Science.gov

Sample records for x-ray attenuation coefficient

  1. Uranium soft x-ray total attenuation coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Oliver, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium total attenuation coefficients were measured continuously from 0.84 to 6.0 keV and at selected higher energies using a vacuum single crystal diffractometer and flow-proportional counter. Statistical fluctuations ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The overall accuracy was 3%. Prominent structure was measured within 20 eV of the M/sub 5/ (3.552 keV) and M/sub 4/ (3.728 keV) edges. Jump ratios were determined from log-log polynomial fits to data at energies apart from the near-edge regions. These data were compared with calculations based on a relativistic HFS central potential model and with previously tabulated data.

  2. New consistency tests for high-accuracy measurements of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by the X-ray extended-range technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chantler, C.T.; Islam, M.T.; Rae, N.A.; Tran, C.Q.; Glover, J.L.; Barnea, Z.

    2012-09-25

    An extension of the X-ray extended-range technique is described for measuring X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by introducing absolute measurement of a number of foils - the multiple independent foil technique. Illustrating the technique with the results of measurements for gold in the 38-50 keV energy range, it is shown that its use enables selection of the most uniform and well defined of available foils, leading to more accurate measurements; it allows one to test the consistency of independently measured absolute values of the mass attenuation coefficient with those obtained by the thickness transfer method; and it tests the linearity of the response of the counter and counting chain throughout the range of X-ray intensities encountered in a given experiment. In light of the results for gold, the strategy to be ideally employed in measuring absolute X-ray mass attenuation coefficients, X-ray absorption fine structure and related quantities is discussed.

  3. Measurement of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in biological and geological samples in the energy range of 7-12keV.

    PubMed

    Trunova, Valentina; Sidorina, Anna; Kriventsov, Vladimir

    2014-10-17

    Information about X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in different materials is necessary for accurate X-ray fluorescent analysis. The X-ray mass attenuation coefficients for energy of 7-12keV were measured in biological (Mussel and Oyster tissues, blood, hair, liver, and Cabbage leaves) and geological (Baikal sludge, soil, and Alaskite granite) samples. The measurements were carried out at the EXAFS Station of Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (VEPP-3). Obtained experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values calculated for some samples. PMID:25464176

  4. Measurement of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in biological and geological samples in the energy range of 7-12keV.

    PubMed

    Trunova, Valentina; Sidorina, Anna; Kriventsov, Vladimir

    2014-10-17

    Information about X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in different materials is necessary for accurate X-ray fluorescent analysis. The X-ray mass attenuation coefficients for energy of 7-12keV were measured in biological (Mussel and Oyster tissues, blood, hair, liver, and Cabbage leaves) and geological (Baikal sludge, soil, and Alaskite granite) samples. The measurements were carried out at the EXAFS Station of Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (VEPP-3). Obtained experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values calculated for some samples.

  5. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold in the 38-50-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M T; Rae, N A; Glover, J L; Barnea, Z; de Jonge, M D; Tran, C Q; Wang, J; Chantler, C T

    2010-11-12

    We used synchrotron x rays to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold at nine energies from 38 to 50 keV with accuracies of 0.1%. Our results are much more accurate than previous measurements in this energy range. A comparison of our measurements with calculated mass attenuation coefficients shows that our measurements fall almost exactly midway between the XCOM and FFAST calculated theoretical values, which differ from one another in this energy region by about 4%, even though the range includes no absorption edge. The consistency and accuracy of these measurements open the way to investigations of the x-ray attenuation in the region of the L absorption edge of gold.

  6. X-Ray Form Factor, Attenuation and Scattering Tables

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 66 X-Ray Form Factor, Attenuation and Scattering Tables (Web, free access)   This database collects tables and graphs of the form factors, the photoabsorption cross section, and the total attenuation coefficient for any element (Z <= 92).

  7. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboards for X-ray in the 16.63-25.30 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tousi, E. T.; Bauk, S.; Hashim, R.; Jaafar, M. S.; Abuarra, A.; Aldroobi, K. S. A.; Al-Jarrah, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The roots of Eremurus spp. were used as a bio-adhesive in the fabrication of Rhizophora spp. particleboards. The mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard of six samples with two different weight percentages of the Eremurus spp. root (6% and 12%) and three various Rhizophora spp. particle sizes (≤149 μm, 149-500 μm and 500-1000 μm) were determined by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) photons in 16.63 keV and 25.30 keV of the photon energy range. The results were compared with theoretically calculated mass attenuations using the XCOM computer program for younger-age (breast 1: 75% muscle+25% fat), middle-age (breast 2: 50% muscle+50% fat), and old-age (breast 3: 25% muscle+75% fat) breasts. The results indicated that Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard is the appropriate suitable phantom in the diagnostic energy region. The mass attenuation coefficient in the low weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and the large Rhizophora spp. particle size were found very close to breast 1. Moreover the mass attenuation coefficient of the sample with high weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and small Rhizophora spp. particle size was found very close to water as a standard material phantom. In addition, the viscosity of dissolved Eremurus spp. root in water could be considerably higher than that of formaldehyde-based adhesives, which affects on some properties such as high strength and high binding.

