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Sample records for x-ray analysis electron

  1. Analysis of x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Sunil Sunny, C.

    2006-03-15

    The analysis of the x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source is carried out. Assuming single-particle motion, the electron acceleration and its final energy are calculated for TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity field and uniform external dc magnetic field. In the calculation, initial coordinates of 40 000 electrons were uniformly selected over the central plane of the cavity using random number generator. The final energy of each electron when it hits the wall is stored and the electron energy distribution is obtained. Using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4A, the geometry of the ECR x-ray source is modeled. The x-ray energy spectrum is calculated for the geometry model and the numerically calculated electron energy distribution. The calculated x-ray spectrum is compared with the experimentally measured x-ray spectrum.

  2. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  4. Diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis by electron-probe x-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghadially, F N; Murphy, F; Lalonde, J M

    1984-10-01

    A miner with a long history of drug abuse developed pulmonary fibrosis. It was not clear whether his disease was due to drug abuse or exposure to mine dust. Electron-probe x-ray analysis of mineral deposits in the lung showed that his disease was due to drug abuse and not occupational exposure to mine dust.

  5. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  6. Electron probe X-ray analysis of an intraocular foreign body.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, I A; Lalonde, J M; Ghadially, F N

    1977-10-01

    We describe a simple and rapid method of electron probe x-ray analysis on a foreign body removed from the eye. We demonstrated the presence of copper in an intraocular foreign body which has originated from a blank 0.22 calibre cartridge. Sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, sulpher and chlorine were also detected. It seems likely that these elements were derived from the biological milieu in which the intraocular foreign body had rested for some 2 years and 9 months.

  7. X-ray analysis of electron Bernstein wave heating in MST.

    PubMed

    Seltzman, A H; Anderson, J K; DuBois, A M; Almagri, A; Forest, C B

    2016-11-01

    A pulse height analyzing x-ray tomography system has been developed to detect x-rays from electron Bernstein wave heated electrons in the Madison symmetric torus reversed field pinch (RFP). Cadmium zinc telluride detectors are arranged in a parallel beam array with two orthogonal multi-chord detectors that may be used for tomography. In addition a repositionable 16 channel fan beam camera with a 55° field of view is used to augment data collected with the Hard X-ray array. The chord integrated signals identify target emission from RF heated electrons striking a limiter located 12° toroidally away from the RF injection port. This provides information on heated electron spectrum, transport, and diffusion. RF induced x-ray emission from absorption on harmonic electron cyclotron resonances in low current (<250 kA) RFP discharges has been observed.

  8. X-ray analysis of electron Bernstein wave heating in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzman, A. H.; Anderson, J. K.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A.; Forest, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    A pulse height analyzing x-ray tomography system has been developed to detect x-rays from electron Bernstein wave heated electrons in the Madison symmetric torus reversed field pinch (RFP). Cadmium zinc telluride detectors are arranged in a parallel beam array with two orthogonal multi-chord detectors that may be used for tomography. In addition a repositionable 16 channel fan beam camera with a 55° field of view is used to augment data collected with the Hard X-ray array. The chord integrated signals identify target emission from RF heated electrons striking a limiter located 12° toroidally away from the RF injection port. This provides information on heated electron spectrum, transport, and diffusion. RF induced x-ray emission from absorption on harmonic electron cyclotron resonances in low current (<250 kA) RFP discharges has been observed.

  9. Analysis of Fast Electron Energy Distribution by Measuring Hard X-ray Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bass, Anthony; Griffin, Brandon; Pandit, Rishi; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Link, Anthony; Patel, Prav; Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of intense, short-pulse laser-produced fast electrons is important for fundamental understanding and applications. We carried out an experiment to characterize the fast electron energy distribution by measuring angular-dependent high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. A 100 μm thick metal foil (Al, Cu, and Ag) mounted on a plastic backing was irradiated by the 0.35 ps, 15 J Leopard Laser at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. The bremsstrahlung x-rays and the escaping electrons from the target were recorded using differential filter stack spectrometers at 22° and 45° off laser axis and a magnet-based electron spectrometer along the laser axis. The electron spectrum inferred from two different diagnostics had single slope temperature of ~ 1.5 MeV for the Cu foil. The results were compared to an analytic calculation and a 2-D Particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The analysis of the electron energy distribution and angular distribution will be presented. This work was supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Con.

  10. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  11. An electronic processing system for cosmic X-ray event analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedhia, D. K.; Shah, M. R.

    1991-08-01

    An electronic logic system has been developed to evaluate and process X-ray events in 20-100 keV energy range from multi-cell xenon filled proportional counters used in X-ray astronomy. The electronic system consists of X-ray event selection logic, pulse height analyzer, K-fluorescent gating and arrival time tagging. Using 'K-fluorescent gating technique', improved energy resolution for incident X-ray energies above 34 keV is achieved. The X-ray event selection logic is designed to obtain higher background rejection efficiency for charged particles and Compton events. It provides significant advantage in studying weak cosmic X-ray sources as well as detecting spectral line features in the field of hard X-ray spectroscopy from balloon-borne telescope. The telemetry system used is formatting the event location and digitized energy information with a dead time of 1.28 ms. To reduce the dead time of the system, buffer memories are used with proper time tagging.

  12. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C.; Vis, R.D.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W.; Bowen, D.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  13. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. ); Vis, R.D. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. ); Jones, K.W. ); Bowen, D.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  14. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  15. Quantitative analysis of flare accelerated electrons through their hard X-ray and microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave modelling that takes into account the temporal evolution of the electron spectrum as well as the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field and the ambient medium in the radio source is presented. This method is illustrated for the June 29 1980 10:41 UT event. The implication on the process of acceleration/injection is discussed.

  16. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of Electron Beam Diodes for Flash X-ray Radiography at Sandia National Laboratories*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Oliver, B. V.; Hahn, K.; Rovang, D.; Maenchen, J. E.; Droemer, D.; Welch, D. R.; Maron, Y.

    2006-10-01

    Experiments were performed on RITS-3, a Marx driven, three stage IVA (5.5MV, 120kA), and are continuing on RITS-6, a six stage IVA (10MV, 120kA), to study the role of plasma formation and propagation on electron beam focusing for flash x-ray radiography. It is believed that plasmas formed on electrodes or by interactions with background gases limit e-beam focusing and stability and cause pulse shortening of the diode. These are concerns as higher doses (1000 Rad at 1m) from smaller sources (2mm dia.) are required for future radiographic applications. Diagnostics include time and space resolved visible and uv emission spectra using 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromators equipped with framing and streak cameras. Line and continuum analysis are conducted using a time-dependent CR model. Self-consistent line shape calculations measure Stark, Doppler, and opacity broadening. Electron density and temperature determinations as well as neutral and ion species parameters are obtained. Such data is crucial to the fundamental understanding of electron beam diode behavior and aids in the continued development of these sources. *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000.

  18. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 103 barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing 57Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  19. Scanning electron microscopic and X-ray micro analysis on tooth enamel exposed to alkaline agents.

    PubMed

    Taubee, Fabian; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    The background of this study comprises two clinical cases, where patients exposed to aerosols of an alkaline and surface active cleaning agent developed loss of enamel substance on their teeth, further resulting in loss of teeth and partially destroyed soft tissues. The alkaline cleaning agent consisted of potassium hydroxide and various surfactants. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible changes in morphology and composition in human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions, by means of X-ray micro analysis (XRMA), FTIR-spectroscopic analyses and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Extracted premolars, exposed to potassium hydroxide solutions and alkaline cleaning solution,were analyzed by means of XRMA and SEM. Enamel powder, exposed to cleaning solution, was analyzed by means of FTIR. The SEM analysis revealed an increased porosity of the enamel surface and partially loss of enamel substance after exposure to alkaline solutions. The XRMA analyses revealed a decrease in carbon concentration while phosphorous and calcium showed no marked changes. The FTIR analyses showed no significant changes in peak heights or peak positions for phosphate, carbonate or hydroxide. It was concluded that human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions showed loss of organic substance, marked pores in enamel surface and loss of substance in the enamel surface.

  20. Radiation shielding analysis of a special linear accelerator for electron beam and X-ray.

    PubMed

    Kang, W G; Pyo, S H; Alkhuraiji, T S; Han, B S; Kang, C M

    2017-01-31

    The King AbdulAziz City for Science & Technology in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia plans to build a 10 MeV, 15 kW linear accelerator (LINAC) for electron beam and X-ray. The accelerator will be supplied by EB Tech, Republic of Korea, and the design and construction of the accelerator building will be conducted in the cooperation with EB Tech. This report presents the shielding analysis of the accelerator building using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). In order to improve the accuracy in estimating deep radiation penetration and to reduce computation time, various variance reduction techniques, including the weight window (WW) method, the deterministic transport (DXTRAN) spheres were considered. Radiation levels were estimated at selected locations in the shielding facility running MCNP6 for particle histories up to 1.0×10+8. The final results indicated that the calculated doses at all selected detector locations met the dose requirement of 50 mSv/yr, which is the United State Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) requirement.

  1. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  2. Stimulated Electronic X-Ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Purvis, Michael; Ryan, Duncan; London, Richard A.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Graf, Alexander; Brown, Gregory; Rocca, Jorge J.; Rohringer, Nina

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate strong stimulated inelastic x-ray scattering by resonantly exciting a dense gas target of neon with femtosecond, high-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A small number of lower energy XFEL seed photons drive an avalanche of stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering processes that amplify the Raman scattering signal by several orders of magnitude until it reaches saturation. Despite the large overall spectral width, the internal spiky structure of the XFEL spectrum determines the energy resolution of the scattering process in a statistical sense. This is demonstrated by observing a stochastic line shift of the inelastically scattered x-ray radiation. In conjunction with statistical methods, XFELs can be used for stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, with spectral resolution smaller than the natural width of the core-excited, intermediate state.

  3. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  4. Coherent diffraction imaging analysis of shape-controlled nanoparticles with focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of the coherent diffraction imaging analysis of nanoparticles using focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses, allowing us to analyze the size distribution of particles as well as the electron density projection of individual particles. We measured 1000 single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction patterns of shape-controlled Ag nanocubes and Au/Ag nanoboxes and estimated the edge length from the speckle size of the coherent diffraction patterns. We then reconstructed the two-dimensional electron density projection with sub-10 nm resolution from selected coherent diffraction patterns. This method enables the simultaneous analysis of the size distribution of synthesized nanoparticles and the structures of particles at nanoscale resolution to address correlations between individual structures of components and the statistical properties in heterogeneous systems such as nanoparticles and cells.

  5. Joint Analysis of Radiative and Non-Radiative Electronic Relaxation Upon X-ray Irradiation of Transition Metal Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Golnak, Ronny; Bokarev, Sergey I.; Seidel, Robert; Xiao, Jie; Grell, Gilbert; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Thürmer, Stephan; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Kühn, Oliver; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F.

    2016-01-01

    L-edge soft X-ray spectroscopy has been proven to be a powerful tool to unravel the peculiarities of electronic structure of transition metal compounds in solution. However, the X-ray absorption spectrum is often probed in the total or partial fluorescence yield modes, what leads to inherent distortions with respect to the true transmission spectrum. In the present work, we combine photon- and electron-yield experimental techniques with multi-reference first principles calculations. Exemplified for the prototypical FeCl2 aqueous solution we demonstrate that the partial yield arising from the Fe3s → 2p relaxation is a more reliable probe of the absorption spectrum than the Fe3d → 2p one. For the bonding-relevant 3d → 2p channel we further provide the basis for the joint analysis of resonant photoelectron and inelastic X-ray scattering spectra. Establishing the common energy reference allows to assign both spectra using the complementary information provided through electron-out and photon-out events. PMID:27098342

  6. Design, analysis and testing of x-ray tube for next generation x-ray machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanganal, Santoshakumar; Rao Ratnala, Srinivas; Shivakumar Gouda, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    A conceptual design of x-ray metal tube frame assembly is done to establish the technical feasibility and characterize the performance of a base design of x-ray metal tube frame assembly to meet the experimental critical to qualities (CTQ's) of x-ray tube at 72 kW for 20 seconds. Experimental test configuration with linear variable differential transformers (LVDT's) & thermo-couples is set to study the thermal prediction of x-ray tube with model results. Graphs of temperature versus time and deflection versus time shows curve shape magnitudes within 5% and 1%. A thermal - structural analysis is considered in analyzing the thermal - structural behavior in x-ray metal tube by considering worst protocol as 3.2 kW in steady state condition and 14.4 kW in transient state condition for 30 seconds. This analysis is done by doing a conceptual design of x-ray metal tube frame assembly with major modifications in frame and electron collector based on thermal - structural results. 3D modelling of x-ray metal tube frame assembly is done in Creo parametric 2.0 CAD software and analysis is done in ANSYS 16.1 simulation software. FEA results of conceptual design are in good agreement with CTQ's results of x-ray tube at 72 kW for 20 seconds.

  7. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Schropp, Andreas; ...

    2015-04-14

    X-ray focus optimization and characterization based on coherent scattering and quantitative speckle size measurements was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Its performance as a single-pulse free-electron laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle size/shape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in finding the focus' location, size and shape. In addition, its single-pulse compatibility enables users to capture pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in focus properties compared with other techniques that require scanning and averaging.

  8. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Schropp, Andreas; Seiboth, Frank; Feng, Yiping; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zhang, Wenkai; Robert, Aymeric; Zhu, Diling

    2015-01-01

    X-ray focus optimization and characterization based on coherent scattering and quantitative speckle size measurements was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Its performance as a single-pulse free-electron laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle size/shape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in finding the focus’ location, size and shape. In addition, its single-pulse compatibility enables users to capture pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in focus properties compared with other techniques that require scanning and averaging. PMID:25931074

  9. X-ray Topographic Methods and Application to Analysis of Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W. E.; Liu, H. Y.; Chaudhuri, J.

    1984-01-01

    Three supplementary X-ray techniques new to semiconductor applications are discussed. These are the Computer Aided Rocking Curve Analyzer, the Divergent Beam Method and a new method based on enhanced X-ray flourescence. The first method is used for quantitative mapping of an elastic or plastic strain field while the other two methods are used only to measure elastic strains. The divergent beam method is used for measuring the full strain tensor while the microfluorescence method is useful for monitoring strain uniformity. These methods are discussed in detail and examples of their application is presented. Among these are determination of the full strain ellipsoid in state-of-the-art liquid phase epitaxy deposited III-V epitaxial films; mapping of the plastic strain concentrations in tensile deformed Si; and quantitative determination of damage in V3Si due to ion implantation.

  10. Degradation of spatial resolution in thin-foil x-ray microchemical analysis due to plural scattering of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Twigg, Mark Erickson

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based Monte Carlo simulation of incoherent plural scattering of electrons has been developed in order to estimate the broadening of an electron probe as it propagates through a solid. By applying this approach to modeling the spreading of a fine (50 A) probe focused on a thin foil in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we have estimated the spatial resolution of the compositional analysis obtainable using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Specifically, an attempt has been made to determine how the apparent microchemistry of a feature of finer dimensions than the broadened beam differs from the actual composition of the given feature. The apparent Ge concentration profile in the vicinity of a 200 A wide Ge platelet in a 5000 A thick Al foil was measured, using STEM and EDS, and compared with the profile predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Results are presented and discussed.

  11. Measurements and analysis of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum obtained in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.; Rodrigues, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2008-02-15

    From the ECR plasma, hot electrons leak across the magnetic lines of force and by striking the plasma chamber produce bremsstrahlung x-rays. The wall bremsstrahlung gives information on the confinement status of hot electron. In our studies, experimental measurements are carried out in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the wall bremsstrahlung x-rays and the results are presented. While optimizing a particular charge state in ECR ion source, experimental parameters are adjusted to get a maximum current. The wall bremsstrahlung components are studied in these cases for understanding the hot electron confinement conditions.

  12. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  13. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  14. Independent-electron analysis of the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in Ne10 + collisions with He, Ne, and Ar atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-09-01

    We present a theoretical study on the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in 4.54 keV/amu Ne10 +-He, -Ne, and -Ar collisions. Single-particle capture probabilities were calculated using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. In this framework we investigated the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on capture cross sections and x-ray spectra. Excellent agreement is shown with the previously measured relative cross sections and x-ray spectra and calculations based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method using the no-response single-particle electron capture probabilities in a multinomial single-electron capture analysis. Our results demonstrate the importance of using this consistent statistical analysis of single-electron capture within the independent electron model; a requirement that a previous calculation for the same collision problem using the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method may not have considered.

  15. Analysis of Individual Environmental Particles Using Modern Methods of Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Cowin, James P.; Iedema, Martin J.

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the composition of particles in the atmosphere is critical because of their health effects and their direct and indirect effects on radiative forcing, and hence on climate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of single particle off-line analysis to investigate the chemistry of individual atmospheric particles using modern, state-of-the-art electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry techniques. We show that these methods provide specific, detailed data on particle composition, chemistry, morphology, phase and internal structure. This information is crucial for evaluating hygroscopic properties of aerosols, understanding aerosol aging and reactivity, and correlating the characteristics of aerosols with their optical properties. The manuscript presents a number of analytical advances in methods of electron probe particle analysis along with a brief review of a number of the research projects carried out in the authors’ laboratory on the chemical characterization of environmental particles. The obtained data offers a rich set of qualitative and quantitative information on the particle chemistry, composition and the mechanisms of gas-particle interactions which are of high importance to atmospheric processes involving particulate matter and air pollution.

  16. Classification and assessment of retrieved electron density maps in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is one of the techniques used to visualize structures of non-crystalline particles of micrometer to submicrometer size from materials and biological science. In the structural analysis of CXDI, the electron density map of a sample particle can theoretically be reconstructed from a diffraction pattern by using phase-retrieval (PR) algorithms. However, in practice, the reconstruction is difficult because diffraction patterns are affected by Poisson noise and miss data in small-angle regions due to the beam stop and the saturation of detector pixels. In contrast to X-ray protein crystallography, in which the phases of diffracted waves are experimentally estimated, phase retrieval in CXDI relies entirely on the computational procedure driven by the PR algorithms. Thus, objective criteria and methods to assess the accuracy of retrieved electron density maps are necessary in addition to conventional parameters monitoring the convergence of PR calculations. Here, a data analysis scheme, named ASURA, is proposed which selects the most probable electron density maps from a set of maps retrieved from 1000 different random seeds for a diffraction pattern. Each electron density map composed of J pixels is expressed as a point in a J-dimensional space. Principal component analysis is applied to describe characteristics in the distribution of the maps in the J-dimensional space. When the distribution is characterized by a small number of principal components, the distribution is classified using the k-means clustering method. The classified maps are evaluated by several parameters to assess the quality of the maps. Using the proposed scheme, structure analysis of a diffraction pattern from a non-crystalline particle is conducted in two stages: estimation of the overall shape and determination of the fine structure inside the support shape. In each stage, the most accurate and probable density maps are objectively selected. The validity

  17. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    1991-01-01

    An analysis was made of Lithium/carbon fluoride cell parts for possible chloride contamination induced by exposure to thionyl chloride (SOCl2); various samples were submitted for analysis. Only a portion of the analysis which has been conducted is covered, herein, namely analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). A strip of nickel was exposed to SOCl2 vapors to observe variations in surface concentrations of sulfur and chlorine with time. By detecting chlorine one can not infer contamination by SOCl2 only that contamination is present. Six samples of stainless steel foil were analyzed for chlorine using EDS. Chlorine was not detected on background samples but was detected on the samples which had been handled including those which had been cleaned. Cell covers suspected of being contaminated while in storage and covers which were not exposed to the same storage conditions were analyzed for chlorine. Although no chlorine was found on the covers from cells, it was found on all stored covers. Results are presented with techniques shown for analysis and identification. Relevant photomicrographs are presented.

  18. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John

    1991-05-01

    An analysis was made of Lithium/carbon fluoride cell parts for possible chloride contamination induced by exposure to thionyl chloride (SOCl2); various samples were submitted for analysis. Only a portion of the analysis which has been conducted is covered, herein, namely analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). A strip of nickel was exposed to SOCl2 vapors to observe variations in surface concentrations of sulfur and chlorine with time. By detecting chlorine one can not infer contamination by SOCl2 only that contamination is present. Six samples of stainless steel foil were analyzed for chlorine using EDS. Chlorine was not detected on background samples but was detected on the samples which had been handled including those which had been cleaned. Cell covers suspected of being contaminated while in storage and covers which were not exposed to the same storage conditions were analyzed for chlorine. Although no chlorine was found on the covers from cells, it was found on all stored covers. Results are presented with techniques shown for analysis and identification. Relevant photomicrographs are presented.

  19. X-ray mapping in electron-beam instruments.

    PubMed

    Friel, John J; Lyman, Charles E

    2006-02-01

    This review traces the development of X-ray mapping from its beginning 50 years ago through current analysis procedures that can reveal otherwise obscure elemental distributions and associations. X-ray mapping or compositional imaging of elemental distributions is one of the major capabilities of electron beam microanalysis because it frees the operator from the necessity of making decisions about which image features contain elements of interest. Elements in unexpected locations, or in unexpected association with other elements, may be found easily without operator bias as to where to locate the electron probe for data collection. X-ray mapping in the SEM or EPMA may be applied to bulk specimens at a spatial resolution of about 1 microm. X-ray mapping of thin specimens in the TEM or STEM may be accomplished at a spatial resolution ranging from 2 to 100 nm, depending on specimen thickness and the microscope. Although mapping has traditionally been considered a qualitative technique, recent developments demonstrate the quantitative capabilities of X-ray mapping techniques. Moreover, the long-desired ability to collect and store an entire spectrum at every pixel is now a reality, and methods for mining these data are rapidly being developed.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis of defects in mature rat incisor enamel after thyroparathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Chardin, H; Acevedo, A C; Risnes, S

    1998-04-01

    The surface and the structure of the erupted enamel of the continuously growing rat incisor were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyse the effect of thyroparathyroidectomy on enamel formation. Ten male 21-day-old Wistar rats were thyroparathyroidectomized and five sham-operated rats were used as controls. Two months after surgery the rats were perfused with 1% glutaraldehyde and their mandibles dissected. The erupted ends of the incisors were cut off and routinely processed for SEM. An energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX analysis) was performed for the calcium:iron ratio of the enamel surface defects. Thyroparathyroidectomy induced surface defects and structural abnormalities in the outer layer of the mature erupted enamel. It was established that the surface and structural defects were related. The EDX analysis of the outer enamel showed that the enamel defects were associated with an abnormal elevation of the iron content. The SEM appearance and the EDX analyses indicated that these defects were hypomineralized and rich in iron. The reddish colour of the enamel is due to the high concentrations of iron.

  1. Characterization of wood dust from furniture by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Gómez Yepes, Milena Elizabeth; Cremades, Lázaro V

    2011-01-01

    Study characterized and analyzed form factor, elementary composition and particle size of wood dust, in order to understand its harmful health effects on carpenters in Quindío (Colombia). Once particle characteristics (size distributions, aerodynamic equivalent diameter (D(α)), elemental composition and shape factors) were analyzed, particles were then characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXRA). SEM analysis of particulate matter showed: 1) cone-shaped particle ranged from 2.09 to 48.79 µm D(α); 2) rectangular prism-shaped particle from 2.47 to 72.9 µm D(α); 3) cylindrically-shaped particle from 2.5 to 48.79 µm D(α); and 4) spherically-shaped particle from 2.61 to 51.93 µm D(α). EDXRA reveals presence of chemical elements from paints and varnishes such as Ca, K, Na and Cr. SEM/EDXRA contributes in a significant manner to the morphological characterization of wood dust. It is obvious that the type of particles sampled is a complex function of shapes and sizes of particles. Thus, it is important to investigate the influence of particles characteristics, morphology, shapes and D(α) that may affect the health of carpenters in Quindío.

  2. An introduction to X-ray astronomy data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morini, M.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * X-RAY COSMIC SOURCES * X-RAY ASTRONOMY DETECTORS * CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF X-RAY ASTRONOMY DATA * ENERGY SPECTRA ANALYSIS * TIME VARIABILITY ANALYSIS * IMAGE ANALYSIS * References

  3. An analysis of FtsZ assembly using small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuchibhatla, Anuradha; Abdul Rasheed, A S; Narayanan, Janaky; Bellare, Jayesh; Panda, Dulal

    2009-04-09

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used for the first time to study the self-assembly of the bacterial cell division protein, FtsZ, with three different additives: calcium chloride, monosodium glutamate and DEAE-dextran hydrochloride in solution. The SAXS data were analyzed assuming a model form factor and also by a model-independent analysis using the pair distance distribution function. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for direct observation of the FtsZ filaments. By sectioning and negative staining with glow discharged grids, very high bundling as well as low bundling polymers were observed under different assembly conditions. FtsZ polymers formed different structures in the presence of different additives and these additives were found to increase the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments by different mechanisms. The combined use of SAXS and TEM provided us a significant insight of the assembly of FtsZ and microstructures of the assembled FtsZ polymers.

  4. Studies on x-ray and UV emissions in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2008-02-15

    A novel electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source is constructed based on the ECR technique. In this paper, the possibility of using the ECR x-ray source for producing UV rays by optimizing the plasma parameters is explored. X-ray and UV emissions from the ECR x-ray source are carried out for argon, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} plasma. The x-ray spectral and dose measurements are carried with NaI(Tl) based spectrometer and dosimeter, respectively. For UV measurement, a quartz window arrangement is made at the exit port and the UV intensity is measured at 5 cm from the quartz plate using UV meter. The x-ray and UV emissions are carried out for different microwave power levels and gas pressures. The x-ray emission is observed in the pressure range {<=}10{sup -5} Torr, whereas the UV emission is found to be negligible for the gas pressures <10{sup -5} Torr and it starts increasing in the pressure range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -3} Torr. At high-pressure range, collision frequency of electron-atom is large which leads to the higher UV flux. At low pressure, the electron-atom collision frequency is low and hence the electrons reach high energy and by hitting the cavity wall produces higher x-ray flux. By choosing proper experimental conditions and plasma gas species, the same source can be used as either an x-ray source or an UV source.

  5. VETA-I x ray test analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissenden, R. J. V.; Chartas, G.; Freeman, M. D.; Hughes, J. P.; Kellogg, E. M.; Podgorski, W. A.; Schwartz, D. A.; Zhao, P.

    1992-01-01

    This interim report presents some definitive results from our analysis of the VETA-I x-ray testing data. It also provides a description of the hardware and software used in the conduct of the VETA-I x-ray test program performed at the MSFC x-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). These test results also serve to supply data and information to include in the TRW final report required by DPD 692, DR XC04. To provide an authoritative compendium of results, we have taken nine papers as published in the SPIE Symposium, 'Grazing Incidence X-ray/EUV Optics for Astronomy and Projection Lithography' and have reproduced them as the content of this report.

  6. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Tomokazu Hirano, Tomohiko Suyama, Motohiro

    2016-01-28

    We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

  7. Analysis of a Novel Diffractive Scanning Wire Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for Discriminative Profiling of Electron Vs. X Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-01

    Recent numerical studies of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime indicate a large sensitivity of the gain to the degree of transverse overlap (and associated phase coherence) between the electron and photon beams traveling down the insertion device. Simulations of actual systems imply that accurate detection and correction for this relative loss of overlap, rather than correction for the absolute departure of the electron beam from a fixed axis, is the preferred function of an FEL amplifier's Beam Position Monitor (BPM) and corrector systems. In this note we propose a novel diffractive BPM with the capability of simultaneously detecting and resolving the absolute (and relative) transverse positions and profiles of electron and x-ray beams co-propagating through an undulator. We derive the equations governing the performance of the BPM and examine its predicted performance for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), viz., for profiling multi-GeV electron bunches co-propagating with one-to-several-hundred keV x-ray beams. Selected research and development (r&d) tasks for fabricating and testing the proposed BPM are discussed.

  8. Lung dust content in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a study with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x ray analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Monsó, E; Tura, J M; Pujadas, J; Morell, F; Ruiz, J; Morera, J

    1991-01-01

    Examination with an optical microscope and polarised light is not sensitive enough to detect low diameter asbestos fibres. This limitation implies that some cases of asbestosis can be erroneously diagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) if asbestos bodies are not found in the standard examination of abnormal tissue. To determine whether IPF is over-diagnosed, a study was carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x ray analysis (EDXA) on 25 samples previously diagnosed as IPF at the standard examination. Scanning electron microscopy will show the presence of low diameter fibres in the lung without tissue destruction, and these fibres can be identified using EDXA. The quantitative and qualitative results for lung tissue from patients diagnosed as having IPF were compared with the results of the examination of 25 samples of normal lung. Most of the samples from patients diagnosed as having IPF showed only occasional inorganic particles (less than 10 particles/SEM field at 160 x), results equivalent to the results obtained in normal lung. Two cases of IPF, however, showed innumerable asbestos fibres (greater than 100 fibres/SEM field). One of these two patients had an antecedent of brief exposure to asbestos. No environmental antecedent was found in the second patient. Asbestosis was the final diagnosis for these two patients. The examination of inorganic particles in normal lungs showed mainly non-fibrous silicates (61.4%) and particles of heavy elements (34.9%). Only one asbestos fibre was found (0.9%). It is concluded that standard pathological techniques overdiagnose IPF in a few cases in which asbestos bodies are not found with the optical microscope. Images PMID:2039745

  9. Use of electron microprobe x-ray analysis for determination of low calcium concentrations across leaves deficient in calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, D. J.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An electron microprobe with wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (WDS) was found to be useful for the determination of Ca concentrations in leaf tissue deficient in Ca. WDS effectively detected Ca concentrations as low as 0.2 mg/g dry wt in the presence of high levels of K and Mg (120 and 50 mg/g dry wt, respectively). Leaf specimens were prepared for analysis by quick-freezing in liquid nitrogen and freeze-drying at -20 degrees C to maintain elemental integrity within the tissue. Because dry material was analyzed, sample preparation was simple and samples could be stored for long periods before analysis. A large beam diameter of 50 gm was used to minimize tissue damage under the beam and analyze mineral concentrations within several cells at one time. Beam penetration was between 50 and 55 microns, approximately one-third of the thickness of the leaf. For analysis of concentrations in interveinal areas, analyses directed into the abaxial epidermis were found most useful. However, because of limited beam penetration, analyses of veinal areas would require use of cross sections [correction of crosssections]. Solid mineral standards were used for instrument standardization. To prevent measurement errors resulting from differences between the matrix of the mineral standards and the analyzed tissue, concentrations in leaves were corrected using gelatin standards prepared and analyzed under the same conditions. WDS was found to be useful for documenting that very low Ca levels occur in specific areas of lettuce leaves exhibiting the Ca deficiency injury termed tipburn.

  10. Proton induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and selective x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sokaras, D.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Fliegauf, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Karydas, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We present the analytical features and performance of an x-ray spectroscopy end station of moderate energy resolution operating with proton-induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams. The apparatus was designed, installed and operated at the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG Accelerator Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos,' Athens. The setup includes a two-level ultrahigh vacuum chamber that hosts in the lower level up to six primary targets in a rotatable holder; there, the irradiation of pure element materials-used as primary targets-with few-MeV high current ({approx}{mu}A) proton beams produces intense quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams of selectable energy. In the chamber's upper level, a six-position rotatable sample holder hosts the targets considered for x-ray spectroscopy studies. The proton-induced x-ray beam, after proper collimation, is guided to the sample position whereas various filters can be also inserted along the beam's path to eliminate the backscattered protons or/and to absorb selectively components of the x-ray beam. The apparatus incorporates an ultrathin window Si(Li) spectrometer (FWHM 136 eV at 5.89 keV) coupled with low-noise electronics capable of efficiently detecting photons down to carbon K{alpha}. Exemplary soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and results of selective x-ray fluorescence analysis are presented.

  11. Analysis of 20 KEV Electron Induced X-Ray Production in Skull, Femur/tibia Bones of Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Watson, Alec; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2010-04-01

    Hind-limb suspension (HLS) of rats is a NASA validated model of simulated weightlessness. This study examines the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system of rats to assess whether or not exposure of rats to HLS for one week will induce alteration of structural features in selected bones. Four groups of rats were used: two unsuspended controls and two suspended groups. Body weight, food, and water intake were monitored daily before and after suspension. X-rays were measured by a liquid nitrogen cooled Si(li) detector on a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) that provided the 20 keV electron beam. X-ray data were collected from square cross sections between 100 μm2 and 104 μm2. The bones were measured for elemental levels of calcium, phosphorus, oxygen and carbon from both control and HLS rats. The average body weight of all HLS groups decreased compared to their respective unsuspended controls. Food and water intake was also lower in both suspended groups. A correlation among HLS and control samples in terms of the distribution of the primary elements was found in the bone tissue when analyzed as a function of position along the hind-leg and within the cross sections.

  12. Comparative analysis of isolated cellular organelles by means of soft X-ray contact microscopy with laser-plasma source and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Limongi, T; Palladino, L; Tomassetti, G; Reale, L; Cesare, P; Flora, F; Aimola, P; Ragnelli, A M

    2004-04-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM) is, at present, a useful tool for the examination at submicrometre resolution of biological systems maintained in their natural hydrated conditions. Among current X-ray-generating devices, laser-plasma sources are now easily available and, owing to their pulse nature, offer the opportunity to observe living biological samples before radiation damage occurs, even if the resolution achievable is not as high as with synchrotron-produced X-rays. To assess the potential of laser-plasma source SXCM in the study of cellular organelles, we applied it for the analysis of chloroplasts extracted from spinach leaves and mitochondria isolated from bovine heart and liver. X-ray radiation was generated by a nanosecond laser-plasma source, produced by a single shot excimer XeCl laser focused onto an yttrium target. The images obtained with SXCM were then compared with those produced by transmission electron microscopy observation of the same samples prepared with negative staining, a technique requiring no chemical fixation, in order to facilitate their interpretation and test the applicability of SXCM imaging.

  13. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  14. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the O1s→π* transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  15. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  16. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  17. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  18. Suborbital Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy with Gaseous Electron Multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Thomas D.

    This thesis consists of the design, fabrication, and launch of a sounding rocket payload to observe the spectrum of the soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This instrument, designated the Off-plane Grating Rocket for Extended Source Spectroscopy (OGRESS), was launched from White Sands Missile Range on May 2nd, 2015. The X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire-grid focuser feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount which dispersed the spectrum onto Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. The gain characteristics of OGRESS's GEM detectors were fully characterized with respect to applied voltage and internal gas pressure, allowing operational settings to be optimized. The GEMs were optimized to operate below laboratory atmospheric pressure, allowing lower applied voltages, thus reducing the risk of both electrical arcing and tearing of the thin detector windows. The instrument recorded 388 seconds of data and found highly uniform count distributions over both detector faces, in sharp contrast to the expected thermal line spectrum. This signal is attributed to X-ray fluorescence lines generated inside the spectrograph. The radiation is produced when thermal ionospheric particles are accelerated into the interior walls of the spectrograph by the high voltages of the detector windows. A fluorescence model was found to fit the flight data better than modeled supernova spectra. Post-flight testing and analysis revealed that electrons produce distinct signal on the detectors which can also be successfully modeled as fluorescence emission.

  19. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Kim W.; Turman, Bobby N.; Kaye, Ronald J.; Schneider, Larry X.

    2000-01-01

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  20. Oil Wearmetal Analysis by X-Ray (OWAX).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    radioisotopes and x-ray tubes. 4 X-RAY FLUORESCENCE TECHNIQUE X-Ray Source X-Ray Detector ( Radioisotope or X-ray Tube (Proportional Counter or Solid State...for short analysis times (500 seconds or less), the low sensitivity fcr bulk analyses, and the difficulties in filtering large quantities if oil combine...rapid, temporary deployment of aircraft, as it will provide immediate analysis of wearmetal trends with no special operator training or extensive

  1. Laser Electron Generator of the X-Ray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Bessonov, E. G.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu. Ya.; Popov, N. L.; Postnov, A. A.; Uspenski, Yu. A.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Shabalin, Yu. V.; Slovokhotov, Yu. L.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.; Ishanov, B. S.; Poseryaev, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Kostrukov, P. V.; Tunkin, V. G.

    The possibility of the creation and the application prospects of the laser-electron X-ray generator based on the Thompson scattering of the laser radiation on a bunch of relativistic electrons are considered. Such a generator fills the existing gap between X-ray tubes and synchrotron sources, which is several orders of magnitude in terms of the brightness, average intensity, size and also in the construction and exploitation costs. The layout of beam-lines and experimental stations intended for the applications of the X-ray laser-electron generator to the investigation of the elemental composition and material structure and biological objects is discussed.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis of silver-coated gold nanorods designed for bionanotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Honda, Takumi; Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Nishida, Minoru; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2017-01-01

    Multicomponent nano-agents were designed and built via a core-shell approach to enhance their surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. These nano-agents had 36 nm × 12 nm gold nanorod cores coated by 4 nm thick silver shell films and a subsequent thin bifunctional thiolated polyethylene glycol (HS-PEG-COOH) layer. Ambient time-lapsed SERS signal measurements of these functionalized nanorods taken over a two-week period indicated no signal degradation, suggesting that large portions of the silver shells remained in pure metallic form. The morphology of the nanorods was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultra-high resolution scanning TEM. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were utilized to assess the oxidation states of the silver shells covered by HS-PEG-COOH. The binding energies of Ag 3d XPS spectra yielded very small chemical shifts with oxidation; however, the AES peak shapes gave meaningful information about the extent of oxidation undergone by the nano-agent. While the silver shells without HS-PEG-COOH coatings oxidized significantly, the silver shells with HS-PEG-COOH remained predominantly metallic. In fact, six month-old samples still retained mostly metallic silver shells. These findings further demonstrate the stability and longevity of the nanostructures, indicating their significant potential as plasmonically active agents for highly sensitive detection in various biological systems, including cancer cells, tissues, or even organisms.

  3. Note: Alignment/focus dependent core-line sensitivity for quantitative chemical analysis in hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using a hemispherical electron analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Conan; Browning, Raymond; Karlin, Barry A.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2013-03-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an established technique for quantitative chemical analysis requiring accurate peak intensity analysis. We present evidence of focus/alignment dependence of relative peak intensities for peaks over a broad kinetic energy range with a hemispherical electron analyzer operated in a position imaging mode. A decrease of over 50% in the Ag 2p{sub 3/2} to Ag 3d ratio is observed in a Ag specimen. No focus/alignment dependence is observed when using an angular imaging mode, necessitating the use of angular mode for quantitative chemical analysis.

  4. Note: Alignment/focus dependent core-line sensitivity for quantitative chemical analysis in hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using a hemispherical electron analyzer.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Conan; Browning, Raymond; Karlin, Barry A; Fischer, Daniel A; Woicik, Joseph C

    2013-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an established technique for quantitative chemical analysis requiring accurate peak intensity analysis. We present evidence of focus∕alignment dependence of relative peak intensities for peaks over a broad kinetic energy range with a hemispherical electron analyzer operated in a position imaging mode. A decrease of over 50% in the Ag 2p₃/₂ to Ag 3d ratio is observed in a Ag specimen. No focus∕alignment dependence is observed when using an angular imaging mode, necessitating the use of angular mode for quantitative chemical analysis.

  5. Design optimization and transverse coherence analysis for an x-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    I present a design study for an X-ray Free Electron Laser driven by the SLAC linac, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The study assumes the LCLS is based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Following a brief review of the fundamentals of SASE, I will provide without derivation a collection of formulas relating SASE performance to the system parameters. These formulas allow quick evaluation of FEL designs and provide powerful tools for optimization in multi-dimensional parameter space. Optimization is carried out for the LCLS over all independent system parameters modeled, subjected to a number of practical constraints. In addition to the optimizations concerning gain and power, another important consideration for a single pass FEL starting from noise is the transverse coherence property of the amplified radiation, especially at short wavelength. A widely used emittance criteria for FELs requires that the emittance is smaller than the radiation wavelength divided by 4{pi}. For the LCLS the criteria is violated by a factor of 5, at a normalized emittance of 1.5 mm-mrad, wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, and beam energy of 15 GeV. Thus it is important to check quantitatively the emittance effect on the transverse coherence. I will examine the emittance effect on transverse coherence by analyzing different transverse modes and show that full transverse coherence can be obtained even at the LCLS parameter regime.

  6. Atmospheric electron-induced x-ray spectrometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.; Urgiles, Eduardo; Toda, Risaku; Crisp, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper extends the work reported at the IEEE Aerospace conference in 2001 and 2003 where the concept and progress in the development of the so called atmospheric Electron X-ray Spectrometer (AEXS) has been described.

