmp4f/fameloblasts, suggesting that the reduced MMP20 and KLK4 expression may be due to the attenuated epithelial BMP/Smad4 signaling. PMID:27146352

  15. Amelogenesis imperfecta associated with dental follicular-like hamartomas and generalised gingival enlargement.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, S; Davies, J; Smallridge, J; Vaidyanathan, M

    2014-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an inherited disorder characterised by generalised defects of dental enamel, but has been associated with other dental and medical conditions. It affects the appearance and structure of teeth, both in the primary and secondary dentition. AI in the presence of dental follicular hamartomas and gingival hyperplasia is rare and the management presents several challenges to the clinician. This article describes a case of a girl who presented to the paediatric department at the age of 7 years complaining of discomfort when eating and that she was unhappy with the appearance of her anterior teeth. The patient was born in the UK but she and her family were African and of Kenyan origin. She was otherwise fit and well. Investigations included clinical, radiographic and pathological examination as well as cone beam computed tomography imaging and X-ray Microtomography of extracted primary teeth. A diagnosis of AI in the presence of dental follicular hamartomas and generalised gingival hyperplasia was made, which had resulted in the delayed eruption of permanent teeth and an associated anterior open bite. There was no family history of dental defects. Initial treatment included preventative advice and the application of preformed metal crowns on all primary molars. Extraction of all remaining primary incisors was carried out followed by gingivectomy around the maxillary permanent incisors, mandibular central incisors and maxillary left second primary molar. Composite resin reconstruction of all permanent incisors and mandibular primary canines was complicated by the poor quality of enamel. Orthodontic extrusion of the anterior incisors was carried out to improve surface area for bonding with some success. A multidisciplinary team managed this case and decided that no surgical intervention of the dental follicular hamartomas was warranted. The patient coped well with treatment and attended for regular review over an 8-year period. She was

  16. Enamelin (Enam) is essential for amelogenesis: ENU-induced mouse mutants as models for different clinical subtypes of human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI).

    PubMed

    Masuya, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kunihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Junko; Shimizu, Aya; Fujimoto, Naomi; Kawai, Akiko; Miura, Ikuo; Kaneda, Hideki; Kobayashi, Kimio; Ishijima, Junko; Maeda, Takahide; Gondo, Yoichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2005-03-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of commonly inherited defects of dental enamel formation, which exhibits marked genetic and clinical heterogeneity. The genetic basis of this heterogeneity is still poorly understood. Enamelin, the affected gene product in one form of AI (AIH2), is an extracellular matrix protein that is one of the components of enamel. We isolated three ENU-induced dominant mouse mutations, M100395, M100514 and M100521, which caused AI-like phenotypes in the incisors and molars of the affected individuals. Linkage analyses mapped each of the three mutations to a region of chromosome 5 that contained the genes encoding enamelin (Enam) and ameloblastin (Ambn). Sequence analysis revealed that each mutation was a single-base substitution in Enam. M100395 (Enam(Rgsc395)) and M100514 (Enam(Rgsc514)) were putative missense mutations that caused S to I and E to G substitutions at positions 55 and 57 of the translated protein, respectively. Enam(Rgsc395) and Enam(Rgsc514) heterozygotes showed severe breakage of the enamel surface, a phenotype that resembled local hypoplastic AI. The M100521 mutation (Enam(Rgsc521)) was a T to A substitution at the splicing donor site in intron 4. This mutation resulted in a frameshift that gave rise to a premature stop codon. The transcript of the Enam(Rgsc521) mutant allele was degraded, indicating that Enam(Rgsc521) is a loss-of-function mutation. Enam(Rgsc521) heterozygotes showed a hypomaturation-type AI phenotype in the incisors, possibly due to haploinsufficiency of Enam. Enam(Rgsc521) homozygotes showed complete loss of enamel on the incisors and the molars. Thus, we report here that the Enam gene is essential for amelogenesis, and that mice with different point mutations at Enam may provide good animal models to study the different clinical subtypes of AI.

  17. Identification of a novel FAM83H mutation and microhardness of an affected molar in autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hyun, H-K; Lee, S-K; Lee, K-E; Kang, H-Y; Kim, E-J; Choung, P-H; Kim, J-W

    2009-11-01

    To determine the underlying molecular genetic aetiology of a family with the hypocalcified form of amelogenesis imperfecta and to investigate the hardness of the enamel and dentine of a known FAM83H mutation. Mutational screening of the FAM83H on the basis of candidate gene approach was performed. All exons and exon-intron boundaries was amplified and sequenced. A microhardness test was performed to measure the Vickers microhardness value. A novel nonsense mutation (c.1354C>T, p.Q452X) was identified in the last exon of FAM83H, which resulted in soft, uncalcified enamel. The affected enamel was extremely soft (about 17% of the normal control), but the underlying dentine was as hard as the normal control. Mutational analysis revealed a novel mutation in FAM83H gene. Hardness of dentine was not affected by the mutation, whilst the enamel was extremely soft.

  18. Mutations in the latent TGF-beta binding protein 3 (LTBP3) gene cause brachyolmia with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Muller, Jean; Clauss, François; Prasad, Megana K; Obry, Frédéric; Raymond, Jean Louis; Switala, Marzena; Alembik, Yves; Soskin, Sylvie; Mathieu, Eric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Dabovic, Branka Brukner; Rifkin, Daniel B; Dheedene, Annelies; Boudin, Eveline; Caluseriu, Oana; Cholette, Marie-Claude; Mcleod, Ross; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gellé, Marie-Paule; Coeuriot, Jean-Louis; Jacquelin, Louis-Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Van Hul, Wim; Bertola, Debora; Dollé, Pascal; Verloes, Alain; Mortier, Geert; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2015-06-01

    Inherited dental malformations constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report on four families, three of them consanguineous, with an identical phenotype, characterized by significant short stature with brachyolmia and hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with almost absent enamel. This phenotype was first described in 1996 by Verloes et al. as an autosomal recessive form of brachyolmia associated with AI. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of recessive hypomorphic mutations including deletion, nonsense and splice mutations, in the LTBP3 gene, which is involved in the TGF-beta signaling pathway. We further investigated gene expression during mouse development and tooth formation. Differentiated ameloblasts synthesizing enamel matrix proteins and odontoblasts expressed the gene. Study of an available knockout mouse model showed that the mutant mice displayed very thin to absent enamel in both incisors and molars, hereby recapitulating the AI phenotype in the human disorder. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Mutations in the latent TGF-beta binding protein 3 (LTBP3) gene cause brachyolmia with amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Muller, Jean; Clauss, François; Prasad, Megana K.; Obry, Frédéric; Raymond, Jean Louis; Switala, Marzena; Alembik, Yves; Soskin, Sylvie; Mathieu, Eric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Dabovic, Branka Brukner; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Dheedene, Annelies; Boudin, Eveline; Caluseriu, Oana; Cholette, Marie-Claude; Mcleod, Ross; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gellé, Marie-Paule; Coeuriot, Jean-Louis; Jacquelin, Louis-Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Van Hul, Wim; Bertola, Debora; Dollé, Pascal; Verloes, Alain; Mortier, Geert; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Inherited dental malformations constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report on four families, three of them consanguineous, with an identical phenotype, characterized by significant short stature with brachyolmia and hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with almost absent enamel. This phenotype was first described in 1996 by Verloes et al. as an autosomal recessive form of brachyolmia associated with AI. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of recessive hypomorphic mutations including deletion, nonsense and splice mutations, in the LTBP3 gene, which is involved in the TGF-beta signaling pathway. We further investigated gene expression during mouse development and tooth formation. Differentiated ameloblasts synthesizing enamel matrix proteins and odontoblasts expressed the gene. Study of an available knockout mouse model showed that the mutant mice displayed very thin to absent enamel in both incisors and molars, hereby recapitulating the AI phenotype in the human disorder. PMID:25669657

  20. Interdisciplinary Full Mouth Rehabilitation of a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report with 8 Years Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, S; Sanjeev, R; Ephraim, Rena; Joseph, Mathai

    2014-01-01

    This case report deals with the interdisciplinary approach of a 28-year-old lady with Amelogenesis imperfecta of the hypoplastic kind. The patient came with a chief illness of worn out teeth, unsatisfactory esthetics and severe sensitivity of teeth. Her family history revealed a related situation in her father’s brother and her sister. On clinical assessment, the crowns of all teeth were worn out. The plan of the treatment was to protect as much tooth structure, restore the vertical dimension, and improve esthetics and masticatory function. The treatment procedures involved prosthodontic, endodontic, and periodontic interventions. After recording the vertical height, endodontic treatment and crown lengthening were performed with respect to the lower anteriors. The lost vertical height was regained in stages by insertion of full coverage crowns for all the teeth. The patient’s esthetic and functional needs were met with systematic and sequential interdisciplinary treatment approach. PMID:25628493

  1. Loss of epithelial FAM20A in mice causes amelogenesis imperfecta, tooth eruption delay and gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Li; Liu, Pei-Hong; Xie, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Su; Liu, Chao; Chen, Li; Qin, Chun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    FAM20A has been studied to a very limited extent. Mutations in human FAM20A cause amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival fibromatosis and kidney problems. It would be desirable to systemically analyse the expression of FAM20A in dental tissues and to assess the pathological changes when this molecule is specifically nullified in individual tissues. Recently, we generated mice with a Fam20A-floxed allele containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. We analysed FAM20A expression in dental tissues using X-Gal staining, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, which showed that the ameloblasts in the mouse mandibular first molar began to express FAM20A at 1 day after birth, and the reduced enamel epithelium in erupting molars expressed a significant level of FAM20A. By breeding K14-Cre mice with Fam20Aflox/flox mice, we created K14-Cre;Fam20Aflox/flox (conditional knock out, cKO) mice, in which Fam20A was inactivated in the epithelium. We analysed the dental tissues of cKO mice using X-ray radiography, histology and immunohistochemistry. The molar enamel matrix in cKO mice was much thinner than normal and was often separated from the dentinoenamel junction. The Fam20A-deficient ameloblasts were non-polarized and disorganized and were detached from the enamel matrix. The enamel abnormality in cKO mice was consistent with the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta. The levels of enamelin and matrix metalloproteinase 20 were lower in the ameloblasts and enamel of cKO mice than the normal mice. The cKO mice had remarkable delays in the eruption of molars and hyperplasia of the gingival epithelium. The findings emphasize the essential roles of FAM20A in the development of dental and oral tissues. PMID:27281036

  2. Loss of epithelial FAM20A in mice causes amelogenesis imperfecta, tooth eruption delay and gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Liu, Pei-Hong; Xie, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Su; Liu, Chao; Chen, Li; Qin, Chun-Lin

    2016-06-30

    FAM20A has been studied to a very limited extent. Mutations in human FAM20A cause amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival fibromatosis and kidney problems. It would be desirable to systemically analyse the expression of FAM20A in dental tissues and to assess the pathological changes when this molecule is specifically nullified in individual tissues. Recently, we generated mice with a Fam20A-floxed allele containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. We analysed FAM20A expression in dental tissues using X-Gal staining, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, which showed that the ameloblasts in the mouse mandibular first molar began to express FAM20A at 1 day after birth, and the reduced enamel epithelium in erupting molars expressed a significant level of FAM20A. By breeding K14-Cre mice with Fam20A(flox/flox) mice, we created K14-Cre;Fam20A(flox/flox) (conditional knock out, cKO) mice, in which Fam20A was inactivated in the epithelium. We analysed the dental tissues of cKO mice using X-ray radiography, histology and immunohistochemistry. The molar enamel matrix in cKO mice was much thinner than normal and was often separated from the dentinoenamel junction. The Fam20A-deficient ameloblasts were non-polarized and disorganized and were detached from the enamel matrix. The enamel abnormality in cKO mice was consistent with the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta. The levels of enamelin and matrix metalloproteinase 20 were lower in the ameloblasts and enamel of cKO mice than the normal mice. The cKO mice had remarkable delays in the eruption of molars and hyperplasia of the gingival epithelium. The findings emphasize the essential roles of FAM20A in the development of dental and oral tissues.

  3. A novel autosomal-recessive mutation, whitish chalk-like teeth, resembling amelogenesis imperfecta, maps to rat chromosome 14 corresponding to human 4q21.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Taku; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Ohshima, Hayato; Osawa, Masaru; Yokoi, Norihide; Oikawa, Toshihiro; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2005-12-01

    A rat mutant, whitish chalk-like teeth (wct), with white, chalk-like abnormal incisors, was discovered and morphologically and genetically characterized. The mutant rats showed tooth enamel defects that were similar to those of human amelogenesis imperfecta. The wct mutation was found to disturb the morphological transition of ameloblasts from secretory to maturation stages and to induce cyst formation. This mutation also disturbs the transfer of iron into the enamel, resulting in the whitish chalk-like incisors. A genetic linkage study indicated that the wct locus maps to a specific interval of rat chromosome 14 between D14Got13 and D14Wox2. Interestingly, the human chromosomal region orthologous to wct, a 5.5-Mb interval in human chromosome 4q21, is a critical region for the locus of human amelogenesis imperfecta AIH2. These results strongly suggest that this wct mutant is a useful model for the identification of genes responsible for amelogenesis imperfecta and molecular mechanisms of tooth development.

  4. Effect of etching on bonding of a self-etch adhesive to dentine affected by amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Epasinghe, Don Jeevanie; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung

    2018-02-01

    Dentine affected by amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is histologically altered due to loss of hypoplastic enamel and becomes hypermineralized. In the present study, we examined the effect of additional acid etching on microtensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to AI-affected dentine. Flat coronal dentine obtained from extracted AI-affected and non-carious permanent molars were allocated to two groups: (a) Clearfil SE Bond (control); and (b) Clearfil SE Bond and additional etching with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. The bonded teeth were sectioned into .8-mm 2 beams for microtensile bond strength testing, and stressed to failure under tension. The bond strength data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (dentine type and etching step) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P<.05). Representative fractured beams from each group were examined under scanning electron microscopy. Both factors, dentine substrate (P<.001) and etching step (P<.05), and their interactions (P<.001), were statistically significant. Additional etching had an adverse effect on the bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond to normal dentine (P<.005), and no significant improvement was found for AI-affected dentine (P=.479). Additional acid etching does not improve the bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to AI-affected dentine. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Early Restorative Crown Therapy: An Interview Study with Adolescents and Young Adults on Their Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Anette; Hasselblad, Tove; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can present with rapid tooth loss or fractures of enamel as well as alterations in enamel thickness, color, and shape; factors that may compromise aesthetic appearance and masticatory function. The aim was to explore the experiences and perceptions of adolescents and young adults living with AI and receiving early prosthetic therapy. Seven patients with severe AI aged 16 to 23 years who underwent porcelain crown therapy participated in one-to-one individual interviews. The interviews followed a topic guide consisting of open-ended questions related to experiences of having AI. Transcripts from the interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The analysis process identified three main themes: Disturbances in daily life, Managing disturbances, and Normalization of daily life. These themes explain the experiences of patients living with enamel disturbances caused by AI and receiving early crown therapy. Experiences include severe pain and sensitivity problems, feelings of embarrassment, and dealing with dental staff that lack knowledge and understanding of their condition. The patients described ways to manage their disturbances and to reduce pain when eating or drinking, and strategies for meeting other people. After definitive treatment with porcelain crown therapy, they described feeling like a normal patient. In conclusion the results showed that adolescents and young adults describe a profound effect of AI on several aspects of their daily life. PMID:27359125

  6. Noninvasive and multidisciplinary approach to the functional and esthetic rehabilitation of amelogenesis imperfecta: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Juliana Feltrin; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Paschoal, Marco Aurélio Benini; Campos, Edson Alves; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Losso, Estela Maris; Cordeiro, Rita de Cássia Loiola

    2014-01-01

    Case Report. An 8-year-old girl with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) reported unsatisfactory aesthetics, difficulty in mastication, and dental hypersensitivity. The intraoral examination observed mixed dentition, malocclusion in anteroposterior relationships, anterior open bite, and dental asymmetry. A hypoplastic form of AI was diagnosed in the permanent dentition. A multidisciplinary planning was performed and divided into preventive, orthopedic, and rehabilitation stages. Initially, preventive treatment was implemented, with fluoride varnish applications, in order to protect the fragile enamel and reduce the dental sensitivity. In the second stage, the patient received an interceptive orthopedic treatment to improve cross-relationship of the arches during six months. Finally, the rehabilitation treatment was executed to establish the vertical dimension. In the posterior teeth, indirect composite resin crowns were performed with minimally invasive dental preparation. Direct composite resin restorations were used to improve the appearance of anterior teeth. Follow-Up. The follow-up was carried out after 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. After 18 months of follow-up, The restoration of integrity, oral hygiene, and patient satisfaction were observed . Conclusion. Successful reduction of the dental hypersensitivity and improvement of the aesthetic and functional aspects as well as quality of life were observed.

  7. Mutations in C4orf26, encoding a peptide with in vitro hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation and growth activity, cause amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A; Brookes, Steven J; Logan, Clare V; Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Sayed, Jihad; Raïf, El Mostafa; Shore, Roger C; Dashash, Mayssoon; Barron, Martin; Morgan, Joanne E; Carr, Ian M; Taylor, Graham R; Johnson, Colin A; Aldred, Michael J; Dixon, Michael J; Wright, J Tim; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2012-09-07

    Autozygosity mapping and clonal sequencing of an Omani family identified mutations in the uncharacterized gene, C4orf26, as a cause of recessive hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disease in which the formation of tooth enamel fails. Screening of a panel of 57 autosomal-recessive AI-affected families identified eight further families with loss-of-function mutations in C4orf26. C4orf26 encodes a putative extracellular matrix acidic phosphoprotein expressed in the enamel organ. A mineral nucleation assay showed that the protein's phosphorylated C terminus has the capacity to promote nucleation of hydroxyapatite, suggesting a possible function in enamel mineralization during amelogenesis. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutations in C4orf26, Encoding a Peptide with In Vitro Hydroxyapatite Crystal Nucleation and Growth Activity, Cause Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Brookes, Steven J.; Logan, Clare V.; Poulter, James A.; El-Sayed, Walid; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Sayed, Jihad; Raïf, El Mostafa; Shore, Roger C.; Dashash, Mayssoon; Barron, Martin; Morgan, Joanne E.; Carr, Ian M.; Taylor, Graham R.; Johnson, Colin A.; Aldred, Michael J.; Dixon, Michael J.; Wright, J. Tim; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Autozygosity mapping and clonal sequencing of an Omani family identified mutations in the uncharacterized gene, C4orf26, as a cause of recessive hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disease in which the formation of tooth enamel fails. Screening of a panel of 57 autosomal-recessive AI-affected families identified eight further families with loss-of-function mutations in C4orf26. C4orf26 encodes a putative extracellular matrix acidic phosphoprotein expressed in the enamel organ. A mineral nucleation assay showed that the protein’s phosphorylated C terminus has the capacity to promote nucleation of hydroxyapatite, suggesting a possible function in enamel mineralization during amelogenesis. PMID:22901946

  9. Amelogenesis imperfecta caused by N-terminal enamelin point mutations in mice and men is driven by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Smith, Claire E L; Poulter, James A; Mighell, Alan J; Inglehearn, Chris F; Brown, Catriona J; Rodd, Helen; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J

    2017-05-15

    'Amelogenesis imperfecta' (AI) describes a group of inherited diseases of dental enamel that have major clinical impact. Here, we identify the aetiology driving AI in mice carrying a p.S55I mutation in enamelin; one of the most commonly mutated proteins underlying AI in humans. Our data indicate that the mutation inhibits the ameloblast secretory pathway leading to ER stress and an activated unfolded protein response (UPR). Initially, with the support of the UPR acting in pro-survival mode, Enamp.S55I heterozygous mice secreted structurally normal enamel. However, enamel secreted thereafter was structurally abnormal; presumably due to the UPR modulating ameloblast behaviour and function in an attempt to relieve ER stress. Homozygous mutant mice failed to produce enamel. We also identified a novel heterozygous ENAMp.L31R mutation causing AI in humans. We hypothesize that ER stress is the aetiological factor in this case of human AI as it shared the characteristic phenotype described above for the Enamp.S55I mouse. We previously demonstrated that AI in mice carrying the Amelxp.Y64H mutation is a proteinopathy. The current data indicate that AI in Enamp.S55I mice is also a proteinopathy, and based on comparative phenotypic analysis, we suggest that human AI resulting from the ENAMp.L31R mutation is another proteinopathic disease. Identifying a common aetiology for AI resulting from mutations in two different genes opens the way for developing pharmaceutical interventions designed to relieve ER stress or modulate the UPR during enamel development to ameliorate the clinical phenotype. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Mapping of the locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to a 4-Mb YAC contig on chromosome 4q11-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Kaerrman, C.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K.

    1997-01-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (Al) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited enamel defects. We recently mapped a locus for autosomal dominant local hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to the long arm of chromosome 4. The disease gene was localized to a 17.6-cM region between the markers D4S392 and D4S395. The albumin gene (ALB), located in the same interval, was a candidate gene for autosomal dominant AI (ADAI) since albumin has a potential role in enamel maturation. Here we describe refined mapping of the AIH2 locus and the construction of marker maps by radiation hybrid mapping and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-basedmore » sequence tagged site-content mapping. A radiation hybrid map consisting of 11 microsatellite markers in the 5-cM interval between D4S409 and D4S1558 was constructed. Recombinant haplotypes in six Swedish ADAI families suggest that the disease gene is located in the interval between D4S2421 and ALB. ALB is therefore not likely to be the disease-causing gene. Affected members in all six families share the same allele haplotypes, indicating a common ancestral mutation in all families. The AIH2 critical region is less than 4 cM and spans a physical distance of approximately 4 Mb as judged from radiation hybrid maps. A YAC contig over the AIH2 critical region including several potential candidate genes was constructed. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  11. Correction of malocclusion and oral rehabilitation in a case of amelogenesis imperfecta by insertion of dental implants followed by Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis of the edentulous atrophic maxilla.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Aysegul; Sermet, Bulent; Ureturk, Sevin; Kundakcioglu, Abdulsamet

    2014-09-17

    Amelogenesis imperfecta refers a group of hereditary diseases affecting the teeth and can present a variety of clinical forms and appearances, compromising esthetic appearance. Amelogenesis imperfecta variably reduces oral health quality and can result in severe psychological problems. We present the management of an amelogenesis imperfecta Angle class III malocclusion case with speech, esthetics and functional problems. This is an example of the rarely presented delayed eruption with multiple morphologic dental alterations and edentulous maxilla.There are only a few available reports in which this method is used method to correct sagittal discrepancies in edentulous patients.Our treatment plan consisted of a preoperative diagnostic and prosthodontics phase (including preparation of guiding prosthesis), followed by a surgical phase of Le Fort I osteotomy, distraction osteogenesis to correct the malocclusion, implant insertion and a follow up final restorative phase. Our treatment strategy attempts to serve patient needs, achieving function and esthetics while also minimizing the risk of reconstruction failure. Treatment not only restored function and esthetics, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life.

  12. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gasse, Barbara; Prasad, Megana; Delgado, Sidney; Huckert, Mathilde; Kawczynski, Marzena; Garret-Bernardin, Annelyse; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Stoetzel, Corinne; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene ( MMP20 ) produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues), pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  13. Whole-exome sequencing, without prior linkage, identifies a mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to identifying the defective gene in a family with an inherited disease is to find the disease locus through family studies. However, the rapid development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing facilitates a more direct approach. Here, we report the identification of a frameshift mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Whole-exome sequencing of three affected family members and subsequent filtering of shared variants, without prior genetic linkage, sufficed to identify the pathogenic variant. Simultaneous analysis of multiple family members confirms segregation, enhancing the power to filter the genetic variation found and leading to rapid identification of the pathogenic variant. LAMB3 encodes a subunit of Laminin-5, one of a family of basement membrane proteins with essential functions in cell growth, movement and adhesion. Homozygous LAMB3 mutations cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and enamel defects are seen in JEB cases. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of dominant AI due to a LAMB3 mutation in the absence of JEB.

  14. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin – Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70→T point mutation observed in human amelogenesis imperfecta

    DOE PAGES

    Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-13

    Amelogenin is the predominant extracellular protein responsible for converting carbonated hydroxyapatite into dental enamel, the hardest and most heavily mineralized tissue in vertebrates. Despite much effort, the precise mechanism by which amelogenin regulates enamel formation is not fully understood. To assist efforts aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanism of enamel formation, more facile protocols to purify recombinantly expressed amelogenin, ideally without any tag to assist affinity purification, are advantageous. Here we describe an improved method to purify milligram quantities of amelogenin that exploits its high solubility in 2% glacial acetic acid under conditions of low ionic strength. The method involvesmore » heating the frozen cell pellet for two 15 min periods at ~70 ºC with two minutes of sonication in between, dialysis twice in 2% acetic acid (1:250 v/v), and reverse phase chromatography. A further improvement in yield is obtained by resuspending the frozen cell pellet in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride in the first step. The acetic acid heating method is illustrated with a murine amelogenin containing the corresponding P70→T point mutation observed in an human amelogenin associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (P71T), while the guanidine hydrochloride heating method is illustrated with wild type murine amelogenin (M180). The self-assembly properties of P71T were probed by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies as a function of protein (0.1 to 1.8 mM) and NaCl (0 to 367 mM) concentration. In conclusion, relative to similar studies with wild type murine amelogenin, P71T self-associates at lower protein or salt concentrations with the interactions initiated near the N-terminus.« less

  15. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Gasse, Barbara; Prasad, Megana; Delgado, Sidney; Huckert, Mathilde; Kawczynski, Marzena; Garret-Bernardin, Annelyse; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Stoetzel, Corinne; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene (MMP20) produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues), pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI. PMID:28659819

  16. Limited phenotypic variation of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta in a Danish five-generation family with a novel FAM83H nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Gjørup, Hans; Jensen, Lillian G; Juncker, Inger; Nyegaard, Mette; Børglum, Anders D; Poulsen, Sven; Hertz, Jens M

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND.  Autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta (ADHCAI) is a disease with severe dental manifestations. OBJECTIVES.  The aims were by means of a genome-wide linkage scan to search for the gene underlying the ADHCAI phenotype in a Danish five-generation family and to study the phenotypic variation of the enamel in affected family members. RESULTS.  Significant linkage was found to a locus at chromosome 8q24.3 comprising the gene FAM83H identified to be responsible for ADHCAI in other families. Subsequent sequencing of FAM83H in affected family members revealed a novel nonsense mutation, p.Y302X. Limited phenotypic variation was found among affected family members with loss of translucency and discoloration of the enamel. Extensive posteruptive loss of enamel was found in all teeth of affected subjects. The tip of the cusps on the premolars and molars and a zone along the gingival margin seemed resistant to posteruptive loss of enamel. We have screened FAM83H in another five unrelated Danish patients with a phenotype of ADHCAI similar to that in the five-generation family, and identified a de novo FAM83H nonsense mutation, p.Q452X in one of these patients. CONCLUSION.  We have identified a FAM83H mutation in two of six unrelated families with ADHCAI and found limited phenotypic variation of the enamel in these patients. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Amelogenesis imperfecta caused by N-terminal enamelin point mutations in mice and men is driven by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J.; Smith, Claire E.L.; Poulter, James A.; Mighell, Alan J.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Brown, Catriona J.; Rodd, Helen; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract ‘Amelogenesis imperfecta’ (AI) describes a group of inherited diseases of dental enamel that have major clinical impact. Here, we identify the aetiology driving AI in mice carrying a p.S55I mutation in enamelin; one of the most commonly mutated proteins underlying AI in humans. Our data indicate that the mutation inhibits the ameloblast secretory pathway leading to ER stress and an activated unfolded protein response (UPR). Initially, with the support of the UPR acting in pro-survival mode, Enamp.S55I heterozygous mice secreted structurally normal enamel. However, enamel secreted thereafter was structurally abnormal; presumably due to the UPR modulating ameloblast behaviour and function in an attempt to relieve ER stress. Homozygous mutant mice failed to produce enamel. We also identified a novel heterozygous ENAMp.L31R mutation causing AI in humans. We hypothesize that ER stress is the aetiological factor in this case of human AI as it shared the characteristic phenotype described above for the Enamp.S55I mouse. We previously demonstrated that AI in mice carrying the Amelxp.Y64H mutation is a proteinopathy. The current data indicate that AI in Enamp.S55I mice is also a proteinopathy, and based on comparative phenotypic analysis, we suggest that human AI resulting from the ENAMp.L31R mutation is another proteinopathic disease. Identifying a common aetiology for AI resulting from mutations in two different genes opens the way for developing pharmaceutical interventions designed to relieve ER stress or modulate the UPR during enamel development to ameliorate the clinical phenotype. PMID:28334996

  18. Identification of Mutations in SLC24A4, Encoding a Potassium-Dependent Sodium/Calcium Exchanger, as a Cause of Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Poulter, James A.; Logan, Clare V.; Brookes, Steven J.; Jafri, Hussain; Ferguson, Christopher H.; Anwari, Babra M.; Rashid, Yasmin; Zhao, Haiqing; Johnson, Colin A.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    A combination of autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a null mutation in SLC24A4 in a family with hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfect a (AI), a condition in which tooth enamel formation fails. SLC24A4 encodes a calcium transporter upregulated in ameloblasts during the maturation stage of amelogenesis. Screening of further AI families identified a missense mutation in the ion-binding site of SLC24A4 expected to severely diminish or abolish the ion transport function of the protein. Furthermore, examination of previously generated Slc24a4 null mice identified a severe defect in tooth enamel that reflects impaired amelogenesis. These findings support a key role for SLC24A4 in calcium transport during enamel formation. PMID:23375655

  19. Osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Marini, Joan C; Forlino, Antonella; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Bishop, Nick J; Byers, Peter H; Paepe, Anne De; Fassier, Francois; Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Krakow, Deborah; Montpetit, Kathleen; Semler, Oliver

    2017-08-18

    Skeletal deformity and bone fragility are the hallmarks of the brittle bone dysplasia osteogenesis imperfecta. The diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta usually depends on family history and clinical presentation characterized by a fracture (or fractures) during the prenatal period, at birth or in early childhood; genetic tests can confirm diagnosis. Osteogenesis imperfecta is caused by dominant autosomal mutations in the type I collagen coding genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2) in about 85% of individuals, affecting collagen quantity or structure. In the past decade, (mostly) recessive, dominant and X-linked defects in a wide variety of genes encoding proteins involved in type I collagen synthesis, processing, secretion and post-translational modification, as well as in proteins that regulate the differentiation and activity of bone-forming cells have been shown to cause osteogenesis imperfecta. The large number of causative genes has complicated the classic classification of the disease, and although a new genetic classification system is widely used, it is still debated. Phenotypic manifestations in many organs, in addition to bone, are reported, such as abnormalities in the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, skin fragility, muscle weakness, hearing loss and dentinogenesis imperfecta. Management involves surgical and medical treatment of skeletal abnormalities, and treatment of other complications. More innovative approaches based on gene and cell therapy, and signalling pathway alterations, are under investigation.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: amelogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... these proteins are involved in the formation of enamel, which is the hard, calcium-rich material that ... believed to be involved in the formation of enamel. Mutations in any of these genes result in ...

  1. Regulation of pH During Amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Nanci, Antonio; Kurtz, Ira; Wright, J Timothy; Paine, Michael L

    2010-02-01

    During amelogenesis, extracellular matrix proteins interact with growing hydroxyapatite crystals to create one of the most architecturally complex biological tissues. The process of enamel formation is a unique biomineralizing system characterized first by an increase in crystallite length during the secretory phase of amelogenesis, followed by a vast increase in crystallite width and thickness in the later maturation phase when organic complexes are enzymatically removed. Crystal growth is modulated by changes in the pH of the enamel microenvironment that is critical for proper enamel biomineralization. Whereas the genetic bases for most abnormal enamel phenotypes (amelogenesis imperfecta) are generally associated with mutations to enamel matrix specific genes, mutations to genes involved in pH regulation may result in severely affected enamel structure, highlighting the importance of pH regulation for normal enamel development. This review summarizes the intra- and extracellular mechanisms employed by the enamel-forming cells, ameloblasts, to maintain pH homeostasis and, also, discusses the enamel phenotypes associated with disruptions to genes involved in pH regulation.

  2. Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder in which bones break easily. Sometimes the bones break for no known reason. OI can also ... you make collagen, a protein that helps make bones strong. OI can range from mild to severe, ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions X-linked thrombocytopenia X-linked thrombocytopenia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked thrombocytopenia is a bleeding disorder that primarily ...

  4. X-linked congenital panhypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Schimke, R N; Spaulding, J J; Hollowell, J G

    1971-05-01

    Two half brothers with panhypopituitary dwarfism are reported who have the same mother and different, unrelated fathers. The subject of hereditary panhypopituitarism is reviewed briefly. It is concluded that there are at least two forms of hereditary panhypopituitary dwarfism, one of which may be X-linked.

  5. Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Justin Easow; Dharmalingam, Mala

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a common heritable connective tissue disorder. Nearly ninety percent are due to Type I collagen mutations. Type I-IV are autosomal dominant, and Type VI–XIII are autosomal recessive. They are Graded 1-5 based on severity. Genomic testing is done by collagen analysis from fibroblasts. The mainstay of treatment is bisphosphonate therapy. The prognosis is variable. PMID:29285457

  6. Deciphering defective amelogenesis using in vitro culture systems.

    PubMed

    Arinawati, Dian Yosi; Miyoshi, Keiko; Tanimura, Ayako; Horiguchi, Taigo; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    The conventional two-dimensional (2D) in vitro culture system is frequently used to analyze the gene expression with or without extracellular signals. However, the cells derived from primary culture and cell lines frequently deviate the gene expression profile compared to the corresponding in vivo samples, which sometimes misleads the actual gene regulation in vivo. To overcome this gap, we developed the comparative 2D and 3D in vitro culture systems and applied them to the genetic study of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) as a model. Recently, we found specificity protein 6 (Sp6) mutation in an autosomal-recessive AI rat that was previously named AMI. We constructed 3D structure of ARE-B30 cells (AMI-derived rat dental epithelial cells) or G5 (control wild type cells) combined with RPC-C2A cells (rat pulp cell line) separated by the collagen membrane, while in 2D structure, ARE-B30 or G5 was cultured with or without the collagen membrane. Comparative analysis of amelogenesis-related gene expression in ARE-B30 and G5 using our 2D and 3D in vitro systems revealed distinct expression profiles, showing the causative outcomes. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 and follistatin were reciprocally expressed in G5, but not in ARE-B30 cells. All-or-none expression of amelotin, kallikrein-related peptidase 4, and nerve growth factor receptor was observed in both cell types. In conclusion, our in vitro culture systems detected the phenotypical differences in the expression of the stage-specific amelogenesis-related genes. Parallel analysis with 2D and 3D culture systems may provide a platform to understand the molecular basis for defective amelogenesis caused by Sp6 mutation. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Forlino, Antonella; Marini, Joan C

    2016-04-16

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a phenotypically and molecularly heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders that share similar skeletal abnormalities causing bone fragility and deformity. Previously, the disorder was thought to be an autosomal dominant bone dysplasia caused by defects in type I collagen, but in the past 10 years discoveries of novel (mainly recessive) causative genes have lent support to a predominantly collagen-related pathophysiology and have contributed to an improved understanding of normal bone development. Defects in proteins with very different functions, ranging from structural to enzymatic and from intracellular transport to chaperones, have been described in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Knowledge of the specific molecular basis of each form of the disorder will advance clinical diagnosis and potentially stimulate targeted therapeutic approaches. In this Seminar, together with diagnosis, management, and treatment, we describe the defects causing osteogenesis imperfecta and their mechanism and interrelations, and classify them into five groups on the basis of the metabolic pathway compromised, specifically those related to collagen synthesis, structure, and processing; post-translational modification; folding and cross-linking; mineralisation; and osteoblast differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Circadian rhythms regulate amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Seon, Yoon Ji; Mourão, Marcio A; Schnell, Santiago; Kim, Doohak; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2013-07-01

    Ameloblasts, the cells responsible for making enamel, modify their morphological features in response to specialized functions necessary for synchronized ameloblast differentiation and enamel formation. Secretory and maturation ameloblasts are characterized by the expression of stage-specific genes which follows strictly controlled repetitive patterns. Circadian rhythms are recognized as key regulators of the development and diseases of many tissues including bone. Our aim was to gain novel insights on the role of clock genes in enamel formation and to explore the potential links between circadian rhythms and amelogenesis. Our data shows definitive evidence that the main clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) oscillate in ameloblasts at regular circadian (24 h) intervals both at RNA and protein levels. This study also reveals that the two markers of ameloblast differentiation i.e. amelogenin (Amelx; a marker of secretory stage ameloblasts) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (Klk4, a marker of maturation stage ameloblasts) are downstream targets of clock genes. Both, Amelx and Klk4 show 24h oscillatory expression patterns and their expression levels are up-regulated after Bmal1 over-expression in HAT-7 ameloblast cells. Taken together, these data suggest that both the secretory and the maturation stages of amelogenesis might be under circadian control. Changes in clock gene expression patterns might result in significant alterations of enamel apposition and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Circadian Rhythms Regulate Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li; Seon, Yoon Ji; Mourão, Marcio A.; Schnell, Santiago; Kim, Doohak; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblasts, the cells responsible for making enamel, modify their morphological features in response to specialized functions necessary for synchronized ameloblast differentiation and enamel formation. Secretory and maturation ameloblasts are characterized by the expression of stage-specific genes which follows strictly controlled repetitive patterns. Circadian rhythms are recognized as key regulators of development and diseases of many tissues including bone. Our aim was to gain novel insights on the role of clock genes in enamel formation and to explore the potential links between circadian rhythms and amelogenesis. Our data shows definitive evidence that the main clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) oscillate in ameloblasts at regular circadian (24h) intervals both at RNA and protein levels. This study also reveals that two markers of ameloblast differentiation i.e. amelogenin (Amelx; a marker of secretory ameloblasts) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (Klk4, a marker of maturation ameloblasts) are downstream targets of clock genes. Both, Amelx and Klk4 show 24h oscillatory expression patterns and their expression levels are up-regulated after Bmal1 over-expression in HAT-7 ameloblast cells. Taken together, these data suggest that both the secretory and the maturation stage of amelogenesis might be under circadian control. Changes in clock genes expression patterns might result in significant alterations of enamel apposition and mineralization. PMID:23486183

  10. Transcriptional factor DLX3 promotes the gene expression of enamel matrix proteins during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhichun; Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Wang, Weiping; Jia, Zhuqing; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3) is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO) inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease.

  11. The Unfolded Protein Response in Amelogenesis and Enamel Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Dixon, Michael J; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    During the secretory phase of their life-cycle, ameloblasts are highly specialized secretory cells whose role is to elaborate an extracellular matrix that ultimately confers both form and function to dental enamel, the most highly mineralized of all mammalian tissues. In common with many other "professional" secretory cells, ameloblasts employ the unfolded protein response (UPR) to help them cope with the large secretory cargo of extracellular matrix proteins transiting their ER (endoplasmic reticulum)/Golgi complex and so minimize ER stress. However, the UPR is a double-edged sword, and, in cases where ER stress is severe and prolonged, the UPR switches from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic mode. The purpose of this review is to consider the role of the ameloblast UPR in the biology and pathology of amelogenesis; specifically in respect of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) and fluorosis. Some forms of AI appear to correspond to classic proteopathies, where pathological intra-cellular accumulations of protein tip the UPR toward apoptosis. Fluorosis also involves the UPR and, while not of itself a classic proteopathic disease, shares some common elements through the involvement of the UPR. The possibility of therapeutic intervention by pharmacological modulation of the UPR in AI and fluorosis is also discussed.

  12. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with localized aggressive periodontitis and amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ajlan, Sumaiah Abdulbaqi

    2015-11-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an inherited medical condition that implies defects in steroid biosynthesis. The dental findings of a female patient with CAH are reported. The patient suffered from severe periodontal tissue destruction, obvious enamel defects, as well as some occlusal problems. The management approach is presented and the possibility of interrelation of her dental findings with her medical condition is discussed. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  13. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predictmore » which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.« less

  14. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions X-linked SCID X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is an inherited ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is a disorder that ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked myotubular myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions X-linked myotubular myopathy X-linked myotubular myopathy Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked myotubular myopathy is a condition that primarily ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked congenital stationary night blindness X-linked congenital stationary night blindness Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia (XLAG) is a ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 is a disorder of ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type is a condition ...

  4. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Claire; Ribes, Sandy; Wu, Yong; Diallo, Mamadou Tidiane; Salmon, Benjamin; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Houillier, Pascal; Müller, Dominik; Chaussain, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ) permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL). Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC), were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI). In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO) mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis. PMID:28596736

  5. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Ribes, Sandy; Wu, Yong; Diallo, Mamadou Tidiane; Salmon, Benjamin; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Houillier, Pascal; Müller, Dominik; Chaussain, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ) permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL). Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC), were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI). In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO) mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis.

  6. A Simulation of X-Linked Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to lead students through a classroom-based simulation to teach a variety of concepts such as X-linked traits, sex determination, and sex anomalies. The simulation utilizes inexpensive materials such as plastic eggs that twist apart to represent human eggs and sperm. (AIM)

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sep;104(3):221-30. Citation on PubMed Smith CIE, Berglöf A. X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia. 2001 Apr ... Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  8. FAM20A Gene Mutation: Amelogenesis or Ectopic Mineralization?

    PubMed

    Lignon, Guilhem; Beres, Fleur; Quentric, Mickael; Rouzière, Stephan; Weil, Raphael; De La Dure-Molla, Muriel; Naveau, Adrien; Kozyraki, Renata; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: FAM20A gene mutations result in enamel renal syndrome (ERS) associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), nephrocalcinosis, gingival fibromatosis, and impaired tooth eruption. FAM20A would control the phosphorylation of enamel peptides and thus enamel mineralization. Here, we characterized the structure and chemical composition of unerupted tooth enamel from ERS patients and healthy subjects. Methods: Tooth sections were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). Results: SEM revealed that prisms were restricted to the inner-most enamel zones. The bulk of the mineralized matter covering the crown was formed by layers with varying electron-densities organized into lamellae and micronodules. Tissue porosity progressively increased at the periphery, ending with loose and unfused nanonodules also observed in the adjoining soft tissues. Thus, the enamel layer covering the dentin in all ERS patients (except a limited layer of enamel at the dentino-enamel junction) displayed an ultrastructural globular pattern similar to one observed in ectopic mineralization of soft tissue, notably in the gingiva of Fam20a knockout mice. XRD analysis confirmed the existence of alterations in crystallinity and composition (vs. sound enamel). XRF identified lower levels of calcium and phosphorus in ERS enamel. Finally, EDS confirmed the reduced amount of calcium in ERS enamel, which appeared similar to dentin. Conclusion: This study suggests that, after an initial normal start to amelogenesis, the bulk of the tissue covering coronal dentin would be formed by different mechanisms based on nano- to micro-nodule aggregation. This evocated ectopic mineralization process is known to intervene in several soft tissues in FAM20A gene mutant.

  9. Transcriptional Factor DLX3 Promotes the Gene Expression of Enamel Matrix Proteins during Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichun; Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Wang, Weiping; Jia, Zhuqing; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3) is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO) inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease. PMID:25815730

  10. Lamellar macular hole in X linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Goel, Neha

    2016-01-01

    X linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is the most common juvenile onset retinal degeneration. The disorder leads to poor vision in old age. Complications, however, can lead to earlier loss of vision in this condition. This report describes two patients of XLRS, who had presented with poor vision because of having had a lamellar macular hole at a young age. Lamellar macular holes are rare and have never been reported to cause early onset poor vision in XLRS. PMID:27170611

  11. Lamellar macular hole in X linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Goel, Neha

    2016-05-11

    X linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is the most common juvenile onset retinal degeneration. The disorder leads to poor vision in old age. Complications, however, can lead to earlier loss of vision in this condition. This report describes two patients of XLRS, who had presented with poor vision because of having had a lamellar macular hole at a young age. Lamellar macular holes are rare and have never been reported to cause early onset poor vision in XLRS. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. What Is Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Other Related Conditions: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 ... approved drug products. Last Reviewed 2014-11 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 ...

  13. Dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Biria, Mina; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Mozaffar, Sedighe; Ahmadi, Rahil

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta. Systemic and dental manifestations of OI and its medical and dental treatments are discussed in this paper. A 5-year-old child with the diagnosis of OI was referred to the Dental School of Shaid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. On clinical examination yellow/brown discoloration of primary teeth with the attrition of the exposed dentin and class III malocclusion was observed. Enamel of first permanent molars was hypoplastic. Radiographic examinations confirmed the diagnosis of DI. A histological study was performed on one of the exfoliating teeth, which showed abnormal dentin. Primary teeth with DI were more severely affected compared to permanent teeth; enamel disintegration occurred in teeth with DI, demonstrating the need for restricts recalls for these patients. PMID:23162594

  14. X linked mental retardation: a clinical guide.

    PubMed

    Raymond, F L

    2006-03-01

    Mental retardation is more common in males than females in the population, assumed to be due to mutations on the X chromosome. The prevalence of the 24 genes identified to date is low and less common than expansions in FMR1, which cause Fragile X syndrome. Systematic screening of all other X linked genes in X linked families with mental retardation is currently not feasible in a clinical setting. The phenotypes of genes causing syndromic and non-syndromic mental retardation (NLGN3, NLGN4, RPS6KA3(RSK2), OPHN1, ATRX, SLC6A8, ARX, SYN1, AGTR2, MECP2, PQBP1, SMCX, and SLC16A2) are first discussed, as these may be the focus of more targeted mutation analysis. Secondly, the relative prevalence of genes causing only non-syndromic mental retardation (IL1RAPL1, TM4SF2, ZNF41, FTSJ1, DLG3, FACL4, PAK3, ARHGEF6, FMR2, and GDI) is summarised. Thirdly, the problem of recurrence risk where a molecular genetics diagnosis has not been made and what proportion of the male excess of mental retardation is due to monogenic disorders of the X chromosome are discussed.

  15. X-linked agammaglobulinemia in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trakultivakorn, Muthita; Ochs, Hans D

    2006-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by a failure to generate immunoglobulins of all isotypes due to the absence of mature B cells and plasma cells, secondary to mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene. We report six patients with XLA, confirmed by mutation analysis, from northern Thailand. The mean age of onset was 2.5 years and the mean age at diagnosis was 7.3 years. All patients had a history of otitis media, pneumonia and arthritis at the time of diagnosis, five patients had developed bronchiectasis and 3 patients septicemia. Other infections reported included sinusitis (5/6), pericarditis (1/6), meningitis (1/6) and pyoderma (1/6). Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated on multiple occasions. One patient died of sepsis at the age of 16 years. These observations demonstrate that early diagnosis and treatment can improve prognosis and quality of life.

  16. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of amore » large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.« less

  17. MiR-153 Regulates Amelogenesis by Targeting Endocytotic and Endosomal/lysosomal Pathways-Novel Insight into the Origins of Enamel Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kaifeng; Lin, Wenting; Guo, Jing; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Snead, Malcolm L; Hacia, Joseph G; Paine, Michael L

    2017-03-13

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is group of inherited disorders resulting in enamel pathologies. The involvement of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of AI is yet to be clarified due to a lack of knowledge about amelogenesis. Our previous genome-wide microRNA and mRNA transcriptome analyses suggest a key role for miR-153 in endosome/lysosome-related pathways during amelogenesis. Here we show that miR-153 is significantly downregulated in maturation ameloblasts compared with secretory ameloblasts. Within ameloblast-like cells, upregulation of miR-153 results in the downregulation of its predicted targets including Cltc, Lamp1, Clcn4 and Slc4a4, and a number of miRNAs implicated in endocytotic pathways. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed the predicted interactions between miR-153 and the 3'-UTRs of Cltc, Lamp1 (in a prior study), Clcn4 and Slc4a4. In an enamel protein intake assay, enamel cells transfected with miR-153 show a decreased ability to endocytose enamel proteins. Finally, microinjection of miR-153 in the region of mouse first mandibular molar at postnatal day 8 (PN8) induced AI-like pathologies when the enamel development reached maturity (PN12). In conclusion, miR-153 regulates maturation-stage amelogenesis by targeting key genes involved in the endocytotic and endosomal/lysosomal pathways, and disruption of miR-153 expression is a potential candidate etiologic factor contributing to the occurrence of AI.

  18. X-linked intellectual disability update 2017.

    PubMed

    Neri, Giovanni; Schwartz, Charles E; Lubs, Herbert A; Stevenson, Roger E

    2018-04-25

    The X-chromosome comprises only about 5% of the human genome but accounts for about 15% of the genes currently known to be associated with intellectual disability. The early progress in identifying the X-linked intellectual disability (XLID)-associated genes through linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing has been accelerated with the use of high-throughput technologies. In the 10 years since the last update, the number of genes associated with XLID has increased by 96% from 72 to 141 and duplications of all 141 XLID genes have been described, primarily through the application of high-resolution microarrays and next generation sequencing. The progress in identifying genetic and genomic alterations associated with XLID has not been matched with insights that improve the clinician's ability to form differential diagnoses, that bring into view the possibility of curative therapies for patients, or that inform scientists of the impact of the genetic alterations on cell organization and function. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Gastrointestinal Manifestations in X-linked Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Barmettler, Sara; Otani, Iris M.; Minhas, Jasmit; Abraham, Roshini S.; Chang, Yenhui; Dorsey, Morna J.; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Ochs, Hans D.; Walter, Jolan E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose X-linked agammaglobulinemia is a primary humoral immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and increased susceptibility to infection. Although there is increased awareness of autoimmune and inflammatory complications in XLA, the spectrum of gastrointestinal manifestations has not previously been fully explored. Methods We present a case report of a family with two affected patients with XLA. Given the gastrointestinal involvement of the grandfather in this family, we performed a retrospective descriptive analysis of XLA patients with reported diagnoses of GI manifestations and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or enteritis registered at the USIDNet, a national registry of primary immunodeficiencies. Results In this cohort of patients with XLA, we found that up to 35% had concurrent gastrointestinal manifestations, and 10% had reported diagnoses of IBD or enteritis. The most commonly reported mutations were missense, which have been associated with a less severe XLA phenotype in the literature. The severity of symptoms were wide-ranging, and management strategies were diverse and mainly experimental. Conclusions Patients with XLA may require close monitoring with particular attention for GI manifestations including IBD and infectious enteritis. Further studies are needed to improve diagnosis and management of GI conditions in XLA patients. PMID:28236219

  20. Anthropometric characteristics of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Pronicka, Ewa; Popowska, Ewa; Rowińska, Elzbieta; Arasimowicz, Elzbieta; Syczewska, Małgorzata; Jurkiewicz, Dorota; Lebiedowski, Michał

    2004-04-15

    An anthropometric study was undertaken to assess head proportions of patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). Fourteen morphometric parameters of the head were measured and 10 cephalic indices calculated in 82 affected persons (57 females and 25 males) from 55 unrelated families with XLH, and compared with the results obtained in the group of their healthy relatives (37 females and 33 males), as well as with general population control values. Normalized values (SD, z-score) were analyzed statistically. The group of healthy relatives, both males and females, differed significantly from Polish population control values in most of the normalized variables measured, making population control values useless as a control group for the analyzed XLH group. Intrafamilial values of cephalic parameters in healthy relatives of the XLH patients were finally applied for statistical analysis. Generally patients with XLH showed highly statistically significant increase in head length (males 0.95 +/- 1.07 vs. -0.37 +/- 1.02, females 0.57 +/- 1.59 vs. -0.06 +/- 1.15), significant decrease in occipital breadth (males -0.56 +/- 1.27 vs. 0.70 +/- 1.28, females -0.59 +/- 1.7 vs. 0.13 +/- 1.1) and several milder anomalies of craniofacial proportions. Mean cephalic index was significantly lower in XLH patients when compared with the healthy relatives (males -0.909 vs. 0.278 P < 0.0001, females -0.705 vs. 0.381 P = 0.007). The cephalic changes were found both in XLH children and XLH adults and were more pronounced in affected males than in females. There were no differences between offspring born by hypophosphatemic and normophosphatemic mothers. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Retinoic Acid Excess Impairs Amelogenesis Inducing Enamel Defects

    PubMed Central

    Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Mathieu, Eric; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Niederreither, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Abnormalities of enamel matrix proteins deposition, mineralization, or degradation during tooth development are responsible for a spectrum of either genetic diseases termed Amelogenesis imperfecta or acquired enamel defects. To assess if environmental/nutritional factors can exacerbate enamel defects, we investigated the role of the active form of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA). Robust expression of RA-degrading enzymes Cyp26b1 and Cyp26c1 in developing murine teeth suggested RA excess would reduce tooth hard tissue mineralization, adversely affecting enamel. We employed a protocol where RA was supplied to pregnant mice as a food supplement, at a concentration estimated to result in moderate elevations in serum RA levels. This supplementation led to severe enamel defects in adult mice born from pregnant dams, with most severe alterations observed for treatments from embryonic day (E)12.5 to E16.5. We identified the enamel matrix proteins enamelin (Enam), ameloblastin (Ambn), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (Odam) as target genes affected by excess RA, exhibiting mRNA reductions of over 20-fold in lower incisors at E16.5. RA treatments also affected bone formation, reducing mineralization. Accordingly, craniofacial ossification was drastically reduced after 2 days of treatment (E14.5). Massive RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on E14.5 and E16.5 lower incisors. Reductions in Runx2 (a key transcriptional regulator of bone and enamel differentiation) and its targets were observed at E14.5 in RA-exposed embryos. RNA-seq analysis further indicated that bone growth factors, extracellular matrix, and calcium homeostasis were perturbed. Genes mutated in human AI (ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, AMTN, KLK4) were reduced in expression at E16.5. Our observations support a model in which elevated RA signaling at fetal stages affects dental cell lineages. Thereafter enamel protein production is impaired, leading to permanent enamel alterations. PMID:28111553

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism syndrome (XDP): clinical and molecular genetic analysis. Brain Pathol. 1992 Oct;2(4):287-95. Review. Citation on PubMed Kaji R, Goto S, Tamiya G, Ando S, Makino S, Lee LV. Molecular dissection and anatomical basis of dystonia: X-linked ...