  7. Larch: X-ray Analysis for Synchrotron Applications using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Larch is an open-source library and toolkit written in Python for processing and analyzing X-ray spectroscopic data. The primary emphasis is on X-ray spectroscopic and scattering data collected at modern synchrotron sources. Larch provides a wide selection of general-purpose processing, analysis, and visualization tools for processing X-ray data; its related target application areas include X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps, quantitative X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and X-ray standing waves and surface scattering. Larch provides a complete set of XAFS Analysis tools and has support for visualizing and analyzing XRF maps and spectra, and additional tools for X-ray spectral analysis, data handling, and general-purpose data modeling.

  8. Development of miniaturized electron probe X-ray microanalyzer.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Imanishi, Akira; Kawai, Jun

    2011-11-15

    A miniaturized electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA) with a small chamber including the electron source and the sample stage was realized using a pyroelectric crystal as an electron source. The EPMA we propose is the smallest reported so far. Performance of the EPMA was evaluated by investigating energy of obtained continuous X-rays and lower detection limits of transition metals (titanium, iron, and nickel). End point energy (Duane-Hunt limit) of continuous X-rays of 45 keV was obtained. However, it is expected that the EPMA can analyze characteristic X-rays with energy less than 20 keV. The EPMA was able to measure titanium, iron, and nickel wires whose projected areas were more than 0.03 mm(2).

  9. Growth and texture of spark plasma sintered Al2O3 ceramics: A combined analysis of X-rays and electron back scatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravarthana, D.; Chateigner, D.; Lutterotti, L.; Lacotte, M.; Marinel, S.; Dubos, P. A.; Hervas, I.; Hug, E.; Salvador, P. A.; Prellier, W.

    2013-04-01

    Textured alumina ceramics were obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering of undoped commercial α-Al2O3 powders. Various parameters (density, grain growth, grain size distribution) of the alumina ceramics, sintered at two typical temperatures 1400 °C and 1700 °C, are investigated. Quantitative textural and structural analysis, carried out using a combination of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction and X-ray diffraction, are represented in the form of mapping and pole figures. The mechanical properties of these textured alumina ceramics include high elastic modulus and hardness values with high anisotropic nature, opening the door for a large range of applications.

  10. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part I: Analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a deceased person's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Each of these techniques has been extensively studied, especially on living individuals. The current studies (Part I and Part II) were designed to compare the use and utility of the different GSR testing techniques in a medical examiner setting. In Part I, the hands of deceased persons who died from undisputed suicidal handgun wounds were tested for GSR by SEM-EDX over a 4-year period. A total of 116 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and results of GSR testing, including spatial deposition upon the hands. It was found that in only 50% of cases with a known self-inflicted gunshot wound was SEM-EDX positive for at least 1 specific particle for GSR. In 18% of the cases there was a discernible pattern (spatial distribution) of the particles on the hand such that the manner in which the weapon was held could be determined. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon immediately prior to death were positive for GSR by SEM-EDX, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether a deceased individual has discharged a firearm. Furthermore, in only 18% of cases was a discernible pattern present indicating how the firearm was held. The low sensitivity, along with the low percentage of cases with a discernible pattern, limits the usefulness of GSR test results by SEM-EDX in differentiating self-inflicted from non-self-inflicted wounds.

  11. SU-E-J-09: A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Relationship Between Cherenkov Light Emission and Dose for Electrons, Protons, and X-Ray Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Zhang, R; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A number of recent studies have proposed that light emitted by the Cherenkov effect may be used for a number of radiation therapy dosimetry applications. Here we investigate the fundamental nature and accuracy of the technique for the first time by using a theoretical and Monte Carlo based analysis. Methods: Using the GEANT4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) and BEAMnrc for phase space file generation, the light yield, material variability, field size and energy dependence, and overall agreement between the Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition for electron, proton, and flattened, unflattened, and parallel opposed x-ray photon beams was explored. Results: Due to the exponential attenuation of x-ray photons, Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition were identical for monoenergetic pencil beams. However, polyenergetic beams exhibited errors with depth due to beam hardening, with the error being inversely related to beam energy. For finite field sizes, the error with depth was inversely proportional to field size, and lateral errors in the umbra were greater for larger field sizes. For opposed beams, the technique was most accurate due to an averaging out of beam hardening in a single beam. The technique was found to be not suitable for measuring electron beams, except for relative dosimetry of a plane at a single depth. Due to a lack of light emission, the technique was found to be unsuitable for proton beams. Conclusions: The results from this exploratory study suggest that optical dosimetry by the Cherenkov effect may be most applicable to near monoenergetic x-ray photon beams (e.g. Co-60), dynamic IMRT and VMAT plans, as well as narrow beams used for SRT and SRS. For electron beams, the technique would be best suited for superficial dosimetry, and for protons the technique is not applicable due to a lack of light emission. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  12. Flash X-Ray (FXR) Accelerator Optimization Electronic Time-Resolved Measurement of X-Ray Source Size

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P

    2005-07-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating various approaches to minimize the x-ray source size on the Flash X-Ray (FXR) linear induction accelerator in order to improve x-ray flux and increase resolution for hydrodynamic radiography experiments. In order to effectively gauge improvements to final x-ray source size, a fast, robust, and accurate system for measuring the spot size is required. Timely feedback on x-ray source size allows new and improved accelerator tunes to be deployed and optimized within the limited run-time constraints of a production facility with a busy experimental schedule; in addition, time-resolved measurement capability allows the investigation of not only the time-averaged source size, but also the evolution of the source size, centroid position, and x-ray dose throughout the 70 ns beam pulse. Combined with time-resolved measurements of electron beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and current, key limiting factors can be identified, modeled, and optimized for the best possible spot size. Roll-bar techniques are a widely used method for x-ray source size measurement, and have been the method of choice at FXR for many years. A thick bar of tungsten or other dense metal with a sharp edge is inserted into the path of the x-ray beam so as to heavily attenuate the lower half of the beam, resulting in a half-light, half-dark image as seen downstream of the roll-bar; by measuring the width of the transition from light to dark across the edge of the roll-bar, the source size can be deduced. For many years, film has been the imaging medium of choice for roll-bar measurements thanks to its high resolution, linear response, and excellent contrast ratio. Film measurements, however, are fairly cumbersome and require considerable setup and analysis time; moreover, with the continuing trend towards all-electronic measurement systems, film is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to procure. Here, we shall

  13. Feasibility of coherent X-ray production by X-ray pumping. [inverting electron population in lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csonka, P. L.; Crasemann, B.

    1974-01-01

    It is suggested that coherent X-rays can be produced by inverting the electron population in a suitable target, such as Li, through irradiation with X-rays generated by fast electrons traversing an electromagnetic field (as in a storage ring). Conditions to be satisfied by target and radiation parameters are stated, and examples given.

  14. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  15. Functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nanocomposite fibrous networks: Characterization by fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Neda

    2015-02-01

    The preparation and characterization of functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nano-composite fibrous material is described. Magnetite-cellulose nano-composite was prepared by a combination of the solution-based formation of magnetic nano-particles and subsequent coating with amino celluloses. Characterization was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. The peaks of Fe3O4 in the XRD pattern of nanocomposite confirm existence of the nanoparticles in the amino cellulose matrix. Magnetite-cellulose particles exhibit an average diameter of roughly 33 nm as demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles were irregular spheres dispersed in the cellulose matrix. The vibration corresponding to the Nsbnd CH3 functional group about 2850 cm-1 is assigned in the FTIR spectra. Functionalized magnetite-cellulose nano-composite polymers have a potential range of application as targeted drug delivery system in biomedical field.

  16. Probing Transient Electron Dynamics Using Ultrafast X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Linear x-ray absorption in atoms or molecules creates highly excited multi-electron quantum systems, which relax rapidly by fluorescence or Auger emission. These relaxation rates are usually less than a few femtoseconds in duration, and so they can reveal transient elecronic states in molecules as they undergo photo-induced transformations. I will show recent results from femtosecond x-ray experiments that display this phenomenon. There are efforts underway to push the temporal resolving power of ultrafast x-ray pulses into the attosecond regime, using stronger fields to initiate nonlinear absorption processes such as transient stimulated electronic Raman scattering. I will discuss current progress and future prospects for research in this area. This research is supported through Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Lab by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Science Program.

  17. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  18. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  19. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, A; Coffee, R; Vetter, S; Hering, P; West, G N; Gilevich, S; Lutman, A A; Li, S; Maxwell, T; Galayda, J; Fry, A; Huang, Z

    2016-06-24

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  20. X-ray atomic orbital analysis of 4f and 5d electron configuration of SmB6 at 100, 165, 230 and 298 K.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Shiro; Tanaka, Kiyoaki; Iga, Fumitoshi

    2010-06-01

    Accurate electron-density measurement of SmB(6) at 100, 165, 230 and 298 K, and X-ray atomic orbital (XAO) analysis were carried out. The 4f-electron density around Sm and 5d electron density at approximately 1 A from Sm were analysed by XAO analysis. The 5d electron density is due to the electrons of the 5d(J = 5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals which stem from the e(g) orbitals in the strong field approximation. The change in electron populations of the 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals with temperature is similar to that of the resistivity. Since the conduction band consists of 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) and B-2p orbitals according to band theory, this indicates that the larger populations of the 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals correspond to the larger number of localized electrons and are correlated to the resistivity of SmB(6). The occupation of the bulky 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals may be the reason for the elongation of the lattice parameter below 150 K. The 4f(7/2)Gamma(6) orbitals are obviously occupied except at 100 K, which seems to be caused by the energy gap between 4f(5/2) and 4f(7/2) states, which begins to exist between 100 and 150 K, and may represent one of the properties of a Kondo insulator.

  1. X-ray absorption in pillar shaped transmission electron microscopy specimens.

    PubMed

    Bender, H; Seidel, F; Favia, P; Richard, O; Vandervorst, W

    2017-03-07

    The dependence of the X-ray absorption on the position in a pillar shaped transmission electron microscopy specimen is modeled for X-ray analysis with single and multiple detector configurations and for different pillar orientations relative to the detectors. Universal curves, applicable to any pillar diameter, are derived for the relative intensities between weak and medium or strongly absorbed X-ray emission. For the configuration as used in 360° X-ray tomography, the absorption correction for weak and medium absorbed X-rays is shown to be nearly constant along the pillar diameter. Absorption effects in pillars are about a factor 3 less important than in planar specimens with thickness equal to the pillar diameter. A practical approach for the absorption correction in pillar shaped samples is proposed and its limitations discussed. The modeled absorption dependences are verified experimentally for pillars with HfO2 and SiGe stacks.

  2. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; ...

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarilymore » by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.« less

  3. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  4. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  5. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Grguraš, I; Behrens, C; Bromberger, H; Costello, J T; Czwalinna, M K; Felber, M; Hoffmann, M C; Ilchen, M; Liu, H Y; Mazza, T; Meyer, M; Pfeiffer, S; Prędki, P; Schefer, S; Schmidt, C; Wegner, U; Schlarb, H; Cavalieri, A L

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  6. Investigating the electron density of multi-MeV X-ray-induced air plasmas at low pressures based on electromagnetic resonant cavity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribière, M.; d'Almeida, T.; Cessenat, O.; Maulois, M.; Pouzalgues, R.; Crabos, B.; Delbos, C.; Garrigues, A.; Azaïs, B.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate air plasmas generated by multi-MeV pulsed X-rays at pressures ranging from 10-5 to 10-1 mbar. The experimental approach used for these studies is based on measurements of resonant frequencies damping and shift for different electromagnetic modes within a cylindrical cavity. Time-integrated electron densities in X-ray-induced air plasmas are inferred from the damping rate of the measured magnetic fields and their corresponding frequency shifts. In the present study, electron densities ranging from 108 to 109 cm-3 at pressures ranging from 10-3 to 10-1 mbar have been measured. Experimental results were confronted to 3D Maxwell-Vlasov Particle-In-Cell simulations incorporating a radiation-induced electric conductivity model. The method used in this work enables determining microscopic and macroscopic physical quantities within low pressure air plasmas generated by pulsed X-ray.

  7. Deducing Electron Properties from Hard X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontar, E. P.; Brown, J. C.; Emslie, A. G.; Hajdas, W.; Holman, G. D.; Hurford, G. J.; Kasparova, J.; Mallik, P. C. V.; Massone, A. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Piana, M.; Prato, M.; Schmahl, E. J.; Suarez-Garcia, E.

    2011-01-01

    X-radiation from energetic electrons is the prime diagnostic of flare-accelerated electrons. The observed X-ray flux (and polarization state) is fundamentally a convolution of the cross-section for the hard X-ray emission process(es) in question with the electron distribution function, which is in turn a function of energy, direction, spatial location and time. To address the problems of particle propagation and acceleration one needs to infer as much information as possible on this electron distribution function, through a deconvolution of this fundamental relationship. This review presents recent progress toward this goal using spectroscopic, imaging and polarization measurements, primarily from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Previous conclusions regarding the energy, angular (pitch angle) and spatial distributions of energetic electrons in solar flares are critically reviewed. We discuss the role and the observational evidence of several radiation processes: free-free electron-ion, free-free electron-electron, free-bound electron-ion, photoelectric absorption and Compton backscatter (albedo), using both spectroscopic and imaging techniques. This unprecedented quality of data allows for the first time inference of the angular distributions of the X-ray-emitting electrons and improved model-independent inference of electron energy spectra and emission measures of thermal plasma. Moreover, imaging spectroscopy has revealed hitherto unknown details of solar flare morphology and detailed spectroscopy of coronal, footpoint and extended sources in flaring regions. Additional attempts to measure hard X-ray polarization were not sufficient to put constraints on the degree of anisotropy of electrons, but point to the importance of obtaining good quality polarization data in the future.

  8. Development and comparison of the methods for quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis analysis of thin specimens and their application to biological material.

    PubMed

    Warley, A

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a return to the use of electron probe X-ray microanalysis for biological studies but this has occurred at a time when the Hall programme which acted as the mainstay for biological microanalysis is no longer easily available. Commercial quantitative routines rely on the Cliff-Lorimer method that was originally developed for materials science applications. Here, the development of these two main routines for obtaining quantitative data from thin specimens is outlined and the limitations that are likely to be met when the Cliff-Lorimer routine is applied to biological specimens is discussed. The effects of specimen preparation on element content is briefly summarized and the problems encountered when using quantitative analysis on resin-embedded materials emphasized.

  9. Effects of Pamidronate on Dental Enamel Formation Assessed by Light Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Microhardness Testing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana P; do Espírito Santo, Renan F; Line, Sérgio R P; Pinto, Maria das G F; Santos, Pablo de M; Toralles, Maria Betania P; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory-stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical properties of mature enamel of upper incisors from adult rats that had been treated with pamidronate disodium (0.5 mg/kg/week for 56 days), using transmitted polarizing and bright-field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness testing. BFLM showed no morphological changes of the EOECM in pamidronate and control groups, but TPLM revealed a statistically significant reduction in optical retardation values of birefringence brightness of pamidronate-treated rats when compared with control animals (p0.05). The present study indicates that pamidronate can affect birefringence of the secretory-stage EOECM, which does not seem to be associated with significant changes in morphological and/or mechanical properties of mature enamel.

  10. X-Ray Computed Tomography for Failure Analysis Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    AD-A268 086 WL-TR-93-4047 X - RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR FAILURE ANALYSIS INVESTIGATIONS Richard H. Bossi William Shepherd Boeing Defense & Space... X - Ray Computed Tomography for Failure Analysis Investigations PE: 63112F PR: 3153 6. AUTilOR(S) TA: 00 Richard H. Bossi and William Shepherd WU: 06 7...feature detection and three-dimensional positioning capability of X - ray computed tomography are valuable and cost saving assets to a failure analysis

  11. The physics of x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Marinelli, A.; Reiche, S.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (x-ray FELs) give us for the first time the possibility to explore structures and dynamical processes of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scales. They generate coherent photon pulses with time duration of a few to 100 fs, peak power of 10 to 100 GW, over a wavelength range extending from about 100 nm to less than 1 Å. Using these novel and unique capabilities new scientific results are being obtained in atomic and molecular sciences, in areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This paper reviews the physical principles, the theoretical models, and the numerical codes on which x-ray FELs are based, starting from a single electron spontaneous undulator radiation to the FEL collective instability of a high density electron beam, strongly enhancing the electromagnetic radiation field intensity and its coherence properties. A short review is presented of the main experimental properties of x-ray FELs, and the results are discussed of the most recent research to improve their longitudinal coherence properties, increase the peak power, and generate multicolor spectra.

  12. ELECTRON INJECTORS FOR NEXT GENERATION X-RAY SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUEM,H.; BEN-ZVI,I.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; ET AL.

    2004-08-02

    Next generation x-ray sources require very high-brightness electron beams that are typically at or beyond the present state-of-the-art, and thus place stringent and demanding requirements upon the electron injector parameters. No one electron source concept is suitable for all the diverse applications envisaged, which have operating characteristics ranging from high-average-current, quasi-CW, to high-peak-current, single-pulse electron beams. Advanced Energy Systems, in collaboration with various partners, is developing several electron injector concepts for these x-ray source applications. The performance and design characteristics of five specific RF injectors, spanning ''L'' to ''X''-band, normal-conducting to superconducting, and low repetition rate to CW, which are presently in various stages of design, construction or testing, is described. We also discuss the status and schedule of each with respect to testing.

  13. [X-ray fluorescence analysis in archaeometry: application and expectation].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Mao, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Shi-ding

    2006-12-01

    This article describes the applications of X-ray fluorescence in archaeology research, including the appraisal, dating, provenance and mine material origin analysis of cultural relic, the study of manufacturing technics and production of cultural relic, etc. It also suggests some expectation and problems, in order to draw attention of X-ray fluorescence analysts and archaeologists, promote the in-depth development of X-ray fluorescence analysis application in archaeology research, and further make more contributions to Chinese archaeology research.

  14. Electron microscopy, micro-analysis, and X-ray diffraction characterization of the mineral-like tissue deposited by human cementum tumor-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Arzate, H; Alvarez-Pérez, M A; Alvarez-Fregoso, O; Wusterhaus-Chávez, A; Reyes-Gasga, J; Ximénez-Fyvie, L A

    2000-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the mineralized-like tissue deposited by cementoblasts are not well-known due to the difficulties in obtaining and culturing cells representing the cementum phenotype. We hypothesized that a putative cementoblastic cell line derived from a human cementoblastoma could serve as a suitable model to study the physical, chemical, and morphological features of the cementum-like tissue deposited in vitro. The cementoblastoma cell line was studied by transmission electron, high resolution, scanning, and atomic force microscopy and compared with human cellular cementum, human osteoblasts, and human alveolar bone. The analyses of the crystals and mineral-like tissue in the cell line were performed by x-ray diffraction microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray micro-analysis. TEM examination of cementoblastoma cells revealed the presence of electron-dense intracellular vesicles surrounded by a membrane that contained filaments and needle-like structures. The diffraction patterns obtained from the intracellular material and human cellular cementum were similar, with D-spacings of 3.36 and 2.8, consistent with those of hydroxyapatite (3.440 and 2.814). The composition of the mineral-like tissue had a Ca/P ratio of 1.60 for cementoblastoma cells and 1.97 for human cellular cementum. Na (5.29%) and Cl (1.47%) were present in the composition of cementoblastoma cells. Human cellular cementum additionally contained Mg (4.95%). Osteoblastic cells showed a Ca/P ratio of 1.6280. Na represented 4.52% and Cl 1.22% of its composition. Human alveolar bone had a Ca/P ratio value of 2.01. Na (6.63%), Mg (2.10%), and Cl (0.84%) were also present. All samples examined represented biological-type hydroxyapatite. Based on the compositional and morphological features, these findings indicate that cementoblastoma-derived cells express the human cellular cementum phenotype.

  15. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  16. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.; Wang, X.; Bhowmik, A.; Bobbs, B.; Cover, R.A.; Dixon, F.P.; Rakowsky, G.; Gallardo, J.; Pellegrini, C.; Westenskow, G.

    1988-09-09

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Search for X-rays and relativistic electrons in laboratory discharge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostgaard, Nikolai; Carlson, Brant E.; Grøndahl, Øystein; Kochkin, Pavlo; Nisi, Ragnhild S.; Gjesteland, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In 2013 discharge experiments were carried out at the Technical University of Eindhoven. The experimental set-up was designed to search for both X-rays and electrons produced in meter-scale sparks using a 1 MV Marx generator. In this paper we present the spatial distribution of signals and examine whether they are X-rays only or X-rays and electrons. Other characteristics of the signals will be presented as well. These experiments are carried out in the context of a larger effort to understand the various phenomena of X-rays and gammas from natural lightning. We acknowledge Z. Scherrer, K. Weber and K. LeCaptain at the Carthage college for supporting the initial data-analysis.

  18. The role of X-ray spectroscopy in understanding the geometric and electronic structure of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-06-01

    X-ray absorption (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) provide element specific probes of the geometric and electronic structures of metalloprotein active sites. As such, these methods have played an integral role in nitrogenase research beginning with the first EXAFS studies on nitrogenase in the late 1970s. Herein, we briefly explain the information that can be extracted from XAS and XES. We then highlight the recent applications of these methods in nitrogenase research. The influence of X-ray spectroscopy on our current understanding of the atomic structure and electronic structure of iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) is emphasized. Contributions of X-ray spectroscopy to understanding substrate interactions and cluster biosynthesis are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  19. Remote X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The legacy of planetary X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) began in 1960 when W. Parish proposed an XRD instrument for deployment on the moon. The instrument was built and flight qualified, but the Lunar XRD program was cancelled shortly before the first human landing in 1969. XRF chemical data have been collected in situ by surface landers on Mars (Viking 1 & 2, Pathfinder) and Venus (Venera 13 & 14). These highly successful experiments provide critical constraints on our current understanding of surface processes and planetary evolution. However, the mineralogy, which is more critical to planetary surface science than simple chemical analysis, will remain unknown or will at best be imprecisely constrained until X-ray diffraction (XRD) data are collected. Recent progress in X-ray detector technology allows the consideration of simultaneous XRD (mineralogic analysis) and high-precision XRF (elemental analysis) in systems miniaturized to the point where they can be mounted on fixed landers or small robotic rovers. There is a variety of potential targets for XRD/XRF equipped landers within the solar system, the most compelling of which are the poles of the moon, the southern highlands of Mars and Europa.

  20. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, M. Wiemann, C.; Weber, N.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Schneider, C. M.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. The high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.

  1. Researches on stability of microfocus electron-impact x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-tian; Liu, Jun-Biao; Zhao, Wei-xia; Niu, Geng; Han, Li

    2016-10-01

    A microfocus electron-impact X-ray source with micro-beam was introduced in this paper. The tungsten cathode electrogun is used as emitting system, and the focusing system is consists of two magnetic solenoid lenses, it is effective, light and handy. The matching problems between emitting system focusing system are studied on the microfocus X-ray source. The current of the first focusing lens and the second focusing lens is 0.8A and 1.64A at the voltage of 90kV respectively, and the filament current is 2.5A. Under the condition, the micro-beam spot X-ray is gained. The test results of stability showed that the X-ray source have a excellent stability, X-ray intensity of which is 110.6+/-0.03μSr/hr, target current of which is 185.5+/-1.5μA, and the target temperature of which is 96.5+/-0.5°C.The resolution of micro-focus X-ray source is about 4μm by the analysis of JIMA, which meet the application requirement of microfocus X-ray source.

  2. Uncertainty estimates for electron probe X-ray microanalysis measurements.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Nicholas W M; Newbury, Dale E

    2012-11-20

    It has been over 60 years since Castaing (Castaing, R. Application of Electron Probes to Local Chemical and Crystallographic Analysis. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Paris, Paris, France, 1951; translated by P. Duwez and D. Wittry, California Institute of Technology, 1955) introduced the technique of electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA), yet the community remains unable to quantify some of the largest terms in the technique's uncertainty budget. Historically, the EPMA community has assigned uncertainties to its measurements which reflect the measurement precision portion of the uncertainty budget and omitted terms related to the measurement accuracy. Yet, in many cases, the precision represents only a small fraction of the total budget. This paper addresses this shortcoming by considering two significant sources of uncertainty in the quantitative matrix correction models--the mass absorption coefficient, [μ/ρ], and the backscatter coefficient, η. Understanding the influence of these sources provides insight into the utility of EPMA measurements, and equally important, it allows practitioners to develop strategies to optimize measurement accuracy by minimizing the influence of poorly known model parameters.

  3. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  4. Evidence for beamed electrons in a limb X-ray flare observed by Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, Eberhard; Elwert, Gerhard

    1986-01-01

    The limb flare of November 18, 1980, 14:51 UT, was investigated on the basis of X-ray images taken by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) and of X-ray spectra from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The impulsive burst was also recorded at microwave frequencies between 2 and 20 GHz whereas no optical flare and no radio event at frequencies below 1 GHz were reported. The flare occurred directly at the SW limb of the solar disk. Taking advantage of the spatial resolution of HXIS images, the time evolution of the X-radiation originating from relatively small source regions can be studied. Using Monte Carlo computations of the energy distribution of energetic electrons traversing the solar plasma, the bremsstrahlung spectra produced by the electrons were derived.

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.; Naidu, S. V. N.; Houska, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    SOPAD separates overlapping peaks and analyzes derivatives of X-ray diffraction data. SOPAD helps analyst get most information out of available diffraction data. SOPAD uses Marquardt-type nonlinear regression routine to refine initial estimates of individual peak positions, intensities, shapes, and half-widths.

  6. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous and Nonosseous Materials Using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and Multivariate Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    Identification of osseous materials is generally established on gross anatomical features. However, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic and may require chemical analysis. This research was designed to assess the use of scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), elemental analysis, and multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis) for discrimination of osseous and nonosseous materials of similar chemical composition. Sixty samples consisting of osseous (human and nonhuman bone and dental) and non-osseous samples were assessed. After outliers were removed a high overall correct classification of 97.97% was achieved, with 99.86% correct classification for osseous materials. In addition, a blind study was conducted using 20 samples to assess the applicability for using this method to classify unknown materials. All of the blind study samples were correctly classified resulting in 100% correct classification, further demonstrating the efficiency of SEM/EDX and statistical analysis for differentiation of osseous and nonosseous materials.

  7. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emma, C.; Fang, K.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  8. OSO-8 soft X-ray wheel experiment: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The soft X-ray experiment hardware and its operation are described. The device included six X-ray proportional counters, two of which, numbers 1 and 4, were pressurized with on-board methane gas supplies. Number 4 developed an excessive leak rate early in the mission and was turned off on 1975 day number 282 except for brief (typically 2-hour) periods up to day 585 after which it as left off. Counter 1 worked satisfactorily until 1975 day number 1095 (January 1, 1978) at which time the on-board methane supply was depleted. The other four counters were sealed and all except number 3 worked satisfactorily throughout the mission which terminated with permanent satellie shut-down on day 1369. This was the first large area thin-window, gas-flow X-ray detector to be flown in orbit. The background problems were severe and consumed a very large portion of the data analysis effort. These background problems were associated with the Earth's trapped electron belts.

  9. A Novel Rotating-Wave X-Ray Source for Analysis of the Martian Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.; Taylor, M.; Liu, Y.; Hodyss, R.; Allwood, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we present analysis and computer simulations for a new accelerator concept that we are proposing for exploration of various planetary surfaces, including the Martian landscape. The rotating-wave accelerator (RWA) uses rotating-wave fields and an external magnetic field to produce acceleration of a low-energy electron beam to high velocities. X-rays are produced by the electrons upon impinging on a suitable target. A linear analysis of the accelerating process is presented as well as computer simulations. These studies show that the RWA can successfully achieve 200-keV X-rays; energy that is ideally suited for X-ray analysis on Mars and other planetary missions. The RWA development will enable a new generation of very compact, power-efficient imaging and analytical instruments capable of producing high-energy X-rays for standoff planetary surface X-ray analysis such as fluorescence and tomography.

  10. Structural enzymology using X-ray free electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Kupitz, Christopher; Olmos, Jose L; Holl, Mark; Tremblay, Lee; Pande, Kanupriya; Pandey, Suraj; Oberthür, Dominik; Hunter, Mark; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Tenboer, Jason; Calvey, George; Katz, Andrea; Chen, Yujie; Wiedorn, Max O; Knoska, Juraj; Meents, Alke; Majriani, Valerio; Norwood, Tyler; Poudyal, Ishwor; Grant, Thomas; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Weijun; Tolstikova, Aleksandra; Morgan, Andrew; Metz, Markus; Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Zook, James D; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Meza, Domingo; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Frank, Matthias; White, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Bajt, Sasa; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N; Zatsepin, Nadia; Nelson, Garrett; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Schwander, Peter; Pollack, Lois; Fromme, Petra; Ourmazd, Abbas; Phillips, George N; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-07-01

    Mix-and-inject serial crystallography (MISC) is a technique designed to image enzyme catalyzed reactions in which small protein crystals are mixed with a substrate just prior to being probed by an X-ray pulse. This approach offers several advantages over flow cell studies. It provides (i) room temperature structures at near atomic resolution, (ii) time resolution ranging from microseconds to seconds, and (iii) convenient reaction initiation. It outruns radiation damage by using femtosecond X-ray pulses allowing damage and chemistry to be separated. Here, we demonstrate that MISC is feasible at an X-ray free electron laser by studying the reaction of M. tuberculosis ß-lactamase microcrystals with ceftriaxone antibiotic solution. Electron density maps of the apo-ß-lactamase and of the ceftriaxone bound form were obtained at 2.8 Å and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. These results pave the way to study cyclic and non-cyclic reactions and represent a new field of time-resolved structural dynamics for numerous substrate-triggered biological reactions.

  11. Structural enzymology using X-ray free electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kupitz, Christopher; Olmos, Jose L.; Holl, Mark; Tremblay, Lee; Pande, Kanupriya; Pandey, Suraj; Oberthür, Dominik; Hunter, Mark; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Tenboer, Jason; Calvey, George; Katz, Andrea; Chen, Yujie; Wiedorn, Max O.; Knoska, Juraj; Meents, Alke; Majriani, Valerio; Norwood, Tyler; Poudyal, Ishwor; Grant, Thomas; Miller, Mitchell D.; Xu, Weijun; Tolstikova, Aleksandra; Morgan, Andrew; Metz, Markus; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Zook, James D.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Meza, Domingo; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Frank, Matthias; White, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Bajt, Sasa; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Zatsepin, Nadia; Nelson, Garrett; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Schwander, Peter; Pollack, Lois; Fromme, Petra; Ourmazd, Abbas; Phillips, George N.; Schmidt, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Mix-and-inject serial crystallography (MISC) is a technique designed to image enzyme catalyzed reactions in which small protein crystals are mixed with a substrate just prior to being probed by an X-ray pulse. This approach offers several advantages over flow cell studies. It provides (i) room temperature structures at near atomic resolution, (ii) time resolution ranging from microseconds to seconds, and (iii) convenient reaction initiation. It outruns radiation damage by using femtosecond X-ray pulses allowing damage and chemistry to be separated. Here, we demonstrate that MISC is feasible at an X-ray free electron laser by studying the reaction of M. tuberculosis ß-lactamase microcrystals with ceftriaxone antibiotic solution. Electron density maps of the apo-ß-lactamase and of the ceftriaxone bound form were obtained at 2.8 Å and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. These results pave the way to study cyclic and non-cyclic reactions and represent a new field of time-resolved structural dynamics for numerous substrate-triggered biological reactions. PMID:28083542

  12. Method based on artificial excitation of characteristic radiation by an electron beam for remote X-ray spectral elemental analysis of surface rocks on atmosphereless celestial bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.

    2016-11-01

    This article, like our previous one [1], is devoted to advanced space technology concepts. It evaluates the potential for developing active systems to conduct a remote elemental analysis of surface rocks on an atmosphereless celestial body. The analysis is based on the spectrometry of characteristic X-rays (CXR) artificially excited in the surface soil layer. It has been proposed to use an electron beam injected from aboard a spacecraft orbiting the celestial body (or moving in a flyby trajectory) to excite the CXR elements contained in surface rocks. The focus is on specifying technical requirements to the parameters of payloads for a global mapping of the composition of lunar rocks from aboard of a low-orbiting lunar satellite. This article uses the results obtained in [2], our first study that shows the potential to develop an active system for a remote elemental analysis of lunar surface rocks using the above method. Although there has been interest in our research on the part of leading national academic institutions and space technology developers in the Soviet Union, the studies were discontinued because of the termination of the Soviet lunar program and the completion of the American Apollo program.

  13. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  14. Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.

    2012-02-15

    A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

  15. Atmospheric Electron-Induced X-Ray Spectrometer (AEXS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.; Urgiles, Eduardo; Toda, Risaku; George, Thomas; Douglas, Susanne; Crisp, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in the development of the so-called Atmospheric Electron X-ray Spectrometer (AEXS) instrument in our laboratory at JPL. The AEXS is a novel miniature instrument concept based on the excitation of characteristic X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and luminescence spectra using a focused electron beam, for non-destructive evaluation of surfaces of samples in situ, in planetary ambient atmosphere. In situ operation is obtained through the use of a thin electron transmissive membrane to isolate the vacuum within the AEXS electron source from the outside ambient atmosphere. By using a focused electron beam, the impinging electrons on samples in the external atmosphere excite XRF spectra from the irradiated spots with high-to-medium spatial resolution. The XRF spectra are analyzed using an energy-dispersive detector to determine surface elemental composition. The use of high- intensity electron beam results in rapid spectrum acquisition (several minutes), and consequently low energy consumption (several tens of Joules) per acquired XRF spectrum in comparison to similar portable instruments.

  16. X ray microscope assembly and alignment support and advanced x ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted recently to the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft x ray application in microscopy and projection lithography. The spherical Schwarzschild microscope consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for x ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. In order to reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles have been considered in this investigation. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical head reflecting two mirror microscope configurations.

  17. TES X-ray microcalorimeters for X-ray astronomy and material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-11-01

    TES X-ray microcalorimeter arrays provide not only high-energy resolution (FWHM < 10eV) in X-ray spectroscopy but also imaging and high-counting-rate capabilities. They are very promising spectrometer for X-ray astronomy and material analysis. In this paper, we report our recent progress. For material analysis, we have fabricated 8 × 8 format array with a fast signal response ( 40 μs) and proved the energy resolution of 5.8 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV. We developed common biasing scheme to reduce number of wirings from room temperature to the cryogenic stage. From measurements using the newly-designed common-bias SQUID array amplifier chips, and from numerical simulations, we demonstrated that signal cross talks due to the common bias is enough small. For space applications, we are developing frequency-division signal multiplexing system. We have fabricated a baseband feedback system and demonstrated that the noise added by the feedback system is about 4 eV FWHM equivalent for 16 ch multiplexing system. The digital to analog converter (DAC) dominates the noise, and needs be reduced by a factor of four for future astronomy missions.

  18. The angular distribution of energetic electron and X-ray emissions from triggered lightning leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, M. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate individual X-ray bursts from lightning leaders to determine if energetic electrons at the source (and hence X-rays) are emitted isotropically or with some degree of anisotropy. This study was motivated by the work of Saleh et al. (2009), which found the falloff of X-rays in concentric radial annuli, covering all azimuthal directions in each annulus, from the lightning channel to be most consistent with an isotropic electron source. Here we perform a statistical analysis of angular and spatial distributions of X-rays measured by up to 21 NaI/PMT detectors at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing site for 21 leader X-ray bursts from five leaders (including four dart-stepped leaders and one dart leader). Two procedures were used to complete this analysis. Procedure 1 found the first-order anisotropy, and procedure 2 tested whether or not the angular distribution was consistent with an isotropic distribution. Because higher-order anisotropies could be present in the data, a distribution that is not isotropic does not necessarily have a significant first-order anisotropy. Using these procedures, we find that at least 11 out of 21 X-ray bursts have a statistically significant first-order anisotropy, and hence those 11 are inconsistent with an isotropic emission. The remaining 10 bursts do not have significant first-order anisotropy. However, of those 10 bursts, 9 are inconsistent with isotropic emission, since they exhibit significant higher-order anisotropies. Since Saleh et al. (2009) did not consider anisotropies in the azimuthal direction, these new measurements of anisotropy do not necessarily contradict that work. Indeed, our analysis supports the finding that the X-ray emissions from lightning are inconsistent with a vertically downward beam. The level of anisotropy of the runaway electrons is important because it provides, in principle, information on the streamer zone in front of the leader and the electric field near the

  19. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT).

    PubMed

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J; Scott, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK's first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600-1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment.

  20. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT)

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK’s first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600–1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  1. A case of hut lung: scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis of a domestically acquired form of pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Gujral, Manmeet; Abraham, Jerrold L; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Iannuzzi, Michael C

    2013-07-01

    Hut lung is a pneumoconiosis caused by exposure to smoke derived from biomass fuels used for cooking in poorly ventilated huts. We report, to our knowledge, the first analysis of the dust deposited in the lungs in hut lung by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). A Bhutanese woman presented with shortness of breath and an abnormal chest radiograph. Chest CT scan showed innumerable tiny bilateral upper lobe centrilobular nodules. Transbronchial biopsy revealed mild interstitial fibrosis with heavy interstitial deposition of black dust. SEM/EDS showed that the dust was carbonaceous, with smaller yet substantial numbers of silica and silicate particles. Additional history revealed use of a wood/coal-fueled stove in a small, poorly ventilated hut for 45 years. The possibility of hut lung should be considered in women from countries where use of biomass-fueled stoves for cooking is common. Our findings support the classification of this condition as a mixed-dust pneumoconiosis.

  2. Synthesis, X-ray structure analysis, thermodynamic and electronic properties of 4-acetamido benzaldehyde using vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeeva Jasmine, N.; Arunagiri, C.; Subashini, A.; Stanley, N.; Thomas Muthiah, P.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical Spectrograms, namely, FT-Raman (3500-50 cm-1) and FT-Infrared (4000-400 cm-1) spectra have been studied for 4-acetamido benzaldehyde (4ABA) and are assigned to different normal modes of the molecule. Vibrational spectral analysis was compared with the experimental and theoretical, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The effect of polarity on the Harmonic vibrational frequencies, intensities, optimized geometrical parameters and several thermodynamic parameters in the ground state have been computed by the B3LYP method using 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure is presented and compared with the XRD values. The global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as HOMO, LUMO, gap energy (ΔE) and other parameters, including electronegativity (χ) and global hardness (η). The values of the reactivity descriptors indicated that the interaction between 4ABA molecules reduced its reactivity in comparison with the exhibited in gas phase. In addition, the local reactivity has been analyzed through the Fukui function and condensed softness indices.

  3. The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged contaminated sediment using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, EXAFS spectroscopy, and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfili, Frédéric; Manceau, Alain; Sarret, Géraldine; Spadini, Lorenzo; Kirpichtchikova, Tatiana; Bert, Valérie; Laboudigue, Agnès; Marcus, Matthew A.; Ahamdach, Noureddine; Libert, Marie-Françoise

    2005-05-01

    The maintenance of waterways generates large amounts of dredged sediments, which are deposited on adjacent land surfaces. These sediments are often rich in metal contaminants and present a risk to the local environment. Understanding how the metals are immobilized at the molecular level is critical for formulating effective metal containment strategies such as phytoremediation. In the present work, the mineralogical transformations of Zn-containing phases induced by two graminaceous plants (A grostis tenuis and Festuca rubra) in a contaminated sediment ([Zn] = 4700 mg kg -1, [P 2O 5] = 7000 mg kg -1, pH = 7.8), untreated or amended with hydroxylapatite (AP) or Thomas basic slag (TS), were investigated after two yr of pot experiment by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS), synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence (μ-SXRF), and powder and laterally resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-EXAFS) spectroscopy. The number and nature of Zn species were evaluated by principal component (PCA) and least-squares fitting (LSF) analysis of the entire set of μ-EXAFS spectra, which included up to 32 individual spectra from regions of interest varying in chemical composition. Seven Zn species were identified at the micrometer scale: sphalerite, gahnite, franklinite, Zn-containing ferrihydrite and phosphate, (Zn-Al)-hydrotalcite, and Zn-substituted kerolite-like trioctahedral phyllosilicate. Bulk fractions of each species were quantified by LSF of the powder EXAFS spectra to linear combinations of the identified Zn species spectra. In the untreated and unvegetated sediment, Zn was distributed as ˜50% (mole ratio of total Zn) sphalerite, ˜40% Zn-ferrihydrite, and ˜10 to 20% (Zn-Al)-hydrotalcite plus Zn-phyllosilicate. In unvegetated but amended sediments (AP and TS), ZnS and Zn-ferrihydrite each decreased by 10 to 20% and were replaced by Zn-phosphate (˜30˜40%). In the presence of plants, ZnS was almost completely

  4. Bent diamond-crystal x-ray spectrographs for x-ray free-electron laser noninvasive diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We report on the manufacturing and X-ray tests of bent diamond-crystal X-ray spectrographs, designed for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) spectra in the spectral range from 5 to 15 keV. The key component is a curved, 20-μm thin, single crystalline diamond triangular plate in the (110) orientation. The radius of curvature can be varied between R = 0:6 m and R = 0:1 m in a controlled fashion, ensuring imaging in a spectral window of up to 60 eV for 8 keV X-rays. All of the components of the bending mechanism (about 10 parts) are manufactured from diamond, thus ensuring safe operations in intense XFEL beams. The spectrograph is transparent to 88% for 5-keV photons, and to 98% for 15-keV photons. Therefore, it can be used for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray spectra during XFEL operations.