  3. Pleiotropic function of DLX3 in amelogenesis: from regulating pH and keratin expression to controlling enamel rod decussation.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Morasso, Maria I

    2018-12-01

    DLX3 is essential for tooth enamel development and is so far the only transcription factor known to be mutated in a syndromic form of amelogenesis imperfecta. Through conditional deletion of Dlx3 in the dental epithelium in mouse, we have previously established the involvement of DLX3 in enamel pH regulation, as well as in controlling the expression of sets of keratins that contribute to enamel rod sheath formation. Here, we show that the decussation pattern of enamel rods was lost in conditional knockout animals, suggesting that DLX3 controls the coordinated migration of ameloblasts during enamel secretion. We further demonstrate that DLX3 regulates the expression of some components of myosin II complexes potentially involved in driving the movement of ameloblasts that leads to enamel rod decussation.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... infects most humans. In some people it causes infectious mononucleosis (commonly known as "mono"). Normally, after initial infection, ... severe susceptibility to EBV infection severe susceptibility to infectious mononucleosis X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome XLP Related Information How ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked cardiac valvular dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis), abnormal blood clots, or sudden death. X-linked ... Johns Hopkins Medicine: Mitral Valve Prolapse MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Endocarditis MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Mitral Valve Prolapse General Information from ...

  6. X-linked mental retardation associated with macro-orchidism.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G; Eastman, C; Casey, J; McLeay, A; Procopis, P; Turner, B

    1975-01-01

    Two families are described with an X-linked form of mental retardation in whom the affected males were found to have bilateral enlargement of the testes. No conclusive evidence of any endocrinological disturbance was found. Images PMID:1240971

  7. Severe manifestations in carrier females in X linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Souied, E; Segues, B; Ghazi, I; Rozet, J M; Chatelin, S; Gerber, S; Perrault, I; Michel-Awad, A; Briard, M L; Plessis, G; Dufier, J L; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1997-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of progressive hereditary disorders of the retina in which various modes of inheritance have been described. Here, we report on X linked RP in nine families with constant and severe expression in carrier females. In our series, however, the phenotype was milder and delayed in carrier females compared to hemizygous males. This form of X linked RP could be regarded therefore as partially dominant. The disease gene maps to chromosome Xp2.1 in the genetic interval encompassing the RP3 locus (Zmax=13.71 at the DXS1100 locus). Single strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which accounts for RP3, failed to detect any mutation in our families. Future advances in the identification of X linked RP genes will hopefully help to elucidate the molecular basis of this X linked dominant RP. Images PMID:9350809

  8. MiR-153 Regulates Amelogenesis by Targeting Endocytotic and Endosomal/lysosomal Pathways–Novel Insight into the Origins of Enamel Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kaifeng; Lin, Wenting; Guo, Jing; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Snead, Malcolm L.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Paine, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is group of inherited disorders resulting in enamel pathologies. The involvement of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of AI is yet to be clarified due to a lack of knowledge about amelogenesis. Our previous genome-wide microRNA and mRNA transcriptome analyses suggest a key role for miR-153 in endosome/lysosome-related pathways during amelogenesis. Here we show that miR-153 is significantly downregulated in maturation ameloblasts compared with secretory ameloblasts. Within ameloblast-like cells, upregulation of miR-153 results in the downregulation of its predicted targets including Cltc, Lamp1, Clcn4 and Slc4a4, and a number of miRNAs implicated in endocytotic pathways. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed the predicted interactions between miR-153 and the 3′-UTRs of Cltc, Lamp1 (in a prior study), Clcn4 and Slc4a4. In an enamel protein intake assay, enamel cells transfected with miR-153 show a decreased ability to endocytose enamel proteins. Finally, microinjection of miR-153 in the region of mouse first mandibular molar at postnatal day 8 (PN8) induced AI-like pathologies when the enamel development reached maturity (PN12). In conclusion, miR-153 regulates maturation-stage amelogenesis by targeting key genes involved in the endocytotic and endosomal/lysosomal pathways, and disruption of miR-153 expression is a potential candidate etiologic factor contributing to the occurrence of AI. PMID:28287144

  9. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome Printable PDF Open All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome is an inherited disorder ...

  10. Osteogenesis imperfecta: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Telma; Vilaça, Tatiane; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2017-12-01

    Here we summarize the diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta, discuss newly discovered genes involved in osteogenesis imperfecta, and review the management of this disease in children and adults. Mutations in the two genes coding for collagen type I, COL1A1 and COL1A2, are the most common cause of osteogenesis imperfecta. In the past 10 years, defects in at least 17 other genes have been identified as responsible for osteogenesis imperfecta phenotypes, with either dominant or recessive transmission. Intravenous bisphosphonate infusions are the most widely used medical treatment. This has a marked effect on vertebra in growing children and can lead to vertebral reshaping after compression fractures. However, bisphosphonates are less effective for preventing long-bone fractures. At the moment, new therapies are under investigation. Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta, more research is needed. Bisphosphonate treatment decreases long-bone fracture rates, but such fractures are still frequent. New antiresorptive and anabolic agents are being investigated but efficacy and safety of these drugs, especially in children, need to be better established before they can be used in clinical practice.

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Burnei, Gheorghe; Vlad, Costel; Georgescu, Ileana; Gavriliu, Traian Stefan; Dan, Daniela

    2008-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable disorder characterized by extremely fragile bones, blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, and scoliosis. In 1979, Sillence classified the condition into four types based on genetic and clinical criteria. Three more classifications have subsequently been added. Diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta may be done prenatally (in severe cases), clinically, radiographically, or via biochemical or genetic examination. Medical treatment consists of bisphosphonate use, even in patients younger than age 2 years. Surgical treatment consists of internal splinting of long bones. Research is currently being done on the use of smart intramedullary rods (ie, composed of nitinol shape-memory alloy) for correction of bone deformity and on the use of bone marrow transplantation to increase osteoblast density, thereby reducing fracture frequency.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources (6 links) Cincinnati Children's Hospital: Coxa Vera Disease InfoSearch: Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda X-linked Johns ... Free article on PubMed Central Savarirayan R, Thompson E, Gécz J. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDL, MIM #313400). ...

  13. X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa in an American family

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disease with autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. At least 3 forms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa have been reported: RP2 which maps to Xp11.4-p 11.23, RP3 which maps to Xp21.1 and RP6, which maps to Xp21.3-p21.1. The X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa are generally considered to be recessive as female carriers are not affected or are much less affected than males. Here we report a five generation American family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in which both males and females are significantly affected. The disease locus in this family appears to be distinctmore » from RP2 and RP3. The American family (UTAD054) presents with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. The family appeared to fit an autosomal dominant pattern; however, linkage testing excluded all known adRP loci. Absence of male-to-male transmission in the pedigree suggested the possibility of X-linked dominant inheritance. Thus we tested six microsatellite markers that map to Xp (DXS987, DXS989, DXS993, DXS999, DXS1003 and DXS1110). Of these, DXS989 showed tight linkage with one allele (199) showing a 100% concordance with disease status. The odds favoring an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance in this family, versus autosomal dominant, are 10{sup 5}:1. In addition, recombinations for DXS999, and dXS1110, the two markers flanking DXS989, were observed in affected individuals. These data map the disease locus in this family to a 9 mb region on the X chromosome between Xp22.11 and Xp21.41. In addition, the recombinant individuals exclude close linkage to RP2 and RP3. The observance of high penetrance in females indicates that this family has X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We suggest that this mode of inheritance should be considered in other families with dominant retinitis pigmentosa but an absence of male-to-male transmission.« less

  14. Impaired plasticity of macrophages in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weinhofer, Isabelle; Zierfuss, Bettina; Hametner, Simon; Wagner, Magdalena; Popitsch, Niko; Machacek, Christian; Bartolini, Barbara; Zlabinger, Gerhard; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes; Köhler, Wolfgang; Höftberger, Romana; Regelsberger, Günther; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Lassmann, Hans; Berger, Johannes

    2018-05-30

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by ATP-binding cassette transporter D1 (ABCD1) mutations and manifests by default as slowly progressive spinal cord axonopathy with associated demyelination (adrenomyloneuropathy). In 60% of male cases, however, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy converts to devastating cerebral inflammation and demyelination (cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy) with infiltrating blood-derived monocytes and macrophages and cytotoxic T cells that can only be stopped by allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy at an early stage of the disease. Recently, we identified monocytes/macrophages but not T cells to be severely affected metabolically by ABCD1 deficiency. Here we found by whole transcriptome analysis that, although monocytes of patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy have normal capacity for macrophage differentiation and phagocytosis, they are pro-inflammatory skewed also in patients with adrenomyloneuropathy in the absence of cerebral inflammation. Following lipopolysaccharide activation, the ingestion of myelin debris, normally triggering anti-inflammatory polarization, did not fully reverse the pro-inflammatory status of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy macrophages. Immunohistochemistry on post-mortem cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy lesions reflected the activation pattern by prominent presence of enlarged lipid-laden macrophages strongly positive for the pro-inflammatory marker co-stimulatory molecule CD86. Comparative analyses of lesions with matching macrophage density in cases of cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy and acute multiple sclerosis showed a similar extent of pro-inflammatory activation but a striking reduction of anti-inflammatory mannose receptor (CD206) and haemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor (CD163) expression on cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy macrophages. Accordingly, ABCD1-deficiency leads to an impaired plasticity of macrophages that is reflected in incomplete establishment of anti-inflammatory responses

  15. Bmp2 Deletion Causes an Amelogenesis Imperfecta Phenotype Via Regulating Enamel Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FENG; FENG, JUNSHENG; WANG, FENG; LI, WENTONG; GAO, QINGPING; CHEN, ZHUO; SHOFF, LISA; DONLY, KEVIN J.; GLUHAK-HEINRICH, JELICA; CHUN, YONG HEE PATRICIA; HARRIS, STEPHEN E.; MACDOUGALL, MARY; CHEN, SHUO

    2015-01-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. PMID:25545831

  16. Bmp2 deletion causes an amelogenesis imperfecta phenotype via regulating enamel gene expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Wentong; Gao, Qingping; Chen, Zhuo; Shoff, Lisa; Donly, Kevin J; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Chun, Yong Hee Patricia; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: osteogenesis imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the COL1A1 , COL1A2 , CRTAP , and P3H1 genes cause osteogenesis imperfecta . Mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes are responsible for more than ...

  18. The Spine in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Maegen J; Kruse, Richard W; Shah, Suken A

    2017-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder of type I collagen. Although multiple genotypes and phenotypes are associated with osteogenesis imperfecta, approximately 90% of the mutations are in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by bone fragility. Patients typically have multiple fractures or limb deformity; however, the spine can also be affected. Spinal manifestations include scoliosis, kyphosis, craniocervical junction abnormalities, and lumbosacral pathology. The incidence of lumbosacral spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis is higher in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta than in the general population. Use of diphosphonates has been found to decrease the rate of progression of scoliosis in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. A lateral cervical radiograph is recommended in patients with this condition before age 6 years for surveillance of craniocervical junction abnormalities, such as basilar impression. Intraoperative and anesthetic considerations in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta include challenges related to fracture risk, airway management, pulmonary function, and blood loss.

  19. X linked exudative vitreoretinopathy: clinical features and genetic linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Fullwood, P; Jones, J; Bundey, S; Dudgeon, J; Fielder, A R; Kilpatrick, M W

    1993-03-01

    A four generation family in which familial exudative vitreoretinopathy is inherited as an X linked condition is described. Essentially the condition is one of abnormal vascularisation and signs at birth are those of a retinopathy superficially resembling retinopathy of prematurity, retinal folds, or, in advanced cases, enophthalmos or even phthisis. Prognosis depends on the progression of the retinal changes. The family members, including seven affected males and five obligate carrier females, have been types for 20 DNA markers, and linkage analysis suggests a gene locus either at Xq21.3 or at Xp11. As the latter region includes the locus for the gene for Norrie disease, it is possible that this and X linked vitreoretinopathy are allelic. We can further speculate that the differences in severity of the clinical manifestations are dependent only upon the timing of the insult.

  20. X-Linked Retinoschisis: Phenotypic Variability in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yangyan; Liu, Xiao; Tang, Luosheng; Wang, Xia; Coursy, Terry; Guo, Xiaojian; Li, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. Our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of a four generations of this family (a total of 18 members)with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and detected a novel mutations of c.3G > A (p.M1?) in the initiation codon of the RS1 gene. by direct sequencing.Identification of this mutation in this family provides evidence about potential genetic or environmental factors on its phenotypic variance, as patients presented with different phenotypes regardless of having the same mutation. Importantly, OCT has proven vital for XLRS diagnosis in children. PMID:26823236

  1. The multifocal electroretinogram in X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shizhou; Wu, Dezheng; Jiang, Futian; Luo, Guangwei; Liang, Jiongji; Wen, Feng; Yu, Minzhong; Long, Shixian; Wu, Lezheng

    2003-05-01

    To measure and compare the multifocal electroretinography in normal control and X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, 13 cases (13 right eyes) of normal control and nine cases (17 eyes) of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis were measured with VERIS Science 4.0. Four cases (eight eyes) out of the nine retinoschisis cases were tested with Ganzfeld ERG at the same day. The results showed statistically significant difference of average response densities and latencies in six ring retinal regions between the normal control and retinoschisis. The trace array and 3-D topography of multifocal ERG showed multi-area amplitude decrease with absence or reduction of central peak amplitude in patients with retinoschisis. The P1/N1 ratio of multifocal ERG average response densities in six ring retinal regions was different from the b/a ratio of Ganzfeld ERG. The multifocal ERG and Ganzfeld ERG each had its advantage in the diagnosis of retinoschisis.

  2. X-Linked Retinoschisis: Phenotypic Variability in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangyan; Liu, Xiao; Tang, Luosheng; Wang, Xia; Coursey, Terry G; Coursy, Terry; Guo, Xiaojian; Li, Zhuo

    2016-01-29

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. Our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of a four generations of this family (a total of 18 members)with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and detected a novel mutations of c.3G > A (p.M1?) in the initiation codon of the RS1 gene. by direct sequencing.Identification of this mutation in this family provides evidence about potential genetic or environmental factors on its phenotypic variance, as patients presented with different phenotypes regardless of having the same mutation. Importantly, OCT has proven vital for XLRS diagnosis in children.

  3. Genotypic analysis of X-linked retinoschisis in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lamey, Tina; Laurin, Sarina; Chelva, Enid; De Roach, John

    2010-01-01

    X-linked Retinoschisis is a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration. Four Western Australian families affected by X-Linked Retinoschisis were analysed using DNA and clinical information from the Australian Inherited Retinal Disease (IRD) Register and DNA Bank. By direct sequencing of the RS1 gene, three genetic variants were identified; 52+1G > T, 289T > G and 416delA. 289T > G has not been previously reported and is likely to cause a substitution of a membrane binding residue (W92G) in the functional discoidin domain. All clinically diagnosed individuals showed typical electronegative ERGs. The 52+1G > T obligate carrier also recorded a bilaterally abnormal rod ERG and mildly abnormal photopic responses. mfERG trace arrays showed reduced response densities in the paramacular region extending futher temporally for each eye.

  4. A family study of congenital X linked sideroblastic anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, J; May, A; Geddes, D; Jacobs, A

    1990-01-01

    We report on the cytogenetic findings in a family study of pyridoxine responsive, X linked sideroblastic anaemia. An increase in the number of X chromosomes was observed in a small proportion of metaphases prepared from five female members, but these findings did not strictly correlate with the carrier status of the condition. No consistent cytogenetic abnormality could be identified or associated with this rare familial condition. The diagnosis and counselling of carriers of this condition is discussed. Images PMID:2308152

  5. Macular hole in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Al-Swaina, Nayef; Nowilaty, Sawsan R

    2013-10-01

    An 18 year-old male with no antecedent of trauma, systemic syndrome or myopia was referred for surgical treatment of a full thickness macular hole in the left eye. A more careful inspection revealed discrete foveal cystic changes in the fellow eye and subtle peripheral depigmented retinal pigment epithelial changes in both eyes. A spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scan confirmed, in addition to the full thickness macular hole in the left eye, microcystic spaces in the nuclear layers of both retinae. The diagnosis of X-linked retinoschisis was confirmed with a full field electroretinogram displaying the typical negative ERG. Macular holes are uncommon in the young and those complicating X-linked retinoschisis are rare. This report highlights the importance of investigating the presence of a macular hole in a young patient and illustrates the clinical and SD-OCT clues beyond the foveal center which led to the correct diagnosis of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

  6. Phenotype-genotype correlations in X linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, J; Pelet, A; Martin, C; Delrieu, O; Aymé, S; Bonneau, D; Briard, M L; Hanauer, A; Larget-Piet, L; Lefrançois, P

    1992-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) represents a group of clinically heterogeneous retinal degenerations in which all modes of inheritance have been described. We have previously found two different clinical profiles in X linked RP as a function of age and mode of onset. The first clinical form has very early onset with severe myopia. The second form starts later with night blindness with mild myopia or none. At least two genes have been identified in X linked forms, namely RP2 (linked to DXS7, DXS255, and DXS14) and RP3 (linked to DXS84 and OTC) on the short arm of the X chromosome. In order to contribute to phenotype-genotype correlations in X linked RP, we tested the hypothesis that the two clinical profiles could be accounted for by the two different gene loci. The present study provides evidence for linkage of the clinical form with early myopia as the onset symptom with the RP2 gene (pairwise linkage to DXS255: Z = 3.13 at theta = 0), while the clinical form with later night blindness as the onset symptom is linked to the RP3 gene (pairwise linkage to OTC: Z = 4.16 at theta = 0). Images PMID:1357178

  7. Osteogenesis imperfecta with right renal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Vaish, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Nitin; Jain, Nirdesh; Agarwal, Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    We here report a case of osteogenesis imperfecta who presented with severe hypertension and left ventricular failure and had right renal artery occlusion. The case is very interesting as renal artery occlusion has not been reported earlier in osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:22962392

  8. Psychosocial aspects of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Landry, G L; Cole, D E

    1986-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by bone fragility and recurrent fractures. It is currently classified into four types on clinical grounds and appears to arise from different disorders of bone collagen synthesis. The biochemical identification of disturbances in collagen metabolism and the genetic delineation of new mutations of collagen genes have made prenatal diagnosis by molecular methods feasible in some cases. Most people with osteogenesis imperfecta suffer frequent fractures (and sometimes consequent serious disability), for which there are few effective preventive measures. This disorder may have a profound psychosocial influence on patients and their families. In this report the extent of this influence is reviewed and aspects important to the medical community are highlighted; these include the emotional burdens imposed by unfounded suspicions of child abuse, the social and financial costs of repeated hospitalization and immobility, and the frustrations generated by the lack of helpful, practical information for families and health care workers. An important social outcome has been the rise of self-help organizations, exemplified by the Canadian Osteogenesis Imperfecta Society. For Canadian families the society has been an important vehicle for exchange of information and an active, positive response to a lifelong, often severely disabling disorder. PMID:3756737

  9. Genetics Home Reference: immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions IPEX syndrome Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome primarily affects males and is ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions X-linked hyper IgM syndrome X-linked hyper IgM syndrome Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked hyper IgM syndrome is a condition that ...

  11. BTKbase, mutation database for X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA).

    PubMed Central

    Vihinen, M; Brandau, O; Brandén, L J; Kwan, S P; Lappalainen, I; Lester, T; Noordzij, J G; Ochs, H D; Ollila, J; Pienaar, S M; Riikonen, P; Saha, B K; Smith, C I

    1998-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the gene coding for Bruton's agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK). A database (BTKbase) of BTK mutations has been compiled and the recent update lists 463 mutation entries from 406 unrelated families showing 303 unique molecular events. In addition to mutations, the database also lists variants or polymorphisms. Each patient is given a unique patient identity number (PIN). Information is included regarding the phenotype including symptoms. Mutations in all the five domains of BTK have been noticed to cause the disease, the most common event being missense mutations. The mutations appear almost uniformly throughout the molecule and frequently affect CpG sites that code for arginine residues. The putative structural implications of all the missense mutations are given in the database. The improved version of the registry having a number of new features is available at http://www. helsinki.fi/science/signal/btkbase.html PMID:9399844

  12. Burosumab Therapy in Children with X-Linked Hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Thomas O; Whyte, Michael P; Imel, Erik A; Boot, Annemieke M; Högler, Wolfgang; Linglart, Agnès; Padidela, Raja; Van't Hoff, William; Mao, Meng; Chen, Chao-Yin; Skrinar, Alison; Kakkis, Emil; San Martin, Javier; Portale, Anthony A

    2018-05-24

    X-linked hypophosphatemia is characterized by increased secretion of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), which leads to hypophosphatemia and consequently rickets, osteomalacia, and skeletal deformities. We investigated burosumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets FGF-23, in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia. In an open-label, phase 2 trial, we randomly assigned 52 children with X-linked hypophosphatemia, in a 1:1 ratio, to receive subcutaneous burosumab either every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks; the dose was adjusted to achieve a serum phosphorus level at the low end of the normal range. The primary end point was the change from baseline to weeks 40 and 64 in the Thacher rickets severity total score (ranging from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating greater disease severity). In addition, the Radiographic Global Impression of Change was used to evaluate rachitic changes from baseline to week 40 and to week 64. Additional end points were changes in pharmacodynamic markers, linear growth, physical ability, and patient-reported outcomes and the incidence of adverse events. The mean Thacher rickets severity total score decreased from 1.9 at baseline to 0.8 at week 40 with every-2-week dosing and from 1.7 at baseline to 1.1 at week 40 with every-4-week dosing (P<0.001 for both comparisons); these improvements persisted at week 64. The mean serum phosphorus level increased after the first dose in both groups, and more than half the patients in both groups had levels within the normal range (3.2 to 6.1 mg per deciliter [1.0 to 2.0 mmol per liter]) by week 6. Stable serum phosphorus levels were maintained through week 64 with every-2-week dosing. Renal tubular phosphate reabsorption increased from baseline in both groups, with an overall mean increase of 0.98 mg per deciliter (0.32 mmol per liter). The mean dose of burosumab at week 40 was 0.98 mg per kilogram of body weight with every-2-week dosing and 1.50 mg per kilogram with every-4-week dosing. Across both

  13. Prenatal Correction of X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Holm; Faschingbauer, Florian; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Körber, Iris; Wohlfart, Sigrun; Dick, Angela; Wahlbuhl, Mandy; Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Vigolo, Michele; Kirby, Neil; Tannert, Corinna; Rompel, Oliver; Rascher, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schneider, Pascal

    2018-04-26

    Genetic deficiency of ectodysplasin A (EDA) causes X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), in which the development of sweat glands is irreversibly impaired, an condition that can lead to life-threatening hyperthermia. We observed normal development of mouse fetuses with Eda mutations after they had been exposed in utero to a recombinant protein that includes the receptor-binding domain of EDA. We administered this protein intraamniotically to two affected human twins at gestational weeks 26 and 31 and to a single affected human fetus at gestational week 26; the infants, born in week 33 (twins) and week 39 (singleton), were able to sweat normally, and XLHED-related illness had not developed by 14 to 22 months of age. (Funded by Edimer Pharmaceuticals and others.).

  14. Chiari malformation, syringomyelia and bulbar palsy in X linked hypophosphataemia

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Laura; Wordsworth, Paul

    2015-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) is a rare condition with numerous musculoskeletal complications. It may mimic other more familiar conditions, such as vitamin D deficiency, ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. We describe two cases with Chiari type 1 malformations and syringomyelia, neither of which is well recognised in XLH. The first presented late with the additional complications of spinal cord compression, pseudofracture, renal stones and gross femoroacetabular impingement requiring hip replacement. The second also had bulbar palsy; the first case to be described in this condition, to the best of our knowledge. We wish to raise awareness of the important neurological complications of syringomyelia, Chiari malformation, spinal cord compression and bulbar palsy when treating these patients. We also wish to draw attention to the utility of family history and genetic testing when making the diagnosis of this rare but potentially treatable condition. PMID:26561226

  15. Chiari malformation, syringomyelia and bulbar palsy in X linked hypophosphataemia.

    PubMed

    Watts, Laura; Wordsworth, Paul

    2015-11-11

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) is a rare condition with numerous musculoskeletal complications. It may mimic other more familiar conditions, such as vitamin D deficiency, ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. We describe two cases with Chiari type 1 malformations and syringomyelia, neither of which is well recognised in XLH. The first presented late with the additional complications of spinal cord compression, pseudofracture, renal stones and gross femoroacetabular impingement requiring hip replacement. The second also had bulbar palsy; the first case to be described in this condition, to the best of our knowledge. We wish to raise awareness of the important neurological complications of syringomyelia, Chiari malformation, spinal cord compression and bulbar palsy when treating these patients. We also wish to draw attention to the utility of family history and genetic testing when making the diagnosis of this rare but potentially treatable condition. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. A CLINICIAN'S GUIDE TO X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Thomas O.; Imel, Erik A.; Holm, Ingrid A.; Jan de Beur, Suzanne M.; Insogna, Karl L.

    2011-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is the prototypic disorder of renal phosphate wasting, and the most common form of heritable rickets. Physicians, patients, and XLH support groups have all expressed concerns about the dearth of information about this disease and the lack of treatment guidelines which frequently lead to missed diagnoses or mismanagement. This perspective addresses the recommendation by conferees for the dissemination of concise and accessible treatment guidelines for clinicians arising from the “Advances in Rare Bone Diseases Scientific Conference,” held at the National Institutes of Health in October 2008. We briefly review the clinical and pathophysiologic features of the disorder, and offer this guide in response to the conference recommendation, base on our collective accumulated experience in the management of this complex disorder. PMID:21538511

  17. Indocyanine green angiography of juvenile X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Souied, Eric H; Goritsa, Anna; Querques, Giuseppe; Coscas, Gabriel; Soubrane, Gisele

    2005-09-01

    In juvenile X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), fluorescein angiography is usually unremarkable and contributes poorly to the diagnosis. However, indocyanine green (ICG) angiography features in eyes that are affected with XLRS were not yet described. Retrospective observational case series. A complete ophthalmologic examination that included ICG angiography was performed on three unrelated male patients (six eyes) who were 15, 22, and 48 years old. A distinct hyperfluorescent stellate pattern in the macular area that was associated with radial lines of hypofluorescence that were centered on the foveola was observed on the early phase of ICG examination (six of six eyes). This feature disappeared on the late phase of ICG examination. On these six XLRS eyes, early phases of ICG examination revealed an unusual radial aspect on the macula. This finding suggests that ICG angiography may be useful for the diagnosis of XLRS.

  18. Bisphosphonate therapy for osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Dwan, Kerry; Phillipi, Carrie A; Steiner, Robert D; Basel, Donald

    2016-10-19

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is caused by a genetic defect resulting in an abnormal type I collagen bone matrix which typically results in multiple fractures with little or no trauma. Bisphosphonates are used in an attempt to increase bone mineral density and reduce these fractures in people with osteogenesis imperfecta. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To assess the effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates in increasing bone mineral density, reducing fractures and improving clinical function in people with osteogenesis imperfecta. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of journals and conference proceedings. We additionally searched PubMed and major conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Register: 28 April 2016. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing bisphosphonates to placebo, no treatment, or comparator interventions in all types of osteogenesis imperfecta. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included trials. Fourteen trials (819 participants) were included. Overall, the trials were mainly at a low risk of bias, although selective reporting was an issue in several of the trials. Data for oral bisphosphonates versus placebo could not be aggregated; a statistically significant difference favouring oral bisphosphonates in fracture risk reduction and number of fractures was noted in two trials. No differences were reported in the remaining three trials which commented on fracture incidence. Five trials reported data for spine bone mineral density; all found statistically significant increased lumbar spine density z scores for at least one time point studied. For intravenous bisphosphonates versus placebo

  19. Bisphosphonate therapy for osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Dwan, Kerry; Phillipi, Carrie A; Steiner, Robert D; Basel, Donald

    2014-07-23

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is caused by a genetic defect resulting in an abnormal type I collagen bone matrix which typically results in multiple fractures with little or no trauma. Bisphosphonates are used in an attempt to increase bone mineral density and reduce these fractures in people with osteogenesis imperfecta. To assess the effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates in increasing bone mineral density, reducing fractures and improving clinical function in people with osteogenesis imperfecta. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of journals and conference proceedings. We additionally searched PubMed and major conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 07 April 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing bisphosphonates to placebo, no treatment, or comparator interventions in all types of osteogenesis imperfecta. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included trials. Fourteen trials (819 participants) were included. Overall, the trials were mainly at a low risk of bias, although selective reporting was an issue in several of the trials. Data for oral bisphosphonates versus placebo could not be aggregated; a statistically significant difference favouring oral bisphosphonates in fracture risk reduction and number of fractures was noted in two trials. No differences were reported in the remaining three trials which commented on fracture incidence. Five trials reported data for spine bone mineral density; all found statistically significant increased lumbar spine density z scores for at least one time point studied. For intravenous bisphosphonates versus placebo, aggregated data from two trials showed no statistically significant difference for the number of participants with at least one fracture, risk ratio 0.56 (95

  20. Recent developments in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Joseph L.; Albert, Carolyne; Fritz, Jessica; Harris, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an uncommon genetic bone disease associated with brittle bones and fractures in children and adults. Although OI is most commonly associated with mutations of the genes for type I collagen, many other genes (some associated with type I collagen processing) have now been identified. The genetics of OI and advances in our understanding of the biomechanical properties of OI bone are reviewed in this article. Treatment includes physiotherapy, fall prevention, and sometimes orthopedic procedures. In this brief review, we will also discuss current understanding of pharmacologic therapies for treatment of OI. PMID:26401268

  1. Differential expression of syndecan isoforms during mouse incisor amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muto, Taro; Miyoshi, Keiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Nakada, Hiroshi; Okayama, Minoru; Matsuo, Takashi; Noma, Takafumi

    2007-08-01

    Syndecans are transmembranous heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan side-chains located on the cell surface. The mammalian syndecan family is composed of four types of syndecans (syndecan-1 to -4). Syndecans interact with the intracellular cytoskeleton through the cytoplasmic domains of their core proteins and membrane proteins, extracellular enzymes, growth factors, and matrix components, through their heparan-sulfate chains, to regulate developmental processes.Here, as a first step to assess the possible roles of syndecan proteins in amelogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of all syndecan isoforms in continuously growing mouse incisors, in which we can overview major differentiation stages of amelogenesis at a glance. Understanding the expression domain of each syndecan isoform during specific developmental stages seems useful for investigating their physiological roles in amelogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of syndecan core proteins in the lower incisors from postnatal day 1 mice revealed spatially and temporally specific expression patterns, with syndecan-1 expressed in undifferentiated epithelial and mesenchymal cells, and syndecan-2, -3, and -4 in more differentiated cells. These findings suggest that each syndecan isoform functions distinctly during the amelogenesis of the incisors of mice.

  2. X-linked dominant protoporphyria: The first reported Japanese case.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yukiko; Kokunai, Yasuhito; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Akasaka, Eijiro; Nakano, Hajime; Moriwaki, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    A 12-year-old boy with photosensitivity since 3 years of age presented with small concavities on both cheeks, the nasal root and the dorsal surface of both hands. According to the clinical features, erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) was suspected. Urine and blood samples were tested for porphyrin derivatives, which revealed a markedly elevated level of erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) and a diagnosis of EPP was made. The patient's mother had no photosensitivity, however, lesions appearing slightly as small scars were found on the dorsum of her right hand; his elder sister and father showed no rash. The EP levels were elevated in samples from his mother and mildly elevated in those from his elder sister and father. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, genetic analyses were performed using samples from all family members, which revealed no mutations in the ferrochelatase-encoding gene (FECH), which is responsible for EPP. Instead, a pathological mutation of the 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase-encoding gene (ALAS2) was identified in samples from the patient, his mother and his elder sister, confirming a definitive diagnosis of X-linked dominant protoporphyria (XLDPP). This is the first Japanese family reported to have XLDPP, demonstrating evidence of the condition in Japan. In addition, because XLDPP is very similar to EPP in its clinical aspects and laboratory findings, a genetic analysis is required for the differential diagnosis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Heterogeneity analysis in 40 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, P.W.; Aldred, M.A.; Dempster, M.

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in 40 kindreds with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), with 20 polymorphic markers, showed that significant heterogeneity is present (P=.001) and that 56% of kindreds are of RP3 type and that 26% are of RP2 type. The location of the RP3 locus was found to be 0.4 cM distal to OTC in the Xp21.1 region, and that of the RP2 locus was 6.5 cM proximal to DXS7 in Xp11.2-p11.3. Bayesian probabilities of linkage to RP2, RP3, or to neither locus were calculated. This showed that 20 of 40 kindreds could be assigned to one or the othermore » locus, with a probability >.70 (14 kindreds with RP3 and 6 kindreds with RP2 disease). A further three kindreds were found to be unlinked to either locus, with a probability >.8. The remaining 17 kindreds could not be classified unambiguously. This highlights the difficulty of classifying families in the presence of genetic heterogeneity, where two loci are separated by an estimated 16 cM. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.« less

  4. Status of Adults With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Winkelstein, Jerry A.; Conley, Mary Ellen; James, Cynthia; Howard, Vanessa; Boyle, John

    2010-01-01

    Since many children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) can now be expected to reach adulthood, knowledge of the status of adults with XLA would be of importance to the patients, their families, and the physicians caring for these patients. We performed the current study in adults with XLA to examine the impact of XLA on their daily lives and quality of life, their educational and socioeconomic status, their knowledge of the inheritance of their disorder, and their reproductive attitudes. Physicians who had entered adult patients with XLA in a national registry were asked to pass on a survey instrument to their patients. The patients then filled out the survey instrument and returned it directly to the investigators. Adults with XLA were hospitalized more frequently and missed more work and/or school than did the general United States population. However, their quality of life was comparable to that of the general United States population. They achieved a higher level of education and had a higher income than did the general United States population. Their knowledge of the inheritance of their disease was excellent. Sixty percent of them would not exercise any reproductive planning options as a result of their disease. The results of the current study suggest that although the disease impacts the daily lives of adults with XLA, they still become productive members of society and excel in many areas. PMID:18794707

  5. Evidence for Phex haploinsufficiency in murine X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Du, L; Ecarot, B

    1999-04-01

    Mutations in the PHEX gene (phosphate-regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemia (HYP). We previously reported the full-length coding sequence of murine Phex cDNA and provided evidence of Phex expression in bone and tooth. Here, we report the cloning of the entire 3.5-kb 3'UTR of the Phex gene, yielding a total of 6248 bp for the Phex transcript. Southern blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that the 3' end of the coding sequence and the 3'UTR of the Phex gene, spanning exons 16 to 22, are deleted in Hyp, the mouse model for HYP. Northern blot analysis of bone revealed lack of expression of stable Phex mRNA from the mutant allele and expression of Phex transcripts from the wild-type allele in Hyp heterozygous females. Expression of the Phex protein in heterozygotes was confirmed by Western analysis with antibodies raised against a COOH-terminal peptide of the mouse Phex protein. Taken together, these results indicate that the dominant pattern of Hyp inheritance in mice is due to Phex haploinsufficiency.

  6. [Gene mutation analysis of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Ma, Hong-Wei; Li, Fang; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Yu, Ya-Fen; Zhao, Gui-Jie

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of PHEX gene mutations in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), the possible presence of mutational hot spots, and the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Clinical data of 10 children with XLH was retrospectively reviewed. The relationship between gene mutation type and severity of XLH was evaluated. PHEX gene mutations were detected in all 10 children with XLH, including 6 cases of missense mutation, 2 cases of splice site mutation, 1 case of frameshift mutation, and 1 case of nonsense mutation. Two new mutations, c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG, were found. The type of PHEX gene mutation was not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.571 and 0.467), and the mutation site was also not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.400 and 1.000). Missense mutation is the most common type of PHEX gene mutation in children with XLH, and c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG are two new PHEX gene mutations. The type and site of PHEX gene mutation are not associated with the severity of XLH.

  7. Novel Phenotypic and Genotypic Findings in X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Vaclavik, Veronika; Bird, Alan C.; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe atypical phenotypes associated with the retinoschisis (X-linked, juvenile) 1 mutation (RS1). Methods Seven patients with multiple fine white dots at the macula and reduced visual acuity were evaluated. Six patients underwent pattern and full-field electroretinography (ERG). On-off ERG, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence imaging were performed in some patients. Mutational screening of RS1 was prompted by the ERG findings. Results Fine white dots resembling drusenlike deposits and sometimes associated with retinal pigment epithelial abnormalities were present in the maculae. An electronegative bright-flash ERG configuration was present in all patients tested, and abnormal pattern ERG findings confirmed macular dysfunction. A parafoveal ring of high-density autofluorescence was present in 3 eyes; 1 patient showed high-density foci concordant with the white dots. Optical coherence tomography did not show foveal schisis in 3 of 4 eyes. All patients carried mutations in RS1, including 1 with a novel 206T→C mutation in exon 4. Conclusions Multiple fine white dots at the macula may be the initial fundus feature in RS1 mutation. Electrophysiologic findings suggest dysfunction after phototransduction and enable focused mutational screening. Autofluorescence imaging results suggest early retinal pigment epithelium involvement; a parafoveal ring of high-density autofluorescence has not previously been described in this disorder. PMID:17296904

  8. Juvenile X-linked retinoschisis responsive to intravitreal corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Waseem H; Browne, Andrew W; Singh, Rishi P

    2017-04-01

    To report the case of an adult male with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) who presented with cystoid macular edema (CME) that responded consistently to treatment with intravitreal steroids. A 39 year old male with unilateral presentation of CME after repair of a retinal detachment secondary to XLRS responded initially to an injection of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA). Central subfield thickness on OCT was reduced. Three months later, the CME recurred and he was unresponsive to topical treatment so repeat IVTA was given, and the CME once again was reduced dramatically. After the next recurrence, intravitreal dexamethasone implant treatment was initiated and successful at treating recurrences in 3 month intervals for 5 additional injections. Finally, an intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide implant was surgically placed with control of CME. Corticosteroids have never been reported to be effective in CME related to XLRS. Here, we document a case of a man who successfully had decrease of intraretinal fluid and schisis with treatment of intravitreal corticosteroids as demonstrated by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

  9. Multifocal ERG findings in carriers of X-linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Linda S.; Seiple, William; Szlyk, Janet P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether retinal dysfunction in obligate carriers of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) could be observed in local electroretinographic responses obtained with the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG). Methods Nine obligate carriers of XLRS (mean age, 46.2 years) were examined for the study. Examination of each carrier included an ocular examination and mfERG testing. For the mfERG, we used a 103-scaled hexagonal stimulus array that subtended a retinal area of approximately 40° in diameter. The amplitudes and implicit times in each location for the mfERG were compared with the corresponding values determined for a group of 34 normally-sighted, age-similar control subjects. Results Mapping of 103 local electroretinographic response amplitudes and implicit times within a central 40° area with the mfERG showed regions of reduced mfERG amplitudes and delayed implicit times in two of nine carriers. Conclusions The mfERG demonstrated areas of retinal dysfunction in two carriers of XLRS. When present, retinal dysfunction was evident in the presence of a normal-appearing fundus. Multifocal ERG testing can be useful for identifying some carriers of XLRS. PMID:17180613

  10. [Importance of family examination in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis].

    PubMed

    Kłosowska-Zawadka, A; Bernardczyk-Meller, J; Gotz-Wieckowska, A; Krawczyński, M

    2005-12-01

    Congenital (juvenile) retinoschisis belongs to the group of hereditary vitreoretinopathies. This disorder is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern and its onset usually occurs in 5- to 10-year-old boys. Presenting clinical signs include decreased visual acuity due to maculopathy. The authors present a case of a 17-year-old boy with decreased visual acuity, hypermetropia, and bilateral retinoschisis with maculopathy upon fundus examination. In view of a 50% risk of the disorder occurring in the brothers of the affected male, they underwent full ophthalmological and electrophysiological examinations (until then asymptomatic). In one of them decreased visual acuity, mixed astigmatism, and maculopathy were present, without any changes of the peripheral retina. In the youngest brother decreased visual acuity, hypermetropia, and maculopathy were diagnosed. Genetic counseling and ophthalmological examination of family members at risk facilitated early recognition of the pathological changes in the siblings. Genetic counseling with pedigree analysis and genetic analysis, if possible, should be offered to all affected patients and family members.

  11. A natural history study of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Amburgey, Kimberly; Tsuchiya, Etsuko; de Chastonay, Sabine; Glueck, Michael; Alverez, Rachel; Nguyen, Cam-Tu; Rutkowski, Anne; Hornyak, Joseph; Beggs, Alan H; Dowling, James J

    2017-09-26

    To define the natural history of X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM). We performed a cross-sectional study that included an online survey (n = 35) and a prospective, 1-year longitudinal investigation using a phone survey (n = 33). We ascertained data from 50 male patients with MTM and performed longitudinal assessments on 33 affected individuals. Consistent with existing knowledge, we found that MTM is a disorder associated with extensive morbidities, including wheelchair (86.7% nonambulant) and ventilator (75% requiring >16 hours of support) dependence. However, unlike previous reports and despite the high burden of disease, mortality was lower than anticipated (approximate rate 10%/y). Seventy-six percent of patients with MTM enrolled (mean age 10 years 11 months) were alive at the end of the study. Nearly all deaths in the study were associated with respiratory failure. In addition, the disease course was more stable than expected, with few adverse events reported during the prospective survey. Few non-muscle-related morbidities were identified, although an unexpectedly high incidence of learning disability (43%) was noted. Conversely, MTM was associated with substantial burdens on patient and caregiver daily living, reflected by missed days of school and lost workdays. MTM is one of the most severe neuromuscular disorders, with affected individuals requiring extensive mechanical interventions for survival. However, among study participants, the disease course was more stable than predicted, with more individuals surviving infancy and early childhood. These data reflect the disease burden of MTM but offer hope in terms of future therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  12. A natural history study of X-linked myotubular myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amburgey, Kimberly; Tsuchiya, Etsuko; de Chastonay, Sabine; Glueck, Michael; Alverez, Rachel; Nguyen, Cam-Tu; Rutkowski, Anne; Hornyak, Joseph; Beggs, Alan H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To define the natural history of X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM). Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study that included an online survey (n = 35) and a prospective, 1-year longitudinal investigation using a phone survey (n = 33). Results: We ascertained data from 50 male patients with MTM and performed longitudinal assessments on 33 affected individuals. Consistent with existing knowledge, we found that MTM is a disorder associated with extensive morbidities, including wheelchair (86.7% nonambulant) and ventilator (75% requiring >16 hours of support) dependence. However, unlike previous reports and despite the high burden of disease, mortality was lower than anticipated (approximate rate 10%/y). Seventy-six percent of patients with MTM enrolled (mean age 10 years 11 months) were alive at the end of the study. Nearly all deaths in the study were associated with respiratory failure. In addition, the disease course was more stable than expected, with few adverse events reported during the prospective survey. Few non–muscle-related morbidities were identified, although an unexpectedly high incidence of learning disability (43%) was noted. Conversely, MTM was associated with substantial burdens on patient and caregiver daily living, reflected by missed days of school and lost workdays. Conclusions: MTM is one of the most severe neuromuscular disorders, with affected individuals requiring extensive mechanical interventions for survival. However, among study participants, the disease course was more stable than predicted, with more individuals surviving infancy and early childhood. These data reflect the disease burden of MTM but offer hope in terms of future therapeutic intervention. PMID:28842446

  13. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Gigantism: X-linked acrogigantism and GPR101 mutations.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, Donato; Korbonits, Márta

    X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) is a recently identified condition of early-onset GH excess resulting from the germline or somatic duplication of the GPR101 gene on chromosome Xq26.3. Thirty patients have been formally reported so far. The disease affects mostly females, occurs usually sporadically, and is characterised by early onset and marked overgrowth. Most patients present with concomitant hyperprolactinaemia. Histopathology shows pituitary hyperplasia or pituitary adenoma with or without associated hyperplasia. XLAG-related pituitary adenomas present peculiar histopathological features that should contribute to raise the suspicion of this rare condition. Treatment is frequently challenging and multi-modal. While females present with germline mutations, the sporadic male patients reported so far were somatic mosaics with variable levels of mosaicism, although no differences in the clinical phenotype were observed between patients with germline or somatic duplication. The GPR101 gene encodes an orphan G protein-coupled receptor normally expressed in the central nervous system, and at particularly high levels in the hypothalamus. While the physiological function and the endogenous ligand of GPR101 are unknown, the high expression of GPR101 in the arcuate nucleus and the occurrence of increased circulating GHRH levels in some patients with XLAG, suggest that increased hypothalamic GHRH secretion could play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarise the published evidence on XLAG and GPR101 and discuss the results of recent studies that have investigated the potential role of GPR101 variants in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypertension is a characteristic complication of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshie; Takagi, Masaki; Takeda, Ryojun; Miyai, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-03-31

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is a group of rare disorders caused by defective proximal tubular reabsorption of phosphate. Mutations in the PHEX gene are responsible for the majority of cases. There are very few reports of long-term complications of XLH other than skeletal and dental diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the phenotypic presentation of XLH during adulthood including complications other than skeletal and dental diseases. The clinical and biochemical phenotype of 22 adult patients with a PHEX gene mutation were examined retrospectively from their medical records. 6 patients had hypertension. The average age of hypertension onset was 29.0 years. Secondary hyperparathyroidism preceded the development of hypertension in 5 patients. 1 patient developed tertiary hyperparathyroidism. 15 patients had nephrocalcinosis. 2 patients had chronic renal dysfunction. Patients with hypertension had a significantly lower eGFR (p=0.010) compared to patients without hypertension. No significant difference was found in any other parameters. To examine the genotype-phenotype correlation, 10 adult males were chosen for analysis. No significant genotype-phenotype correlation analysis was revealed in any of the complications. However, there was a possibility that the age at nephrocalcinosis onset was younger in the non-missense mutation group than in the missense mutation group (p=0.063). This study corroborated the view that early-onset hypertension could be one of the characteristic complications seen in XLH patients. Considering the limited number of our patients, further study is necessary to address a potential cause of hypertension. XLH patients require careful lifelong treatment.

  16. Muscle abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, L-N.; Trejo, P.; Rauch, F.

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is mainly characterized by bone fragility but muscle abnormalities have been reported both in OI mouse models and in children with OI. Muscle mass is decreased in OI, even when short stature is taken into account. Dynamic muscle tests aiming at maximal eccentric force production reveal functional deficits that can not be explained by low muscle mass alone. However, it appears that diaphyseal bone mass is normally adapted to muscle force. At present the determinants of muscle mass and function in OI have not been clearly defined. Physiotherapy interventions and bisphosphonate treatment appear to have some effect on muscle function in OI. Interventions targeting muscle mass have shown encouraging results in OI animal models and are an interesting area for further research. PMID:28574406

  17. Structure/Psychophysical Relationships in X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lea D; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Klein, Martin; Pennesi, Mark E; Jayasundera, Thiran; Birch, David G

    2016-02-01

    To compare structural properties from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and psychophysical measures from a subset of patients enrolled in a larger multicenter natural history study of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). A subset of males (n = 24) participating in a larger natural history study of XLRS underwent high-resolution SDOCT. Total retina (TR) thickness and outer segment (OS) thickness were measured manually. Shape discrimination hyperacuity (SDH) and contour integration perimetry (CIP) were performed on an iPad with the myVisionTrack application. Sensitivity was measured with fundus-guided perimetry (4-2 threshold testing strategy; 10-2 grid, spot size 3, 68 points). Correlation was determined with Pearson's r correlation. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. Mean macular OS thickness was less in XLRS patients (17.2 ± 8.1 μm) than in controls (37.1 ± 5.7 μm; P < 0.0001) but mean TR thickness was comparable (P = 0.5884). For patients, total sensitivity was lower (13.2 ± 6.6 dB) than for controls (24.2 ± 2.4 dB; P = 0.0008) and had a strong correlation with photoreceptor OS (R(2) = 0.55, P = 0.0001) and a weak correlation with TR thickness (R(2) = 0.22, P = 0.0158). The XLRS subjects had a logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 ± 0.3 that was associated with OS (R(2) = 0.79, P < 0.0001) but not TR thickness (R(2) = 0.01, P = 0.6166). Shape DH and CIP inner ring correlated with OS (R(2) = 0.33, P = 0.0085 and R(2) = 0.47, P = 0.0001, respectively) but not TR thickness (R(2) = 0.0004, P = 0.93; R(2) = 0.0043, P = 0.75, respectively). When considered from a single visit, OS thickness within the macula is more closely associated with macular function than TR thickness within the macula in patients with XLRS.

  18. Visual Function in Carriers of X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Comander, Jason; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Sandberg, Michael A.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency and severity of visual function loss in female carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Design Case series. Participants XLRP carriers with cross-sectional data (n = 242) and longitudinal data (n = 34, median follow-up: 16 years, follow-up range: 3–37 years). Half of the carriers were from RPGR- or RP2-genotyped families. Methods Retrospective medical records review. Main Outcome Measures Visual acuities, visual field areas, final dark adaptation thresholds, and full-field ERGs to 0.5 Hz and 30 Hz flashes. Results In genotyped families, 40% of carriers showed a baseline abnormality on at least one of the three psychophysical tests. There was a wide range of function among carriers; for example 3 of 121 (2%) of genotyped carriers were legally blind due to poor visual acuity, some as young as 35 years of age. Visual fields were less affected than visual acuity. In all carriers, the average ERG amplitude to 30 Hz flashes was about 50% of normal, and the average exponential rate of amplitude loss over time was half that of XLRP males (3.7%/year vs 7.4%/year, respectively). Among obligate carriers with affected fathers and/or sons, 53 of 55 (96%) had abnormal baseline ERGs. Some carriers who initially had completely normal fundi in both eyes went on to develop moderately decreased vision, though not legal blindness. Among carriers with RPGR mutations, those with mutations in ORF15, compared to those in exons 1–14, had worse final dark adaptation thresholds and lower 0.5 Hz and 30 Hz ERG amplitudes. Conclusions Most carriers of XLRP had mildly or moderately reduced visual function but rarely became legally blind. In most cases, obligate carriers could be identified by ERG testing. Carriers of RPGR ORF15 mutations tended to have worse visual function than carriers of RPGR exon 1–14 mutations. Since XLRP carrier ERG amplitudes and decay rates over time were on average half of those of affected males, these observations were

  19. Lentiviral hematopoietic cell gene therapy for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Nathalie; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Bougnères, Pierre; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof Von; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Aubourg, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a severe genetic demyelinating disease caused by a deficiency in ALD protein, an adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter encoded by the ABCD1 gene. When performed at an early stage of the disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) can arrest the progression of cerebral demyelinating lesions. To overcome the limitations of allogeneic HCT, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy strategy aiming to perform autologous transplantation of lentivirally corrected cells was developed. We demonstrated the preclinical feasibility of HSC gene therapy for ALD based on the correction of CD34+ cells from X-ALD patients using an HIV1-derived lentiviral vector. These results prompted us to initiate an HSC gene therapy trial in two X-ALD patients who had developed progressive cerebral demyelination, were candidates for allogeneic HCT, but had no HLA-matched donors or cord blood. Autologous CD34+ cells were purified from the peripheral blood after G-CSF stimulation, genetically corrected ex vivo with a lentiviral vector encoding wild-type ABCD1 cDNA, and then reinfused into the patients after they had received full myeloablative conditioning. Over 3 years of follow-up, the hematopoiesis remained polyclonal in the two patients treated with 7-14% of granulocytes, monocytes, and T and B lymphocytes expressing the lentivirally encoded ALD protein. There was no evidence of clonal dominance or skewing based on the retrieval of lentiviral insertion repertoire in different hematopoietic lineages by deep sequencing. Cerebral demyelination was arrested 14 and 16months, respectively, in the two treated patients, without further progression up to the last follow-up, a clinical outcome that is comparable to that observed after allogeneic HCT. Longer follow-up of these two treated patients and HSC gene therapy performed in additional ALD patients are however needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of lentiviral HSC

  20. Structure/Psychophysical Relationships in X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lea D.; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Klein, Martin; Pennesi, Mark E.; Jayasundera, Thiran; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare structural properties from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and psychophysical measures from a subset of patients enrolled in a larger multicenter natural history study of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). Methods A subset of males (n = 24) participating in a larger natural history study of XLRS underwent high-resolution SDOCT. Total retina (TR) thickness and outer segment (OS) thickness were measured manually. Shape discrimination hyperacuity (SDH) and contour integration perimetry (CIP) were performed on an iPad with the myVisionTrack application. Sensitivity was measured with fundus-guided perimetry (4-2 threshold testing strategy; 10-2 grid, spot size 3, 68 points). Correlation was determined with Pearson's r correlation. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. Results Mean macular OS thickness was less in XLRS patients (17.2 ± 8.1 μm) than in controls (37.1 ± 5.7 μm; P < 0.0001) but mean TR thickness was comparable (P = 0.5884). For patients, total sensitivity was lower (13.2 ± 6.6 dB) than for controls (24.2 ± 2.4 dB; P = 0.0008) and had a strong correlation with photoreceptor OS (R2 = 0.55, P = 0.0001) and a weak correlation with TR thickness (R2 = 0.22, P = 0.0158). The XLRS subjects had a logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 ± 0.3 that was associated with OS (R2 = 0.79, P < 0.0001) but not TR thickness (R2 = 0.01, P = 0.6166). Shape DH and CIP inner ring correlated with OS (R2 = 0.33, P = 0.0085 and R2 = 0.47, P = 0.0001, respectively) but not TR thickness (R2 = 0.0004, P = 0.93; R2 = 0.0043, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusions When considered from a single visit, OS thickness within the macula is more closely associated with macular function than TR thickness within the macula in patients with XLRS. PMID:26830370

  1. FARVATX: FAmily-based Rare Variant Association Test for X-linked genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods. PMID:27325607

  2. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. [Osteogenesis imperfecta in monozygotic twins in Burundi].