  5. Food Irradiation Using Electron Beams and X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bruce

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the technology of food irradiation using electron accelerators. Food irradiation has generally come to describe the use of ionizing radiation to decrease the population of, or prevent the growth of, undesirable biological organisms in food. The many beneficial applications include insect disinfestation, sprouting inhibition, delayed ripening, and the enhanced safety and sterilization of fresh and frozen meat products, seafood, and eggs. With special regard to food safety, bacteria such as Salmonella enteridis, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 are the primary causes of food poisoning in industrialized countries. Ionizing doses in the range of only 1-5 kilogray (kGy) can virtually eliminate these organisms from food, without affecting the food's sensory and nutritional qualities, and without inducing radioactivity. The key elements of an accelerator-based irradiation facility include the accelerator system, a scanning system, and a material handling system that moves the product through the beam in a precisely controlled manner. Extensive radiation shielding is necessary to reduce the external dose to acceptable levels, and a safety system is necessary to prevent accidental exposure of personnel during accelerator operation. Parameters that affect the dose distribution must be continuously monitored and controlled with process control software. The choice of electron beam vs x-ray depends on the areal density (density times thickness) of the product and the anticipated mass throughput. To eliminate nuclear activation concerns, the maximum kinetic energy of the accelerator is limited by regulation to 10 MeV for electron beams, and 5 MeV for x-rays. From penetration considerations, the largest areal density that can be treated by double-sided electron irradiation at 10 MeV is about 8.8 g/cm2. Products having greater areal densities must be processed using more penetrating x-rays. The

  6. Optimization of Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry Analysis Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephen J. B.

    2002-01-01

    In setting up the conditions for quantitative wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe analysis a number of parameters have to be defined for each element, namely accelerating voltage, beam current, and (for each element) x-ray line, spectrometer crystal, pulse-height analyser settings, background offsets, and counting times for peak and background. The choices made affect both the reliability of the results and the time taken to obtain a complete analysis. It is difficult for even an experienced user to arrive at the optimum set of conditions for any particular application, in view of the large number of interacting factors involved. Furthermore, optimum choices of some parameters are dependent not only on the concentration of the element concerned (for example, counting times) but also the concentrations of other elements which may have peaks that interfere with peak and/or background measurements, requiring alternative selections of x-ray line or spectrometer crystal. The various factors involved in arriving at an optimum routine and practical possibilities for computer-aided optimization are discussed here. PMID:27446748

  7. University of California electron and X-ray experiments on ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The history of the University of California solar and interplanetary electron experiment and the solar X-ray experiment is outlined, and the two instruments used are described. The roles of personnel are mentioned and the data analysis projects completed or begun are summarized. A bibliography is included.

  8. Tutorial Review: X-ray Mapping in Electron-Beam Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friel, John J.; Lyman, Charles E.

    2006-02-01

    This review traces the development of X-ray mapping from its beginning 50 years ago through current analysis procedures that can reveal otherwise obscure elemental distributions and associations. X-ray mapping or compositional imaging of elemental distributions is one of the major capabilities of electron beam microanalysis because it frees the operator from the necessity of making decisions about which image features contain elements of interest. Elements in unexpected locations, or in unexpected association with other elements, may be found easily without operator bias as to where to locate the electron probe for data collection. X-ray mapping in the SEM or EPMA may be applied to bulk specimens at a spatial resolution of about 1 [mu]m. X-ray mapping of thin specimens in the TEM or STEM may be accomplished at a spatial resolution ranging from 2 to 100 nm, depending on specimen thickness and the microscope. Although mapping has traditionally been considered a qualitative technique, recent developments demonstrate the quantitative capabilities of X-ray mapping techniques. Moreover, the long-desired ability to collect and store an entire spectrum at every pixel is now a reality, and methods for mining these data are rapidly being developed.

  9. X-ray absorption and soft x-ray fluorescence analysis of KDP optics

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; van Buuren, T; Miller, E; Land, T A; Bostedt, C; Franco, N; Whitman, P K; Baisden, P A; Terminello, L J; Callcott, T A

    2000-08-09

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) is a non-linear optical material used for laser frequency conversion and optical switches. Unfortunately, when KDP crystals are coated with a porous silica anti-reflection coating [1] and then exposed to ambient humidity, they develop dissolution pits [2,3]. Previous investigations [2] have shown that thermal annealing renders KDP optics less susceptible to pitting suggesting that a modification of surface chemistry has occurred. X-ray absorption and fluorescence were used to characterize changes in the composition and structure of KDP optics as a function of process parameters. KDP native crystals were also analyzed to provide a standard basis for interpretation. Surface sensitive total electron yield and bulk sensitive fluorescence yield from the K 2p, P 2p (L{sub 2,3}-edge) and O 1s (K-edge) absorption edges were measured at each process step. Soft X-ray fluorescence was also used to observe changes associated with spectral differences noted in the absorption measurements. Results indicate that annealing at 160 C dehydrates the surface of KDP resulting in a metaphosphate surface composition with K:P:O = 1:1:3.

  10. Reflection of attosecond x-ray free electron laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; Chapman, H

    2006-10-30

    In order to utilize hard x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL's) when they are extended to attosecond pulse lengths, it is necessary to choose optical elements with minimal response time. Specular grazing incidence optics made of low-Z materials are popular candidates for reflectors since they are likely to withstand x-ray damage and provide sufficiently large reflectivities. Using linear-optics reflection theory, we calculated the transient reflectivity of a delta-function electric pulse from a homogeneous semi-infinite medium as a function of angle of incidence for s- and p-polarized light. We specifically considered the pulse response of Be, diamond, silicon carbide, and silicon, all of which are of relevance to the XFEL's that are currently being built. We found that the media emit energy in a damped oscillatory way, and that the impulse-response times are shorter than 0.3 fs for normal incidence. For grazing incidence, the impulse-response time is substantially shorter, making grazing-incidence mirrors a good choice for deep-sub-femtosecond reflective optics.

  11. Reflection of attosecond x-ray free electron laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2007-01-15

    In order to utilize hard x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL's) when they are extended to attosecond pulse lengths, it is necessary to choose optical elements with minimal response time. Specular grazing-incidence optics made of low-Z materials are popular candidates for reflectors since they are likely to withstand x-ray damage and provide sufficiently large reflectivities. Using linear-optics reflection theory, we calculated the transient reflectivity of a delta-function electric pulse from a homogenous semi-infinite medium as a function of angle of incidence for s- and p-polarized light. We specifically considered the pulse response of beryllium, diamond, silicon carbide, and silicon, all of which are of relevance to the XFEL's that are currently being built. We found that the media emit energy in a damped oscillatory way, and that the impulse-response times are shorter than 0.3 fs for normal incidence. For grazing incidence, the impulse-response time is substantially shorter, making grazing-incidence mirrors a good choice for deep subfemtosecond reflective optics.

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, David Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  14. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  15. Proposal for an x-ray free electron laser oscillator with intermediate energy electron beam.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinhua; Deng, Haixiao; Dai, Zhimin

    2012-01-20

    Harmonic lasing of low-gain free electron laser oscillators has been experimentally demonstrated in the terahertz and infrared regions. Recently, the low-gain oscillator has been reconsidered as a promising candidate for hard x-ray free electron lasers, through the use of high reflectivity, high-resolution x-ray crystals. In this Letter, it is proposed to utilize a crystal-based cavity resonant at a higher harmonic of the undulator radiation, together with phase shifting, to enable harmonic lasing of the x-ray free electron laser oscillator, and hence allow the generation of hard x-ray radiation at a reduced electron beam energy. Results show that fully coherent free electron laser radiation with megawatt peak power, in the spectral region of 10-25 keV, can be generated with a 3.5 GeV electron beam.

  16. Note: Studies on target placement in TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for the enhancement of x-ray dose

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.; Singh, A. K.; Sista, V. L. S. Rao

    2010-03-15

    X-ray source based on electron cyclotron resonance principle has been constructed using TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity. At present the device is used to provide low energy x-ray field for thermoluminescent dosimeter badge calibration. Theoretical and experimental studies on the effect of target placement inside the TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity for enhancing the x-ray output are carried out and the results are presented in this note. Optimum target location is identified by theoretical analysis on the electric field distribution inside the cavity using MICROWAVE STUDIO program. By modifying the magnetic field configuration, the resonance region is shifted to the optimum target location. The microwave transmission line is upgraded with a three stub tuner which improves the microwave coupling from the source to the target loaded cavity. Molybdenum target is located at a radial distance of 2.5 cm from the cavity center and the x-ray dose rate is measured at 20 cm from the exit port for different microwave power. With the introduction of the target, the x-ray output has improved nearly from 70% to 160% in the microwave power of 150-500 W.

  17. Electron Beam Pattern Writer For X-Ray Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Wilson, A. D.; Lafuente, J.; Voelker, H.; Kern, A.

    1984-03-01

    This paper discusses the capabilities of a vector scan electron-beam system as an X-ray mask writer for pattern geometries at and below one-half micron. The noise level in the deflection system has been reduced to an RMS value of 150 A over a 0.5 mm deflection field, thus making our exposure system usable in the one-quarter micron regime. Pattern geometries below 2000 A have been fabricated on a thin membrane. Drift compensation techniques, implemented in software, have reduced placement errors over the entire mask to less than 700 A. Accomplishments in the areas of noise reduction, bandwidth error compensation, system resolution, and improvements in pattern placement accuracy are discussed.

  18. X-Ray Free Electron Laser Interaction With Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2009-05-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) will enable studying new areas of laser-matter interaction. We summarize the current understanding of the interaction of XFEL pulses with matter and describe some of the simulation approaches that are used to design experiments on future XFEL sources. Modified versions of these models have been successful in guiding and analyzing experiments performed at the extreme-ultraviolet FEL FLASH at wavelengths of 6 nm and longer. For photon energies of several keV, no XFEL-matter interaction experiments have been performed yet but data is anticipated to become available in the near future, which will allow to test our understanding of the interaction physics in this wavelength regime.

  19. XAP, a program for deconvolution and analysis of complex X-ray spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, James E.; Haleby, Abdul Malik

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray analysis program (XAP) is a spectral-deconvolution program written in BASIC and specifically designed to analyze complex spectra produced by energy-dispersive X-ray analytical systems (EDS). XAP compensates for spectrometer drift, utilizes digital filtering to remove background from spectra, and solves for element abundances by least-squares, multiple-regression analysis. Rather than base analyses on only a few channels, broad spectral regions of a sample are reconstructed from standard reference spectra. The effects of this approach are (1) elimination of tedious spectrometer adjustments, (2) removal of background independent of sample composition, and (3) automatic correction for peak overlaps. Although the program was written specifically to operate a KEVEX 7000 X-ray fluorescence analytical system, it could be adapted (with minor modifications) to analyze spectra produced by scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobes, and probes, and X-ray defractometer patterns obtained from whole-rock powders.

  20. Electron probe X-ray analysis on human hepatocellular lysosomes with copper deposits: copper binding to a thiol-protein in lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaichi, T.; Kidokoro, R.; Hayashi, H.; Sakamoto, N.

    1984-11-01

    Livers of eight patients with chronic liver diseases were investigated by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. First, three kinds of preparations (osmium-Epon sections, glutaraldehyde-frozen sections, and unfixed-frozen sections) were compared for element detectability at a subcellular level. The glutaraldehyde-frozen sections were satisfactory as far as copper, sulfur, and phosphorus were concerned. Five patients (one patient with Wilson's disease, one chronic cholestasis, one chronic hepatitis, and two asymptomatic primary biliary cirrhosis) yielded x-ray images of copper and sulfur consistent with hepatocellular lysosomes. Second, the glutaraldehyde-frozen sections were utilized for a study of copper deposits in the patients' livers. There was a significant correlation between copper and sulfur contents in the lysosomes of all patients studied but no correlation in the remainder of the cytoplasm. Zinc was not detected in the lysosomes. Whatever the content of copper in the lysosomes, the ratio of delta copper to phosphorus (weight/weight) to delta sulfur to phosphorus was 0.60. These data indicate that most lysosomal copper binds to a thiol protein, probably metallothionein, in the liver.

  1. Remineralization of demineralized enamel by toothpastes: a scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and three-dimensional stereo-micrographic study.

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta S; Nicholson, John W; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija M

    2013-06-01

    Remineralization of hard dental tissues is thought to be a tool that could close the gap between prevention and surgical procedures in clinical dentistry. The purpose of this study was to examine the remineralizing potential of different toothpaste formulations: toothpastes containing bioactive glass, hydroxyapatite, or strontium acetate with fluoride, when applied to demineralized enamel. Results obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM/energy dispersive X-ray analyses proved that the hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass-containing toothpastes were highly efficient in promoting enamel remineralization by formation of deposits and a protective layer on the surface of the demineralized enamel, whereas the toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate and 1040 ppm fluoride as NaF had little, if any, remineralization potential. In conclusion, the treatment of demineralized teeth with toothpastes containing hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass resulted in repair of the damaged tissue.

  2. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasada, R; Ha, Y; Higuchi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2016-05-10

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test.

  3. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test.

  4. X-ray fluorescence analysis of various alloys. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, J.W. Jr.; Ferguson, M.R.; Eager, M.H.

    1980-02-15

    For a number of years, x-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been used in the Y-12 Plant Laboratory for the analysis of a wide variety of materials. During the past few years, the technique has been applied to the analysis of a large number of experimental alloys. The general procedure consists of the following steps: (1) ignition of the alloy to oxides, (2) addition of suitable internal standards, (3) dissolution of the oxides and internal standards by sodium tetraborate (borax) fusion, (4) casting a pellet from the fusion in a graphite mold (Figure 1), and (5) determination of the major constituents by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  5. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles.

  6. Data acquisition system for X-ray free-electron laser experiments at SACLA.

    PubMed

    Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Yamaga, Mitsuhiro; Sugimoto, Takashi; Okada, Kensuke; Abe, Toshinori; Furukawa, Yukito; Ohata, Toru; Tanaka, Ryotaro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-05-01

    A data acquisition system for X-ray free-electron laser experiments at SACLA has been developed. The system has been designed for reliable shot-to-shot data storage with a high data stream greater than 4 Gbps and massive data analysis. Configuration of the system and examples of prompt data analysis during experiments are presented. Upgrade plans for the system to extend flexibility are described.

  7. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  8. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  9. Electrodynamics of relativistic electron beam x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejadi, Pardis

    Probing matter at atomic scales provides invaluable information about its structure; as a result interest in sources of x-rays and gamma-rays with high spectral resolution, low angular divergence and small source size has been on the rise. Explorations in this domain require x-ray or gamma-ray sources with high brightness. In the past decade, relativistic electron sources such as synchrotron rings and free electron lasers have proven to be the best technology available for the production of such beams. We1 start with an introduction to the physics of radiation and provide a summary of the theoretical grounds this work is based on. This dissertation is dedicated to different aspects of both fundamental processes of radiation in relativistic electron sources, and critical control and diagnostics that are required for the operation of these sources. Therefore this work is broken into two main parts. In the first part, the electron source that is currently set up at University of Hawai`i at Manoa will be introduced in detail. This source has unique capabilities as it is an inverse-Compton scattering (ICS) source that uses a free electron laser (FEL) with pulses of picosecond duration at ˜ 3 GHz rate for production of a coherent/semi-coherent x-ray beam by means of an optical cavity. After introducing the essential elements of the system and what was achieved prior to this work, we will focus on the requirements for achieving an optimum electron beam matched for the operation of the system which is the main focus of part I of this dissertation. The transport beam line of our system is unique and complex. For this reason, a simulation module has been developed for the study and delivery of an optimal beam. We will discuss the capabilities of this system and its compatibility with other elements that were already installed on the beam line. Finally, we will present results and experimental data as well as guidelines for future operation of the system when the microwave

  10. Manganese binding properties of human calprotectin under conditions of high and low calcium: X-ray crystallographic and advanced electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Derek M; Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Bowman, Sarah E J; Stich, Troy A; Drennan, Catherine L; Britt, R David; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-03-04

    The antimicrobial protein calprotectin (CP), a hetero-oligomer of the S100 family members S100A8 and S100A9, is the only identified mammalian Mn(II)-sequestering protein. Human CP uses Ca(II) ions to tune its Mn(II) affinity at a biologically unprecedented hexahistidine site that forms at the S100A8/S100A9 interface, and the molecular basis for this phenomenon requires elucidation. Herein, we investigate the remarkable Mn(II) coordination chemistry of human CP using X-ray crystallography as well as continuous-wave (CW) and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. An X-ray crystallographic structure of Mn(II)-CP containing one Mn(II), two Ca(II), and two Na(I) ions per CP heterodimer is reported. The CW EPR spectrum of Ca(II)- and Mn(II)-bound CP prepared with a 10:0.9:1 Ca(II):Mn(II):CP ratio is characterized by an unusually low zero-field splitting of 485 MHz (E/D = 0.30) for the S = 5/2 Mn(II) ion, consistent with the high symmetry of the His6 binding site observed crystallographically. Results from electron spin-echo envelope modulation and electron-nuclear double resonance experiments reveal that the six Mn(II)-coordinating histidine residues of Ca(II)- and Mn(II)-bound CP are spectroscopically equivalent. The observed (15)N (I = 1/2) hyperfine couplings (A) arise from two distinct classes of nitrogen atoms: the coordinating ε-nitrogen of the imidazole ring of each histidine ligand (A = [3.45, 3.71, 5.91] MHz) and the distal δ-nitrogen (A = [0.11, 0.18, 0.42] MHz). In the absence of Ca(II), the binding affinity of CP for Mn(II) drops by two to three orders of magnitude and coincides with Mn(II) binding at the His6 site as well as other sites. This study demonstrates the role of Ca(II) in enabling high-affinity and specific binding of Mn(II) to the His6 site of human calprotectin.

  11. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Kato, Ryukou; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons' energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  12. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  13. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Sadaoki Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Kato, Ryukou

    2014-11-15

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons’ energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  14. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Vartanyants, I.A.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; Williams, G.J.; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; Sinn, H.; Attwood, D.; Nugent, K.A.; Weckert, E.; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  15. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120{degree} to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL.

  16. Ultrafast Electrons and X-rays as Probe of Biomolecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ganesh

    The structure-function relation in Biology suggests that every biological molecule has evolved its structure to carry out a specific function. However, for many of these processes (such as those with catalytic activity) the structure of the biomolecule changes during the course of a reaction. Understanding the structure-function relation thus becomes a question of understanding biomolecular dynamics that span a variety of timescales (from electronic rearrangements in the femtoseconds to side-chain alteration in the microseconds and more). This dissertation deals with the study of biomolecular dynamics in the ultrafast timescales (fs-ns) using electron and X-ray probes in both time and frequency domains. It starts with establishing the limitations of traditional electron diffraction coupled with molecular replacement to study biomolecular structure and proceeds to suggest a pulsed electron source Hollow-Cone Transmission Electron Microscope as an alternative scheme to pursue ultrafast biomolecular imaging. In frequency domain, the use of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy as a tool to access ultrafast nuclear dynamics in the steady state, is detailed with the new monochromated NiON UltraSTEM and examples demonstrating this instrument's capability are provided. Ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to elucidate biomolecular dynamics is presented in studying X-ray as a probe, with the study of the photolysis of Methylcobalamin using time-resolved laser pump--X-ray probe absorption spectroscopy. The analysis in comparison to prior literature as well as DFT based XAS simulations offer good agreement and understanding to the steady state spectra but are so far inadequate in explaining the time-resolved data. However, the trends in the absorption simulations for the transient intermediates show a strong anisotropic dependence on the axial ligation, which would define the direction for future studies on this material to achieve a solution.

  17. Search for X-rays and relativistic electrons in laboratory discharge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostgaard, N.; Carlson, B. E.; Grøndahl, Ø.; Kochkin, P.; Nisi, R.; Gjesteland, T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013 discharge experiments were carried out at the Technical University of Eindhoven. The experimental set-up was designed to search for both X-rays and electrons produced in meter-scale sparks using a 1 MV Marx generator. In this paper we present the spatial distribution of signals and examine whether they are X-rays only or X-rays and electrons. Other characteristics of the signals will be presented as well. These experiments are carried out in the context of a larger effort to understand the various phenomena of X-rays and gammas from natural lightning.

  18. Quality assurance of X-ray spectrometry for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiros, M. A.; Pinheiro, T.; Araújo, M. F.; Costa, M. M.; Palha, M.; da Silva, R. C.

    2001-11-01

    Three different techniques, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, total reflection X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission were used to initiate an evaluation program on quality assurance (QA) procedures applied to X-ray spectrometry for chemical analysis. The use of standard methodologies to assure the statistical control of measurement data is the main objective of this work. Certified Reference Materials were used and up to 15 certified elements were analyzed to carry out the QA procedures. For the internal quality control, z-scores were calculated and control charts were produced. The plotted elemental data illustrate statistically controlled methodologies for the majority of the determinations. Even the cases where the control charts exhibit values out of control limits, the z-scores are below 3 in absolute value, indicating satisfactory results. Concerning external quality control the statistical methods applied showed that the results obtained for the three techniques are comparable, although some significant differences occur, mainly due to sample preparation. Therefore, the techniques are traceable to certified reference materials and the data gathered so far, enable to initiate a database for QA procedures.

  19. Measurement of total calcium in neurons by electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2013-11-20

    In this article the tools, techniques, and instruments appropriate for quantitative measurements of intracellular elemental content using the technique known as electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) are described. Intramitochondrial calcium is a particular focus because of the critical role that mitochondrial calcium overload plays in neurodegenerative diseases. The method is based on the analysis of X-rays generated in an electron microscope (EM) by interaction of an electron beam with the specimen. In order to maintain the native distribution of diffusible elements in electron microscopy specimens, EPMA requires "cryofixation" of tissue followed by the preparation of ultrathin cryosections. Rapid freezing of cultured cells or organotypic slice cultures is carried out by plunge freezing in liquid ethane or by slam freezing against a cold metal block, respectively. Cryosections nominally 80 nm thick are cut dry with a diamond knife at ca. -160 °C, mounted on carbon/pioloform-coated copper grids, and cryotransferred into a cryo-EM using a specialized cryospecimen holder. After visual survey and location mapping at ≤-160 °C and low electron dose, frozen-hydrated cryosections are freeze-dried at -100 °C for ~30 min. Organelle-level images of dried cryosections are recorded, also at low dose, by means of a slow-scan CCD camera and subcellular regions of interest selected for analysis. X-rays emitted from ROIs by a stationary, focused, high-intensity electron probe are collected by an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer, processed by associated electronics, and presented as an X-ray spectrum, that is, a plot of X-ray intensity vs. energy. Additional software facilitates: 1) identification of elemental components by their "characteristic" peak energies and fingerprint; and 2) quantitative analysis by extraction of peak areas/background. This paper concludes with two examples that illustrate typical EPMA applications, one in which mitochondrial calcium analysis

  20. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON A HOMOLOGOUS SERIES OF SATURATED PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES.

    PubMed

    ELBERS, P F; VERVERGAERT, P H

    1965-05-01

    Three homologous saturated phosphatidylcholines were studied by electron microscopy after tricomplex fixation. The results are compared with those obtained by x-ray diffraction analysis of the same and some other homologous compounds, in the dry crystalline state and after tricomplex fixation. By electron microscopy alternating dark and light bands are observed which are likely to correspond to phosphatide double layers. X-Ray diffraction reveals the presence of lamellar structures of regular spacing. The layer spacings obtained by both methods are in good agreement. From the electron micrographs the width of the polar parts of the double layers can be derived directly. The width of the carboxylglycerylphosphorylcholine moiety of the layers is found by extrapolating the x-ray diffraction data to zero chain length of the fatty acids. When from this width the contribution of the carboxylglyceryl part of the molecules is subtracted, again we find good agreement with the electron microscope measurements. An attempt has been made to account for the different layer spacings measured in terms of orientation of the molecules within the double layers.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  2. Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis Using a Scanning Electron Microscope and an X-Ray Energy Spectrometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    necessary to solve the ZAF cor- rections in an iterative manner similar to that used by J . Colby 13in the Magic IV programme . In that programme the...Combined with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Analyzer for Quantitative Analysis", X-ray Spectrometry, 2, 1973. 10. Green, L.: Journ. of Phys. E. Scient ... Instrum ., 2, (3), 1973. 11. Wodke, Norbert F. and Schamber, Frederick, MS 885 Super ML Operation and Programme Description Version 1, Unpublished, Tracor

  3. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray-diffraction tests performed on aluminum conductors in commercial HI1-507A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit analog multiplexers, both before and after circuits exposed to ionizing radiation from Co(60) source, and after postirradiation annealing at ambient and elevated temperatures. Tests in addition to electrical tests performed to determine effects of irradiation and of postirradiation annealing on electrical operating characteristics of circuits. Investigators sought to determine whether relationship between effects of irradiation on devices and physical stresses within devices. X-ray diffraction potentially useful for nondestructive measurement of stresses.

  4. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  5. Low-voltage electron-probe microanalysis of Fe-Si compounds using soft X-rays.

    PubMed

    Gopon, Phillip; Fournelle, John; Sobol, Peter E; Llovet, Xavier

    2013-12-01

    Conventional electron-probe microanalysis has an X-ray analytical spatial resolution on the order of 1-4 μm width/depth. Many of the naturally occurring Fe-Si compounds analyzed in this study are smaller than 1 μm in size, requiring the use of lower accelerating potentials and nonstandard X-ray lines for analysis. Problems with the use of low-energy X-ray lines (soft X-rays) of iron for quantitative analyses are discussed and a review is given of the alternative X-ray lines that may be used for iron at or below 5 keV (i.e., accelerating voltage that allows analysis of areas of interest <1 μm). Problems include increased sensitivity to surface effects for soft X-rays, peak shifts (induced by chemical bonding, differential self-absorption, and/or buildup of carbon contamination), uncertainties in the mass attenuation coefficient for X-ray lines near absorption edges, and issues with spectral resolution and count rates from the available Bragg diffractors. In addition to the results from the traditionally used Fe Lα line, alternative approaches, utilizing Fe Lβ, and Fe Ll-η lines, are discussed.

  6. Depth analysis of subgap electronic states in amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-In-Ga-Zn-O, studied by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kenji; Kamiya, Toshio; Ikenaga, Eiji; Yanagi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Hosono, Hideo

    2011-04-01

    In a previous work, we examined subgap states in highly doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) films by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HX-PES) and found they had subgap electronic states above the valence band maximum (VBM) with the densities > 5 × 1020 cm-3 and just below the Fermi level with the densities > 5 × 1019 cm-3 [K. Nomura, T. Kamiya, H. Yanagi, E. Ikenaga, K. Yang, K. Kobayashi, M. Hirano, and H. Hosono, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 202117 (2008)]; however, their electron densities (Ne > 3 × 1019 cm-3) are rather high and not compatible with rational properties required for active channel layers in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In this work, we report the effects of Ne and thermal annealing on the subgap states in order to provide the data useful for actual TFTs. It was found that the low-Ne a-IGZO films had extra subgap states above VBM similar to the previous report, but their densities were as small as ˜2.0 × 1020 cm-3 for the highly resistive, wet-annealed a-IGZO films. Angle-dependent HX-PES revealed that the subgap states above VBM concentrate in the surface region. The O 1s peak indicated that the wet annealing suppressed the generation of subgap states by terminating these states with -OH bonds. The subgap states below EF were observed commonly in all the samples including ZnO, crystalline (c-) IGZO and a-IGZO. It is concluded that these states below EF are neither related to the disordered structures of a-IGZO nor to their TFT characteristics. It is considered that these states are related to the metastable states created by the high-energy photons in vacuum.

  7. Correlative analysis of hard and soft x ray observations of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a promising new technique for jointly analyzing BATSE hard X-ray observations of solar flares with simultaneous soft X-ray observations. The technique is based upon a model in which electric currents and associated electric fields are responsible for the respective heating and particle acceleration that occur in solar flares. A useful by-product of this technique is the strength and evolution of the coronal electric field. The latter permits one to derive important flare parameters such as the current density, the number of current filaments composing the loop, and ultimately the hard X-ray spectrum produced by the runaway electrons. We are continuing to explore the technique by applying it to additional flares for which we have joint BATSE/Yohkoh observations. A central assumption of our analysis is the constant of proportionality alpha relating the hard X-ray flux above 50 keV and the rate of electron acceleration. For a thick-target model of hard X-ray production, it can be shown that cv is in fact related to the spectral index and low-energy cutoff of precipitating electrons. The next step in our analysis is to place observational constraints on the latter parameters using the joint BATSE/Yohkoh data.

  8. Calculation of x-ray spectra emerging from an x-ray tube. Part I. electron penetration characteristics in x-ray targets.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, Gavin G; Evans, Philip M

    2007-06-01

    The penetration characteristics of electron beams into x-ray targets are investigated for incident electron kinetic energies in the range 50-150 keV. The frequency densities of electrons penetrating to a depth x in a target, with a fraction of initial kinetic energy, u, are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for beam energies of 50, 80, 100, 120 and 150 keV in a tungsten target. The frequency densities for 100 keV electrons in Al, Mo and Re targets are also calculated. A mixture of simple modeling with equations and interpolation from data is used to generalize the calculations in tungsten. Where possible, parameters derived from the Monte Carlo data are compared to experimental measurements. Previous electron transport approximations in the semiempirical models of other authors are discussed and related to this work. In particular, the crudity of the use of the Thomson-Whiddington law to describe electron penetration and energy loss is highlighted. The results presented here may be used towards calculating the target self-attenuation correction for bremsstrahlung photons emitted within a tungsten target.

  9. Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and fluorescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons which impact on the counter windows of soft X-ray detectors are discussed. The errors caused by X-rays produced in the residual atmosphere above a rocket-borne detector because of the resemblance to X-rays of cosmic origin are examined. The design and development of counter windows which make it possible to identify the atmospherically produced X-rays are described. Curves are presented to show the following: (1) preliminary low energy electron data from Atmospheric Explorer C, (2) X-ray flux in electron-excited nitrogen and oxygen, (3) typical proportional counter response to low energy cosmic rays, and (4) proportional counter response to X-radiation produced by electrons incident upon a gas of oxygen to nitrogen number of 0.4.

  10. Enhanced Electron Efficiency in an X-ray Diode

    SciTech Connect

    K. Sun, L. MacNeil

    2010-05-20

    The goal for this research is to optimize the XRD structure and usage configurations and increase the efficiency of the XRD. This research was successful in optimizing the XRD structure and usage configurations, thus creating a high efficiency XRD. Best efficiency occurs when there is an angle between the photocathode and incident X-rays.

  11. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed x- ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, M. C.; Silva, C. R. E.; Oliveira, P. M. C.; da Silva, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed x-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed x-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC x-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed x-rays.

  12. Analysis of sculptures using XRF and X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calza, C.; Oliveira, D. F.; Freitas, R. P.; Rocha, H. S.; Nascimento, J. R.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-11-01

    This work reports the analysis of two sacred images on polychrome wood using X-ray Radiography and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence. The first case is the analysis of a sculpture portraying Saint Sebastian, the patron saint of Rio de Janeiro, which is considered the second most ancient sacred image of Brazil. This sculpture was made in Portugal and was transported to Brazil by Estácio Sá, founder of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in 1565. Nowadays, it is located on the main altar of the Church of Capuchin Friars. The second case is the analysis of a sculpture representing Our Lady of Conception, which is located in the D. João VI Museum (EBA/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro). The objective of these analyses was to evaluate the general conditions of the sculptures, identifying possible problems and internal damages, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the materials and pigments employed by the artists, in order to assist its restoration procedures. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system, developed at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, consisting of a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek and an Oxford TF3005 X-ray tube with W anode. An X-ray source, a CR System GE CR50P and IP detectors were used to perform the radiographs. The XRF analysis of the sculptures identified the original pigments in both cases and the radiographic images revealed details of the manufacture; restored regions; extensive use of lead white; presence of cracks on the wood; use of nails and spikes, etc.

  13. Hard X-ray emitting energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, S.; Vilmer, N.; Bommier, V.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents flowing in the corona. While no measurements of coronal electric currents are presently available, maps of photospheric electric currents can now be derived from SDO/HMI observations. Photospheric electric currents have been shown to be the tracers of the coronal electric currents. Particle acceleration can result from electric fields associated with coronal electric currents. We revisit here some aspects of the relationship between particle acceleration in solar flares and electric currents in the active region. Aims: We study the relation between the energetic electron interaction sites in the solar atmosphere, and the magnitudes and changes of vertical electric current densities measured at the photospheric level, during the X2.2 flare on February 15, 2011, in AR NOAA 11158. Methods: X-ray images from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are overlaid on magnetic field and electric current density maps calculated from the spectropolarimetric measurements of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) using the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes. X-ray images are also compared with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) to complement the flare analysis. Results: Part of the elongated X-ray emissions from both thermal and non-thermal electrons overlay the elongated narrow current ribbons observed at the photospheric level. A new X-ray source at 50-100 keV (produced by non-thermal electrons) is observed in the course of the flare and is cospatial with a region in which new vertical photospheric currents appeared during the same period (an increase of 15%). These observational results are discussed in the context of the scenarios in which magnetic reconnection (and subsequent plasma heating and particle

  14. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  15. Photoelectron dynamics in x-ray free-electron-laser diffractive imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2012-06-08

    X-ray free electron lasers hold the promise of enabling atomic-resolution diffractive imaging of single biological molecules. We develop a hybrid continuum-particle model to describe the x-ray induced damage and find that the photoelectron dynamics and electrostatic confinement strongly affect the time scale of the damage processes. These phenomena are not fully captured in hydrodynamic modeling approaches.

  16. Nonlinear effects in propagation of radiation of X-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosik, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear effects accompanying the propagation of high-intensity beams of X-ray free-electron lasers are considered. It is shown that the X-ray wave field in the crystal significantly changes due to the formation of "hollow" atomic shells as a result of the photoelectric effect.

  17. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    SciTech Connect

    Kapilashrami, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Fadley, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-14

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO=VBM{sub CIGS} – VBM{sub diamond}=0.3 eV±0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV±0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  18. Design and analysis of multilayer x ray/XUV microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The design and analysis of a large number of normal incidence multilayer x ray microscopes based on the spherical mirror Schwarzschild configuration is examined. Design equations for the spherical mirror Schwarzschild microscopes are summarized and used to evaluate mirror parameters for microscopes with magnifications ranging from 2 to 50x. Ray tracing and diffraction analyses are carried out for many microscope configurations to determine image resolution as a function of system parameters. The results are summarized in three publication included herein. A preliminary study of advanced reflecting microscope configurations, where aspherics are used in place of the spherical microscope mirror elements, has indicated that the aspherical elements will improve off-axis image resolution and increase the effective field of view.

  19. X-ray cross correlation analysis uncovers hidden local symmetries in disordered matter

    PubMed Central

    Wochner, Peter; Gutt, Christian; Autenrieth, Tina; Demmer, Thomas; Bugaev, Volodymyr; Ortiz, Alejandro Díaz; Duri, Agnès; Zontone, Federico; Grübel, Gerhard; Dosch, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    We explore the different local symmetries in colloidal glasses beyond the standard pair correlation analysis. Using our newly developed X-ray cross correlation analysis (XCCA) concept together with brilliant coherent X-ray sources, we have been able to access and classify the otherwise hidden local order within disorder. The emerging local symmetries are coupled to distinct momentum transfer (Q) values, which do not coincide with the maxima of the amorphous structure factor. Four-, 6-, 10- and, most prevalently, 5-fold symmetries are observed. The observation of dynamical evolution of these symmetries forms a connection to dynamical heterogeneities in glasses, which is far beyond conventional diffraction analysis. The XCCA concept opens up a fascinating view into the world of disorder and will definitely allow, with the advent of free electron X-ray lasers, an accurate and systematic experimental characterization of the structure of the liquid and glass states. PMID:20716512

  20. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis for the study of cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Segura, E; Warley, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Of the analytical electron microscopy techniques available, electron probe X-ray microanalysis has been most widely used for the study of biological specimens. This technique is able to identify, localize, and quantify elements both at the whole cell and at the intracellular level. The use SEM or TEM to analyze individual whole cells gives a simple and rapid method to study changes in ion transport after stimulation, whereas the analysis of thin sections of cryoprepared cell sections, although technically more difficult, allows details about ionic content in intracellular compartments, such as mitochondria, ER, and lysosomes, to be obtained. In this chapter the principles underlying X-ray emission are briefly outlined, step-by-step methods for specimen preparation of whole cells and cell sections for microanalysis are given, as are the methods used for deriving quantitative information from spectra. Areas where problems might occur have been highlighted. The different areas in which X-ray microanalysis is being used in the study of cell physiology are briefly reviewed.

  1. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2006-03-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150 keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10x10 cm{sup 2} has been marked at 20 cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05 mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7 min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10{sup -5} Torr, microwave power: 350 W, and coil current: 0 A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40 keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  2. Phase contrast: the frontier of x-ray and electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Y.; Margaritondo, G.

    2013-12-01

    Phase contrast has been a fundamental component of microscopy since the early 1940s. In broad terms, it refers to the formation of images using not the combination of wave intensities but their amplitudes with the corresponding phase factors. The impact on visible microscopy of biological specimens has been major. This contrast mechanism is now playing an increasingly important role in other kinds of microscopy, notably those based on electrons or x-rays. It notably solves the background problem of weak absorption contrast. New breakthroughs and new techniques are continuously produced, unfortunately unknown to most of the scientists that could exploit them. The present special cluster issue of reviews was inspired by this situation. The case of x-rays is very interesting. Phase contrast requires a high degree of longitudinal and lateral coherence. But conventional x-ray sources are not coherent. The progress of synchrotron sources yielded high coherence as a key byproduct—and started a rapid expansion of phase contrast radiology. No review—or cluster of reviews—can possibly cover all the facets of the recent progress. Without trying to be absolutely comprehensive, the present special cluster issue touches a variety of issues, giving a very broad picture. Liu et al review in general terms the different phase-based hard-x-ray techniques, with an interesting variety of examples. Then, Suortti et al and Wang et al present more specialized overviews of crystal and grating based x-ray imaging techniques, very powerful in the analysis of biological specimens. Mokso et al discuss the many facets of tomography using phase effects, expanding the picture of tomographic reconstruction of the three previous reviews. Wu et al treat the rapid progress in hard-x-ray focusing and its impact on radiology and tomography for materials science and biomedical research. The next two reviews deal with special and very interesting classes of applications. Specifically, Lee et al

  3. X-ray fluorescence analysis of low concentrations metals in geological samples and technological products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoida, I. A.; Trushin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    For the past several years many nuclear physics methods of quantitative elemental analysis have been designed. Many of these methods have applied in different devices which have become useful and effective instrument in many industrial laboratories. Methods of a matter structure analysis are based on the intensity detection of the X-ray radiation from the nuclei of elements which are excited by external X-ray source. The production of characteristic X-rays involves transitions of the orbital electrons of atoms in the target material between allowed orbits, or energy states, associated with ionization of the inner atomic shells. One of these methods is X-ray fluorescence analysis, which is widespread in metallurgical and processing industries and is used to identify and measure the concentration of the elements in ores and minerals on a conveyor belt. Samples of copper ore with known concentrations of elements, were taken from the Ural deposit. To excite the characteristic X-rays radionuclide sources 109Cd, with half-life 461.4 days were used. After finding the calibration coefficients, control measurements of samples and averaging of overall samples were made. The measurement error did not exceed 3%.

  4. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G.; Heimann, P.; Krupin, O.; Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Kelez, N.; Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; and others

    2012-04-15

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  5. Analysis of Historical Coins by X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddell, Mark; Manukyan, Khatchatur; Aprahamian, Ani; Jordan, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Using different setups of the EDAX Orbis Micro X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer, we have learned more about the limitations and optimizations of the XRF method and collected data about early British and Spanish colonial silver coins. XRF spectrometry was used to study Mexican, Bolivian, and Massachusetts silver coins from the University of Notre Dame's Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Runs were performed in both air and vacuum conditions, and the x-ray beam diameter was compared between 1 and 0.03 mm. Using these methods we were able to contribute to the understanding of the historical coinage as well as learn about the best ways to use the method. During analysis we found significant differences in the spectra for silver L shell excitation and silver K shell excitation when switching from 0.03 to 1mm x-ray beam widths. Our data trends also fit with the historical theory that the coinage from the Massachusetts' mint were created by melting down Spanish silver coins (like the ones made from Mexico and Bolivia) and adding a small percent more of copper. We have the intent to build on what we have learned by also studying some Roman Denarii in the future, and by trying to create a custom designed version of the XRF which can be moved more easily and provide quick scans for a larger number of artifacts.

  6. Electron channeling: a problem for x-ray microanalysis in materials science.

    PubMed

    Meisenkothen, Frederick; Wheeler, Robert; Uchic, Michael D; Kerns, Robert D; Scheltens, Frank J

    2009-04-01

    Electron channeling effects can create measurable signal intensity variations in all product signals that result from the scattering of the electron beam within a crystalline specimen. Of particular interest to the X-ray microanalyst are any variations that occur within the characteristic X-ray signal that are not directly related to a specimen composition variation. Many studies have documented the effect of crystallographic orientation on the local X-ray yield; however, the vast majority of these studies were carried out on thin foil specimens examined in transmission. Only a few studies have addressed these effects in bulk specimen materials, and these analyses were generally carried out at common scanning electron microscope microanalysis overvoltages (>1.5). At these overvoltage levels, the anomalous transmission effect is weak. As a result, the effect of electron channeling on the characteristic X-ray signal intensity has traditionally been overlooked in the field of quantitative electron probe microanalysis. The present work will demonstrate that electron channeling can produce X-ray variations of up to 26%, between intensity maxima and minima, in low overvoltage X-ray microanalyses of bulk specimens. Intensity variations of this magnitude will significantly impact the accuracy of qualitative and quantitative X-ray microanalyses at low overvoltage on engineering structural materials.

  7. X-Ray Microanalysis and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry in the Analytical Electron Microscope: Review and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses future directions in analytical electron microscopy for microchemical analysis using X-ray and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). The technique of X-ray microanalysis, using the ratio method and k(sub AB) factors, is outlined. The X-ray absorption correction is the major barrier to the objective of obtaining I% accuracy and precision in analysis. Spatial resolution and Minimum Detectability Limits (MDL) are considered with present limitations of spatial resolution in the 2 to 3 microns range and of MDL in the 0.1 to 0.2 wt. % range when a Field Emission Gun (FEG) system is used. Future directions of X-ray analysis include improvement in X-ray spatial resolution to the I to 2 microns range and MDL as low as 0.01 wt. %. With these improvements the detection of single atoms in the analysis volume will be possible. Other future improvements include the use of clean room techniques for thin specimen preparation, quantification available at the I% accuracy and precision level with light element analysis quantification available at better than the 10% accuracy and precision level, the incorporation of a compact wavelength dispersive spectrometer to improve X-ray spectral resolution, light element analysis and MDL, and instrument improvements including source stability, on-line probe current measurements, stage stability, and computerized stage control. The paper reviews the EELS technique, recognizing that it has been slow to develop and still remains firmly in research laboratories rather than in applications laboratories. Consideration of microanalysis with core-loss edges is given along with a discussion of the limitations such as specimen thickness. Spatial resolution and MDL are considered, recognizing that single atom detection is already possible. Plasmon loss analysis is discussed as well as fine structure analysis. New techniques for energy-loss imaging are also summarized. Future directions in the EELS technique will be

  8. An investigation on some of the tumor treatment cases using x-rays and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Burcu; Yigitoglu, Ibrahim; Arslan Kabalay, Ipek; Altiparmak, Duygu; Kilicaslan, Sinem

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we discussed some of the applications which X-rays and electron beam used in radiotherapy for tumor treatments. This study has been performed at Radiation Oncology Department, Medicine Faculty in Gaziosmanpasa University by using the VARIAN CLINICA DHX linear accelerator which is operated in the range of 6 MeV - 15 MeV. Processes for the treatments that X-rays used for pancreas, bladder and prostate tumors and the processes that the electron beam used for some of the derm tumors are studied. Effects of X-rays and electron beams to treatments process are examined and the obtained results are presented comparatively.

  9. X-ray diffraction analysis of modulated crystals: Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotina, N. B.

    2007-07-15

    The state of the art of X-ray diffraction analysis of modulated crystals is reviewed. The review begins with a brief historical overview followed by the consideration of the main concepts and notations used in this field. Then, methods of structural analysis of modulated crystals are considered with emphasis on recent achievements. The most interesting objects are listed, and the directions of investigation are outlined. Examples of analysis of both individual structures and families of modulated and incommensurate composite structures are given in terms of superspace symmetry.

  10. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  11. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  12. Inferring the Energy Distribution of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares from X-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Su, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in solar flares is important for constraining possible acceleration mechanisms and for understanding the relationships between flare X-ray sources, radio sources, and particles observed in space. Solar flare hard X-rays are primarily emitted from dense, thick-target regions in the lower atmosphere, but the electrons are understood to be accelerated higher in the corona. Various processes can distort the X-ray spectrum or the energy distribution of electrons before they reach the thick-target region. After briefly reviewing the processes that affect the X-ray spectrum and the electron distribution, I will describe recent results from a study of flare spectra from RHESSI to determine the importance of these processes in inferring the energy distribution of accelerated electrons.

  13. Detection and Analysis of X Ray Emission from the Princeton-Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Alexandra; Swanson, Charles; Jandovitz, Peter; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The PFRC is an odd-parity rotating-magnetic-field-driven field-reversed-configuration magnetic confinement experiment. Studying X rays produced via electron Bremsstrahlung with neutral particles is crucial to the further understanding of the energy and particle confinement of the PFRC. The data on the x rays are collected using a detector system comprised of two, spatially scannable Amptek XR-100 CR detectors and a Amptek XR-100 SDD detector that view the plasma column at two axial locations, one in the divertor and one near the axial midplane. These provide X-ray energy and arrival-time information. (Data analysis requires measurement of each detector's efficiency, a parameter that is modified by window transmission. Detector calibrations were performed with a custom-made X-ray tube that impinged 1-microamp 1-5 kV electron beams onto a carbon target.) From the analyzed data, the average electron energy, effective temperature, and electron density can be extracted. Spatial scans then allow the FRC's internal energy to be measured. We present recent measurements of the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 0.8 to 6 keV and the inferred electron temperature in the PFRC device as functions of heating power, magnetic field and fill gas pressure. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Electron Probe Microanalysis of Ni Silicides Using Ni-L X-Ray Lines.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Xavier; Pinard, Philippe T; Heikinheimo, Erkki; Louhenkilpi, Seppo; Richter, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    We report electron probe microanalysis measurements on nickel silicides, Ni5Si2, Ni2Si, Ni3Si2, and NiSi, which were done in order to investigate anomalies that affect the analysis of such materials by using the Ni L3-M4,5 line (Lα). Possible sources of systematic discrepancies between experimental data and theoretical predictions of Ni L3-M4,5 k-ratios are examined, and special attention is paid to dependence of the Ni L3-M4,5 k-ratios on mass-attenuation coefficients and partial fluorescence yields. Self-absorption X-ray spectra and empirical mass-attenuation coefficients were obtained for the considered materials from X-ray emission spectra and relative X-ray intensity measurements, respectively. It is shown that calculated k-ratios with empirical mass attenuation coefficients and modified partial fluorescence yields give better agreement with experimental data, except at very low accelerating voltages. Alternatively, satisfactory agreement is also achieved by using the Ni L3-M1 line (Lℓ) instead of the Ni L3-M4,5 line.

  15. X-ray texture analysis of paper coating pigments and the correlation with chemical composition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roine, J.; Tenho, M.; Murtomaa, M.; Lehto, V.-P.; Kansanaho, R.

    2007-10-01

    The present research experiments the applicability of x-ray texture analysis in investigating the properties of paper coatings. The preferred orientations of kaolin, talc, ground calcium carbonate, and precipitated calcium carbonate particles used in four different paper coatings were determined qualitatively based on the measured crystal orientation data. The extent of the orientation, namely, the degree of the texture of each pigment, was characterized quantitatively using a single parameter. As a result, the effect of paper calendering is clearly seen as an increase on the degree of texture of the coating pigments. The effect of calendering on the preferred orientation of kaolin was also evident in an independent energy dispersive spectrometer analysis on micrometer scale and an electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis on nanometer scale. Thus, the present work proves x-ray texture analysis to be a potential research tool for characterizing the properties of paper coating layers.

  16. Nondispersive X-ray emission analysis for geochemical exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Lamothe, R.; Schmadebeck, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1969-01-01

    Nondispersive X-ray emission technique uses lightweight, and rugged X-ray fluorescence units. The X-ray pulse-height spectra is excited by radioactive isotope sources. The technique is applicable for quantitative and qualitative analyses on complex chemical systems, and satisfies the goals for a lunar geochemical exploration device.

  17. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  18. Hard X-ray and Hot Electron Environment in Vacuum Hohlraums at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J W; . Suter, L J; Landen, O L; Foster, J M; Celeste, J R; Holder, J P; Dewald, E L; Schneider, M B; Hinkel, D E; Kauffman, R L; Atherton, L J; Bonanno, R E; Dixit, S N; Eder, D C; Haynam, C A; Kalantar, D H; Koniges, A E; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; Manes, K R; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Shaw, M J; Stevenson, R M; Parham, T G; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wallace, R J; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P K; Young, B K; Hammel, B A; Moses, E I

    2005-09-22

    Time resolved hard x-ray images (hv > 9 keV) and time integrated hard x-ray spectra (hv = 18-150 keV) from vacuum hohlraums irradiated with four 351 nm wavelength NIF laser beams are presented as a function of hohlraum size and laser power and duration. The hard x-ray images and spectra provide insight into the time evolution of the hohlraum plasma filling and the production of hot electrons. The fraction of laser energy detected as hot electrons (f{sub hot}) and a comparison to a filling model are presented.

  19. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  20. Controlled Betatron X-Ray Radiation from Tunable Optically Injected Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Fitour, R.; Faure, J.; Tafzi, A.; Goddet, J. P.; Malka, V.; Rousse, A.

    2011-12-16

    The features of Betatron x-ray emission produced in a laser-plasma accelerator are closely linked to the properties of the relativistic electrons which are at the origin of the radiation. While in interaction regimes explored previously the source was by nature unstable, following the fluctuations of the electron beam, we demonstrate in this Letter the possibility to generate x-ray Betatron radiation with controlled and reproducible features, allowing fine studies of its properties. To do so, Betatron radiation is produced using monoenergetic electrons with tunable energies from a laser-plasma accelerator with colliding pulse injection [J. Faure et al., Nature (London) 444, 737 (2006)]. The presented study provides evidence of the correlations between electrons and x-rays, and the obtained results open significant perspectives toward the production of a stable and controlled femtosecond Betatron x-ray source in the keV range.

  1. Controlled betatron x-ray radiation from tunable optically injected electrons.

    PubMed

    Corde, S; Phuoc, K Ta; Fitour, R; Faure, J; Tafzi, A; Goddet, J P; Malka, V; Rousse, A

    2011-12-16

    The features of Betatron x-ray emission produced in a laser-plasma accelerator are closely linked to the properties of the relativistic electrons which are at the origin of the radiation. While in interaction regimes explored previously the source was by nature unstable, following the fluctuations of the electron beam, we demonstrate in this Letter the possibility to generate x-ray Betatron radiation with controlled and reproducible features, allowing fine studies of its properties. To do so, Betatron radiation is produced using monoenergetic electrons with tunable energies from a laser-plasma accelerator with colliding pulse injection [J. Faure et al., Nature (London) 444, 737 (2006)]. The presented study provides evidence of the correlations between electrons and x-rays, and the obtained results open significant perspectives toward the production of a stable and controlled femtosecond Betatron x-ray source in the keV range.

  2. Investigation of surface structure with X-ray absorption and electron emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Mark Daniel

    The use of electron spectromicroscopy for the study of the chemical composition and electronic properties of surfaces, overlayers, and interfaces has become widely accepted. Improvements to the optics of instruments such as the X-ray photo electron emission microscope have pushed spectroscopic microscopies into the realm of very high spatial resolution, at and below 1 micrometer [1]. Coupled with the high spectral resolution available from third generation synchrotron sources, this spatial resolution allows the measurement of micro-X-ray absorption near-edge spectra in addition to the more typical electron emission spectra and diffraction patterns. Complementary to the experimental developments is the development of improved theoretical methods for computational modeling of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies. In the field of tribochemistry, zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) has long been a topic of much study. ZDDP is widely used as an anti-wear additive in engine oils and there is interest in determining the decomposition products of ZDDP that provide this protection against friction. An analysis of X-ray absorption near-edge spectra of thermal films from ZDDP samples is presented, including a comparison of the Zinc L-edge spectra with model calculations [2]. It was found essential to carry out self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure for the modeling. For the techniques of electron diffraction, a new method for a full multiple-scattering calculation of diffraction patterns from crystals with two-dimensional periodicity parallel to the surface is presented [3]. The calculation makes use of Helmholtz's reciprocity principle to compute the path-reversed process of the back propagation of a photoelectron from the position of a distant detector to that of the emitting atom. Early application is demonstrated with simulations of 64 eV M2,3VV and 914 eV L 2,3VV Auger electron diffraction from a Cu(001) surface. The functionality of the path

  3. Entangled Valence Electron-Hole Dynamics Revealed by Stimulated Attosecond X-ray Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan

    2012-01-01

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by stimulated resonant Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction. PMID:23755318

  4. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  5. Coherent X-ray radiation excited by a diverging relativistic electron beam in a single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Blazhevich, S. V. Noskov, A. V.

    2015-05-15

    We develop a dynamic theory of coherent X-rays generated in a single-crystal wafer by a diverging relativistic electron beam. The dependence of the spectral-angular density of coherent X-ray radiation on the angle of divergence is analyzed for the case when the angular spread can be described by the 2D Gaussian distribution. The theory constructed here makes it possible to analyze coherent radiation for an arbitrary angular distribution of electrons in the beam as well.

  6. Coherent X-ray radiation excited by a diverging relativistic electron beam in a single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a dynamic theory of coherent X-rays generated in a single-crystal wafer by a diverging relativistic electron beam. The dependence of the spectral-angular density of coherent X-ray radiation on the angle of divergence is analyzed for the case when the angular spread can be described by the 2D Gaussian distribution. The theory constructed here makes it possible to analyze coherent radiation for an arbitrary angular distribution of electrons in the beam as well.

  7. Towards adaptive, streaming analysis of x-ray tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Mathew; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Lansing, Carina S.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Miller, Erin A.; Lanekoff, Ingela; Laskin, Julia

    2015-03-04

    Temporal and spatial resolution of chemical imaging methodologies such as x-ray tomography are rapidly increasing, leading to more complex experimental procedures and fast growing data volumes. Automated analysis pipelines and big data analytics are becoming essential to effectively evaluate the results of such experiments. Offering those data techniques in an adaptive, streaming environment can further substantially improve the scientific discovery process, by enabling experimental control and steering based on the evaluation of emerging phenomena as they are observed by the experiment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)’ Chemical Imaging Initiative (CII - http://imaging.pnnl.gov/ ) has worked since 2011 towards developing a framework that allows users to rapidly compose and customize high throughput experimental analysis pipelines for multiple instrument types. The framework, named ‘Rapid Experimental Analysis’ (REXAN) Framework [1], is based on the idea of reusable component libraries and utilizes the PNNL developed collaborative data management and analysis environment ‘Velo’, to provide a user friendly analysis and data management environment for experimental facilities. This article will, discuss the capabilities established for X-Ray tomography, discuss lessons learned, and provide an overview of our more recent work in the Analysis in Motion Initiative (AIM - http://aim.pnnl.gov/ ) at PNNL to provide REXAN capabilities in a streaming environment.

  8. Damage investigation on tungsten and diamond diffractive optics at a hard x-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Fredrik; Nilsson, Daniel; Holmberg, Anders; Hertz, Hans M; Schroer, Christian G; Seiboth, Frank; Patommel, Jens; Meier, Vivienne; Hoppe, Robert; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Krzywinski, Jacek; Sinn, Harald; Vogt, Ulrich

    2013-04-08

    Focusing hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation with extremely high fluence sets stringent demands on the x-ray optics. Any material placed in an intense x-ray beam is at risk of being damaged. Therefore, it is crucial to find the damage thresholds for focusing optics. In this paper we report experimental results of exposing tungsten and diamond diffractive optics to a prefocused 8.2 keV free-electron laser beam in order to find damage threshold fluence levels. Tungsten nanostructures were damaged at fluence levels above 500 mJ/cm(2). The damage was of mechanical character, caused by thermal stress variations. Diamond nanostructures were affected at a fluence of 59 000 mJ/cm(2). For fluence levels above this, a significant graphitization process was initiated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and µ-Raman analysis were used to analyze exposed nanostructures.

  9. Elemental analysis by means of X-ray attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Giannini, Marino

    1980-03-01

    Radioactive sources of 109Cd, 241Am and 57Co were employed to measure the attenuation coefficient of biological materials such as whole blood, red blood cells, plasma, urine, water and of materials of interest for computed tomography, such as plexiglas, polyethylene, nylon, teflon, etc. The experimental errors range between 0.3% and 1%. A method is also presented which allows quantitative analysis of materials by measuring their attenuation coefficient at various monoenergetic X-ray energies. As an example, attenuation measurements at 60 keV and 122 keV were employed in order to determine the concentration of lead and copper in silver alloys.

  10. Plan for PLEX X-Ray Ablation Experiments and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S

    2001-09-27

    PLEX is a Z-pinch based x-ray source that can produce x-rays with fluences (0.3-18 J/cm{sup 2}), pulselengths (10-30 ns), repetition rates (<10 Hz), and energies (50-500 eV) of interest for IFE chambers and optics. It provides an affordable, dedicated method to advance our understanding of x-ray damage to materials. The PLEX x-ray source will be used to experimentally validate and further develop the ABLATOR x-ray ablation code for use in inertial fusion energy (IFE) studies.

  11. Supershort avalanche electron beams and x-ray in high-pressure nanosecond discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. H.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2008-10-01

    The properties of a supershort avalanche electron beam (S AEB) and X-ray radiation produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. An electron beam of the runaway electrons with amplitude of ~ 50 A has been obtained in air atmospheric pressure. It is reported that S AEB is formed in the angle above 2π sr. Three groups of the runaway electrons are formed in a gas diode under atmospheric air pressure, when nanosecond voltage pulses with amplitude of hundreds of kilovolts are applied. The electron beam has been generated behind a 45 μm thick AlBe foil in SF6 and Xe under the pressure of 2 arm, and in He under the pressure of about 12 atm. The paper gives the analysis of a generation mechanism of SAEB.

  12. Rayleigh x-ray scattering from many-electron atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhykov, A.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Stöhlker, Th; Fritzsche, S.

    2015-07-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for the elastic Rayleigh scattering of x-rays by many-electron atoms and ions. Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution and linear polarization of the scattered photons for the case when the incident light is completely (linearly) polarized. Based on second-order perturbation theory and the independent particle approximation, we found that the Rayleigh angular distribution is strongly affected by the charge state and shell structure of the target ions or atoms. This effect can be observed experimentally at modern synchrotron facilities and might provide further insight into the structure of heavy atomic systems.

  13. Theory of time-resolved nonresonant x-ray scattering for imaging ultrafast coherent electron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Gopal; Slowik, Jan Malte; Santra, Robin

    2014-04-01

    Future ultrafast x-ray light sources might image ultrafast coherent electron motion in real space and in real time. For a rigorous understanding of such an imaging experiment, we extend the theory of nonresonant x-ray scattering to the time domain. The role of energy resolution of the scattering detector is investigated in detail. We show that time-resolved nonresonant x-ray scattering with no energy resolution offers an opportunity to study time-dependent electronic correlations in nonequilibrium quantum systems. Furthermore, our theory presents a unified description of ultrafast x-ray scattering from electronic wave packets and the dynamical imaging of ultrafast dynamics using inelastic x-ray scattering by Abbamonte and co-workers. We examine closely the relation of the scattering signal and the linear density response of electronic wave packets. Finally, we demonstrate that time-resolved x-ray scattering from a crystal consisting of identical electronic wave packets recovers the instantaneous electron density.

  14. X-ray Free-Electron Lasers - Present and Future Capabilities [Invited

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John; Ratner, John Arthur:a Daniel F.; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2011-11-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fsto500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

  15. X-ray free-electron lasers--present and future capabilities [Invited

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; Arthur, John; Ratner, Daniel F.; White, William E.

    2010-11-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fs to 500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

  16. Observation of pulsed x-ray trains produced by laser-electron Compton scatterings

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu; Araki, Sakae; Fukuda, Masafumi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Omori, Tsunehiko; Taniguchi, Takashi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Sasao, Noboru

    2009-12-15

    X-ray generation based on laser-electron Compton scattering is one attractive method to achieve a compact laboratory-sized high-brightness x-ray source. We have designed, built, and tested such a source; it combines a 50 MeV multibunch electron linac with a mode-locked 1064 nm laser stored and amplified in a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We directly observed trains of pulsed x rays using a microchannel plate detector; the resultant yield was found to be 1.2x10{sup 5} Hz in good agreement with prediction. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based compact x-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  17. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of galvannealed coatings on steel.

    PubMed

    Schmid, P; Uran, K; Macherey, F; Ebert, M; Ullrich, H-J; Sommer, D; Friedel, F

    2009-04-01

    The formation of Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds, as relevant in the commercial product galvannealed steel sheet, was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and different methods of X-ray diffraction. A scanning electron microscope with high resolution was applied to investigate the layers of the galvannealed coating and its topography. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID) was preferred over conventional Bragg-Brentano geometry for analysing thin crystalline layers because of its lower incidence angle alpha and its lower depth of information. Furthermore, in situ experiments at an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an internal heating plate and at an X-ray diffractometer equipped with a high-temperature chamber were carried out. Thus, it was possible to investigate the phase evolution during heat treatment by X-ray diffraction and to display the growth of the zeta crystals in the ESEM.

  18. High Pressure X-ray Absorption Studies on Correlated-Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, Andrew L.

    2016-08-26

    This project used high pressure to alter the electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions in rare earth and actinide compounds. Knowledge of these properties is the starting points for a first-principles understanding of electronic and electronically related macroscopic properties. The research focused on a systematic study of x-ray absorption measurements on rare earth and actinide compounds.

  19. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2010-10-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 1012 photons per pulse, 20 µm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  20. Two-colour hard X-ray free-electron laser with wide tunability.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Inubushi, Yuichi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sato, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Togashi, Tadashi; Togawa, Kazuaki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Ultrabrilliant, femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) have promoted the investigation of exotic interactions between intense X-rays and matters, and the observation of minute targets with high spatio-temporal resolution. Although a single X-ray beam has been utilized for these experiments, the use of multiple beams with flexible and optimum beam parameters should drastically enhance the capability and potentiality of XFELs. Here we show a new light source of a two-colour double-pulse (TCDP) XFEL in hard X-rays using variable-gap undulators, which realizes a large and flexible wavelength separation of more than 30% with an ultraprecisely controlled time interval in the attosecond regime. Together with sub-10-fs pulse duration and multi-gigawatt peak powers, the TCDP scheme enables us to elucidate X-ray-induced ultrafast transitions of electronic states and structures, which will significantly contribute to the advancement of ultrafast chemistry, plasma and astronomical physics, and quantum X-ray optics.

  1. Predicting X-ray absorption spectra of semiconducting polymers for electronic structure and morphology characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Gregory; Patel, Shrayesh; Pemmaraju, C. Das; Kramer, Edward; Prendergast, David; Chabinyc, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Core-level X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveals important information on the electronic structure of materials and plays a key role in morphology characterization. Semiconducting polymers are the active component in many organic electronics. Their electronic properties are critically linked to device performance, and a proper understanding of semiconducting polymer XAS is crucial. Techniques such as resonant X-ray scattering rely on core-level transitions to gain materials contrast and probe orientational order. However, it is difficult to identify these transitions based on experiments alone, and complementary simulations are required. We show that first-principles calculations can capture the essential features of experimental XAS of semiconducting polymers, and provide insight into which molecular model, such as oligomers or periodic boundary conditions, are best suited for XAS calculations. Simulated XAS can reveal contributions from individual atoms and be used to visualize molecular orbitals. This allows for improved characterization of molecular orientation and scattering analysis. These predictions lay the groundwork for understanding how chemical makeup is linked to electronic structure, and to properly utilize experiments to characterize semiconducting polymers.

  2. Detection of soft X-rays with NEA III-V photocathodes. [Negative Electron Affinity X-ray detector for astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardas, D.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Enck, R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of tests on an X-ray photomultiplier containing a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode. This device makes it possible to investigate the response of the NEA photocathode to X-rays of various energies. The obtained data provide a basis for the determination of the photoelectron yield and energy resolution of the considered photocathode as a function of energy in the range from 0.8 to 3 keV. The investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using an NEA III-V photocathode for the detection of soft X-rays.

  3. Coherent control of long-range photoinduced electron transfer by stimulated X-ray Raman processes

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    We show that X-ray pulses resonant with selected core transitions can manipulate electron transfer (ET) in molecules with ultrafast and atomic selectivity. We present possible protocols for coherently controlling ET dynamics in donor–bridge–acceptor (DBA) systems by stimulated X-ray resonant Raman processes involving various transitions between the D, B, and A sites. Simulations presented for a Ru(II)–Co(III) model complex demonstrate how the shapes, phases and amplitudes of the X-ray pulses can be optimized to create charge on demand at selected atoms, by opening up otherwise blocked ET pathways. PMID:27559082

  4. X-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics of a water molecule irradiated by an x-ray free-electron laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Hao, Yajiang; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2016-08-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics of polyatomic molecules, based on the rate equation model and molecular electronic structure calculations. An efficient numerical procedure is developed to calculate photoionization cross sections, Auger rates, and fluorescence rates for all possible electronic multiple-hole configurations of molecules. We investigate the charge-state distribution of a water molecule after interaction with an intense x-ray pulse and discuss its dependence on the fluence and the pulse duration of the x-ray beam. Our results demonstrate that a water molecule exposed to an intense x-ray pulse is more ionized than what would be expected within the independent-atom picture.

  5. Comparison of the data of X-ray microtomography and fluorescence analysis in the study of bone-tissue structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadchikov, V. E.; Senin, R. A.; Blagov, A. E.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Gulimova, V. I.; Zolotov, D. A.; Orekhov, A. S.; Osadchaya, A. S.; Podurets, K. M.; Savel'ev, S. V.; Seregin, A. Yu.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Chukalina, M. V.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of localizing clusters of heavy atoms is substantiated by comparing the data of X-ray microtomography at different wavelengths, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence analysis. The proximal tail vertebrae of Turner's thick-toed gecko ( Chondrodactylus turneri) have been investigated for the first time by both histological and physical methods, including X-ray microtomography at different wavelengths and elemental analysis. This complex methodology of study made it possible to reveal the regions of accumulation of heavy elements in the aforementioned bones of Turner's thick-toed gecko.

  6. Calibration of a two-color soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, L. M.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Franz, P.; Goetz, J.; McGarry, M. B.; Stephens, H. D.

    2016-11-01

    The two-color soft x-ray (SXR) tomography diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus is capable of making electron temperature measurements via the double-filter technique; however, there has been a 15% systematic discrepancy between the SXR double-filter (SXRDF) temperature and Thomson scattering (TS) temperature. Here we discuss calibration of the Be filters used in the SXRDF measurement using empirical measurements of the transmission function versus energy at the BESSY II electron storage ring, electron microprobe analysis of filter contaminants, and measurement of the effective density. The calibration does not account for the TS and SXRDF discrepancy, and evidence from experiments indicates that this discrepancy is due to physics missing from the SXRDF analysis rather than instrumentation effects.

  7. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; ...

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  8. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  9. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J; Brewster, Aaron S; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Bogan, Michael J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Adams, Paul D; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2014-05-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  10. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, Gérald Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-15

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  11. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  12. Visualizing a protein quake with time resolved X-ray scattering at a free electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Barty, Anton; Williams, Garth J.; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Milathianaki, Despina; DePonte, Daniel P.; Shoeman, Robert L.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Katona, Gergely; Westenhoff, Sebastian; White, Thomas A.; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Berntsen, Peter; Bogan, Mike; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Doak, R. Bruce; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Henning, Robert; Hunter, Mark S.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kosheleva, Irina; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Stellato, Francesco; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Schlichting, Ilme; Boutet, Sébastien; Groenhof, Gerrit; Chapman, Henry N.; Neutze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A ‘protein quake’ describes the hypothesis that proteins rapidly dissipate energy through quake like structural motions. Here we measure ultrafast structural changes in the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center following multi-photon excitation using time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free electron laser. A global conformational change arises within picoseconds, which precedes the propagation of heat through the protein. This motion is damped within a hundred picoseconds. PMID:25108686

  13. X-Ray Lithography Mask Metrology: Use of Transmitted Electrons in an SEM for Linewidth Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Postek, Michael T.; Lowney, Jeremiah R.; Vladar, Andras E.; Keery, William J.; Marx, Egon; Larrabee, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray masks present a measurement object that is different from most other objects used in semiconductor processing because the support membrane is, by design, x-ray transparent. This characteristic can be used as an advantage in electron beam-based x-ray mask metrology since, depending upon the incident electron beam energies, substrate composition and substrate thickness, the membrane can also be essentially electron transparent. The areas of the mask where the absorber structures are located are essentially x-ray opaque, as well as electron opaque. This paper shows that excellent contrast and signal-to-noise levels can be obtained using the transmitted-electron signal for mask metrology rather than the more commonly collected secondary electron signal. Monte Carlo modeling of the transmitted electron signal was used to support this work in order to determine the optimum detector position and characteristics, as well as in determining the location of the edge in the image profile. The comparison between the data from the theoretically-modeled electron beam interaction and actual experimental data were shown to agree extremely well, particularly with regard to the wall slope characteristics of the structure. Therefore, the theory can be used to identify the location of the edge of the absorber line for linewidth measurement. This work provides one approach to improved x-ray mask linewidth metrology and a more precise edge location algorithm for measurement of feature sizes on x-ray masks in commercial instrumentation. This work also represents an initial step toward the first SEM-based accurate linewidth measurement standard from NIST, as well as providing a viable metrology for linewidth measurement instruments of x-ray masks for the lithography community. PMID:28053482

  14. Fractal analysis of powder X-ray diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Cruz, A.; Santolalla, C.; Moreno, E.; de los Reyes-Heredia, J. A.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2012-02-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with broad background are commonly found in the characterization of materials with a certain degree of amorphicity, so the sharp intensity peaks associated with material phases are not well defined. This work used rescaled range (denoted by R/S) analysis, a method intended for fractal analysis of noisy signals, to characterize XRD patterns with broad background. It is found that XRD patterns with broad background are not random at all, but contain information on regularities expressed as autocorrelations of the intensity signal. Sol-gel alumina fired at different temperatures was used as an example to illustrate the applicability of the method. It is shown that fractal R/S analysis is able to locate angular regions that can be associated to ideal International Centre for Diffraction Data Powder Diffraction File (ICDD PDF) lines of diverse alumina phases.

  15. Accelerated Electrons in Cassiopeia A: An Explanation for the Hard X-Ray Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    2001-01-01

    We propose a model for the hard X-ray (>10 keV) emission observed from the supernova remnant Cas A. Lower hybrid waves are generated in strong (mG) magnetic fields, generally believed to reside in this remnant, by shocks reflected from density inhomogeneities. These then accelerate electrons to energies of several tens of keV. Around 4% of the X-ray-emitting plasma electrons need to be in this accelerated distribution, which extends up to electron velocities of order the electron Alfvén speed and is directed along magnetic field lines. Bremsstrahlung from these electrons produces the observed hard X-ray emission. Such waves and accelerated electrons have been observed in situ at comet Halley, and we discuss the viability of the extrapolation from this case to the parameters relevant to Cas A.

  16. Phase recovery and lensless imaging by iterative methods in optical, X-ray and electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Howells, M

    2002-05-15

    Thomas Young's quantitative analysis of interference effects provided the confidence needed to revive the wave theory of light, and firmly established the concept of phase in optics. Phase plays a similarly fundamental role in matter-wave interferometry, for which the field-emission electron microscope provides ideal instrumentation. The wave-particle duality is vividly demonstrated by experimental 'Young's fringes' using coherent electron beams under conditions in which the flight time is less than the time between particle emission. A brief historical review is given of electron interferometry and holography, including the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the electron Sagnac interferometer. The simultaneous development of phase-contrast imaging at subnanometre spatial resolution has greatly deepened our understanding of atomic processes in biology, materials science and condensed-matter physics, while electron holography has become a routine tool for the mapping of electrostatic and magnetic fields in materials on a nanometre scale. The encoding of phase information in scattered farfield intensities is discussed, and non-interferometric, non-crystallographic methods for phase retrieval are reviewed in relationship to electron holography. Examples of phase measurement and diffraction-limited imaging using the hybrid input-output iterative algorithm are given, including simulations for soft X-ray imaging, and new experimental results for coherent electron and visible-light scattering. Image reconstruction is demonstrated from experimental electron and visible-light Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The prospects this provides for lensless imaging using particles for which no lenses exist (such as neutrons, condensates, coherent atom beams and X-rays) are discussed. These new interactions can be expected to provide new information, perhaps, for example, in biology, with the advantage of less damage to samples.

  17. Bayesian Multiscale Analysis of X-Ray Jet Features in High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, A.; Kashyap, V.; Stein, N.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission of powerful quasar jets may be a result of the inverse Compton (IC) process in which the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons gain energy by interactions with the jet’s relativistic electrons. However, there is no definite evidence that IC/CMB process is responsible for the observed X-ray emission of large scale jets. A step toward understanding the X-ray emission process is to study the Radio and X-ray morphologies of the jet. We implement a sophisticated Bayesian image analysis program, Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) (Esch et al. 2004; Conners & van Dyk 2007), to analyze jet features in 11 Chandra images of high redshift quasars (z ~ 2 - 4.8). Out of the 36 regions where knots are visible in the radio jets, nine showed detectable X-ray emission. We measured the ratios of the X-ray and radio luminosities of the detected features and found that they are consistent with the CMB radiation relationship. We derived a range of the bulk lorentz factor (Γ) for detected jet features under the CMB jet emission model. There is no discernible trend of Γ with redshift within the sample. The efficiency of the X-ray emission between the detected jet feature and the corresponding quasar also shows no correlation with redshift. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and the Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution, and by NASA Contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the CXC in the application packages CIAO, ChIPS, and Sherpa. We thank Teddy Cheung for providing the VLA radio images. Connors, A., & van Dyk, D. A. 2007, Statistical Challenges in Modern Astronomy IV, 371, 101 Esch, D. N., Connors, A., Karovska, M., & van Dyk, D. A. 2004, ApJ, 610, 1213

  18. Note: Theoretical study on the gas pressure dependence of x-ray yield in TE{sub 111} cavity based electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S. Sen, Soubhadra; Baskaran, R.

    2014-11-15

    Adopting Langevin methodology, a pressure dependent frictional force term which represents the collisional effect is added to the Lorentz equation. The electrons are assumed to be starting from the uniformly distributed co-ordinates on the central plane. The trajectory of each electron is numerically simulated by solving the modified Lorentz equation for a given pressure. The Bremsstrahlung x-ray energy spectrum for each electron crossing the cavity wall boundary is obtained using the Duane-Hunt law. The total x-ray yield is estimated by adding the spectral contribution of each electron. The calculated yields are compared with the experimental results and a good agreement is found.

  19. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  20. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  1. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-15

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  2. Application of multivariate statistical analysis to STEM X-ray spectral images: interfacial analysis in microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

    2006-12-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis methods have been applied to scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectral images. The particular application of the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) technique provides a high spectral contrast view of the raw spectral image. The power of this approach is demonstrated with a microelectronics failure analysis. Specifically, an unexpected component describing a chemical contaminant was found, as well as a component consistent with a foil thickness change associated with the focused ion beam specimen preparation process. The MCR solution is compared with a conventional analysis of the same spectral image data set.

  3. Depth-dependent non-destructive analysis of thin overlayers using total-reflection-angle X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Noriyoshi; Okubo, Soichiro; Yonemitsu, Kyoko

    1996-07-01

    Electron-beam excited X-ray chemical analysis with very small angle condition has been applied to measure thin overlayers on substrates. Relations between the fluorescent X-ray intensity and the emission angle is investigated based on a model. It is demonstrated that the emission-angle dependence of the X-ray intensity is sensitively reflected by film thickness and layer structure. The calculations agreed well with experiments for thin Au and Pd multilayers on Si substrate. The results show that this method is applicable to a non-destructive depth profiling of chemical compositions.

  4. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles. PMID:24763651

  5. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the `diffraction before destruction' scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles.

  6. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  7. X-RAY NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROCESSES IN ATOMS USING A SELF-AMPLIFIED SPONTANEOUS EMISSION FREE-ELECTRON LASER

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N

    2008-08-08

    X-ray free electron lasers (xFEL) will open new avenues to the virtually unexplored territory of non-linear interactions of x rays with matter. Initially xFELs will be based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Each SASE pulse consists of a number of coherent intensity spikes of random amplitude, i.e. the process is chaotic and pulses are irreproducible. The coherence time of SASE xFELs will be a few femtoseconds for a photon energy near 1 keV. The importance of coherence properties of light in non-linear optical processes was theoretically discovered in the early 1960s. In this contribution we will illustrate the impact of field chaoticity on x-ray non-linear optical processes on neon for photon energies around 1 keV and intensities up to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Resonant and non-resonant processes are discussed. The first process to be addressed is the formation of a double-core hole in neon by photoionization with x rays above 1.25 keV energy. In contrast to the long-wavelength regime, non-linear optical processes in the x-ray regime are characterized in general by sequential single-photon single-electron interactions. Despite this fact, the sequential absorption of multiple x-ray photons depends on the statistical properties of the radiation field. Treating the x rays generated by a SASE FEL as fully chaotic, a quantum-mechanical analysis of inner-shell two-photon absorption is performed. By solving a system of time-dependent rate equations, we demonstrate that double-core hole formation in neon via x-ray two-photon absorption is enhanced by chaotic photon statistics. At an intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, the statistical enhancement is about 30%, much smaller than typical values in the optical regime. The second part of this presentation discusses the resonant Auger effect of atomic neon at the 1s-3p transition (at 867.1 eV). For low X-ray intensity, the excitation process 1s {yields} 3p in Neon can be treated perturbatively. The

  8. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  9. High sensitive X-ray films to detect electron showers in 100 GeV region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taira, T.; Shirai, T.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Yoshida, A.; Aizu, H.; Nomura, Y.; Kazuno, M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonscreen type X-ray films were used in emulsion chamber experiments to detect high energy showers in cosmic rays. Ranges of the detection threshold is from about 1 to 2 TeV depending on the exposure conditions. Different types of X-ray films and sheets i.e. high sensitive screen type X-ray films and luminescence sheets were tested. The threshold of the shower detection is found to be about 200 GeV, which is much lower than that of nonscreen type X-ray films. These films are useful to detect showers in the medium energy range, a few hundred GeV, of the cosmic ray electrons.

  10. Single-shot beam-position monitor for x-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Tono, Kensuke; Kudo, Togo; Yabashi, Makina; Tachibana, Takeshi; Feng, Yiping; Fritz, David; Hastings, Jerome; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2011-02-01

    We have developed an x-ray beam-position monitor for detecting the radiation properties of an x-ray free electron laser (FEL). It is composed of four PIN photodiodes that detect backscattered x-rays from a semitransparent diamond film placed in the beam path. The signal intensities from the photodiodes are used to compute the beam intensity and position. A proof-of-principle experiment at a synchrotron light source revealed that the error in the beam position is reduced to below 7 μm by using a nanocrystal diamond film prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Owing to high dose tolerance and transparency of the diamond film, the monitor is suitable for routine diagnostics of extremely intense x-ray pulses from the FEL.