    PubMed

    Armstrong, O; Karayuba, R; Ngendahayo, L; Habonimana, E

    1994-01-01

    Little data is available about osteogenesis imperfecta in Black African children. This defect was diagnosed in monozygotic twins from Rwanda who presented multiple fractures, in particular of the femur, when they began to walk. Osteogenesis imperfecta was confirmed by lower limb deformity, presence of wormian bones in the skull, blue sclera, and tooth defects. In addition to the fact that it is uncommon to encounter this condition in monozygotic twins, this case is interesting for several reasons. Was osteogenesis imperfecta in these patients type I, frequent, or type III, exceptional? More importantly, this case stresses the high prevalence of type III in Black Africa which could constitute a hot-bed in the world.

  4. A Comparison of Selective Pressures in Plant X-Linked and Autosomal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Krasovec, Marc; Filatov, Dmitry A.

    2018-01-01

    Selection is expected to work differently in autosomal and X-linked genes because of their ploidy difference and the exposure of recessive X-linked mutations to haploid selection in males. However, it is not clear whether these expectations apply to recently evolved sex chromosomes, where many genes retain functional X- and Y-linked gametologs. We took advantage of the recently evolved sex chromosomes in the plant Silene latifolia and its closely related species to compare the selective pressures between hemizygous and non-hemizygous X-linked genes as well as between X-linked genes and autosomal genes. Our analysis, based on over 1000 genes, demonstrated that, similar to animals, X-linked genes in Silene evolve significantly faster than autosomal genes—the so-called faster-X effect. Contrary to expectations, faster-X divergence was detectable only for non-hemizygous X-linked genes. Our phylogeny-based analyses of selection revealed no evidence for faster adaptation in X-linked genes compared to autosomal genes. On the other hand, partial relaxation of purifying selection was apparent on the X-chromosome compared to the autosomes, consistent with a smaller genetic diversity in S. latifolia X-linked genes (πx = 0.016; πaut = 0.023). Thus, the faster-X divergence in S. latifolia appears to be a consequence of the smaller effective population size rather than of a faster adaptive evolution on the X-chromosome. We argue that this may be a general feature of “young” sex chromosomes, where the majority of X-linked genes are not hemizygous, preventing haploid selection in heterogametic sex. PMID:29751495

  5. MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF MOSAIC RETINOPATHY IN CARRIERS OF HEREDITARY X-LINKED RECESSIVE DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Wu, An-Lun; Wang, Jung-Pan; Tseng, Yun-Ju; Liu, Laura; Kang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Chao, An-Ning; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Chen, Tun-Lu; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun; Wang, Nan-Kai

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the clinical features in carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked ocular albinism, and choroideremia (CHM) using multimodal imaging and to assess their diagnostic value in these three mosaic retinopathies. We prospectively examined 14 carriers of 3 X-linked recessive disorders (X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked ocular albinism, and CHM). Details of abnormalities of retinal morphology were evaluated using fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. In six X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carriers, fundus appearance varied from unremarkable to the presence of tapetal-like reflex and pigmentary changes. On FAF imaging, all carriers exhibited a bright radial reflex against a dark background. By spectral domain optical coherence tomography, loss of the ellipsoid zone in the macula was observed in 3 carriers (50%). Regarding the retinal laminar architecture, 4 carriers (66.7%) showed thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a dentate appearance of the outer plexiform layer. All five X-linked ocular albinism carriers showed a characteristic mud-splatter patterned fundus, dark radial streaks against a bright background on FAF imaging, and a normal-appearing retinal structure by spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging. Two of the 3 CHM carriers (66.7%) showed a diffuse moth-eaten appearance of the fundus, and all 3 showed irregular hyper-FAF and hypo-FAF spots throughout the affected area. In the CHM carriers, the structural changes observed by spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging were variable. Our findings in an Asian cohort suggest that FAF imaging is a practical diagnostic test for differentiating X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked ocular albinism, and CHM carriers. Wide-field FAF is an easy and helpful adjunct to testing for the correct diagnosis and identification of lyonization in carriers of these three mosaic retinopathies.

  6. A Comparison of Selective Pressures in Plant X-Linked and Autosomal Genes.

    PubMed

    Krasovec, Marc; Nevado, Bruno; Filatov, Dmitry A

    2018-05-03

    Selection is expected to work differently in autosomal and X-linked genes because of their ploidy difference and the exposure of recessive X-linked mutations to haploid selection in males. However, it is not clear whether these expectations apply to recently evolved sex chromosomes, where many genes retain functional X- and Y-linked gametologs. We took advantage of the recently evolved sex chromosomes in the plant Silene latifolia and its closely related species to compare the selective pressures between hemizygous and non-hemizygous X-linked genes as well as between X-linked genes and autosomal genes. Our analysis, based on over 1000 genes, demonstrated that, similar to animals, X-linked genes in Silene evolve significantly faster than autosomal genes—the so-called faster-X effect. Contrary to expectations, faster-X divergence was detectable only for non-hemizygous X-linked genes. Our phylogeny-based analyses of selection revealed no evidence for faster adaptation in X-linked genes compared to autosomal genes. On the other hand, partial relaxation of purifying selection was apparent on the X-chromosome compared to the autosomes, consistent with a smaller genetic diversity in S. latifolia X-linked genes (π x = 0.016; π aut = 0.023). Thus, the faster-X divergence in S. latifolia appears to be a consequence of the smaller effective population size rather than of a faster adaptive evolution on the X-chromosome. We argue that this may be a general feature of “young” sex chromosomes, where the majority of X-linked genes are not hemizygous, preventing haploid selection in heterogametic sex.

  7. New Perspectives on Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Forlino, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.

    2012-01-01

    A new paradigm has emerged for osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) as a collagen-related disorder. The more prevalent autosomal dominant forms of OI are caused by primary defects in type I collagen, while autosomal recessive forms are caused by deficiency of proteins which interact with type I procollagen for post-translational modification and/or folding. Factors contributing to the mechanism of dominant OI include intracellular stress, disruption of interactions between collagen and non-collagenous proteins, compromised matrix structure, abnormal cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and tissue mineralization. Recessive OI is caused by deficiency of any of the three components of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex; absence of 3-hydroxylation is associated with increased modification of the collagen helix, supporting delayed collagen folding. Other causes of recessive OI include deficiency of collagen chaperones, FKBP65 or HSP47. Murine models are crucial to uncovering the common pathways in dominant and recessive OI bone dysplasia. Clinical management of OI is multidiscipinary, encompassing substantial progress in physical rehabilitation and surgical procedures, managment of hearing, dental and pulmonary abnormalities, as well as drugs such as bisphosphonates and rGH. Novel treatments using cell therapy or new drug regimens hold promise for the future. PMID:21670757

  8. What is new in genetics and osteogenesis imperfecta classification?

    PubMed

    Valadares, Eugênia R; Carneiro, Túlio B; Santos, Paula M; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Zabel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Literature review of new genes related to osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and update of its classification. Literature review in the PubMed and OMIM databases, followed by selection of relevant references. In 1979, Sillence et al. developed a classification of OI subtypes based on clinical features and disease severity: OI type I, mild, common, with blue sclera; OI type II, perinatal lethal form; OI type III, severe and progressively deforming, with normal sclera; and OI type IV, moderate severity with normal sclera. Approximately 90% of individuals with OI are heterozygous for mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, with dominant pattern of inheritance or sporadic mutations. After 2006, mutations were identified in the CRTAP, FKBP10, LEPRE1, PLOD2, PPIB, SERPINF1, SERPINH1, SP7, WNT1, BMP1, and TMEM38B genes, associated with recessive OI and mutation in the IFITM5 gene associated with dominant OI. Mutations in PLS3 were recently identified in families with osteoporosis and fractures, with X-linked inheritance pattern. In addition to the genetic complexity of the molecular basis of OI, extensive phenotypic variability resulting from individual loci has also been documented. Considering the discovery of new genes and limited genotype-phenotype correlation, the use of next-generation sequencing tools has become useful in molecular studies of OI cases. The recommendation of the Nosology Group of the International Society of Skeletal Dysplasias is to maintain the classification of Sillence as the prototypical form, universally accepted to classify the degree of severity in OI, while maintaining it free from direct molecular reference. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Suspect osteogenesis imperfecta in a male kitten

    PubMed Central

    Evason, Michelle D.; Taylor, Susan M.; Bebchuk, Trevor N.

    2007-01-01

    A 4.5-month-old, male domestic shorthair was presented with bilateral femoral fractures after falling from a low height. Radiographs revealed reduced radio-opacity and thin cortices of all long bones. A presumptive diagnosis of osteodystrophy, secondary to osteogenesis imperfecta, was made on postmortem examination. PMID:17436908

  10. Contemporary Medical and Surgical Management of X-linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Melinda S; Grunseich, Karl; Carpenter, Thomas O

    2015-07-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia is an inheritable disorder of renal phosphate wasting that clinically manifests with rachitic bone pathology. X-linked hypophosphatemia is frequently misdiagnosed and mismanaged. Optimized medical therapy is the cornerstone of treatment. Even with ideal medical management, progressive bony deformity may develop in some children and adults. Medical treatment is paramount to the success of orthopaedic surgical procedures in both children and adults with X-linked hypophosphatemia. Successful correction of complex, multiapical bone deformities found in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia is possible with careful surgical planning and exacting surgical technique. Multiple methods of deformity correction are used, including acute and gradual correction. Treatment of some pediatric bony deformity with guided growth techniques may be possible. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  11. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:26395485

  12. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions XMEN X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus ...

  13. Role of prostaglandins in the pathogenesis of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Syal, Ashu; Quigley, Raymond; Seikaly, Mouin

    2006-08-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia is an X-linked dominant disorder resulting from a mutation in the PHEX gene. PHEX stands for phosphate-regulating gene with endopeptidase activity, which is located on the X chromosome. Patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia have hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate wasting and low or inappropriately normal levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The renal phosphate wasting is not intrinsic to the kidney but likely due to an increase in serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), and perhaps other phosphate-wasting peptides previously known as phosphatonins. Patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia have short stature, rickets, bone pain and dental abscesses. Current therapy is oral phosphate and vitamin D which effectively treats the rickets and bone pain but does not adequately improve short stature. In this review, we describe recent observations using Hyp mice; mice with the same mutation as patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia. We have recently found that Hyp mice have abnormal renal prostaglandin production, which may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Administration of FGF-23 in vivo results in phosphaturia and an increase in prostaglandin excretion, and FGF-23 increases proximal tubule prostaglandin production in vitro. In Hyp mice, indomethacin improves the phosphate transport defect in vitro and in vivo. Whether indomethacin has the same effect in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia is unknown.

  14. The dynamics of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirotaka; Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Amelogenesis is a multistep process that relies on specific temporal and spatial signaling networks between the dental epithelium and mesenchymal tissues. Epigenetic modifications of key developmental genes in this process may be closely linked to a network of molecular events. However, the role of epigenetic regulation in amelogenesis remains unclear. Here, we have uncovered the spatial distributions of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) to determine epigenetic events in the mandibular incisors of mice. Immunohistochemistry and dot blotting showed that 5-hmC in ameloblasts increased from the secretory stage to the later maturation stage. We also demonstrated the distribution of 5-mC-positive ameloblasts with punctate nuclear labeling from sometime after the initiation of the secretory stage to the later maturation stage; however, dot blotting failed to detect this change. No obvious alteration of 5-mC/5-hmC staining in odontoblasts and dental pulp cells was observed. Concomitant with quantitative expression data, immunohistochemistry showed that maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells and subsequently decreased at later stages of development. Meanwhile, de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b and DNA demethylase Tet family genes were universally expressed, except Tet1 that was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells. Thus, DNMT1 may sustain the undifferentiated status of dental epithelial cells through the maintenance of DNA methylation, while the hydroxylation of 5-mC may occur through the whole differentiation process by TET activity. Taken together, these data indicate that the dynamic changes of 5-mC and 5-hmC may be critical for the regulation of amelogenesis.

  15. Behavior of scoliosis during growth in children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Anissipour, Alireza K; Hammerberg, Kim W; Caudill, Angela; Kostiuk, Theodore; Tarima, Sergey; Zhao, Heather Shi; Krzak, Joseph J; Smith, Peter A

    2014-02-05

    Spinal deformities are common in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, a heritable disorder that causes bone fragility. The purpose of this study was to describe the behavior of spinal curvature during growth in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and establish its relationship to disease severity and medical treatment with bisphosphonates. The medical records and radiographs of 316 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta were retrospectively reviewed. The severity of osteogenesis imperfecta was classified with the modified Sillence classification. Serial curve measurements were recorded throughout the follow-up period for each patient with scoliosis. Regression analysis was used to determine the effect of disease severity (Sillence type), patient age, and bisphosphonate treatment on the progression of scoliosis as measured with the Cobb method. Of the 316 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, 157 had associated scoliosis, a prevalence of 50%. Scoliosis prevalence (68%) and mean progression rate (6° per year) were the highest in the group of patients with the most severe osteogenesis imperfecta (modified Sillence type III). A group with intermediate osteogenesis imperfecta severity, modified Sillence type IV, demonstrated intermediate scoliosis values (54%, 4° per year). The patient group with the mildest form of osteogenesis imperfecta, modified Sillence type I, had the lowest scoliosis prevalence (39%) and rate of progression (1° per year). Early treatment-before the patient reached the age of six years-of type-III osteogenesis imperfecta with bisphosphonate therapy decreased the curve progression rate by 3.8° per year, which was a significant decrease. Bisphosphonate treatment had no demonstrated beneficial effect on curve behavior in patients with other types of osteogenesis imperfecta or in patients of older age. The prevalence of scoliosis in association with osteogenesis imperfecta is high. Progression rates of scoliosis in children with osteogenesis

  16. Clinical and genetic features in autosomal recessive and X-linked Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Sivakumar, Vanessa; Mohammad, Mardhiah; Colville, Deb; Storey, Helen; Flinter, Frances; Dagher, Hayat; Savige, Judy

    2014-03-01

    This study determined the family history and clinical features that suggested autosomal recessive rather than X-linked Alport syndrome. All patients had the diagnosis of Alport syndrome and the mode of inheritance confirmed by genetic testing, and underwent examination at a single centre. Patients comprised 9 males and 6 females with autosomal recessive Alport syndrome, and 18 males and 22 females with X-linked disease. Fourteen (93 %) individuals with autosomal recessive Alport syndrome developed early end-stage renal failure, all 15 had hearing loss, and most had lenticonus (12, 80 %), and a central (13, 87 %) or peripheral (13, 87 %) retinopathy. These features occurred as often as in males with X-linked disease. Females with autosomal recessive inheritance were less likely to have an affected family member in another generation (p = 0.01) than females with X-linked disease. They were more likely to have renal failure (p = 0.003), hearing loss (p = 0.02) and lenticonus (p < 0.001). Fifty percent had a central retinopathy compared with 18 % with X-linked disease (p = 0.14), but peripheral retinopathy prevalence was not different (p = 0.64). Nonsense mutations accounted for 67 % (8/12) of these disease-causing mutations. Autosomal recessive inheritance is increased in females with Alport syndrome and early onset renal failure, hearing loss, lenticonus, and, possibly, central retinopathy.

  17. X-linked hypophosphatemia attributable to pseudoexons of the PHEX gene.

    PubMed

    Christie, P T; Harding, B; Nesbit, M A; Whyte, M P; Thakker, R V

    2001-08-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia is commonly caused by mutations of the coding region of PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome). However, such PHEX mutations are not detected in approximately one third of X-linked hypophosphatemia patients who may harbor defects in the noncoding or intronic regions. We have therefore investigated 11 unrelated X-linked hypophosphatemia patients in whom coding region mutations had been excluded, for intronic mutations that may lead to mRNA splicing abnormalities, by the use of lymphoblastoid RNA and RT-PCRs. One X-linked hypophosphatemia patient was found to have 3 abnormally large transcripts, resulting from 51-bp, 100-bp, and 170-bp insertions, all of which would lead to missense peptides and premature termination codons. The origin of these transcripts was a mutation (g to t) at position +1268 of intron 7, which resulted in the occurrence of a high quality novel donor splice site (ggaagg to gtaagg). Splicing between this novel donor splice site and 3 preexisting, but normally silent, acceptor splice sites within intron 7 resulted in the occurrences of the 3 pseudoexons. This represents the first report of PHEX pseudoexons and reveals further the diversity of genetic abnormalities causing X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  18. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Engelbert, R H; Pruijs, H E; Beemer, F A; Helders, P J

    1998-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal disorder of remarkable clinical variability characterized by bone fragility, osteopenia, variable degrees of short stature, and progressive skeletal deformities. Additional clinical manifestations such as blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, joint laxity, and maturity onset deafness are described in the literature. OI occurs in about 1 in 20,000 births and is caused by quantitative and qualitative defects in the synthesis of collagen I. Depending on the severity of the disease, a large impact on motor development, range of joint motion, muscle strength, and functional ability may occur. Treatment strategies should primarily focus on the improvement of functional ability and the adoption of compensatory strategies, rather than merely improving range of joint motion and muscle strength. Surgical treatment of the extremities may be indicated to stabilize the long bones to optimize functional ability and walking capacity. Surgical treatment of the spine may be indicated in patients with progressive spinal deformity and in those with symptomatic basilar impression.

  19. The prognosis for walking in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Daly, K; Wisbeach, A; Sanpera, I; Fixsen, J A

    1996-05-01

    We report a postal survey of 59 families of children with osteogenesis imperfecta. From the 51 replies we collected data on developmental milestones and walking ability and related them to the Sillence and the Shapiro classifications of osteogenesis imperfecta. Twenty-four of the patients had been treated by intramedullary rodding. Both classifications helped to predict eventual walking ability. We found that independent sitting by the age of ten months was a predictor for the use of walking as the main means of mobility with 76% attaining this. Of the patients who did not achieve sitting by ten months, walking became the main means of mobility in only 18%. The developmental pattern of mobility was similar in the rodded and non-rodded patients.

  20. Cardiovascular Involvement in Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Karamifar, Hamdollah; Ilkhanipoor, Homa; Ajami, Gholamhossein; Karamizadeh, Zohreh; Amirhakimi, Gholamhossein; Shakiba, Ali-Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective Osteogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary disease resulting from mutation in type I procollagen genes. One of the extra skeletal manifestations of this disease is cardiac involvement. The prevalence of cardiac involvement is still unknown in the children with osteogenesis imperfecta. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities in these patients. Methods 24 children with osteogenesis imperfecta and 24 normal children who were matched with the patients regarding sex and age were studied. In both groups, standard echocardiography was performed, and heart valves were investigated. Dimensions of left ventricle, aorta annulus, sinotubular junction, ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between the two groups. Findings The results revealed no significant difference between the two groups regarding age, sex, ejection fraction, shortening fraction, mean of aorta annulus, sinotubular junction, ascending and descending aorta, but after correction based on the body surface area, dimensions of aorta annulus, sinotubular junction, ascending and descending aorta in the patients were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Two (8.3%) patients had aortic insufficiency and five (20%) patients had tricuspid regurgitation, three of whom had gradient >25 mmHg and one patient had pulmonary insufficiency with indirect evidence of pulmonary hypertension. According to Z scores of aorta annulus, sinotubular junction and ascending aorta, 5, 3, and 1 out of 24 patients had Z scores >2 respectively. Conclusion The prevalence of valvular heart diseases and aortic root dilation was higher in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. In conclusion, cardiovascular investigation is recommended in these children. PMID:24800009

  1. Rehabilitation of infants with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Binder, H

    1995-01-01

    Experience gained over twelve years of treating infants with Osteogenesis Imperfecta is described. Emphasized are the facts that no child, including those with OI Sillence II, is too severely involved to not benefit at least from positioning to prevent severe secondary deformities; the Sillence classification does not predict functional ability, particularly regarding patiens with type III OI; disuse weakness and osteoporosis due to immobilization may be more handicapping than the underlying disease itself.

  2. Alport syndrome, mental retardation, midface hypoplasia, and elliptocytosis: a new X linked contiguous gene deletion syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, J J; Renieri, A; Gallagher, P G; Kashtan, C E; Cherniske, E M; Bruttini, M; Piccini, M; Vitelli, F; Ballabio, A; Pober, B R

    1998-01-01

    We describe a family with four members, a mother, two sons, and a daughter, who show clinical features consistent with X linked Alport syndrome. The two males presented with additional features including mental retardation, dysmorphic facies with marked midface hypoplasia, and elliptocytosis. The elliptocytosis was not associated with any detectable abnormalities in red cell membrane proteins; red cell membrane stability and rigidity was normal on ektacytometry. Molecular characterisation suggests a submicroscopic X chromosome deletion encompassing the entire COL4A5 gene. We propose that the additional abnormalities found in the affected males of this family are attributable to deletion or disruption of X linked recessive genes adjacent to the COL4A5 gene and that this constellation of findings may represent a new X linked contiguous gene deletion syndrome. Images PMID:9598718

  3. Use of topical dorzolamide for patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis: case report.

    PubMed

    Bastos, André Luís Carvalho de Moura; Freitas, Bruno de Paula; Villas Boas, Oscar; Ramiro, Alexandre Campelo

    2008-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a recessively inherited vitreoretinal degeneration characterized by macular pathology and splitting of the neuroretinal layers that is associated with alterations in the XLRS1 gene. There have been no therapeutic interventions known to be effective for patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, but some studies are trying to determine the importance of dorzolamide for the treatment of foveal lesions in this disease. The authors, using optical coherence tomography, describe findings in a patient with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, before and after a topical use of dorzolamide. Besides the improvement in his visual acuity, further studies are required to elucidate the real prevalence of nonresponse to dorzolamide and the frequency with which there may be a recurrence of foveal cystic changes during continued treatment.

  4. Screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy among adult men with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Horn, Morten A; Erichsen, Martina M; Wolff, Anette S B; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Husebye, Eystein S; Tallaksen, Chantal M E; Skjeldal, Ola H

    2013-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is an important cause of Addison's disease in boys, but less is known about its contribution to Addison's disease in adult men. After surveying all known cases of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in Norway in a separate study, we aimed to look for any missed cases among the population of adult men with nonautoimmune Addison's disease. Among 153 adult men identified in a National Registry for Addison's Disease (75% of identified male cases of Addison's disease in Norway), those with negative indices for 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies were selected. Additionally, cases with low autoantibody indices (48-200) were selected. Sera from subjects included were analysed for levels of very long-chain fatty acids, which are diagnostic for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in men. Eighteen subjects had negative indices and 17 had low indices for 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies. None of those with low indices and only one of those with negative indices were found to have X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy; this subject had already been diagnosed because of the neurological symptoms. Cases of Addison's disease proved to be caused by X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy constitute 1·5% of all adult male cases in Norway; the proportion among nonautoimmune cases was 15%. We found X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to be an uncommon cause of Addison's disease in adult men. However, this aetiological diagnosis has far-reaching consequences both for the patient and for his extended family. We therefore recommend that all adult men with nonautoimmune Addison's disease be analysed for levels of very long-chain fatty acids. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of XΔTsixY male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with XΔTsixX female cells. This increase reflected the inability of XΔTsixY cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with XΔTsixX cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in XΔTsixX female cells relative to XΔTsixY male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating XΔTsixY and 39,XΔTsix (XΔTsixO) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because XΔTsixX female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active XΔTsix X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing. PMID:26739568

  6. Retinal detachment 7 years after prophylactic schisis cavity excision in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Sobrin, Lucia; Berrocal, Audina M; Murray, Timothy G

    2003-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis developed a retinal detachment at the site of previous prophylactic excision of a schisis cavity. The patient underwent a scleral buckle procedure, pars plana vitrectomy, membrane peel, and silicone oil injection with successful reattachment. At last follow-up, the visual acuity was 20/400 and the retina was attached. Prophylactic excision of a schisis cavity may be complicated by retinal detachment several years after the surgery. Given the favorable natural history of schisis cavities in X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, the decision to perform prophylactic excision should be undertaken cautiously after full consideration of the potential complications.

  7. Neovascular glaucoma in a patient with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chengguo; Chen, Changzheng; Xing, Yiqiao; Du, Lei

    2005-09-01

    To report the rubeosis iridis and neovascular glaucoma findings in one patient of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis(XLRS). Color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography (FFA), OCT and B-scan were performed in a patient with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis complicated with neovascular glaucoma. Color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography (FFA), OCT and B-scan unveiled a rare condition of XLRS complicated with neovascular glaucoma. XLRS may complicate with neovascular glaucoma. It is necessary to test OCT, FFA, ERG and carefully examine the fundus of the follow eye when it comes to uncertain neovascular glaucoma of youth and child. And only in this way, can we exclude XLRS.

  8. X-Linked Intellectual Disability: Unique Vulnerability of the Male Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for approximately 16% of males with intellectual disability (ID). This is, in part, related to the fact that males have a single X chromosome. Progress in the clinical and molecular characterization of XLID has outpaced progress in the delineation of ID due to genes on the other 22 chromosomes.…

  9. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A.; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J.; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-01-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible. PMID:20511493

  10. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-08-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible.

  11. Genotype-phenotype variations in five Spanish families with Norrie disease or X-linked FEVR.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria José; Gimenez-Pardo, Ascension; Garcia-Hoyos, Maria; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta; Ramos, Carmen; Ayuso, Carmen

    2005-09-02

    Norrie disease (OMIM 310600) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital blindness in males. Approximately 40 to 50% of the cases develop deafness and mental retardation. X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR) is a hereditary ocular disorder characterized by a failure of peripheral retinal vascularization. Both X-linked disorders are due to mutations in the NDP gene, which encodes a 133 amino acid protein called Norrin, but autosomal recessive (AR) and autosomal dominant (AD) forms of FEVR have also been described. In this study, we report the molecular findings and the related phenotype in five Spanish families affected with Norrie disease or XL-FEVR due to mutations of the NDP gene. The study was conducted in 45 subjects from five Spanish families. These families were clinically diagnosed with Norrie disease or similar conditions. The three exons of the NDP gene were analyzed by automatic DNA sequencing. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Two new nonsense mutations, apart from other mutations previously described in the NDP gene, were found in those patients affected with ND or X-linked FEVR. An important genotype-phenotype variation was found in relation to the different mutations of the NDP gene. In fact, the same mutation may be responsible for different phenotypes. We speculate that there might be other molecular factors that interact in the retina with Norrin, which contribute to the resultant phenotypes.

  12. Non-syndromic posterior lenticonus a cause of childhood cataract: evidence for X-linked inheritance.

    PubMed

    Russell-Eggitt, I M

    2000-12-01

    When an X-linked pedigree of posterior lenticonus with cataract was identified further evidence for X-linked inheritance of this condition was sought. Forty-three cases of posterior lenticonus were identified from a database of 354 children with cataract. Two children with the X-linked syndromes of Lowe and Nance-Horan and 3 children with Fanconi syndrome have been excluded from further analysis. None of the children was deaf. None of the non-syndromic cases had microcornea. There were 38 cases of non-syndromic posterior lenticonus (approximately 11%). There were 15 children from 13 pedigrees and 23 apparently sporadic cases. Of the 106 cases on the database with unilateral cataract 15 had posterior lenticonus (approximately 14%). Eleven of 13 pedigrees were compatible with X-linked inheritance or autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expression. However, in 2 pedigrees there was father to son transmission. Posterior lenticonus is a common cause of unilateral infantile cataract, but is thought to be a rare cause of bilateral cataracts. This study suggests that posterior lenticonus is responsible for a significant proportion of childhood cataracts (approximately 14% of unilateral and approximately 9% of bilateral cases). Posterior lenticonus is generally thought to occur as a sporadic condition. This study demonstrates that there is a family history of early-onset cataract in a significant number of bilateral cases (approximately 58%).

  13. Pyoderma Gangrenosum–Like Ulcer in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick R.; Jain, Ashish; Uzel, Gulbu; Ranken, Raymond; Ivy, Cristina; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Turner, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers and cellulitis of the lower extremities associated with recurrent fevers in patients with X-linked (Bruton) agammaglobulinemia have been reported to be caused by Helicobacter bilis (formerly classified as Flexispira rappini and then Helicobacter strain flexispira taxon 8). Consistent themes in these reports are the difficulty in recovering this organism in blood and wound cultures and in maintaining isolates in vitro. We confirmed the presence of this organism in a patient’s culture by using a novel application of gene amplification polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Observation An adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with indurated plaques and a chronic leg ulcer whose origin was strongly suspected to be an H bilis organism. Histologic analysis demonstrated positive Warthin-Starry staining of curvilinear rods, which grew in culture but failed to grow when sub-cultured. They could not be identified by conventional techniques. A combination of gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of this organism. Conclusions This novel technology was useful in the identification of a difficult-to-grow Helicobacter organism, the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like leg ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Correct identification of this organism as the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia is of great importance for the early initiation of appropriate and curative antibiotic therapy. PMID:20479300

  14. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  15. CAPILLARY NETWORK ALTERATIONS IN X-LINKED RETINOSCHISIS IMAGED ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Romano, Francesco; Arrigo, Alessandro; Chʼng, Soon Wai; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Manitto, Maria Pia; Martina, Elisabetta; Bandello, Francesco; Stanga, Paulo E

    2018-06-05

    To assess foveal and parafoveal vasculature at the superficial capillary plexus, deep capillary plexus, and choriocapillaris of patients with X-linked retinoschisis by means of optical coherence tomography angiography. Six patients with X-linked retinoschisis (12 eyes) and seven healthy controls (14 eyes) were recruited and underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity, dilated fundoscopy, and 3 × 3-mm optical coherence tomography angiography macular scans (DRI OCT Triton; Topcon Corp). After segmentation and quality review, optical coherence tomography angiography slabs were imported into ImageJ 1.50 (NIH; Bethesda) and digitally binarized. Quantification of vessel density was performed after foveal avascular zone area measurement and exclusion. Patients were additionally divided into "responders" and "nonresponders" to dorzolamide therapy. Foveal avascular zone area resulted markedly enlarged at the deep capillary plexus (P < 0.001), particularly in nonresponders. Moreover, patients disclosed a significant deep capillary plexus rarefaction, when compared with controls (P: 0.04); however, a subanalysis revealed that this damage was limited to the fovea (P: 0.006). Finally, the enlargement of foveal avascular zone area positively correlated with a decline in best-corrected visual acuity (P: 0.01). Prominent foveal vascular impairment is detectable in the deep capillary plexus of patients with X-linked retinoschisis. Our results correlate with functional outcomes, suggesting a possible vascular role in X-linked retinoschisis clinical manifestations.

  16. Transcription map of Xq27: candidates for several X-linked diseases.

    PubMed

    Zucchi, I; Jones, J; Affer, M; Montagna, C; Redolfi, E; Susani, L; Vezzoni, P; Parvari, R; Schlessinger, D; Whyte, M P; Mumm, S

    1999-04-15

    Human Xq27 contains candidate regions for several disorders, yet is predicted to be a gene-poor cytogenetic band. We have developed a transcription map for the entire cytogenetic band to facilitate the identification of the relatively small number of expected candidate genes. Two approaches were taken to identify genes: (1) a group of 64 unique STSs that were generated during the physical mapping of the region were used in RT-PCR with RNA from human adult and fetal brain and (2) ESTs that have been broadly mapped to this region of the chromosome were finely mapped using a high-resolution yeast artificial chromosome contig. This combined approach identified four distinct regions of transcriptional activity within the Xq27 band. Among them is a region at the centromeric boundary that contains candidate regions for several rare developmental disorders (X-linked recessive hypoparathyroidism, thoracoabdominal syndrome, albinism-deafness syndrome, and Borjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome). Two transcriptionally active regions were identified in the center of Xq27 and include candidate regions for X-linked mental retardation syndrome 6, X-linked progressive cone dystrophy, X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 24, and a prostate cancer susceptibility locus. The fourth region of transcriptional activity encompasses the FMR1 (FRAXA) and FMR2 (FRAXE) genes. The analysis thus suggests clustered transcription in Xq27 and provides candidates for several heritable disorders for which the causative genes have not yet been found. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. MHC class 2 deficiency and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia in a consanguineous extended family.

    PubMed

    Broides, A; Shubinsky, G; Parvari, R; Grimbacher, B; Somech, R; Garty, B Z; Levy, J

    2009-08-01

    Manifestations of immunodeficiency within the same family are presumed to be the same disease. We report a consanguineous extended family where four patients have immunodeficiency, three have X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and one has major histocompatibility complex class 2 deficiency. Within one family, two rare genetic diseases with similar clinical manifestations can occur.

  18. Unusual phenotypic expression of an XLRS1 mutation in X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Jodi A; Srivastava, Anand K; Holden, Kenton R

    2006-04-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis is a rare progressive vitreoretinal degenerative process that appears in early childhood, results in decreased visual acuity and blindness (if severe), and is caused by various mutations within the XLRS1 gene at Xp22.2. We report an affected family of Western European ancestry with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. The family was found to carry a 304C-->T substitution in exon 4 of the XLRS1 gene, resulting in an Arg102Trp amino acid substitution. Two of the four available clinical cases in this family were found to carry the mutation. All available mothers of affected males were found to be unaffected carriers of the mutation, a typical feature of X-linked diseases. Two new female carriers, sisters of affected males, were identified and counseled accordingly. Questionnaires on visual functioning were given to the affected family members to examine the psychologic and sociologic impact of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, which documented an associated stigma even when affected with a "mild" phenotype.

  19. Structure of initial crystals formed during human amelogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Voegel, J. C.; Yacaman, J.; Frank, R. M.

    1992-02-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis revealed only the existence of carbonated hydroxyapatite (c.HA) during amelogenesis, whereas conventional transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that developing enamel crystals have a ribbon-like habit. The described compositional changes could be an indication for the presence of minerals different from c.HA. However, the absence of identification of such a mineral shows the need of studies by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) of initial formed human enamel crystals. We demonstrate the existence of two crystal families involved in the early stages of biomineralization: (a) nanometer-size particles which appeared as a precursor phase; (b) ribbon-like crystals, with a structure closely related to c.HA, which by a progressive thickening process tend to attain the mature enamel crystal habit.

  20. X-linked Alport syndrome caused by splicing mutations in COL4A5.

    PubMed

    Nozu, Kandai; Vorechovsky, Igor; Kaito, Hiroshi; Fu, Xue Jun; Nakanishi, Koichi; Hashimura, Yuya; Hashimoto, Fusako; Kamei, Koichi; Ito, Shuichi; Kaku, Yoshitsugu; Imasawa, Toshiyuki; Ushijima, Katsumi; Shimizu, Junya; Makita, Yoshio; Konomoto, Takao; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2014-11-07

    X-linked Alport syndrome is caused by mutations in the COL4A5 gene. Although many COL4A5 mutations have been detected, the mutation detection rate has been unsatisfactory. Some men with X-linked Alport syndrome show a relatively mild phenotype, but molecular basis investigations have rarely been conducted to clarify the underlying mechanism. In total, 152 patients with X-linked Alport syndrome who were suspected of having Alport syndrome through clinical and pathologic investigations and referred to the hospital for mutational analysis between January of 2006 and January of 2013 were genetically diagnosed. Among those patients, 22 patients had suspected splice site mutations. Transcripts are routinely examined when suspected splice site mutations for abnormal transcripts are detected; 11 of them showed expected exon skipping, but others showed aberrant splicing patterns. The mutation detection strategy had two steps: (1) genomic DNA analysis using PCR and direct sequencing and (2) mRNA analysis using RT-PCR to detect RNA processing abnormalities. Six splicing consensus site mutations resulting in aberrant splicing patterns, one exonic mutation leading to exon skipping, and four deep intronic mutations producing cryptic splice site activation were identified. Interestingly, one case produced a cryptic splice site with a single nucleotide substitution in the deep intron that led to intronic exonization containing a stop codon; however, the patient showed a clearly milder phenotype for X-linked Alport syndrome in men with a truncating mutation. mRNA extracted from the kidney showed both normal and abnormal transcripts, with the normal transcript resulting in the milder phenotype. This novel mechanism leads to mild clinical characteristics. This report highlights the importance of analyzing transcripts to enhance the mutation detection rate and provides insight into genotype-phenotype correlations. This approach can clarify the cause of atypically mild phenotypes in X-linked

  1. Localisation of the gene for X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations (PDR), previously known as X-linked cutaneous amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.

    1994-08-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (PDR), previously reported as X-linked cutaneous amyloidosis (MIM No. 301220), is characterized by brown pigmentation of the skin which follows the lines of Blaschko in females but appears as reticulate sheets in males. Males may suffer severe gastrointestinal disorders in infancy with failure to thrive and early death. Nowadays symptomatic treatment allows survival and other manifestations may appear such as corneal dystrophy with severe photophobia or chronic respiratory disease. Amyloid deposition in the skin may be no more than an age-dependent secondary manifestation. The PDR gene was localized by linkage analysis to Xp21-p22. The background geneticmore » map is Xpter-DXS996-22.5-DXS207-3.3-DXS999-3.3-DXS365-14.2-DXS989-4.1-3`DMD-3.5-DXS997-1.0-STR44-9.3-DYSI-2.3-DXS1068-11.0-DXS228 with distances between markers given in cM. Recombinants detected with DXS999 distally and DXS228 proximally, define the limits to the localization. Linkage was found with several markers within this interval. Peak lod scores of 3.21 at {theta} = 0.0 were obtained between PDR and DXS989 and between PDR and 5`DYSI within the dystrophin locus. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  2. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: prognosis for walking.

    PubMed

    Engelbert, R H; Uiterwaal, C S; Gulmans, V A; Pruijs, H; Helders, P J

    2000-09-01

    We studied the predicted value of disease-related characteristics for the ability of children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) to walk. The severity of OI was classified according to Sillence. The parents were asked to report the age at which the child achieved motor milestones, the fracture incidence, and the age and localization of the first surgical intervention. The present main means of mobility was classified according to Bleck. There were 76 replies to the 98 questionnaires, of which 70 were included (type I, 41; type III, 11; type IV, 18). The type of OI was strongly associated with current walking ability, as was the presence of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Patients with type III and IV had a lower chance of ultimately walking compared with those with type I. Children with more than 2 intramedullary rods in the lower extremities had a reduced chance of walking than patients without rods. Rolling over before 8 months, unsupported sitting before 9 months, the ability to get in sitting position without support before 12 months, and the ability to get in a standing position without support before 12 months showed positive odds ratios. In Bleck > or = 4, multivariate analysis revealed that only the presence of rodding (yes/no) in the lower extremities had additional predictive value to the type of OI. The presence of dentinogenesis imperfecta and rodding (yes/no) had additional value in Bleck > or = 5. The type of OI is the single most important clinical indicator of the ultimate ability to walk. Information about motor development adds little. The early achievement of motor milestones contributes to the ability of independent walking when the type of OI is uncertain. Intramedullary rodding of the lower extremities is primarily related to the severity of the disease and in this way provides consequences for the ability to walk.

  3. Hip and knee replacement in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Papagelopoulos, P J; Morrey, B F

    1993-04-01

    Five total hip and three total knee arthroplasties were performed, from 1969 to 1990, in six patients who had osteogenesis imperfecta. The patients who had a hip arthroplasty were followed for a mean of seven years, and those who had a knee arthroplasty, for a mean of ten years. Postoperatively, all had relief of pain and were able to walk; one patient used a walker and two used a cane. The only postoperative complication was an intrapelvic protrusion of the acetabular component six years after a bipolar hip replacement.

  4. Possible linkage of SP6 transcriptional activity with amelogenesis by protein stabilization.

    PubMed

    Utami, Trianna W; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Yanuaryska, Ryna Dwi; Horiguchi, Taigo; Noma, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    Ameloblasts produce enamel matrix proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and amelotin during tooth development. The molecular mechanisms of ameloblast differentiation (amelogenesis) are currently not well understood. SP6 is a transcription factor of the Sp/KLF family that was recently found to regulate cell proliferation in a cell-type-specific manner. Sp6-deficient mice demonstrate characteristic tooth anomalies such as delayed eruption of the incisors and supernumerary teeth with disorganized amelogenesis. However, it remains unclear how Sp6 controls amelogenesis. In this study, we used SP6 high producer cells to identify SP6 target genes. Based on the observations that long-term culture of SP6 high producer cells reduced SP6 protein expression but not Sp6 mRNA expression, we found that SP6 is short lived and specifically degraded through a proteasome pathway. We established an in vitro inducible SP6 expression system coupled with siRNA knockdown and found a possible linkage between SP6 and amelogenesis through the regulation of amelotin and Rock1 gene expression by microarray analysis. Our findings suggest that the regulation of SP6 protein stability is one of the crucial steps in amelogenesis.

  5. Possible Linkage of SP6 Transcriptional Activity with Amelogenesis by Protein Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Utami, Trianna W.; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Yanuaryska, Ryna Dwi; Horiguchi, Taigo; Noma, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    Ameloblasts produce enamel matrix proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and amelotin during tooth development. The molecular mechanisms of ameloblast differentiation (amelogenesis) are currently not well understood. SP6 is a transcription factor of the Sp/KLF family that was recently found to regulate cell proliferation in a cell-type-specific manner. Sp6-deficient mice demonstrate characteristic tooth anomalies such as delayed eruption of the incisors and supernumerary teeth with disorganized amelogenesis. However, it remains unclear how Sp6 controls amelogenesis. In this study, we used SP6 high producer cells to identify SP6 target genes. Based on the observations that long-term culture of SP6 high producer cells reduced SP6 protein expression but not Sp6 mRNA expression, we found that SP6 is short lived and specifically degraded through a proteasome pathway. We established an in vitro inducible SP6 expression system coupled with siRNA knockdown and found a possible linkage between SP6 and amelogenesis through the regulation of amelotin and Rock1 gene expression by microarray analysis. Our findings suggest that the regulation of SP6 protein stability is one of the crucial steps in amelogenesis. PMID:22046099

  6. Placental sulfatase deficiency: maternal and fetal expression of steroid sulfatase deficiency and X-linked ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, K D; Carr, B R

    1986-07-01

    PSD-X-linked ichthyosis are manifestations of a similar disorder of an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency of steroid sulfatase. The decreased enzyme activity is due to the absence of the expression of enzyme (steroid sulfatase) protein. Affected individuals with this disorder are males (X-linked inheritance) with a frequency of 1/2000 to 1/6000 births. Homozygous females from cosanguineous marriages have been reported with this disorder. The diagnosis is suspected and confirmed by: Low estriol excretion; Negative DHEAS loading test Increased DHEAS in amnionic fluid; Normal DHEAS in cord plasma; Possible delayed or abnormal labor patterns; Decreased sulfatase activity in the placenta, fibroblast, erythrocytes, lymphocytes or leukocytes of affected individuals; Development of ichthyosis in male infants at 2 to 3 months of age.

  7. [X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: a report of three cases. The importance of early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    López Úbeda, Marta; de Arriba Muñoz, Antonio; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José I; García Jiménez, María C

    2017-10-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is the most common peroxisomal disorder. This disease is caused by a defect in the ABCD1 gen. Saturated very long chain fatty acids are accumulated in serum, adrenal cortex and central nervous system white matter. The clinical spectrum is characterized by progressive neurological dysfunction and adrenal insufficiency with a devastating prognosis. We report a first case of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy with fatal evolution which identified two asymptomatic family members and established a preventive treatment. Although there is no definitive cure, we stress the importance of family study and evaluation of the individual in situation of risk to establish an early preventive treatment and to give in each particular situation suitable professional advice. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  8. A family with X-linked anophthalmia: exclusion of SOX3 as a candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne; Lee, Stephen S; Hamilton, Steven P

    2005-10-01

    We report on a four-generation family with X-linked anophthalmia in four affected males and show that this family has LOD scores consistent with linkage to Xq27, the third family reported to be linked to the ANOP1 locus. We sequenced the SOX3 gene at Xq27 as a candidate gene for the X-linked anophthalmia based on the high homology of this gene to SOX2, a gene previously mutated in bilateral anophthlamia. However, no amino acid sequence alterations were identified in SOX3. We have improved the definition of the phenotype in males with anophthalmia linked to the ANOP1 locus, as microcephaly, ocular colobomas, and severe renal malformations have not been described in families linked to ANOP1. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in heterozygous female patients: women are not just carriers.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Charles Marques; Simão, Gustavo Novelino; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Marques, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a recessive X-linked disorder associated with marked phenotypic variability. Female carriers are commonly thought to be normal or only mildly affected, but their disease still needs to be better described and systematized. To review and systematize the clinical features of heterozygous women followed in a Neurogenetics Clinic. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiological data of all women known to have X-ADL. The nine women identified were classified into three groups: with severe and aggressive diseases; with slowly progressive, spastic paraplegia; and with mildly decreased vibratory sensation, brisk reflexes, and no complaints. Many of these women did not have a known family history of X-ALD. Heterozygous women with X-ADL have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from mild to severe phenotypes.

  10. [Clinical and molecular study in a child with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Clarich, Gabriella; Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia encompasses more than 200 clinically distinct entities, which affect at least two structures derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is the most common type and is caused by mutation of the EDA gene that encodes Ectodysplasin-A. It occurs in less than 1 in 100 000 individuals and is clinically characterized by hypodontia, hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis, and eye dis orders. We present a child evaluated in a multidisciplinary manner with clinical and molecular diagnosis of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with type missense mutation c.1133C> T; p.T378M in EDA gene.

  11. Patulous Subarachnoid Space of the Optic Nerve Associated with X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Chaudhry, Imtiaz

    2013-01-01

    Although the deficiency forms are the most common manifestations of rickets, there are other forms of rickets that are resistant to vitamin D. Of these, the most common is X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Rickets represents a group of multiple cranial bone disorders-craniosynostosis and the presence of Chari I malformation being the most notable-that explain the increase in intracranial pressure. We present a 4-year-old patient with an unusual association of X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets, bilateral proptosis, and prominent bilateral widening of the optic nerve sheaths. Although the association between intracranial hypertension and rickets is known, to the best of our knowledge, such a prominent distention of the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve without papilloedema has not been previously described.

  12. Fatal hepatic hemorrhage by peliosis hepatis in X-linked myotubular myopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Motoki, T; Fukuda, M; Nakano, T; Matsukage, S; Fukui, A; Akiyoshi, S; Hayashi, Y K; Ishii, E; Nishino, I

    2013-11-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with X-linked myotubular myopathy complicated by peliosis hepatis. At birth, he was affected with marked generalized muscle hypotonia and weakness, which required permanent ventilatory support, and was bedridden for life. He died of acute fatal hepatic hemorrhage after using a mechanical in-exsufflator. Peliosis hepatis, defined as multiple, variable-sized, cystic blood-filled spaces through the liver parenchyma, was confirmed by autopsy. To avoid fatal hepatic hemorrhage by peliosis hepatis, routine hepatic function tests and abdominal imaging tests should be performed for patients with X-linked myotubular myopathy, especially at the time of using artificial respiration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Vitreoretinal surgery without schisis cavity excision for the management of juvenile X linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    García-Arumí, J; Corcóstegui, I A; Navarro, R; Zapata, M A; Berrocal, M H

    2008-11-01

    Juvenile X linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a congenital X linked recessive retinal disorder characterised by cystic maculopathy and peripheral schisis. This study presents the case of an 8-month-old boy with a documented positive family history of XLRS, with a large retinoschisis cavity affecting the macula, first in the left eye and 1 year later in the right eye. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy in both eyes using 23-G instruments, posterior hyaloid dissection, a small retinotomy, fluid drainage with a 42-G cannula, infrared diode laser and silicone oil as internal tamponade. The anatomical and functional outcomes at 3 years following the first surgery are described. To the authors' knowledge, there is no previously reported experience with this technique in patients with XLRS.

  14. Convergence of Human Genetics and Animal Studies: Gene Therapy for X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Ronald A.; Wei, Lisa L.; Sieving, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoschisis is an X-linked recessive genetic disease that leads to vision loss in males. X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) typically affects young males; however, progressive vision loss continues throughout life. Although discovered in 1898 by Haas in two brothers, the underlying biology leading to blindness has become apparent only in the last 15 years with the advancement of human genetic analyses, generation of XLRS animal models, and the development of ocular monitoring methods such as the electroretinogram and optical coherence tomography. It is now recognized that retinoschisis results from cyst formations within the retinal layers that interrupt normal visual neurosignaling and compromise structural integrity. Mutations in the human retinoschisin gene have been correlated with disease severity of the human XLRS phenotype. Introduction of a normal human retinoschisin cDNA into retinoschisin knockout mice restores retinal structure and improves neural function, providing proof-of-concept that gene replacement therapy is a plausible treatment for XLRS. PMID:26101206

  15. Challenges of Fracture Management for Adults With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; DeFroda, Steven F; Sindhu, Kunal; Cruz, Aristides I; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is caused by qualitative or quantitative defects in type I collagen. Although often considered a disease with primarily pediatric manifestations, more than 25% of lifetime fractures are reported to occur in adulthood. General care of adults with osteogenesis imperfecta involves measures to preserve bone density, regular monitoring of hearing and dentition, and maintenance of muscle strength through physical therapy. Surgical stabilization of fractures in these patients can be challenging because of low bone mineral density, preexisting skeletal deformities, or obstruction by instrumentation from previous surgeries. Additionally, unique perioperative considerations exist when operatively managing fractures in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. To date, there is little high-quality literature to help guide the optimal treatment of fractures in adult patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e17-e22.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  17. Genetic localization and phenotypic expression of X-linked cataract (Xcat) in Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Favor, J; Pretsch, W

    1990-01-01

    Linkage data relative to the markers tabby and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are presented to locate X-linked cataract (Xcat) in the distal portion of the mouse X-chromosome between jimpy and hypophosphatemia. The human X-linked cataract-dental syndrome, Nance-Horan Syndrome, also maps closely to human hypophosphatemia and would suggest homology between mouse Xcat and human Nance-Horan Syndrome genes. In hemizygous males and homozygous females penetrance is complete with only slight variation in the degree of expression. Phenotypic expression in Xcat heterozygous females ranges from totally clear to totally opaque lenses. The phenotypic expression between the two lenses of a heterozygous individual could also vary between totally clear and totally opaque lenses. However, a correlation in the degree of expression between the eyes of an individual was observed. A variegated pattern of lens opacity was evident in female heterozygotes. Based on these observations, the site of gene action for the Xcat locus is suggested to be endogenous to the lens cells and the precursor cell population of the lens is concluded to be small. The identification of an X-linked cataract locus is an important contribution to the estimate of the number of mutable loci resulting in cataract, an estimate required so that dominant cataract mutagenesis results may be expressed on a per locus basis. The Xcat mutation may be a useful marker for a distal region of the mouse X-chromosome which is relatively sparsely marked and the X-linked cataract mutation may be employed in gene expression and lens development studies.

  18. A novel UBE2A mutation causes X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento.

    PubMed

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Ohashi, Ikuko; Enomoto, Yumi; Naruto, Takuya; Mitsui, Jun; Aida, Noriko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (ID) type Nascimento (MIM #300860), also known as ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 A (UBE2A) deficiency syndrome, is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by moderate to severe ID, speech impairment, dysmorphic facial features, genital anomalies and skin abnormalities. Here, we report a Japanese patient with severe ID and congenital cataract. We identified a novel hemizygous mutation (c.76G>A, p.Gly26Arg) in UBE2A by whole-exome sequencing.

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of patients with sporadic and X-linked infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Deng, Wen-Li; Lei, Xin-Lan; Xing, Dong-Jun; Ye, Liang; Xu, Su-Zhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Xin-Ping; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nystagmus (IN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by involuntary rhythmic oscillations of the eyes accompanied by different degrees of vision impairment. Two genes have been identified as mainly causing IN: FRMD7 and GPR143. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic basis of both sporadic IN and X-linked IN. Design Prospective analysis. Patients Twenty Chinese patients, including 15 sporadic IN cases and 5 from X-linked IN families, were recruited and underwent molecular genetic analysis. We first performed PCR-based DNA sequencing of the entire coding region and the splice junctions of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes in participants. Mutational analysis and co-segregation confirmation were then performed. Setting All clinical examinations and genetic experiments were performed in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Results Two mutations in the FRMD7 gene, including one novel nonsense mutation (c.1090C>T, p.Q364X) and one reported missense mutation (c.781C>G, p.R261G), were identified in two of the five (40%) X-linked IN families. However, none of putative mutations were identified in FRMD7 or GPR143 in any of the sporadic cases. Conclusions The results suggest that mutations in FRMD7 appeared to be the major genetic cause of X-linked IN, but not of sporadic IN. Our findings provide further insights into FRMD7 mutations, which could be helpful for future genetic diagnosis and genetic counselling of Chinese patients with nystagmus. PMID:27036142

  20. Refined genetic mapping of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, P.R.; Barker, D.F.; Chance, P.F.

    1994-02-01

    Genetic linkage studies were conducted in four multigenerational families with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), using 12 highly polymorphic short-tandem-repeat markers for the pericentromeric region of the X Chromosome. Pairwise linkage analysis with individual markers confirmed tight linkage of CMTX to the pericentromeric region in each family. Multipoint analyses strongly support the order DXS337-CMTX-DXS441-(DXS56, PGK1). 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. X-linked ocular albinism in Blacks. Ocular albinism cum pigmento.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, F E; Green, W R; Fleischman, J A; Hambrick, G W

    1978-07-01

    X-linked ocular albinism can be an unsuspected cause of congenital nystagmus in blacks. In this study, eight of ten black ocular albinos from two kindreds had nonalbinotic, moderately pigmented fundi and no transillumination of the iris. We refer to this paradoxical condition as "ocular albinism cum pigmento." The only constant ophthalmoscopic feature was a foveal hypoplasia. Biopsy of clinically normal skin to demonstrate giant pigment granules is the most accurate means of diagnosis.

  2. Foveomacular schisis in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis: an optical coherence tomography study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Ni, Yingqin; Keane, Pearse A; Jiang, Chunhui; Wang, Wenji; Xu, Gezhi

    2010-06-01

    To explore the structural features of juvenile X-linked retinoschisis using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Retrospective, observational cross-sectional study. Eighteen male patients (34 eyes) who were diagnosed with juvenile X-linked retinoschisis at the Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University over an 18-month period were included. Their OCT images, which were obtained using spectral-domain OCT (Cirrus HD-OCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec), were analyzed. The anatomic location of the schisis cavity in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis was characterized by direct inspection of OCT images. On OCT, the schisis cavity was visible at the fovea in all 34 eyes, and it was associated with increased retinal thickness. Schisis was present at the retinal nerve fiber layer in 4 eyes, at the inner nuclear layer in 29 eyes, and at the outer nuclear layer/outer plexiform layer in 22 eyes. In most cases, widespread foveomacular schisis was detected using OCT; however, in 9 eyes (6 patients), the schisis was confined to the fovea. Schisis of the inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer/outer plexiform layer almost always involved the foveal center, but retinal nerve fiber layer schisis was seen only in the parafoveal area. Despite conventional wisdom, in patients with X-linked retinoschisis, the schisis cavity can occur in a number of different layers of the neurosensory retina (retinal nerve fiber layer, inner nuclear layer, and outer nuclear layer/outer plexiform layer). In addition, different forms of schisis may affect different locations in the macula (foveal vs parafoveal), and, in most eyes, the schisis involves the entire foveomacular region. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS): a review of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Kim, David Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is one of the most common genetic causes of juvenile progressive retinal-vitreal degeneration in males. To date, more than 196 different mutations of the RS1 gene have been associated with XLRS. The mutation spectrum is large and the phenotype variable. This review will focus on the clinical features of XLRS and examine the relationship between phenotype and genotype.

  4. Meiotic drive impacts expression and evolution of x-linked genes in stalk-eyed flies.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josephine A; Brand, Cara L; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Johns, Philip M; Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species.

  5. Paternal inheritance of classic X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Burkhard S; Kurzbuch, Katrin; Chang, Bernard S; Pauli, Elisabeth; Hamer, Hajo M; Winkler, Jürgen; Hehr, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a developmental disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by heterotopic nodules of gray matter resulting from disturbed neuronal migration. The most common form of bilateral PNH is X-linked dominant inherited, caused by mutations in the Filamin A gene (FLNA) and associated with a wide variety of other clinical findings including congenital heart disease. The typical patient with FLNA-associated PNH is female and presents with difficult to treat seizures. In contrast, hemizygous FLNA loss of function mutations in males are reported to be perinatally lethal. In X-linked dominant traits like FLNA-associated PNH the causal mutation is commonly inherited from the mother. Here, we present an exceptional family with paternal transmission of classic bilateral FLNA-associated PNH from a mildly affected father with somatic and germline mosaicism for a c.5686G>A FLNA splice mutation to both daughters with strikingly variable clinical manifestation and PNH extent in cerebral MR imaging. Our observations emphasize the importance to consider in genetic counseling and risk assessment the rare genetic constellation of paternal transmission for families with X-linked dominant inherited FLNA-associated PNH. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders.

    PubMed

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P; Webb, Tom R; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J; Maher, Eamonn R; Moore, Anthony T; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2009-07-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we show that NHS and X-linked cataract are allelic diseases. Two CXN families, which were negative for mutations in the NHS gene, were further analysed using array comparative genomic hybridization. CXN was found to be caused by novel copy number variations: a complex duplication-triplication re-arrangement and an intragenic deletion, predicted to result in altered transcriptional regulation of the NHS gene. Furthermore, we also describe the clinical and molecular analysis of seven families diagnosed with NHS, identifying four novel protein truncation mutations and a novel large deletion encompassing the majority of the NHS gene, all leading to no functional protein. We therefore show that different mechanisms, aberrant transcription of the NHS gene or no functional NHS protein, lead to different diseases. Our data highlight the importance of copy number variation and non-recurrent re-arrangements leading to different severity of disease and describe the potential mechanisms involved.

  7. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P.; Webb, Tom R.; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O.; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A.; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K.; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2009-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we show that NHS and X-linked cataract are allelic diseases. Two CXN families, which were negative for mutations in the NHS gene, were further analysed using array comparative genomic hybridization. CXN was found to be caused by novel copy number variations: a complex duplication–triplication re-arrangement and an intragenic deletion, predicted to result in altered transcriptional regulation of the NHS gene. Furthermore, we also describe the clinical and molecular analysis of seven families diagnosed with NHS, identifying four novel protein truncation mutations and a novel large deletion encompassing the majority of the NHS gene, all leading to no functional protein. We therefore show that different mechanisms, aberrant transcription of the NHS gene or no functional NHS protein, lead to different diseases. Our data highlight the importance of copy number variation and non-recurrent re-arrangements leading to different severity of disease and describe the potential mechanisms involved. PMID:19414485

  8. Mutational studies in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Cherryson, A.K.; Yeung, L.; Kennerson, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive disorders of the peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) is characterized by slow motor nerve conduction velocities in affected males and the presence of mildly affected or normal carrier females with intermediate or normal nerve conduction velocities. CMTX, which has an incidence of 3.1 per 100,000 and accounts for approximately 10% of CMT cases, has been mapped to Xq13. One of the genes lying in this region, connexin 32, has been found to contain alterations in individuals affected with X-linked CMT. We havemore » identified our X-linked families from dominant type 1 CMT families using the clinical criteria given above. These families were screened for point mutations in connexin 32. We have identified three missense mutations, a G{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 35 (valine to methionine), a C{r_arrow}G transition at amino acid 158 (proline to alanine) and a T{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 182 (serine to threonine). Another family showed a 18 bp deletion, which removed the amino acid 111 to 116 inclusive (histidine, glycine, aspartic acid, proline, leucine, histidine).« less

  9. Optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of juvenile X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Urban; Larsson, Eva; Holmström, Gerd

    2004-04-01

    To describe the value of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of X-linked retinoschisis. We report three boys aged between 8 and 17 years, diagnosed with X-linked retinoschisis. During investigations they were examined with OCT (Zeiss Humphrey OCT 1, upgraded version). Single scans of the central posterior pole and the region around the vascular arcades were obtained. Two of the boys underwent full-field ERG according to ISCEV standards. Genetic analysis was performed in all three boys, with sequencing of the XLRS gene. The OCT results revealed a pattern with a cleavage of the retina in two distinct planes, one deep (outer retina) and one superficial. This was very obvious in one patient and a similar but not as pronounced pattern was seen in the other two cases. The two layers were superficially connected with thin-walled, vertical palisades, separated by low reflective, cystoid spaces, confluent and most prominent in the foveal region. Full-field ERG and/or DNA analysis are well known methods used for diagnosis of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. In this paper, we suggest that OCT can also be a helpful diagnostic tool.

  10. Novel XLRS1 gene mutations cause X-linked juvenile retinoschisis in Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Li, Xiaoxin; Wang, Lihua

    2008-01-01

    To investigate various XLRS1 (RS1) gene mutations in Chinese families with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS or RS). Genomic DNA was isolated from leukocytes of 29 male patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, 38 female carriers, and 100 normal controls. All 6 exons of the RS1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the RS1 gene mutations were determined by direct sequencing. Eleven different RS1 mutations in 12 families were identified in the 29 male patients. The mutations comprised eight missense, two frameshift, and one splice donor site mutation. Four of these mutations, one frameshift mutation (26 del T) in exon 1, one frameshift mutation (488 del G) in exon 5, Asp145His and Arg156Gly in exon 5, have not been previously described. One novel non-disease-related polymorphism, 576C to T (Pro192Pro) in exon 6, was also found. Six recurrent mutations, Ser73Pro and Arg102Gln mutations in exon 4 and Arg200Cys, Arg209His, Arg213Gln, and Cys223Arg mutations in exon 6, were also identified in this study. RS1 gene mutations caused X-linked juvenile retinoschisis in these Chinese families.

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 23 in oncogenic osteomalacia and X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Kenneth B; Zahradnik, Richard; Larsson, Tobias; White, Kenneth E; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Imanishi, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Hampson, Geeta; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Ljunggren, Osten; Oba, Koichi; Yang, In Myung; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Econs, Michael J; Lavigne, Jeffrey; Jüppner, Harald

    2003-04-24

    Mutations in fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) cause autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets. Clinical and laboratory findings in this disorder are similar to those in oncogenic osteomalacia, in which tumors abundantly express FGF-23 messenger RNA, and to those in X-linked hypophosphatemia, which is caused by inactivating mutations in a phosphate-regulating endopeptidase called PHEX. Recombinant FGF-23 induces phosphaturia and hypophosphatemia in vivo, suggesting that it has a role in phosphate regulation. To determine whether FGF-23 circulates in healthy persons and whether it is elevated in those with oncogenic osteomalacia or X-linked hypophosphatemia, an immunometric assay was developed to measure it. Using affinity-purified, polyclonal antibodies against [Tyr223]FGF-23(206-222)amide and [Tyr224]FGF-23(225-244)amide, we developed a two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that detects equivalently recombinant human FGF-23, the mutant form in which glutamine is substituted for arginine at position 179 (R179Q), and synthetic human FGF-23(207-244)amide. Plasma or serum samples from 147 healthy adults (mean [+/-SD] age, 48.4+/-19.6 years) and 26 healthy children (mean age, 10.9+/-5.5 years) and from 17 patients with oncogenic osteomalacia (mean age, 43.0+/-13.3 years) and 21 patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (mean age, 34.9+/-17.2 years) were studied. Mean FGF-23 concentrations in the healthy adults and children were 55+/-50 and 69+/-36 reference units (RU) per milliliter, respectively. Four patients with oncogenic osteomalacia had concentrations ranging from 426 to 7970 RU per milliliter, which normalized after tumor resection. FGF-23 concentrations were 481+/-528 RU per milliliter in those with suspected oncogenic osteomalacia and 353+/-510 RU per milliliter (range, 31 to 2335) in those with X-linked hypophosphatemia. FGF-23 is readily detectable in the plasma or serum of healthy persons and can be markedly elevated in those with oncogenic

  12. Single Molecule Effects of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations in Tropocollagen Protein Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-02

    Single molecule effects of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations in tropocollagen protein domains Alfonso Gautieri,1,2 Simone Vesentini,2 Alberto...2008 proteinscience.org Abstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease characterized by fragile bones, skeletal deformities and, in severe...diagnosis and treatment, an effort referred to as materiomics. Keywords: steered molecular dynamics; osteogenesis imperfecta ; Young’s modulus; collagen

  13. The Specific Role of FAM20C in Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Jung, J.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, B.; Lu, Y.; Feng, J.Q.; Qin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we showed that Sox2-Cre;Fam20Cfl/fl mice in which Fam20C was ubiquitously inactivated had severe defects in dentin, enamel, and bone, along with hypophosphatemia. It remains to be determined if the enamel defects in the mice with universal inactivation of Family with sequence similarity 20-C (FAM20C) were associated with the dentin defects and whether hypophosphatemia in the knockout mice contributed to the enamel defects. In this study, we crossed Fam20Cfl/fl mice with keratin 14-Cre (K14-Cre) transgenic mice to specifically inactivate Fam20C in the epithelial cells, including the dental epithelial cells that are responsible for forming tooth enamel. X-ray, backscattered scanning electron microscopic, and histological analyses showed that the K14-Cre;Fam20Cfl/fl mice had severe enamel and ameloblast defects, while their dentin and alveolar bone were not significantly affected. Accordingly, serum biochemistry of the K14-Cre;Fam20Cfl/fl mice showed normal phosphate and FGF23 levels in the circulation. Analysis of these data indicates that, while FAM20C is a molecule essential to amelogenesis, its inactivation in the dental epithelium does not significantly affect dentinogenesis. Hypophosphatemia makes no significant contribution to the enamel defects in the mice with the ubiquitous deletion of Fam20C. PMID:24026952

  14. The specific role of FAM20C in amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Jung, J; Liu, Y; Yuan, B; Lu, Y; Feng, J Q; Qin, C

    2013-11-01

    Previously, we showed that Sox2-Cre;Fam20C(fl/fl) mice in which Fam20C was ubiquitously inactivated had severe defects in dentin, enamel, and bone, along with hypophosphatemia. It remains to be determined if the enamel defects in the mice with universal inactivation of Family with sequence similarity 20-C (FAM20C) were associated with the dentin defects and whether hypophosphatemia in the knockout mice contributed to the enamel defects. In this study, we crossed Fam20C(fl/fl) mice with keratin 14-Cre (K14-Cre) transgenic mice to specifically inactivate Fam20C in the epithelial cells, including the dental epithelial cells that are responsible for forming tooth enamel. X-ray, backscattered scanning electron microscopic, and histological analyses showed that the K14-Cre;Fam20C(fl/fl) mice had severe enamel and ameloblast defects, while their dentin and alveolar bone were not significantly affected. Accordingly, serum biochemistry of the K14-Cre;Fam20C(fl/fl) mice showed normal phosphate and FGF23 levels in the circulation. Analysis of these data indicates that, while FAM20C is a molecule essential to amelogenesis, its inactivation in the dental epithelium does not significantly affect dentinogenesis. Hypophosphatemia makes no significant contribution to the enamel defects in the mice with the ubiquitous deletion of Fam20C.

  15. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  16. Orthotic management for children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Weintrob, J C

    1995-01-01

    Fitting children and infants who have osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) with braces has posed substantial problems of implementation and patient management For the past twelve years bracing has been an important component of a patient research and management program conducted at the National Institutes of Health. By using the smallest manufactured parts and developing a wealth of experience, functional and well-fitting braces have been provided to a number of tiny and small children. Bracing allows these children to stand and walk earlier than would have otherwise been possible. Braces are used in conjunction with standing frames and parapodiums to increase a child's mobility. Less involved children have become good household and short distance ambulators with the use of braces.

  17. [Orthotic management for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Alguacil Diego, I M; Molina Rueda, F; Gómez Conches, M

    2011-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a disease caused by a genetic defect in the qualitative and quantitative synthesis of type I collagen. There is a wide variation in its clinical signs, characterized by bone fragility, resulting in a bone vulnerable to external and internal forces, determining the occurrence of frequent fractures with minimal or no trauma. The therapeutic objective is directed to improve the functional capacity of the child or adult concerned, adopting those compensatory strategies to optimise their independence. In this sense, the use of different orthoses and assistive technology are important for achieving these objectives. We reviewed the main contributions to this orthotic disease and the evolution of the different devices used in different databases over the last 25 years. Copyright © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: A case report

    PubMed Central

    REN, JIANMIN; XU, XIAOJIE; JIAN, XIANGDONG; WANG, JIERU

    2014-01-01

    A 15-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital having experienced repeated fractures over the previous three years, predominantly due to falling down or overexertion. The clinical signs and radiological features, such as recurrent fractures, blue sclera and low bone mineral density (BMD) level, all led to the diagnosis of a mild form of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. The patient began treatment with a regular intake of calcium (1,000 mg/day), an adequate intake of vitamin D (800 U/day) and intravenous pamidronate (60 mg). Following four months of treatment, the symptoms and quality of life of the patient improved. This patient appears to be a rare case of OI type I. PMID:24926339

  19. A Novel Mutation in the XLRS1 Gene in a Korean Family with X-linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Jwa, Nam Soo; Kim, Sung Soo; Lee, Sung Chul; Kwon, Oh Woong

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To report a novel missense mutation in the XLRS1 gene in a Korean family with X-linked retinoschisis. Methods Observation case report of a family with a proband with X-linked retinoschisis underwent complete ophthalmologic examination. Genomic DNA was excluded from the family's blood and all exons of the XLRS1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using a direct sequencing method. Results A novel Leu103Phe missense mutation was identified. Conclusions A novel Leu103Phe mutation is an additional missense mutation which is responsible for the pathogenesis of X-linked retinoschisis. PMID:16768192

  20. Expression pattern of X-linked genes in sex chromosome aneuploid bovine cells.

    PubMed

    Basrur, Parvathi K; Farazmand, Ali; Stranzinger, Gerald; Graphodatskaya, Daria; Reyes, Ed R; King, W Allan

    2004-01-01

    Expression of the X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) gene is a prerequisite step for dosage compensation in mammals, accomplished by silencing one of the two X chromosomes in normal female diploid cells or all X chromosomes in excess of one in sex chromosome aneuploids. Our previous studies showing that XIST expression does not eventuate the inactivation of X-linked genes in fetal bovine testis had suggested that XIST expression may not be an indicator of X inactivation in this species. In this study, we used a semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach on cultures of bovine cells with varying sex chromosome constitution (XY, XX, XXY and XXX) to test whether the levels of XIST expressed conform to the number of late replicating (inactive) X chromosomes displayed by proliferating cells in these cultures. Expression patterns of four X-linked genes, including hypoxanthine phosphorybosyl transferase (HPRT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), zinc finger protein locus on the X (ZFX). and 'selected mouse cDNA on the X' (SMCX), in all these cells were also tested. Results showed that XIST expression was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in XXX cells compared to XX and XXY cells and that G6PD. HPRT, and SMCX loci are subject to X inactivation. The significantly higher levels of ZFX expressed in XXX cells compared to XX and XXY cells (p < 0.05) confirmed that this bovine locus, as human ZFX, escapes X inactivation. However, the levels of XIST and ZFX expressed were not proportional to the X chromosome load in these cells suggesting that X-linked loci escaping inactivation may be regulated at transcription (or post-transcription) level by mechanisms that prevent gene-specific product accumulation beyond certain levels in sex chromosome aneuploids.

  1. Molecular characterization of a novel X-linked syndrome involving developmental delay and deafness.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; de Silva, Michelle G; Tan, Tiong Yang; Rose, Elizabeth; Nishimura, Carla; Tolmachova, Tanya; Hulett, Joanne M; White, Susan M; Silver, Jeremy; Bahlo, Melanie; Smith, Richard J H; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M

    2007-11-01

    X-linked syndromes associated with developmental delay and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) have been characterized at the molecular level, including Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome and Norrie disease. In this study we report on a novel X-linked recessive, congenital syndrome in a family with developmental delay and SNHL that maps to a locus associated with mental retardation (MR) for which no causative gene has been identified. The X-linked recessive inheritance and congenital nature of the syndrome was confirmed by detailed clinical investigation and the family history. Linkage mapping of the X-chromosome was conducted to ascertain the disease locus and candidate genes were screened by direct sequencing and STRP analysis. The recessive syndrome was mapped to Xp11.3-q21.32 and a deletion was identified in a regulatory region upstream of the POU3F4 gene in affected family members. Since mutations in POU3F4 cause deafness at the DFN3 locus, the deletion is the likely cause of the SNHL in this family. The choroideremia (CHM) gene was also screened and a novel missense change was identified. The alteration changes the serine residue at position 89 in the Rab escort 1 protein (REP-1) to a cysteine (S89C). Prenylation of Rab proteins was investigated in patients and the location of REP-1 expression in the brain determined. However, subsequent analysis revealed that this change in CHM was polymorphic having no effect on REP-1 function. Although the causative gene at the MR locus in this family has not been identified, there are a number of genes involved in syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of MR that are potential candidates. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. [Detection of large deletions in X linked Alport syndrome using competitive multiplex fluorescence polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Zhang, Y Q; Ding, J; Yu, L X

    2017-10-18

    To evaluate the ability of multiplex competitive fluorescence polymerase chain reaction in detection of large deletion and duplication genotypes of X-linked Alport syndrome. Clinical diagnosis of X-linked Alport syndrome was based on either abnormal staining of type IV collagen α5 chain in the epidermal basement membrane alone or with abnormal staining of type IV collagen α5 chain in the glomerular basement membrane and Bowman's capsule/ultrastructural changes in the glomerular basement membrane typical of Alport syndrome. A total of 20 unrelated Chinese patients (13 males and 7 females) clinically diagnosed as X-linked Alport syndrome were included in the study. Their genotypes were unknown. Control subjects included a male patient with other renal disease and two patients who had large deletions in COL4A5 gene detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes in all the participants. Multiplex competitive fluorescence polymerase chain reaction was used to coamplify 53 exons of COL4A5 gene and four reference genes in a single reaction. When a deletion removed exon 1 of COL4A5 gene was identified, the same method was used to coamplify the first 4 exons of COL4A5 and COL4A6 genes, a promoter shared by COL4A5 and COL4A6 genes, and three reference genes in a single reaction. Any copy number loss suggested by this method was verified by electrophoresis of corresponding polymerase chain reaction amplified products or DNA sequencing to exclude possible DNA variations in the primer regions. Genotypes of two positive controls identified by multiplex competitive fluorescence polymerase chain reaction were consistent with those detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Deletions were identified in 6 of the 20 patients, including two large deletions removing the 5' part of both COL4A5 and COL4A6 genes with the breakpoint located in the second intron of COL4A6, two large deletions

  3. Hunting for Novel X-Linked Breast Cancer Suppressor Genes in Mouse and Human

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 01/03/07 2 . REPORT TYPE...and correlated significantly with HER- 2 over-expression, regardless of the status of HER- 2 amplification. In toto, the data demonstrate that FOXP3...is an X-linked breast cancer suppressor gene and an important regulator of the HER- 2 /ErbB2 oncogene. 15. SUBJECT TERMS No subject terms provided 16

  4. X-linked agammaglobulinemia - first case with Bruton tyrosine kinase mutation from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Samreen Kulsom; Qureshi, Sonia; Qamar, Farah Naz

    2017-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency with more than 600 mutations in Bruton tyrosine kinase (Bkt) gene which are responsible for early-onset agammaglobulinemia and repeated infections. Herein we present a case of a 3-year-old boy with history of repeated diarrhoea and an episode of meningoencephalitis with hemiplegia. The workup showed extremely low levels of immunoglobulin with low CD+19 cells. Genetic analysis showed Btk mutation 18 c.1883delCp.T628fs. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a case of XLA confirmed by molecular technique from Pakistan.

  5. Suspected X-linked facial dysmorphia and growth retardation in related Labrador retriever puppies.

    PubMed

    Dierks, C; Hoffmann, H; Heinrich, F; Hellige, M; Hewicker-Trautwein, M; Distl, O

    2017-02-01

    Seven male Labrador retriever puppies from four different litters were identified with a brachycephalic-like face and skull, associated with low birth weight, severe growth retardation, and reduced abilities to crawl and suckle, which were not compatible with survival. Excessive doming of the cranium, brachygnathia superior and inferior, and an abnormally opened fontanelle were found in all affected puppies by computed tomography and at post-mortem examination. Pedigree analysis supported an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel UBE2A mutation causes X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento

    PubMed Central

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Ohashi, Ikuko; Enomoto, Yumi; Naruto, Takuya; Mitsui, Jun; Aida, Noriko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (ID) type Nascimento (MIM #300860), also known as ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 A (UBE2A) deficiency syndrome, is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by moderate to severe ID, speech impairment, dysmorphic facial features, genital anomalies and skin abnormalities. Here, we report a Japanese patient with severe ID and congenital cataract. We identified a novel hemizygous mutation (c.76G>A, p.Gly26Arg) in UBE2A by whole-exome sequencing. PMID:28611923

  7. Spontaneous closure of macular hole in a patient with x-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Province, William D; Peracha, Mohammed O

    2010-01-01

    To observe macular hole in a patient with juvenile retinoschisis. A 4-year-old boy with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis was examined and followed-up for 2 years. Optical coherence tomography was used to study his maculae. A full-thickness macular hole was detected by clinical examination and optical coherence tomography. Spontaneous closure of the macular hole was noticed and confirmed by optical coherence tomography 2 years later with visual improvement. Macular hole in patients with juvenile retinoschisis should be observed for at least a short period of time before a surgical repair is considered.

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from a patient with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi-Hsien; Huang, Kang-Chieh; Lu, Huai-En; Syu, Shih-Han; Yarmishyn, Aliaksandr A; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Hwang, De-Kuang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2018-05-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a hereditary retinal dystrophy manifested as splitting of anatomical layers of retina. In this report, we generated a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line, TVGH-iPSC-013-05, from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a male patient with XLRS by using the Sendai-virus delivery system. We believe that XLRS patient-specific iPSCs provide a powerful in vitro model for evaluating the pathological phenotypes of the disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis in females and response to carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed; Seth, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    A 63 year old woman was referred to the retina clinic after her vision failed to improve in her left eye after cataract surgery. X-linked retinoschisis was diagnosed in the patient after her retina exam revealed an area of retinoschisis and a foveal cyst. The OCT confirmed the macular cyst and the ERG showed loss of B waves. The florescein angiogram showed no significant perifoveal leakage. Her foveal cyst resolved after treatment with carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. The patient's son was examined and his ophthalmologic exam, ERG and imaging findings were consistent with X-linked retinoschisis. However, his bilateral foveal cysts did not respond to treatment with carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. X-linked retinoschisis is a very rare disease in women due to its X-linked recessive inheritance and the foveal cysts associated with it can respond to carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

  10. A major X-linked locus affects kidney function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Magalie S.; Savage, Holly S.; Stearns, Timothy M.; Cario, Clinton L.; Walsh, Kenneth A.; Paigen, Beverly; Berndt, Annerose

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common disease with increasing prevalence in the western population. One common reason for chronic kidney failure is diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy and hyperglycemia are characteristics of the mouse inbred strain KK/HlJ, which is predominantly used as a model for metabolic syndrome due to its inherited glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. We used KK/HlJ, an albuminuria-sensitive strain, and C57BL/6J, an albuminuria-resistant strain, to perform a quantitative trait locus (QTL) cross to identify the genetic basis for chronic kidney failure. Albumin-creatinine-ratio (ACR) was measured in 130 F2 male offspring. One significant QTL was identified on chromosome (Chr) X and four suggestive QTLs were found on Chrs 6, 7, 12, and 13. Narrowing of the QTL region was focused on the X-linked QTL and performed by incorporating genotype and expression analyses for genes located in the region. From the 485 genes identified in the X-linked QTL region, a few candidate genes were identified using a combination of bioinformatic evidence based on genomic comparison of the parental strains and known function in urine homeostasis. Finally, this study demonstrates the significance of the X chromosome in the genetic determination of albuminuria. PMID:23011808

  11. Autosomal-recessive and X-linked forms of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ouvrier, Robert; Geevasingha, Nimeshan; Ryan, Monique M

    2007-08-01

    The hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSNs, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies) are the most common degenerative disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In recent years a dramatic expansion has occurred in our understanding of the molecular basis and cell biology of the recessively inherited demyelinating and axonal neuropathies, with delineation of a number of new neuropathies. Mutations in some genes cause a wide variety of clinical, neurophysiologic, and pathologic phenotypes, rendering diagnosis difficult. The X-linked forms of HMSN represent at least 10%-15% of all HMSNs and have an expanded disease spectrum including demyelinating, intermediate, and axonal neuropathies, transient central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, mental retardation, and hearing loss. This review presents an overview of the recessive and X-linked forms of HMSN observed in childhood, with particular reference to disease phenotype and neurophysiologic and pathologic abnormalities suggestive of specific diagnoses. These findings can be used by the clinician to formulate a differential diagnosis and guide targeted genetic testing.

  12. A Novel Mutation in a Kazakh Family with X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rakhimova, Saule E.; Nigmatullina, Nazym B.; Momynaliev, Kuvat T.; Ramanculov, Yerlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a genetic condition that results in hematuria, progressive renal impairment, hearing loss, and occasionally lenticonus and retinopathy. Approximately 80% of Alport syndrome cases are caused by X-linked mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding type IV collagen. The objective of this study was to define the SNP profiles for COL4A5 in patients with hereditary nephritis and hematuria. For this, we examined four subjects from one Kazakh family clinically affected with X-linked Alport syndrome due to COL4A5 gene mutations. All 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene were screened by linkage analysis and direct DNA sequencing, resulting in the identification of a novel mutation (G641E) in exon 25. The mutation was found only in two affected family individuals but was not present in healthy family members or 200 unrelated healthy controls. This result demonstrates that this novel mutation is pathogenic and has meaningful implications for the diagnosis of patients with Alport syndrome. PMID:26168235

  13. A Novel Mutation in a Kazakh Family with X-Linked Alport Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baikara, Barshagul T; Zholdybayeva, Elena V; Rakhimova, Saule E; Nigmatullina, Nazym B; Momynaliev, Kuvat T; Ramanculov, Yerlan M

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a genetic condition that results in hematuria, progressive renal impairment, hearing loss, and occasionally lenticonus and retinopathy. Approximately 80% of Alport syndrome cases are caused by X-linked mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding type IV collagen. The objective of this study was to define the SNP profiles for COL4A5 in patients with hereditary nephritis and hematuria. For this, we examined four subjects from one Kazakh family clinically affected with X-linked Alport syndrome due to COL4A5 gene mutations. All 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene were screened by linkage analysis and direct DNA sequencing, resulting in the identification of a novel mutation (G641E) in exon 25. The mutation was found only in two affected family individuals but was not present in healthy family members or 200 unrelated healthy controls. This result demonstrates that this novel mutation is pathogenic and has meaningful implications for the diagnosis of patients with Alport syndrome.

  14. The forensic value of X-linked markers in mixed-male DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    He, HaiJun; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Cai, JinHong; Huang, Jian

    2018-05-04

    Autosomal genetic markers and Y chromosome markers have been widely applied in analysis of mixed stains at crime scenes by forensic scientists. However, true genotype combinations are often difficult to distinguish using autosomal markers when similar amounts of DNA are contributed by multiple donors. In addition, specific individuals cannot be determined by Y chromosomal markers because male relatives share the same Y chromosome. X-linked markers, possessing characteristics somewhere intermediate between autosomes and the Y chromosome, are less universally applied in criminal casework. In this paper, X markers are proposed to apply to male mixtures because their true genes can be more easily and accurately recognized than the decision of the genotypes of AS markers. In this study, an actual two-man mixed stain from a forensic case file and simulated male-mixed DNA were examined simultaneously with the X markers and autosomal markers. Finally, the actual mixture was separated successfully by the X markers, although it was unresolved by AS-STRs, and the separation ratio of the simulated mixture was much higher using Chr X tools than with AS methods. We believe X-linked markers provide significant advantages in individual discrimination of male mixtures that should be further applied to forensic work.

  15. Linkage and candidate gene analysis of X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Shastry, B S; Hejtmancik, J F; Plager, D A; Hartzer, M K; Trese, M T

    1995-05-20

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a hereditary eye disorder characterized by avascularity of the peripheral retina, retinal exudates, tractional detachment, and retinal folds. The disorder is most commonly transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, but X-linked transmission also occurs. To initiate the process of identifying the gene responsible for the X-linked disorder, linkage analysis has been performed with three previously unreported three- or four-generation families. Two-point analysis showed linkage to MAOA (Zmax = 2.1, theta max = 0) and DXS228 (Zmax = 0.5, theta max = 0.11), and this was further confirmed by multipoint analysis with these same markers (Zmax = 2.81 at MAOA), which both lie near the gene causing Norrie disease. Molecular genetic analysis further reveals a missense mutation (R121W) in the third exon of the Norrie's disease gene that perfectly cosegregates with the disease through three generations in one family. This mutation was not detected in the unaffected family members and six normal unrelated controls, suggesting that it is likely to be the pathogenic mutation. Additionally, a polymorphic missense mutation (H127R) was detected in a severely affected patient.

  16. Molecular and clinical studies of X-linked deafness among Pakistani families.

    PubMed

    Waryah, Ali M; Ahmed, Zubair M; Bhinder, Munir A; Binder, Munir A; Choo, Daniel I; Sisk, Robert A; Shahzad, Mohsin; Khan, Shaheen N; Friedman, Thomas B; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2011-07-01

    There are 68 sex-linked syndromes that include hearing loss as one feature and five sex-linked nonsyndromic deafness loci listed in the OMIM database. The possibility of additional such sex-linked loci was explored by ascertaining three unrelated Pakistani families (PKDF536, PKDF1132 and PKDF740) segregating X-linked recessive deafness. Sequence analysis of POU3F4 (DFN3) in affected members of families PKDF536 and PKDF1132 revealed two novel nonsense mutations, p.Q136X and p.W114X, respectively. Family PKDF740 is segregating congenital blindness, mild-to-profound progressive hearing loss that is characteristic of Norrie disease (MIM#310600). Sequence analysis of NDP among affected members of this family revealed a novel single nucleotide deletion c.49delG causing a frameshift and premature truncation (p.V17fsX1) of the encoded protein. These mutations were not found in 150 normal DNA samples. Identification of pathogenic alleles causing X-linked recessive deafness will improve molecular diagnosis, genetic counseling and molecular epidemiology of hearing loss among Pakistanis.

  17. X-linked primary immunodeficiency associated with hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene.

    PubMed

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Luce, Sonia; Ouchani, Farid; Soheili, Tayebeh Shabi; Sadek, Hanem; Chouteau, Myriam; Durand, Amandine; Pic, Isabelle; Majewski, Jacek; Brouzes, Chantal; Lambert, Nathalie; Bohineust, Armelle; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Gandemer, Virginie; Monnier, Delphine; Heijmans, Catherine; van Gijn, Marielle; Dalm, Virgil A; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Picard, Capucine; Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven; Hivroz, Claire; Jabado, Nada; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    We investigated 7 male patients (from 5 different families) presenting with profound lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, fluctuating monocytopenia and neutropenia, a poor immune response to vaccine antigens, and increased susceptibility to bacterial and varicella zoster virus infections. We sought to characterize the genetic defect involved in a new form of X-linked immunodeficiency. We performed genetic analyses and an exhaustive phenotypic and functional characterization of the lymphocyte compartment. We observed hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene (located on the X chromosome and coding for MSN) in all 7 patients. Six of the latter had the same missense mutation, which led to an amino acid substitution (R171W) in the MSN four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin domain. The seventh patient had a nonsense mutation leading to a premature stop codon mutation (R533X). The naive T-cell counts were particularly low for age, and most CD8 + T cells expressed the senescence marker CD57. This phenotype was associated with impaired T-cell proliferation, which was rescued by expression of wild-type MSN. MSN-deficient T cells also displayed poor chemokine receptor expression, increased adhesion molecule expression, and altered migration and adhesion capacities. Our observations establish a causal link between an ezrin-radixin-moesin protein mutation and a primary immunodeficiency that could be referred to as X-linked moesin-associated immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Analysis of a Kindred With X-linked Mental Handicap and Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, M. A.; Dry, K. L.; Knight-Jones, E. B.; Hardwick, L. J.; Teague, P. W.; Lester, D. H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A. D.; Raeburn, J. A.; Bird, A. C.; Fielder, A. R.; Wright, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5'-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. PMID:7977353

  19. Genetic analysis of a kindred with X-linked mental handicap and retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, M.A.; Dry, K.L.; Hardwick, L.J.

    1994-11-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538more » and 5{prime}-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  20. Misdiagnosis of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in a choroideremia patient with heavily pigmented fundi.

    PubMed

    Nanda, A; Salvetti, A P; Martinez-Fernandez de la Camara, C; MacLaren, R E

    2018-06-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are thought to be the leading cause of sight loss in the working age population. Mutations found in the RPGR and CHM genes cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and choroideremia, respectively. In the first instance, an X-linked family history of visual field loss commonly raises the suspicion of one of these two genes. In choroideremia, the classic description of a white fundal reflex secondary to the widespread chorioretinal degeneration was made over a hundred years ago in Caucasians. But, it is not so obvious in heavily pigmented fundi. Hence, the clinical diagnosis of CHM in non-Caucasian patients may be challenging in the first stages of the disease. Here we report a case of a Southeast Asian gentleman who has a family history of X-linked retinal degeneration and was found to have a confirmed in-frame deletion of 12 DNA nucleotides in exon 15 of the RPGR gene. Later in life, however, his fundal appearance showed unusual areas of circular pigment hypertrophy and clumping. He was therefore tested for carrying a disease-causing mutation in the CHM gene and a null mutation was found. Since gene therapy trials are ongoing for both of these conditions, it has now become critically important to establish the correct genetic diagnosis in order to recruit suitable candidates. Moreover, this case demonstrates the necessity to remain vigilant in the interpretation of genetic results which are inconsistent with clinical features.

  1. Test-Retest Intervisit Variability of Functional and Structural Parameters in X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Brett G; Cukras, Catherine A; Vitale, Susan; Turriff, Amy; Bowles, Kristin; Sieving, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    To examine the variability of four outcome measures that could be used to address safety and efficacy in therapeutic trials with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. Seven men with confirmed mutations in the RS1 gene were evaluated over four visits spanning 6 months. Assessments included visual acuity, full-field electroretinograms (ERG), microperimetric macular sensitivity, and retinal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Eyes were separated into Better or Worse Eye groups based on acuity at baseline. Repeatability coefficients were calculated for each parameter and jackknife resampling used to derive 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The threshold for statistically significant change in visual acuity ranged from three to eight letters. For ERG a-wave, an amplitude reduction greater than 56% would be considered significant. For other parameters, variabilities were lower in the Worse Eye group, likely a result of floor effects due to collapse of the schisis pockets and/or retinal atrophy. The criteria for significant change (Better/Worse Eye) for three important parameters were: ERG b/a-wave ratio (0.44/0.23), point wise sensitivity (10.4/7.0 dB), and central retinal thickness (31%/18%). The 95% CI range for visual acuity, ERG, retinal sensitivity, and central retinal thickness relative to baseline are described for this cohort of participants with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS). A quantitative understanding of the variability of outcome measures is vital to establishing the safety and efficacy limits for therapeutic trials of XLRS patients.

  2. Craniofacial morphometric analysis of individuals with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Alice F; Larson, Jacinda R; Jones, Kyle B; Liberton, Denise K; Landan, Maya; Wang, Zhifeng; Boekelheide, Anne; Langham, Margaret; Mushegyan, Vagan; Oberoi, Snehlata; Brao, Rosalie; Wen, Timothy; Johnson, Ramsey; Huttner, Kenneth; Grange, Dorothy K; Spritz, Richard A; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Jheon, Andrew H; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-09-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most prevalent type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED). ED is an umbrella term for a group of syndromes characterized by missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. The X-linked recessive (XL), autosomal recessive (AR), and autosomal dominant (AD) types of HED are caused by mutations in the genes encoding ectodysplasin (EDA1), EDA receptor (EDAR), or EDAR-associated death domain (EDARADD). Patients with HED have a distinctive facial appearance, yet a quantitative analysis of the HED craniofacial phenotype using advanced three-dimensional (3D) technologies has not been reported. In this study, we characterized craniofacial morphology in subjects with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) by use of 3D imaging and geometric morphometrics (GM), a technique that uses defined landmarks to quantify size and shape in complex craniofacial morphologies. We found that the XLHED craniofacial phenotype differed significantly from controls. Patients had a smaller and shorter face with a proportionally longer chin and midface, prominent midfacial hypoplasia, a more protrusive chin and mandible, a narrower and more pointed nose, shorter philtrum, a narrower mouth, and a fuller and more rounded lower lip. Our findings refine the phenotype of XLHED and may be useful both for clinical diagnosis of XLHED and to extend understanding of the role of EDA in craniofacial development.

  3. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome: an X-linked encephalo-tropho-schisis syndrome. 1988.

    PubMed

    Neri, G; Marini, R; Cappa, M; Borrelli, P; Opitz, J M

    2013-11-01

    The following paper by Professor GiovanniNeri and colleagues was originally published in 1988, American Journal of Medical Genetics 30:287–299. This paper represented a seminal work at the time of publication as it not only reported a new family with a disorder that had been called the “gigantism-dysplasia syndrome”, but also suggested naming the condition the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This eponym has clearly stood “the test of time”, and that designation is now widely accepted. This paper is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We report on another family with the so-called "gigantism-dysplasia syndrome", an X-linked condition characterized by pre-and postnatal overgrowth, characteristic face with apparent coarseness, dysplastic changes in several tissues, and mild intellectual impairment. This condition has been called the Golabi-Rosen syndrome; however, we agree that is the same entity as that described, in a milder form, by Simpson et al. in 1975 and by Behmel et al. in 1984. Therefore, we suggest that this entity be designated the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. The manifestations in affected individuals suggest that this condition represents an X-linked encephalo-tropho-schisis syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease predominates in a cohort of multiethnic Malaysian patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Samulong, Sarimah; Tey, Shelisa; Suan, Liaw Chiew; Meng, Lao Kah; Goh, Khean Jin; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina

    2014-02-01

    Data regarding Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is lacking in Southeast Asian populations. We investigated the frequency of the common genetic mutations in a multiethnic Malaysian cohort. Patients with features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary liability to pressure palsies were investigated for PMP22 duplication, deletion, and point mutations and GJB1, MPZ, and MFN2 point mutations. Over a period of 3 years, we identified 25 index patients. A genetic diagnosis was reached in 60%. The most common were point mutations in GJB1, accounting for X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (24% of the total patient population), followed by PMP22 duplication causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (20%). We also discovered 2 novel GJB1 mutations, c.521C>T (Proline174Leucine) and c.220G>A (Valine74Methionine). X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease was found to predominate in our patient cohort. We also found a better phenotype/genotype correlation when applying a more recently recommended genetic approach to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Severe X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata in nine new female fetuses.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Mathilde; Dufernez, Fabienne; Bruel, Ange-Line; Gonzales, Marie; Aral, Bernard; Saint-Onge, Judith; Gigot, Nadège; Desir, Julie; Daelemans, Caroline; Jossic, Frédérique; Schmitt, Sébastien; Mangione, Raphaele; Pelluard, Fanny; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Labaune, Jean-Marc; Bigi, Nicole; D'Olne, Dominique; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Toutain, Annick; Blesson, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh, Salima; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Joyé, Nicole; Vibert-Guigue, Claude; Rigonnot, Luc; Rousseau, Thierry; Vabres, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe; Lamazière, Antonin; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Faivre, Laurence; Laurent, Nicole; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2015-07-01

    Conradi-Hünermann-Happle [X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2)] syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant skeletal dysplasia usually lethal in men while affected women show wide clinical heterogeneity. Different EBP mutations have been reported. Severe female cases have rarely been reported, with only six antenatal presentations. To better characterize the phenotype in female fetuses, we included nine antenatally diagnosed cases of women with EBP mutations. All cases were de novo except for two fetuses with an affected mother and one case of germinal mosaicism. The mean age at diagnosis was 22 weeks of gestation. The ultrasound features mainly included bone abnormalities: shortening (8/9 cases) and bowing of the long bones (5/9), punctuate epiphysis (7/9) and an irregular aspect of the spine (5/9). Postnatal X-rays and examination showed ichthyosis (8/9) and epiphyseal stippling (9/9), with frequent asymmetric short and bowed long bones. The X-inactivation pattern of the familial case revealed skewed X-inactivation in the mildly symptomatic mother and random X-inactivation in the severe fetal case. Differently affected skin samples of the same fetus revealed different patterns of X-inactivation. Prenatal detection of asymmetric shortening and bowing of the long bones and cartilage stippling should raise the possibility of CPDX2 in female fetuses, especially because the majority of such cases involve de novo mutations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Brancaleoni, V.; Balwani, M.; Granata, F.; Graziadei, G.; Missineo, P.; Fiorentino, V.; Fustinoni, S.; Cappellini, M.D.; Naik, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Di Pierro, E.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromsomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  7. Molecular and Clinical Studies of X-linked Deafness Among Pakistani Families

    PubMed Central

    Waryah, Ali M.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Choo, Daniel I.; Sisk, Robert A.; Binder, Munir A.; Shahzad, Mohsin; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2011-01-01

    There are 68 sex-linked syndromes that include hearing loss as one feature and five sex-linked nonsyndromic deafness loci listed in the OMIM database. The possibility of additional such sex-linked loci was explored by ascertaining three unrelated Pakistani families (PKDF536, PKDF1132, PKDF740) segregating X-linked recessive deafness. Sequence analysis of POU3F4 (DFN3) in affected members of families PKDF536 and PKDF1132 revealed two novel nonsense mutations, p.Q136X and p.W114X, respectively. Family PKDF740 is segregating congenital blindness, mild to profound progressive hearing loss that is characteristic of Norrie disease (MIM#310600). Sequence analysis of NDP among affected members of this family revealed a novel single nucleotide deletion c.49delG causing a frameshift and premature truncation (p.V17fsX1) of the encoded protein. These mutations were not found in 150 normal DNA samples. Identification of pathogenic alleles causing X-linked recessive deafness will improve molecular diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular epidemiology of hearing loss among Pakistanis. PMID:21633365

  8. Linkage localization of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J.; Trofatter, J.; Haines, J.L.

    1993-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive, degenerative disorders of peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) (McKusick 302800), a subdivision of type I, or demyelinating, CMT is an X-linked dominant condition with variable penetrance. Previous linkage analysis using RFLPs demonstrated linkage to markers on the proximal long and short arms of the X chromosome, with the more likely localization on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Available variable simple-sequence repeats (VSSRs) broaden the possibilities for linkage analysis. This paper presents new linkage data and recombination analysis derived frommore » work with four VSSR markers - AR, PGKP1, DXS453, and DXYS1X - in addition to analysis using RFLP markers described elsewhere. These studies localize the CMTX gene to the proximal Xq segment between PGKP1 (Xq11.2-12) and DXS72 (Xq21.1), with a combined maximum multipoint lod score of 15.3 at DXS453 ([theta] = 0). 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  9. X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus mutations in North America and the Hopewell hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bichet, D G; Arthus, M F; Lonergan, M; Hendy, G N; Paradis, A J; Fujiwara, T M; Morgan, K; Gregory, M C; Rosenthal, W; Didwania, A

    1993-01-01

    In X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) the urine of male patients is not concentrated after the administration of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin. This disease is due to mutations in the V2 receptor gene that maps to chromosome region Xq28. In 1969, Bode and Crawford suggested that most NDI patients in North America shared common ancestors of Ulster Scot immigrants who arrived in Halifax in 1761 on the ship Hopewell. A link between this family and a large Utah kindred was also suggested. DNA was obtained from 17 affected male patients from the "Hopewell" kindred and from four additional families from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick who shared the same Xq28 NDI haplotype. The Utah kindred and two families (Q2, Q3) from Quebec were also studied. The "Hopewell" mutation, W71X, is a single base substitution (G-->A) that changes codon 71 from TGG (tryptophan) to TGA (stop). The W71X mutation was found in affected members of the Hopewell and of the four satellite families. The W71X mutation is the cause of X-linked NDI for the largest number of related male patients living in North America. Other families (Utah, Q2 and Q3) that are historically and ethnically unrelated bear other mutations in the V2 receptor gene. Images PMID:8104196

  10. Apparent X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia associated with retinitis pigmentosa and a hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Krawczyński, Maciej R; Dmeńska, Hanna; Witt, Michał

    2004-01-01

    Three brothers, one 10-year-old and a pair of 14-year-old dizygotic twins--expressed the classical, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with typical ophthalmoscopic findings, night blindness, visual field constricted to 10 degrees and flat ERG response. All three brothers were also diagnosed with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and had recurrent respiratory infections, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis. In all of them, resection of the middle lobe of the right lung was performed. A similar clinical picture of coexisting RP and PCD was noted in the brother of the probands' mother. All probands displayed situs solitus. Consistent with the X-linked mode of RP inheritance, there were also three obligatory female carriers of the disorder in this family: the mother of the affected boys, her mother and a daughter of her brother. In all of them, retinitis pigmentosa "sine pigmento" was found with milder but clinically significant symptoms (mild night blindness, visual field constricted to 30 degrees, and scotopic and photopic ERG responses reduced to 30-60%). No extraocular symptoms were detected in any of the heterozygous female carriers. This family presents an example of two rare phenomena: X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa (with milder expression in females) and a rare combination of RP with recurrent respiratory infections due to PCD.

  11. Treatment of Chronic Enterovirus Encephalitis With Fluoxetine in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Gofshteyn, Jacqueline; Cárdenas, Ana María; Bearden, David

    2016-11-01

    Enterovirus may result in a devastating chronic encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, particularly in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Prognosis for patients with chronic enterovirus encephalitis is poor, almost invariably resulting in mortality without specific treatment. There are currently no approved antiviral agents for enterovirus, but the antidepressant drug fluoxetine has been identified through library-based compound screening as a potential anti-enteroviral agent in vitro. However, use of fluoxetine has not previously been studied in humans with enteroviral disease. A five year old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with progressive neurological deterioration and was found to have chronic enterovirus encephalitis by brain biopsy. He failed to respond to standard treatment with high dose intravenous immunoglobulin, but showed stabilization and improvement following treatment with fluoxetine. This is the first report to describe the use of fluoxetine as a potential therapy for chronic enterovirus infection. Further investigation of fluoxetine as a treatment option for chronic enterovirus encephalitis is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative temporospatial expression profiling of murine amelotin protein during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Somogyi-Ganss, Eszter; Nakayama, Yohei; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nakano, Yukiko; Stolf, Daiana; McKee, Marc D; Ganss, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Tooth enamel is formed in a typical biomineralization process under the guidance of specific organic components. Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently identified, secreted protein that is transcribed predominantly during the maturation stage of enamel formation, but its protein expression profile throughout amelogenesis has not been described in detail. The main objective of this study was to define the spatiotemporal expression profile of AMTN during tooth development in comparison with other known enamel proteins. A peptide antibody against AMTN was raised in rabbits, affinity purified and used for immunohistochemical analyses on sagittal and transverse paraffin sections of decalcified mouse hemimandibles. The localization of AMTN was compared to that of known enamel proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin, enamelin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated/amyloid in Pindborg tumors and kallikrein 4. Three-dimensional images of AMTN localization in molars at selected ages were reconstructed from serial stained sections, and transmission electron microscopy was used for ultrastructural localization of AMTN. AMTN was detected in ameloblasts of molars in a transient fashion, declining at the time of tooth eruption. Prominent expression in maturation stage ameloblasts of the continuously erupting incisor persisted into adulthood. In contrast, amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin were predominantly found during the early secretory stage, while odontogenic ameloblast-associated/amyloid in Pindborg tumors and kallikrein 4 expression in maturation stage ameloblasts paralleled that of AMTN. Secreted AMTN was detected at the interface between ameloblasts and the mineralized enamel. Recombinant AMTN protein did not mediate cell attachment in vitro. These results suggest a primary role for AMTN in the late stages of enamel mineralization. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. A rare combination of amniotic constriction band with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa Hitesh; Shah, Hitesh

    2015-11-11

    Amniotic constriction bands and osteogenesis imperfecta are disorders arising from a collagen defect. We report a rare association of amniotic bands with osteogenesis imperfecta in a child. The child was born with multiple amniotic bands involving the right leg, both hands and both feet. Multiple fractures of long bones of lower limbs occurred in childhood due to trivial trauma. Deformities of the femur and tibia due to malunion with osteopenia and blue sclerae were present. The patient was treated with z plasty of constriction band of the right tibia and bisphosphonate for osteogenesis imperfecta. This rare association of both collagen diseases may provide further insight for the pathogenesis of these diseases. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Orthotic treatment of positional brachycephaly associated with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Carolina G; Schreen, Gerd; Lago-Rizzardi, Camilla D do; Peccin, Maria Stella; Pinto, Fernando Cg

    2017-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder of the connective tissue characterized primarily by fractures with no or small causal antecedents and extremely variable clinical presentation. The disorder requires a global and, therefore, multidisciplinary therapeutic approach that should aim, among other aspects, at the prevention and treatment of deformities resulting from osteogenesis imperfecta. Due to limitations related to bony deformities, it can be difficult to place these infants in a variety of positions that would help remediate skull deformities, so a cranial orthosis becomes the therapy of choice. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the results obtained during treatment with a cranial remolding orthosis (helmet) in babies with osteogenesis imperfecta. Case Description and Methods: For the first time in the scientific literature, this study describes the use of a cranial orthosis for the treatment of infants with osteogenesis imperfecta. Both children had severe asymmetrical brachycephaly documented by laser digital scanning and were submitted to treatment with a cranial remolding orthosis. Outcomes and Conclusion: The study showed that there was a significant improvement in cranial proportion and symmetry, with a reduction in the cephalic index at reevaluation. It is concluded that the orthotic therapy is an effective therapeutic modality to improve the proportion and minimize the asymmetry in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Clinical relevance The clinical relevance of such a description is that children with osteogenesis imperfecta may have numerous deformities and minimizing them can be an important factor. This report showed a beneficial result as the orthotic therapy modality improved the proportions and minimized the asymmetry. This treatment offers too high levels of satisfaction to parents and brings these children closer to normal indices.