  11. MeV-energy x rays from inverse compton scattering with laser-wakefield accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Powers, N D; Ghebregziabher, I; Maharjan, C M; Liu, C; Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Zhang, J; Cunningham, N; Moorti, A; Clarke, S; Pozzi, S; Umstadter, D P

    2013-04-12

    We report the generation of MeV x rays using an undulator and accelerator that are both driven by the same 100-terawatt laser system. The laser pulse driving the accelerator and the scattering laser pulse are independently optimized to generate a high energy electron beam (>200  MeV) and maximize the output x-ray brightness. The total x-ray photon number was measured to be ∼1×10(7), the source size was 5  μm, and the beam divergence angle was ∼10  mrad. The x-ray photon energy, peaked at 1 MeV (reaching up to 4 MeV), exceeds the thresholds of fundamental nuclear processes (e.g., pair production and photodisintegration).

  12. Effect of an electron scattering cloud on X-ray oscillations produced by beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J.; Lamb, F. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a scattering cloud on the amplitude of oscillations produced by a rotating beam of X-rays is investigated using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The scattering cloud was modeled as a uniform density sphere, and the source was represented as an anistropic distribution of radiation emerging from a point at the center of the scattering cloud. The intensity distribution produced by the source beam is examined as a function of optical depth. The relation between electron scattering optical depth and the forward-backward ratio is studied. It is observed that the scattering in a central corona of various optical depths reduces the amplitude of the oscillation. The data suggest that the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the X-ray intensities of some luminous low-mass X-ray binaries are caused by oscillations in the luminosity of the X-ray star.

  13. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0).

  14. Infrared Line Emission from Molecular Gas Heated by X-Rays and Energetic Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    "I propose to carry out a detailed study using infrared observations (and in some cases, optical and ultraviolet observations) of dense interstellar gas exposed to intense fluxes of X-rays and/or energetic electrons. This is undoubtedly the dominant source of line emission for clouds exposed to X-rays from active galactic nuclei, supernova shocks, or embedded X-ray sources (e.g., X-ray binaries), or to high-temperature or relativistic electrons in galaxy clusters, near powerful radio sources, or supernova remnants. Detailed physical and chemical models of such clouds will be used to analyze infrared observations of the Great Annihilator X-ray source in the Galactic Center, cD galaxies in massive cooling flows, and the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies which will be obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), UV and optical observations of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based near-infrared observations of Seyfert nuclei. Results from this work will also be of great relevance to observations obtained with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomical Satellite (SWAS). In the first year of funding of this proposal, my chief collaborators (D.J. Hollenbach and A.G.G.M. Tielens, both of NASA Ames Research Center) and I concentrated on completing our models of the physical conditions in, and the resulting line emission from, dense gas irradiated by X-rays. As noted in the original proposal, some important physical processes were not yet thoroughly incorporated into our models at the time of submission. We completed our modeling of the physical conditions and line emission for essentially the entire range of parameter space (five orders of magnitude in X-ray flux to gas density ratio) occupied by typical dense interstellar clouds in which the gas is mostly neutral and X-rays are important for the ionization, chemistry, and thermal balance.

  15. Measurements of electron temperature profiles on Alcator C-Mod using a novel energy-resolving x-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, J.; Delgado, L.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Rice, J.

    2015-11-01

    The most common electron temperature diagnostics, Thomson Scattering (TS) and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE), both require large diagnostic footprints and expensive optics. Another electron temperature diagnostic is the Pulse-Height-Analysis (PHA) system, which derives the electron temperature from the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. However, the main disadvantage of the PHA method is poor temporal resolution of the Si(Li) diode detectors. This paper presents a novel x-ray pinhole camera, which uses a pixilated Pilatus detector that allows single photon counting at a rate 2MHz per pixel and the setting of energy thresholds. The detector configuration is optimized by Shannon-sampling theory, such that spatial profiles of the x-ray continuum intensity can be obtained simultaneously for different energies, in the range from 4 to 16 keV. The exponential-like dependence of the x-ray intensity with photon energies is compared with a model describing the Be filter, attenuation in air, and detector efficiency, as well as different sets of energy thresholds. Electron temperature measurements are compared with TS and ECE measurements. This work was supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DoE Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program.

  16. In Situ Mineralogical Analysis of Planetary Materials Using X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Remote observations of Mars have led scientists to believe that its early climate was similar to that of the early Earth, having had abundant liquid water and a dense atmosphere. One of the most fascinating questions of recent times is whether simple bacterial life developed on Mars (as it did on the Earth) during this early element period. Analyses of SNC meteorites have broadened considerably our knowledge of the chemistry of certain types of Martian rocks, underscoring the tantalizing possibility of early hydrothermal systems and even of ancient bacterial life. Detailed analyses of SNC meteorites in Terrestrial laboratories utilize the most sophisticated organic, isotopic and microscopic techniques in existence. Indeed; it is unlikely that the key biogenic indicators used in McKay et al (ibid) could be identified by a remote instrument on the surface of Mars. As a result, it is probable that any robotic search for evidence of an ancient Martian biosphere will have as its focus the identification of key minerals in likely host rocks rather than the direct detection of organic or isotopic biomarkers. Even on a sample return mission, mineralogical screening will be utilized to choose the most likely candidate rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is the only technique that can provide a direct determination of the crystal structures of the phases present within a sample. When many different crystalline phases are present, quantitative analysis is better constrained if used in conjunction with a determination of elemental composition, obtainable by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using the same X-ray source as for XRD. For planetary surface analysis, a remote instrument combining XRD and XRF could be used for mineralogical characterization of both soils and rocks. We are designing a remote XRD/XRF instrument with this objective in mind. The instrument concept pays specific attention to constraints in sample preparation, weight, volume, power, etc. Based on the geometry of a

  17. x-ray irradiation analysis based on wavelet transform in tokamak plasma.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, K; Ghoranneviss, M; Elahi, A Salar; Saviz, S

    2014-01-01

    Hard x-ray emission from the Runaway electrons is an important issue in tokamaks. Suggesting methods to reduce the Runaway electrons and therefore the emitted hard x-ray is important for tokamak plasma operation. In this manuscript, we have investigated the effects of external fields on hard x-ray intensity and Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) activity. In other words, we have presented the effects of positive biased limiter and Resonant Helical Field (RHF) on the MHD fluctuations and hard x-ray emission from the Runaway electrons. MHD activity and hard x-ray intensity were analyzed using Wavelet transform in the presence of external fields and without them. The results show that the MHD activity and therefore the hard x-ray intensity can be controlled by the external electric and magnetic fields.

  18. Electronic structure measurements of metal-organic solar cell dyes using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.

    The focus of this thesis is twofold: to report the results of X-ray absorption studies of metal-organic dye molecules for dye-sensitized solar cells and to provide a basic training manual on X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques and data analysis. The purpose of our research on solar cell dyes is to work toward an understanding of the factors influencing the electronic structure of the dye: the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, ligands, and cage structure. First we study the effect of replacing Ru in several common dye structures by Fe. First-principles calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C 1s and N 1s edges are combined to investigate transition metal dyes in octahedral and square planar N cages. Octahedral molecules are found to have a downward shift in the N 1s-to-pi* transition energy and an upward shift in C 1s-to-pi* transition energy when Ru is replaced by Fe, explained by an extra transfer of negative charge from Fe to the N ligands compared to Ru. For the square planar molecules, the behavior is more complex because of the influence of axial ligands and oxidation state. Next the crystal field parameters for a series of phthalocyanine and porphyrins dyes are systematically determined using density functional calculations and atomic multiplet calculations with polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectra. The polarization dependence of the spectra provides information on orbital symmetries which ensures the determination of the crystal field parameters is unique. A uniform downward scaling of the calculated crystal field parameters by 5-30% is found to be necessary to best fit the spectra. This work is a part of the ongoing effort to design and test new solar cell dyes. Replacing the rare metal Ru with abundant metals like Fe would be a significant advance for dye-sensitized solar cells. Understanding the effects of changing the metal centers in these dyes in terms of optical absorption, charge transfer, and electronic

  19. Runaway electron energy measurement using hard x-ray spectroscopy in "Damavand" tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, C; Iraji, D; Farahbod, A H; Akhtari, K; Rasouli, H; Modarresi, H; Lamehi, M

    2009-01-01

    Set of experiments has been developed to study existing runaway electrons in "Damavand" tokamak plasma upon characteristics of hard x-ray emissions produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles and limiters. As a first step, spatial distribution of hard x-ray emissions on the equatorial plane of the torus was considered. Obtained spectra of hard x-ray emissions for different alignments of shielded detector indicate isotropic emissivity in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with wide angle cone of bremsstrahlung radiations, deduced from the mean value of energy of the runaway electrons. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons. In the second stage in order to investigate time evolution of energy of the runaway electrons, similar technique were applied to obtain hard x-ray energy in every 3 ms intervals, from the beginning to the end of plasma. The mean energy of the runaway electrons increases during the ramp up phase and reaches its maximum between 3 and 9 ms after plasma formation. Also considering the time dependence of the counted photons in each energy range shows that energetic photons are emitted during the ramp up phase of the plasma current in Damavand tokamak.

  20. Runaway electron energy measurement using hard x-ray spectroscopy in 'Damavand' tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, C.; Farahbod, A. H.; Rasouli, H.; Lamehi, M.; Iraji, D.; Akhtari, K.; Modarresi, H.

    2009-01-15

    Set of experiments has been developed to study existing runaway electrons in ''Damavand'' tokamak plasma upon characteristics of hard x-ray emissions produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles and limiters. As a first step, spatial distribution of hard x-ray emissions on the equatorial plane of the torus was considered. Obtained spectra of hard x-ray emissions for different alignments of shielded detector indicate isotropic emissivity in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with wide angle cone of bremsstrahlung radiations, deduced from the mean value of energy of the runaway electrons. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons. In the second stage in order to investigate time evolution of energy of the runaway electrons, similar technique were applied to obtain hard x-ray energy in every 3 ms intervals, from the beginning to the end of plasma. The mean energy of the runaway electrons increases during the ramp up phase and reaches its maximum between 3 and 9 ms after plasma formation. Also considering the time dependence of the counted photons in each energy range shows that energetic photons are emitted during the ramp up phase of the plasma current in Damavand tokamak.

  1. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Amano, D.; Miyade, H.

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  2. Electronic ground states of Fe2(+) and Co2(+) as determined by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamudio-Bayer, V; Hirsch, K; Langenberg, A; Ławicki, A; Terasaki, A; V Issendorff, B; Lau, J T

    2015-12-28

    The (6)Π electronic ground state of the Co2 (+) diatomic molecular cation has been assigned experimentally by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy in a cryogenic ion trap. Three candidates, (6)Φ, (8)Φ, and (8)Γ, for the electronic ground state of Fe2 (+) have been identified. These states carry sizable orbital angular momenta that disagree with theoretical predictions from multireference configuration interaction and density functional theory. Our results show that the ground states of neutral and cationic diatomic molecules of 3d transition elements cannot generally be assumed to be connected by a one-electron process.

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Pulse Temporal Characterization in Free-Electron Lasers Using a Transverse Deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    We propose a novel method to characterize the temporal duration and shape of femtosecond x-ray pulses in a free-electron laser (FEL) by measuring the time-resolved electron-beam energy loss and energy spread induced by the FEL process, with a transverse radio-frequency deflector located after the undulator. Its merits are simplicity, high resolution, wide diagnostic range, and non-invasive to user operation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first hard x-ray free-electron laser in the world, it can provide single-shot measurements on the electron beam and x-ray pulses with a resolution on the order of 1-2 femtoseconds rms.

  4. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H.; Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F.; Stohr, J.; Diaz, J.; Cossy-Gantner, A.

    1998-03-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) using X-rays is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper the authors give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments.

  5. Three-dimensional structure determination protocol for noncrystalline biomolecules using x-ray free-electron laser diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-02-01

    Coherent and intense x-ray pulses generated by x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources are paving the way for structural determination of noncrystalline biomolecules. However, due to the small scattering cross section of electrons for x rays, the available incident x-ray intensity of XFEL sources, which is currently in the range of 10(12)-10(13) photons/μm(2)/pulse, is lower than that necessary to perform single-molecule diffraction experiments for noncrystalline biomolecules even with the molecular masses of megadalton and submicrometer dimensions. Here, we propose an experimental protocol and analysis method for visualizing the structure of those biomolecules by the combined application of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction methods. To compensate the small scattering cross section of biomolecules, in our protocol, a thin vitreous ice plate containing several hundred biomolecules/μm(2) is used as sample, a setup similar to that utilized by single-molecule cryoelectron microscopy. The scattering cross section of such an ice plate is far larger than that of a single particle. The images of biomolecules contained within irradiated areas are then retrieved from each diffraction pattern, and finally provide the three-dimensional electron density model. A realistic atomic simulation using large-scale computations proposed that the three-dimensional structure determination of the 50S ribosomal subunit embedded in a vitreous ice plate is possible at a resolution of 0.8 nm when an x-ray beam of 10(16) photons/500×500 nm(2)/pulse is available.

  6. PROS: An IRAF based system for analysis of x ray data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, M. A.; Deponte, J.; Moran, J. F.; Orszak, J. S.; Roberts, W. P.; Schmidt, D.

    1992-01-01

    PROS is an IRAF based software package for the reduction and analysis of x-ray data. The use of a standard, portable, integrated environment provides for both multi-frequency and multi-mission analysis. The analysis of x-ray data differs from optical analysis due to the nature of the x-ray data and its acquisition during constantly varying conditions. The scarcity of data, the low signal-to-noise ratio and the large gaps in exposure time make data screening and masking an important part of the analysis. PROS was developed to support the analysis of data from the ROSAT and Einstein missions but many of the tasks have been used on data from other missions. IRAF/PROS provides a complete end-to-end system for x-ray data analysis: (1) a set of tools for importing and exporting data via FITS format -- in particular, IRAF provides a specialized event-list format, QPOE, that is compatible with its IMAGE (2-D array) format; (2) a powerful set of IRAF system capabilities for both temporal and spatial event filtering; (3) full set of imaging and graphics tasks; (4) specialized packages for scientific analysis such as spatial, spectral and timing analysis -- these consist of both general and mission specific tasks; and (5) complete system support including ftp and magnetic tape releases, electronic and conventional mail hotline support, electronic mail distribution of solutions to frequently asked questions and current known bugs. We will discuss the philosophy, architecture and development environment used by PROS to generate a portable, multimission software environment. PROS is available on all platforms that support IRAF, including Sun/Unix, VAX/VMS, HP, and Decstations. It is available on request at no charge.

  7. Revealing the electronic structure of LiC6 by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Li, X.; Augustsson, A.; Lee, C. M.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Nordgren, J.; Ross, P. N.; Guo, J.-H.

    2017-03-01

    The electronic structure of LiC6 has been investigated by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies. The results reveal that upon full lithiation of graphite, the Li 2s electrons are transferred into the carbon π* states in a near rigid-band behavior, resulting in the increased density of states near EF and the shift of σ* states to lower energies. In addition, the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra of LiC6 do not show strong dispersive features as that of graphite, indicating that the crystal momentum is not conserved during the scattering process due to the delocalization of electrons in the intermediate state.

  8. Electronic-state-lifetime interference in the hard-x-ray regime: Argon as a showcase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsztejn, G.; Püttner, R.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Travnikova, O.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Cunha de Miranda, B.; Ismail, I.; Céolin, D.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.; Marchenko, T.

    2017-01-01

    Electronic-state-lifetime interference is a phenomenon specific for ionization of atoms and molecules in the hard-x-ray regime. Using resonant K L2 ,3L2 ,3 Auger decay in argon as a showcase, we present a model that allows extracting the interference terms directly from the cross sections of the final electronic states. The analysis provides fundamental information on the excitation and decay processes such as probabilities of various decay paths and the values of the dipole matrix elements for transitions to the excited states. Our results shed light on the interplay between spectator, shake-down, and shake-up processes in the relaxation of deep core-hole states.

  9. Analysis of urinary stone components by x-ray coherent scatter: characterizing composition beyond laboratory x-ray diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Melanie T M; Batchelar, Deidre L; Velupillai, Sujeevan; Denstedt, John D; Cunningham, Ian A

    2005-08-21

    Monoenergetic x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is an established standard for the assessment of urinary stone composition. The inherent low energy of x-rays used (8 keV), however, restricts penetration depth and imposes a requirement for small powdered samples. A technique capable of producing detailed information regarding component structural arrangements in calculi non-destructively would provide clearer insights into causes of formation and subsequent growth and allow the selection of more appropriate courses of therapy. We describe a new method based on the detection of coherent scatter (CS) in stone components using polyenergetic x-rays (70 kVp) from diagnostic equipment. While the higher energy allows the analysis of intact calculi, the polyenergetic source causes an angular broadening of measured CS patterns. We show that it is possible to relate the polyenergetic (CS) and monoenergetic (XRD) measurements through a superposition integral of the monoenergetic XRD cross-section with a function representative of the polyenergetic spectrum used in CS. Experimentally acquired diffractometry cross-sections of the seven major urinary stone components were subjected to this operation, revealing good agreement of diffraction features with CS. Therefore, our CS analysis is sensitive to stone component structure, similar to conventional XRD analysis. This indicates that CS analysis can be used as a basis to classify urinary calculi by composition. The potential of identifying stone components non-destructively was demonstrated from a tomographic CS analysis of a stone-mimicking phantom. Tomographic composition maps were generated from CS patterns, showing the structural arrangement of multiple stone components within the phantom. CS analysis has the ability to detect components in the presence of many others. The ability to perform CS measurements in intact calculi would allow for the identification of stone structures critical to patient metaprophylaxis.

  10. Understanding x-ray driven impulsive electronic state redistribution using a three-state model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew R.; Cryan, James; Bucksbaum, Philip H.

    2016-05-01

    The natural timescale for electron motion is extremely fast; electrons can move across molecular bonds in less than a femtosecond. To understand this fast motion and the role of electronic coherence, we are interested in creating a superposition of valence excited states through excitation with a broad bandwidth (>5eV) laser pulse. In the x-ray regime, the molecular ground state can couple to valence-excited states through an intermediate autoionizing resonance in a process known as stimulated x-ray Raman scattering (SXRS). X-rays excite electrons from the highly localized K-shells in a molecule, creating a superposition of valence-excited states initially localized around a target atom in the molecule. Coherences between states in the superposition will subsequently drive charge transfer as the wavepacket spreads out across the molecule. We use an effective 3-state model coupling the ground, auto-ionizing, and valence-excited states in diatomic systems to study the cross-section of SXRS as function of x-ray intensity, central frequency, bandwidth, and chirp. We also make observations on how the x-ray parameters affect the degree of initial localization to an atom of the wavepacket created in SXRS. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  11. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of NLO Crystals: Traditional Applications and More New Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Clark, Ronald D.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis is one of the more important methods for the molecular and crystal structure determination of matter and therefore it has a great importance in material science including design and engineering of different compounds with non-linear optical (NLO) properties. It was shown in our previous publications that this method provides unique information about molecular structure of NLO compounds, their crystal symmetry and crystal packing arrays, molecular conformation and geometries and many other structural and electronic characteristics that are important for understanding the nature of NLO properties of solids. A very new application of the X-ray diffraction method is related to analysis of the electron density distribution p(r) in crystals and some of its characteristics (atomic and group charges, dipole and higher multipole moments, etc.), that may be obtained directly form the diffraction measurements. In the present work, we will discuss our preliminary low temperature high-resolution X-ray data for the m-nitroaniline (mNA) single crystal (VI). This is one of the "classical" organic NLO materials and electron density distribution analysis in this simple compound has a great scientific interest.

  12. X-ray and optical pulse interactions via electron trapping in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Stephen; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Dichiara, Anthony; Henning, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A highly excited state of GaAs is created by the absorption of an extremely intense focused 80 ps pulse of hard x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. This state is probed by 2 ps laser pulses with photon energies near the semiconducting band gap, which has previously revealed x-ray induced optical transparency. Two unexpected results are found: x-ray induced luminescence is dramatically enhanced when a high intensity laser pulse precedes the x-ray pulse, and the decay of the induced transparency becomes much slower when the intensity of the subsequent probe laser is increased. Both results require that energy be stored in GaAs by the first pulse, and then released by the second pulse. We describe how this can be explained by electron trapping centers in GaAs with trapping lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. We compare these results with lifetime measurements of other excitations produced by ultrafast optical absorption. We also show how minor improvements in focusing will lead to single-pulse x-ray induced temperature jumps of thousands of Kelvin, allowing new x-ray excited dense matter states to be explored. Supported by DOE award DE-SC0004078. The Advanced Photon Source is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. BioCARS is supported by the NIGMS of the NIH under grant number R24GM111072.

  13. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; ...

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as wellmore » as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.« less

  14. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glockner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.

  15. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts: Bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons in the solar chromosphere and the total energy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of various aspects of impulsive X-ray bursts (IXB's) has lead to the consideration of a model where the X-rays are produced by bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere. It was found that in general the X-ray spectrum from such a beam will fall off more rapidly than when the effect of the beaming of radiation is neglected. Furthermore, the spectral index of the resulting X-rays appears to increase by about unity for X-ray energies 100 kev, a fact which may explain the observed cutoff in the spectrum of the IXB's. It is also shown that in such a model there is sufficient energy in the form of nonthermal electrons to explain the total energy (approximately 10 to the 32nd power ergs) of a flare.

  16. High-Performance X-ray Detection in a New Analytical Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, C. E.; Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.; Ackland, D. W.; vonHarrach, S.; Nicholls, A. W.; Statham, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray detection by energy-dispersive spectrometry in the analytical electron microscope (AEM) is often limited by low collected X-ray intensity (P), modest peak-to-background (P/B) ratios, and limitations on total counting time (tau) due to specimen drift and contamination. A new AFM has been designed with maximization of P. P/B, and tau as the primary considerations. Maximization of P has been accomplished by employing a field-emission electron gun, X-ray detectors with high collection angles, high-speed beam blanking to allow only one photon into the detector at a time, and simultaneous collection from two detectors. P/B has been maximized by reducing extraneous background signals generated at the specimen holder, the polepieces and the detector collimator. The maximum practical tau has been increased by reducing specimen contamination and employing electronic drift correction. Performance improvments have been measured using the NIST standard Cr thin film. The 0-3 steradian solid angle of X-ray collection is the highest value available. The beam blanking scheme for X-ray detection provides 3-4 times greater throughput of X-rays at high count rates into a recorded spectrum than normal systems employing pulse-pileup rejection circuits. Simultaneous X-ray collection from two detectors allows the highest X-ray intensity yet recorded to be collected from the NIST Cr thin film. The measured P/B of 6300 is the highest level recorded for an AEM. In addition to collected X-ray intensity (cps/nA) and P/B measured on the standard Cr film, the product of these can be used as a figure-of-merit to evaluate instruments. Estimated minimum mass fraction (MMF) for Cr measured on the standard NIST Cr thin film is also proposed as a figure-of-merit for comparing X-ray detection in AEMs. Determinations here of the MMF of Cr detectable show at least a threefold improvement over previous instruments.

  17. Wavelet and R/S analysis of the X-ray flickering of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzolin, G.; Tamburini, F.; de Martino, D.; Bianchini, A.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Recently, wavelets and R/S analysis have been used as statistical tools to characterize the optical flickering of cataclysmic variables. Aims: Here we present the first comprehensive study of the statistical properties of X-ray flickering of cataclysmic variables in order to link them with physical parameters. Methods: We analyzed a sample of 97 X-ray light curves of 75 objects of all classes observed with the XMM-Newton space telescope. By using the wavelets analysis, each light curve has been characterized by two parameters, α and Σ, that describe the energy distribution of flickering on different timescales and the strength at a given timescale, respectively. We also used the R/S analysis to determine the Hurst exponent of each light curve and define their degree of stochastic memory in time. Results: The X-ray flickering is typically composed of long time scale events (1.5 ⪉ α ⪉ 3), with very similar strengths in all the subtypes of cataclysmic variables (-3 ⪉ Σ ⪉ -1.5). The X-ray data are distributed in a much smaller area of the α - Σ parameter space with respect to those obtained with optical light curves. The tendency of the optical flickering in magnetic systems to show higher Σ values than the non-magnetic systems is not encountered in the X-rays. The Hurst exponents estimated for all light curves of the sample are larger than those found in the visible, with a peak at 0.82. In particular, we do not obtain values lower than 0.5. The X-ray flickering presents a persistent memory in time, which seems to be stronger in objects containing magnetic white dwarf primaries. Conclusions: The similarity of the X-ray flickering in objects of different classes together with the predominance of a persistent stochastic behavior can be explained in terms of magnetically-driven accretion processes acting in a considerable fraction of the analyzed objects. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Low Energy X-Ray and Electron Interactions within Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Microscopy at Pomona College," Norelco Reporter, VII, 137 (1960). b."Isolation of Selected Elements with an Electron Microscope ," Norelco Reporter...38. "Measurement of Primary Electron Interaction Coefficients (500 to 1500 eV Region," Colloque International du C.N.R.S., Processus Electroniques

  19. Detecting electronic coherence by multidimensional broadband stimulated x-ray Raman signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-08-01

    Nonstationary molecular states which contain electronic coherences can be impulsively created and manipulated by using recently developed ultrashort optical and x-ray pulses via photoexcitation, photoionization, and Auger processes. We propose several stimulated-Raman detection schemes that can monitor the subsequent phase-sensitive electronic and nuclear dynamics. Three detection protocols of an x-ray broadband probe are compared: frequency-dispersed transmission, integrated photon number change, and total pulse energy change. In addition, each can be either linear or quadratic in the x-ray probe intensity. These various signals offer different gating windows into the molecular response, which is described by correlation functions of electronic polarizabilities. Off-resonant and resonant signals are compared.

  20. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  1. X-ray comb generation from nuclear-resonance-stabilized x-ray free-electron laser oscillator for fundamental physics and precision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K.-J.

    2015-03-01

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as 57Fe as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as 181Ta or 45Sc.

  2. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  3. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, Elżbieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment.

  4. Soft X Ray Telescope (SXT) focus error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anees

    1991-01-01

    The analysis performed on the soft x-ray telescope (SXT) to determine the correct thickness of the spacer to position the CCD camera at the best focus of the telescope and to determine the maximum uncertainty in this focus position due to a number of metrology and experimental errors, and thermal, and humidity effects is presented. This type of analysis has been performed by the SXT prime contractor, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab (LPARL). The SXT project office at MSFC formed an independent team of experts to review the LPARL work, and verify the analysis performed by them. Based on the recommendation of this team, the project office will make a decision if an end to end focus test is required for the SXT prior to launch. The metrology and experimental data, and the spreadsheets provided by LPARL are used at the basis of the analysis presented. The data entries in these spreadsheets have been verified as far as feasible, and the format of the spreadsheets has been improved to make these easier to understand. The results obtained from this analysis are very close to the results obtained by LPARL. However, due to the lack of organized documentation the analysis uncovered a few areas of possibly erroneous metrology data, which may affect the results obtained by this analytical approach.

  5. Sequential electronic and structural transitions in VO2 observed using X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Strachan, John Paul; Pickett, Matthew D; Bratkovsky, Alexander; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2014-11-26

    The popular dual electronic and structural transitions in VO2 are explored using X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy with high spatial and spectral resolutions. It is found that during both heating and cooling, the electronic transition always precedes the structural Peierls transition. Between the two transitions, there are intermediate states that are spectrally isolated here.

  6. Development of an ultrashort table-top electron and x-ray source pumped by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardeau-Montaut, Jean-Pierre; Kiraly, Bela; Girardeau-Montaut, Claire; Leboutet, Hubert

    1999-09-01

    We report on the design of the CIBER-X source which is a new laser driven table-top ultrashort electron and x-ray source. X-ray pulses are produced by a three-step process which consists of the electron pulse production from a thin metallic photocathode illuminated by picosecond 213 nm laser pulses with 16 ps duration. The electrons are accelerated in the diode by a cw electric field of 11 MV/m, and the photoinjector produces a single 70 - 100 keV electron pulse of approximately 0,5 nC and approximately 20 A peak current at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The gun is a standard Pierce diode electrode type, the electrons leaving the diode through a hole made in the anode. The electrons are then transported along a path approximately 20 cm long, and are focused by two magnetic fields produced by electromagnetic coils. Finally, the x-rays are produced by the impact of electrons on a massive target of Tm. Simulations of geometrical and energetic characteristics of the complete source were done previously with assistance of the code PIXEL1. Finally, experimental performances of electron and x-ray bursts are discussed.

  7. X-ray spectra from the Cornell Electron-Beam Ion Source (CEBIS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Janson, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation emitted from the Cornell electron beam ion source (CEBIS I) has been surveyed with a Si(Li) x-ray detector. These spectra can be used to estimate backgrounds from electron bremsstrahlung and to evaluate the feasibility of atomic physics experiments using the CEBIS I source in this configuration. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  8. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Study of runaway electrons with Hard X-ray spectrometry of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shevelev, A.; Chugunov, I.; Khilkevitch, E.; Gin, D.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Kiptily, V.; Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    Hard-X-ray spectrometry is a tool widely used for diagnostic of runaway electrons in existing tokamaks. In future machines, ITER and DEMO, HXR spectrometry will be useful providing information on runaway electron energy, runaway beam current and its profile during disruption.

  10. Fresh-slice multicolour X-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lutman, Alberto A.; Maxwell, Timothy J.; MacArthur, James P.; Guetg, Marc W.; Berrah, Nora; Coffee, Ryan N.; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marinelli, Agostino; Moeller, Stefan; Zemella, Johann C. U.

    2016-10-24

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide femtosecond X-ray pulses with a narrow energy bandwidth and unprecedented brightness. Ultrafast physical and chemical dynamics, initiated with a site-specific X-ray pulse, can be explored using XFELs with a second ultrashort X-ray probe pulse. However, existing double-pulse schemes are complicated, difficult to customize or provide only low-intensity pulses. Here we present the novel fresh-slice technique for multicolour pulse production, wherein different temporal slices of an electron bunch lase to saturation in separate undulator sections. This method combines electron bunch tailoring from a passive wakefield device with trajectory control to provide multicolour pulses. The fresh-slice scheme outperforms existing techniques at soft X-ray wavelengths. It produces femtosecond pulses with a power of tens of gigawatts and flexible colour separation. The pulse delay can be varied from temporal overlap to almost one picosecond. As a result, we also demonstrate the first three-colour XFEL and variably polarized two-colour pulses.

  11. Fresh-slice multicolour X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Lutman, Alberto A.; Maxwell, Timothy J.; MacArthur, James P.; ...

    2016-10-24

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide femtosecond X-ray pulses with a narrow energy bandwidth and unprecedented brightness. Ultrafast physical and chemical dynamics, initiated with a site-specific X-ray pulse, can be explored using XFELs with a second ultrashort X-ray probe pulse. However, existing double-pulse schemes are complicated, difficult to customize or provide only low-intensity pulses. Here we present the novel fresh-slice technique for multicolour pulse production, wherein different temporal slices of an electron bunch lase to saturation in separate undulator sections. This method combines electron bunch tailoring from a passive wakefield device with trajectory control to provide multicolour pulses. The fresh-slice schememore » outperforms existing techniques at soft X-ray wavelengths. It produces femtosecond pulses with a power of tens of gigawatts and flexible colour separation. The pulse delay can be varied from temporal overlap to almost one picosecond. As a result, we also demonstrate the first three-colour XFEL and variably polarized two-colour pulses.« less

  12. Fresh-slice multicolour X-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutman, Alberto A.; Maxwell, Timothy J.; MacArthur, James P.; Guetg, Marc W.; Berrah, Nora; Coffee, Ryan N.; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marinelli, Agostino; Moeller, Stefan; Zemella, Johann C. U.

    2016-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide femtosecond X-ray pulses with a narrow energy bandwidth and unprecedented brightness. Ultrafast physical and chemical dynamics, initiated with a site-specific X-ray pulse, can be explored using XFELs with a second ultrashort X-ray probe pulse. However, existing double-pulse schemes are complicated, difficult to customize or provide only low-intensity pulses. Here we present the novel fresh-slice technique for multicolour pulse production, wherein different temporal slices of an electron bunch lase to saturation in separate undulator sections. This method combines electron bunch tailoring from a passive wakefield device with trajectory control to provide multicolour pulses. The fresh-slice scheme outperforms existing techniques at soft X-ray wavelengths. It produces femtosecond pulses with a power of tens of gigawatts and flexible colour separation. The pulse delay can be varied from temporal overlap to almost one picosecond. We also demonstrate the first three-colour XFEL and variably polarized two-colour pulses.

  13. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  14. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, C.; Pourshahab, B.; Rasouli, H.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Orouji, T.

    2014-05-15

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points – three TLDs per point – to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  15. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, C; Pourshahab, B; Hosseini Pooya, S M; Orouji, T; Rasouli, H

    2014-05-01

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points--three TLDs per point--to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  16. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-09-30

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  17. Electron spectroscopy of rare-gas clusters irradiated by x-ray free-electron laser pulses from SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, H.; Tachibana, T.; Motomura, K.; Xu, W. Q.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.

    2016-02-01

    We have measured electron energy spectra and asymmetry parameters of Ar clusters and Xe clusters illuminated by intense x-rays at 5 and 5.5 keV. A velocity map imaging spectrometer was developed for this purpose and employed at an x-ray free-electron laser facility, SACLA in Japan. The cluster size dependence and the peak fluence dependence of the electron spectra and asymmetry parameters are discussed.

  18. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Results characterizing GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes with a 10 μm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 μm and 400 μm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm2 to 67 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. 55Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 μm diameter device and one 400 μm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 μm and 740 eV using the 400 μm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. 63Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 μm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  19. ARSA accelerator - small-size source of nanosecond pulses of electron and x-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elyash, S.L.; Alexandrin, A.I.; Donskoy, E.N.

    1993-12-31

    ARSA miniature accelerator is notable for high intensity of radiation and characteristics stability. Near the output window the electron an x ray dose in the air constitutes in a 10 ns pulse 3 x 10{sup 4} Gy and 3 Gy, respectively. Maximal electron and x-ray quanta energy of 700 keV provides high permeability. Dimensions of the accelerator high-voltage unit are small: 250 x 1000 mm and 50 kg weight. It operates in a single pulse regime or generates a pulse series according to the specified program.

  20. IPC two-color analysis of x ray galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1990-01-01

    The mass distributions were determined of several clusters of galaxies by using X ray surface brightness data from the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Determining cluster mass distributions is important for constraining the nature of the dark matter which dominates the mass of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the Universe. Galaxy clusters are permeated with hot gas in hydrostatic equilibrium with the gravitational potentials of the clusters. Cluster mass distributions can be determined from x ray observations of cluster gas by using the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and knowledge of the density and temperature structure of the gas. The x ray surface brightness at some distance from the cluster is the result of the volume x ray emissivity being integrated along the line of sight in the cluster.

  1. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-09-26

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  2. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometers for multielement analysis: status of equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala Jiménez, Rony E.

    2001-11-01

    Multielement analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has evolved during two decades. At present commercial equipment is available for chemical analysis of all types of biological and mineral samples. The electronic industry has also benefited from scientific and technological developments in this field due to new instrumentation to determine contamination on the surface of silicon wafers (the equipment will not be covered in this paper). The basic components of the spectrometers can be summarized as follows: (a) excitation source; (b) geometric arrangement (optics) for collimation and monochromatization of the primary radiation; (c) X-ray detector; and (d) software for operation of the instrument, data acquisition and spectral deconvolution to determine the concentrations of the elements (quantitative analysis). As an optional feature one manufacturer offers a conventional 45° geometry for direct excitation. Personal communications of the author and commercial brochures available have allowed us to list the components used in TXRF for multielement analysis. Excitation source: high-power sealed X-ray tubes, output from 1300 to 3000 W, different mixed alloy anodes Mo/W are used but molybdenum, tungsten and copper are common; single anode metal ceramic low power X-ray tubes, output up to 40 W. Excitation systems can be customized according to the requirements of the laboratory. Detector: silicon-lithium drifted semiconductor detector liquid nitrogen cooled; or silicon solid state thermoelectrically cooled detector (silicon drift detector SDD and silicon-PIN diode detector). Optics: multilayer monochromator of silicon-tungsten, nickel-carbon or double multilayer monochromator. Electronics: spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter adapted to a PC compatible computer with software in a Windows environment for the whole operation of the spectrometer and for qualitative/quantitative analysis of samples are standard features in the

  3. Water analysis via portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Delaina; Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Duda, Bogdan; Li, Bin; Weindorf, David C.; Deb, Shovik; Brevik, Eric; Ray, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid, in-situ elemental water analysis would be an invaluable tool in studying polluted and/or salt-impacted waters. Analysis of water salinity has commonly used electrical conductance (EC); however, the identity of the elements responsible for the salinity are not revealed using EC. Several studies have established the viability of using portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometry for elemental data analysis of soil, sediment, and other matrices. However, the accuracy of PXRF is known to be affected while scanning moisture-laden soil samples. This study used PXRF elemental data in water samples to predict water EC. A total of 256 water samples, from 10 different countries were collected and analyzed via PXRF, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and a digital salinity bridge. The PXRF detected some elements more effectively than others, but overall results indicated that PXRF can successfully predict water EC via quantifying Cl in water samples (validation R2 and RMSE of 0.77 and 0.95 log μS cm-1, respectively). The findings of this study elucidated the potential of PXRF for future analysis of pollutant and/or metal contaminated waters.

  4. A statistical analysis of hard X-Ray solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, G.; Rowe, A. K.; Yeung, J.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we perform a statistical study on, 8319 X-Ray solar flares observed with the Hard X-Ray Spectrometer (HXRBS) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM). The events are examined in terms of the durations, maximum intensities, and intensity profiles. It is concluded that there is no evidence for a correlation between flare intensity, flare duration, and flare asymmetry. However, we do find evidence for a rapid fall-of in the number of short-duration events.

  5. Internal conversion in energy dispersive X-ray analysis of actinide-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Wiss, Thierry; Thiele, Hartmut; Cremer, Bert; Ray, Ian

    2007-06-01

    The use of X-ray elemental analysis tools like energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) is described in the context of the investigation of nuclear materials. These materials contain radioactive elements, particularly alpha-decaying actinides that affect the quantitative EDS measurement by producing interferences in the X-ray spectra. These interferences originating from X-ray emission are the result of internal conversion by the daughter atoms from the alpha-decaying actinides. The strong interferences affect primarily the L X-ray lines from the actinides (in the typical energy range used for EDS analysis) and would require the use of the M lines. However, it is typically at the energy of the actinide's M lines that the interferences are dominant. The artifacts produced in the X-ray analysis are described and illustrated by some typical examples of analysis of actinide-bearing material.

  6. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  7. Performance of the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator with crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu.; Fawley, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include the frequency-dependent Bragg crystal reflectivity and the transverse diffraction and focusing using the two-dimensional FEL code GINGER. A review of the physics of Bragg crystal reflectors and the x-ray FEL oscillator is made, followed by a discussion of its numerical implementation in GINGER. The simulation results for a two-crystal cavity and realistic FEL parameters indicate ˜109 photons in a nearly Fourier-limited, ps pulse. Compressing the electron beam to 100 A and 100 fs results in comparable x-ray characteristics for relaxed beam emittance, energy spread, and/or undulator parameters, albeit in a larger radiation bandwidth. Finally, preliminary simulation results indicate that the four-crystal FEL cavity can be tuned in energy over a range of a few percent.

  8. Structural states of myelin observed by x-ray diffraction and freeze- fracture electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Coordinated freeze-fracture electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to visualize the morphological relation between compacted and native period membrane arrays in myelinated nerves treated with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Comparison of x-ray diffraction at room temperature and at low temperature was used as a critical measure of the extent of structural preservation. Our x-ray diffraction patterns show that in the presence of cryoprotective agents, it is possible to preserve with only small changes the myelin structure which exists at room temperature. These changes include a slight increase in packing disorder of the membrane, a small, negative thermal expansion of the membrane unit, and some reorganization in the cytoplasmic half of the bilayer. The freeze-fracture electron microscopy clearly demonstrates continuity of compact and native period phases in DMSO-treated myelin. Finally, the use of freezing to trap the transient, intermediate structure during a structural transition in glycerol is demonstrated. PMID:479295

  9. Hard x-ray and hot electron environment in vacuum hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.W.; Suter, L.J.; Landen, O.L.; Foster, J.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Holder, J.P.; Dewald, E.L.; Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kauffman, R.L.; Atherton, L.J.; Bonanno, R.E.; Dixit, S.N.; Eder, D.C.; Haynam, C.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Koniges, A.E.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Manes, K.R.