  15. Minimally invasive mitral valve repair in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Tagliasacchi, Isabella; Martinelli, Luigi; Bardaro, Leopoldo; Chierchia, Sergio

    2017-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a disorder of the connective tissue that affects several structures including heart valves. However, cardiac surgery is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. In a 48-year-old man with osteogenesis imperfecta and mitral valve prolapse, we performed the first successful mitral valve repair by right anterior mini-thoracotomy. At the 1-year follow-up, he was asymptomatic and echocardiography confirmed the initial success. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. [Osteogenesis imperfecta--operative treatment on lower extremities in children with osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Sułko, Jerzy; Radło, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    The group of 141 children with osteogenesis imperfecta was treated in Orthopaedic Department of the University Children Hospital in Krakow, Poland. In 77 (54.6%) children from this group, we operated on lower extremities. Prophylactic operations, that were intramedullary Rush rodding, we performed in 19 cases (14 femurs and 11 tibias). Sofield-Millar procedures we performed in 58 children. We operated 321 times - there are 4 operations on average in one child. Average follow-up period was 6.7 years. We operated 473 long bones: 234 femurs and 239 tibias. We did 479 osteotomies. First operations were done at the age of 9 years on average (1.5-21 years). Further operations, 3 in each patient on average, we performed in period 37 months from one to another on tibias and 49 months on femurs. In all operated children we achieved full axis correction and their activity after operation improved. In order to assess that, we used the Bleck scale. In general, before operation, 54 (70%) children did not walk, and, in contrast, after operations 53 (69%) started walking. Operative treatment of the lower extremities in children with osteogenesis imperfecta improves their clinical physical abilities, quality of life and allows increase in activities.

  17. Tremor in X-linked recessive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease).

    PubMed

    Dias, Francisco A; Munhoz, Renato P; Raskin, Salmo; Werneck, Lineu César; Teive, Hélio A G

    2011-01-01

    To study tremor in patients with X-linked recessive spinobulbar muscular atrophy or Kennedy's disease. Ten patients (from 7 families) with a genetic diagnosis of Kennedy's disease were screened for the presence of tremor using a standardized clinical protocol and followed up at a neurology outpatient clinic. All index patients were genotyped and showed an expanded allele in the androgen receptor gene. Mean patient age was 37.6 years and mean number of CAG repeats 47 (44-53). Tremor was present in 8 (80%) patients and was predominantly postural hand tremor. Alcohol responsiveness was detected in 7 (88%) patients with tremor, who all responded well to treatment with a β-blocker (propranolol). Tremor is a common feature in patients with Kennedy's disease and has characteristics similar to those of essential tremor.

  18. Tremor in X-linked recessive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Francisco A; Munhoz, Renato P; Raskin, Salmo; Werneck, Lineu César; Teive, Hélio A G

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study tremor in patients with X-linked recessive spinobulbar muscular atrophy or Kennedy's disease. METHODS: Ten patients (from 7 families) with a genetic diagnosis of Kennedy's disease were screened for the presence of tremor using a standardized clinical protocol and followed up at a neurology outpatient clinic. All index patients were genotyped and showed an expanded allele in the androgen receptor gene. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 37.6 years and mean number of CAG repeats 47 (44-53). Tremor was present in 8 (80%) patients and was predominantly postural hand tremor. Alcohol responsiveness was detected in 7 (88%) patients with tremor, who all responded well to treatment with a β-blocker (propranolol). CONCLUSION: Tremor is a common feature in patients with Kennedy's disease and has characteristics similar to those of essential tremor. PMID:21808858

  19. Regulatory divergence of X-linked genes and hybrid male sterility in mice.

    PubMed

    Oka, Ayako; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation is the reduction of fertility or viability in hybrids between genetically diverged populations. One example of reproductive isolation, hybrid male sterility, may be caused by genetic incompatibility between diverged genetic factors in two distinct populations. Genetic factors involved in hybrid male sterility are disproportionately located on the X chromosome. Recent studies showing the evolutionary divergence in gene regulatory networks or epigenetic effects suggest that the genetic incompatibilities occur at much broader levels than had previously been thought (e.g., incompatibility of protein-protein interactions). The latest studies suggest that evolutionary divergence of transcriptional regulation causes genetic incompatibilities in hybrid animals, and that such incompatibilities preferentially involve X-linked genes. In this review, we focus on recent progress in understanding hybrid sterility in mice, including our studies, and we discuss the evolutionary significance of regulatory divergence for speciation.

  20. Application of carrier testing to genetic counseling for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Nachtman, R.G.; Belmont, J.W.

    Bruton X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a phenotypically recessive genetic disorder of B lymphocyte development. Female carriers of XLA, although asymptomatic, have a characteristic B cell lineage-specific skewing of the pattern of X inactivation. Skewing apparently results from defective growth and maturation of B cell precursors bearing a mutant active X chromosome. In this study, carrier status was tested in 58 women from 22 families referred with a history of agammaglobulinemia. Primary carrier analysis to examine patterns of X inactivation in CD19[sup +] peripheral blood cells (B lymphocytes) was conducted using quantitative PCR at the androgen-receptor locus. Obligate carriers of XLAmore » demonstrated >95% skewing of X inactivation in peripheral blood CD19[sup +] cells but not in CD19[sup [minus

  1. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis: mutations at the retinoschisis and Norrie disease gene loci?

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, M; Rossi, F; Trese, M T; Shastry, B S

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile retinoschisis (RS) and Norrie disease (ND) are X-linked recessive retinal disorders. Both disorders, in the majority of cases, are monogenic and are caused by mutations in the RS and ND genes, respectively. Here we report the identification of a family in which mutations in both the RS and ND genes are segregating with RS pathology. Although the mutations identified in this report were not functionally characterized with regard to their pathogenicity, it is likely that both of them are involved in RS pathology in the family analyzed. This suggests the complexity and digenic nature of monogenic human disorders in some cases. If this proves to be a widespread problem, it will complicate the strategies used to identify the genes involved in diseases and to develop methods for intervention.

  2. A mutation in the Norrie disease gene (NDP) associated with X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z Y; Battinelli, E M; Fielder, A; Bundey, S; Sims, K; Breakefield, X O; Craig, I W

    1993-10-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a hereditary disorder characterized by an abnormality of the peripheral retina. Both autosomal dominant (adFEVR) and X-linked (XLFEVR) forms have been described, but the biochemical defect(s) underlying the symptoms are unknown. Molecular analysis of the Norrie gene locus (NDP) in a four generation FEVR family (shown previously to exhibit linkage to the X-chromosome markers DXS228 and MAOA (Xp11.4-p11.3)) reveals a missense mutation in the highly conserved region of the NDP gene, which caused a neutral amino acid substitution (Leu124Phe), was detected in all of the affected males, but not in the unaffected family members, nor in normal controls. The observations suggest that phenotypes of both XLFEVR and Norrie disease can result from mutations in the same gene.

  3. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affectedmore » females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.« less

  4. Subcortical laminar heterotopia and lissencephaly in two families: a single X linked dominant gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, J M; Motte, J; Chiron, C; Brian, R; Andermann, E; Dulac, O

    1994-01-01

    Neuronal migration disorders can now be recognised by MRI. This paper reports two families in which the mothers had subcortical laminar heterotopia and four of their children had either similar heterotopia (two girls) or severe pachygyria or lissencephaly (two boys). Laminar heterotopia was more evident on MRI T2 weighted images. The patients had mild to severe epilepsy and mental retardation depending on the extent of cortical abnormalities. In these families, subcortical laminar heterotopia, pachygyria, and lissencephaly seem to share the same X linked or autosomal dominant gene. No chromosomal abnormalities, especially of chromosome 17, could be identified. For appropriate genetic counselling of the family of a child with lissencephaly or subcortical laminar heterotopia, MRI should be performed in parents or siblings with mental retardation or epilepsy. Images PMID:8057113

  5. Assessing interethnic admixture using an X-linked insertion-deletion multiplex.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; dos Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; dos Santos, Andrea Kely Campos Ribeiro; Pereira, Rui; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Zago, Marco Antonio; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a PCR multiplex was optimized, allowing the simultaneous analysis of 13 X-chromosome Insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs). Genetic variation observed in Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans reveals high inter-population variability. The estimated proportions of X-chromosomes in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon region show a predominant Amerindian contribution (approximately 41%), followed by European (approximately 32%) and African (approximately 27%) contributions. The proportion of Amerindian contribution based on X-linked data is similar to the expected value based on mtDNA and Y-chromosome information. The accuracy for assessing interethnic admixture, and the high differentiation between African, European, and Native American populations, demonstrates the suitability of this INDEL set to measure ancestry proportions in three-hybrid populations, as it is the case of Latin American populations.

  6. Central motor and sensory pathway involvement in an X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth family.

    PubMed

    Zambelis, T; Panas, M; Kokotis, P; Karadima, G; Kararizou, E; Karandreas, N

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the subclinical involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in an X-linked Charcot-Marie-Toth (CMTX) family. Seven subjects, all members of one family with a C.462T > G connexin 32 (Cx32) mutation were investigated by Blink reflex, Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). There were five clinically symptomatic for CMT neuropathy (four male and one female) and two asymptomatic (female) subjects. Subclinical CNS involvement was observed in all, symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. This is the largest CMTX neuropathy family investigated for CNS involvement. Electrophysiological involvement of the CNS in every examined member of this family was observed, raising the question of a more systematic involvement of the CNS in CMTX disease.

  7. Arch fingerprints, hypotonia, and areflexia associated with X linked mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, R E; Häne, B; Arena, J F; May, M; Lawrence, L; Lubs, H A; Schwartz, C E

    1997-01-01

    A syndrome with distinctive facies, poor muscle tone, absent deep tendon reflexes, tapered fingers, excessive fingerprint arches, genu valgum and mild-moderate mental retardation has occurred in four males in two generations of a white family of European ancestry. The facies are characterised by square configuration, tented upper lip, and thickening of the helices, upper eyelids, and alae nasi. At birth and at maturity, growth (head circumference, height, weight) of affected males is comparable to or greater than unaffected male sibs. Moderate impairment of cognitive function was documented (IQ scores between 40-51). Carriers show no heterozygote manifestations. This X linked condition appears to be different from other syndromes with mental retardation, although there are certain similarities with the alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X). Linkage analysis found tight linkage to DXS1166 and DXS995 in Xq13 and Xq21 respectively. Images PMID:9192265

  8. Arch fingerprints, hypotonia, and areflexia associated with X linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R E; Häne, B; Arena, J F; May, M; Lawrence, L; Lubs, H A; Schwartz, C E

    1997-06-01

    A syndrome with distinctive facies, poor muscle tone, absent deep tendon reflexes, tapered fingers, excessive fingerprint arches, genu valgum and mild-moderate mental retardation has occurred in four males in two generations of a white family of European ancestry. The facies are characterised by square configuration, tented upper lip, and thickening of the helices, upper eyelids, and alae nasi. At birth and at maturity, growth (head circumference, height, weight) of affected males is comparable to or greater than unaffected male sibs. Moderate impairment of cognitive function was documented (IQ scores between 40-51). Carriers show no heterozygote manifestations. This X linked condition appears to be different from other syndromes with mental retardation, although there are certain similarities with the alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X). Linkage analysis found tight linkage to DXS1166 and DXS995 in Xq13 and Xq21 respectively.

  9. X linked neonatal centronuclear/myotubular myopathy: evidence for linkage to Xq28 DNA marker loci.

    PubMed

    Thomas, N S; Williams, H; Cole, G; Roberts, K; Clarke, A; Liechti-Gallati, S; Braga, S; Gerber, A; Meier, C; Moser, H

    1990-05-01

    We have studied the inheritance of several polymorphic Xq27/28 DNA marker loci in two three generation families with the X linked neonatal lethal form of centronuclear/myotubular myopathy (XL MTM). We found complete linkage of XLMTM to all four informative Xq28 markers analysed, with GCP/RCP (Z = 3.876, theta = 0.00), with DXS15 (Z = 3.737, theta = 0.00), with DXS52 (Z = 2.709, theta = 0.00), and with F8C (Z = 1.020, theta = 0.00). In the absence of any observable recombination, we are unable to sublocalise the XLMTM locus further within the Xq28 region. This evidence for an Xq28 localisation may allow us to carry out useful genetic counselling within such families.

  10. X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: New Features and a Novel EDA Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Savasta, Salvatore; Carlone, Giorgia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; Chiappe, Francesca; Bassanese, Francesco; Piras, Roberta; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Brazzelli, Valeria; Verrotti, Alberto; Marseglia, Gian L

    2017-01-01

    We described a 5-year-old male with hypodontia, hypohidrosis, and facial dysmorphisms characterized by a depressed nasal bridge, maxillary hypoplasia, and protuberant lips. Chromosomal analysis revealed a normal 46,XY male karyotype. Due to the presence of clinical features of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED), the EDA gene, located at Xq12q13.1, of the patient and his family was sequenced. Analysis of the proband's sequence revealed a missense mutation (T to A transversion) in hemizygosity state at nucleotide position 158 in exon 1 of the EDA gene, which changes codon 53 from leucine to histidine, while heterozygosity at this position was detected in the slightly affected mother; moreover, this mutation was not found in the publically available Human Gene Mutation Database. To date, our findings indicate that a novel mutation in EDA is associated with X-linked HED, adding it to the repertoire of EDA mutations. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. X-linked adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy: Psychiatric and neurological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Daniah; Alleyne, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy is a rare x-linked inborn error of metabolism occurring predominantly in males with onset in early 30s. Here, we report a 34-year-old male with first signs of disease in early 20s manifesting as a pure psychiatric disorder. Prior to onset of neurological symptoms, this patient demonstrated a schizophrenia and bipolar-like presentation. The disease progressed over the next 10–13 years and his memory and motor problems became evident around the age of 33 years. Subsequently, diagnostic testing showed the typical magnetic resonance imaging and lab findings for adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy. This case highlights adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy which may present as a pure psychiatric disturbance in early adulthood and briefly discusses the prolonged time between the onset of psychiatric symptoms and the onset of neurological disease. PMID:29201369

  12. X-linked adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy: Psychiatric and neurological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Daniah; Alleyne, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy is a rare x-linked inborn error of metabolism occurring predominantly in males with onset in early 30s. Here, we report a 34-year-old male with first signs of disease in early 20s manifesting as a pure psychiatric disorder. Prior to onset of neurological symptoms, this patient demonstrated a schizophrenia and bipolar-like presentation. The disease progressed over the next 10-13 years and his memory and motor problems became evident around the age of 33 years. Subsequently, diagnostic testing showed the typical magnetic resonance imaging and lab findings for adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy. This case highlights adult-onset adrenoleukodystrophy which may present as a pure psychiatric disturbance in early adulthood and briefly discusses the prolonged time between the onset of psychiatric symptoms and the onset of neurological disease.

  13. Mutational Survey of the PHEX Gene in Patients with X-linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Traxler, Elizabeth A.; Estwick, Selina A.; Curry, Leah R.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Sorenson, Andrea H.; Imel, Erik A.; Econs, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting, aberrant vitamin D metabolism, and abnormal bone mineralization. XLH is caused by inactivating mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome). In this study, we sequenced the PHEX gene in subjects from 26 kindreds who were clinically diagnosed with XLH. Sequencing revealed 18 different mutations, of which thirteen have not been reported previously. In addition to deletions, splice site mutations, and missense and nonsense mutations, a rare point mutation in the 3’-untranslated region (3’-UTR) was identified as a novel cause of XLH. In summary, we identified a wide spectrum of mutations in the PHEX gene. Our data, in accord with those of others, indicate that there is no single predominant PHEX mutation responsible for XLH. PMID:18625346

  14. Connexin mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J.; Scherer, S.S.; Wang, S.

    1993-12-24

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is a form of hereditary neuropathy with demyelination. Recently, this disorder was mapped to chromosome Xq13.1. The gene for the gap junction protein connexin32 is located in the same chromosomal segment, which led to its consideration as a candidate gene for CMTX. With the use of Northern (RNA) blot and immunohistochemistry techniques, it was found that connexin32 is normally expressed in myelinated peripheral nerve. Direct sequencing of the connexin32 gene showed seven different mutations in affected persons from eight CMTX families. These findings, a demonstration of inherited defects in a gap junction protein, suggest that connexin32more » plays an important role in peripheral nerve.« less

  15. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase: From X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Toward Targeted Therapy for B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  16. Three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography in X linked foveal retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sandeep; Manisha; Meyer, Carsten H

    2013-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was performed in two cases of bilateral X linked foveal retinoschisis of different age groups. On fundus examination spoke wheel and honeycomb pattern of cysts were observed along with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) defects. On SD-OCT, schisis was observed in the outer plexiform layer. External limiting membrane disruption was observed in the subfoveal area, along with disruption of outer nuclear layer (ONL) and inner–outer segment junction. Elevation of ONL due to tractional pull of central palisade was a novel observation. Retinoschisis extended beyond the optic disc up to the nasal region. Extracted RNFL tomogram presented an unprecedented visualisation of schisis along 360° of the optic disc. Tractional elevation in the foveal area and schisis involving nasal region, not observed upon clinical examination, was highlighted on SD-OCT. This investigative modality is an important adjunct in the assessment of foveal retinoschisis. PMID:23563673

  17. Infantile vitreous hemorrhage as the initial presentation of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Joo; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, So Yeon; Park, Sung Sup; Yu, Young Suk

    2009-06-01

    The authors report two cases of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) manifested as bilateral vitreous hemorrhage as early as in an 1-month-old infant and in a 3-month-old infant. The one-month-old male infant showed massive bilateral vitreous hemorrhage. During vitrectomy, thin membrane representing an inner part of schisis cavity was excised and intraschisis hemorrhage was evacuated. As intraschisis cavities were cleared, the stump of inner layer appeared as the demarcation line between the outer layer of the schisis retina and non-schisis retina. The other three-month-old male infant presenting with esodeviation also showed bilateral vitreous hemorrhage. Typical bilateral retinoschisis involving maculae could be seen through vitreous hemorrhage in both eyes on fundus examination. Spontaneous absorption of hemorrhage was observed on regular follow-up. XLRS could be manifested as massive hemorrhage inside or outside of the schisis cavity early in infancy.

  18. Mutations in the RS1 gene in a Chinese family with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiaofang; Chu, Yan; Guo, Qiannan; Wu, Dong; Liao, Shixiu

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the mutations in the retinoschisis 1 (RS1) gene, which was associated with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) in a four-generation Chinese family, and to provide the theoretical basis for gene diagnosis and gene therapy. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes. All six exons and flanking intronic regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by direct sequencing. Through our genetic analysis, one frameshift 573delG mutation was identified in the patients of this four-generation pedigree; however, this mutation was absent in normal or non-carrier subjects. In conclusion, this 573delG mutation is reported in the Chinese population for the first time. This mutation widens the mutational spectrum of RS1 in Asians. Identification of mutations in the RS1 gene and expanded information on clinical manifestations will facilitate early diagnosis, appropriate early therapy, and genetic counseling regarding the prognosis of XLRS.

  19. En face swept-source optical coherence tomographic analysis of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shinji; Takahashi, Atsushi; Mase, Tomoko; Nagaoka, Taiji; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the area of retinoschisis by X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) en face images. We report two cases of XLRS in the same family. The patients presented with bilateral blurred vision. The posterior segment examination showed a spoked-wheel pattern in the macula. SS-OCT cross-sectional images revealed widespread retinal splitting at the level of the inner nuclear layer bilaterally. We diagnosed XLRS. To evaluate the area of retinoschisis, we obtained en face SS-OCT images, which clearly visualized the area of retinoschisis seen as a sunflower-like structure in the macula. We report the findings on en face SS-OCT images from patients with XLRS. The en face images using SS-OCT showed the precise area of retinoschisis compared with the SS-OCT thickness map and are useful for managing patients with XLRS.

  20. Infantile Vitreous Hemorrhage as the Initial Presentation of X-linked Juvenile Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Joo; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, So Yeon; Park, Sung Sup

    2009-01-01

    The authors report two cases of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) manifested as bilateral vitreous hemorrhage as early as in an 1-month-old infant and in a 3-month-old infant. The one-month-old male infant showed massive bilateral vitreous hemorrhage. During vitrectomy, thin membrane representing an inner part of schisis cavity was excised and intraschisis hemorrhage was evacuated. As intraschisis cavities were cleared, the stump of inner layer appeared as the demarcation line between the outer layer of the schisis retina and non-schisis retina. The other three-month-old male infant presenting with esodeviation also showed bilateral vitreous hemorrhage. Typical bilateral retinoschisis involving maculae could be seen through vitreous hemorrhage in both eyes on fundus examination. Spontaneous absorption of hemorrhage was observed on regular follow-up. XLRS could be manifested as massive hemorrhage inside or outside of the schisis cavity early in infancy. PMID:19568363

  1. X-linked recessive panhypopituitarism associated with a regional duplication in Xq25-q26.

    PubMed Central

    Lagerström-Fermér, M; Sundvall, M; Johnsen, E; Warne, G L; Forrest, S M; Zajac, J D; Rickards, A; Ravine, D; Landegren, U; Pettersson, U

    1997-01-01

    We present a linkage analysis and a clinical update on a previously reported family with X-linked recessive panhypopituitarism, now in its fourth generation. Affected members exhibit variable degrees of hypopituitarism and mental retardation. The markers DXS737 and DXS1187 in the q25-q26 region of the X chromosome showed evidence for linkage with a peak LOD score (Zmax) of 4.12 at zero recombination fraction (theta(max) = 0). An apparent extra copy of the marker DXS102, observed in the region of the disease gene in affected males and heterozygous carrier females, suggests that a segment including this marker is duplicated. The gene causing this disorder appears to code for a dosage-sensitive protein central to development of the pituitary. Images Figure 2 PMID:9106538

  2. X-Linked Glomerulopathy Due to COL4A5 Founder Variant.

    PubMed

    Barua, Moumita; John, Rohan; Stella, Lorenzo; Li, Weili; Roslin, Nicole M; Sharif, Bedra; Hack, Saidah; Lajoie-Starkell, Ginette; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Becknell, Brian; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Cattran, Daniel; Paterson, Andrew D; Pei, York

    2018-03-01

    Alport syndrome is a rare hereditary disorder caused by rare variants in 1 of 3 genes encoding for type IV collagen. Rare variants in COL4A5 on chromosome Xq22 cause X-linked Alport syndrome, which accounts for ∼80% of the cases. Alport syndrome has a variable clinical presentation, including progressive kidney failure, hearing loss, and ocular defects. Exome sequencing performed in 2 affected related males with an undefined X-linked glomerulopathy characterized by global and segmental glomerulosclerosis, mesangial hypercellularity, and vague basement membrane immune complex deposition revealed a COL4A5 sequence variant, a substitution of a thymine by a guanine at nucleotide 665 (c.T665G; rs281874761) of the coding DNA predicted to lead to a cysteine to phenylalanine substitution at amino acid 222, which was not seen in databases cataloguing natural human genetic variation, including dbSNP138, 1000 Genomes Project release version 01-11-2004, Exome Sequencing Project 21-06-2014, or ExAC 01-11-2014. Review of the literature identified 2 additional families with the same COL4A5 variant leading to similar atypical histopathologic features, suggesting a unique pathologic mechanism initiated by this specific rare variant. Homology modeling suggests that the substitution alters the structural and dynamic properties of the type IV collagen trimer. Genetic analysis comparing members of the 3 families indicated a distant relationship with a shared haplotype, implying a founder effect. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenotype and genotype in 101 males with X-linked creatine transporter deficiency.

    PubMed

    van de Kamp, J M; Betsalel, O T; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, S; Abulhoul, L; Grünewald, S; Anselm, I; Azzouz, H; Bratkovic, D; de Brouwer, A; Hamel, B; Kleefstra, T; Yntema, H; Campistol, J; Vilaseca, M A; Cheillan, D; D'Hooghe, M; Diogo, L; Garcia, P; Valongo, C; Fonseca, M; Frints, S; Wilcken, B; von der Haar, S; Meijers-Heijboer, H E; Hofstede, F; Johnson, D; Kant, S G; Lion-Francois, L; Pitelet, G; Longo, N; Maat-Kievit, J A; Monteiro, J P; Munnich, A; Muntau, A C; Nassogne, M C; Osaka, H; Ounap, K; Pinard, J M; Quijano-Roy, S; Poggenburg, I; Poplawski, N; Abdul-Rahman, O; Ribes, A; Arias, A; Yaplito-Lee, J; Schulze, A; Schwartz, C E; Schwenger, S; Soares, G; Sznajer, Y; Valayannopoulos, V; Van Esch, H; Waltz, S; Wamelink, M M C; Pouwels, P J W; Errami, A; van der Knaap, M S; Jakobs, C; Mancini, G M; Salomons, G S

    2013-07-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency is a monogenic cause of X-linked intellectual disability. Since its first description in 2001 several case reports have been published but an overview of phenotype, genotype and phenotype--genotype correlation has been lacking. We performed a retrospective study of clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic data of 101 males with X-linked creatine transporter deficiency from 85 families with a pathogenic mutation in the creatine transporter gene (SLC6A8). Most patients developed moderate to severe intellectual disability; mild intellectual disability was rare in adult patients. Speech language development was especially delayed but almost a third of the patients were able to speak in sentences. Besides behavioural problems and seizures, mild to moderate motor dysfunction, including extrapyramidal movement abnormalities, and gastrointestinal problems were frequent clinical features. Urinary creatine to creatinine ratio proved to be a reliable screening method besides MR spectroscopy, molecular genetic testing and creatine uptake studies, allowing definition of diagnostic guidelines. A third of patients had a de novo mutation in the SLC6A8 gene. Mothers with an affected son with a de novo mutation should be counselled about a recurrence risk in further pregnancies due to the possibility of low level somatic or germline mosaicism. Missense mutations with residual activity might be associated with a milder phenotype and large deletions extending beyond the 3' end of the SLC6A8 gene with a more severe phenotype. Evaluation of the biochemical phenotype revealed unexpected high creatine levels in cerebrospinal fluid suggesting that the brain is able to synthesise creatine and that the cerebral creatine deficiency is caused by a defect in the reuptake of creatine within the neurones.

  4. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  5. Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Review with Clinical Examples

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, F.S.; Cobben, J.M.; Kariminejad, A.; Maugeri, A.; Nikkels, P.G.J.; van Rijn, R.R.; Pals, G.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by susceptibility to bone fractures, with a severity ranging from subtle increase in fracture frequency to prenatal fractures. The first scientific description of OI dates from 1788. Since then, important milestones in OI research and treatment have, among others, been the classification of OI into 4 types (the ‘Sillence classification’), the discovery of defects in collagen type I biosynthesis as a cause of most cases of OI and the use of bisphosphonate therapy. Furthermore, in the past 5 years, it has become clear that OI comprises a group of heterogeneous disorders, with an estimated 90% of cases due to a causative variant in the COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes and with the remaining 10% due to causative recessive variants in the 8 genes known so far, or in other currently unknown genes. This review aims to highlight the current knowledge around the history, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical/radiological features, management, and future prospects of OI. The text will be illustrated with clinical descriptions, including radiographs and, where possible, photographs of patients with OI. PMID:22570641

  6. Physical training in children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Van Brussel, Marco; Takken, Tim; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Pruijs, Hans J; Van der Net, Janjaap; Helders, Paul J M; Engelbert, Raoul H H

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of a physical training program on exercise capacity, muscle force, and subjective fatigue levels in patients with mild to moderate forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Thirty-four children with OI type I or IV were randomly assigned to either a 12-week graded exercise program or care as usual for 3 months. Exercise capacity and muscle force were studied; subjective fatigue, perceived competence, and health-related quality of life were secondary outcomes. All outcomes were measured at baseline (T = 0), after intervention (T = 1), and after 6 and 9 months (T = 2 and T = 3, respectively). After intervention (T = 1), peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), relative VO2peak (VO2peak/kg), maximal working capacity (Wmax), and muscle force were significantly improved (17%, 18%, 10%, and 12%, respectively) compared with control values. Subjective fatigue decreased borderline statistically significantly. Follow-up at T = 2 showed a significant decrease of the improvements measured at T = 1 of VO2peak, but VO2peak/kg, Wmax, and subjective fatigue showed no significant difference. At T = 3, we found a further decrease of the gained improvements. A supervised training program can improve aerobic capacity and muscle force and reduces levels of subjective fatigue in children with OI type I and IV in a safe and effective manner.

  7. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogenesis imperfecta mice.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L

    2010-09-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (P(o), P(o)/mg and P(o)/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased P(o) and an inability to sustain P(o) for the 300-ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytoskeleton and nuclear lamina affection in recessive osteogenesis imperfecta: A functional proteomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Assunta; Besio, Roberta; Carnemolla, Chiara; Landi, Claudia; Armini, Alessandro; Aglan, Mona; Otaify, Ghada; Temtamy, Samia A; Forlino, Antonella; Bini, Luca; Bianchi, Laura

    2017-09-07

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related disorder associated to dominant, recessive or X-linked transmission, mainly caused by mutations in type I collagen genes or in genes involved in type I collagen metabolism. Among the recessive forms, OI types VII, VIII, and IX are due to mutations in CRTAP, P3H1, and PPIB genes, respectively. They code for the three components of the endoplasmic reticulum complex that catalyzes 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen α1Pro986. Under-hydroxylation of this residue leads to collagen structural abnormalities and results in moderate to lethal OI phenotype, despite the exact molecular mechanisms are still not completely clear. To shed light on these recessive forms, primary fibroblasts from OI patients with mutations in CRTAP (n=3), P3H1 (n=3), PPIB (n=1) genes and from controls (n=4) were investigated by a functional proteomic approach. Cytoskeleton and nucleoskeleton asset, protein fate, and metabolism were delineated as mainly affected. While western blot experiments confirmed altered expression of lamin A/C and cofilin-1, immunofluorescence analysis using antibody against lamin A/C and phalloidin showed an aberrant organization of nucleus and cytoskeleton. This is the first report describing an altered organization of intracellular structural proteins in recessive OI and pointing them as possible novel target for OI treatment. OI is a prototype for skeletal dysplasias. It is a highly heterogeneous collagen-related disorder with dominant, recessive and X-linked transmission. There is no definitive cure for this disease, thus a better understanding of the molecular basis of its pathophysiology is expected to contribute in identifying potential targets to develop new treatments. Based on this concept, we performed a functional proteomic study to delineate affected molecular pathways in primary fibroblasts from recessive OI patients, carrying mutations in CRTAP (OI type VII), P3H1 (OI type VIII), and PPIB (OI type IX) genes

  9. The clinical application of single-sperm-based SNP haplotyping for PGD of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linjun; Diao, Zhenyu; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhou, Jianjun; Yan, Guijun; Sun, Haixiang

    2018-05-15

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, presenting either autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked inheritance patterns. The majority of OI cases are autosomal dominant and are caused by heterozygous mutations in either the COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene. In these dominant disorders, allele dropout (ADO) can lead to misdiagnosis in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Polymorphic markers linked to the mutated genes have been used to establish haplotypes for identifying ADO and ensuring the accuracy of PGD. However, the haplotype of male patients cannot be determined without data from affected relatives. Here, we developed a method for single-sperm-based single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotyping via next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the PGD of OI. After NGS, 10 informative polymorphic SNP markers located upstream and downstream of the COL1A1 gene and its pathogenic mutation site were linked to individual alleles in a single sperm from an affected male. After haplotyping, a normal blastocyst was transferred to the uterus for a subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycle. The accuracy of PGD was confirmed by amniocentesis at 19 weeks of gestation. A healthy infant weighing 4,250 g was born via vaginal delivery at the 40th week of gestation. Single-sperm-based SNP haplotyping can be applied for PGD of any monogenic disorders or de novo mutations in males in whom the haplotype of paternal mutations cannot be determined due to a lack of affected relatives. ADO: allele dropout; DI: dentinogenesis imperfect; ESHRE: European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology; FET: frozen embryo transfer; gDNA: genomic DNA; ICSI: intracytoplasmic sperm injection; IVF: in vitro fertilization; MDA: multiple displacement amplification; NGS: next-generation sequencing; OI: osteogenesis imperfect; PBS: phosphate buffer saline; PCR: polymerase chain reaction; PGD: preimplantation genetic diagnosis; SNP: single-nucleotide polymorphism; STR

  10. Evaluation of stomatognathic problems in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (osteogenesis imperfecta - oi) - preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Smoląg, Danuta; Kulesa-Mrowiecka, Małgorzata; Sułko, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    According to epidemiological data, muscular dysfunctions of the masticatory system occur in 15-23% of the population. Preventive examinations of functional disorders of the stomatognathic system are, therefore, of particular importance. A distinct group of patients exposed to dysfunctions in the area of the masticatory organ locomotor apparatus comprises those with genetic diseases characterised by disorders in collagen formation. One of such diseases is osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and dentinogenesis imperfecta that usually goes together with the former. The objective of this work was to evaluate the frequency with which particular disorders of the masticatory organ locomotor apparatus occur within the group of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. The study was performed on patients of the Orthopaedic Clinic of the Polish-American Paediatric Institute in Kraków. The mean age of the children was 7.9 years. In all the cases, a genetic diagnosis of OI has been confirmed. The research methods were based on an in-depth interview on family diseases, pregnancy, postnatal period, feeding, subjective assessment of dysfunctions in the stomatognathic system. An examination of the deformations in the stomatognathic system and the skeleton was conducted, as well as an examination of the trauma and tone of the jaw. The relationship between breastfeeding and swallowing and speech disorders was also evaluated. The impact of intubation on mandibular ranges was investigated. The results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis on the basis of which conclusions were drawn concerning disorders in the stomatognathic system which tend to occur in children with OI. The renunciation of breastfeeding significantly contributes to sucking and swallowing disorders, rumen disorders, as well as biomechanical disorders in the temporomandibular joint. A significant dependence between breastfeeding and swallowing problems was found, whereas there was no such dependence with respect to

  11. [Genetic mutation and clinical features of osteogenesis imperfecta type V].

    PubMed

    Guan, Shizhen; Bai, Xue; Wang, Yi; Liu, Zhigang; Ren, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Tianke; Ju, Mingyan; Li, Keqiu; Li, Guang

    2017-12-10

    To explore genetic mutations and clinical features of osteogenesis imperfecta type V. Clinical record of five patients (including one familial case) with osteogenesis imperfecta type V were retrospectively analyzed. Peripheral blood samples of the patients, one family member, as well as healthy controls were collected. Mutation of IFITM5 gene was identified by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. A heterozygous mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5-UTR of the IFITM5 gene was identified in all of the patients and one mother. The clinical findings included frequent fractures and spine and/or extremities deformities, absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta, absence of hearing impairment, and blue sclera in 1 case. Radiographic findings revealed calcification of the interosseous membrane between the radius-ulna in all cases. Hyperplastic callus formation was found in 3 cases. Four had radial-head dislocation. A single heterozygous mutation c.-14C>T was found in the 5-UTR of the IFITM5 gene in 5 patients with osteogensis imperfecta type V. The patients showed specific radiological features including calcification of interosseous membrane, hyperplastic callus formation, and radial-head dislocation.

  12. GEP, a local growth factor, is critical for odontogenesis and amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengguo; Jiang, Baichun; Xie, Yixia; Liu, Chuan-ju; Feng, Jian Q

    2010-11-25

    Granulin epithelin precursor (GEP) is a new growth factor that functions in brain development, chondrogenesis, tissue regeneration, tumorigenesis, and inflammation. The goal of this study was to study whether GEP was critical for odontogenesis and amelogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry data showed that GEP was expressed in both odontoblast and ameloblast cells postnatally. Knockdown of GEP by crossing U6-ploxPneo-GEP and Sox2-Cre transgenic mice led to a reduction of dentin thickness, an increase in predentin thickness, and a reduction in mineral content in enamel. The in vitro application of recombinant GEP up-regulated molecular markers important for odontogenesis (DMP1, DSPP, and ALP) and amelogenesis (ameloblastin, amelogenin and enamelin). In conclusion, both the in vivo and the in vivo data support an important role of GEP in tooth formation during postnatal development.

  13. GEP, a Local Growth Factor, is Critical for Odontogenesis and Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengguo; Jiang, Baichun; Xie, Yixia; Liu, Chuan-ju; Feng, Jian Q.

    2010-01-01

    Granulin epithelin precursor (GEP) is a new growth factor that functions in brain development, chondrogenesis, tissue regeneration, tumorigenesis, and inflammation. The goal of this study was to study whether GEP was critical for odontogenesis and amelogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry data showed that GEP was expressed in both odontoblast and ameloblast cells postnatally. Knockdown of GEP by crossing U6-ploxPneo-GEP and Sox2-Cre transgenic mice led to a reduction of dentin thickness, an increase in predentin thickness, and a reduction in mineral content in enamel. The in vitro application of recombinant GEP up-regulated molecular markers important for odontogenesis (DMP1, DSPP, and ALP) and amelogenesis (ameloblastin, amelogenin and enamelin). In conclusion, both the in vivo and the in vivo data support an important role of GEP in tooth formation during postnatal development. PMID:21152114

  14. A longitudinal study of visual function in carriers of X-linked recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Grover, S; Fishman, G A; Anderson, R J; Lindeman, M

    2000-02-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the progression of visual function impairment in carriers of X-linked recessive retinitis pigmentosa. We also assessed the relationship between the retinal findings at presentation and the extent of deterioration. Observational, retrospective, case series. Twenty-seven carriers of X-linked recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Each carrier was clinically categorized into one of four grades (grades 0 through 3) depending on the presence or absence of a tapetal-like retinal reflex and the extent of peripheral pigmentary degeneration. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed and data for visual acuity, visual field area, and electroretinographic measurements were collected on the most recent visit in both eyes. These were then compared with similar data obtained on their initial visits. A comparison of visual function was carried out between the initial visit and the most recent visit on each carrier. The visual acuity was measured with Snellen's acuity charts. The visual fields to targets V-4-e and II-4-e were planimeterized and used for the analysis. The electroretinographic (ERG) measures used were light-adapted single-flash b-wave amplitudes and 30-Hz red flicker for cone function, dark-adapted maximal b-wave amplitudes, and response to a low intensity blue-flash for rod function. None of the 11 carriers with a tapetal-like reflex only (grade 1) showed any significant change in visual acuity or fields as compared with 3 of 7 (43%) carriers with diffuse peripheral pigmentary findings (grade 3) who showed significant deterioration in visual acuity in at least one eye, and 6 of 7 (86%) who showed a significant decrease in visual field area with at least one target size in at least one eye. By comparison, only 1 of 10 carriers with a grade 1 fundus finding demonstrated a significant decrease in maximal dark-adapted ERG function as compared with 5 of 6 (83%) carriers with grade 3 in response to a single-flash stimulus and

  15. Unique Variants in OPN1LW Cause Both Syndromic and Nonsyndromic X-Linked High Myopia Mapped to MYP1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiali; Gao, Bei; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Shiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Jia, Xiaoyun; Yang, Jianhua; Guo, Xiangming; Yin, Ye; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2015-06-01

    MYP1 is a locus for X-linked syndromic and nonsyndromic high myopia. Recently, unique haplotypes in OPN1LW were found to be responsible for X-linked syndromic high myopia mapped to MYP1. The current study is to test if such variants in OPN1LW are also responsible for X-linked nonsyndromic high myopia mapped to MYP1. The proband of the family previously mapped to MYP1 was initially analyzed using whole-exome sequencing and whole-genome sequencing. Additional probands with early-onset high myopia were analyzed using whole-exome sequencing. Variants in OPN1LW were selected and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Long-range and second PCR were used to determine the haplotype and the first gene of the red-green gene array. Candidate variants were further validated in family members and controls. The unique LVAVA haplotype in OPN1LW was detected in the family with X-linked nonsyndromic high myopia mapped to MYP1. In addition, this haplotype and a novel frameshift mutation (c.617_620dup, p.Phe208Argfs*51) in OPN1LW were detected in two other families with X-linked high myopia. The unique haplotype cosegregated with high myopia in the two families, with a maximum LOD score of 3.34 and 2.31 at θ = 0. OPN1LW with the variants in these families was the first gene in the red-green gene array and was not present in 247 male controls. Reevaluation of the clinical data in both families with the unique haplotype suggested nonsyndromic high myopia. Our study confirms the findings that unique variants in OPN1LW are responsible for both syndromic and nonsyndromic X-linked high myopia mapped to MYP1.

  16. PPIB mutations cause severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Fleur S; Nesbitt, Isabel M; Zwikstra, Eline H; Nikkels, Peter G J; Piersma, Sander R; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Jimenez, Connie R; Huizer, Margriet; Morsman, Alice C; Cobben, Jan M; van Roij, Mirjam H H; Elting, Mariet W; Verbeke, Jonathan I M L; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Shaw, Nick J; Högler, Wolfgang; McKeown, Carole; Sistermans, Erik A; Dalton, Ann; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Pals, Gerard

    2009-10-01

    Deficiency of cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) or prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1(P3H1) has been reported in autosomal-recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). CRTAP, P3H1, and cyclophilin B (CyPB) form an intracellular collagen-modifying complex that 3-hydroxylates proline at position 986 (P986) in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I. This 3-prolyl hydroxylation is decreased in patients with CRTAP and P3H1 deficiency. It was suspected that mutations in the PPIB gene encoding CyPB would also cause OI with decreased collagen 3-prolyl hydroxylation. To our knowledge we present the first two families with recessive OI caused by PPIB gene mutations. The clinical phenotype is compatible with OI Sillence type II-B/III as seen with COL1A1/2, CRTAP, and LEPRE1 mutations. The percentage of 3-hydroxylated P986 residues in patients with PPIB mutations is decreased in comparison to normal, but it is higher than in patients with CRTAP and LEPRE1 mutations. This result and the fact that CyPB is demonstrable independent of CRTAP and P3H1, along with reported decreased 3-prolyl hydroxylation due to deficiency of CRTAP lacking the catalytic hydroxylation domain and the known function of CyPB as a cis-trans isomerase, suggest that recessive OI is caused by a dysfunctional P3H1/CRTAP/CyPB complex rather than by the lack of 3-prolyl hydroxylation of a single proline residue in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I.

  17. A Guide to Education for Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta. What Is OIF? Care of an Osteogenesis Imperfecta Baby and Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostegenesis Imperfecta Foundation, Inc., Manchester, NH.

    Three pamphlets provide basic information on the care and education of children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) a lifelong liability to fractures due to imperfectly formed "brittle bones." The first brochure, a guide to education for children with OI, addresses the importance of attitudes, the value of early education, public school…

  18. Stable Isotopes Reveal Rapid Enamel Elongation (Amelogenesis) Rates for the Early Cretaceous Iguanodontian Dinosaur Lanzhousaurus magnidens.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Celina A; You, Hai-Lu; Suarez, Marina B; Li, Da-Qing; Trieschmann, J B

    2017-11-10

    Lanzhousaurus magnidens, a large non-hadrosauriform iguanodontian dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Hekou Group of Gansu Province, China has the largest known herbivorous dinosaur teeth. Unlike its hadrosauriform relatives possessing tooth batteries of many small teeth, Lanzhousaurus utilized a small number (14) of very large teeth (~10 cm long) to create a large, continuous surface for mastication. Here we investigate the significance of Lanzhousaurus in the evolutionary history of iguanodontian-hadrosauriform transition by using a combination of stable isotope analysis and CT imagery. We infer that Lanzhousaurus had a rapid rate of tooth enamel elongation or amelogenesis at 0.24 mm/day with dental tissues common to other Iguanodontian dinosaurs. Among ornithopods, high rates of amelogenesis have been previously observed in hadrosaurids, where they have been associated with a sophisticated masticatory apparatus. These data suggest rapid amelogenesis evolved among non-hadrosauriform iguanodontians such as Lanzhousaurus, representing a crucial step that was exapted for the evolution of the hadrosaurian feeding mechanism.

  19. Human X-Linked genes regionally mapped utilizing X-autosome translocations and somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Shows, T B; Brown, J A

    1975-01-01

    Human genes coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT, EC 2.4.2.8; IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49; D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase), and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK, EC 2.7.2.3; ATP:3-phospho-D-glycerate 1-phosphotransferase) have been assigned to specific regions on the long arm of the X chromosome by somatic cell gentic techniques. Gene assignment and linear order were determined by employing human somatic cells possessing an X/9 translocation or an X/22 translocation in man-mouse cell hybridization studies. The X/9 translocation involved the majority of the X long arm translocated to chromosome 9 and the X/22 translocation involved the distal half of the X long arm translocated to 22. In each case these rearrangements appeared to be reciprocal. Concordant segregation of X-linked enzymes and segments of the X chromosome generated by the translocations indicated assignment of the PGK gene to a proximal long arm region (q12-q22) and the HPRT and G6PD genes to the distal half (q22-qter) of the X long arm. Further evidence suggests a gene order on the X long arm of centromere-PGK-HPRT-G6PD. Images PMID:1056018

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features as Surrogate Markers of X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets Activity.

    PubMed

    Lempicki, Marta; Rothenbuhler, Anya; Merzoug, Valérie; Franchi-Abella, Stéphanie; Chaussain, Catherine; Adamsbaum, Catherine; Linglart, Agnès

    2017-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is the most common form of inheritable rickets. Rickets treatment is monitored by assessing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, clinical features, and radiographs. Our objectives were to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of XLH and to assess correlations with disease activity. Twenty-seven XLH patients (median age 9.2 years) were included in this prospective single-center observational study. XLH activity was assessed using height, leg bowing, dental abscess history, and serum ALP levels. We looked for correlations between MRI features and markers of disease activity. On MRI, the median maximum width of the physis was 5.6 mm (range 4.8-7.8; normal <1.5), being >1.5 mm in all of the patients. The appearance of the zone of provisional calcification was abnormal on 21 MRI images (78%), Harris lines were present on 24 (89%), and bone marrow signal abnormalities were present on 16 (59%). ALP levels correlated with the maximum physeal widening and with the transverse extent of the widening. MRI of the knee provides precise rickets patterns that are correlated with ALP, an established biochemical marker of the disease, avoiding X-ray exposure and providing surrogate quantitative markers of disease activity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Imprinted and X-linked non-coding RNAs as potential regulators of human placental function

    PubMed Central

    Buckberry, Sam; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Roberts, Claire T

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome is inextricably linked to placental development, which is strictly controlled temporally and spatially through mechanisms that are only partially understood. However, increasing evidence suggests non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) direct and regulate a considerable number of biological processes and therefore may constitute a previously hidden layer of regulatory information in the placenta. Many ncRNAs, including both microRNAs and long non-coding transcripts, show almost exclusive or predominant expression in the placenta compared with other somatic tissues and display altered expression patterns in placentas from complicated pregnancies. In this review, we explore the results of recent genome-scale and single gene expression studies using human placental tissue, but include studies in the mouse where human data are lacking. Our review focuses on the ncRNAs epigenetically regulated through genomic imprinting or X-chromosome inactivation and includes recent evidence surrounding the H19 lincRNA, the imprinted C19MC cluster microRNAs, and X-linked miRNAs associated with pregnancy complications. PMID:24081302

  2. Parents of childhood X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: high risk for depression and neurosis.

    PubMed

    Kuratsubo, Izumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess mental health in parents of patients with the childhood cerebral form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD) and to investigate factors relating to psychological problems in order to improve clinical management and quality of life. Sixteen fathers and 21 mothers of patients with CCALD completed a battery of psychological examinations including the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), the General Health Questionnaire 60 (GHQ60), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Three fathers and 11 mothers showed high scores on the BDI-II, suggesting that they were in a depressive state. Depression in the mothers was serious as compared with previous reports. Six fathers and 11 mothers were considered to be in a state of neurosis, according to the results of the GHQ60. Four fathers and 8 mothers showed high levels of anxiety on the STAI. Health and social status of the mothers correlated with their mental health, and younger mothers with young patients tended to be more depressed. Thus, parents of patients with CCALD have a high risk of depression and neurosis. Understanding the mental state of these parents and improvements in the social support system including mental counseling, home nursing care, supports in workplace and community are necessary to prevent and treat psychological problems. Especially, early intervention for mental health problems should be provided for younger mothers with few years since the child's diagnosis.

  3. Towards isolation of the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3)

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, K.L.; Aldred, M.A.; Hardwick, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Until recently the region of interest containing the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3) was thought to lie between CYBB (Xp21.1) and the proximal end of the deletion in patient BB (JBBprox). This region was thought to span 100-150 kb. Here we present new mapping data to show that the distance between the 5{prime} (most proximal) end of CYBB and JBBprox is only 50 kb. Recently Roux et al. (1994) have described the isolation of a gene within this region but this showed no disease-associated changes. Further evidence from mapping the deletion in patient NF (who suffered from McLead`s syndromemore » and CGD but not RP) and from linkage analysis of our RP3 families with a new dinucleotide repeat suggests that the gene must extend proximally from JBBprox. In order to extend the region of search we have constructed a YAC contig spanning 800 kb to OTC. We are continuing our search for the RP3 gene using a variety of strategies including exon trapping and cDNA enrichment as well as direct screening of cDNA libraries with subclones from this region.« less

  4. X-linked recessive primary retinal dysplasia is linked to the Norrie disease locus.

    PubMed

    Ravia, Y; Braier-Goldstein, O; Bat-Miriam, K M; Erlich, S; Barkai, G; Goldman, B

    1993-08-01

    X-linked primary retinal dysplasia (PRD) refers to an abnormal proliferation of retinal tissue causing either its neural elements or its glial tissue to form folds, giving rise to gliosis. A Jewish family of oriental origin was previously reported by Godel and Goodman, in which a total of five males suffer from different degrees of blindness. The authors postulated that the described findings are distinguished from Norrie disease, since in this case no clinical findings, other than those associated with the eyes, were noticed in the affected males. In addition, two of the carrier females exhibit minimal eye changes. We have performed linkage analysis of the family using the L1.28, p58-1 and m27 beta probes, and DXS426 and MAOB associated microsatellites. Our results map the gene responsible for the disorder between the MAOB and DXS426, m27 beta and p58-1 loci, on the short arm of the X chromosome at Xp11.3, which suggest the possibility that the same gene is responsible for both primary retinal dysplasia and Norrie disease.

  5. Optimization of Retinal Gene Therapy for X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to RPGR Mutations.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Boye, Shannon E; Ye, Guo-Jie; Iwabe, Simone; Dufour, Valerie L; Marinho, Luis Felipe; Swider, Malgorzata; Kosyk, Mychajlo S; Sha, Jin; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Alexander, John J; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Shearman, Mark S; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2017-08-02

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in the RPGR gene is an early onset and severe cause of blindness. Successful proof-of-concept studies in a canine model have recently shown that development of a corrective gene therapy for RPGR-XLRP may now be an attainable goal. In preparation for a future clinical trial, we have here optimized the therapeutic AAV vector construct by showing that GRK1 (rather than IRBP) is a more efficient promoter for targeting gene expression to both rods and cones in non-human primates. Two transgenes were used in RPGR mutant (XLPRA2) dogs under the control of the GRK1 promoter. First was the previously developed stabilized human RPGR (hRPGRstb). Second was a new full-length stabilized and codon-optimized human RPGR (hRPGRco). Long-term (>2 years) studies with an AAV2/5 vector carrying hRPGRstb under control of the GRK1 promoter showed rescue of rods and cones from degeneration and retention of vision. Shorter term (3 months) studies demonstrated comparable preservation of photoreceptors in canine eyes treated with an AAV2/5 vector carrying either transgene under the control of the GRK1 promoter. These results provide the critical molecular components (GRK1 promoter, hRPGRco transgene) to now construct a therapeutic viral vector optimized for RPGR-XLRP patients. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of ALDP (ABCD1) and Mitochondria in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, M. C.; Lu, J.-F.; Zhang, H.-P.; Dong, G.-X.; Heinzer, A. K.; Watkins, P. A.; Powers, J.; Smith, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders have been associated with malfunction of peroxisomal metabolic pathways, but the pathogenesis of these disorders is largely unknown. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is associated with elevated levels of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; C>22:0) that have been attributed to reduced peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation activity. Previously, our laboratory and others have reported elevated VLCFA levels and reduced peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in human and mouse X-ALD fibroblasts. In this study, we found normal levels of peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in tissues from ALD mice with elevated VLCFA levels. Treatment of ALD mice with pharmacological agents resulted in decreased VLCFA levels without a change in VLCFA β-oxidation activity. These data indicate that ALDP does not determine the rate of VLCFA β-oxidation and that VLCFA levels are not determined by the rate of VLCFA β-oxidation. The rate of peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in human and mouse fibroblasts in vitro is affected by the rate of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. We hypothesize that ALDP facilitates the interaction between peroxisomes and mitochondria, resulting, when ALDP is deficient in X-ALD, in increased VLCFA accumulation despite normal peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in ALD mouse tissues. In support of this hypothesis, mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed in adrenal cortical cells of ALD mice. PMID:12509471

  7. X-linked infantile spinal muscular atrophy: clinical definition and molecular mapping.

    PubMed

    Dressman, Devin; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Yariz, Kemal O; Basterrecha, Hugo; Martínez, Francisco; Palau, Francesc; Barmada, M Michael; Clark, Robin Dawn; Meindl, Alfons; Wirth, Brunhilde; Hoffman, Eric P; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    X-linked infantile spinal-muscular atrophy (XL-SMA) is a rare disorder, which presents with the clinical characteristics of hypotonia, areflexia, and multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis) associated with loss of anterior horn cells and death in infancy. We have previously reported a single family with XL-SMA that mapped to Xp11.3-q11.2. Here we report further clinical description of XL-SMA plus an additional seven unrelated (XL-SMA) families from North America and Europe that show linkage data consistent with the same region. We first investigated linkage to the candidate disease gene region using microsatellite repeat markers. We further saturated the candidate disease gene region using polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms in an effort to narrow the critical region. Two-point and multipoint linkage analysis was performed using the Allegro software package. Linkage analysis of all XL-SMA families displayed linkage consistent with the original XL-SMA region. The addition of new families and new markers has narrowed the disease gene interval for a XL-SMA locus between SNP FLJ22843 near marker DXS 8080 and SNP ARHGEF9 which is near DXS7132 (Xp11.3-Xq11.1).

  8. A sex-ratio meiotic drive system in Drosophila simulans. II: an X-linked distorter.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yun; Araripe, Luciana; Kingan, Sarah B; Ke, Yeyan; Xiao, Hailian; Hartl, Daniel L

    2007-11-06

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes creates a genetic condition favoring the invasion of sex-ratio meiotic drive elements, resulting in the biased transmission of one sex chromosome over the other, in violation of Mendel's first law. The molecular mechanisms of sex-ratio meiotic drive may therefore help us to understand the evolutionary forces shaping the meiotic behavior of the sex chromosomes. Here we characterize a sex-ratio distorter on the X chromosome (Dox) in Drosophila simulans by genetic and molecular means. Intriguingly, Dox has very limited coding capacity. It evolved from another X-linked gene, which also evolved de nova. Through retrotransposition, Dox also gave rise to an autosomal suppressor, not much yang (Nmy). An RNA interference mechanism seems to be involved in the suppression of the Dox distorter by the Nmy suppressor. Double mutant males of the genotype dox; nmy are normal for both sex-ratio and spermatogenesis. We postulate that recurrent bouts of sex-ratio meiotic drive and its subsequent suppression might underlie several common features observed in the heterogametic sex, including meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and achiasmy.

  9. [Prenatal diagnosis of X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with X-chromosome inversion].

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui-juan; Fang, Qun; Wang, Lian-tang

    2005-07-13

    To investigate the possibility of prenatal diagnosis of the fetal suspected to be affected by anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) in a family with X-linked EDA so as to provide a basis for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling of this disorder. Pedigree analysis and genetic counseling were performed in a family after a proband was diagnosed with EDA. The peripheral blood samples were collected from the proband, a 12-year-old boy, his mother, and his 2 aunts, one being pregnant, to undergo chromosome karyotype analysis. The fetus Puncture of umbilical vein was performed to collect the blood of fetus for chromosome examination. Induced abortion was conducted due to the diagnosis of the fetus with EDA. Autopsy, immunohistochemistry of the skin tissues of face, breast, epigastrium, and thigh, and X-ray photography of the lower jawbone were made. Pericentric inversion occurring at one of the X-chromosome [inv (x) (p22q13)] was found in the proband and his nephew (the fetus), both patients, and his mother and his second aunt (the pregnant woman), both carriers. Autopsy of the fetus showed epidermis dysplasia and deficiency of hair follicle and sebaceous gland. Immunohistochemistry showed that epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin were negatively expressed in the fetal skin tissues. Pedigree analysis and genetic counseling for the family members of EDA patients and prenatal and postpartum examination for the fetus help diagnose EDA.

  10. Icebox, a recessive X-linked mutation in Drosophila causing low sexual receptivity.

    PubMed

    Kerr, C; Ringo, J; Dowse, H; Johnson, E

    1997-11-01

    The X-linked recessive mutation icebox (ibx; 1-23, 7F1) of Drosophila melanogaster lowers the sexual receptivity of females. The probability of mating with mature wild-type males is reduced in ibx homozygotes, and the frequency of rejection behavior (rate per minute) towards courting males is increased. ibx fails to complement In(1)RA35, which is a lethal allele of Neuroglian (Nrg, which encodes a transmembrane protein found in embryonic tissues including the nervous system) due to a breakpoint in that gene; however, both l(1)B4 and l(1)VA142, other lethal mutations of Nrg, do complement ibx. 12-h ibx embryos exhibit a normal pattern of staining for the Neuroglian-specific antibody, Mab BP104. Males and females mutant for ibx have normal egg-to-adult survival and appear normal in several "general" behavioral traits including olfaction, phototaxis, locomotor activity, and heartbeat. ibx males court normally, and are successful in mating. These characteristics suggest that ibx does not cause sensory or motor defects. Ovarian growth and sperm storage are wild-type in ibx/ibx females. Treatment with the JH analog methoprene increases the receptivity of ibx/ibx females.

  11. X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a clinico-genetic study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Che Ry; Kang, Hee Gyung; Choi, Hyun Jin; Cho, Min Hyun; Lee, Jung Won; Kang, Ju Hyung; Park, Hye Won; Koo, Ja Wook; Ha, Tae-Sun; Kim, Su-Yung; Il Cheong, Hae

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective genotype and phenotype analysis of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) was conducted on a nationwide cohort of 25 (24 male, 1 female) Korean children with AVPR2 gene mutations, comparing non-truncating and truncating mutations. In an analysis of male patients, the median age at diagnosis was 0.9 years old. At a median follow-up of 5.4 years, urinary tract dilatations were evident in 62% of patients and their median glomerular filtration rate was 72 mL/min/1.73 m2. Weights and heights were under the 3rd percentile in 22% and 33% of patients, respectively. One patient had low intelligence quotient and another developed end-stage renal disease. No statistically significant genotype-phenotype correlation was found between non-truncating and truncating mutations. One patient was female; she was analyzed separately because inactivation and mosaicism of the X chromosome may influence clinical manifestations in female patients. Current unsatisfactory long-term outcome of congenital NDI necessitates a novel therapeutic strategy.

  12. Novel EDA mutation in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, B; Lu, H; Xiao, X; Zhou, L; Lu, J; Zhu, L; Yu, D; Zhao, W

    2015-11-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is characterized by abnormalities of hair, teeth, and sweat glands, while non-syndromic hypodontia (NSH) affects only teeth. Mutations in Ectodysplasin A (EDA) underlie both XLHED and NSH. This study investigated the genetic causes of six hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) patients and genotype-phenotype correlation. The EDA gene of six patients with HED was sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis and structural modeling for the mutations were performed. The records of 134 patients with XLHED and EDA-related NSH regarding numbers of missing permanent teeth from this study and 20 articles were reviewed. Nonparametric tests were used to analyze genotype-phenotype correlations. In four of the six patients, we identified a novel mutation c.852T>G (p.Phe284Leu) and three reported mutations: c.467G>A (p.Arg156His), c.776C>A (p.Ala259Glu), and c.871G>A (p.Gly291Arg). They were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and structural modeling. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis revealed that truncating mutations were associated with more missing teeth. Missense mutations and the mutations affecting the TNF homology domain were correlated with fewer missing teeth. This study extended the mutation spectrum of XLHED and revealed the relationship between genotype and the number of missing permanent teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Diagnosis of X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia by Meibography and Infrared Thermography of the Eye.

    PubMed

    Kaercher, Thomas; Dietz, Jasna; Jacobi, Christina; Berz, Reinhold; Schneider, Holm

    2015-09-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is the most common form of ectodermal dysplasia. Clinical characteristics include meibomian gland disorder and the resulting hyperevaporative dry eye. In this study, we evaluated meibography and ocular infrared thermography as novel methods to diagnose XLHED. Eight infants, 12 boys and 14 male adults with XLHED and 12 healthy control subjects were subjected to a panel of tests including the ocular surface disease index (OSDI), meibography and infrared thermography, non-invasive measurement of tear film break-up time (NIBUT) and osmolarity, Schirmer's test, lissamine green staining and fluorescein staining. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for single tests and selected test combinations. Meibography had 100% sensitivity and specificity for identifying XLHED. Infrared thermography, a completely non-invasive procedure, revealed a typical pattern for male subjects with XLHED. It was, however, less sensitive (86% for adults and 67% for children) than meibography or a combination of established routine tests. In adults, OSDI and NIBUT were the best single routine tests (sensitivity of 86% and 71%, respectively), whereas increased tear osmolarity appeared as a rather unspecific ophthalmic symptom. In children, NIBUT was the most convincing routine test (sensitivity of 91%). Meibography is the most reliable ophthalmic examination to establish a clinical diagnosis in individuals with suspected hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, even before genetic test results are available. Tear film tests and ocular surface staining are less sensitive in children, but very helpful for estimating the severity of ocular surface disease in individuals with known XLHED.

  14. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    PubMed

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  15. Whole exome sequencing confirms the clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome combined with X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xunlun; Chen, Xue; Lei, Bo; Chen, Rui; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Fangxia; Rong, Weining; Ha, Ruoshui; Liu, Yani; Zhao, Feng; Yang, Peizeng; Zhao, Chen

    2015-06-04

    To determine the genetic lesions and to modify the clinical diagnosis for a Chinese family with significant intrafamilial phenotypic diversities and unusual presentations. Three affected patients and the asymptomatic father were included and received comprehensive systemic examinations. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed for mutation detection. Structural modeling test was applied to analyze the potential structural changes caused by the missense substitution. The proband showed a wide spectrum of systemic anomalies, including bilateral ectopia lentis, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, widening of tibial metaphysis with medial bowing, and dolichostenomelia in digits, while her mother and elder brother only demonstrated similar skeletal changes. A recurrent mutation, PHEX p.R291*, was found in all patients, while a de novo mutation, FBN1 p.C792F, was only detected in the proband. The FBN1 substitution was also predicted to cause significant conformational change in fibrillin-1 protein, thus changing its physical and biological properties. Taken together, we finalized the diagnosis for this family as X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), and diagnosed this girl as Marfan syndrome combined with XLH, and congenital heart disease. Our study also emphasizes the importance of WES in assisting the clinical diagnosis for complicated cases when the original diagnoses are challenged.

  16. Osteopontin and the dento-osseous pathobiology of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Hoac, Betty; Coyac, Benjamin R; Leger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Wicart, Philippe; Whyte, Michael P; Glorieux, Francis H; Linglart, Agnès; Chaussain, Catherine; McKee, Marc D

    2017-02-01

    Seven young patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH, having inactivating PHEX mutations) were discovered to accumulate osteopontin (OPN) at the sites of defective bone mineralization near osteocytes - the so-called hallmark periosteocytic (lacunar) "halos" of XLH. OPN was also localized in the pericanalicular matrix extending beyond the osteocyte lacunae, as well as in the hypomineralized matrix of tooth dentin. OPN, a potent inhibitor of mineralization normally degraded by PHEX, is a member of a family of acidic, phosphorylated, calcium-binding, extracellular matrix proteins known to regulate dental, skeletal, and pathologic mineralization. Associated with the increased amount of OPN (along with inhibitory OPN peptide fragments) in XLH bone matrix, we found an enlarged, hypomineralized, lacuno-canalicular network - a defective pattern of skeletal mineralization that decreases stiffness locally at: i) the cell-matrix interface in the pericellular environment of the mechanosensing osteocyte, and ii) the osteocyte's dendritic network of cell processes extending throughout the bone. Our findings of an excess of inhibitory OPN near osteocytes and their cell processes, and in dentin, spatially correlates with the defective mineralization observed at these sites in the skeleton and teeth of XLH patients. These changes likely contribute to the dento-osseous pathobiology of XLH, and participate in the aberrant bone adaptation and remodeling seen in XLH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. X-linked hypophosphataemia: a homologous disorder in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Tenenhouse, H S

    1999-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia is an inherited disorder of phosphate (Pi) homeostasis characterized by growth retardation, rickets and osteomalacia, hypophosphataemia, and aberrant renal Pi reabsorption and vitamin D metabolism. Studies in murine Hyp and Gy homologues have identified a specific defect in Na+-Pi cotransport at the brush border membrane, abnormal regulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) synthesis and degradation, and an intrinsic defect in bone mineralization. The mutant gene has been identified in XLH patients, by positional cloning, and in Hyp and Gy mice, and was designated PHEX/Phex to signify a PHosphate-regulating gene with homology to Endopeptidases on the X chromosome. PHEX/Phex is expressed in bones and teeth but not in kidney and efforts are under way to elucidate how loss of PHEX/Phex function elicits the mutant phenotype. Based on its homology to endopeptidases, it is postulated that PHEX/Phex is involved in the activation or inactivation of a peptide hormone(s) which plays a key role in the regulation of bone mineralization, renal Pi handling and vitamin D metabolism.

  18. Renal involvement in the immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) disorder.

    PubMed

    Sheikine, Yuri; Woda, Craig B; Lee, Pui Y; Chatila, Talal A; Keles, Sevgi; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Schmidt, Birgitta; Rosen, Seymour; Rodig, Nancy M

    2015-07-01

    Immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) disorder is an autoimmune disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor. These mutations affect the normal function of circulating regulatory T cells. IPEX is characterized by profound immune dysregulation leading to dermatitis, enteropathy, multiple endocrinopathies and failure to thrive. Different forms of renal injury have also been noted in these patients but these have been described to a very limited extent. Three patients with IPEX with characteristic renal findings and mutations in FOXP3, including one novel mutation, are described. Case presentations are followed by a review of the renal manifestations noted in IPEX and the range of therapeutic options for this disorder. We recommend that IPEX be considered in the differential diagnosis of young children who present with signs of immune dysregulation with a concomitant renal biopsy demonstrating immune complex deposition in a membranous-like pattern and/or interstitial nephritis.

  19. X-linked microtubule-associated protein, Mid1, regulates axon development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tingjia; Chen, Renchao; Cox, Timothy C.; Moldrich, Randal X.; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Tan, Guohe; Perry, Jo K.; Ashworth, Alan; Bartlett, Perry F.; Xu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Bin; Wu, Mingyue; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuanyuan; Richards, Linda J.; Xiong, Zhiqi

    2013-01-01

    Opitz syndrome (OS) is a genetic neurological disorder. The gene responsible for the X-linked form of OS, Midline-1 (MID1), encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the degradation of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac). However, how Mid1 functions during neural development is largely unknown. In this study, we provide data from in vitro and in vivo experiments suggesting that silencing Mid1 in developing neurons promotes axon growth and branch formation, resulting in a disruption of callosal axon projections in the contralateral cortex. In addition, a similar phenotype of axonal development was observed in the Mid1 knockout mouse. This defect was largely due to the accumulation of PP2Ac in Mid1-depleted cells as further down-regulation of PP2Ac rescued the axonal phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that Mid1-dependent PP2Ac turnover is important for normal axonal development and that dysregulation of this process may contribute to the underlying cause of OS. PMID:24194544

  20. X-linked microtubule-associated protein, Mid1, regulates axon development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingjia; Chen, Renchao; Cox, Timothy C; Moldrich, Randal X; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Tan, Guohe; Perry, Jo K; Ashworth, Alan; Bartlett, Perry F; Xu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Bin; Wu, Mingyue; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuanyuan; Richards, Linda J; Xiong, Zhiqi

    2013-11-19

    Opitz syndrome (OS) is a genetic neurological disorder. The gene responsible for the X-linked form of OS, Midline-1 (MID1), encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the degradation of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac). However, how Mid1 functions during neural development is largely unknown. In this study, we provide data from in vitro and in vivo experiments suggesting that silencing Mid1 in developing neurons promotes axon growth and branch formation, resulting in a disruption of callosal axon projections in the contralateral cortex. In addition, a similar phenotype of axonal development was observed in the Mid1 knockout mouse. This defect was largely due to the accumulation of PP2Ac in Mid1-depleted cells as further down-regulation of PP2Ac rescued the axonal phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that Mid1-dependent PP2Ac turnover is important for normal axonal development and that dysregulation of this process may contribute to the underlying cause of OS.

  1. Leaky phenotype of X-linked agammaglobulinaemia in a Japanese family

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, H; Kawamoto, N; Asano, T; Mabuchi, Y; Horikoshi, H; Teramoto, T; JIN-RONG; Matsui, E; Kondo, M; Fukao, T; Kasahara, K; Kondo, N

    2005-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that is caused by a block in early B-cell differentiation. Whereas early B precursors in the bone marrow are present in substantial numbers, XLA-affected individuals have dramatically reduced numbers of circulating mature B cells, plasma cells and immunoglobulins of all isotypes. We report on a Japanese family with 3 XLA patients, in whom the serum immunoglobulin levels and number of B cells showed a significant difference among them in spite of harbouring the same splice donor site mutation in the BTK gene. We developed concise method for detection of this mutation, which is helpful for discovering the carrier. Patient 2 showed a significant serum immunoglobulin levels of all isotypes, including allergen-specific IgE. Expression of a normal and truncated size BTK gene was detected in patient 2′s peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Expression of BTK protein was also detected in some B cells. These results suggest that the leaky phenotype in patient 2 was caused in part by the expression of a normal BTK gene transcript. The increased frequency of infection with age expanded the number of B cells with normal BTK gene expression and produced the serum immunoglobulin, including IgE. PMID:15932514

  2. Correlation of genetic and clinical findings in Spanish patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria-Jose; Gimenez-Pardo, Ascension; Garcia-Hoyos, Maria; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Aguirre-Lamban, Jana; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Vazquez-Fernandez del Pozo, Silvia; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Baiget, Montserrat; Ramos, Carmen; Ayuso, Carmen

    2009-09-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is one of the most common causes of juvenile macular degeneration in males, characterized by microcystic changes, splitting within the inner retinal layer (schisis), and the presence of vitreous veils. This study was conducted to describe and further correlate specific genetic variation in Spanish patients with XLRS with clinical characteristics and additional ophthalmic complications. The study was performed in 34 Spanish families with XLRS, comprising 51 affected males. Thorough clinical ophthalmic and electrophysiological examinations were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Twenty different mutations were identified. Ten of the 20 were novel and 3 were de novo mutational events. The most common mutation (p.Gln154Arg; 6/20) presented a common haplotype. RS1 variants did not correlate with ophthalmic findings and were not associated with additional ophthalmic complications. The prevalent p.Gln154Arg mutation is first reported in this work and presents a common origin in Spanish patients with XLRS. In addition, de novo mutations mainly occur in CG dinucleotides. Despite the large mutational spectrum and variable phenotypes, no genotype-phenotype correlations were found. Identifying the causative mutation is helpful in confirming diagnosis and counseling, but cannot provide a prognosis.

  3. Clinical and molecular characterization of females affected by X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Staffieri, Sandra E; Rose, Loreto; Chang, Andrew; De Roach, John N; McLaren, Terri L; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W; Lamey, Tina M

    2015-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration associated with mutations in the RS1 gene. XLRS has a variable expressivity in males and shows no clinical phenotype in carrier females. Clinical and molecular characterization of male and female individuals affected with XLRS in a consanguineous family. Consanguineous Eastern European-Australian family Four clinically affected and nine unaffected family members were genetically and clinically characterized. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis was conducted by the Australian Inherited Retinal Disease Register and DNA Bank. Clinical and molecular characterization of the causative mutation in a consanguineous family with XLRS. By direct sequencing of the RS1 gene, one pathogenic variant, NM_000330.3: c.304C > T, p. R102W, was identified in all clinically diagnosed individuals analysed. The two females were homozygous for the variant, and the males were hemizygous. Clinical and genetic characterization of affected homozygous females in XLRS affords the rare opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms of XLRS and the manifestation of these mutations as disease in humans. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  4. Case report of an atypical early onset X-linked retinoschisis in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Murro, Vittoria; Caputo, Roberto; Bacci, Giacomo Maria; Sodi, Andrea; Mucciolo, Dario Pasquale; Bargiacchi, Sara; Giglio, Sabrina Rita; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2017-02-24

    X-linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) is one of the most common macular degenerations in young males, with a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1:5000 to 1:20000. Clinical diagnosis of XLRS can be challenging due to the highly variable phenotypic presentation and limited correlation has been identified between mutation type and disease severity or progression. We report the atypical early onset of XLRS in 3-month-old monozygotic twins. Fundus examination was characterized by severe bullous retinal schisis with pre-retinal and intraretinal haemorrhages. Molecular genetic analysis of the RS1 was performed and the c.288G > A (p. Trp96Ter) mutation was detected in both patients. Early onset XLRS is associated with a more progressive form of the disease, characterized by large bullous peripheral schisis involving the posterior pole, vascular abnormalities and haemorrhages. The availability of specific technology permitted detailed imaging of the clinical picture of unusual cases of XLRS. The possible relevance of modifying genes should be taken into consideration for the future development of XLRS gene therapy.

  5. Novel RS1 mutations associated with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    YI, JUNHUI; LI, SHIQIANG; JIA, XIAOYUN; XIAO, XUESHAN; WANG, PANFENG; GUO, XIANGMING; ZHANG, QINGJIONG

    2012-01-01

    To identify mutations in the retinoschisin (RS1) gene in families with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). Twenty families with XLRS were enrolled in this study. All six coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of RS1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The nucleotide sequences of the amplicons were determined by Sanger sequencing. Ten hemizygous mutations in RS1 were detected in patients from 14 of the 20 families. Four of the ten mutations were novel, including c:176G>A (p:Cys59Tyr) in exon 3, c:531T>G (p:Tyr177X), c:607C>G (p:Pro203Ala) and c:668G>A (p:Cys223Tyr) in exon 6. These four novel mutations were not present in 176 normal individuals. The remaining six were recurrent mutations, including c:214G>A (p:Glu72Lys), c:304C>T (p:Arg102Trp), c:436G>A (p:Glu146Lys), c:544C>T (p:Arg182Cys), c:599G>A (p:Arg200His) and c:644A>T (p:Glu215Val). Our study expanded the mutation spectrum of RS1 and enriches our understanding of the molecular basis of XLRS. PMID:22245991

  6. X-Linked Retinoschisis in Juveniles: Follow-Up by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qin-Rui; Huang, Lv-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Li; Xia, Hui-Ka; Li, Tian-Qi; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the structural progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) in patients by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design. Retrospective, observational study. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with XLRS by genetic testing underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations from December 2014 to October 2016. Each eye was measured by SD-OCT using the same clinical protocol. A correlation between best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and SD-OCT measurements was observed. Results. Six patients demonstrated retinoschisis (12 eyes) and typical foveal cyst-like cavities (10 eyes) on SD-OCT images with a mean logMAR VA of 0.48. The median age was 7.5 years at the initial visit. Their foveal retinal thickness (516.9  μ m) and choroid thickness (351.4  μ m) decreased at a rate of 38.1 and 7.5  μ m, respectively, at the 10.5-month follow-up visit; however, there were no significant differences ( P = 0.622 and P = 0.406, resp.). There was no significant correlation between VA, the foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. Conclusions. SD-OCT images for XLRS patients during the juvenile period revealed no significant changes in the fundus structure, including the foveal retinal thickness and choroid thickness within one-year follow-up. There was a lack of correlation between VA, foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness.

  7. X-Linked Retinoschisis in Juveniles: Follow-Up by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the structural progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) in patients by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design. Retrospective, observational study. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with XLRS by genetic testing underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations from December 2014 to October 2016. Each eye was measured by SD-OCT using the same clinical protocol. A correlation between best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and SD-OCT measurements was observed. Results. Six patients demonstrated retinoschisis (12 eyes) and typical foveal cyst-like cavities (10 eyes) on SD-OCT images with a mean logMAR VA of 0.48. The median age was 7.5 years at the initial visit. Their foveal retinal thickness (516.9 μm) and choroid thickness (351.4 μm) decreased at a rate of 38.1 and 7.5 μm, respectively, at the 10.5-month follow-up visit; however, there were no significant differences (P = 0.622 and P = 0.406, resp.). There was no significant correlation between VA, the foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. Conclusions. SD-OCT images for XLRS patients during the juvenile period revealed no significant changes in the fundus structure, including the foveal retinal thickness and choroid thickness within one-year follow-up. There was a lack of correlation between VA, foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. PMID:28286756

  8. Novel RS1 mutations associated with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Junhui; Li, Shiqiang; Jia, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Xueshan; Wang, Panfeng; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2012-04-01

    To identify mutations in the retinoschisin (RS1) gene in families with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). Twenty families with XLRS were enrolled in this study. All six coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of RS1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The nucleotide sequences of the amplicons were determined by Sanger sequencing. Ten hemizygous mutations in RS1 were detected in patients from 14 of the 20 families. Four of the ten mutations were novel, including c:176G>A (p:Cys59Tyr) in exon 3, c:531T>G (p:Tyr177X), c:607C>G (p:Pro203Ala) and c:668G>A (p:Cys223Tyr) in exon 6. These four novel mutations were not present in 176 normal individuals. The remaining six were recurrent mutations, including c:214G>A (p:Glu72Lys), c:304C>T (p:Arg102Trp), c:436G>A (p:Glu146Lys), c:544C>T (p:Arg182Cys), c:599G>A (p:Arg200His) and c:644A>T (p:Glu215Val). Our study expanded the mutation spectrum of RS1 and enriches our understanding of the molecular basis of XLRS.

  9. Mutations in the XLRS1 gene in Thai families with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Atchaneeyasakul, La-ongsri; Trinavarat, Adisak; Pituksung, Auengporn; Jinda, Worapoj; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Limwongse, Chanin

    2010-01-01

    To identify genetic mutations of the XLRS1 gene and to describe the ocular phenotypes in two unrelated Thai patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. Ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity and fundus examination and photography, was performed in all participants. Electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography were performed when possible. All six exons of the XLRS1 gene were amplified, and mutation screening was determined by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and DNA sequencing. Two point mutations were identified, a novel missense mutation c.378A > G (p.D126G) in exon 5 and a reported mutation c.637C > T (p.R213W) in exon 6. The first proband with the p.D126G mutation developed vitreous hemorrhage in both eyes at age 7 months. Foveal and peripheral schisis with several inner layer holes were detected in both eyes. The second proband with the p.R213W mutation developed slightly blurred vision at age 10 years. Fundus examination showed numerous fine white dots at the macula without foveal or peripheral schisis. Electronegative ERG results were documented in both probands. A novel p.D126G mutation appeared to be associated with a severe phenotype with vitreous hemorrhage developing in infancy. Both intra- and interfamilial clinical variabilities were recognized in our patients.

  10. PROTECTIVE LEVELS OF VARICELLA-ZOSTER ANTIBODY DID NOT EFFECTIVELY PREVENT CHICKENPOX IN AN X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernanda Aimée; Gonzalez, Isabela Garrido da Silva; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed mild varicella despite regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He maintained protective antibody levels against varicella and the previous batches of IVIG that he received had adequate varicella-specific IgG levels. The case illustrates that IVIG may not prevent VZV infection.

  11. Mutations of the X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 are associated with autism

    PubMed Central

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Betancur, Catalina; Råstam, Maria; Colineaux, Catherine; Gillberg, I Carina; Söderström, Henrik; Giros, Bruno; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Many studies have supported a genetic aetiology for autism. Here we report mutations in two X-linked genes, neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4, in siblings with autism spectrum disorders. These mutations affect cell adhesion molecules localised at the synapse and suggest that a defect of synaptogenesis may predispose to autism. PMID:12669065

  12. Mutations of the X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 are associated with autism.

    PubMed

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Betancur, Catalina; Råstam, Maria; Colineaux, Catherine; Gillberg, I Carina; Soderstrom, Henrik; Giros, Bruno; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    Many studies have supported a genetic etiology for autism. Here we report mutations in two X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 in siblings with autism-spectrum disorders. These mutations affect cell-adhesion molecules localized at the synapse and suggest that a defect of synaptogenesis may predispose to autism.

  13. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis in a consanguineous family: phenotypic variability and report of a homozygous female patient.

    PubMed

    Gliem, Martin; Holz, Frank G; Stöhr, Heidi; Weber, Bernhard H F; Charbel Issa, Peter

    2014-12-01

    To describe the phenotypic variability in a consanguineous family with genetically confirmed X-linked retinoschisis. Five patients, including one homozygous female, were characterized by clinical examination, optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, mapping of macular pigment optical density, electroretinography, and DNA testing. The 36-year-old male index patient showed a ring of enhanced autofluorescence and outer retinal atrophy on optical coherence tomography. Electroretinography testing revealed a reduced a/b ratio. His mother presented with a central atrophic retina with markedly reduced autofluorescence signal and a surrounding ring of enhanced autofluorescence. The 40-year-old brother of the index patient and his 2 sons showed characteristic signs for X-linked retinoschisis, including retinal schisis and a reduced a/b ratio. Genetic testing revealed a c.293C>A mutation in the RS1 gene in all affected family members while the mother of the index patient was homozygous for this mutation. X-linked retinoschisis can present with a wide phenotypic variability. Here, detailed family history and genetic testing established the diagnosis of X-linked retinoschisis despite striking differences in phenotypic presentation in affected subjects, homozygosity of one affected female, and seemingly dominant inheritance in three subsequent generations because of multiple consanguinity.

  14. Juvenile X-linked retinoschisis presenting as juxtapapillary retinal fold mimicking combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pointdujour-Lim, Renelle; Say, Emil Anthony T; Shields, Carol L

    2017-04-01

    A 21-month-old boy presumptively diagnosed with combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium was found to have juvenile X-linked retinoschisis with vitreomacular traction and prominent retinal folding. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An X-linked three allele model of hand preference and hand posture for writing.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Walter F

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a genetic model of hand preferences for writing and for handwriting posture (HWP). The challenge of devising an X-linked model for these aspects of human handedness was posed by the results of a large family handedness study (McKeever, 2000) that showed evidence of such linkage. Because X-linkage for handedness has been widely regarded as untenable, the prospects for developing such a model were not initially encouraging, but ultimately a viable model did suggest itself. Family studies of handedness and leading theories of handedness are briefly described, as is some of the research on HWP motivated by the theory of Levy and Nagylaki (1972). It is argued that there is evidence that HWP reflects a biological dictate and not just individual "choices" or "adaptations" to writing in a left-to-right direction with the left hand. The model proposes that inverted handwriting posture is not necessarily highly related to speech and language lateralities of sinistrals, but that it reveals an interhemispheric mediation of writing. It is hypothesised that it reflects a specialisation of the left angular gyrus (with some possible extension into the supramarginal gyrus) for the storage of movement and timing sequences of cursive writing, and right hemisphere motor programming of the motor output of writing. It is also argued that no family handedness study conducted to date is adequate for testing the predictions of extant handedness theories, and the often wide variations between the results of family handedness studies are noted. It is suggested that fMRI studies could definitively test the HWP hypotheses of the model and that the hypothesis of X-linkage could be tested definitively should studies of the human genome identify a gene for handedness.

  16. Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-Linked Syndrome: A Paradigm of Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Barzaghi, Federica; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type-1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase. The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease. This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed. PMID:23060872

  17. Establishment of a cell model of X-linked sideroblastic anemia using genome editing.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiriko; Kubota, Yoshiko; Nomura, Kazumi; Hayashimoto, Haruka; Chida, Taisei; Yoshino, Naoto; Wayama, Marina; Ogasawara, Katsutoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Tooyama, Ikuo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2018-06-13

    ALAS2 gene mutations cause X-linked sideroblastic anemia. The presence of ring sideroblasts in a patient's bone marrow is the hallmark of sideroblastic anemia, but the precise mechanisms underlying sideroblast formation are largely unknown. Using a genome editing system, a mutation was introduced in the erythroid-specific enhancer of the ALAS2 gene in HUDEP2 cells, which were derived from human umbilical stem cells and can produce erythrocytes. The established cell line, termed HA2low, expressed less ALAS2 mRNA than did wild-type cells, even after erythroid differentiation. Although the mRNA expression of α-globin, β-globin, and the mitochondrial iron importer mitoferrin-1 was induced similarly in wild-type and HA2low cells, hemoglobinization of differentiated cells was limited in HA2low cells compared to wild-type cells. Importantly, Prussian blue staining revealed that approximately one-third of differentiated HA2low cells exhibited intracellular iron deposition, and these cells looked like ring sideroblasts. Electron microscopy confirmed that the mitochondria in HA2low cells contained high-density deposits that might contain iron. Ring sideroblastic cells appeared among HA2low cells only after differentiation, while the induced expression of mitochondrial ferritin was observed in both cell types during differentiation. These results suggest that the induction of mitochondrial ferritin expression might be essential for, but not the primary cause of, ring sideroblast formation. Our results also suggest that the insufficient supply of protoporphyrin IX due to ALAS2 deficiency, in combination with increased iron import into mitochondria during erythroid differentiation, results in the formation of ring sideroblasts. Furthermore, HA2low cells are a useful tool for characterizing ring sideroblasts in vitro. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Response to Drs. Shastry and Trese: Phenotype-genotype correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Munnich, A.

    1996-11-11

    Shastry and Trese recently reported on a large kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) characterized by a loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function. In their report, the disease had an early onset with severe myopia and a loss of central vision, while night blindness occurred later. Genetic analysis suggested that the disease was linked to the RP2 locus, and the authors raised the question of whether other cases linked to RP2 could display a similar loss of central vision. Three years ago, we reported on 4 large XLRP pedigrees with a very early onset with severe myopia andmore » early loss of visual acuity, while in 5 other families the disease started later with night blindness. We showed that the first clinical form was linked to RP2, while the second was linked to RP3. Thus, the major difference between the two forms concerns the initial symptom, information which can be obtained from the parents and patients after careful questioning. By contrast, in adult life, no difference in either severity of disease or aspect of the fundus was observed in our series, regardless of the clinical subtype of XLRP. Some months later, Jacobson et al. reported on a pedigree with an RP2 genotype, and their data support the notion that in XLRP of RP2 type 1, cone dysfunction takes place first, and as the disease advances both rods and cones are affected. We were very happy, therefore, to read that the study of Shastry and Trese fully confirmed our previous findings. 3 refs.« less

  19. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-bindingmore » domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  20. Somatic mosaicism underlies X-linked acrogigantism syndrome in sporadic male subjects.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adrian F; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W; Naves, Luciana A; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Beckers, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101 We studied XLAG syndrome patients (n= 18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome caused by Xq26.3 duplications were identified using high-definition array comparative genomic hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted that males with XLAG had a decreased log2ratio (LR) compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, whereas females showed no such decrease. Compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1 and 53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint junction-specific quantification droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique, we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism, and identified one female gigantism patient who had had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. Role of the X-linked gene GPR174 in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Napier, C; Mitchell, A L; Gan, E; Wilson, I; Pearce, S H S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune endocrinopathies demonstrate a profound gender bias, but the reasons for this remain obscure. The 1000 genes on the X chromosome are likely to be implicated in this inherent susceptibility; various theories, including skewed X chromosome inactivation and fetal microchimerism, have been proposed. GPR174 is an Xq21 putative purinergic receptor that is widely expressed in lymphoid tissues. A single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs3827440, encoding Ser162Pro, has recently been associated with Graves' disease in Chinese and Polish populations, suggesting a role of this X chromosome gene in autoimmune disease. We investigated the role of rs3827440 in a UK cohort of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD). Samples from 286 AAD cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped using TaqMan single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays (C_25954273_10) on the Applied Biosystems 7900HT Fast real-time PCR system. Using a dominant (present/absent) model, the serine-encoding T allele of rs3827440 was present in 189 of 286 AAD patients (66%) compared with 132 of 288 unaffected controls (46%) [P = .010, odds ratio 1.80 (5%-95% confidence interval 1.22-2.67)]. An allele dosage model found a significant excess of the T allele in AAD patients compared with controls [P = .03, odds ratio 1.34 (5%-95% confidence interval 1.07-1.67)]. We have demonstrated a significant association of this X chromosome-encoded immunoreceptor with AAD for the first time. This X-linked gene could have a more generalized role in autoimmunity pathogenesis: G protein-coupled receptors are promising drugable targets, and further work to elucidate the functional role of GPR174 is now warranted.

  2. Inflammatory profile in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients: Understanding disease progression.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Desirèe Padilha; Donida, Bruna; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Deon, Marion; Hauschild, Tatiane Cristina; Koehler-Santos, Patricia; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2018-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited disease characterized by progressive inflammatory demyelization in the brain, adrenal insufficiency, and an abnormal accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in tissue and body fluids. Considering that inflammation might be involved in pathophysiology of X-ALD, we aimed to investigate pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in plasma from three different male phenotypes (CCER, AMN, and asymptomatic individuals). Our results showed that asymptomatic patients presented increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-8, and TNF-α and the last one was also higher in AMN phenotype. Besides, asymptomatic patients presented higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. AMN patients presented higher levels of IL-2, IL-5, and IL-4. We might hypothesize that inflammation in X-ALD is related to plasmatic VLCFA concentration, since there were positive correlations between C26:0 plasmatic levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines in asymptomatic and AMN patients and negative correlation between anti-inflammatory cytokine and C24:0/C22:0 ratio in AMN patients. The present work yields experimental evidence that there is an inflammatory imbalance associated Th1, (IL-2, IL-6, and IFN-γ), Th2 (IL-4 and IL-10), and macrophages response (TNF-α and IL-1β) in the periphery of asymptomatic and AMN patients, and there is correlation between VLCFA plasmatic levels and inflammatory mediators in X-ALD. Furthermore, we might also speculate that the increase of plasmatic cytokines in asymptomatic patients could be considered an early biomarker of brain damage and maybe also a predictor of disease progression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qing-lin; Xu, Jia; Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai 200233

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related genemore » with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.« less

  4. Mutations in apoptosis-inducing factor cause X-linked recessive auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Liang; Guan, Jing; Ealy, Megan; Zhang, Qiujing; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Hongyang; Zhao, Yali; Shen, Zhirong; Campbell, Colleen A; Wang, Fengchao; Yang, Ju; Sun, Wei; Lan, Lan; Ding, Dalian; Xie, Linyi; Qi, Yue; Lou, Xin; Huang, Xusheng; Shi, Qiang; Chang, Suhua; Xiong, Wenping; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Ning; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jing; Salvi, Richard J; Petit, Christine; Smith, Richard J H; Wang, Qiuju

    2015-01-01

    Background Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) is a form of hearing loss in which auditory signal transmission from the inner ear to the auditory nerve and brain stem is distorted, giving rise to speech perception difficulties beyond that expected for the observed degree of hearing loss. For many cases of ANSD, the underlying molecular pathology and the site of lesion remain unclear. The X-linked form of the condition, AUNX1, has been mapped to Xq23-q27.3, although the causative gene has yet to be identified. Methods We performed whole-exome sequencing on DNA samples from the AUNX1 family and another small phenotypically similar but unrelated ANSD family. Results We identified two missense mutations in AIFM1 in these families: c.1352G>A (p.R451Q) in the AUNX1 family and c.1030C>T (p.L344F) in the second ANSD family. Mutation screening in a large cohort of 3 additional unrelated families and 93 sporadic cases with ANSD identified 9 more missense mutations in AIFM1. Bioinformatics analysis and expression studies support this gene as being causative of ANSD. Conclusions Variants in AIFM1 gene are a common cause of familial and sporadic ANSD and provide insight into the expanded spectrum of AIFM1-associated diseases. The finding of cochlear nerve hypoplasia in some patients was AIFM1-related ANSD implies that MRI may be of value in localising the site of lesion and suggests that cochlea implantation in these patients may have limited success. PMID:25986071

  5. Cerebral Vasculitis in X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Cured by Matched Unrelated Cord Blood Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gray, Paul E; O'Brien, Tracey A; Wagle, Mayura; Tangye, Stuart G; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Roscioli, Tony; Choo, Sharon; Sutton, Rosemary; Ziegler, John B; Frith, Katie

    2015-10-01

    Vasculitis occurs rarely in association with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP). There are four published cases of non-EBV XLP-associated cerebral vasculitis reported, none of whom have survived without major cognitive impairment. A 9-year old boy initially presented aged 5 years with a restrictive joint disease. He subsequently developed dysgammaglobulinemia, episodic severe pneumonitis, aplastic anaemia, gastritis and cerebral vasculitis. A diagnosis of XLP was made, based on flow cytometric analysis and the identification of a novel mutation in SH2D1A, c.96G>C. No peripheral blood lymphocyte clonal proliferation was identified and he was EBV negative, although human herpes virus-7 (HHV7) was detected repeatedly in his cerebrospinal fluid. He underwent a reduced intensity unrelated umbilical cord blood transplant, but failed to engraft. A second 5/6 matched cord gave 100 % donor engraftment. Complications included BK virus-associated haemorrhagic cystitis, a possible NK-cell mediated immune reconstitution syndrome and post-transplant anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, the latter treated with cyclophosphamide and rituximab. At +450 days post-transplant he is in remission from his vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and HHV-7 has remained undetectable. This is the second published description of joint disease in XLP, and only the fourth case of non-EBV associated cerebral vasculitis in XLP, as well as being the first to be successfully treated for this manifestation. This case raises specific questions about vasculitis in XLP, in particular the potential relevance of HHV-7 to the pathogenesis.

  6. Evaluation of pharmacological induction of fatty acid beta-oxidation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M C; Zhang, H P; Smith, K D

    2001-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder associated with elevated levels of saturated unbranched very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; C > 22:0) in plasma and tissues, and reduced VLCFA beta-oxidation in fibroblasts, white blood cells, and amniocytes from X-ALD patients. The X-ALD gene (ABCD1) at Xq28 encodes the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) that is related to the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABCD) transmembrane half-transporter proteins. The function of ALDP is unknown and its role in VLCFA accumulation unresolved. Previously, our laboratory has shown that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) treatment of X-ALD fibroblasts results in increased peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation activity and increased expression of the X-ALD-related protein, ALDRP, encoded by the ABCD2 gene. In this study, the effect of various pharmacological agents on VLCFA beta-oxidation in ALD mouse fibroblasts is tested. 4PBA, styrylacetate and benzyloxyacetate (structurally related to 4PBA), and trichostatin A (functionally related to 4PBA) increase both VLCFA (peroxisomal) and long-chain fatty acid [LCFA (peroxisomal and mitochondrial)] beta-oxidation. Isobutyrate, zaprinast, hydroxyurea, and 5-azacytidine had no effect on VLCFA or LCFA beta-oxidation. Lovastatin had no effect on fatty acid beta-oxidation under normal tissue culture conditions but did result in an increase in both VLCFA and LCFA beta-oxidation when ALD mouse fibroblasts were cultured in the absence of cholesterol. The effect of trichostatin A on peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation is shown to be independent of an increase in ALDRP expression, suggesting that correction of the biochemical abnormality in X-ALD is not dependent on pharmacological induction of a redundant gene (ABCD2). These studies contribute to a better understanding of the role of ALDP in VLCFA accumulation and may lead to the development of more effective pharmacological therapies. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Somatic Mosaicism Underlies X-linked Acrogigantism (XLAG) Syndrome in Sporadic Male Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Adrian F.; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W.; Naves, Luciana A.; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Beckers., Albert

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101. We studied XLAG syndrome patients (N=18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome were identified with Xq26.3 duplications using high definition array comparative genome hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted males with XLAG had a decreased log2 ratio compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, while females showed no such decrease. As compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1-53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint-junction specific quantification droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism and identified one female gigantism patient that had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. PMID:26935837

  8. Safety Assessment of Docosahexaenoic Acid in X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa: The 4-Year DHAX Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Fish, Gary E.; Spencer, Rand; Pearson, N. Shirlene; Takacs, Alison; Hoffman, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) continues to be evaluated and recommended as treatment and prophylaxis for various diseases. We recently assessed efficacy of high-dose DHA supplementation to slow vision loss in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) in a randomized clinical trial. Because DHA is a highly unsaturated fatty acid, it could serve as a target for free-radical induced oxidation, resulting in increased oxidative stress. Biosafety was monitored during the 4-year trial to determine whether DHA supplementation was associated with identifiable risks. Methods. Males (n = 78; 7–31 years) meeting entry criteria were enrolled. The modified intent-to-treat cohort (DHA = 33; placebo = 27) adhered to the protocol ≥ 1 year. Participants were randomized to an oral dose of 30 mg/kg/d DHA or placebo plus a daily multivitamin. Comprehensive metabolic analyses were assessed for group differences. Treatment-emergent adverse events including blood chemistry metabolites were recorded. Results. By year 4, supplementation elevated plasma and red blood cell–DHA 4.4- and 3.6-fold, respectively, compared with the placebo group (P < 0.00001). Over the trial duration, no significant differences between DHA and placebo groups were found for vitamin A, vitamin E, platelet aggregation, antioxidant activity, lipoprotein cholesterol, or oxidized LDL levels (all P > 0.14). Adverse events were transient and not considered severe (e.g., gastrointestinal [GI] irritability, blood chemistry alterations). One participant was unable to tolerate persistent GI discomfort. Conclusions. Long-term, high-dose DHA supplementation to patients with XLRP was associated with limited safety risks in this 4-year trial. Nevertheless, GI symptoms should be monitored in all patients taking high dose DHA especially those with personal or family history of GI disturbances. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00100230.) PMID:25015354

  9. Extraordinary Sequence Divergence at Tsga8, an X-linked Gene Involved in Mouse Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Good, Jeffrey M.; Vanderpool, Dan; Smith, Kimberly L.; Nachman, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The X chromosome plays an important role in both adaptive evolution and speciation. We used a molecular evolutionary screen of X-linked genes potentially involved in reproductive isolation in mice to identify putative targets of recurrent positive selection. We then sequenced five very rapidly evolving genes within and between several closely related species of mice in the genus Mus. All five genes were involved in male reproduction and four of the genes showed evidence of recurrent positive selection. The most remarkable evolutionary patterns were found at Testis-specific gene a8 (Tsga8), a spermatogenesis-specific gene expressed during postmeiotic chromatin condensation and nuclear transformation. Tsga8 was characterized by extremely high levels of insertion–deletion variation of an alanine-rich repetitive motif in natural populations of Mus domesticus and M. musculus, differing in length from the reference mouse genome by up to 89 amino acids (27% of the total protein length). This population-level variation was coupled with striking divergence in protein sequence and length between closely related mouse species. Although no clear orthologs had previously been described for Tsga8 in other mammalian species, we have identified a highly divergent hypothetical gene on the rat X chromosome that shares clear orthology with the 5′ and 3′ ends of Tsga8. Further inspection of this ortholog verified that it is expressed in rat testis and shares remarkable similarity with mouse Tsga8 across several general features of the protein sequence despite no conservation of nucleotide sequence across over 60% of the rat-coding domain. Overall, Tsga8 appears to be one of the most rapidly evolving genes to have been described in rodents. We discuss the potential evolutionary causes and functional implications of this extraordinary divergence and the possible contribution of Tsga8 and the other four genes we examined to reproductive isolation in mice. PMID:21186189

  10. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage.

  11. Analysis of Anatomic and Functional Measures in X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Cukras, Catherine A.; Huryn, Laryssa A.; Jeffrey, Brett P.; Turriff, Amy; Sieving, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To examine the symmetry of structural and functional parameters between eyes in patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), as well as changes in visual acuity and electrophysiology over time. Methods This is a single-center observational study of 120 males with XLRS who were evaluated at the National Eye Institute. Examinations included best-corrected visual acuity for all participants, as well as ERG recording and optical coherence tomography (OCT) on a subset of participants. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Spearman correlations and linear regression. Results Our analyses demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of structural and functional measures between the two eyes of XLRS patients for all parameters. OCT central macular thickness (n = 78; Spearman r = 0.83, P < 0.0001) and ERG b/a ratio (n = 78; Spearman r = 0.82, P < 0.0001) were the most strongly correlated between a participant's eyes, whereas visual acuity was less strongly correlated (n = 120; Spearman r = 0.47, P < 0.0001). Stability of visual acuity was observed with an average change of less than one letter (n = 74; OD −0.66 and OS −0.70 letters) in a mean follow-up time of 6.8 years. There was no statistically significant change in the ERG b/a ratio within eyes over time. Conclusions Although a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes is observed across individuals with XLRS, our study demonstrates a significant correlation of structural and functional findings between the two eyes and stability of measures of acuity and ERG parameters over time. These results highlight the utility of the fellow eye as a useful reference for monocular interventional trials.

  12. The prevalence of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) in Denmark, 1995-2010.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Skovbo, Stine; Svaneby, Dea; Pedersen, Lars; Fryzek, Jon

    2013-05-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is characterised by hypohidrosis, sparse hair, and teeth abnormalities. Infants with XLHED have an increased risk of death by hyperpyrexia. XLHED is the most common form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED); however, no population-based prevalence estimates are available. We aimed to: 1) estimate the prevalence of XLHED in the Danish population per January 1, 2011; 2) identify the most frequent age at time of diagnosis; and 3) quantify the most frequent clinical feature associated with XLHED. We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study (1995-2010). We leveraged national medical registries and data from clinical departments to categorise XLHED cases into three groups: 1) Molecularly-confirmed XLHED; 2) Clinically-diagnosed HED (registered with ICD-10 Q 82.4); and 3) Possible HED (registered with sufficient clinical features based on a clinical algorithm that we designed). We identified 90 molecularly-confirmed XLHED, 146 clinically-diagnosed HED, and 988 possible HED cases between 1995 and 2010 (total n = 1224). The prevalence was 21.9 per 100,000 overall and 1.6 per 100,000 when restricting to molecularly-confirmed XLHED cases. The most frequent age at time of XLHED diagnosis occurred between the ages of 11 and 18 years. Teeth abnormalities occurred in 79% of all cases and 52% of molecularly-confirmed cases as a primary clinical marker. We present the first ever population-based prevalence estimates of XLHED and suggest that the prevalence of XLHED may be higher than previously estimated. Diagnosis occurs most frequently during adolescence and teeth abnormalities were the most frequent clinical marker of XLHED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Genotype-phenotype correlation in boys with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Kristin; Schneider, Anne-Theres; Wohlfart, Sigrun; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Huttner, Kenneth; Johnson, Ramsey; Schneider, Holm

    2014-10-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), the most frequent form of ectodermal dysplasia, is a genetic disorder of ectoderm development characterized by malformation of multiple ectodermal structures such as skin, hair, sweat and sebaceous glands, and teeth. The disease is caused by a broad spectrum of mutations in the gene EDA. Although XLHED symptoms show inter-familial and intra-familial variability, genotype-phenotype correlation has been demonstrated with respect to sweat gland function. In this study, we investigated to which extent the EDA genotype correlates with the severity of XLHED-related skin and hair signs. Nineteen male children with XLHED (age range 3-14 years) and seven controls (aged 6-14 years) were examined by confocal microscopy of the skin, quantification of pilocarpine-induced sweating, semi-quantitative evaluation of full facial photographs with respect to XLHED-related skin issues, and phototrichogram analysis. All eight boys with known hypomorphic EDA mutations were able to produce at least some sweat and showed less severe cutaneous signs of XLHED than the anhidrotic XLHED patients (e.g., perioral and periorbital eczema or hyperpigmentation, regional hyperkeratosis, characteristic wrinkles under the eyes). As expected, individuals with XLHED had significantly less and thinner hair than healthy controls. However, there were also significant differences in hair number, diameter, and other hair characteristics between the group with hypomorphic EDA mutations and the anhidrotic patients. In summary, this study indicated a remarkable genotype-phenotype correlation of skin and hair findings in prepubescent males with XLHED. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dosage effect of a Phex mutation in a murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Gray, Amie K.; Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Econs, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is caused by mutations in the PHEX gene, which increase circulating levels of the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Since XLH is a dominant disease, one mutant allele is sufficient for manifestation of the disease. However, dosage effect of a PHEX mutation in XLH is not completely understood. To examine the effect of Phex genotypes, we compared serum biochemistries and skeletal measures between all five possible genotypes of a new murine model of XLH (PhexK496X or PhexJrt). Compared to sex-matched littermate controls, all Phex mutant mice had hypophosphatemia, mild hypocalcemia, and increased parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase levels. Furthermore, mutant mice had markedly elevated serum Fgf23 levels due to increased Fgf23 expression and reduced cleavage of Fgf23. Although females with a homozygous Phex mutation were slightly more hypocalcemic and hypophosphatemic than heterozygous females, the two groups had comparable intact Fgf23 levels. Similarly, there was no difference in intact Fgf23 or phosphorus concentrations between hemizygous males and heterozygous females. Compared to heterozygous females, homozygous counterparts were significantly smaller and had shorter femurs with reduced bone mineral density, suggesting the existence of dosage effect in the skeletal phenotype of XLH. However, overall phenotypic trends in regards to mineral ion homeostasis were mostly unaffected by the presence of one or two mutant Phex allele(s). The lack of gene dosage effect on circulating Fgf23 (and thus, phosphorus) levels suggests that a Phex mutation may create the lower set point for extracellular phosphate concentrations. PMID:23700148

  15. Iron and fibroblast growth factor 23 in X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Erik A.; Gray, Amie; Padgett, Leah; Econs, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) causes hypophosphatemia in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). Iron status influences C-terminal FGF23 (incorporating fragments plus intact FGF23) in ADHR and healthy subjects, and intact FGF23 in ADHR. We hypothesized that in XLH serum iron would inversely correlate to C-terminal FGF23, but not to intact FGF23, mirroring the relationships in normal controls. Methods Subjects included 25 untreated outpatients with XLH at a tertiary medical center and 158 healthy adult controls. Serum iron and plasma intact FGF23 and C-terminal FGF23 were measured in stored samples. Results Intact FGF23 was greater than the control mean in 100% of XLH patients, and >2SD above the control mean in 88%, compared to 71% and 21% respectively for C-terminal FGF23. In XLH, iron correlated negatively to log-C-terminal FGF23 (r= −0.523, p<0.01), with a steeper slope than in controls (p<0.001). Iron was not related to log-intact FGF23 in either group. The log-ratio of intact FGF23 to C-terminal FGF23 was higher in XLH (0.00 ± 0.44) than controls (−0.28 ± 0.21, p<0.01), and correlated positively to serum iron (controls r= 0.276, p<0.001; XLH r= 0.428, p<0.05), with a steeper slope in XLH (p<0.01). Conclusion Like controls, serum iron in XLH is inversely related to C-terminal FGF23 but not intact FGF23. XLH patients are more likely to have elevated intact FGF23 than C-terminal FGF23. The relationships of iron to FGF23 in XLH suggest altered regulation of FGF23 cleaving may contribute to maintaining hypophosphatemia around an abnormal set-point. PMID:24325979

  16. Survey of the enthesopathy of X-linked hypophosphatemia and its characterization in Hyp mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guoying; Katz, Lee D; Insogna, Karl L; Carpenter, Thomas O; Macica, Carolyn M

    2009-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is characterized by rickets and osteomalacia as a result of an inactivating mutation of the PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) gene. PHEX encodes an endopeptidase that, when inactivated, results in elevated circulating levels of FGF-23, a novel phosphate-regulating hormone (a phosphatonin), thereby resulting in increased phosphate excretion and impaired bone mineralization. A generalized and severe mineralizing enthesopathy in patients with XLH was first reported in 1985; we likewise report a survey in which we found evidence of enthesopathy in fibrocartilaginous insertion sites, as well as osteophyte formation, in the majority of patients. Nonetheless, there has been very little focus on the progression and pathogenesis underlying the paradoxical heterotopic calcification of tendon and ligament insertion sites. Such studies have been hampered by lack of a model of mineralizing enthesopathy. We therefore characterized the involvement of the most frequently targeted fibrocartilaginous tendon insertion sites in Hyp mice, a murine model of the XLH mutation that phenocopies the human syndrome in every detail including hypophosphatemia and elevated FGF-23. Histological examination of the affected entheses revealed that mineralizing insertion sites, while thought to involve bone spur formation, were not due to bone-forming osteoblasts but instead to a significant expansion of mineralizing fibrocartilage. Our finding that enthesis fibrocartilage cells specifically express fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3)/Klotho suggests that the high circulating levels of FGF-23, characteristic of XLH and Hyp mice, may be part of the biochemical milieu that underlies the expansion of mineralizing enthesis fibrocartilage.