    2006-03-15

    Time resolved hard x-ray images (hv>9 keV) and time integrated hard x-ray spectra (hv=18-150 keV) from vacuum hohlraums irradiated with four 351 nm wavelength National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, 755 (1994)] laser beams are presented as a function of hohlraum size, laser power, and duration. The hard x-ray images and spectra provide insight into the time evolution of the hohlraum plasma filling and the production of hot electrons. The fraction of laser energy detected as hot electrons (F{sub hot}) shows a correlation with laser intensity and with an empirical hohlraum plasma filling model. In addition, the significance of Au K-alpha emission and Au K-shell reabsorption observed in some of the bremsstrahlung dominated spectra is discussed.

  10. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources. PMID:26610328

  11. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  12. THE X-RAY DETECTABILITY OF ELECTRON BEAMS ESCAPING FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Krucker, Saem; Christe, Steven; Lin, Robert P.

    2009-05-01

    We study the detectability and characterization of electron beams as they leave their acceleration site in the low corona toward interplanetary space through their nonthermal X-ray bremsstrahlung emission. We demonstrate that the largest interplanetary electron beams ({approx}>10{sup 35} electrons above 10 keV) can be detected in X-rays with current and future instrumentation, such as RHESSI or the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Hinode. We make a list of optimal observing conditions and beam characteristics. Amongst others, good imaging (as opposed to mere localization or detection in spatially integrated data) is required for proper characterization, putting the requirement on the number of escaping electrons (above 10 keV) to {approx}>3 x 10{sup 36} for RHESSI, {approx}>3 x 10{sup 35} for Hinode/XRT, and {approx}>10{sup 33} electrons for the FOXSI sounding rocket scheduled to fly in 2011. Moreover, we have found that simple modeling hints at the possibility that coronal soft X-ray jets could be the result of local heating by propagating electron beams.

  13. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis to understand the role of tannin-based dyes in the degradation of historical wool textiles.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Annalaura; Degano, Ilaria; Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2014-10-01

    An innovative approach, combining field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, is presented to investigate the degradation mechanisms affecting tannin-dyed wool. In fact, tannin-dyed textiles are more sensitive to degradation then those dyed with other dyestuffs, even in the same conservation conditions. FESEM-EDX was first used to study a set of 48 wool specimens (artificially aged) dyed with several raw materials and mordants, and prepared according to historical dyeing recipes. EDX analysis was performed on the surface of wool threads and on their cross-sections. In addition, in order to validate the model formulated by the analysis of reference materials, several samples collected from historical and archaeological textiles were subjected to FESEM-EDX analysis. FESEM-EDX investigations enabled us to reveal the correlation between elemental composition and morphological changes. In addition, aging processes were clarified by studying changes in the elemental composition of wool from the protective cuticle to the fiber core in cross-sections. Morphological and elemental analysis of wool specimens and of archaeological and historical textiles showed that the presence of tannins increases wool damage, primarily by causing a sulfur decrease and fiber oxidation.

  14. Development of suitable plastic standards for X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mans, Christian; Hanning, Stephanie; Simons, Christoph; Wegner, Anne; Janβen, Anton; Kreyenschmidt, Martin

    2007-02-01

    For the adoption of the EU directive "Restriction on use of certain Hazardous Substances" and "Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment" using X-ray fluorescence analysis suitable standard materials are required. Plastic standards based on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer, containing the regulated elements Br, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb were developed and produced as granulates and solid bodies. The calibration materials were not generated as a dilution from one master batch but rather the element concentrations were distributed over nine independent calibration samples. This was necessary to enable inter-elemental corrections and empirical constant mass absorption coefficients. The produced standard materials are characterized by a homogenous element distribution, which is more than sufficient for X-ray fluorescence analysis. Concentrations for all elements except for Br could be determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy after microwave assisted digestion. The concentration of Br was determined by use of Neutron Activation Analysis at Hahn-Meitner-Institute in Berlin, Germany. The correlation of the X-ray fluorescence analysis measurements with the values determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Neutron Activation Analysis showed a very good linearity.

  15. An x-ray microprobe beam line for trace element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation to an x-ray microprobe for trace element analysis is a complementary and natural extension of existing microprobe techniques using electrons, protons, and heavier ions as excitation sources for x-ray fluorescence. The ability to focus charged particles leads to electron microprobes with spatial resolutions in the sub-micrometer range and down to 100 ppM detection limits and proton microprobes with micrometer resolution and ppM detection limits. The characteristics of synchrotron radiation that prove useful for microprobe analysis include a broad and continuous energy spectrum, a relatively small amount of radiation damage compared to that deposited by charged particles, a highly polarized source which reduces background scattered radiation in an appropriate counting geometry, and a small vertical divergence angle of approx.0.2 mrad which allows for focussing of the light beam into a small spot with high flux. The features of a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) are described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. OnDA: online data analysis and feedback for serial X-ray imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Yoon, Chun Hong; Lane, Thomas J.; White, Thomas A.; O’Grady, Christopher; Kuhn, Manuela; Aplin, Steve; Koglin, Jason; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a free and open-source data analysis utility designed for fast online feedback during serial X-ray diffraction and scattering experiments: OnDA (online data analysis). Three complete real-time monitors for common types of serial X-ray imaging experiments are presented. These monitors are capable of providing the essential information required for quick decision making in the face of extreme rates of data collection. In addition, a set of modules, functions and algorithms that allow developers to modify the provided monitors or develop new ones are provided. The emphasis here is on simple, modular and scalable code that is based on open-source libraries and protocols. OnDA monitors have already proven to be invaluable tools in several experiments, especially for scoring and monitoring of diffraction data during serial crystallography experiments at both free-electron laser and synchrotron facilities. It is felt that in the future the kind of fast feedback that OnDA monitors provide will help researchers to deal with the expected very high throughput data flow at next-generation facilities such as the European X-ray free-electron laser. PMID:27275150

  17. Electronic structure of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes studied using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Muradyan, V. E.; Vinogradov, N. A.; Preobrajenski, A. B.; Gudat, W.; Vinogradov, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results of combined investigation of the chemical bond formation in fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different fluorine contents (10-55wt%) and reference compounds (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals and “white” graphite fluoride) using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy at C1s and F1s thresholds. Measurements were performed at BESSY II (Berlin, Germany) and MAX-laboratory (Lund, Sweden). The analysis of the soft x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra points to the formation of covalent chemical bonding between fluorine and carbon atoms in the fluorinated nanotubes. It was established that within the probing depth (˜15nm) of carbon nanotubes, the process of fluorination runs uniformly and does not depend on the fluorine concentration. In this case, fluorine atoms interact with MWCNTs through the covalent attachment of fluorine atoms to graphene layers of the graphite skeleton (phase 1) and this bonding is accompanied by a change in the hybridization of the 2s and 2p valence electron states of the carbon atom from the trigonal (sp2) to tetrahedral (sp3) hybridization and by a large electron transfer between carbon an fluorine atoms. In the MWCNT near-surface region the second fluorine-carbon phase with weak electron transfer is formed; it is located mainly within two or three upper graphene monolayers, and its contribution becomes much poorer as the probing depth of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) increases. The defluorination process of F-MWCNTs on thermal annealing has been investigated. The conclusion has been made that F-MWCNT defluorination without destruction of graphene layers is possible.

  18. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  19. Making use of x-ray optical effects in photoelectron-, Auger electron-, and x-ray emission spectroscopies: Total reflection, standing-wave excitation, and resonant effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.-H.; Gray, A. X.; Kaiser, A. M.; Mun, B. S.; Sell, B. C.; Kortright, J. B.; Fadley, C. S.

    2013-02-21

    We present a general theoretical methodology and related open-access computer program for carrying out the calculation of photoelectron, Auger electron, and x-ray emission intensities in the presence of several x-ray optical effects, including total reflection at grazing incidence, excitation with standing-waves produced by reflection from synthetic multilayers and at core-level resonance conditions, and the use of variable polarization to produce magnetic circular dichroism. Calculations illustrating all of these effects are presented, including in some cases comparisons to experimental results. Sample types include both semi-infinite flat surfaces and arbitrary multilayer configurations, with interdiffusion/roughness at their interfaces. These x-ray optical effects can significantly alter observed photoelectron, Auger, and x-ray intensities, and in fact lead to several generally useful techniques for enhancing surface and buried-layer sensitivity, including layer-resolved densities of states and depth profiles of element-specific magnetization. The computer program used in this study should thus be useful for a broad range of studies in which x-ray optical effects are involved or are to be exploited in next-generation surface and interface studies of nanoscale systems.

  20. X-ray CT analysis of pore structure in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunoki, Toshifumi; Miyata, Yoshihisa; Mikami, Kazuaki; Shiota, Erika

    2016-06-01

    The development of microfocused X-ray computed tomography (CT) devices enables digital imaging analysis at the pore scale. The applications of these devices are diverse in soil mechanics, geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering, petroleum engineering, and agricultural engineering. In particular, the imaging of the pore space in porous media has contributed to numerical simulations for single-phase and multiphase flows or contaminant transport through the pore structure as three-dimensional image data. These obtained results are affected by the pore diameter; therefore, it is necessary to verify the image preprocessing for the image analysis and to validate the pore diameters obtained from the CT image data. Moreover, it is meaningful to produce the physical parameters in a representative element volume (REV) and significant to define the dimension of the REV. This paper describes the underlying method of image processing and analysis and discusses the physical properties of Toyoura sand for the verification of the image analysis based on the definition of the REV. On the basis of the obtained verification results, a pore-diameter analysis can be conducted and validated by a comparison with the experimental work and image analysis. The pore diameter is deduced from Young-Laplace's law and a water retention test for the drainage process. The results from previous study and perforated-pore diameter originally proposed in this study, called the voxel-percolation method (VPM), are compared in this paper. In addition, the limitations of the REV, the definition of the pore diameter, and the effectiveness of the VPM for an assessment of the pore diameter are discussed.

  1. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  2. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R M; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E; Gregory, Steven T; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes.

  3. Design and measurement of a Cu L-edge x-ray filter for free electron laser pumped x-ray laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.; London, R. A.; Rohringer, N.; Cone, K. V.; Rocca, J. J.

    2010-10-15

    An inner-shell photoionized x-ray laser pumped by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser has been proposed recently. The measurement of the on-axis 849 eV Ne K{alpha} laser and protection of the x-ray spectrometer from damage require attenuation of the 1 keV LCLS beam. An Al/Cu foil combination is well suited, serving as a low energy bandpass filter below the Cu L-edge at 933 eV. A high resolution grating spectrometer is used to measure the transmission of a candidate filter with an intense laser-produced x-ray backlighter developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility Janus. The methodology and discussion of the observed fine structure above the Cu L-edge will be presented.

  4. The Mn4Ca photosynthetic water-oxidation catalyst studied by simultaneous X-ray spectroscopy and crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Koroidov, Sergey; Hellmich, Julia; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of photosystem II and the catalytic intermediate states of the Mn4CaO5 cluster involved in water oxidation have been studied intensively over the past several years. An understanding of the sequential chemistry of light absorption and the mechanism of water oxidation, however, requires a new approach beyond the conventional steady-state crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. In this report, we present the preliminary progress using an X-ray free-electron laser to determine simultaneously the light-induced protein dynamics via crystallography and the local chemistry that occurs at the catalytic centre using X-ray spectroscopy under functional conditions at room temperature. PMID:24914152

  5. X-ray structure determination using low-resolution electron microscopy maps for molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ryan N.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Read, Randy J.; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-07-30

    Structures of multi-subunit macromolecular machines are primarily determined by either electron microscopy (EM) or X-ray crystallography. In many cases, a structure for a complex can be obtained at low resolution (at a coarse level of detail) with EM and at higher resolution (with finer detail) by X-ray crystallography. The integration of these two structural techniques is becoming increasingly important for generating atomic models of macromolecular complexes. A low-resolution EM image can be a powerful tool for obtaining the "phase" information that is missing from an X-ray crystallography experiment, however integration of EM and X-ray diffraction data has been technically challenging. Here we show a step-by-step protocol that explains how low-resolution EM maps can be placed in the crystallographic unit cell by molecular replacement, and how initial phases computed from the placed EM density are extended to high resolution by averaging maps over non-crystallographic symmetry. As the resolution gap between EM and Xray crystallography continues to narrow, the use of EM maps to help with X-ray crystal structure determination, as described in this protocol, will become increasingly effective.

  6. X-ray structure determination using low-resolution electron microscopy maps for molecular replacement

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Ryan N.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; ...

    2015-07-30

    Structures of multi-subunit macromolecular machines are primarily determined by either electron microscopy (EM) or X-ray crystallography. In many cases, a structure for a complex can be obtained at low resolution (at a coarse level of detail) with EM and at higher resolution (with finer detail) by X-ray crystallography. The integration of these two structural techniques is becoming increasingly important for generating atomic models of macromolecular complexes. A low-resolution EM image can be a powerful tool for obtaining the "phase" information that is missing from an X-ray crystallography experiment, however integration of EM and X-ray diffraction data has been technically challenging.more » Here we show a step-by-step protocol that explains how low-resolution EM maps can be placed in the crystallographic unit cell by molecular replacement, and how initial phases computed from the placed EM density are extended to high resolution by averaging maps over non-crystallographic symmetry. As the resolution gap between EM and Xray crystallography continues to narrow, the use of EM maps to help with X-ray crystal structure determination, as described in this protocol, will become increasingly effective.« less

  7. Curved diamond-crystal spectrographs for x-ray free-electron laser noninvasive diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    We report on the manufacturing and X-ray tests of bent diamond-crystal X-ray spectrographs, designed for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) spectra in the spectral range from 5 to 15 keV. The key component is a curved, 20-μm thin, single crystalline diamond triangular plate in the (110) orientation. The radius of curvature can be varied between R = 0.6 m and R = 0.1 m in a controlled fashion, ensuring imaging in a spectral window of up to 60 eV for ≃8 keV X-rays. All of the components of the bending mechanism (about 10 parts) are manufactured from diamond, thus ensuring safe operations in intense XFEL beams. The spectrograph is transparent to 88% for 5-keV photons and to 98% for 15-keV photons. Therefore, it can be used for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray spectra during XFEL operations.

  8. Polarization control in an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Ilchen, Markus; Lindahl, Anton O.; Buck, Jens; Coffee, Ryan N.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Dammann, Lars; Ding, Yuantao; Durr, Hermann A.; Glaser, Leif; Grunert, Jan; Hartmann, Gregor; Hartmann, Nick; Higley, Daniel; Hirsch, Konstantin; Levashov, Yurii I.; Marinelli, Agostino; Maxwell, Tim; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Osipov, Timur; Peters, Franz; Planas, Marc; Shevchuk, Ivan; Schlotter, William F.; Scholz, Frank; Seltmann, Jorn; Viefhaus, Jens; Walter, Peter; Wolf, Zachary R.; Huang, Zhirong; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2016-05-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers are unique sources of high-brightness coherent radiation. However, existing devices supply only linearly polarized light, precluding studies of chiral dynamics. A device called the Delta undulator has been installed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to provide tunable polarization. With a reverse tapered planar undulator line to pre-microbunch the beam and the novel technique of beam diverting, hundreds of microjoules of circularly polarized X-ray pulses are produced at 500–1,200 eV. These X-ray pulses are tens of femtoseconds long, have a degree of circular polarization of 0.98–0.04+0.02 at 707 eV and may be scanned in energy. We also present a new two-colour X-ray pump–X-ray probe operating mode for the LCLS. As a result, energy differences of ΔE/E = 2.4% are supported, and the second pulse can be adjusted to any elliptical polarization. In this mode, the pointing, timing, intensity and wavelength of the two pulses can be modified.

  9. Polarization control in an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Ilchen, Markus; ...

    2016-05-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers are unique sources of high-brightness coherent radiation. However, existing devices supply only linearly polarized light, precluding studies of chiral dynamics. A device called the Delta undulator has been installed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to provide tunable polarization. With a reverse tapered planar undulator line to pre-microbunch the beam and the novel technique of beam diverting, hundreds of microjoules of circularly polarized X-ray pulses are produced at 500–1,200 eV. These X-ray pulses are tens of femtoseconds long, have a degree of circular polarization of 0.98–0.04+0.02 at 707 eV and may be scanned in energy. Wemore » also present a new two-colour X-ray pump–X-ray probe operating mode for the LCLS. As a result, energy differences of ΔE/E = 2.4% are supported, and the second pulse can be adjusted to any elliptical polarization. In this mode, the pointing, timing, intensity and wavelength of the two pulses can be modified.« less

  10. Scale analysis using X-ray microfluorescence and computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeias, J. P.; de Oliveira, D. F.; dos Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Scale deposits are the most common and most troublesome damage problems in the oil field and can occur in both production and injection wells. They occur because the minerals in produced water exceed their saturation limit as temperatures and pressures change. Scale can vary in appearance from hard crystalline material to soft, friable material and the deposits can contain other minerals and impurities such as paraffin, salt and iron. In severe conditions, scale creates a significant restriction, or even a plug, in the production tubing. This study was conducted to qualify the elements present in scale samples and quantify the thickness of the scale layer using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence (SRμXRF) and computed radiography (CR) techniques. The SRμXRF results showed that the elements found in the scale samples were strontium, barium, calcium, chromium, sulfur and iron. The CR analysis showed that the thickness of the scale layer was identified and quantified with accuracy. These results can help in the decision making about removing the deposited scale.

  11. An X-ray Analysis of α Cru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Mark; Ignace, R.; Oskinova, L.

    2010-01-01

    The star α Cru is an early B type subgiant star recently observed by the Chandra Space Telescope. This star is of particular interest due to the observed x-ray emission produced by shocks that form in the stellar wind. We observe hydrogen like O VIII and helium like O VII spectral lines in the Low Energy Transmission Grating spectrum. The O VII produces characteristic triplet line. We provide an analysis of the helium like triplet that explains the conditions in the stellar wind where that line emission is formed. α Cru is also an ultraviolet bright star, so an International Ultraviolet Explorer observation is used to explain the effect of ultraviolet pumping on the forbidden component of the α triplet line. The data appear basically consistent with theoretical models of shocks in stellar winds by Owocki, Caster, & Rybicki (1988) and Feldmeier et al. (1997). This project was funded by a partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF AST-0552798), Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and the Department of Defense (DoD) ASSURE (Awards to Stimulate and Support Undergraduate Research Experiences) programs.

  12. A Review of X-ray Free-Electron Laser Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; /ANL, APS

    2006-12-18

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed as extremely bright sources for a next-generation x-ray facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory of the startup, the exponential growth, and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The radiation characteristics of an x-ray FEL, including its transverse coherence, temporal characteristics, and harmonic content, are discussed. FEL performance in the presence of machine errors and undulator wakefields is examined. Various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are summarized.

  13. Prospects for using X-ray free-electron lasers to investigate shock-compressed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Bob; Higginbotham, Andrew; Kimminau, Giles; Murphy, William; Whitcher, Thomas; Wark, Justin; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Lee, Richard; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce; Larsson, Jorgen; Park, Nigel; Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus

    2007-12-12

    Within the next few years hard X-ray Free Electron Lasers will come on line. Such systems will have spectral brightnesses ten orders of magnitude greater than any extant synchrotron, with pulse lengths as short as a few femtoseconds. It is anticipated that large-scale optical lasers capable of shock-compressing matter to multi-megabar pressures will be sited alongside the X-ray source. We discuss how such systems can further our knowledge of shocked and isochorically heated matter, in particular investigating the potential to perform polycrystalline diffraction and the creation of warm dense matter.

  14. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-08-22

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY.

  15. On angiography with a Thomson laser-electron X-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, A. V.; Vinogradov, S. L.; D’yachkov, N. V.; Polunina, A. V.; Postnov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a possibility of application of laser-electron X-ray generators for diagnosing the vessel status of internal organs. It is shown that modern lasers and linear accelerators can be used for the development of angiographic instruments of a new type with an increased spatial and temporal resolution while maintaining or reducing the radiation load on the patient and medical staff. Such improvements in diagnostic and ambient factors cannot be achieved with the use of X-ray tubes. All particular estimates and calculations have been performed for a contrast agent based on iodine compounds.

  16. Investigations of large x-ray optics for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stormer, Michael; Liard-Cloup, Audrey; Felten, Frank; Jacobi, Sandra; Steeg, Barbara; Feldhaus, Josef; Bormann, Rudiger

    2004-10-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is being set up at DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg, Germany). In the current XUV range of the FEL, total-reflection X-ray mirrors are needed for beam guidance, beam alignment, and monochromatisation. Such X-ray optics are used at a grazing incidence angle of about 2° thus a maximum length of about 500 mm is required. Due to the working range of the FEL (50 - 200 eV), carbon has been selected as a suitable material with an absorption edge at 284 eV. The amorphous carbon coatings were manufactured by magnetron sputtering in a special UHV system for large deposition at GKSS research centre (Geesthacht, Germany). The variation in film thickness over the whole length has been investigated by X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Good uniformity (better than 2 %) and low roughness (< 0.5 nm) have been observed.

  17. A waveguide electron cyclotron resonance source of X-ray emission for low-dose introscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Ionidi, V. Yu.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that a "point" target in a conventional evacuated waveguide in the magnetic field of a mirror trap formed by two disk magnets axially magnetized in the direction perpendicular to the electric field vector represents a source of X-ray bremsstrahlung of electrons accelerated in an ECR discharge with a broad range of photon energies up to 0.8 MeV. The dosage rate of the source is ˜1 R/h. The source fed from a conventional microwave oven has small dimensions and a low weight. It is easy-to-use and is suitable as a laboratory tool, in particular, in radiobiology and introscopy. After passing through the object, X-ray emission is recorded by a digital camera with the help of a highly sensitive X-ray fluorescent screen, which converts it into an optical image.

  18. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    David, C; Gorelick, S; Rutishauser, S; Krzywinski, J; Vila-Comamala, J; Guzenko, V A; Bunk, O; Färm, E; Ritala, M; Cammarata, M; Fritz, D M; Barrett, R; Samoylova, L; Grünert, J; Sinn, H

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×10(17)W/cm(2) was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  19. Spectrometer for hard X-ray free-electron laser based on diffraction focusing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Gorobtsov, O Y; Vartanyants, I A

    2013-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short spatially coherent pulses of X-ray radiation. A diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of ΔE/E 2 × 10(-6), is proposed. This is much better than for most modern X-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single-crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from a metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. It is shown that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  20. Emerging opportunities in structural biology with X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Ilme; Miao, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FELs) produce X-ray pulses with extremely brilliant peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration. It has been proposed that radiation damage can be “outrun” by using an ultra intense and short X-FEL pulse that passes a biological sample before the onset of significant radiation damage. The concept of “diffraction-before-destruction” has been demonstrated recently at the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first operational hard X-ray FEL, for protein nanocrystals and giant virus particles. The continuous diffraction patterns from single particles allow solving the classical “phase problem” by the oversampling method with iterative algorithms. If enough data are collected from many identical copies of a (biological) particle, its three-dimensional structure can be reconstructed. We review the current status and future prospects of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) and single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) with X-FELs. PMID:22922042

  1. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  2. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  3. Laser and Pulsed Power Electron Density Imaging Through Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Stoeckl, Christian; Mileham, Chad; Begischev, Ildar; Theobald, Wolfgang; Bromage, Jake; Regan, Sean; Klein, Salee; Muñoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Vescovi, Milenko; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    A Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer was deployed using laser driven and x-pinch x-ray backlighters. The Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer is an ideal electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas with the potential to simultaneously deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single image with source limited resolution. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 10-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using Cu foil targets at the Multi-TeraWatt facility. An areal electron density of 0.050 g/cm2 was obtained at the center of a fluoro-nylon fiber of 300 mm diameter with a source FWHM of 80 µm and resolution of 50 µm. Grating survival and Moiré pattern formation was demonstrated using a Cu x-pinch plasma of FWHM 27 µm, driven by the 350 kA, 350 ns Llampudken pulsed power generator. These results closely match simulations and laboratory results. It was demonstrated that the technique can detect both sharp and smooth density gradients in the range of 2x1023 to 2x1025 cm-3, thus allowing implementation of the electron density technique as a HED plasma diagnostic in both laser and pulsed power experiments U.S. DoE/NNSA and DE-NA0002955.

  4. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons.

  5. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  6. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Chen, L M; Tao, M Z; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Mirzaie, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2016-06-08

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 10(8)/shot and 10(8 )photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3(rd) generation synchrotrons.

  7. Electronic structure of warm dense copper studied by ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Correa, A A; Ogitsu, T; Weber, C P; Lee, H J; Feng, J; Ni, P A; Ping, Y; Nelson, A J; Prendergast, D; Lee, R W; Falcone, R W; Heimann, P A

    2011-04-22

    We use time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the unoccupied electronic density of states of warm dense copper that is produced isochorically through the absorption of an ultrafast optical pulse. The temperature of the superheated electron-hole plasma, which ranges from 4000 to 10 000 K, was determined by comparing the measured x-ray absorption spectrum with a simulation. The electronic structure of warm dense copper is adequately described with the high temperature electronic density of state calculated by the density functional theory. The dynamics of the electron temperature is consistent with a two-temperature model, while a temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling parameter is necessary.

  8. X-ray Mapping of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Materials Using the Electron Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, P.

    2006-01-01

    Lunar samples returned from the Apollo program motivated development of the Bence-Albee algorithm for the rapid and accurate analysis of lunar materials, and established interlaboratory comparability through its common use. In the analysis of mineral and rock fragments it became necessary to combine micro- and macroscopic analysis by coupling electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) with automated stage point counting. A coarse grid that included several thousand points was used, and initially wavelength-dispersive (WDS) and later energydispersive (EDS) data were acquired at discrete stage points using approx. 5 sec count times. A approx 50 micrometer beam diameter was used for WDS and up to 500 micrometer beam diameter for EDS analysis. Average analyses of discretely sampled phases were coupled with the point count data to calculate the bulk composition using matrix algebra. Use of a defocused beam resulted in a contribution from multiple phases to each analytical point, and the analytical data were deconvolved relative to end-member phase chemistry on the fly. Impressive agreement was obtained between WDS and EDS measurements as well as comparison with bulk chemistry obtained by other methods. In the 30 years since these methods were developed, significant improvements in EPMA automation and computer processing have taken place. Digital beam control allows routine collection of x-ray maps by EDS, and stage mapping for WDS is conducted continuously at slew speed and incrementally by sampling at discrete points. Digital pulse processing in EDS systems has significantly increased the throughput for EDS mapping, and the ongoing development of Si-drift detector systems promises mapping capabilities rivaling WDS systems. Spectrum imaging allows a data cube of EDS spectra to be acquired and sophisticated processing of the original data is possible using matrix algebra techniques. The study of lunar and meteoritic materials includes the need to conveniently: (1) Characterize

  9. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on the... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  10. Analysis of polychromaticity effects in X-ray Talbot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhili; Zhu, Peiping; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Liu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Kai; Hong, Youli; Zhang, Huitao; Ge, Xin; Gao, Kun; Wu, Ziyu

    2010-07-01

    The influence of polychromaticity of the X-ray source on the performance of an X-ray Talbot interferometer applied for phase-contrast imaging is analyzed through numerical simulations based on the Fresnel diffraction theory. The presented simulation results show that the visibility of the self-image is fairly insensitive to the source polychromaticity and explain why the interferometer could be well combined with polychromatic X-ray sources in recent experiments. Furthermore, the self-image with a high visibility can be obtained under polychromatic illumination even at a high-order fractional Talbot distance. This fact implies that the acquired image quality for phase measurements can be improved, since the primary signal for phase measurement is proportional to the inter-grating distance. Finally, we mention that the results are also valid for Talbot-Lau interferometer and scanning double-grating configuration.

  11. X-ray Phase Contrast analysis - Digital wavefront development

    SciTech Connect

    Idir, Mourad; Potier, Jonathan; Fricker, Sebastien; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Modi, M. H.

    2010-06-23

    Optical schemes that enable imaging of the phase shift produced by an object have become popular in the x-ray region, where phase can be the dominant contrast mechanism. The propagation-based technique consists of recording the interference pattern produced by choosing one or several sample-to-detector distances. Pioneering studies, carried out making use of synchrotron radiation, demonstrated that this technique results in a dramatic increase of image contrast and detail visibility, allowing the detection of structures invisible with conventional techniques. An experimental and theoretical study of in-line hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging had been performed. The theoretical description of the technique is based on Fresnel diffraction. As an illustration of the potential of this quantitative imaging technique, high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of simple objects will be presented.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus.

  13. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Albertin, F; Astolfo, A; Stampanoni, M; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y; Kaplan, F; Margaritondo, G

    2015-03-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page `reading'. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project.

  14. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, F.; Astolfo, A.; Stampanoni, M.; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y.; Kaplan, F.; Margaritondo, G.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project. PMID:25723946

  15. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) single particle analysis of metallurgy plant emissions.

    PubMed

    Arndt, J; Deboudt, K; Anderson, A; Blondel, A; Eliet, S; Flament, P; Fourmentin, M; Healy, R M; Savary, V; Setyan, A; Wenger, J C

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of single particles deposited on industrial filters located in three different chimneys of an iron-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy manufacturing plant have been compared using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Very similar types of particles were observed using both analytical techniques. Calcium-containing particles dominated in the firing area of the sintering unit, Mn and/or Al-bearing particles were observed at the cooling area of the sintering unit, while Mn-containing particles were dominant at the smelting unit. SEM-EDX analysis of particles collected downstream of the industrial filters showed that the composition of the particles emitted from the chimneys is very similar to those collected on the filters. ATOFMS analysis of ore samples was also performed to identify particulate emissions that could be generated by wind erosion and manual activities. Specific particle types have been identified for each emission source (chimneys and ore piles) and can be used as tracers for source apportionment of ambient PM measured in the vicinity of the industrial site.

  16. Analysis of particles produced during airbag deployment by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and their deposition on surrounding surfaces: a mid-research summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, J. Matney

    2011-06-01

    Airbags can be encountered in forensic work when investigating a car crash and are typically constructed with primerlike material to begin the deployment apparatus. The mechanisms of airbag deployment can produce particles ideal for scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis. A recent study published by Berk studied airbags with vents and showed that it is possible for particles generated from the deployment of these airbags to deposit on surfaces in the vehicle as the airbags deflate.1 Another paper published by Berk reported particles similar in morphology and composition to primer gunshot residue (GSR) are produced by side impact airbags.2 This paper's aim will be to show mid-point results of a study still in progress in which non-vented airbags were analyzed to determine if they exhibited the same particle depositing features as their vented airbag counterparts. Further investigation in this study is being performed to find more airbags which produce primer gunshot residue-like particles containing lead, barium, and antimony from airbag deployment. To date, the study has resulted in (1) non-vented airbags exhibiting deposition of particles suitable for SEM/EDS analysis and (2) no gunshot residue-like particles being detected from the airbag residues studied thus far.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIO AND X-RAY MODELING AND DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE: REVEALING FLARE COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  18. Three-dimensional Radio and X-Ray Modeling and Data Analysis Software: Revealing Flare Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  19. Investigation of electron trajectories of an x-ray tube in magnetic fields of MR scanners.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhifei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Conolly, Steven; Pelc, Norbert J

    2007-06-01

    A hybrid x-ray/MR system combining an x-ray fluoroscopic system and an open-bore magnetic resonance (MR) system offers advantages from both powerful imaging modalities and thus can benefit numerous image-guided interventional procedures. In our hybrid system configurations, the x-ray tube and detector are placed in the MR magnet and therefore experience a strong magnetic field. The electron beam inside the x-ray tube can be deflected by a misaligned magnetic field, which may damage the tube. Understanding the deflection process is crucial to predicting the electron beam deflection and avoiding potential damage to the x-ray tube. For this purpose, the motion of an electron in combined electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields was analyzed theoretically to provide general solutions that can be applied to different geometries. For two specific cases, a slightly misaligned strong field and a perpendicular weak field, computer simulations were performed with a finite-element method program. In addition, experiments were conducted using an open MRI magnet and an inserted electromagnet to quantitatively verify the relationship between the deflections and the field misalignment. In a strong (B > E/c; c: speed of light) and slightly misaligned magnetic field, the deflection in the plane of E and B caused by electrons following the magnetic field lines is the dominant component compared to the deflection in the E X B direction due to the drift of electrons. In a weak magnetic field (B < or = E/c), the main deflection is in the E x B direction and is caused by the perpendicular component of the magnetic field.

  20. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  1. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-10-14

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L(2) method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  2. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions. PMID:25424639

  3. Atomic processes modeling of X-ray free electron laser produced plasmas using SCFLY code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H.-K.; Cho, B. I.; Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Wark, J. S.; Lee, R. W.

    2017-03-01

    With the development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL), a novel state of matter of highly transient and non-equilibrium plasma has been created in laboratories. As high intensity X-ray laser beams interact with a solid density target, electrons are ionized from inner-shell orbitals and these electrons and XFEL photons create dense and finite temperature plasmas. In order to study atomic processes in XFEL driven plasmas, the atomic kinetics model SCFLY containing an extensive set of configurations needed for solid density plasmas was applied to study atomic processes of XFEL driven systems. The code accepts the time-dependent conditions of the XFEL as input parameters, and computes time-dependent population distributions and ionization distributions self-consistently with electron temperatures and densities assuming an instantaneous equilibration of electron energies. The methods and assumptions in the atomic kinetics model and unique aspects of atomic processes in XFEL driven plasmas are described.

  4. Measurement of electron density in dual-energy x-ray CT with monochromatic x rays and evaluation of its accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tsunoo, Takanori; Torikoshi, Masami; Ohno, Yumiko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Information on electron density is important for radiotherapy treatment planning in order to optimize the dose distribution in the target volume of a patient. At present, the electron density is derived from a computed tomography (CT) number measured in x-ray CT scanning; however, there are uncertainties due to the beam hardening effect and the method by which the electron density is converted from the CT number. In order to measure the electron density with an accuracy of +/-1%, the authors have developed dual-energy x ray CT using monochromatic x rays. They experimentally proved that the measured linear attenuation coefficients were only a few percent lower than the theoretical ones, which led to an accuracy within 2% for the electron density. There were three factors causing inaccuracy in the linear attenuation coefficient and the electron density: the influence of scattered radiation, the nonlinearity in the detector response function, and a theoretical process to derive the electron density from the linear attenuation coefficients. The linear attenuation coefficients of water were experimentally proved to differ by 1%-2% from the theoretical one even when the scattering effect was negligible. The nonlinearity of the response function played an important role in correcting the difference in the linear attenuation coefficient. Furthermore, the theoretical process used for deriving the electron density from the linear attenuation coefficients introduces about 0.6% deviation from the theoretical value into the resultant electron density. This deviation occurs systematically so that it can be corrected. The authors measured the electron densities for seven samples equivalent to soft tissue in dual-energy x-ray CT, and finally obtained them with an accuracy of around +/-1%.

  5. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, and NMR characterization of iron-rich fired clays.

    PubMed

    Presciutti, Federica; Capitani, Donatella; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Costantino, Ferdinando; Viel, Stéphane; Segre, Annalaura

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of an iron-rich clay and the structural changes involved in the firing process as a preliminary step to get information on ancient ceramic technology. To this purpose, illite-rich clay samples fired at different temperatures were characterized using a multitechnique approach, i.e., by electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with electron dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, magic angle spinning and multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR. During firing, four main reaction processes occur: dehydration, dehydroxylation, structural breakdown, and recrystallization. When the results are combined from all characterization methods, the following conclusions could be obtained. Interlayer H2O is located close to aluminum in octahedral sites and is driven off at temperatures lower than 600 degrees C. Between 600 and 700 degrees C dehydroxylation occurs whereas, between 800 and 900 degrees C, the aluminum in octahedral sites disappears, due to the breakdown of the illite structure, and all iron present is oxidized to Fe3+. In samples fired at 1000 and 1100 degrees C iron clustering was observed as well as large single crystals of iron with the occurrence of ferro- or ferrimagnetic effects. Below 900 degrees C the aluminum in octahedral sites presents a continuous distribution of chemical shift, suggesting the presence of slightly distorted sites. Finally, over the whole temperature range, the presence of at least two tetrahedral aluminum sites was revealed, characterized by different values of the quadrupolar coupling constant.

  7. XSPEC12: Object-Oriented X-Ray Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, B.; Arnaud, K. A.; Gordon, Craig A.

    2003-03-01

    XSPEC was designed to be a mission-independent general purpose X-ray data analysis program. In order for XSPEC to keep fulfilling this role well into the 21st Century we have re-implemented its code base in ANSI C++ using object oriented programming techniques. The abstract programming formulation used for XSPEC12 gives considerable advantages for the future. It will be possible to implement new data formats, table model formats, fitting and statistical techniques by loading ``add-in'' modules without the necessity of recompiling existing code. As the first examples, we have written modules that (a) read INTEGRAL/SPI data and responses and (b) implement the CERN/MINUIT optimization library. The new code can also solve problems with source confusion (multiple sources can be modeled and fit from a single spectrum). As for efficiency, the new code achieves similar performance in double precision arithmetic than XSPEC11 gives in single precision. For the cases of analysis with simple analytical models and large spectral arrays, and time series analyses (multiple spectra with the same response matrices) XSPEC12 should give a considerable speed advantage over previous versions. XSPEC12 will have a very similar, but enhanced, syntax over previous releases. It will continue to support user models in Fortran77, but will also support user models in C and C++. The I/O streams designed for XSPEC12 can support either a command line user interface or, in future, a GUI. Additionally, the plotting interface has been written to be independent of the plotting library: future releases will be able to implement newer user graphics packages. XSPEC12 should be available as an alpha release in the late Spring of 2003. We encourage readers to join the testing program that we will be announcing once the release date has been set.

  8. Non-equilibrium electron features in X-ray emission spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Landen, O. L.; Svyatsky, D.; Thorn, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Bradley, D.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    An X-ray spectrometer proposed for the National Ignition Facility will infer the imploded core electron temperature from the free-free continuum spectra of the emitted photons with energies of 15 to 30 keV. In this range reabsorption rates are low so one might expect a rather unambiguous temperature measurement from the spectrum slope at the higher energy cut-off. It can be noticed, however, that the harder X-ray radiation is emitted by the tail of the electron distribution. The mean- free-path for the suprathermal electrons is much larger than for their thermal counterparts, making this tail to deviate from Maxwellian and obscuring interpretation of the data. We utilize solutions for the reduced kinetic equation to investigate modification to the X-ray spectra due to suprathermal electrons' deviation from equilibrium. The logarithmic slope of the spectrum from the depleted electron distribution is found to increasingly drop at higher photon energies compared to the case of perfectly Maxwellian electrons. Interpreting the spectrum from a depleted distribution with assumption of Maxwellian electrons enforced gives the electron temperature lower than the actual one. The newly predicted effects are further enhanced in the presence of hydrodynamic mix. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  9. Data collection strategies for time-resolved X-ray free-electron laser diffraction, and 2-color methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chufeng; Schmidt, Kevin; Spence, John C.