  17. Dosage effect of a Phex mutation in a murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Gray, Amie K; Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Econs, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is caused by mutations in the PHEX gene, which increase circulating levels of the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Because XLH is a dominant disease, one mutant allele is sufficient for manifestation of the disease. However, the dosage effect of a PHEX mutation in XLH is not completely understood. To examine the effect of Phex genotypes, we compared serum biochemistries and skeletal measures between all five possible genotypes of a new murine model of XLH (Phex (K496X) or Phex (Jrt) ). Compared to sex-matched littermate controls, all Phex mutant mice had hypophosphatemia, mild hypocalcemia, and increased parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase levels. Furthermore, mutant mice had markedly elevated serum Fgf23 levels due to increased Fgf23 expression and reduced cleavage of Fgf23. Although females with a homozygous Phex mutation were slightly more hypocalcemic and hypophosphatemic than heterozygous females, the two groups had comparable intact Fgf23 levels. Similarly, there was no difference in intact Fgf23 or phosphorus concentrations between hemizygous males and heterozygous females. Compared to heterozygous females, homozygous counterparts were significantly smaller and had shorter femurs with reduced bone mineral density, suggesting the existence of dosage effect in the skeletal phenotype of XLH. However, overall phenotypic trends in regards to mineral ion homeostasis were mostly unaffected by the presence of one or two mutant Phex allele(s). The lack of a gene dosage effect on circulating Fgf23 (and thus phosphorus) levels suggests that a Phex mutation may create the lower set point for extracellular phosphate concentrations.

  18. X-linked hypophosphatemia: the mutant gene is expressed in teeth as well as in kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, E D; Scriver, C R; Reade, T; Fujiwara, T M; Morgan, K; Ciampi, A; Schwartz, S

    1990-01-01

    Mutation at a locus (HPDR) on the X chromosome (McKusick 30780 [HPDR1]; 30781 [HPDR2]) causes impaired renal phosphate transport, hypophosphatemia, and an associated impairment in the process of mineralization in bone and teeth (X-linked hypophosphatemia [XLH]). We measured the dental pulp profile area (PRATIO [= pulp area/tooth area]) and serum phosphorus (Pi) values in uniformly treated XLH patients (six males, 81 teeth, 1,457 Pi values; 11 females, 129 teeth, 1,439 Pi values). Serum Pi values, reflecting the metabolic environment of tooth development, were obtained by repeated measurement between 1 mo and 26 years of age during treatment. PRATIO values calculated from standardized Rinn radiographs were used as outcome measurements of tooth development in XLH patients and in age-matched controls (12 males, 100 teeth; 27 females, 275 teeth). Age-dependent serum Pi values were not different in the treated XLH males and females. In teeth forming primary dentin there was no gene dosage effect on PRATIO values apparent in subjects below 15 years of age. However, in teeth forming secondary dentin a gene dosage was found in the subjects aged 15 to 25 years: XLH male teeth (n = 65) mean +/- SD = 0.163 +/- 0.046; XLH female teeth (n = 75) mean +/- SD = 0.137 +/- 0.039; control teeth (n = 209) mean +/- SD = 0.116 +/- 0.023; (higher PRATIO values mean less development or mineralization of secondary dentin); differences in these PRATIO values (males vs. female and XLH vs. control) were significant by mixed-model analysis of variance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2155529

  19. Defective Mineralization in X-Linked Hypophosphatemia Dental Pulp Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Coyac, B R; Hoac, B; Chafey, P; Falgayrac, G; Slimani, L; Rowe, P S; Penel, G; Linglart, A; McKee, M D; Chaussain, C; Bardet, C

    2018-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is a skeletal disease caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. Mutated or absent PHEX protein/enzyme leads to a decreased serum phosphate level, which cause mineralization defects in the skeleton and teeth (osteomalacia/odontomalacia). It is not yet altogether clear whether these manifestations are caused solely by insufficient circulating phosphate availability for mineralization or also by a direct, local intrinsic effect caused by impaired PHEX activity. Here, we evaluated the local role of PHEX in a 3-dimensional model of extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization. Dense collagen hydrogels were seeded either with human dental pulp cells from patients with characterized PHEX mutations or with sex- and age-matched healthy controls and cultured up to 24 d using osteogenic medium with standard phosphate concentration. Calcium quantification, micro-computed tomography, and histology with von Kossa staining for mineral showed significantly lower mineralization in XLH cell-seeded scaffolds, using nonparametric statistical tests. While apatitic mineralization was observed along collagen fibrils by electron microscopy in both groups, Raman microspectrometry indicated that XLH cells harboring the PHEX mutation produced less mineralized scaffolds having impaired mineral quality with less carbonate substitution and lower crystallinity. In the XLH cultures, immunoblotting revealed more abundant osteopontin (OPN), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) than controls, as well as the presence of fragments of these proteins not found in controls, suggesting a role for PHEX in SIBLING protein degradation. Immunohistochemistry revealed altered OPN and DMP1 associated with an increased alkaline phosphatase staining in the XLH cultures. These results are consistent with impaired PHEX activity having local ECM effects in XLH. Future treatments for XLH should target both systemic and local

  20. 7 Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in adult X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ratai, Eva; Kok, Trina; Wiggins, Christopher; Wiggins, Graham; Grant, Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; O'Neill, Gilmore; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Eichler, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background Adult patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) remain at risk for progressive neurological deterioration. Phenotypes vary in their pathology, ranging from axonal degeneration to inflammatory demyelination. The severity of symptoms is poorly explained by conventional imaging. Objective To test the hypothesis that neurochemistry in normal appearing brain differs among adult phenotypes of X-ALD, and that neurochemical changes correlate with the severity of symptoms. Patients and Methods Using a 7 Tesla scanner we performed structural and proton MRSI in 13 adult patients with X-ALD, including 4 patients with adult cerebral ALD (ACALD), 5 with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and 4 female heterozygotes. Studies were also performed in nine healthy controls. Results Among adult X-ALD phenotypes, MI/Cr was 46% higher and Cho/Cr 21% higher in normal appearing white matter of ACALD compared to AMN (p < 0.05). Both NAA/Cr and Glu/Cr ratios were lower in AMN patients (p = 0.028 and p = 0.036, respectively) than in controls. There were no significant differences between AMN and female heterozygotes. In cortex, ACALD patients had lower values of NAA/Cr compared to female heterozygotes and controls (p = 0.022). The global MI/Cr ratio demonstrated a significant association with the EDSS (Spearman ρ = 0.66, p = 0.039). Conclusion 7 Tesla proton MRSI reveals differences in the neurochemistry of ACALD but is unable to distinguish AMN from female heterozygotes. MI/Cr correlates with the severity of the symptoms and may be a meaningful biomarker in adult X-ALD. PMID:19001168

  1. DIA1R is an X-linked gene related to Deleted In Autism-1.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P; Bishop, Naomi E

    2011-01-17

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDS) are frequently occurring disorders diagnosed by deficits in three core functional areas: social skills, communication, and behaviours and/or interests. Mental retardation frequently accompanies the most severe forms of ASDs, while overall ASDs are more commonly diagnosed in males. Most ASDs have a genetic origin and one gene recently implicated in the etiology of autism is the Deleted-In-Autism-1 (DIA1) gene. Using a bioinformatics-based approach, we have identified a human gene closely related to DIA1, we term DIA1R (DIA1-Related). While DIA1 is autosomal (chromosome 3, position 3q24), DIA1R localizes to the X chromosome at position Xp11.3 and is known to escape X-inactivation. The gene products are of similar size, with DIA1 encoding 430, and DIA1R 433, residues. At the amino acid level, DIA1 and DIA1R are 62% similar overall (28% identical), and both encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. Both genes are ubiquitously expressed, including in fetal and adult brain tissue. Examination of published literature revealed point mutations in DIA1R are associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) and DIA1R deletion is associated with syndromes with ASD-like traits and/or XLMR. Together, these results support a model where the DIA1 and DIA1R gene products regulate molecular traffic through the cellular secretory pathway or affect the function of secreted factors, and functional deficits cause disorders with ASD-like symptoms and/or mental retardation.

  2. Three-Month Randomized Clinical Trial of Nasal Calcitonin in Adults with X-linked Hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Rebecca; Abraham, Alice; Simpson, Christine; Olear, Elizabeth; Carpenter, Thomas; Deng, Yanhong; Chen, Chuqing; Insogna, Karl L

    2018-06-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that a single subcutaneous dose of salmon calcitonin leads to a transient decline in circulating levels of FGF23 in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). Since the calcitonin receptor is expressed on osteocytes, this raises the possibility that interdicting signals through that receptor could modulate circulating levels of FGF23 in XLH. In the present study, 21 subjects with XLH were randomly assigned to receive either placebo nasal spray or 400 IU of nasal salmon calcitonin daily for three months. On the first and last day of the study, serial measurements of FGF23, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and TmP/GFR were made over 27 h. At the beginning of Visit 2 (the first day of month 2) and the beginning of Visit 3 (the first day of month 3), single, first-morning, fasting measurements of these same parameters were made before the next administered dose of study drug. Following the initial or final dose of study drug, there were no differences in area under the curve, based on treatment assignment, for the three principal outcome variables. Similarly, there were no differences in the fasting measures taken at the beginning of Visit 2 or Visit 3 compared to the fasting values on either day 2 of Visit 1 or the fasting values on day 2 of Visit 4. There were also no significant changes over time in serum phosphorus, serum calcium, circulating levels of PTH, CTx, or P1NP. The reasons why nasal salmon calcitonin did not recapitulate the findings with subcutaneously administered drug may relate to the kinetics of drug delivery, the bioavailability of drug or peak drug dose achieved. It remains possible, however, that other means of altering calcitonin receptor signaling may still provide an opportunity for regulating FGF23 production.

  3. A candidate gene for X-linked Ocular Albinism (OA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, M.T.; Schiaffino, V.; Rugarli, E.

    1994-09-01

    Ocular Albinism of the Nettleship-Fall type 1 (OA1) is the most common form of ocular albinism. It is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait with affected males showing severe reduction of visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination reveals foveal hypoplasia, hypopigmentation of the retina and iris translucency. Microscopic examination of melanocytes suggests that the underlying defect in OA1 is an abnormality in melanosome formation. Recently we assembled a 350 kb cosmid contig spanning the entire critical region on Xp22.3, which measures approximately 110 kb. A minimum set of cosmids was used to identify transcribed sequences using both cDNA selectionmore » and exon amplification. Two putative exons recovered by exon amplification strategy were found to be highly conserved throughout evolution and, therefore, they were used as probes for the screening of fetal and adult retina cDNA libraries. This led to the isolation of clones spanning a full-length cDNA which measures 7.6 kb. Sequence analysis revealed that the predicted protein product shows homology with syntrophines and a Xenopus laevis apical protein. The gene covers approximately 170 kb of DNA and spans the entire critical region for OA1, being deleted in two patients with contiguous gene deletion including OA1 and in one patient with isolated OA1. Therefore, this new gene represents a very strong candidate for involvement in OA1 (an alternative, but unlikely possibility to be considered is that the true OA1 gene lies within an intron of the former). Northern analysis revealed very high level of expression in retina and melanoma. Unlike most Xp22.3 genes, this gene is conserved in the mouse. We are currently performing SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exons on DNAs from approximately 60 unrelated patients with OA1 for mutation detection.« less

  4. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. METHODS: The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." RESULTS: The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage

  5. Dysregulation of X-linked gene expression in Klinefelter's syndrome and association with verbal cognition.

    PubMed

    Vawter, Marquis P; Harvey, Philip D; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2007-09-05

    Klinefelter's Syndrome (KS) is a chromosomal karyotype with one or more extra X chromosomes. KS individuals often show language impairment and the phenotype might be due to overexpression of genes on the extra X chromosome(s). We profiled mRNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines from males with documented KS and control males using the Affymetrix U133P microarray platform. There were 129 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in KS group compared with controls after Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery adjustment. The DEGs included 14 X chromosome genes which were significantly over-represented. The Y chromosome had zero DEGs. In exploratory analysis of gene expression-cognition relationships, 12 DEGs showed significant correlation of expression with measures of verbal cognition in KS. Overexpression of one pseudoautosomal gene, GTPBP6 (GTP binding protein 6, putative) was inversely correlated with verbal IQ (r = -0.86, P < 0.001) and four other measures of verbal ability. Overexpression of XIST was found in KS compared to XY controls suggesting that silencing of many genes on the X chromosome might occur in KS similar to XX females. The microarray findings for eight DEGs were validated by quantitative PCR. The 14 X chromosome DEGs were not differentially expressed in prior studies comparing female and male brains suggesting a dysregulation profile unique to KS. Examination of X-linked DEGs, such as GTPBP6, TAF9L, and CXORF21, that show verbal cognition-gene expression correlations may establish a causal link between these genes, neurodevelopment, and language function. A screen of candidate genes may serve as biomarkers of KS for early diagnosis. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Nature and Recurrence of AVPR2 Mutations in X-linked Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Bichet, Daniel G.; Birnbaumer, Mariel; Lonergan, Michèle; Arthus, Marie-Françoise; Rosenthal, Walter; Goodyer, Paul; Nivet, Hubert; Benoit, Stéphane; Giampietro, Philip; Simonetti, Simonetta; Fish, Alfred; Whitley, Chester B.; Jaeger, Philippe; Gertner, Joseph; New, Maria; DiBona, Francis J.; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Robertson, Gary L.; Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Morgan, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare disease with defective renal and extrarenal arginine-vasopressin V2 receptor responses due to mutations in the AVPR2 gene in Xq28. We analyzed 31 independent NDI families to determine the nature and recurrence of AVPR2 mutations. Twenty-one new putative disease-causing mutations were identified: 113delCT, 253del35, 255del9, 274insG, V88M, R106C, 402delCT, C112R, Y124X, S126F, W164S, S167L, 684delTA, 804insG, W284X, A285P, W293X, R337X, and three large deletions or gene rearrangements. Five other mutations—R113W, Y128S, R137H, R181C, and R202C—that previously had been reported in other families were detected. There was evidence for recurrent mutation for four mutations (R113W, R137H, S167L, and R337X). Eight de novo mutation events were detected (274insG, R106C, Y128S, 167L [twice], R202C, 684delTA, and R337X). The origins were maternal (one), grandmaternal (one), and grandpaternal (six). In the 31 NDI families and 6 families previously reported by us, there is evidence both for mutation hot spots for nucleotide substitutions and for small deletions and insertions. More than half (58%) of the nucleotide substitutions in 26 families could be a consequence of 5-methylcytosine deamination at a CpG dinucleotide. Most of the small deletions and insertions could be attributed to slipped mispairing during DNA replication. PMID:8037205

  7. Molecular population genetics of X-linked genes in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, M; Schaeffer, S W

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a nucleotide sequence analysis of 500 bp determined in each of five X-linked genes, runt, sisterlessA, period, esterase 5, and Heat-shock protein 83, in 40 Drosophila pseudoobscura strains collected from two populations. Estimates of the neutral migration parameter for the five loci show that gene flow among D. pseudoobscura populations is sufficient to homogenize inversion frequencies across the range of the species. Nucleotide diversity at each locus fails to reject a neutral model of molecular evolution. The sample of 40 chromosomes included six Sex-ratio inversions, a series of three nonoverlapping inversions that are associated with a strong meiotic drive phenotype. The selection driven by the Sex-ratio meiotic drive element has not fixed variation across the X chromosome of D. pseudoobscura because, while significant linkage disequilibrium was observed within the sisterlessA, period, and esterase 5 genes, we did not find evidence for nonrandom association among loci. The Sex-ratio chromosome was estimated to be 25,000 years old based on the decomposition of linkage disequilibrium between esterase 5 and Heat-shock protein 83 or 1 million years old based on the net divergence of esterase 5 between Standard and Sex-ratio chromosomes. Genetic diversity was depressed within esterase 5 within Sex-ratio chromosomes, while the four other genes failed to show a reduction in heterozygosity in the Sex-ratio background. The reduced heterogeneity in esterase 5 is due either to its location near one of the Sex-ratio inversion breakpoints or that it is closely linked to a gene or genes responsible for the Sex-ratio meiotic drive system. PMID:10978282

  8. Somatic GPR101 Duplication Causing X-Linked Acrogigantism (XLAG)—Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Rodd, Celia; Millette, Maude; Iacovazzo, Donato; Stiles, Craig E.; Barry, Sayka; Evanson, Jane; Albrecht, Steffen; Caswell, Richard; Bunce, Benjamin; Jose, Sian; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Roncaroli, Federico; Sampson, Julian; Ellard, Sian

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent reports have proposed that sporadic or familial germline Xq26.3 microduplications involving the GPR101 gene are associated with early-onset X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) with a female preponderance. Case Description: A 4-year-old boy presented with rapid growth over the previous 2 years. He complained of sporadic headaches and had coarse facial features. His height Z-score was +4.89, and weight Z-score was +5.57. Laboratory testing revealed elevated serum prolactin (185 μg/L; normal, <18 μg/L), IGF-1 (745 μg/L; normal, 64–369 μg/L), and fasting GH > 35.0 μg/L. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a homogenous bulky pituitary gland (18 × 15 × 13 mm) without obvious adenoma. A pituitary biopsy showed hyperplastic pituitary tissue with enlarged cords of GH and prolactin cells. Germline PRKAR1A, MEN1, AIP, DICER1, CDKN1B, and somatic GNAS mutations were negative. Medical management was challenging until institution of continuous sc infusion of short-acting octreotide combined with sc pegvisomant and oral cabergoline. The patient remains well controlled with minimal side effects 7 years after presentation. His phenotype suggested XLAG, but his peripheral leukocyte-, saliva-, and buccal cell-derived DNA tested negative for microduplication in Xq26.3 or GPR101. However, DNA isolated from the pituitary tissue and forearm skin showed duplicated dosage of GPR101, suggesting that he is mosaic for this genetic abnormality. Conclusions: Our patient is the first to be described with somatic microduplication leading to typical XLAG phenotype. This patient demonstrates that a negative test for Xq26.3 microduplication or GPR101 duplication on peripheral blood DNA does not exclude the diagnosis of XLAG because it can result from a mosaic mutation affecting the pituitary. PMID:26982009

  9. Somatic GPR101 Duplication Causing X-Linked Acrogigantism (XLAG)-Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Celia; Millette, Maude; Iacovazzo, Donato; Stiles, Craig E; Barry, Sayka; Evanson, Jane; Albrecht, Steffen; Caswell, Richard; Bunce, Benjamin; Jose, Sian; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Roncaroli, Federico; Sampson, Julian; Ellard, Sian; Korbonits, Márta

    2016-05-01

    Recent reports have proposed that sporadic or familial germline Xq26.3 microduplications involving the GPR101 gene are associated with early-onset X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) with a female preponderance. A 4-year-old boy presented with rapid growth over the previous 2 years. He complained of sporadic headaches and had coarse facial features. His height Z-score was +4.89, and weight Z-score was +5.57. Laboratory testing revealed elevated serum prolactin (185 μg/L; normal, <18 μg/L), IGF-1 (745 μg/L; normal, 64-369 μg/L), and fasting GH > 35.0 μg/L. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a homogenous bulky pituitary gland (18 × 15 × 13 mm) without obvious adenoma. A pituitary biopsy showed hyperplastic pituitary tissue with enlarged cords of GH and prolactin cells. Germline PRKAR1A, MEN1, AIP, DICER1, CDKN1B, and somatic GNAS mutations were negative. Medical management was challenging until institution of continuous sc infusion of short-acting octreotide combined with sc pegvisomant and oral cabergoline. The patient remains well controlled with minimal side effects 7 years after presentation. His phenotype suggested XLAG, but his peripheral leukocyte-, saliva-, and buccal cell-derived DNA tested negative for microduplication in Xq26.3 or GPR101. However, DNA isolated from the pituitary tissue and forearm skin showed duplicated dosage of GPR101, suggesting that he is mosaic for this genetic abnormality. Our patient is the first to be described with somatic microduplication leading to typical XLAG phenotype. This patient demonstrates that a negative test for Xq26.3 microduplication or GPR101 duplication on peripheral blood DNA does not exclude the diagnosis of XLAG because it can result from a mosaic mutation affecting the pituitary.

  10. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H.; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; De Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R.; Daly, Adrian F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in 2 families was dominant with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2–3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight SDS score of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF-1 and prolactin, usually due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high somatostatin receptor subtype-2 expression in tumor tissue. Postoperative adjuvant pegvisomant achieved control of IGF-1 all 5 cases in which it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  11. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci couldmore » be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.« less

  12. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis: Clinical diagnosis, genetic analysis, and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Molday, Robert S.; Kellner, Ulrich; Weber, Bernhard H.F.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS, MIM 312700) is a common early onset macular degeneration in males characterized by mild to severe loss in visual acuity, splitting of retinal layers, and a reduction in the b-wave of the electroretinogram (ERG). The RS1 gene (MIM 300839) associated with the disease encodes retinoschisin, a 224 amino acid protein containing a discoidin domain as the major structural unit, an N-terminal cleavable signal sequence, and regions responsible for subunit oligomerization. Retinoschisin is secreted from retinal cells as a disulphide-linked homo-octameric complex which binds to the surface of photoreceptors and bipolar cells to help maintain the integrity of the retina. Over 190 disease-causing mutations in the RS1 gene are known with most mutations occurring as non-synonymous changes in the discoidin domain. Cell expression studies have shown that disease-associated missense mutations in the discoidin domain cause severe protein misfolding and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum, mutations in the signal sequence result in aberrant protein synthesis, and mutations in regions flanking the discoidin domain cause defective disulphide-linked subunit assembly, all of which produce a non-functional protein. Knockout mice deficient in retinoschisin have been generated and shown to display most of the characteristic features found in XLRS patients. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) mediated delivery of the normal RS1 gene to the retina of young knockout mice result in long term retinoschisin expression and rescue of retinal structure and function providing a ‘proof of concept’ that gene therapy may be an effective treatment for XLRS. PMID:22245536

  13. Characterization of novel RS1 exonic deletions in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Leera; Cukras, Catherine; Antolik, Christian; Craig, Candice; He, Hong; Li, Shibo; Hejtmancik, James F.; Sieving, Paul A.; Wang, Xinjing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a vitreoretinal dystrophy characterized by schisis (splitting) of the inner layers of the neuroretina. Mutations within the retinoschisis (RS1) gene are responsible for this disease. The mutation spectrum consists of amino acid substitutions, splice site variations, small indels, and larger genomic deletions. Clinically, genomic deletions are rarely reported. Here, we characterize two novel full exonic deletions: one encompassing exon 1 and the other spanning exons 4–5 of the RS1 gene. We also report the clinical findings in these patients with XLRS with two different exonic deletions. Methods Unrelated XLRS men and boys and their mothers (if available) were enrolled for molecular genetics evaluation. The patients also underwent ophthalmologic examination and in some cases electroretinogram (ERG) recording. All the exons and the flanking intronic regions of the RS1 gene were analyzed with direct sequencing. Two patients with exonic deletions were further evaluated with array comparative genomic hybridization to define the scope of the genomic aberrations. After the deleted genomic region was identified, primer walking followed by direct sequencing was used to determine the exact breakpoints. Results Two novel exonic deletions of the RS1 gene were identified: one including exon 1 and the other spanning exons 4 and 5. The exon 1 deletion extends from the 5′ region of the RS1 gene (including the promoter) through intron 1 (c.(−35)-1723_c.51+2664del4472). The exon 4–5 deletion spans introns 3 to intron 5 (c.185–1020_c.522+1844del5764). Conclusions Here we report two novel exonic deletions within the RS1 gene locus. We have also described the clinical presentations and hypothesized the genomic mechanisms underlying these schisis phenotypes. PMID:24227916

  14. Correlation between spectral-domain OCT findings and visual acuity in X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun Seung; Lee, Jung Bok; Yoon, Young Hee; Lee, Joo Yong

    2014-05-08

    To investigate the tomographic characteristics of the outer retina and choroid and their relationship with visual acuity in X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) patients using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In this retrospective, observational, case-control study, we analyzed 20 eyes of 10 patients with XLRS using SD-OCT. The clinical and tomographic features of the outer retina, including the external limiting membrane (ELM), inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction, cone cell outer segment tips (COST) line, photoreceptor outer segment (PROS) length, and choroid, were evaluated. As controls, 40 age-, sex-, and refraction-matched healthy eyes (1:2 matched) were randomly selected and imaged in parallel. The most prevalent area of abnormality in the outer retina layer of our patients was the outer plexiform layer (OPL; 60% of all affected eyes) and COST line (75% of all affected eyes). On average, the subfoveal choroid and PROS lengths were 35 μm thicker and 19 μm thinner, respectively, in XLRS patients (P = 0.084 and P < 0.001, respectively). A dominant IS/OS junction, COST line defects, and PROS length were related to patient best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA; P = 0.029, P = 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively) by univariate analysis. Cone cell outer segment tips line defect and PROS length were the only factors related to BCVA in multivariate analysis (P = 0.028 and 0.003, respectively). Outer plexiform layer and photoreceptor microstructure defects are frequent in XLRS patients. Cone cell outer segment tips line defects and shortened PROS lengths as well as other photoreceptor microstructure defects may be closely related to poor vision in XLRS.

  15. Long-term 12 year follow-up of X-linked congenital retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Kjellström, Sten; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ponjavic, Vesna; Sieving, Paul A.; Andréasson, Sten

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the retinal structure and function during the progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) from childhood to adulthood. Methods Ten patients clinically diagnosed with XLRS were investigated at 6–15 years of age (mean age 9 years) with a follow-up 8 to 14 years later (mean 12 years). The patients underwent regular ophthalmic examination as well as testing of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), visual field (VF) and assessment of full-field electroretinography (ERG) during their first visit. During the follow-up, the same clinical protocols were repeated. In addition, macular structure and function was examined with multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The patients were 18–25 years of age (mean age 21 years) at the follow-up examination. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of RS1-gene were sequenced for gene mutations in 9 out of the 10 patients. Results Best corrected VA and VF were stable during this follow-up period. No significant progression in cone or rod function could be measured by full-field ERG. Multifocal electroretinography and OCT demonstrated a wide heterogeneity of macular changes in retinal structure and function at the time of follow-up visit. Three different mutations were detected in these nine patients, including a known nonsense mutation in exon 3, a novel insertion in exon 5 and an intronic mutation at 5' splice site of intron 3. Conclusions Clinical follow-up (mean 12 years) of ten young XLRS patients (mean age of 9 years) with a typical congenital retinoschisis phenotype revealed no significant decline in retinal function during this time period. MfERG and OCT demonstrated a wide variety of macular changes including structure and dysfunction. The XLRS disease was relatively stable during this period of observation and would afford opportunity for therapy studies to judge benefit against baseline and against the fellow eye. PMID:20569020

  16. Clinical presentations of X-linked retinoschisis in Taiwanese patients confirmed with genetic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Laura; Chen, Ho-Min; Tsai, Shawn; Chang, Tsong-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Hsun; Yang, Chung-May; Chao, An-Ning; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Yeung, Ling; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and identify genetic mutations in Taiwanese patients with XLRS. Methods This study included 23 affected males from 16 families with XLRS. Fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were sequenced. Results The median age at diagnosis was 18 years (range 4–58 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/25. The typical spoke-wheel pattern in the macula was present in 61% of the patients (14/23) while peripheral retinoschisis was present in 43% of the patients (10/23). Four eyes presented with vitreous hemorrhage, and two eyes presented with leukocoria that mimics Coats’ disease. Macular schisis was identified with SD-OCT in 82% of the eyes (31/38) while foveal atrophy was present in 18% of the eyes (7/38). Concentric area of high intensity was the most common FAF abnormality observed. Seven out of 12 patients (58%) showed electronegative ERG findings. Sequencing of the RS1 gene identified nine mutations, six of which were novel. The mutations are all located in exons 4–6, including six missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, and one deletion-caused frameshift mutation. Conclusions XLRS is a clinically heterogeneous disease with profound phenotypic inter- and intrafamiliar variability. Genetic sequencing is valuable as it allows a definite diagnosis of XLRS to be made without the classical clinical features and ERG findings. This study showed the variety of clinical features of XLRS and reported novel mutations. PMID:25999676

  17. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  18. Characterization of novel RS1 exonic deletions in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Leera; Cukras, Catherine; Antolik, Christian; Craig, Candice; Lee, Ji-Yun; He, Hong; Li, Shibo; Smaoui, Nizar; Hejtmancik, James F; Sieving, Paul A; Wang, Xinjing

    2013-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a vitreoretinal dystrophy characterized by schisis (splitting) of the inner layers of the neuroretina. Mutations within the retinoschisis (RS1) gene are responsible for this disease. The mutation spectrum consists of amino acid substitutions, splice site variations, small indels, and larger genomic deletions. Clinically, genomic deletions are rarely reported. Here, we characterize two novel full exonic deletions: one encompassing exon 1 and the other spanning exons 4-5 of the RS1 gene. We also report the clinical findings in these patients with XLRS with two different exonic deletions. Unrelated XLRS men and boys and their mothers (if available) were enrolled for molecular genetics evaluation. The patients also underwent ophthalmologic examination and in some cases electroretinogram (ERG) recording. All the exons and the flanking intronic regions of the RS1 gene were analyzed with direct sequencing. Two patients with exonic deletions were further evaluated with array comparative genomic hybridization to define the scope of the genomic aberrations. After the deleted genomic region was identified, primer walking followed by direct sequencing was used to determine the exact breakpoints. Two novel exonic deletions of the RS1 gene were identified: one including exon 1 and the other spanning exons 4 and 5. The exon 1 deletion extends from the 5' region of the RS1 gene (including the promoter) through intron 1 (c.(-35)-1723_c.51+2664del4472). The exon 4-5 deletion spans introns 3 to intron 5 (c.185-1020_c.522+1844del5764). Here we report two novel exonic deletions within the RS1 gene locus. We have also described the clinical presentations and hypothesized the genomic mechanisms underlying these schisis phenotypes.

  19. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis: clinical diagnosis, genetic analysis, and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Molday, Robert S; Kellner, Ulrich; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2012-05-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS, MIM 312700) is a common early onset macular degeneration in males characterized by mild to severe loss in visual acuity, splitting of retinal layers, and a reduction in the b-wave of the electroretinogram (ERG). The RS1 gene (MIM 300839) associated with the disease encodes retinoschisin, a 224 amino acid protein containing a discoidin domain as the major structural unit, an N-terminal cleavable signal sequence, and regions responsible for subunit oligomerization. Retinoschisin is secreted from retinal cells as a disulphide-linked homo-octameric complex which binds to the surface of photoreceptors and bipolar cells to help maintain the integrity of the retina. Over 190 disease-causing mutations in the RS1 gene are known with most mutations occurring as non-synonymous changes in the discoidin domain. Cell expression studies have shown that disease-associated missense mutations in the discoidin domain cause severe protein misfolding and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum, mutations in the signal sequence result in aberrant protein synthesis, and mutations in regions flanking the discoidin domain cause defective disulphide-linked subunit assembly, all of which produce a non-functional protein. Knockout mice deficient in retinoschisin have been generated and shown to display most of the characteristic features found in XLRS patients. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) mediated delivery of the normal RS1 gene to the retina of young knockout mice result in long-term retinoschisin expression and rescue of retinal structure and function providing a 'proof of concept' that gene therapy may be an effective treatment for XLRS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular modeling of retinoschisin with functional analysis of pathogenic mutations from human X-linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Y.V.; Caruso, R.C.; Meltzer, M.R.; Smaoui, N.; MacDonald, I.M.; Sieving, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Gene mutations that encode retinoschisin (RS1) cause X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), a form of juvenile macular and retinal degeneration that affects males. RS1 is an adhesive protein which is proposed to preserve the structural and functional integrity of the retina, but there is very little evidence of the mechanism by which protein changes are related to XLRS disease. Here, we report molecular modeling of the RS1 protein and consider perturbations caused by mutations found in human XLRS subjects. In 60 XLRS patients who share 27 missense mutations, we then evaluated possible correlations of the molecular modeling with retinal function as determined by the electroretinogram (ERG) a- and b-waves. The b/a-wave ratio reflects visual-signal transfer in retina. We sorted the ERG b/a-ratios by patient age and by the mutation impact on protein structure. The majority of RS1 mutations caused minimal structure perturbation and targeted the protein surface. These patients' b/a-ratios were similar across younger and older subjects. Maximum structural perturbations from either the removal or insertion of cysteine residues or changes in the hydrophobic core were associated with greater difference in the b/a-ratio with age, with a significantly smaller ratio at younger ages, analogous to the ERG changes with age observed in mice with no RS1-protein expression due to a recombinant RS1-knockout gene. The molecular modeling suggests an association between the predicted structural alteration and/or damage to retinoschisin and the severity of XLRS as measured by the ERG analogous to the RS1-knockout mouse. PMID:20061330

  1. Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Their Life Situation. Report and Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane

    Children with osteogenesis imperfecta form a small and relatively unknown group, with 5 to 10 children diagnosed in Sweden each year and a total of around 200 people under the age of 17 having the condition. A questionnaire was completed by families of 24 Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta, and three families were interviewed. The…

  2. Intravenous pamidronate treatment of infants with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Aström, Eva; Jorulf, Håkan; Söderhäll, Stefan

    2007-04-01

    Children with the severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta have in several studies been treated with intravenous pamidronate, but there are only few reports of the effect of early treatment. To evaluate the effect of treatment started in infancy. In a prospective observational study, with a historic control group, intravenous disodium pamidronate (APD) was given as monthly infusions to 11 children with osteogenesis imperfecta aged 3-13 (median 3.6) months, who had severe osteogenesis imperfecta with congenital bowing of the femora and vertebral compression fractures. During treatment of children aged between 3 and 6 (median 4.5) years, dual-energy x ray absorptiometry measurements of the lumbar spine showed a gradual increase in bone density. Bone metabolism parameters in serum (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, procollagen 1 carboxy-terminal peptide, collagen 1 teleopeptide) and in urine (deoxypyridinoline) indicated a decrease in bone turnover. An improvement of mobility was seen and at the latest recording, at the age of 3.3-6.5 (median 4.8) years, the children could all walk. Vertebral remodelling was seen, with increased vertebral height, and no child developed scoliosis, kyphosis or basilar impression. All children required femoral intramedullar rods for fractures, and five needed tibial rodding for extreme curvatures that prevented functional standing and walking. No adverse effects were seen on growth, fracture healing or blood chemistry. APD is an efficient symptomatic treatment for infants with severe osteogenesis imperfecta, but additional orthopaedic surgery is often needed. Early treatment may prevent scoliosis and basilar impression. Long-term follow-up is important.

  3. Anesthetic Management in a Gravida with Type IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Vue, Elizabeth; Davila, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of the connective tissues caused by abnormalities in collagen formation. OI may present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. A literature review reveals a wide range of implications, from basic positioning to management of the difficult airway. We present the anesthetic management of a 25-year-old gravid woman with OI, fetal demise, and possible uterine rupture, admitted for an exploratory laparotomy. PMID:27433164

  4. Pamidronate treatment for osteogenesis imperfecta in black South Africans.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B D; Isaac, N; Mabele, O; Khiba, S; Nkayi, A; Mokoena, T

    2016-05-25

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable disorder of bone connective tissue. Type III has a high incidence in the black pop-ulation of South Africa. Affected people experience numerous fractures, bone pain and progressive disability. Until the introduction of bisphosphonates to reduce fracture incidence, treatment revolved around orthopaedic and supportive care. Objective. To assess the subjective attitude of patients towards pamidronate treatment. Thirty black patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type III treated at Universitas Hospital were approached and 26 were included in this study. Patients or their parents were interviewed using a standardised researcher-administered questionnaire, either in person or by telephone. Most patients reported a reduction in symptoms, a feeling of increased wellbeing, increased strength and rated the pamidronate treatment highly. The intravenous route of administration and the side-effects experienced were bearable. Overall all patients would recommend this treatment to other affected persons. This is first study to look at bisphosphonate treatment for osteogenesis imperfecta type III in black South Africans. The treatment is well tolerated and highly rated by the patients. Reported improvements and side-effects are similar to those reported in other populations. Using this form of treatment in this population is supported by these findings.

  5. Osteogenesis imperfecta: from diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bregou Bourgeois, Aline; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Bonafé, Luisa; Laurent-Applegate, Lee; Pioletti, Dominique P; Zambelli, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is an inherited connective tissue disorder with wide phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity. A common issue associated with the molecular abnormality is a disturbance in bone matrix synthesis and homeostasis inducing bone fragility. In very early life, this can lead to multiple fractures and progressive bone deformities, including long bone bowing and scoliosis. Multidisciplinary management improves quality of life for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. It consists of physical therapy, medical treatment and orthopaedic surgery as necessary. Medical treatment consists of bone-remodelling drug therapy. Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of moderate to severe osteogenesis imperfecta, from infancy to adulthood. Other more recent drug therapies include teriparatide and denosumab. All these therapies target the symptoms and have effects on the mechanical properties of bone due to modification of bone remodelling, therefore influencing skeletal outcome and orthopaedic surgery. Innovative therapies, such as progenitor and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, targeting the specific altered pathway rather than the symptoms, are in the process of development.

  6. Linkage analysis and physical mapping near the gene for x-linked agammaglobulinemia at Xq22

    SciTech Connect

    Parolini, O.; Lassiter, G.L.; Henry, M.J.

    The gene for x-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has been mapped to Xq22. No recombinations have been reported between the gene and the prob p212 at DXS178; however, this probe is informative in only 30-40% of women and the reported flanking markers, DXS3 and DXS94, and 10-15 cM apart. To identify additional probes that might be useful in genetic counseling, we examined 11 polymorphisms that have been mapped to the Xq21.3-q22 region in 13 families with XLA. In addition, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to further characterize the segman of DNA within which the gene for SLAmore » must lie. The results demonstrated that DXS366 and DXS442, which share a 430-kb pulsed-field fragment, could replace DXS3 as proximal flanking markers. Probes at DXS178 and DXS265 identified the same 145-kb pulsed-field fragment, and both loci were contained within a 200-kb YAC identified with the probe p212. A highly polymorphic CA repeat (DCS178CA) was isolated from one end of this YAC and used in linkage analysis. Probes at DXS101 and DXS328 shared several pulsed-field fragments, the smallest of which was 250 kb. No recombinations were seen between XLA and the DXS178-DXS265-DXS178CA complex, DXS101, DXS328, DXS87, or the gene for proteolipid protein (PLP). Key crossovers, when combined with the linkage data from families with Alport syndrome, suggested the following order of loci: cen-DXS3-DXS366-DXS442-(PLP, DXS101, DXS328, DXS178-DXS265-DXS178CA complex, XL)-(DXS87, DXS94)-DXS327-(DXS350, DXS362)-tel. Our studies also limit the segment of DNA within which the XLA gene must lie to the 3- to 4-cM distance between DCS442 and DXS94 and they identify and orient polymorphisms that can be used in genetic counseling not only for XLA but also for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP deficiency), Alport syndrome (COL4A5 deficiency), and Fabry disease ([alpha]-galactosidase A difficiency). 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  7. Molecular genetics of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa: Progress towards cloning the RP3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Yan, D.; McHenry, C.

    1994-09-01

    Our goal is to identify the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) gene RP3. The location of RP3 is genetically delimited to a region of 1 Mb, distal to DXS140, CYBB and tctex-1-like gene and proximal to the gene OTC. It is currently thought that RP3 is within 40 kb of the proximal deletion breakpoint of a patient BB. However, a more proximal location of the gene, closer to OTC, is not ruled out. We initiated the isolation of the genomic region between DXS140 to OTC in YACs. One of the clones from DXS140 region (55B) is 460 kb and spans aboutmore » 200 kb at each side of BB patient`s proximal breakpoint. It contains CYBB, tctex-1-like genes and two additional CpG islands. The 55B clone has been covered by cosmid and phage subclones. Another YAC clone from the OTC region (OTCC) spans about 1 Mb and contains at least 5 CpG islands. In situ hybridization performed with OTCC showed its location in Xp21; however, several derivative cosmids map to chromosome 7, indicating that it is a chimeric YAC. No overlap is evident between 55B and OTCC. We have isolated the YAC end-sequences and isolation of clones to close the gap is in progress. Cosmids are being used for screening eye tissue cDNA libraries, mainly from retina. Screening is done by hybridization to replica filters or by cDNA enrichment methods. Several cDNA clones have been isolated and are being characterized. Exon-amplification is also being used with the cosmids and phages. Genetic analysis is being performed to determine RP3 patients from clinically indistinguishable RP2, located in Xp11.23-p11.4, and to reduce the genetic distance of current flanking markers. For this we are analyzing a number of XLRP families with established markers in the region and with new microsatellites.« less

  8. AB067. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: Phenotype and genotype in Vietnamese patients

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Nguyen, Ha Thu; Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Bui, Thao Phuong; Nobuyuki, Shimozawa; Vu, Huynh Anh; Do, Mai Thi Thanh; Vu, Dung Chi

    2017-01-01

    Background X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by a defect in the gene ABCD1, which maps to Xq28 and codes for a peroxisomal membrane protein that is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This disease characterized by progressive neurologic dysfunction, occasionally associated with adrenal insufficiency. Objective is to identify phenotype and genotype in Vietnamese patients with X-ALD. Methods Genomic DNA from 20 Vietnamese patients from 18 unrelated families was extracted using standard procedures from the peripheral blood leukocytes. Mutation analysis of ABCD1 was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA direct sequencing. Results We identified 17 different mutations of ABCD1 in 20 patients including missense mutations (2/17), deletion (4/17), frameshift mutation (1/17) and splice site mutation (1/17). Of which, six novel mutations including c.1202G>T (p.Arg401Trp); c.1208T>A (p.Met403Lys); IVS8+28-551bp del; c.1668G>C (p.Q556H); c.292_296delTCGGC (p.S98RfsX95); and the extent of deletion included between IVS1+505 and IVS2+1501, containing whole the exon 2 (4243bp), plus insertion of 79bp from BAP31 and 8bp from unknown origin in this deleted region were identified in six unrelated patients. Eleven reported mutations including c.796G>A (p.Gly266Arg); c.1628C>T (p.Pro543Leu); c.1553G>A (p.Arg518Gln); c.1552 C>T (p.Arg518Trp); c.854G>C (p.R285P); c.1825G>A (p.E609K); c.1415_1416delAG (p.Q472RfsX83) and c.46-53del insG, c.1553G>A (p.Arg518Gln), c.1946-1947insA (p.Asp649fsX733), c.1978C>T (p.Arg660Trp) were identified in 14 patients from 12 families. Most of patients (17/20) presented cerebral ALD type with/without adrenal insufficiency and only 3 patients presented Addison type. Conclusions Mutation analysis of ABCD1 gene helped confirmation of diagnosis of X-ALD, genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis but could not be used to predict the specific phenotype of X-ALD.

  9. Randomized trial of the anti-FGF23 antibody KRN23 in X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Thomas O.; Imel, Erik A.; Ruppe, Mary D.; Weber, Thomas J.; Klausner, Mark A.; Wooddell, Margaret M.; Kawakami, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Takahiro; Zhang, Xiaoping; Humphrey, Jeffrey; Insogna, Karl L.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Background. X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is the most common heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia. XLH-associated mutations in phosphate-regulating endopeptidase (PHEX) result in elevated serum FGF23, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, and low serum concentrations of phosphate (inorganic phosphorus, Pi) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. KRN23 is a human anti-FGF23 antibody developed as a potential treatment for XLH. Here, we have assessed the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and immunogenicity of KRN23 following a single i.v. or s.c. dose of KRN23 in adults with XLH. Methods. Thirty-eight XLH patients were randomized to receive a single dose of KRN23 (0.003–0.3 mg/kg i.v. or 0.1–1 mg/kg s.c.) or placebo. PK, PD, immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability were assessed for up to 50 days. Results. KRN23 significantly increased the maximum renal tubular threshold for phosphate reabsorption (TmP/GFR), serum Pi, and 1,25(OH)2D compared with that of placebo (P < 0.01). The maximum serum Pi concentration occurred later following s.c. dosing (8–15 days) compared with that seen with i.v. dosing (0.5–4 days). The effect duration was dose related and persisted longer in patients who received s.c. administration. Changes from baseline in TmP/GFR, serum Pi, and serum 1,25(OH)2D correlated with serum KRN23 concentrations. The mean t1/2 of KRN23 was 8–12 days after i.v. administration and 13–19 days after s.c. administration. Patients did not exhibit increased nephrocalcinosis or develop hypercalciuria, hypercalcemia, anti-KRN23 antibodies, or elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) or creatinine. Conclusion. KRN23 increased TmP/GFR, serum Pi, and serum 1,25(OH)2D. The positive effect of KR23 on serum Pi and its favorable safety profile suggest utility for KRN23 in XLH patients. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00830674. Funding. Kyowa Hakko Kirin Pharma, Inc. PMID:24569459

  10. Phenotypic Characteristics of a French Cohort of Patients with X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Orès, Raphaëlle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Antonio, Aline; Zeitz, Christina; Augstburger, Edouard; Andrieu, Camille; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle

    2018-05-05

    To analyze the retinal structure in patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) using spectral-domain OCT and to correlate the morphologic findings with visual acuity, electroretinographic results, and patient age. Retrospective, observational study. Data from 52 consecutive male patients with molecularly confirmed XLRS were collected retrospectively. Complete clinical evaluation included best-corrected visual acuity, full-field electroretinography, fundus photography, spectral-domain OCT, and fundus autofluorescence. Spectral-domain OCT images were analyzed to determine full thickness of the retina and tomographic structural changes. Relationships between age, OCT, and visual acuity were assessed. One hundred four eyes of 52 patients were included. The mean age at inclusion was 24±15 years (range, 3-57 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (mean, 0.6±0.38 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution). Macular schisis was found in 88% of eyes and macular atrophy was found in 11% of eyes, whereas peripheral schisis was present in 30% of eyes. A spoke-wheel pattern of high and low intensity was the most frequently observed fundus autofluorescence abnormality (51/94 eyes [54%]). The b-to-a amplitude ratio on bright-flash dark-adapted electroretinography was reduced significantly in 45 of 64 eyes (70%). Spectral-domain OCT was available for 97 eyes and showed foveoschisis in 76 of 97 eyes (78%), parafoveal schisis in 10 of 97 eyes (10%), and foveal atrophy in 11 of 97 eyes (11%). Mean central macular thickness (CMT) was of 373.6±140 μm. Cystoid changes were localized mainly in the inner nuclear layer (85/97 eyes [88%]). Qualitative defects in photoreceptor structures were found in most eyes (79/97 eyes [81%]), and the most frequent abnormality was an interruption of the photoreceptor cell outer segment tips (79/79 eyes [100%]). Older age correlated well with lower CMT

  11. Four novel RS1 gene mutations in Polish patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Skorczyk, Anna; Krawczyński, Maciej R

    2012-01-01

    To determine the clinical features and to identify mutations in the retinoschisis gene (RS1) in ten patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). Ten male patients from nine Polish families were included in this study. Ophthalmologic examinations, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and full-field electroretinography (ERG), were performed in all affected boys. The entire coding region encompassing six exons of the RS1 gene was amplified with PCR and directly sequenced in all the patients. All affected individuals showed typical retinoschisis signs and symptoms, and all appeared to have a mutation in the RS1 gene. Seven different mutations were identified, including two novel missense substitutions: c.176G>C (p.Cys59Ser), c.451T>A (p.Tyr151Asp); one novel nonsense substitution: c.218C>A (p.Ser73*); and one novel frameshift mutation: c.354_355delCA (p.Asp118Glufs*2). We also found two missense substitutions that had been previously described: c.214G>A (p.Glu72Lys) and c.626G>T (p.Arg209Leu) and one known splice site mutation in intron 5: c.522+1G>T (IVS5+1G>T). This study provides the first molecular genetic characteristics of patients with juvenile retinoschisis from the previously unexplored Polish population. We investigated the molecular background of XLRS in ten boys. The present study reports for the first time four novel mutations, including two missense substitutions, one nonsense substitution, and one frameshift deletion. One of these substitutions and 2-bp deletion created stop codons. Moreover, we described three substitutions that had been previously reported (one is a splicing mutation). Further genetic characterization of Polish patients with XLRS will be helpful in understanding the worldwide spectrum of RS1 mutations. Despite the mutation heterogeneity found in a small group of our patients, they presented a relatively uniform clinical picture. Identifying the causative mutation is helpful in confirming diagnosis and counseling, but cannot

  12. Four novel RS1 gene mutations in Polish patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Skorczyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical features and to identify mutations in the retinoschisis gene (RS1) in ten patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). Methods Ten male patients from nine Polish families were included in this study. Ophthalmologic examinations, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and full-field electroretinography (ERG), were performed in all affected boys. The entire coding region encompassing six exons of the RS1 gene was amplified with PCR and directly sequenced in all the patients. Results All affected individuals showed typical retinoschisis signs and symptoms, and all appeared to have a mutation in the RS1 gene. Seven different mutations were identified, including two novel missense substitutions: c.176G>C (p.Cys59Ser), c.451T>A (p.Tyr151Asp); one novel nonsense substitution: c.218C>A (p.Ser73*); and one novel frameshift mutation: c.354_355delCA (p.Asp118Glufs*2). We also found two missense substitutions that had been previously described: c.214G>A (p.Glu72Lys) and c.626G>T (p.Arg209Leu) and one known splice site mutation in intron 5: c.522+1G>T (IVS5+1G>T). Conclusions This study provides the first molecular genetic characteristics of patients with juvenile retinoschisis from the previously unexplored Polish population. We investigated the molecular background of XLRS in ten boys. The present study reports for the first time four novel mutations, including two missense substitutions, one nonsense substitution, and one frameshift deletion. One of these substitutions and 2-bp deletion created stop codons. Moreover, we described three substitutions that had been previously reported (one is a splicing mutation). Further genetic characterization of Polish patients with XLRS will be helpful in understanding the worldwide spectrum of RS1 mutations. Despite the mutation heterogeneity found in a small group of our patients, they presented a relatively uniform clinical picture. Identifying the causative mutation is helpful in confirming

  13. A Mutation in the Rett Syndrome Gene, MECP2, Causes X-Linked Mental Retardation and Progressive Spasticity in Males

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Ilaria; Bruttini, Mirella; Longo, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Rizzolio, Flavio; D’Adamo, Patrizia; Denvriendt, Koenraad; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Toniolo, Daniela; Renieri, Alessandra

    2000-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder of young females. Only one male presenting an MECP2 mutation has been reported; he survived only to age 1 year, suggesting that mutations in MECP2 are male lethal. Here we report a three-generation family in which two affected males showed severe mental retardation and progressive spasticity, previously mapped in Xq27.2-qter. Two obligate carrier females showed either normal or borderline intelligence, simulating an X-linked recessive trait. The two males and the two obligate carrier females presented a mutation in the MECP2 gene, demonstrating that, in males, MECP2 can be responsible for severe mental retardation associated with neurological disorders. PMID:10986043

  14. Deletion of the X-linked opsin gene array locus control region (LCR) results in disruption of the cone mosaic.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Joseph; Rossi, Ethan A; Porter, Jason; Neitz, Jay; Roorda, Austin; Williams, David R; Neitz, Maureen

    2010-09-15

    Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition in which long- (L) and middle- (M) wavelength-sensitive cone function is absent. Due to the X-linked nature of the condition, female carriers are spared from a full manifestation of the associated defects but can show visual symptoms, including abnormal cone electroretinograms. Here we imaged the cone mosaic in four females carrying an L/M array with deletion of the locus control region, resulting in an absence of L/M opsin gene expression (effectively acting as a cone opsin knockout). On average, they had cone mosaics with reduced density and disrupted organization compared to normal trichromats. This suggests that the absence of opsin in a subset of cones results in their early degeneration, with X-inactivation the likely mechanism underlying phenotypic variability in BCM carriers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S.; Moncla, A.