    2015-01-01

    We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo pump-probe method of data analysis with a liquid jet, the fixed sample pump-probe (goniometer) method (both diffract-and-destroy, and below the safe damage dose), and a proposed two-color method. Here, an optical pump pulse arrives between X-ray pulses of slightly different energies which hit the same nanocrystal, using a weak first X-ray pulse which does not damage the sample. (Radiation damage is outrun in the other cases.) This two-color method, in which separated Bragg spots are impressed on the same detector readout, eliminates stochastic fluctuations in crystal size, shape, and orientation and is found to require two orders of magnitude fewer diffraction patterns than the currently used Monte Carlo liquid jet method, for 1% accuracy. Expressions are given for errors in structure factor measurement for the four approaches, and detailed simulations provided for cathepsin B and IC3 crystals. While the error is independent of the number of shots for the dose-limited goniometer method, it falls off inversely as the square root of the number of shots for the two-color and Monte Carlo methods, with a much smaller pre-factor for the two-color mode, when the first shot is below the damage threshold. PMID:26798813

  10. Data collection strategies for time-resolved X-ray free-electron laser diffraction, and 2-color methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Chufeng; Schmidt, Kevin; Spence, John C

    2015-07-01

    We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo pump-probe method of data analysis with a liquid jet, the fixed sample pump-probe (goniometer) method (both diffract-and-destroy, and below the safe damage dose), and a proposed two-color method. Here, an optical pump pulse arrives between X-ray pulses of slightly different energies which hit the same nanocrystal, using a weak first X-ray pulse which does not damage the sample. (Radiation damage is outrun in the other cases.) This two-color method, in which separated Bragg spots are impressed on the same detector readout, eliminates stochastic fluctuations in crystal size, shape, and orientation and is found to require two orders of magnitude fewer diffraction patterns than the currently used Monte Carlo liquid jet method, for 1% accuracy. Expressions are given for errors in structure factor measurement for the four approaches, and detailed simulations provided for cathepsin B and IC3 crystals. While the error is independent of the number of shots for the dose-limited goniometer method, it falls off inversely as the square root of the number of shots for the two-color and Monte Carlo methods, with a much smaller pre-factor for the two-color mode, when the first shot is below the damage threshold.

  11. Duplex multiwire proportional x-ray detector for multichord time-resolved soft x-ray and electron temperature measurements on T-10 tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, A. V.; Andreev, V. F.; Kravtsov, D. E.

    2008-10-01

    Compact 64-channel multiwire proportional chamber is successfully used on T-10 and TCV tokamaks as a continuous-current soft x-ray detectors. The duplex multiwire proportional x-ray detector is a new generation of these detectors. It has been designed for simultaneous multichord measurement of plasma soft x-ray emissivity in a two spectral ranges and determination of the electron temperature by the two-absorber method. The detector consists of two identical multiwire proportional chambers filled by 90%Kr+10%CH4 gas mixture at atmospheric pressure. The first multiwire chamber has 64 channels. The second multiwire chamber (installed behind the first one) has 32 channels. Both chambers view the plasma through the one helium-filled slot-hole camera. Thus, the first multiwire chamber serves as an absorber filter for the second one. Such construction of the detector allows us in addition to soft x-ray measurements to provide measurement of the plasma core electron temperature with spatial resolution of about 2cm and a time resolution of less than 50μs. The construction of the detector and experimental results illustrating the potential of the diagnostic are presented.

  12. Experimental demonstration of x-ray betatron radiation spectrum from laser accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurent, Valentine; Michel, Pierre; Clayton, Chris; Pollock, Bradley; Doeppner, Tilo; Ralph, Joseph; Pak, Art; Wang, Tyan-Lin; Joshi, Chan; Tynan, George; Divol, Laurent; Palastro, John; Glenzer, Siegried; Froula, Dustin

    2008-11-01

    New laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments have been carried out at the Callisto Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will present results of the first experimental campaign on LWFA. The electron beam energy spectrum was measured with a two-screen spectrometer to avoid ambiguities due to the possible angle of the electron beam at the plasma exit [1]. Electron beams up to 300 MeV were measured. X-ray betatron radiation from the accelerated electrons were also measured. By using a set of filters acting like a spectral step function, the x-ray spectrum was reconstructed from fitting theoretical estimates; the radiation peaks at a few keVs. [1] R. Ischebeck et al., Proceedings of PAC 2007, Albuquerque NM, p. 4168. LLNL-ABS-405251

  13. Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange: Downsizing the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    A technique is proposed to generate electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance through laser assisted transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM10 mode is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the emittance exchange. It is shown that with the proposed technique one can significantly downsize an x-ray free electron laser (FEL), which may greatly extend the availability of these light sources. A hard x-ray FEL operating at 1.5 {angstrom} with a saturation length within 30 meters using a 3.8 GeV electron beam is shown to be practically feasible.

  14. Capillary Optics Based X-Ray Micro-Imaging Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Cappuccio, G.; Longoni, A.; Frizzi, T.; Cibin, G.

    2010-04-01

    A rapidly developed during the last few years micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μXRF) is a promising multi-elemental technique for non-destructive analysis. Typically it is rather hard to perform laboratory μXRF analysis because of the difficulty of producing an original small-size X-ray beam as well as its focusing. Recently developed for X-ray beam focusing polycapillary optics offers laboratory X-ray micro probes. The combination of polycapillary lens and fine-focused micro X-ray tube can provide high intensity radiation flux on a sample that is necessary in order to perform the elemental analysis. In comparison to a pinhole, an optimized "X-ray source-op tics" system can result in radiation density gain of more than 3 orders by the value. The most advanced way to get that result is to use the confocal configuration based on two X-ray lenses, one for the fluorescence excitation and the other for the detection of secondary emission from a sample studied. In case of X-ray capillary microfocusing a μXRF instrument designed in the confocal scheme allows us to obtain a 3D elemental mapping. In this work we will show preliminary results obtained with our prototype, a portable X-ray microscope for X-ray both imaging and fluorescence analysis; it enables μXRF elemental mapping simultaneously with X-ray imaging. A prototype of compact XRF spectrometer with a spatial resolution less than 100 μm has been designed.

  15. Elemental composition of strawberry plants inoculated with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense REC3, assessed with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Molina, M F; Lovaisa, N C; Salazar, S M; Díaz-Ricci, J C; Pedraza, R O

    2014-07-01

    The elemental composition of strawberry plants (Fragaria ananassa cv. Macarena) inoculated with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense REC3, and non-inoculated controls, was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis. This allowed simultaneous semi-quantification of different elements in a small, solid sample. Plants were inoculated and grown hydroponically in 50% or 100% Hoagland solution, corresponding to limited or optimum nutrient medium, respectively. Bacteria-inoculated plants increased the growth index 45% and 80% compared to controls when grown in 100% and 50% Hoagland solution, respectively. Thus, inoculation with A. brasilense REC3 in a nutrient-limited medium had the strongest effect in terms of increasing both shoot and root biomass and growth index, as already described for Azospirillum inoculated into nutrient-poor soils. SEM-EDS spectra and maps showed the elemental composition and relative distribution of nutrients in strawberry tissues. Leaves contained C, O, N, Na, P, K, Ca and Cu, while roots also had Si and Cl. The organic fraction (C, O and N) accounted for over 96.3% of the total chemical composition; of the mineral fraction, Na had higher accumulation in both leaves and roots. Azospirillum-inoculated and control plants had similar elemental quantities; however, in bacteria-inoculated roots, P was significantly increased (34.33%), which constitutes a major benefit for plant nutrition, while Cu content decreased (35.16%).

  16. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  17. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  18. [Analysis of pine pollen by using FTIR, SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-min; Wang, Hong-jie; Zhang, Zhuo-yong

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to analyze nutrients in four pine pollen powder samples. The IR fingerprints showed that each of the samples, pinus massoniana, pinus yunnanensis, pinus tabulaeformis, and pinus densiflora, respectively had its own characteristic infrared spectrum. Based on the difference of the relative intensity of those characteristic absorption peaks, the IR fingerprints can be used for the identification of the four kinds of pine pollen samples. The broken pollen of pinus was more easily to release nutritional components for the distinct difference IR fingerprints of natural and broken masson pine pollen samples. As a result of SEM, four kinds of pollen grains were oblong or subspheroidal in distal face and proximal face. The exine sculpture of the four kinds of samples were granulous and almost the same, but there was some difference of the size of pollen grains. The main morphologic change of the broken pollen was that the air bags were separated from pollen particles, and part of the main body of pollen particles was broken. The energy-dispersive X-ray analysis results showed that eleven elements, including Mg, Se, Si, Sr, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, and Fe, existed and the highest content in pollen of pinus was K element. The contents of trace elements were different in different kinds of pollen of pinus. The element intensity in broken masson pine pollen was distinctlyhigher than that innatural masson pine pollen.

  19. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.D.; Langford, D.S.; Williams, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  20. Single-State Electronic Structure Measurements Using Time-Resolved X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-11-11

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on semiconductor and metal surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the city, chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature Ge(100) and polycrystalline Cu foils. Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. In addition, the ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials. Time-resolved electron time-of-flight photoemission results for ultra-thin Cu will be presented.

  1. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-07

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of struthiocalcin 1 from ostrich (Struthio camelus) eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; Marín-García, Liliana; Stojanoff, Vivian; Moreno, Abel

    2007-11-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction data of the protein struthiocalcin 1 isolated from ostrich eggshell are reported. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of struthiocalcin 1 (SCA-1), a protein obtained from the intramineral part of ostrich (Struthio camelus) eggshell, is reported.

  3. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  4. Electron trapping in evolving coronal structures during a large gradual hard X-ray/radio burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruggmann, G.; Vilmer, N.; Klein, K.-L.; Kane, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Gradual hard X-ray/radio bursts are characterized by their long duration, smooth time profile, time delays between peaks at different hard X-ray energies and microwaves, and radiation from extended sources in the low and middle corona. Their characteristic properties have been ascribed to the dynamic evolution of the accelerated electrons in coronal magnetic traps or to the separate acceleration of high-energy electrons in a 'second step' process. The information available so far was drawn from quality considerations of time profiles or even only from the common occurrence of emissions in different spectral ranges. This paper presents model computations of the temporal evolution of hard X-ray and microwave spectra, together with a qualitative discussion of radio lightcurves over a wide spectral range, and metric imaging observations. The basis hypothesis investigated is that the peculiar 'gradual' features can be related to the dynamical evolution of electrons injected over an extended time interval in a coronal trap, with electrons up to relativistic energies being injected simultaneously. The analyzed event (26 April. 1981) is particularly challenging to this hypothesis because of the long time delays between peaks at different X-ray energies and microwave frequencies. The observations are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis, provided that the electrons lose their energy by Coulomb collisions and possibly betatron deceleration. The access of the electrons to different coronal structures varies in the course of the event. The evolution and likely destabilization of part of the coronal plasma-magnetic field configuration is of crucial influence in determining the access to these structures and possibly the dynamical evolution of the trapped electrons through betatron deceleration in the late phase of the event.

  5. Electronic structure of cobalt doped CdSe quantum dots using soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua T. Wright; Su, Dong; van Buuren, Tony; Meulenberg, Robert W.

    2014-08-21

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of cobalt doped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are studied using electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry. Magnetometry measurements suggest these QDs are superparamagnetic, contrary to a spin-glass state observed in the bulk analogue. Moreover, the electron microscopy shows well formed QDs, but with cobalt existing as doped into the QD and as unreacted species not contained in the QD. X-ray absorption measurements at the Co L3-edge suggest that changes in spectra features as a function of particle size can be described considering combination of a cobalt ion in a tetrahedral crystal field and an octahedrally coordinated (impurity) phase. With decreasing particle sizes, the impurity phase increases, suggesting that small QDs can be difficult to dope.

  6. Electron Beam Production and Characterization for the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Le Sage, G P; Barty, C P J; Rosenzweig, J B; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D B; Gibson, D J; Slaughter, D R; Anderson, S

    2002-10-14

    We report on the performance of an S-band RF photocathode electron gun and accelerator for operation with the PLEIADES Thomson x-ray source at LLNL. Simulations of beam production, transport, and focus are presented. It is shown that a 1 ps, 500 pC electron bunch with a normalized emittance of less than 5 {pi}mm-mrad can be delivered to the interaction point. Initial electron measurements are presented. Calculations of expected x-ray flux are also performed, demonstrating an expected peak spectral brightness of 10{sup 20} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Effects of RF phase jitter are also presented, and planned phase measurements and control methods are discussed.

  7. Generation of large-bandwidth x-ray free-electron-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa Hernandez, Angela; Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Beutner, Bolko; Reiche, Sven

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are modern research tools in disciplines such as biology, material science, chemistry, and physics. Besides the standard operation that aims at minimizing the bandwidth of the produced XFEL radiation, there is a strong scientific demand to produce large-bandwidth XFEL pulses for several applications such as nanocrystallography, stimulated Raman spectroscopy, and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction. We present a self-consistent method that maximizes the XFEL pulse bandwidth by systematically maximizing the energy chirp of the electron beam at the undulator entrance. This is achieved by optimizing the compression scheme and the electron distribution at the source in an iterative back-and-forward tracking. Start-to-end numerical simulations show that a relative bandwidth of 3.25% full-width can be achieved for the hard x-ray pulses in the SwissFEL case.

  8. Automated Chemical Analysis of Internally Mixed Aerosol Particles Using X-ray Spectromicroscopy at the Carbon K-Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, Mary K; Moffet, R.C.; Henn, T.; Laskin, A.

    2011-01-20

    We have developed an automated data analysis method for atmospheric particles using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). This method is applied to complex internally mixed submicrometer particles containing organic and inorganic material. Several algorithms were developed to exploit NEXAFS spectral features in the energy range from 278 to 320 eV for quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of elemental carbon, organic carbon, potassium, and noncarbonaceous elements in particles of mixed composition. This energy range encompasses the carbon K-edge and potassium L2 and L3 edges. STXM/NEXAFS maps of different chemical components were complemented with a subsequent analysis using elemental maps obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). We demonstrate the application of the automated mapping algorithms for data analysis and the statistical classification of particles.

  9. Hard x-ray tomographic studies of the destruction of an energetic electron ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.

    2013-05-01

    A tomography system was designed and built at the Large Plasma Device to measure the spatial distribution of hard x-ray (100 KeV-3 MeV) emissivity. The x-rays were generated when a hot electron ring was significantly disrupted by a shear Alfvén wave. The plasma is pulsed at 1 Hz (1 shot/s). A lead shielded scintillator detector with an acceptance angle defined by a lead pinhole is mounted on a rotary gimbal and used to detect the x-rays. The system measures one chord per plasma shot using only one detector. A data plane usually consists of several hundred chords. A novel Dot by Dot Reconstruction (DDR) method is introduced to calculate the emissivity profile from the line integrated data. In the experiments, there are often physical obstructions, which make measurements at certain angles impossible. The DDR method works well even in this situation. The method was tested with simulated data, and was found to be more effective than previously published methods for the specific geometry of this experiment. The reconstructed x-ray emissivity from experimental data by this method is shown.

  10. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  11. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  12. Cumulant approach for electronic excitations in x-ray and electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.

    A quantitative treatment of electronic excitations and other many-body effects in x-ray and electron spectra has long been challenging. Physically, electronic correlations and atomic vibrations lead to inelastic losses and damping effects that are ignored in ground state methods or approximations such as TDDFT. Quasi-particle (QP) approaches such as the GW approximation yield significant improvements, as demonstrated in real-space Green's function and GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, but still ignore multi-electron excitations. Recently such excitations have been treated with considerable success using cumulant expansion techniques and the quasi-boson approximation. In this beyond QP approach, excitations such as plasmons and electron-hole excitations appear as satellites in the spectral function. The method naturally accounts for multiple-satellites and can be extended to include extrinsic losses and interference effects. Extensions for effects of vibrations and strong correlations including charge-transfer satellites may also be possible. These advances are illustrated with a number of applications. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45623.

  13. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groover, Krishangi D.; Izbicki, John

    2016-06-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  14. Single crystal growth and X-ray structure analysis of non-peripheral octahexyl phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Masashi; Nakano, Chika; Higashi, Takuya; Miyano, Tetsuya; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    The single-crystal structure of metal-free non-peripheral octahexyl-substituted phthalocyanine (C6PcH2) has been investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. Two types of C6PcH2 single crystal, bulk and needle crystals, were separately grown by controlling the recrystallization conditions. The structures of the two types of crystal were determined, and were found to be completely different, that is, C6PcH2 exhibits structural polymorphism. It has been clarified that the C6PcH2 microcrystals in thin films used in previously reported electronic devices have the needle structure.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of Orientation Distribution Function Reconstruction of Textured Polycrystal by Parametric X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, I.; Benediktovitch, A.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of quantitative texture analysis by means of parametric x-ray radiation (PXR) from relativistic electrons with Lorentz factor γ > 50MeV in a polycrystal is considered theoretically. In the case of rather smooth orientation distribution function (ODF) and large detector (θD >> 1/γ) the universal relation between ODF and intensity distribution is presented. It is shown that if ODF is independent on one from Euler angles, then the texture is fully determined by angular intensity distribution. Application of the method to the simulated data shows the stability of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  17. Electronic Structure of AC-Clusters and High-Resolution X-ray Spectra of Actinides in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, Nicolay Alex

    2007-07-01

    Ab initio calculations using SCF approach for and analysis of results of investigation of the electronic structure of the clusters RAn+:[L]k with rare earths or actinides were carried out for the clusters in solids and liquids. Theoretical results for the electronic structure, radial integrals and energy of X- ray lines are presented for AC ions with unoccupied 5f-shell in the clusters in oxides, chlorides and fluorides environment. Possibility of collapse of nf-shell for the separate clusters and identification of electronic state of ions with unstable nuclei, are discussed, too. (author)

  18. Applications of direct methods for structure determination to problems in electron and x-ray fibre diffraction of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    2003-03-01

    In this review, the prospect of determining polymer crystal structures directly from single crystal electron or x-ray powder/fibre diffraction intensity data is explored. When care is taken to collect the best data set from a polymer, i.e. sampling the most intense regions of the three-dimensional reciprocal lattice, structure analyses can be carried out effectively by the conventional direct phasing methods employed in small molecule crystallography, even though the data sets are relatively small. This means that constraints imposed by multiple beam interactions in electron diffraction and reflection overlap in x-ray diffraction often do not limit the structure analysis. Several three-dimensional single crystal electron diffraction structure analyses are presented to illustrate the problems encountered. These include: polyethylene, poly(varepsilon-caprolactone), isotactic poly(butene-1) form III, isotactic polypropylene beta-form, poly(p-oxybenzoate) and poly(ethylene sulfide). Techniques for sampling the complete reciprocal lattice are discussed. If an adequate number of data is collected, it is also possible to refine the structure by constrained least squares. In any case Fourier refinement is always useful. From powder x-ray diffraction the crystal structure of polyethylene has been determined by direct methods; from fibre x-ray intensities, this review reports the direct analyses of poly(varepsilon-caprolactone), poly(ethylene terephthalate) and poly(tetramethyl-p-silphenylene siloxane). Rietveld methods might also be useful for the structure refinement. Direct structure analyses are advantageous in that they circumvent a priori assumptions about the molecular model and also the linkage bonds to base conformational refinement. Instead, individual atomic positions or molecular envelopes are observed directly in potential or electron density maps, to which the model can then be fit, a situation analogous to current practice in protein crystallography.

  19. Multicomponent Signal Unmixing from Nanoheterostructures: Overcoming the Traditional Challenges of Nanoscale X-ray Analysis via Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of core–shell nanoparticle clusters have been determined through principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) of an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum image (SI) acquired in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The method blindly decomposes the SI into three components, which are found to accurately represent the isolated and unmixed X-ray signals originating from the supporting carbon film, the shell, and the bimetallic core. The composition of the latter is verified by and is in excellent agreement with the separate quantification of bare bimetallic seed nanoparticles. PMID:25760234

  20. Can X-ray constrained Hartree–Fock wavefunctions retrieve electron correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Genoni, Alessandro; Dos Santos, Leonardo H. R.; Meyer, Benjamin; Macchi, Piero

    2017-01-01

    The X-ray constrained wavefunction (XC-WF) method proposed by Jayatilaka [Jayatilaka & Grimwood (2001) ▸, Acta Cryst. A57, 76–86] has attracted much attention because it represents a possible third way of theoretically studying the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, combining features of the more popular wavefunction- and DFT-based approaches. In its original formulation, the XC-WF technique extracts statistically plausible wavefunctions from experimental X-ray diffraction data of molecular crystals. A weight is used to constrain the pure Hartree–Fock solution to the observed X-ray structure factors. Despite the wavefunction being a single Slater determinant, it is generally assumed that its flexibility could guarantee the capture, better than any other experimental model, of electron correlation effects, absent in the Hartree–Fock Hamiltonian but present in the structure factors measured experimentally. However, although the approach has been known for long time, careful testing of this fundamental hypothesis is still missing. Since a formal demonstration is impossible, the validation can only be done heuristically and, to accomplish this task, X-ray constrained Hartree–Fock calculations have been performed using structure factor amplitudes computed at a very high correlation level (coupled cluster) for selected molecules in isolation, in order to avoid the perturbations due to intermolecular interactions. The results show that a single-determinant XC-WF is able to capture the electron correlation effects only partially. The largest amount of electron correlation is extracted when: (i) a large external weight is used (much larger than what has normally been used in XC-WF calculations using experimental data); and (ii) the high-order reflections, which carry less information on the electron correlation, are down-weighted (or even excluded), otherwise they would bias the fitting towards the unconstrained Hartree–Fock wavefunction. PMID:28250952

  1. Volumes from which calcium and phosphorus X-rays arise in electron probe emission microanalysis of bone: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Howell, P G T; Boyde, A

    2003-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of trajectories for electrons with initial energy of 10 keV through 30 keV were used to map the 3D location of characteristic x-ray photon production for the elements C, P, and Ca until the electrons either escaped as backscattered electrons (BSE) or had insignificant energy. The x-ray production volumes for phosphorus slightly exceed those for calcium, but both greatly exceed the volume through which BSE travel prior to leaving the sample. The x-ray volumes are roughly hemispherical in shape, and the oblate spheroid from which BSE derive occupies only the upper third to half the volume of x-ray generation. Energy-dispersive x-ray emission microanalysis (EDX) may not be secure as a method for the quantitation of BSE images of bone in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Ca:P elemental ratios from EDX analyses may also be imperfect.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure differences in solution and crystalline oxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Green, Evan; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the heme-containing O2 transport protein essential for life in all vertebrates. The resting high-spin (S = 2) ferrous form, deoxy-Hb, combines with triplet O2, forming diamagnetic (S = 0) oxy-Hb. Understanding this electronic structure is the key first step in understanding transition metal–O2 interaction. However, despite intense spectroscopic and theoretical studies, the electronic structure description of oxy-Hb remains elusive, with at least three different descriptions proposed by Pauling, Weiss, and McClure-Goddard, based on theory, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Here, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure, supported by density functional theory calculations, help resolve this debate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data on solution and crystalline oxy-Hb indicate both geometric and electronic structure differences suggesting that two of the previous descriptions are correct for the Fe–O2 center in oxy-Hb. These results support the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state developed by theoretical results. Additionally, it is shown here that small differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation effects can tune the ground state, tipping it into one of the two probable configurations. These data underscore the importance of solution spectroscopy and show that the electronic structure in the crystalline form may not always reflect the true ground-state description in solution. PMID:24062465

  3. ELECTRON ENERGY PARTITION IN THE ABOVE-THE-LOOPTOP SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuo; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Solar flares produce non-thermal electrons with energies up to tens of MeVs. To understand the origin of energetic electrons, coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources, in particular above-the-looptop sources, have been studied extensively. However, it still remains unclear how energies are partitioned between thermal and non-thermal electrons within the above-the-looptop source. Here we show that the kappa distribution, when compared to conventional spectral models, can better characterize the above-the-looptop HXRs (≳15 keV) observed in four different cases. The widely used conventional model (i.e., the combined thermal plus power-law distribution) can also fit the data, but it returns unreasonable parameter values due to a non-physical sharp lower-energy cutoff E{sub c}. In two cases, extreme-ultraviolet data were available from SDO/AIA and the kappa distribution was still consistent with the analysis of differential emission measure. Based on the kappa distribution model, we found that the 2012 July 19 flare showed the largest non-thermal fraction of electron energies about 50%, suggesting equipartition of energies. Considering the results of particle-in-cell simulations, as well as density estimates of the four cases studied, we propose a scenario in which electron acceleration is achieved primarily by collisionless magnetic reconnection, but the electron energy partition in the above-the-looptop source depends on the source density. In low-density above-the-looptop regions (few times 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}), the enhanced non-thermal tail can remain and a prominent HXR source is created, whereas in higher-densities (>10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}), the non-thermal tail is suppressed or thermalized by Coulomb collisions.

  4. Characterization of intense laser-produced fast electrons using hard x-rays via bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Sentoku, Y.; Bass, A.; Griffin, B.; Pandit, R.; Beg, F.; Chen, H.; McLean, H.; Link, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Energy distribution of high-power, short-pulse laser produced fast electrons was experimentally and numerically studied using high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. The hard x-ray photons and escaping electrons from various metal foils, irradiated by the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility, were recorded with a differential filter stack spectrometer that is sensitive to photons produced by mainly 0.5-2 MeV electrons and an electron spectrometer measuring >2 MeV electrons. The experimental bremsstrahlung and the slope of the measured escaped electrons were compared with an analytic calculation using an input electron spectrum estimated with the ponderomotive scaling. The result shows that the electron spectrum entering a Cu foil could be continuous single slope with the slope temperature of ˜1.5 MeV in the detector range. The experiment and analytic calculation were then compared with a 2D particle-in-cell code, PICLS, including a newly developed radiation transport module. The simulation shows that a two-temperature electron distribution is generated at the laser interaction region, but only the hot component of the fast electrons flow into the target during the interaction because the low energy electron component is trapped by self-generated magnetic field in the preformed plasma. A significant amount of the photons less than 100 keV observed in the experiment could be attributed to the low energy electrons entering the foil a few picoseconds later after the gating field disappears.

  5. Deducing the electron-beam diameter in a laser-plasma accelerator using x-ray betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Landgraf, Björn; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Jäckel, Oliver; Peth, Christian; Thiele, Tobias; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Willi, Oswald; Kaluza, Malte C; Spielmann, Christian

    2012-02-17

    We investigate the properties of a laser-plasma electron accelerator as a bright source of keV x-ray radiation. During the interaction, the electrons undergo betatron oscillations and from the carefully measured x-ray spectrum the oscillation amplitude of the electrons can be deduced which decreases with increasing electron energies. From the oscillation amplitude and the independently measured x-ray source size of (1.8±0.3) μm we are able to estimate the electron bunch diameter to be (1.6±0.3) μm.

  6. Claudio Pellegrini and the World’s First Hard X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-10-20

    President Obama welcomed SLAC's Claudio Pellegrini inside the Oval Office on Tuesday morning as a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award, one of the highest honors the U.S. government can give to a scientist. Pellegrini, a visiting scientist and consulting professor at SLAC and distinguished professor emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles, received the award for research that aided in the development of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) including SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Office of Science User Facility that started up in 2009. Here, Pellegrini describes his efforts that contributed to the realization of SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source, the world’s first hard X-ray free-electron laser.

  7. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yu, T. P.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ≤200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 106 photons/s in the form of ˜160 as pulses in the range of 3-300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ≥5 × 1020 photons/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed "attosecond physics."

  8. Design study of Thomson Laser-Electron X-ray Generator (LEX) for Millisecond Angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Bessonov, E. G.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu Ya; Popov, N. L.; Dyachkov, N. V.; Postnov, A. A.; Vinogradov, S. L.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this concept study a laser-electron X-ray generator (LEX) is considered for the medical imaging of the inner vessel structure. It is demonstrated that the modern lasers and linear electron accelerators are suitable for the design of the new generation of angiography medical equipment combining higher spatial and time resolution with the reduced patient dose. Angiography setup based on LEXG can make use of different contrast media (iodine, gadolinium) working on absorption edge due to the narrow tuneable spectrum which is not possible with conventional X-ray tubes. In the present study all estimations are made for iodine-based contrast agents. The conclusion is that modern technologies allow practical implementation of LEX for angiography based on multibunch linear accelerator and photon storage device.

  9. Enhanced charge excitations in electron-doped cuprates by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Takami; Tsutsui, Kenji; Mori, Michiyasu; Sota, Shigetoshi; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) tuned for the Cu L edge is a possible tool to detect charge excitations in cuprate superconductors. We theoretically investigate the possibility for observing a collective charge excitation by the RIXS. The RIXS process via the intermediate state inevitably makes the spectral weight of charge excitation stronger in electron doping than in hole doping. Electron-hole asymmetry also appears in the dynamical charge structure factor, showing a new enhanced small-momentum low-energy mode in electron doping. These facts indicate a possibility of detecting the new charge mode by RIXS in electron-doped systems.

  10. Multivariate statistics applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy X-ray spectrum imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    A modern scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) fitted with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) system can quickly and easily produce spectrum image (SI) datasets containing so much information (hundreds to thousands of megabytes) that they cannot be comprehensively interrogated by a human analyst. Therefore, advanced mathematical techniques are needed to glean materials science and engineering insight into the processing-structure-properties relationship of the examined material from the SI data. This review will discuss recent advances in the application of multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) methods to STEM-EDS SI experiments. In particular, the fundamental mathematics of principal component analysis (PCA) and related methods are reviewed, and advanced methods such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR) are discussed. The applications of PCA and MCR-based techniques to solve difficult materials science problems, such as the analysis of a particle fully embedded in a matrix phase are discussed, as well as confounding effects such as rank deficiency that can confuse the results of MVSA computations. Possible future advances and areas in need of study are also mentioned.

  11. Pair annihilation in laser pulses: Optical versus x-ray free-electron laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, Anton; Johansson, Petter; Marklund, Mattias

    2011-09-15

    We discuss the theory and phenomenology of pair annihilation, within an ultrashort laser pulse, to a single photon. The signature of this process is the unidirectional emission of single photons with a fixed energy. We show that the cross section is significantly larger than for two-photon pair annihilation in vacuum, with x-ray free-electron laser parameters admitting a much clearer signal than optical beams.

  12. Contemporary X-ray electron-density studies using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has many compelling advantages over conventional radiation sources in the measurement of accurate Bragg diffraction data. The variable photon energy and much higher flux may help to minimize critical systematic effects such as absorption, extinction and anomalous scattering. Based on a survey of selected published results from the last decade, the benefits of using synchrotron radiation in the determination of X-ray electron densities are discussed, and possible future directions of this field are examined. PMID:25295169

  13. Suppression of x-rays generated by runaway electrons in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; England, A.C.; Eberle, C.C.; Devan, W.R.; Harris, J.H.; Jernigan, T.C.; Kindsfather, R.R.; Morris, R.N.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray emission from runaway electrons on ATF is a serious issue. Runaway suppression techniques used on Heliotron-E are not adequate for ATF. Three approaches have been developed to suppress runaway production. Monitoring devices have been installed in occupied areas and personnel access and exposure will be limited. Additional shielding will be added as required. These systems will be ready for installation and testing on ATF prior to commissioning or first plasma operation.

  14. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  15. Theoretical study of Raman chirped adiabatic passage by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Highly excited electronic states and rotational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Selma; Sisourat, Nicolas Selles, Patricia; Taïeb, Richard; Carniato, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    Raman Chirped Adiabatic Passage (RCAP) is an efficient method to climb the vibrational ladder of molecules. It was shown on the example of fixed-in-space HCl molecule that selective vibrational excitation can thus be achieved by RCAP and that population transfer can be followed by X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy [S. Engin, N. Sisourat, P. Selles, R. Taïeb, and S. Carniato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 192–195 (2012)]. Here, in a more detailed analysis of the process, we investigate the effects of highly excited electronic states and of molecular rotation on the efficiency of RCAP. Furthermore, we propose an alternative spectroscopic way to monitor the transfer by means of X-ray absorption spectra.

  16. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-09-26

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  17. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Murray, Thomas D; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Ogata, Craig M; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T; Berger, James M

    2015-10-01

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10-15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  18. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; ...

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessarymore » to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.« less

  19. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  20. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; ...

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  1. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  2. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-04-19

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  3. Soft X-ray emission from electron-beam-heated solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, John T.; Zarro, Dominic M.

    1991-01-01

    Using time-dependent numerical simulations and Solar Maximum Mission observations of a solar flare on 1985 January 23, a study is conducted of the ability of an electron-beam-heating model to reproduce the rise phase of a flare as observed in soft X-ray lines of Ca XIX. The electron beam is parameterized by a peak flux, a low-energy cutoff, and a spectral index, and has a time dependence similar to the observed hard X-ray burst. For a spectral index of 6, only models with a low-energy cutoff of 20 keV reproduce the observed peak emission in the Ca XIX line complex. All models with a low-energy cutoff of 15 keV produce too much emission, while all models with a 25-keV cutoff too little emission. None of the models reproduces the temporal behavior of the soft X-ray emission. The electron-beam-heated component is theorized to only represent a small fraction of the energy released in the impulsive phase of this flare.

  4. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  5. Atomic holography with electrons and x-rays: Theoretical and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Len, Patrick Michael

    1997-06-01

    Gabor first proposed holography in 1948 as a means to experimentally record the amplitude and phase of scattered wavefronts, relative to a direct unscattered wave, and to use such a "hologram" to directly image atomic structure. But imaging at atomic resolution has not yet been possible in the way he proposed. Much more recently, Szoeke in 1986 noted that photoexcited atoms can emit photoelectron of fluorescent x-ray wavefronts that are scattered by neighboring atoms, thus yielding the direct and scattered wavefronts as detected in the far field that can then be interpreted as holographic in nature. By now, several algorithms for directly reconstructing three-dimensional atomic images from electron holograms have been proposed (e.g. by Barton) and successfully tested against experiment and theory. Very recently, Tegze and Faigel, and Grog et al. have recorded experimental x-ray fluorescence holograms, and these are found to yield atomic images that are more free of the kinds of aberrations caused by the non-ideal emission or scattering of electrons. The basic principles of these holographic atomic imaging methods are reviewed, including illustrative applications of the reconstruction algorithms to both theoretical and experimental electron and x-ray holograms. The author also discusses the prospects and limitations of these newly emerging atomic structural probes.

  6. [Proposal of a cloud chamber experiment using diagnostic X-ray apparatus and an analysis assisted by a simulation code].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Hanamitsu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Ueno, Junji; Miyoshi, Hirokazu

    2013-04-01

    A cloud chamber is a radiation detector that can visualize the tracks of charged particles. In this study, we developed a middle-type cloud chamber for use in practical training using a diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Because our cloud chamber has a heater to vaporize ethanol and features antifogging glass, it is possible to observe the vapor trails for a long time without the need for fine adjustments. X-rays with a tube voltage of 40 kV or of 120 kV (with a 21-mm aluminum filter) were irradiated at the chamber and the various phenomena were observed. We explain these phenomena in terms of the range of electrons and/or interactions between X-rays and matter and conclude that our analysis is consistent with analysis using the Monte Carlo simulation code EGS5.

  7. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  8. Contour shape analysis of hollow ion x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmej, F. B.; Angelo, P.; Aouad, Y.

    2008-10-22

    Hollow ion x-ray transitions originating from the configurations K{sup 0}L{sup N} have been studied via relativistic atomic structure and Stark broadening calculations. The broadening of the total contour is largely influenced by the oscillator strengths distribution over wavelengths rather than by Stark broadening alone. Interference effects between the upper and lower levels are shown to result in a considerable contour narrowing as well as in a shift of the total contour which could be either red or blue.

  9. X-ray analysis of a polar plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.; Webb, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Polar plumes have been detected in X-rays with the Skylab S-054 experiment. Observations of one well-observed plume are analyzed and the plasma pressure is determined. An isothermal model in hydrostatic equilibrium is found to require unacceptably low temperatures. A hydrodynamic model is proposed which is consistent with earlier white light and EUV observations. Calculations indicate that the total outward mass flux in polar plumes is comparable to that in high speed solar wind streams expected from a polar coronal hole.

  10. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis of boar and inobuta testes after the Fukushima accident

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Abe, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Jin; Kino, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Tong, Bin; Takino, Sachio; Sugano, Yukou; Sugimura, Satoshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Isogai, Emiko; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic radiation exposure associated with the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident on the testes of boar and inobuta (a hybrid of Sus scrofa and Sus scrofa domestica). This study examined the contamination levels of radioactive caesium (Cs), especially 134Cs and 137Cs, in the testis of both boar and inobuta during 2012, after the Fukushima accident. Morphological analysis and electron-probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) were also undertaken on the testes. The 134Cs and 137Cs levels were 6430 ± 23 and 6820 ± 32 Bq/kg in the boar testes, and 755 ± 13 and 747 ± 17 Bq/kg in the inobuta testes, respectively. The internal and external exposure of total 134Cs and 137Cs in the boar testes were 47.1 mGy and 176.2 mGy, respectively, whereas in the inobuta testes, these levels were 6.09 mGy and 59.8 mGy, respectively. Defective spermatogenesis was not detected by the histochemical analysis of radiation-exposed testes for either animal. In neither animal were Cs molecules detected, using EPMA. In conclusion, we showed that adverse radiation-induced effects were not detected in the examined boar and inobuta testes following the chronic radiation exposure associated with the FNPP accident. PMID:26825300

  11. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis of boar and inobuta testes after the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Abe, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Jin; Kino, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Tong, Bin; Takino, Sachio; Sugano, Yukou; Sugimura, Satoshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Isogai, Emiko; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic radiation exposure associated with the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident on the testes of boar and inobuta (a hybrid of Sus scrofa and Sus scrofa domestica). This study examined the contamination levels of radioactive caesium (Cs), especially (134)Cs and (137)Cs, in the testis of both boar and inobuta during 2012, after the Fukushima accident. Morphological analysis and electron-probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) were also undertaken on the testes. The (134)Cs and (137)Cs levels were 6430 ± 23 and 6820 ± 32 Bq/kg in the boar testes, and 755 ± 13 and 747 ± 17 Bq/kg in the inobuta testes, respectively. The internal and external exposure of total (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the boar testes were 47.1 mGy and 176.2 mGy, respectively, whereas in the inobuta testes, these levels were 6.09 mGy and 59.8 mGy, respectively. Defective spermatogenesis was not detected by the histochemical analysis of radiation-exposed testes for either animal. In neither animal were Cs molecules detected, using EPMA. In conclusion, we showed that adverse radiation-induced effects were not detected in the examined boar and inobuta testes following the chronic radiation exposure associated with the FNPP accident.

  12. Beryllium detection in human lung tissue using electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Butnor, Kelly J; Sporn, Thomas A; Ingram, Peter; Gunasegaram, Sue; Pinto, John F; Roggli, Victor L

    2003-11-01

    Chronic berylliosis is an uncommon disease that is caused by the inhalation of beryllium particles, dust, or fumes. The distinction between chronic berylliosis and sarcoidosis can be difficult both clinically and histologically, as both entities can have similar presentations and exhibit nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the lungs. The diagnosis of chronic berylliosis relies on a history of exposure to beryllium, roentgenographic evidence of diffuse nodular disease, and demonstration of beryllium hypersensitivity by ancillary studies, such as lymphocyte proliferation testing. Additional support may be gained by the demonstration of beryllium in lung tissue. Unlike other exogenous particulates, such as asbestos, detection of beryllium in human lung tissue is problematic. The low atomic number of beryllium usually makes it unsuitable for conventional microprobe analysis. We describe a case of chronic berylliosis in which beryllium was detected in lung tissue using atmospheric thin-window energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (ATW EDXA). A woman with a history of occupational exposure to beryllium at a nuclear weapons testing facility presented with progressive cough and dyspnea and a nodular pattern on chest roentgenograph. Open lung biopsy showed nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation that was histologically indistinguishable from sarcoidosis. Scanning electron microscopy and ATW EDXA demonstrated particulates containing beryllium within the granulomas. This application of EDXA offers significant advantages over existing methods of beryllium detection in that it is nondestructive, more widely available, and can be performed using routine paraffin sections.

  13. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system.

  14. New X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of long working distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Yasuko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Uruga, Tomoya

    2010-05-01

    A new X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of 300 mm long working distance has been developed at beamline 37XU of SPring-8. A focusing test has been performed in the X-ray energy range 20-37.7 keV. A focused beam size of 1.3 μm ( V)×1.5 μm ( H) has been achieved at an X-ray energy of 30 keV, and a total photon flux of the focused beam was about 2.7×10 10 photons/s. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis of eggplant roots has been carried out using the developed microprobe. It is clearly observed in the XRF images that cadmium is highly accumulated in the endodermis, exodermis and epidermis of roots. This study demonstrates the potential of scanning microscopy for heavy elements analysis in the high-energy X-ray region.

  15. A Spectral Analysis of the Masuda Flare Using Yohkoh Hard X-Ray Telescope Pixon Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David; Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1997-11-01

    at the peak of the flare; (c) there is a distinct dearth of HXT LO channel emission, relative to the higher energy channels, from the loop-top region, indicating either a very hard spectrum or the presence of a low-energy cutoff in the energetic electron spectrum; (d) the footpoint and loop-top emission during the impulsive phase of the flare are produced by two distinct particle populations; (e) following the main phase of this flare, the loop top is clearly thermal in nature with a peak temperature of ~40 MK that decreases with time as the event proceeds; and (f) the disparity between the present pixon results and previous MEM results is primarily due to the intrinsically better photometry achieved by the pixon method and the avoidance of suppression effects in the present analysis. These conclusions therefore support, in part, those made in previous works, confirming the existence of an impulsive source of hard X-rays in the corona above a flaring loop. Our analysis does, however, allow for a more comprehensive understanding of the temporal and spectral development of this event in the context of an alternative reconstruction technique.

  16. Extended x-ray-absorption fine structure—Auger process for surface structure analysis: Theoretical considerations of a proposed experiment

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Uzi; Adams, David L.

    1976-01-01

    A method for surface structure analysis is proposed. The proposed process combines x-ray photoabsorption and Auger electron emission. The extended x-ray-absorption fine structure, occurring for photon energies above an atomic absorption edge, contains structural information of the microscopic environment due to the coupling of the photoelectron final state with the atomic initial state. Measurement of the variations in the intensity of particular Auger lines, as a function of the incident radiation energy, provides a surface sensitive measure of the photoabsorption cross section in the media. Theoretical considerations of the physical processes underlying the proposed experiment and its feasibility, and a discussion of background contributions are presented. PMID:16592339

  17. Chemical imaging analysis of the brain with X-ray methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collingwood, Joanna F.; Adams, Freddy

    2017-04-01

    Cells employ various metal and metalloid ions to augment the structure and the function of proteins and to assist with vital biological processes. In the brain they mediate biochemical processes, and disrupted metabolism of metals may be a contributing factor in neurodegenerative disorders. In this tutorial review we will discuss the particular role of X-ray methods for elemental imaging analysis of accumulated metal species and metal-containing compounds in biological materials, in the context of post-mortem brain tissue. X-rays have the advantage that they have a short wavelength and can penetrate through a thick biological sample. Many of the X-ray microscopy techniques that provide the greatest sensitivity and specificity for trace metal concentrations in biological materials are emerging at synchrotron X-ray facilities. Here, the extremely high flux available across a wide range of soft and hard X-rays, combined with state-of-the-art focusing techniques and ultra-sensitive detectors, makes it viable to undertake direct imaging of a number of elements in brain tissue. The different methods for synchrotron imaging of metals in brain tissues at regional, cellular, and sub-cellular spatial resolution are discussed. Methods covered include X-ray fluorescence for elemental imaging, X-ray absorption spectrometry for speciation imaging, X-ray diffraction for structural imaging, phase contrast for enhanced contrast imaging and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy for spectromicroscopy. Two- and three-dimensional (confocal and tomographic) imaging methods are considered as well as the correlation of X-ray microscopy with other imaging tools.

  18. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  19. Tomographic analysis of the nonthermal x-ray bursts during disruption instability in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Savrukhin, P. V.; Ermolaeva, A. I.; Shestakov, E. A.; Khramenkov, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal x-ray radiation (E{sub γ} up to 150 keV) is measured in the T-10 tokamaks during disruption instability using two sets of CdTe detectors (10 vertical and 7 horizontal view detectors). Special narrow cupper tubes collimators with lead screening and CdTe detectors integrated with amplifiers inside metallic containers provides enhanced spatial resolution of the system (r ~ 3 cm) and assures protection from the parasitic hard x-ray (E{sub γ} up to 1.5 MeV) and electromagnetic loads during disruption. Spatial localization of the nonthermal x-ray emissivity is reconstructed using tomographic Cormack technique with SVD matrix inversion. Analysis indicated appearance of an intensive non-thermal x-ray bursts during initial stage of the disruptions at high density. The bursts are characterized by repetitive spikes (2–3 kHz) of the x-ray emissivity from the plasma core area. Analysis indicated that the spikes can be connected with acceleration of the non-thermal electrons in enhanced longitudinal electric fields induced during energy quench at the disruption instability.

  20. Tomographic analysis of the nonthermal x-ray bursts during disruption instability in the T-10 tokamak.

    PubMed

    Savrukhin, P V; Ermolaeva, A I; Shestakov, E A; Khramenkov, A V

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal x-ray radiation (Eγ up to 150 keV) is measured in the T-10 tokamaks during disruption instability using two sets of CdTe detectors (10 vertical and 7 horizontal view detectors). Special narrow cupper tubes collimators with lead screening and CdTe detectors integrated with amplifiers inside metallic containers provides enhanced spatial resolution of the system (r ∼ 3 cm) and assures protection from the parasitic hard x-ray (Eγ up to 1.5 MeV) and electromagnetic loads during disruption. Spatial localization of the nonthermal x-ray emissivity is reconstructed using tomographic Cormack technique with SVD matrix inversion. Analysis indicated appearance of an intensive non-thermal x-ray bursts during initial stage of the disruptions at high density. The bursts are characterized by repetitive spikes (2-3 kHz) of the x-ray emissivity from the plasma core area. Analysis indicated that the spikes can be connected with acceleration of the non-thermal electrons in enhanced longitudinal electric fields induced during energy quench at the disruption instability.

  1. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  2. Double-core-hole spectroscopy for chemical analysis with an intense X-ray femtosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Berrah, Nora; Fang, Li; Murphy, Brendan; Osipov, Timur; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Kukk, Edwin; Feifel, Raimund; van der Meulen, Peter; Salen, Peter; Schmidt, Henning T.; Thomas, Richard D.; Larsson, Mats; Richter, Robert; Prince, Kevin C.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Wada, Shin-ichi; Piancastelli, Maria N.; Tashiro, Motomichi; Ehara, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Theory predicts that double-core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy can provide a new powerful means of differentiating between similar chemical systems with a sensitivity not hitherto possible. Although DCH ionization on a single site in molecules was recently measured with double- and single-photon absorption, double-core holes with single vacancies on two different sites, allowing unambiguous chemical analysis, have remained elusive. Here we report that direct observation of double-core holes with single vacancies on two different sites produced via sequential two-photon absorption, using short, intense X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser and compare it with theoretical modeling. The observation of DCH states, which exhibit a unique signature, and agreement with theory proves the feasibility of the method. Our findings exploit the ultrashort pulse duration of the free-electron laser to eject two core electrons on a time scale comparable to that of Auger decay and demonstrate possible future X-ray control of physical inner-shell processes. PMID:21969540

  3. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials.

  4. Conservation of Moroccan manuscript papers aged 150, 200 and 800 years. Analysis by infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS).

    PubMed

    Hajji, Latifa; Boukir, Abdellatif; Assouik, Jamal; Lakhiari, Hamid; Kerbal, Abdelali; Doumenq, Pierre; Mille, Gilbert; De Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2015-02-05

    The preservation of manuscripts and archive materials is a serious problem for librarians and restorers. Paper manuscript is subjected to numerous degradation factors affecting their conservation state. This research represents an attempt to evaluate the conservation restoration process applied in Moroccan libraries, especially the alkaline treatment for strengthening weakened paper. In this study, we focused on six samples of degraded and restored paper taken from three different Moroccan manuscripts aged 150, 200 and 800 years. In addition, the Japanese paper used in restoration has been characterized. A modern paper was also analyzed as reference. A three-step analytical methodology based on infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) analysis was developed before and after restoration in order to determine the effect of the consolidation treatment on the paper structure. The results obtained by XRD and ATR-FTIR disclosed the presence of barium sulfate (BaSO4) in all restored paper manuscripts. The presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in all considered samples was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. The application of de-acidification treatment causes significant changes connected with the increase of intensity mostly in the region 1426 cm(-1), assigned to the asymmetric and symmetric CO stretching mode of calcite, indicating the effectiveness of de-acidification procedure proved by the rise of the alkaline reserve content allowing the long term preservation of paper. Observations performed by SEM magnify the typical paper morphology and the structure of fibbers, highlighting the effect of the restoration process, manifested by the reduction of impurities.

  5. Conservation of Moroccan manuscript papers aged 150, 200 and 800 years. Analysis by infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajji, Latifa; Boukir, Abdellatif; Assouik, Jamal; Lakhiari, Hamid; Kerbal, Abdelali; Doumenq, Pierre; Mille, Gilbert; De Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2015-02-01

    The preservation of manuscripts and archive materials is a serious problem for librarians and restorers. Paper manuscript is subjected to numerous degradation factors affecting their conservation state. This research represents an attempt to evaluate the conservation restoration process applied in Moroccan libraries, especially the alkaline treatment for strengthening weakened paper. In this study, we focused on six samples of degraded and restored paper taken from three different Moroccan manuscripts aged 150, 200 and 800 years. In addition, the Japanese paper used in restoration has been characterized. A modern paper was also analyzed as reference. A three-step analytical methodology based on infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) analysis was developed before and after restoration in order to determine the effect of the consolidation treatment on the paper structure. The results obtained by XRD and ATR-FTIR disclosed the presence of barium sulfate (BaSO4) in all restored paper manuscripts. The presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in all considered samples was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. The application of de-acidification treatment causes significant changes connected with the increase of intensity mostly in the region 1426 cm-1, assigned to the asymmetric and symmetric Csbnd O stretching mode of calcite, indicating the effectiveness of de-acidification procedure proved by the rise of the alkaline reserve content allowing the long term preservation of paper. Observations performed by SEM magnify the typical paper morphology and the structure of fibbers, highlighting the effect of the restoration process, manifested by the reduction of impurities.

  6. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution-function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella-patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage zone of

  7. Cluster of galaxies & Cosmology - X-ray analysis of fossil group RXJ1720.1+2360

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Monica

    2012-09-01

    We present the results on the X-ray analysis of fossil group of galaxies RXJ1720.1+2360. Fossil Groups are systems associated to extended emission in X-rays with one single central elliptical galaxy surrounded by very faint companions. This unusual lack of bright galaxies in the group is presumably due to galactic cannibalism. In this study we present for the first time the imaging and spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of RXJ1720.1+2360. This work is part of a systematic study to determine the X-ray properties of fossil groups.

  8. New approach to breast tumor detection based on fluorescence x-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuyama, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    A new technical approach to breast-tumor detection is proposed. The technique is based on fluorescence x-ray analysis, and can identify a miniature malignant tumor within the breast. The primary beam intensity needed in fluorescence x-ray analysis is on a lower order of magnitude than that used in mammography. Thus, the newly-proposed technique would enable detection of a still tiny breast cancer while dramatically lowering the radiation dose. Field-emission x-ray sources might be a key for translating this concept into a medical technique. PMID:20930932

  9. Iron speciation in human cancer cells by K-edge total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polgári, Zs.; Meirer, F.; Sasamori, S.; Ingerle, D.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Rickers, K.; Réti, A.; Budai, B.; Szoboszlai, N.; Záray, G.

    2011-03-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis in combination with synchrotron radiation induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) acquisition was used to determine the oxidation state of Fe in human cancer cells and simultaneously their elemental composition by applying a simple sample preparation procedure consisting of pipetting the cell suspension onto the quartz reflectors. XANES spectra of several inorganic and organic iron compounds were recorded and compared to that of different cell lines. The XANES spectra of cells, independently from the phase of cell growth and cell type were very similar to that of ferritin, the main Fe store within the cell. The spectra obtained after CoCl 2 or NiCl 2 treatment, which could mimic a hypoxic state of cells, did not differ noticeably from that of the ferritin standard. After 5-fluorouracil administration, which could also induce an oxidative-stress in cells, the absorption edge position was shifted toward higher energies representing a higher oxidation state of Fe. Intense treatment with antimycin A, which inhibits electron transfer in the respiratory chain, resulted in minor changes in the spectrum, resembling rather the N-donor Fe-α,α'-dipyridyl complex at the oxidation energy of Fe(III), than ferritin. The incorporation of Co and Ni in the cells was followed by SR-TXRF measurements.

  10. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-09-13

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  11. Simulation Studies of the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R. R.; Shyd'ko, Y.; Kim, K.-J; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include transverse effects and realistic Bragg crystal properties with the two-dimensional code GINGER. In the present cases considered the radiation divergence is much narrower than the crystal acceptance, and the numerical algorithm can be simplified by ignoring the finite angular bandwidth of the crystal. In this regime GINGER shows that the saturated x-ray pulses have 109 photons and are nearly Fourier-limited with peak powers in excess of 1 MW. Wealso include preliminary results for a four-mirror cavity that can be tuned in wavelength over a few percent, with future plans to incorporate the full transverse response of the Bragg crystals into GINGER to more accurately model this tunable source.

  12. X-ray diagnostic for current density profiling relativistic electron beams in vacuum and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; Koppel, L.; Smith, J.

    1986-02-15

    An x-ray imaging technique has been studied for the purpose of observing the current density profile in a high-current relativistic electron beam (50 MeV, 10 kA). Calculations and measurements of energy spectra and intensities are in good agreement. Results indicate sufficient photon yield for pinhole imaging when the beam deposits a small part of its energy in high-Z gas or a thin high-Z foil. Characteristic L and K x-ray emission is not found not be a reliable technique due to strong L and K shell fluorescence in the presence of intense bremsstrahlung radiation. It is also found that at pressures on the order of one atmosphere, the density of energy deposition in a gas cell is too small to generate sufficient photon yield for time-resolved measurements.

  13. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; KAIST, Daejeon; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations with a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.

  14. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; ...

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations withmore » a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.« less

  15. A Bragg beam splitter for hard x-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Taito; Yabashi, Makina; Sano, Yasuhisa; Tono, Kensuke; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2013-02-11

    We report a Bragg beam splitter developed for utilization of hard x-ray free-electron lasers. The splitter is based on an ultrathin silicon crystal operating in the symmetric Bragg geometry to provide high reflectivity and transmissivity simultaneously. We fabricated frame-shaped Si(511) and (110) crystals with thicknesses below 10 μm by a reactive dry etching method using atmospheric-pressure plasma. The thickness variation over an illuminated area is less than 300 nm peak-to-valley. High crystalline perfection was verified by topographic and diffractometric measurements. The crystal thickness was evaluated from the period of the Pendellösung beats measured with a highly monochromatic and collimated x-ray probe. The crystals provide two replica pulses with uniform wavefront [(<1/50)λ] and low spatial intensity variation (<5%). These Bragg beam splitters will play an important role in innovating XFEL applications.

  16. Comptonization of X-rays by low-temperature electrons. [photon wavelength redistribution in cosmic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A.; Kallman, T.; Mccray, R.; Ross, R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the spectrum that results from the Compton scattering of a monochromatic source of X-rays by low-temperature electrons, both for initial-value relaxation problems and for steady-state spatial diffusion problems. The method gives an exact solution of the inital-value problem for evolution of the spectrum in an infinite homogeneous medium if Klein-Nishina corrections to the Thomson cross section are neglected. This, together with approximate solutions for problems in which Klein-Nishina corrections are significant and/or spatial diffusion occurs, shows spectral structure near the original photon wavelength that may be used to infer physical conditions in cosmic X-ray sources. Explicit results, shown for examples of time relaxation in an infinite medium and spatial diffusion through a uniform sphere, are compared with results obtained by Monte Carlo calculations and by solving the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation.

  17. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light-induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations with a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale. PMID:25832715

  18. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; ...

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shotmore » based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.« less

  19. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  20. Atmospheric Electron-induced X-Ray Spectrometer (AEXS) Instrument Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urgiles, E.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Toda, R.; Crisp, J.; George, T.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This paper describes the progress in data acquisition and establishing the observational capability of the AEXS instrument. The AEXS is a miniature instrument[1-4] based on the excitation of characteristic X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and luminescence spectra using a focused electron beam which enables nondestructive evaluation of sample surfaces in planetary ambient atmospheres. In situ operation is obtained through the use of a thin electron transmissive membrane to isolate the vacuum of the AEXS source from the outside ambient atmosphere. Thus eliminating the need for a vacuum pumped sample chamber as is common in all laboratory SEM s. The transmitted electrons impinge on the sample exciting XRF spectra from the irradiated spot on in-situ or collected samples with sub-mm to cm-scale spatial resolution at Mars atmospheric pressure. The AEXS system (Fig 1) consists of a high-energy (>10keV) electron gun encapsulated by the isolation membrane, an XRF detection and analyzer system, and a high voltage power supply. The XRF data are analyzed to determine the elemental abundance for the irradiated spots. The approach to demonstrating a proof of concept of the AEXS has been through 1) demonstrating the viability of microfabricated membranes, 2) assembling AEXS setups with increasingly integrated functional components, and 3) simulating the AEXS observational capabilities. The development of the instrument is described in detail in the poster paper[4] at this conference. This paper focuses on describing the progress of the AEXS instrument to acquire XRF data and using commercially available software to analyze the data streams and determine the accuracy, precision and resolution of the analysis compared to the certified elemental abundance.

  1. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  2. Design and analysis of soft X-ray imaging microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Cheng, Wang; Wu, Jiang; Hoover, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The spherical Schwarzschild microscope for soft X-ray applications in microscopy and projection lithography consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third-order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for X-ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. To reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles are here considered. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical Head reflecting two-mirror microscope configurations. The Head microscope with a NA of 0.4 achieves diffraction limited performance for objects with a diameter of 40 microns. Thus, it seems possible to record images with a feature size less than 100 A with a 40x microscope when using 40 A radiation.

  3. Intercalation of trioxatriangulenium ion in DNA: binding, electron transfer, x-ray crystallography, and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Reynisson, Jóhannes; Schuster, Gary B; Howerton, Sheldon B; Williams, Loren Dean; Barnett, Robert N; Cleveland, Charles L; Landman, Uzi; Harrit, Niels; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2003-02-26

    Trioxatriangulenium ion (TOTA(+)) is a flat, somewhat hydrophobic compound that has a low-energy unoccupied molecular orbital. It binds to duplex DNA by intercalation with a preference for G-C base pairs. Irradiation of intercalated TOTA(+) causes charge (radical cation) injection that results in strand cleavage (after piperidine treatment) primarily at GG steps. The X-ray crystal structure of TOTA(+) intercalated in the hexameric duplex d[CGATCG](2) described here reveals that intercalation of TOTA(+) results in an unusually large extension of the helical rise of the DNA and that the orientation of TOTA(+) is sensitive to hydrogen-bonding interactions with backbone atoms of the DNA. Electronic structure calculations reveal no meaningful charge transfer from DNA to TOTA(+) because the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of TOTA(+), (LUMO)(T), falls in the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital, (HOMO)(D), and the (LUMO)(D) of the DNA bases. These calculations reveal the importance of backbone, water, and counterion interactions, which shift the energy levels of the bases and the intercalated TOTA(+) orbitals significantly. The calculations also show that the inserted TOTA(+) strongly polarizes the intercalation cavity where a sheet of excess electron density surrounds the TOTA(+).

  4. X-ray and electron scattering intensities of molecules calculated using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Garry T.; Tripathi, Awadh N.; Smith, Vedene H.

    1999-05-01

    The elastic and total intensities for x-ray and high-energy electron scattering from the ten-electron hydride series has been calculated from Kohn-Sham orbitals using the BLYP, B3LYP and LSDA functionals, and compared to the previous Hartree-Fock and singles and doubles configuration interaction (SDCI) results of Wang [J. Wang, A. N. Tripathi, and V. H. Smith, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 101, 4842 (1994)] in the same basis. In those cases where density functional theory (DFT) provides a significantly better electron density than Hartree-Fock, the pair density and hence total scattering intensity for x-rays is also better reproduced, especially in the low s region. The asymptotic behavior of the scattering curves from the DFT methods is poorer than Hartree-Fock due to the inability of DFT to reliably predict the density at the nucleus, the electron-electron distribution at zero-electron separation, and the second moment of the electron-electron distribution.

  5. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  6. Assessment of the U3O7 Crystal Structure by X-ray and Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Leinders, Gregory; Delville, Rémi; Pakarinen, Janne; Cardinaels, Thomas; Binnemans, Koen; Verwerft, Marc

    2016-10-03

    Polycrystalline U3O7 powder was synthesized by oxidation of UO2 powder under controlled conditions using in situ thermal analysis, and by heat treatment in a tubular furnace. The O/U ratio of the U3O7 phase was measured as 2.34 ± 0.01. The crystal structure was assessed from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) data. Similar to U4O9-ε (more precisely U64O143), U3O7 exhibits a long-range ordered structure, which is closely related to the fluorite-type arrangement of UO2. Cations remain arranged identical to that in the fluorite structure, and excess anions form distorted cuboctahedral oxygen clusters, which periodically replace the fluorite anion arrangement. The structure can be described in an expanded unit cell containing 15 fluorite-like subcells (U15O35), and spanned by basis vectors A = ap - 2bp, B = -2ap + bp, and C = 3cp (lattice parameters of the subcell are ap = bp = 538.00 ± 0.02 pm and cp = 554.90 ± 0.02 pm; cp/ap = 1.031). The arrangement of cuboctahedra in U3O7 results in a layered structure, which is different from the well-known U4O9-ε crystal structure.

  7. Data analysis for the hard X-ray experiment on board the ANS spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of X ray bursts form globular clusters gathered by the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite is presented. Publications were prepared on the cosmic ray induced environment, and maps of these radiations as functions of latitude and longitude were generated.

  8. Modelling microscopic features of streamer encounters, electric fields, electron beams and X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, C.; Kochkin, P.; Ebert, U.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorms emit terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), beams of photons with quantum energies ofup to 40 MeV. Likewise electric discharges in the laboratory, mimicing lightning on a small spatial andenergetic scale, emit X-rays whose energies are limited by the available potential difference betweenthe two electrodes. For a maximal available difference of 1 MV and a gap distance of 1 m between the twoelectrodes, we will present the energy and spatial distribution of generated X-rays.For that we have followed the motion of preaccelerated, monoenergetic and monodirectional electronbeams with energies between 100 keV and the maximal available energy of 1 MeV for different electricfield configurations using a particle Monte Carlo code. Omitting any field, we present the subsequent energy and spatial distribution of X-raysand analyse how the photon number depends on the initial electron energy. Fig. 1 shows the position and energy of photons generated by Bremsstrahlung after 0.3 ns by beams of 500 000 electrons with initial energies of 1 MeV moving in the zdirection in STP air. The electrons have generated electron avalanches and all have cooleddown and attached to oxygen after 0.3 ns. Every cross represents one photon projected onto the xz plane; the photon energies Eγ are color coded. We see that photons with energies of approx. 1 MeV can be produced and that the high-energy tail of X-rays is beamedtowards the direction of the initial electron beam whereas low-energy photons show a more isotropicbehaviour. Analysing the cross sections of photons interacting with air we conclude that photons travelseveral meters in air and can reach detectors several meters from the position of the discharge. Byestimating the electric field ahead of the discharge corona and by simulating the motion of electronbeams in these fields, we exclude that electrons travel as far as photons and disturb the measured X-raysignal.

  9. Radiological characterization and water equivalency of genipin gel for x-ray and electron beam dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Bosi, Stephen; Davies, Justin B; Baldock, Clive

    2011-08-07

    The genipin radiochromic gel offers enormous potential as a three-dimensional dosimeter in advanced radiotherapy techniques. We have used several methods (including Monte Carlo simulation), to investigate the water equivalency of genipin gel by characterizing its radiological properties, including mass and electron densities, photon interaction cross sections, mass energy absorption coefficient, effective atomic number, collisional, radiative and total mass stopping powers and electron mass scattering power. Depth doses were also calculated for clinical kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beams as well as megavoltage electron beams. The mass density, electron density and effective atomic number of genipin were found to differ from water by less than 2%. For energies below 150 keV, photoelectric absorption cross sections are more than 3% higher than water due to the strong dependence on atomic number. Compton scattering and pair production interaction cross sections for genipin gel differ from water by less than 1%. The mass energy absorption coefficient is approximately 3% higher than water for energies <60 keV due to the dominance of photoelectric absorption in this energy range. The electron mass stopping power and mass scattering power differ from water by approximately 0.3%. X-ray depth dose curves for genipin gel agree to within 1% with those for water. Our results demonstrate that genipin gel can be considered water equivalent for kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beam dosimetry. For megavoltage electron beam dosimetry, however, our results suggest that a correction factor may be needed to convert measured dose in genipin gel to that of water, since differences in some radiological properties of up to 3% compared to water are observed. Our results indicate that genipin gel exhibits greater water equivalency than polymer gels and PRESAGE formulations.

  10. Ultra soft X-ray Microbeam: optical analysis and intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Palladino, L.; Del Grande, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, optical analysis and intensity measurements of the Ultra Soft x-ray microbeam (100 eV-1 keV) are presented. X-ray emission at 500 eV are generated from a plasma produced by focusing Nd-YAG laser beam on the Yttrium target. In particular, we will report the study of x-ray intensity and the measurement of focal spot dimension. Moreover, the software/hardware control of sample holder position and the alignment of biological sample to the microbeam will be described.

  11. Authentication of vegetable oils by confocal X-ray scattering analysis with coherent/incoherent scattered X-rays.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an alternative analytical method based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio and effective atomic number for non-destructive identification of vegetable oils using confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry. A calibration curve for the Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio and effective atomic number was constructed on the basis of a reliable physical model for X-ray scattering. The content of light elements, which are "invisible" using X-ray fluorescence, can be calculated "by difference" from the calibration curve. In this work, we demonstrated the use of this proposed approach to identify complex organic matrices in different vegetable oils with high precision and accuracy.

  12. Soft-x-ray free-electron-laser interaction with materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; London, Richard A.; Chapman, Henry N.; Bergh, Magnus

    2007-10-15

    Soft-x-ray free-electron lasers have enabled materials studies in which structural information is obtained faster than the relevant probe-induced damage mechanisms. We present a continuum model to describe the damage process based on hot-dense plasma theory, which includes a description of the energy deposition in the samples, the subsequent dynamics of the sample, and the detector signal. We compared the model predictions with experimental data and mostly found reasonable agreement. In view of future free-electron-laser performance, the model was also used to predict damage dynamics of samples and optical elements at shorter wavelengths and larger photon fluences than currently available.

  13. Study of x-ray lithography mask distortion during electron-beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hongyan; Wang, Yongkun

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional finite element model was developed to simulate the X-ray lithography mask distortion during electron-beam writing (EBW). Equivalent heat flux density method was proposed and the transient thermal stress simulation was done. The results show that the in-plane distortion (IPD) of the mask fluctuates with the time. The maximum value is 8.24 nm, and the direction is deviated from the electron beam center. The maximum out-of-plane distortion (OPD) is 9.75μm. The direction is normal to the pattern window, and occurred in the center of the beam center.

  14. EPR study of electron traps in x-ray-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Azzoni, C.B.; Paleari, A. )

    1989-10-01

    Single crystals of yttria-stabilized zirconia (12 mol % of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been x-ray irradiated at room temperature. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the filled electron traps is analyzed in terms of a single oxygen vacancy type of defect with its symmetry axis along the {l angle}111{r angle} direction. The angular dependence of the linewidth and the asymmetry of the line shape are attributed to the disordered rearrangements of the anion sublattice surrounding the oxygen vacancy. This affects the local crystal fields and the directions of the symmetry axis of the defects.

  15. Quasi-elastic X-ray scattering divergence analysis calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, John S.; Milne, Gordon J.

    1989-08-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is described that enables a numerical investigation to be made of the variation of instrumental resolution corrections with apparatus configuration for quasi-elastic X-ray scattering. The program is useful for scattering from phonons, defects, low angle Comptom processes and all instances where the energy change on scattering is at most a small fraction of the incident energy. Account can be taken of an irregular incident beam distribution (in angle and in space), a sample crystal mosaic spread and a finite area detector. The numerical convolutions for each smearing effect are performed separately but cumulatively, allowing the effects of individual processes to be investigated or treated in variant fashion. The program provides a shell of organisation that could be adapted to related problems.

  16. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modular and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.

  17. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  18. Feasibility study for a novel method of dual energy x-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    Dual energy x-ray analysis (DEXA) is investigated using a nonlinear model for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ that is expressed as a function of electron density Ne and the fourth compositional ratio R4. Nonlinear simultaneous equations are solved using a least-squares algorithm based upon the method of Levenberg and Marquardt. Measurements of μ for low atomic number materials (containing elements hydrogen to calcium) at energies 32-66 keV are used to study DEXA accuracy as a function of sample composition, photon energy and their separation ΔE. Results are presented for ΔE = 5-30 keV, for 2% measurement precision, and the doses involved are quantified. The model is subject to propagation of error analysis and results are presented for the relationship between measurement uncertainties and those for Ne and R4. The analysis shows how DEXA accuracy is controlled by the fractional compositional cross-product, which represents the contribution of composition to μ, and how this can be optimized by careful selection of beam energies according to the compositional range of interest. Accurate DEXA is achieved over restricted energy and compositional ranges: soft tissues only at approximately 15-25 keV, all tissues at approximately 30-80 keV and, for situations where a higher dose can be tolerated, all tissues at approximately 4-8 MeV.

  19. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    PubMed

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P

    2014-07-17

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 10(33) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s(-1)) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at a seeded free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Sturari, L.; Bajt, S.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Ratanapreechachai, J.; Caretta, A.; Casarin, B.; Glerean, F.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Manzoni, G.; Cilento, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Simoncig, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Raimondi, L.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Passuello, R.; Gaio, G.; Prica, M.; Scarcia, M.; Kourousias, G.; Borghes, R.; Giannessi, L.; Wurth, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, we have been witnessing an increased interest for studying materials properties under non-equilibrium conditions. Several well established spectroscopies for experiments in the energy domain have been successfully adapted to the time domain with sub-picosecond time resolution. Here we show the realization of high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) with a stable ultrashort X-ray source such as an externally seeded free electron laser (FEL). We have designed and constructed a RIXS experimental endstation that allowed us to successfully measure the d-d excitations in KCoF3 single crystals at the cobalt M2,3-edge at FERMI FEL (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). The FEL-RIXS spectra show an excellent agreement with the ones obtained from the same samples at the MERIXS endstation of the MERLIN beamline at the Advanced Light Source storage ring (Berkeley, USA). We established experimental protocols for performing time resolved RIXS experiments at a FEL source to avoid X ray-induced sample damage, while retaining comparable acquisition time to the synchrotron based measurements. Finally, we measured and modelled the influence of the FEL mixed electromagnetic modes, also present in externally seeded FELs, and the beam transport with ~120 meV experimental resolution achieved in the presented RIXS setup. PMID:27941842

  1. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Bogan, M; Boutet, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Marchesini, S; Woods, B; Bajt, S; Benner, W H; London, R; Ploenjes-Palm, E; Kuhlmann, M; Treusch, R; Dusterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Spiller, E; Moller, T; Bostedt, C; Hoener, M; Shapiro, D; Hodgson, K O; der Spoel, D v; Burmeister, F; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Lee, R; Szoke, A; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J

    2006-03-13

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  2. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastian; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Marchesini, Stefano; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; London, Richard A.; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; Spiller, Eberhard; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  3. X-ray free-electron lasers: from dreams to reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2016-12-01

    The brightness of x-ray sources has been increased one to ten billion times by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) that generate high intensity coherent photon pulses at wavelengths from nanometers to less than one angstrom and a duration of a few to 100 femtoseconds. For the first time XFELs allow for experimental exploration of the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scale, creating new opportunities for scientific research in physics, chemistry, biology, material science and high energy density physics. This paper reviews the history of this development, concentrating on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray XFEL. It also presents the physical principles on which XFELs are based, their present status and future developments, together with some recent experimental results in physics, chemistry and biology. LCLS success has spurred the worldwide construction of more XFELs; SACLA in Japan, XFEL and FLASH in Germany, Swiss FEL, Korean XFEL, Fermi in Italy. The characteristics of these other sources are also discussed.

  4. Extreme ultraviolet resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at a seeded free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell’Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Sturari, L.; Bajt, S.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Ratanapreechachai, J.; Caretta, A.; Casarin, B.; Glerean, F.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Manzoni, G.; Cilento, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Simoncig, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Raimondi, L.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Passuello, R.; Gaio, G.; Prica, M.; Scarcia, M.; Kourousias, G.; Borghes, R.; Giannessi, L.; Wurth, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-12-01

    In the past few years, we have been witnessing an increased interest for studying materials properties under non-equilibrium conditions. Several well established spectroscopies for experiments in the energy domain have been successfully adapted to the time domain with sub-picosecond time resolution. Here we show the realization of high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) with a stable ultrashort X-ray source such as an externally seeded free electron laser (FEL). We have designed and constructed a RIXS experimental endstation that allowed us to successfully measure the d-d excitations in KCoF3 single crystals at the cobalt M2,3-edge at FERMI FEL (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). The FEL-RIXS spectra show an excellent agreement with the ones obtained from the same samples at the MERIXS endstation of the MERLIN beamline at the Advanced Light Source storage ring (Berkeley, USA). We established experimental protocols for performing time resolved RIXS experiments at a FEL source to avoid X ray-induced sample damage, while retaining comparable acquisition time to the synchrotron based measurements. Finally, we measured and modelled the influence of the FEL mixed electromagnetic modes, also present in externally seeded FELs, and the beam transport with ~120 meV experimental resolution achieved in the presented RIXS setup.

  5. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; ...

    2015-06-27

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here in this study, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallizationmore » conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.« less

  6. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jorg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valerie

    2015-06-27

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here in this study, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray diagnostics of cutoff shape of nonthermal electron spectrum at young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Ohira, Yutaka; Sawada, Makoto; Bamba, Aya

    2014-02-01

    Synchrotron X-rays can be a useful tool to investigate electron acceleration at young supernova remnants (SNRs). At present, since the magnetic field configuration around the shocks of SNRs is uncertain, it is not clear whether electron acceleration is limited by SNR age, synchrotron cooling, or even escape from the acceleration region. We study whether the acceleration mechanism can be constrained by the cutoff shape of the electron spectrum around the maximum energy. We derive analytical formulae of the cutoff shape in each case where the maximum electron energy is determined by SNR age, synchrotron cooling and escape from the shock. They are related to the energy dependence of the electron diffusion coefficient. Next, we discuss whether information on the cutoff shape can be provided by observations in the near future which will simply give the photon indices and the flux ratios in the soft and hard X-ray bands. We find that if the power-law index of the electron spectrum is independently determined by other observations, then we can constrain the cutoff shape by comparing theoretical predictions of the photon indices and/or the flux ratios with observed data which will be measured by NuSTAR and/or ASTRO-H. Such study is helpful in understanding the acceleration mechanism. In particular, it will supply another independent constraint on the magnetic field strength around the shocks of SNRs.

  8. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1-3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1-3 MeV photons with a total count of 1011. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V4 and detected photon counts of nearly 106 at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ˜40 μrad at 1 m.

  9. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J. E.; Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L.

    2015-11-14

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1–3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1–3 MeV photons with a total count of 10{sup 11}. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V{sup 4} and detected photon counts of nearly 10{sup 6} at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ∼40 μrad at 1 m.

  10. Feasibility study of a gas electron multiplier detector as an X-Ray image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sukyoung; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Soonhyouk

    2015-07-01

    For its ease of manufacture, flexible geometry, and cheap manufacturing cost, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector can be used as an X-ray image sensor. For this purpose, we acquired relative detection efficiencies and suggested a method to increase the detection efficiency in order to study the possibility of using a GEM detector as an X-ray image sensor. The GEM detector system is composed of GEM foils, the instrument system, the gas system, and the negative power supply. The instrument system consists of an A225 charge sensitive preamp, an A206 discriminator, and a MCA8000D multichannel analyzer. For the gas system, argon gas was mixed with CO2 in a ratio of 8:2, and for the negative 2,000 volts, a 3106D power supply was used. A CsI-coated GEM foil was used to increase the detection efficiency. Fe-55 was used as an X-ray source, and the relative efficiency was acquired by using the ratio of the efficiency of the GEM detector to that of the CdTe detector. The total count method and the energy spectrum method were used to calculate the relative efficiency. The relative detection efficiency of the GEM detector for Fe-55 by using total count method was 32%, and the relative detection efficiencies were 5, 43, 33, 37, 35, and 36%, respectively, for 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7- keV energy spectrum by using the energy spectrum method. In conclusion, we found that the detection efficiency of the two-layered GEM detector is insufficient for use as an X-ray image sensor, so we suggest a CsI-coated GEM foil to increase the efficiency, with resulting value being increased to 41%.

  11. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method will also

  12. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; ...

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles canmore » be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method

  13. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also permit an analysis

  14. Analysis and design of grazing incidence x-ray optics for pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fuchang; Chen, Jianwu; Li, Liansheng; Mei, Zhiwu

    2013-10-01

    As a promising new technology for deep space exploration due to autonomous capability, pulsar navigation has attracted extensive attentions from academy and engineering domains. The pulsar navigation accuracy is determined by the measurement accuracy of Time of Arrival (TOA) of X-ray photon, which can be enhanced through design of appropriate optics. The energy band of X-ray suitable for pulsar navigation is 0.1-10keV, the effective focusing of which can be primely and effectively realized by the grazing incidence reflective optics. The Wolter-I optics, originally proposed based on a paraboloid mirror and a hyperboloid mirror for X-ray imaging, has long been widely developed and employed in X-ray observatory. Some differences, however, remain in the requirements on optics between astronomical X-ray observation and pulsar navigation. X-ray concentrator, the simplified Wolter-I optics, providing single reflection by a paraboloid mirror, is more suitable for pulsar navigation. In this paper, therefore, the requirements on aperture, effective area and focal length of the grazing incidence reflective optics were firstly analyzed based on the characteristics, such as high time resolution, large effective area and low angular resolution, of the pulsar navigation. Furthermore, the preliminary design of optical system and overall structure, as well as the diaphragm, was implemented for the X-ray concentrator. Through optical and FEA simulation, system engineering analysis on the X-ray concentrator was finally performed to analyze the effects of environmental factors on the performance, providing basis and guidance for fabrication of the X-ray concentrator grazing incidence optics.

  15. Two-Bunch Self-Seeding for Narrow-Bandwidth Hard X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Ruth, Ronald D.; /SLAC

    2010-06-04

    It is well-known that seeding can be used to produce narrow-bandwidth and fully-coherent x- ray free-electron lasers. Self-seeding, which uses an extra undulator to generate the seed pulse, is perhaps one of the most promising methods to accomplish this. In the hard x-ray regime with high- energy electrons, this method requires a large magnetic chicane to match the path length delay of the x-ray monochromator that selects a narrow bandwidth of radiation. Such a chicane not only takes large footprint to build, but also may degrade the electron beam qualities through incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation. In this paper, we present an alternative two-bunch self-seeding scheme. The two bunches are precisely separated to match the x-ray delay of the monochromator and eliminate the need for a long, complex magnetic chicane. The spectrally filtered SASE x-ray pulse produced by the first bunch is combined with the second electron bunch at the entrance of the second undulator and then amplified to the saturation level. We present start-to-end simulation results based on the LCLS hard x-ray FEL and show that this method can produce a nearly fully coherent x-ray pulse at a few GW power level.

  16. Measurement of the unstained biological sample by a novel scanning electron generation X-ray microscope based on SEM.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-08-07

    We introduced a novel X-ray microscope system based on scanning electron microscopy using thin film, which enables the measurement of unstained biological samples without damage. An unstained yeast sample was adsorbed under a titanium (Ti)-coated silicon nitride (Si3N4) film 90 nm thick. The X-ray signal from the film was detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. With an electron beam at 2.6 kV acceleration and 6.75 nA current, the yeast image is obtained using the X-ray PD. The image is created by soft X-rays from the Ti layer. The Ti layer is effective in generating the characteristic 2.7-nm wavelength X-rays by the irradiation of electrons. Furthermore, we investigated the electron trajectory and the generation of the characteristic X-rays within the Ti-coated Si3N4 film by Monte Carlo simulation. Our system can be easily utilized to observe various unstained biological samples of cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  17. State-of-the-art and problems of X-ray diffraction analysis of biomacromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, N. S.

    2006-12-15

    The state-of-the-art of X-ray diffraction studies of biomacromolecules is briefly characterized, and the challenge imposed by science is discussed. These studies are characterized by a wide scope and extensive use. This field of science is of great interest and is developed in many countries. The main purpose is to solve practical problems in medicine consisting in the design of drugs against various diseases. X-ray diffraction analysis of enzymes brought the pharmaceutical industry to a new level, thus allowing the rational design of drugs against formerly untreatable diseases. Modern X-ray diffraction studies of biomacromolecules laid the basis for a new science called structural biology. This method allows one to solve fundamental problems of physical chemistry for a new state of matter existing in living systems. Here, science poses numerous problems in analysis of X-ray diffraction data on biological macromolecules. Many of theses problems are in their infancy.

  18. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application.

  19. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  20. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.