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the firstmore » examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  16. An Ethyl-Nitrosourea-Induced Point Mutation in Phex Causes Exon Skipping, X-Linked Hypophosphatemia, and Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Carpinelli, Marina R.; Wicks, Ian P.; Sims, Natalie A.; O’Donnell, Kristy; Hanzinikolas, Katherine; Burt, Rachel; Foote, Simon J.; Bahlo, Melanie; Alexander, Warren S.; Hilton, Douglas J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the clinical, genetic, biochemical, and molecular characterization of a mouse that arose in the first generation (G1) of a random mutagenesis screen with the chemical mutagen ethyl-nitrosourea. The mouse was observed to have skeletal abnormalities inherited with an X-linked dominant pattern of inheritance. The causative mutation, named Skeletal abnormality 1 (Ska1), was shown to be a single base pair mutation in a splice donor site immediately following exon 8 of the Phex (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases located on the X-chromosome) gene. This point mutation caused skipping of exon 8 from Phex mRNA, hypophosphatemia, and features of rickets. This experimentally induced phenotype mirrors the human condition X-linked hypophosphatemia; directly confirms the role of Phex in phosphate homeostasis, normal skeletal development, and rickets; and illustrates the power of mutagenesis in exploring animal models of human disease. PMID:12414538

  17. An ethyl-nitrosourea-induced point mutation in phex causes exon skipping, x-linked hypophosphatemia, and rickets.

    PubMed

    Carpinelli, Marina R; Wicks, Ian P; Sims, Natalie A; O'Donnell, Kristy; Hanzinikolas, Katherine; Burt, Rachel; Foote, Simon J; Bahlo, Melanie; Alexander, Warren S; Hilton, Douglas J

    2002-11-01

    We describe the clinical, genetic, biochemical, and molecular characterization of a mouse that arose in the first generation (G(1)) of a random mutagenesis screen with the chemical mutagen ethyl-nitrosourea. The mouse was observed to have skeletal abnormalities inherited with an X-linked dominant pattern of inheritance. The causative mutation, named Skeletal abnormality 1 (Ska1), was shown to be a single base pair mutation in a splice donor site immediately following exon 8 of the Phex (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases located on the X-chromosome) gene. This point mutation caused skipping of exon 8 from Phex mRNA, hypophosphatemia, and features of rickets. This experimentally induced phenotype mirrors the human condition X-linked hypophosphatemia; directly confirms the role of Phex in phosphate homeostasis, normal skeletal development, and rickets; and illustrates the power of mutagenesis in exploring animal models of human disease.

  18. Germline CYBB mutations that selectively affect macrophages in kindreds with X-linked predisposition to tuberculous mycobacterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Arias, Andres A; Vogt, Guillaume; Picard, Capucine; Galicia, Lizbeth Blancas; Prando, Carolina; Grant, Audrey V; Marchal, Christophe C; Hubeau, Marjorie; Chapgier, Ariane; de Beaucoudrey, Ludovic; Puel, Anne; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Valinetz, Ethan; Jannière, Lucile; Besse, Céline; Boland, Anne; Brisseau, Jean-Marie; Blanche, Stéphane; Lortholary, Olivier; Fieschi, Claire; Emile, Jean-François; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Woda, Bruce; Newburger, Peter E; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Dinauer, Mary C; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in CYBB, the human gene encoding the gp91phox subunit of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, impair the respiratory burst of all types of phagocytes and result in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). We report here two kindreds in which otherwise healthy male adults developed X-linked recessive Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) syndromes. These patients had previously unknown mutations in CYBB that resulted in an impaired respiratory burst in monocyte-derived macrophages but not in monocytes or granulocytes. The macrophage-specific functional consequences of the germline mutation resulted from cell-specific impairment in the assembly of the NADPH oxidase. This ‘experiment of nature’ indicates that CYBB is associated with MSMD and demonstrates that the respiratory burst in human macrophages is a crucial mechanism for protective immunity to tuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:21278736

  19. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis for treatment of cleft lip and palate in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Katsuki, Yuko; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital immune deficiency disorder caused by abnormal antibody production. It is a rare disease with an estimated frequency of 1 in 379,000 that has X-linked recessive heredity and develops only in males. The clinical problems include bacterial infection such as otitis media, sinusitis, and bronchitis. In recent years it has become possible to diagnose XLA in the early stage and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy has permitted survival to adulthood. However, there have been no reports of oral surgery in patients with XLA. Here, we describe a case in which immunoglobulin replacement therapy given pre- and postoperatively was used to control infection in oral surgery and maxillary distraction osteogenesis performed for improving occlusion and appearance of a cleft lip and palate in a patient with XLA. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Autosomal Genes of Autosomal/X-Linked Duplicated Gene Pairs and Germ-Line Proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Maciejowski, John; Ahn, James Hyungsoo; Cipriani, Patricia Giselle; Killian, Darrell J.; Chaudhary, Aisha L.; Lee, Ji Inn; Voutev, Roumen; Johnsen, Robert C.; Baillie, David L.; Gunsalus, Kristin C.; Fitch, David H. A.; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert

    2005-01-01

    We report molecular genetic studies of three genes involved in early germ-line proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans that lend unexpected insight into a germ-line/soma functional separation of autosomal/X-linked duplicated gene pairs. In a genetic screen for germ-line proliferation-defective mutants, we identified mutations in rpl-11.1 (L11 protein of the large ribosomal subunit), pab-1 [a poly(A)-binding protein], and glp-3/eft-3 (an elongation factor 1-α homolog). All three are members of autosome/X gene pairs. Consistent with a germ-line-restricted function of rpl-11.1 and pab-1, mutations in these genes extend life span and cause gigantism. We further examined the RNAi phenotypes of the three sets of rpl genes (rpl-11, rpl-24, and rpl-25) and found that for the two rpl genes with autosomal/X-linked pairs (rpl-11 and rpl-25), zygotic germ-line function is carried by the autosomal copy. Available RNAi results for highly conserved autosomal/X-linked gene pairs suggest that other duplicated genes may follow a similar trend. The three rpl and the pab-1/2 duplications predate the divergence between C. elegans and C. briggsae, while the eft-3/4 duplication appears to have occurred in the lineage to C. elegans after it diverged from C. briggsae. The duplicated C. briggsae orthologs of the three C. elegans autosomal/X-linked gene pairs also display functional differences between paralogs. We present hypotheses for evolutionary mechanisms that may underlie germ-line/soma subfunctionalization of duplicated genes, taking into account the role of X chromosome silencing in the germ line and analogous mammalian phenomena. PMID:15687263

  1. Refractory Chronic Pleurisy Caused by Helicobacter equorum-Like Bacterium in a Patient with X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Michinori; Kaneko, Hideo; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasai, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kato, Zenichiro; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    We describe a 35-year-old man with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who had refractory chronic pleurisy caused by a Helicobacter equorum-like bacterium. Broad-range bacterial PCR targeting the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and in situ hybridization targeting the 16S rRNA gene of H. equorum confirmed the presence of this pathogen in a human for the first time. PMID:21677071

  2. CUL4B ubiquitin ligase in mouse development: a model for human X-linked mental retardation syndrome?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2012-08-01

    CUL4B, a member of the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase family, is frequently mutated in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) patients. The study by Liu et al. showed that Cul4b plays an essential developmental role in the extra-embryonic tissues, while it is dispensable in the embryo proper during mouse embryogenesis. Viable Cul4b-null mice provide the first animal model to study neuronal and behavioral deficiencies seen in human CUL4B XLMR patients.

  3. Identification of a mutation in the MTM1 gene, associated with X-linked myotubular myopathy, in a Greek family.

    PubMed

    Fidani, L; Karagianni, P; Tsakalidis, C; Mitsiako, G; Hatziioannidis, I; Biancalana, V; Nikolaidis, N

    2011-07-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a rare congenital myopathy, usually characterized by severe hypotonia and respiratory insufficiency at birth, in affected, male infants. The disease is causally associated with mutations in the MTM1 gene, coding for phosphatase myotubularin. We report a severe case of XLMTM with a novel mutation, at a donor splicing site (c.1467+1G) previously associated with severe phenotype. The mutation was also identified in the patient's mother, providing an opportunity for sound genetic counseling.

  4. A novel AVPR2 splice site mutation leads to partial X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in two brothers.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Adams, David; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Raygada, Margarita; Golas, Gretchen; Faucz, Fabio R; Nilsson, Ola; Nella, Aikaterini A; Dileepan, Kavitha; Lodish, Maya; Lee, Paul; Tifft, Cynthia; Markello, Thomas; Gahl, William; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI, OMIM#304800) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP, OMIM*192340) receptor type 2 (AVPR2, OMIM*300538) gene. A 20-month-old boy and his 8-year-old brother presented with polyuria, polydipsia, and failure to thrive. Both boys demonstrated partial DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D AVP or desmopressin) responses; thus, NDI diagnosis was delayed. While routine sequencing of AVPR2 showed a potential splice site variant, it was not until exome sequencing confirmed the AVPR2 splice site variant and did not reveal any more likely candidates that the patients' diagnosis was made and proper treatment was instituted. Both patients were hemizygous for two AVPR2 variants predicted in silico to affect AVPR2 messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. A minigene assay revealed that the novel AVPR2 c.276A>G mutation creates a novel splice acceptor site leading to 5' truncation of AVPR2 exon 2 in HEK293 human kidney cells. Both patients have been treated with high-dose DDAVP with a remarkable improvement of their symptoms and accelerated linear growth and weight gain. We present here a unique case of partial X-linked NDI due to an AVPR2 splice site mutation; patients with diabetes insipidus of unknown etiology may harbor splice site mutations that are initially underestimated in their pathogenicity on sequence analysis. • X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by AVPR2 mutations, and disease severity can vary depending on the functional effect of the mutation. What is New: • We demonstrate here that a splice site mutation in AVPR2 leads to partial X-linked NDI in two brothers. • Treatment with high-dose DDAVP led to improvement of polyuria and polydipsia, weight gain, and growth.

  5. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Marijke; Frints, Suzanna G; Van Esch, Hilde; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Baldewijns, Marcella M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2014-08-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from 138.7 to 139.8 Mb, harboring only two annotated genes, SOX3 and ATP11C, and was shown to be a direct tandem copy number gain. Unexpectedly, the microduplication did not fully segregate with the disease in this family suggesting that SOX3 duplications have variable penetrance for X-linked hypopituitarism. In the same family, a female fetus presenting with a neural tube defect was also shown to carry the SOX3 copy number gain. Since we also demonstrated increased SOX3 mRNA levels in amnion cells derived from an unrelated t(X;22)(q27;q11) female fetus with spina bifida, we propose that increased levels of SOX3 could be a risk factor for neural tube defects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Complex Genetic Basis to X-Linked Hybrid Male Sterility Between Two Species of House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Good, Jeffrey M.; Dean, Matthew D.; Nachman, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The X chromosome plays a central role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, but few studies have examined the genetic basis of X-linked incompatibilities during the early stages of speciation. We report the results of a large experiment focused on the reciprocal introgression of the X chromosome between two species of house mice, Mus musculus and M. domesticus. Introgression of the M. musculus X chromosome into a wild-derived M. domesticus genetic background produced male-limited sterility, qualitatively consistent with previous experiments using classic inbred strains to represent M. domesticus. The genetic basis of sterility involved a minimum of four X-linked factors. The phenotypic effects of major sterility QTL were largely additive and resulted in complete sterility when combined. No sterility factors were uncovered on the M. domesticus X chromosome. Overall, these results revealed a complex and asymmetric genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility during the early stages of speciation in mice. Combined with data from previous studies, we identify one relatively narrow interval on the M. musculus X chromosome involved in hybrid male sterility. Only a handful of spermatogenic genes are within this region, including one of the most rapidly evolving genes on the mouse X chromosome. PMID:18689897

  7. A complex genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility between two species of house mice.

    PubMed

    Good, Jeffrey M; Dean, Matthew D; Nachman, Michael W

    2008-08-01

    The X chromosome plays a central role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, but few studies have examined the genetic basis of X-linked incompatibilities during the early stages of speciation. We report the results of a large experiment focused on the reciprocal introgression of the X chromosome between two species of house mice, Mus musculus and M. domesticus. Introgression of the M. musculus X chromosome into a wild-derived M. domesticus genetic background produced male-limited sterility, qualitatively consistent with previous experiments using classic inbred strains to represent M. domesticus. The genetic basis of sterility involved a minimum of four X-linked factors. The phenotypic effects of major sterility QTL were largely additive and resulted in complete sterility when combined. No sterility factors were uncovered on the M. domesticus X chromosome. Overall, these results revealed a complex and asymmetric genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility during the early stages of speciation in mice. Combined with data from previous studies, we identify one relatively narrow interval on the M. musculus X chromosome involved in hybrid male sterility. Only a handful of spermatogenic genes are within this region, including one of the most rapidly evolving genes on the mouse X chromosome.

  8. siRNAs from an X-linked satellite repeat promote X-chromosome recognition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menon, Debashish U; Coarfa, Cristian; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-11-18

    Highly differentiated sex chromosomes create a lethal imbalance in gene expression in one sex. To accommodate hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies, expression of X-linked genes increases twofold. This is achieved by the male- specific lethal (MSL) complex, which modifies chromatin to increase expression. Mutations that disrupt the X localization of this complex decrease the expression of X-linked genes and reduce male survival. The mechanism that restricts the MSL complex to X chromatin is not understood. We recently reported that the siRNA pathway contributes to localization of the MSL complex, raising questions about the source of the siRNAs involved. The X-linked 1.688 g/cm(3) satellite related repeats (1.688(X) repeats) are restricted to the X chromosome and produce small RNA, making them an attractive candidate. We tested RNA from these repeats for a role in dosage compensation and found that ectopic expression of single-stranded RNAs from 1.688(X) repeats enhanced the male lethality of mutants with defective X recognition. In contrast, expression of double-stranded hairpin RNA from a 1.688(X) repeat generated abundant siRNA and dramatically increased male survival. Consistent with improved survival, X localization of the MSL complex was largely restored in these males. The striking distribution of 1.688(X) repeats, which are nearly exclusive to the X chromosome, suggests that these are cis-acting elements contributing to identification of X chromatin.

  9. Single-Exome sequencing identified a novel RP2 mutation in a child with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hassol; Park, Young-Mi; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Taek Lim, Hyun

    2016-10-01

    To present an efficient and successful application of a single-exome sequencing study in a family clinically diagnosed with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Exome sequencing study based on clinical examination data. An 8-year-old proband and his family. The proband and his family members underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examinations. Exome sequencing was undertaken in the proband using Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon Kit and Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Bioinformatic analysis used Illumina pipeline with Burrows-Wheeler Aligner-Genome Analysis Toolkit (BWA-GATK), followed by ANNOVAR to perform variant functional annotation. All variants passing filter criteria were validated by Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation. Analysis of exome sequence data identified a novel frameshift mutation in RP2 gene resulting in a premature stop codon (c.665delC, p.Pro222fsTer237). Sanger sequencing revealed this mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the child's family. We identified a novel causative mutation in RP2 from a single proband's exome sequence data analysis. This study highlights the effectiveness of the whole-exome sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, over the conventional sequencing methods. Even using a single exome, exome sequencing technology would be able to pinpoint pathogenic variant(s) for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, when properly applied with aid of adequate variant filtering strategy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation in the X-Linked EFHC2 Gene Is Associated with Social Cognitive Abilities in Males

    PubMed Central

    Startin, Carla M.; Fiorentini, Chiara; de Haan, Michelle; Skuse, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Females outperform males on many social cognitive tasks. X-linked genes may contribute to this sex difference. Males possess one X chromosome, while females possess two X chromosomes. Functional variations in X-linked genes are therefore likely to impact more on males than females. Previous studies of X-monosomic women with Turner syndrome suggest a genetic association with facial fear recognition abilities at Xp11.3, specifically at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7055196) within the EFHC2 gene. Based on a strong hypothesis, we investigated an association between variation at SNP rs7055196 and facial fear recognition and theory of mind abilities in males. As predicted, males possessing the G allele had significantly poorer facial fear detection accuracy and theory of mind abilities than males possessing the A allele (with SNP variant accounting for up to 4.6% of variance). Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene at SNP rs7055196 is therefore associated with social cognitive abilities in males. PMID:26107779

  11. Combination of a Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant With Umbilical Cord Blood for Cerebral X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Min-Yan; Liu, Sha; Cai, Yan-Na; Liang, Cui-Li; Liu, Li

    2015-08-01

    Childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects central nervous system myelin and the adrenal cortex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the best available curative therapy if performed during the early stages of disease. Only 30% of patients who might benefit from a hematopoietic stem cell transplant will have a full human leukocyte antigen-matched donor, which is considered to be the best choice. We present a 5-year-old boy with cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy whose brain magnetic resonance imaging severity score was 7 and who needed an immediate transplantation without an available full human leukocyte antigen-matched donor. We combined haploidentical and umbilical cord blood sources for transplantation and saw encouraging results. After transplantation, the patient showed neurological stability for 6 months and the level of very long chain fatty acids had decreased. By 1 year, the patient appeared to gradually develop cognition, motor, and visual disturbances resulting from possible mix chimerism. Transplantation of haploidentical stem cells combined with the infusion of umbilical cord blood is a novel approach for treating cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. It is critical to monitor posttransplant chimerism and carry out antirejection therapy timely for a beneficial clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An ex vivo gene therapy approach in X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Abu E; Metcalfe, Andrew L; Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A; Yanai, Anat; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is juvenile-onset macular degeneration caused by haploinsufficiency of the extracellular cell adhesion protein retinoschisin (RS1). RS1 mutations can lead to either a non-functional protein or the absence of protein secretion, and it has been established that extracellular deficiency of RS1 is the underlying cause of the phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesized that an ex vivo gene therapy strategy could be used to deliver sufficient extracellular RS1 to reverse the phenotype seen in XLRS. Here, we used adipose-derived, syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were genetically modified to secrete human RS1 and then delivered these cells by intravitreal injection to the retina of the Rs1h knockout mouse model of XLRS. MSCs were electroporated with two transgene expression systems (cytomegalovirus (CMV)-controlled constitutive and doxycycline-induced Tet-On controlled inducible), both driving expression of human RS1 cDNA. The stably transfected cells, using either constitutive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) or inducible MSC cassettes, were assayed for their RS1 secretion profile. For single injection studies, 100,000 genetically modified MSCs were injected into the vitreous cavity of the Rs1h knockout mouse eye at P21, and data were recorded at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-injection. The control groups received either unmodified MSCs or vehicle injection. For the multiple injection studies, the mice received intravitreal MSC injections at P21, P60, and P90 with data collection at P120. For the single- and multiple-injection studies, the outcomes were measured with electroretinography, optokinetic tracking responses (OKT), histology, and immunohistochemistry. Two lines of genetically modified MSCs were established and found to secrete RS1 at a rate of 8 ng/million cells/day. Following intravitreal injection, RS1-expressing MSCs were found mainly in the inner retinal layers. Two weeks after a single injection of MSCs, the area of the schisis

  13. Four-Year Placebo-Controlled Trial of Docosahexaenoic Acid in X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (DHAX Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Dennis R.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Pearson, N. Shirlene; Fish, Gary E.; Spencer, Rand; Takacs, Alison; Klein, Martin; Locke, Kirsten G.; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE X-linked retinitis pigmentosa is a severe inherited retinal degenerative disease with a frequency of 1 in 100 000 persons. Because no cure is available for this orphan disease and treatment options are limited, slowing of disease progression would be a meaningful outcome. OBJECTIVE To determine whether high-dose docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, slows progression of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa measured by cone electroretinography (ERG). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A 4-year, single-site, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked phase 2 clinical trial at a research center specializing in medical retina. Seventy-eight male patients diagnosed as having X-linked retinitis pigmentosa were randomized to DHA or placebo. Data were omitted for 2 patients with non–X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and 16 patients who were unable to follow protocol during the first year. The remaining participants were tested annually and composed a modified intent-to-treat cohort (DHA group, n = 33; placebo group, n = 27). INTERVENTIONS All participants received a multivitamin and were randomly assigned to oral DHA (30 mg/kg/d) or placebo. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the rate of loss of cone ERG function. Secondary outcomes were rod and maximal ERG amplitudes and cone ERG implicit times. Capsule counts and red blood cell DHA levels were assessed to monitor adherence. RESULTS Average (6-month to 4-year) red blood cell DHA levels were 4-fold higher in the DHA group than in the placebo group (P < .001). There was no difference between the DHA and placebo groups in the rate of cone ERG functional loss (0.028 vs 0.022 log µV/y, respectively; P = .30). No group differences were evident for change in rod ERG (P = .27), maximal ERG (P = .65), or cone implicit time (no change over 4 years). The rate of cone loss (ie, event rate) was markedly reduced compared with rates in previous studies. No severe treatment-emergent adverse

  14. Expression of Steroid Receptors in Ameloblasts during Amelogenesis in Rat Incisors.

    PubMed

    Houari, Sophia; Loiodice, Sophia; Jedeon, Katia; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) play a part in the modern burst of diseases and interfere with the steroid hormone axis. Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the most active and widely used EDCs, affects ameloblast functions, leading to an enamel hypomineralization pattern similar to that of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). In order to explore the molecular pathways stimulated by BPA during amelogenesis, we thoroughly investigated the receptors known to directly or indirectly mediate the effects of BPA. The expression patterns of high affinity BPA receptors (ERRγ, GPR30), of ketosteroid receptors (ERs, AR, PGR, GR, MR), of the retinoid receptor RXRα, and PPARγ were established using RT-qPCR analysis of RNAs extracted from microdissected enamel organ of adult rats. Their expression was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, except that of ERβ and PPARγ which remained undetectable. An additional large scale microarray analysis revealed three main groups of receptors according to their level of expression in maturation-stage ameloblasts. The expression level of RXRα was the highest, similar to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), whereas the others were 13 to 612-fold lower, with AR and GR being intermediate. Immunofluorescent analysis of VDR, ERα and AR confirmed their presence mainly in maturation- stage ameloblasts. These data provide further evidence that ameloblasts express a specific combination of hormonal receptors depending on their developmental stage. This study represents the first step toward understanding dental endocrinology as well as some of the effects of EDCs on the pathophysiology of amelogenesis.

  15. The overview of channels, transporters, and calcium signaling molecules during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Eun; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2018-05-20

    Enamel is a highly calcified tissue. Its formation requires a progressive and dynamic system for the regulation of electrolyte concentration by enamel epithelia. A critical function of enamel epithelial cells, ameloblasts, is the secretion and movement of electrolytes via various channels and transporters to develop the enamel tissue. Enamel formation generates protons, which need to be neutralised. Thus, ameloblasts possess a buffering system to sustain mineral accretion. Normal tooth formation involves stage-dependent net fluctuations in pH during amelogenesis. To date, all of our information about ion transporters in dental enamel tissue is based solely on immunostaining-expression techniques. This review critically evaluates the current understanding and recent discoveries and physiological role of ion channels and transporters, Mg 2+ transporters, and Ca 2+ regulatory proteins during amelogenesis in enamel formation. The ways in which ameloblasts modulate ions are discussed in the context of current research for developing a novel morphologic-functional model of enamel maturation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of Steroid Receptors in Ameloblasts during Amelogenesis in Rat Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Houari, Sophia; Loiodice, Sophia; Jedeon, Katia; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) play a part in the modern burst of diseases and interfere with the steroid hormone axis. Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the most active and widely used EDCs, affects ameloblast functions, leading to an enamel hypomineralization pattern similar to that of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). In order to explore the molecular pathways stimulated by BPA during amelogenesis, we thoroughly investigated the receptors known to directly or indirectly mediate the effects of BPA. The expression patterns of high affinity BPA receptors (ERRγ, GPR30), of ketosteroid receptors (ERs, AR, PGR, GR, MR), of the retinoid receptor RXRα, and PPARγ were established using RT-qPCR analysis of RNAs extracted from microdissected enamel organ of adult rats. Their expression was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, except that of ERβ and PPARγ which remained undetectable. An additional large scale microarray analysis revealed three main groups of receptors according to their level of expression in maturation-stage ameloblasts. The expression level of RXRα was the highest, similar to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), whereas the others were 13 to 612-fold lower, with AR and GR being intermediate. Immunofluorescent analysis of VDR, ERα and AR confirmed their presence mainly in maturation- stage ameloblasts. These data provide further evidence that ameloblasts express a specific combination of hormonal receptors depending on their developmental stage. This study represents the first step toward understanding dental endocrinology as well as some of the effects of EDCs on the pathophysiology of amelogenesis. PMID:27853434

  17. The Role of Epithelial Stat3 in Amelogenesis during Mouse Incisor Renewal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Meng, Bo; Viloria, Edward; Naveau, Adrien; Ganss, Bernhard; Jheon, Andrew H

    2018-03-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in mouse incisor amelogenesis. Since Stat3 is expressed in the epithelial component of developing and adult mouse teeth, we generated and analyzed Krt14Cre/+;Stat3fl/fl mutant mice in which Stat3 was inactivated in epithelia including ameloblast progenitors and ameloblasts, the cells responsible for enamel formation. Histological analysis showed little enamel matrix in mutant incisors compared to controls. Delayed incisor enamel mineralization was demonstrated using micro-computed X-ray tomography analysis and was supported by an increase in the pre-expression distance of enamel-enriched proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and kallikrein-4. Lastly, scanning electron microscopy analysis showed little enamel mineralization in mutant incisors underneath the mesial root of the 1st molar; however, the micro-architecture of enamel mineralization was similar in the erupted portion of control and mutant incisors. Taken together, our findings demonstrate for the first time that the absence of epithelial Stat3 in mice leads to delayed incisor amelogenesis. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Clinical and genetic findings in Hungarian patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, V.; Kánya, M.; Somfai, G.M.; Vámos, R.; Varsányi, B.; Pámer, Zs.; Knézy, K.; Salacz, Gy.; Janáky, M.; Ferencz, M.; Hargitai, J.; Papp, A.; Farkas, Á.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine clinical phenotypes, examine the age dependency of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), and identify mutations in the retinoschisis1 gene (RS1) in 13 Hungarian (Caucasian) families with this disease. Methods This study included 72 members in 13 families. Complete ophthalmological examinations, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and full-field and multifocal electroretinography (ERG), were performed on 20 affected males, 13 female carriers, and 27 healthy controls. The patients were divided into two age groups (Group I <25 years and Group II >25 years), retrospectively, to assess the possible effects of age. Correlations among genotype, age, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), OCT, and ERG results were analyzed. A modified classification scheme was done to identify the different phenotypes of the disease. In each of the 72 family members and 100 age-matched male controls, all exons and introns of RS1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. Results Foveal retinoschisis was detected in 25 eyes (62.5%) of patients by funduscopy, and in 29 eyes (72.5%) by OCT, while macular lamellar schisis was recognizable only by OCT in 30 eyes (75%) of patients. Foveal thickness (FT) and total macular volume were significantly increased in younger (Group I) patients only. For patients younger than 26 years, large inner nuclear central cysts were observable by OCT, while after 26 years, foveas were atrophic. White flecks and dots, which were like that seen in fundus albipunctatus, were detected in both eyes of one patient. In both patient groups, characteristically decreased b-waves of standard combined ERG were recorded without any significant difference between the patient groups. The BCVA and ERG parameters of all patients and the OCT of younger patients were significantly worse (p<0.05) than those of age-matched controls. A significant difference between the two age groups was found in case FT, total macular

  19. Clinical and genetic findings in Hungarian patients with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Lesch, B; Szabó, V; Kánya, M; Somfai, G M; Vámos, R; Varsányi, B; Pámer, Zs; Knézy, K; Salacz, Gy; Janáky, M; Ferencz, M; Hargitai, J; Papp, A; Farkas, A

    2008-01-01

    To determine clinical phenotypes, examine the age dependency of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), and identify mutations in the retinoschisis1 gene (RS1) in 13 Hungarian (Caucasian) families with this disease. This study included 72 members in 13 families. Complete ophthalmological examinations, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and full-field and multifocal electroretinography (ERG), were performed on 20 affected males, 13 female carriers, and 27 healthy controls. The patients were divided into two age groups (Group I <25 years and Group II >25 years), retrospectively, to assess the possible effects of age. Correlations among genotype, age, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), OCT, and ERG results were analyzed. A modified classification scheme was done to identify the different phenotypes of the disease. In each of the 72 family members and 100 age-matched male controls, all exons and introns of RS1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. Foveal retinoschisis was detected in 25 eyes (62.5%) of patients by funduscopy, and in 29 eyes (72.5%) by OCT, while macular lamellar schisis was recognizable only by OCT in 30 eyes (75%) of patients. Foveal thickness (FT) and total macular volume were significantly increased in younger (Group I) patients only. For patients younger than 26 years, large inner nuclear central cysts were observable by OCT, while after 26 years, foveas were atrophic. White flecks and dots, which were like that seen in fundus albipunctatus, were detected in both eyes of one patient. In both patient groups, characteristically decreased b-waves of standard combined ERG were recorded without any significant difference between the patient groups. The BCVA and ERG parameters of all patients and the OCT of younger patients were significantly worse (p<0.05) than those of age-matched controls. A significant difference between the two age groups was found in case FT, total macular volume, and amplitudes of

  20. Update on the evaluation and treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Jennifer; Sochett, Etienne; Howard, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone fragility disorder that presents with a wide clinical phenotype spectrum: from perinatal lethality and severe deformities to very mild forms without fractures. Most cases of OI are due to autosomal dominant mutations of the type I collagen genes. A multidisciplinary approach with rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and consideration of medical therapy with bisphosphonates underpins current management. Greater understanding of the pathogenesis of OI may lead to novel, therapeutic approaches to help improve clinical symptoms of children with OI in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical perspectives on osteogenesis imperfecta versus non-accidental injury.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Elaine Maria

    2015-12-01

    Although non-accidental injuries (NAI) are more common in cases of unexplained fractures than rare disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), ruling out OI and other medical causes of fracture is always indicated. The majority of OI patients can be diagnosed with the help of family history, physical examination, and radiographic findings. In particular, there are a few radiological findings which are seen more commonly in NAI than in OI which may help guide clinician considerations regarding the probability of either of these diagnoses. At the same time, molecular testing still merits careful consideration in cases with unexplained fractures without obvious additional signs of abuse. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [PREPARATIONS OF PAMIDRONOVIC ACID IN COMPLEX TREATMENT ON OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA].

    PubMed

    Zyma, A M; Guk, Yu M; Magomedov, O M; Gayko, O G; Kincha-Polishchuk, T A

    2015-07-01

    Modern view of drug therapy in the complex treatment of orthopedic manifestations of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) was submitted. Developed and tested system of drug correction of structural and functional state of bone tissue (BT) using drugs pamidronovic acid, depending on osteoporosis severity and type of disease. Such therapy is appropriate to apply both independently and in conjunction with surgery to correct deformations of long bones of the lower extremities. Effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed methods of drug therapy was proved, most patients resume features walking and support.

  3. Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Edelu, BO; Ndu, IK; Asinobi, IN; Obu, HA; Adimora, GN

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of rare inherited disorders of connective tissue with the common feature of excessive fragility of bones caused by mutations in collagen. Diagnosis is mainly based on the clinical features of the disorder. We report, the case of a male neonate delivered to a 33-year-old para 2 female at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu with no family history suggestive of OI. He had clinical features of a type II OI and severe birth asphyxia. Multidisciplinary management was instituted, but he died on the 7th day of life. PMID:25031897

  4. X-linked gene expression in the Virginia opossum: differences between the paternally derived Gpd and Pgk-A loci

    SciTech Connect

    Samollow, P.B.; Ford, A.L.; VandeBerg, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Expression of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglycerate kinase-A (PGK-A) in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) was studied electrophoretically in animals from natural populations and those produced through controlled laboratory crosses. Blood from most of the wild animals exhibited a common single-banded phenotype for both enzymes. Rare variant animals, regardless of sex, exhibited single-banded phenotypes different in mobility from the common mobility class of the respective enzyme. The laboratory crosses confirmed the allelic basis for the common and rare phenotypes. Transmission of PGK-A phenotypes followed the pattern of determinate (nonrandom) inactivation of the paternally derived Pgk-A allele, and transmission ofmore » G6PD also was consistent with this pattern. A survey of tissue-specific expression of G6PD phenotypes of heterozygous females revealed, in almost all tissues, three-banded patterns skewed in favor of the allele that was expressed in blood cells. Three-banded patterns were never observed in males or in putatively homozygous females. These patterns suggest simultaneous, but unequal, expression of the maternally and paternally derived Gpd alleles within individual cells. The absence of such partial expression was noted in a parallel survey of females heterozygous at the Pgd-A locus. Thus, it appears that Gpd and Pgk-A are X-linked in D. virginiana and subject to preferential paternal allele inactivation, but that dosage compensation may not be complete for all paternally derived X-linked genes.« less

  5. Genetic studies in a patient with X-linked retinoschisis coexisting with developmental delay and sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Dhandayuthapani; Patric, Irene Rosita Pia; Ganapathy, Aparna; Agarwal, Smitha; Krishna, Shuba; Neriyanuri, Srividya; Sripriya, Sarangapani; Sen, Parveen; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we present a juvenile retinoschisis patient with developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, and reduced axial tone. X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal dystrophy, most often not associated with systemic anomalies and also not showing any locus heterogeneity. Therefore it was of interest to understand the genetic basis of the condition in this patient. RS1 gene screening for XLRS was performed by Sanger sequencing. Whole genome SNP 6.0 array analysis was carried out to investigate gross chromosomal aberrations that could result in systemic phenotype. In addition, targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) was employed to determine any possible involvement of X-linked syndromic and non-syndromic mental retardation genes. This NGS panel consisted of 550 genes implicated in several other rare inherited diseases. RS1 gene screening revealed a pathogenic hemizygous splice site mutation (c.78+1G>T), inherited from the mother. SNP 6.0 array analysis did not indicate any significant chromosomal aberrations that could be disease-associated. Targeted resequencing did not identify any mutations in the X-linked mental retardation genes. However, variations in three other genes (NSD1, LARGE, and POLG) were detected, which were all inherited from the patient's unaffected father. Taken together, RS1 mutation was found to segregate with retinoschisis phenotype while none of the other identified variations were co-segregating with the systemic defects. Hereby, we infer that the multisystemic defects harbored by the patient are a rare coexistence of XLRS, developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, and reduced axial tone reported for the first time in the literature.

  6. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and sagittal craniosynostosis: three patients requiring operative cranial expansion: case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Jaszczuk, Phillip; Rogers, Gary F; Guzman, Raphael; Proctor, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    A defect in a phosphate-regulating gene leads to the most common form of rickets: X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) or vitamin D-resistant rickets (VDDR). XLH has been associated with craniosynostosis, the sagittal suture being the most commonly involved. We present three patients with rickets and symptomatic sagittal suture craniosynostosis all of whom presented late (>2 years of age). Two had a severe phenotype and papilledema, while the third presented with an osseous bulging near the anterior fontanel and experienced chronic headaches. All underwent successful cranial vault expansion. Rachitic patients with scaphocephaly should be screened for craniosynostosis.

  7. The Nance-Horan syndrome: a rare X-linked ocular-dental trait with expression in heterozygous females.

    PubMed

    Bixler, D; Higgins, M; Hartsfield, J

    1984-07-01

    This report describes two families with the Nance-Horan syndrome, an X-linked trait featuring lenticular cataracts and anomalies of tooth shape and number. Previous reports have described blindness in affected males but posterior sutural cataracts with normal vision as the primary ocular expression in heterozygous females. In one of these two families, the affected female is not only blind in one eye but reportedly had supernumerary central incisors (mesiodens) removed. This constitutes the most severe ocular and dental expression of this gene in heterozygous females yet reported.

  8. Golden tapetal reflex in male patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Case report and practical implications.

    PubMed

    van Osch, L; van Schooneveld, M; Bleekerwagemakers, E M

    1990-12-01

    The golden tapetal reflex in the ocular fundus is considered pathognomonic of the carrier state in some families with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XRP). Reports concerning affected males with this characteristic reflex are scarce. A six-year-old boy with XRP having a tapetal reflex is described. Recently the tapetal reflex has drawn attention in linkage studies. XRP is probably genetically heterogeneous and has at least two genetic forms. The finding of a tapetal reflex in one or more female carriers in a family with XRP may be helpful in differentiating between these two genetic forms.

  9. Identification of a mutation in the MTM1 gene, associated with X-linked myotubular myopathy, in a Greek family

    PubMed Central

    Fidani, L; Karagianni, P; Tsakalidis, C; Mitsiako, G; Hatziioannidis, I; Biancalana, V; Nikolaidis, N

    2011-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a rare congenital myopathy, usually characterized by severe hypotonia and respiratory insufficiency at birth, in affected, male infants. The disease is causally associated with mutations in the MTM1 gene, coding for phosphatase myotubularin. We report a severe case of XLMTM with a novel mutation, at a donor splicing site (c.1467+1G) previously associated with severe phenotype. The mutation was also identified in the patient's mother, providing an opportunity for sound genetic counseling. PMID:22435031

  10. Osteogenesis imperfecta types I-XI: implications for the neonatal nurse.

    PubMed

    Womack, Jody

    2014-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), also called "brittle bone disease," is a rare heterozygous connective tissue disorder that is caused by mutations of genes that affect collagen. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by decreased bone mass, bone fragility, and skin hyperlaxity. The phenotype present is determined according to the mutation on the affected gene as well as the type and location of the mutation. Osteogenesis imperfecta is neither preventable nor treatable. Osteogenesis imperfecta is classified into 11 types to date, on the basis of their clinical symptoms and genetic components. This article discusses the definition of the disease, the classifications on the basis of its clinical features, incidence, etiology, and pathogenesis. In addition, phenotype, natural history, diagnosis and management of this disease, recurrence risk, and, most importantly, the implications for the neonatal nurse and management for the family are discussed.

  11. Lack of cyclophilin B in osteogenesis imperfecta with normal collagen folding.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Aileen M; Carter, Erin M; Cabral, Wayne A; Weis, MaryAnn; Chang, Weizhong; Makareeva, Elena; Leikin, Sergey; Rotimi, Charles N; Eyre, David R; Raggio, Cathleen L; Marini, Joan C

    2010-02-11

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable disorder that causes bone fragility. Mutations in type I collagen result in autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta, whereas mutations in either of two components of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex (cartilage-associated protein [CRTAP] and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 [P3H1]) cause autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta with rhizomelia (shortening of proximal segments of upper and lower limbs) and delayed collagen folding. We identified two siblings who had recessive osteogenesis imperfecta without rhizomelia. They had a homozygous start-codon mutation in the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase B gene (PPIB), which results in a lack of cyclophilin B (CyPB), the third component of the complex. The proband's collagen had normal collagen folding and normal prolyl 3-hydroxylation, suggesting that CyPB is not the exclusive peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in collagen folding, as is currently thought. 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  12. Lack of Cyclophilin B in Osteogenesis Imperfecta with Normal Collagen Folding

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Aileen M.; Carter, Erin M.; Cabral, Wayne A.; Weis, MaryAnn; Chang, Weizhong; Makareeva, Elena; Leikin, Sergey; Rotimi, Charles N.; Eyre, David R.; Raggio, Cathleen L.; Marini, Joan C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable disorder that causes bone fragility. Mutations in type I collagen result in autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta, whereas mutations in either of two components of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex (cartilage-associated protein [CRTAP] and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 [P3H1]) cause autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta with rhizomelia (shortening of proximal segments of upper and lower limbs) and delayed collagen folding. We identified two siblings who had recessive osteogenesis imperfecta without rhizomelia. They had a homozygous start-codon mutation in the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase B gene (PPIB), which results in a lack of cyclophilin B (CyPB), the third component of the complex. The proband’s collagen had normal collagen folding and normal prolyl 3-hydroxylation, suggesting that CyPB is not the exclusive peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in collagen folding, as is currently thought. PMID:20089953

  13. Evaluation of the severity of malocclusions in children affected by osteogenesis imperfecta with the peer assessment rating and discrepancy indexes.

    PubMed

    Rizkallah, Jean; Schwartz, Stephane; Rauch, Frank; Glorieux, Francis; Vu, Duy-Dat; Muller, Katia; Retrouvey, Jean-Marc

    2013-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable disorder affecting bone and tooth development. Malocclusion is frequent in those affected by osteogenesis imperfecta, but this has not been studied in detail. The purpose of this study was to describe and quantify the severity of malocclusions in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Articulated dental casts were obtained from 49 patients diagnosed with osteogenesis imperfecta (ages 5-19 years; 28 female) and 49 age- and sex-matched control subjects who did not have osteogenesis imperfecta. Both groups were seeking orthodontic treatment. Malocclusions were scored by using the peer assessment rating (PAR) and the discrepancy index (DI). The average United Kingdom weighted PAR scores were 31.1 (SD, 14.5) for the osteogenesis imperfecta group and 22.7 (SD, 10.7) for the control group (P <0.05). The mean United States weighted PAR scores were 32.2 (SD, 15.0) for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and 21.6 (SD, 9.6) for the controls (P <0.05). The average modified DI scores were 29.8 (SD, 20.2) for the osteogenesis imperfecta group and 12.4 (SD, 6.8) for the control group (P <0.05). Group differences were greatest for lateral open bite (osteogenesis imperfecta group, 7.1; control group, 0.3) for the DI parameters and anterior crossbite (osteogenesis imperfecta group, 13.0; control group, 3.8 [United Kingdom]) for the PAR. Both the PAR and the DI showed that malocclusions were significantly more severe in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta than in the control group. There was a higher incidence of Class III malocclusion associated with anterior and lateral open bites in patients affected by osteogenesis imperfecta. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of miRNA and mRNA transcriptomes during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kaifeng; Hacia, Joseph G; Zhong, Zhe; Paine, Michael L

    2014-11-19

    In the rodent incisor during amelogenesis, as ameloblast cells transition from secretory stage to maturation stage, their morphology and transcriptome profiles change dramatically. Prior whole genome transcriptome analysis has given a broad picture of the molecular activities dominating both stages of amelogenesis, but this type of analysis has not included miRNA transcript profiling. In this study, we set out to document which miRNAs and corresponding target genes change significantly as ameloblasts transition from secretory- to maturation-stage amelogenesis. Total RNA samples from both secretory- and maturation-stage rat enamel organs were subjected to genome-wide miRNA and mRNA transcript profiling. We identified 59 miRNAs that were differentially expressed at the maturation stage relative to the secretory stage of enamel development (False Discovery Rate (FDR)<0.05, fold change (FC)≥1.8). In parallel, transcriptome profiling experiments identified 1,729 mRNA transcripts that were differentially expressed in the maturation stage compared to the secretory stage (FDR<0.05, FC≥1.8). Based on bioinformatics analyses, 5.8% (629 total) of these differentially expressed genes (DEGS) were highlighted as being the potential targets of 59 miRNAs that were differentially expressed in the opposite direction, in the same tissue samples. Although the number of predicted target DEGs was not higher than baseline expectations generated by examination of stably expressed miRNAs, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that these 629 DEGS were enriched for ion transport, pH regulation, calcium handling, endocytotic, and apoptotic activities. Seven differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-21, miR-31, miR-488, miR-153, miR-135b, miR-135a and miR298) in secretory- and/or maturation-stage enamel organs were confirmed by in situ hybridization. Further, we used luciferase reporter assays to provide evidence that two of these differentially expressed miRNAs, miR-153 and miR-31, are potential

  15. Progressive engineering of a homing endonuclease genome editing reagent for the murine X-linked immunodeficiency locus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yupeng; Khan, Iram F.; Boissel, Sandrine; Jarjour, Jordan; Pangallo, Joseph; Thyme, Summer; Baker, David; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Rawlings, David J.

    2014-01-01

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are compact endonucleases with 20–22 bp recognition sites, and thus are ideal scaffolds for engineering site-specific DNA cleavage enzymes for genome editing applications. Here, we describe a general approach to LHE engineering that combines rational design with directed evolution, using a yeast surface display high-throughput cleavage selection. This approach was employed to alter the binding and cleavage specificity of the I-Anil LHE to recognize a mutation in the mouse Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene causative for mouse X-linked immunodeficiency (XID)—a model of human X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). The required re-targeting of I-AniI involved progressive resculpting of the DNA contact interface to accommodate nine base differences from the native cleavage sequence. The enzyme emerging from the progressive engineering process was specific for the XID mutant allele versus the wild-type (WT) allele, and exhibited activity equivalent to WT I-AniI in vitro and in cellulo reporter assays. Fusion of the enzyme to a site-specific DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) resulted in a further enhancement of gene editing efficiency. These results illustrate the potential of LHE enzymes as specific and efficient tools for therapeutic genome engineering. PMID:24682825

  16. A novel mutation in FRMD7 causing X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus in a large family

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang; Gu, Feng; Wang, Yujing; Yan, Jinting; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Shangzhi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To identify the gene responsible for causing an X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus (XLICN) in a six-generation Chinese family. Methods Forty-nine members of an XLICN family were recruited and examined after obtaining informed consent. Affected male individuals were genotyped with microsatellite markers around the FRMD7 locus. Mutations were comprehensively screened by direct sequencing using gene specific primers. An X-inactivation pattern was investigated by X chromosome methylation analysis. Results The patients showed phenotypes consistent with XLICN. Genotype analysis showed that male affected individuals in the family shared a common haplotype with the selected markers. Sequencing FRMD7 revealed a G>T transversion (c.812G>T) in exon 9, which caused a conservative substitution of Cys to Phe at codon 271 (p.C271F). This mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals and was present in the obligate, non-penetrant female carriers. However, the mutation was not observed in unaffected familial males or 400 control males. Females with the mutant gene could be affected or carrier and they shared the same inactivated X chromosome harboring the mutation in blood cells, which showed there is no clear causal link between X-inactivation pattern and phenotype. Conclusions We identified a novel mutation in FRMD7 and confirmed the role of this mutation in the pathogenesis of X-linked congenital nystagmus. PMID:18246032

  17. Variable White Matter Atrophy and Intellectual Development in a Family With X-linked Creatine Transporter Deficiency Despite Genotypic Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Heussinger, Nicole; Saake, Marc; Mennecke, Angelika; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Trollmann, Regina

    2017-02-01

    The X-linked creatine transporter deficiency (CRTD) caused by an SLC6A8 mutation represents the second most common cause of X-linked intellectual disability. The clinical phenotype ranges from mild to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, short stature, poor language skills, and autism spectrum disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate phenotypic variability in the context of genotype, cerebral creatine concentration, and volumetric analysis in a family with CRTD. The clinical phenotype and manifestations of epilepsy were assessed in a Caucasian family with CRTD. DNA sequencing and creatine metabolism analysis confirmed the diagnosis. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) with voxel-based morphometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed in all family members. An SLC6A8 missense mutation (c.1169C>T; p.Pro390Leu, exon 8) was detected in four of five individuals. Both male siblings were hemizygous, the mother and the affected sister heterozygous for the mutation. Structural cMRI was normal, whereas voxel-based morphometry analysis showed reduced white matter volume below the first percentile of the reference population of 290 subjects in the more severely affected boy compared with family members and controls. Normalized creatine concentration differed significantly between the individuals (P < 0.005). There is a broad phenotypic variability in CRTD even in family members with the same mutation. Differences in mental development could be related to atrophy of the subcortical white matter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular and connective tissue anomalies associated with X-linked periventricular heterotopia due to mutations in Filamin A

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; Frentz, Sophia; Morgan, Tim; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Leventer, Richard J; McGillivray, George; Pariani, Mitchel; van der Steen, Anthony; Pope, Michael; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Scott, Richard; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Robertson, Terry; Coppin, Brian; Siegel, Robert; Bret Zurita, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Jose I; Morales, Carmen; Rodrigues, Yuri; Arcas, Joaquín; Saggar, Anand; Horton, Margaret; Zackai, Elaine; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Robertson, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Mutations conferring loss of function at the FLNA (encoding filamin A) locus lead to X-linked periventricular nodular heterotopia (XL-PH), with seizures constituting the most common clinical manifestation of this disorder in female heterozygotes. Vascular dilatation (mainly the aorta), joint hypermobility and variable skin findings are also associated anomalies, with some reports suggesting that this might represents a separate syndrome allelic to XL-PH, termed as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-periventricular heterotopia variant (EDS-PH). Here, we report a cohort of 11 males and females with both hypomorphic and null mutations in FLNA that manifest a wide spectrum of connective tissue and vascular anomalies. The spectrum of cutaneous defects was broader than previously described and is inconsistent with a specific type of EDS. We also extend the range of vascular anomalies associated with XL-PH to included peripheral arterial dilatation and atresia. Based on these observations, we suggest that there is little molecular or clinical justification for considering EDS-PH as a separate entity from XL-PH, but instead propose that there is a spectrum of vascular and connective tissues anomalies associated with this condition for which all individuals with loss-of-function mutations in FLNA should be evaluated. In addition, since some patients with XL-PH can present primarily with a joint hypermobility syndrome, we propose that screening for cardiovascular manifestations should be offered to those patients when there are associated seizures or an X-linked pattern of inheritance. PMID:23032111

  19. A novel missense mutation of NDP in a Chinese family with X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong Yan; Huang, Jia; Wang, Rui Li; Wang, Yue; Guo, Liang Jie; Li, Tao; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hong Dan; Guo, Qian Nan; Dong, Dao Quan

    2016-11-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a hereditary ocular disorder characterized by a failure of peripheral retinal vascularization. In this report, we describe a novel missense mutation of the Norrie disease gene (NDP) in a Chinese family with X-linked FEVR. Ophthalmologic evaluation was performed on four male patients and seven unaffected individuals after informed consent was obtained. Venous blood was collected from the 11 members of this family, and genomic DNA was extracted using standard methods. The coding exons 2 and 3 and their corresponding exon-intron junctions of NDP were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and then subjected to direct DNA sequencing. A novel missense mutation (c.310A>C) in exon 3, leading to a lysine-to-glutamine substitution at position 104 (p.Lys104Gln), was identified in all four patients with X-linked FEVR. Three unaffected female individuals (III2, IV3, and IV11) were found to be carriers of the mutation. This mutation was not detected in other unaffected individuals. The mutation c.310A>C (p.Lys104Gln) in exon 3 of NDP is associated with FEVR in the studied family. This result further enriches the mutation spectrum of FEVR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  20. A novel intronic mutation in the DDP1 gene in a family with X-linked dystonia-deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra, Mario; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Muñoz, Esteban; Tolosa, Eduardo; Martí, María J

    2005-02-01

    X-linked dystonia-deafness syndrome (Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome) is a rare neurodegenerative disease characterized by hearing loss and dystonia. So far, 7 mutations in the coding region of the DDP1 gene have been described. They consist of frameshift, nonsense, missense mutations or deletions. To investigate the presence of mutations in the DDP1 gene in a family with dystonia-deafness syndrome. Seven members belonging to 2 generations of a family with 2 affected subjects underwent genetic analysis. Mutational screening in the DDP1 gene was made through DNA direct sequencing. We found an intronic mutation in the DDP1 gene. It consists of an A-to-C substitution in the position -23 in reference to the first nucleotide of exon 2 (IVS1-23A>C). The mutation was present in 2 affected men and their respective unaffected mothers, whereas it was absent in the healthy men from this family and in 90 healthy controls. Intronic mutations in the DDP1 gene can also cause X-linked dystonia-deafness syndrome. In our case, the effect of the mutation could be due to a splicing alteration.