  8. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form-factor of tin over the energy range of 29 keV-60 keV.

    SciTech Connect

    de Jonge, M. D.; Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Dhal, B. P.; Paterson, D.; Kanter, E. P.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.; Beno, M. A.; Linton, J. A.; Jennings, G.; Univ. of Melbourne; Australian Synchrotron Project

    2007-01-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60 keV to 0.04-3 % accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2 %. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f{sub 2} is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2 % persist between calculated and observed values.

  9. X-ray Attenuation and Absorption Calculations.

    1988-02-25

    This point-source, polychromatic, discrete energy X-ray transport and energy deposition code system calculates first-order spectral estimates of X-ray energy transmission through slab materials and the associated spectrum of energy absorbed by the material.

  10. X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 126 X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest (Web, free access)   Tables and graphs of the photon mass attenuation coefficient and the mass energy-absorption coefficient are presented for all of the elements Z = 1 to 92, and for 48 compounds and mixtures of radiological interest. The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray, gamma ray, bremsstrahlung) from 1 keV to 20 MeV.

  11. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  12. The attenuation of X-rays emitted by supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schocken, K.

    1973-01-01

    The attenuation of X-rays in Arnett's C-12 detonation supernova model is computed. The attenuation of X-rays in the filaments of the Crab Nebula is computed using a model for the filaments by Woltjer and a model by Davidson and Tucker. An empirical expression by Gorenstein, Kellogg, and Gursky for the optical thickness of the interstellar medium for three supernova remnants is analyzed.

  13. Effective x-ray attenuation measurements with full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, John J.; Behera, Madhusmita

    2006-11-15

    This work shows that effective x-ray attenuation coefficients may be estimated by applying Beer's Law to phantom image data acquired with the General Electric Senographe 2000D full field digital mammography system. Theoretical developments are provided indicating that an approximate form of the Beer's relation holds for polychromatic x-ray beams. The theoretical values were compared with experimentally determined measured values, which were estimated at various detector locations. The measured effective attenuation coefficients are in agreement with those estimated with theoretical developments and numerical integration. The work shows that the measured quantities show little spatial variation. The main ideas are demonstrated with polymethylmethacrylate and breast tissue equivalent phantom imaging experiments. The work suggests that the effective attenuation coefficients may be used as known values for radiometric standardization applications that compensate for the image acquisition influences. The work indicates that it is possible to make quantitative attenuation coefficient measurements from a system designed for clinical purposes.

  14. Attenuation properties of diagnostic x-ray shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Archer, B R; Fewell, T R; Conway, B J; Quinn, P W

    1994-09-01

    Single- and three-phase broad-beam x-ray attenuation data have been obtained using lead, steel, plate glass, gypsum wallboard, lead acrylic, and wood. Tube voltages of 50, 70, 100, 125, and 150 kVp were employed and the resulting curves were compared to transmission data found in the literature. To simplify computation of barrier requirements, all data sets were parametrized by nonlinear least-squares fit to a previously described mathematical model. High attenuation half value layers and the lead equivalence of the alternate materials were also determined. PMID:7838062

  15. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kirby, B J; Davis, J R; Grant, J A; Morgan, M J

    2003-10-21

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value. PMID:14620065

  16. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  17. Attenuation of supersoft X-ray sources by circumstellar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. T. B.; Gilfanov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested the possibility of significantly obscuring supersoft X-ray sources in relatively modest amounts of local matter lost from the binaries themselves. If correct, then this would have explained the paucity of observed supersoft X-ray sources and would have significance for the search for single-degenerate Type Ia supernova progenitors. We point out that earlier studies of circumbinary obscuration ignored photoionizations of the gas by the emission from the supersoft X-ray source. We revisit the problem using a full, self-consistent calculation of the ionization state of the circumbinary material photoionized by the radiation of the central source. Our results show that the circumstellar mass-loss rates required for obscuration of supersoft X-ray sources is about an order of magnitude larger than those reported in earlier studies, for comparable model parameters. While this does not entirely rule out the possibility of circumstellar material obscuring supersoft X-ray sources, it makes it unlikely that this effect alone can account for the majority of the missing supersoft X-ray sources. We discuss the observational appearance of hypothetical obscured nuclear-burning white dwarfs and show that they have signatures making them distinct from photoionized nebulae around supersoft X-ray sources imbedded in the low-density interstellar medium.

  18. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2014-02-18

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ℓ{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  19. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer's law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ℓ1-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  20. Detailed Tabulation of Atomic Form Factors, Photoelectric Absorption and Scattering Cross Section, and Mass Attenuation Coefficients in the Vicinity of Absorption Edges in the Soft X-Ray (Z=30-36, Z=60-89, E=0.1 keV-10 keV), Addressing Convergence Issues of Earlier Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.

    2000-07-01

    Reliable knowledge of the complex x-ray form factor [Re(f ) and f″] and the photoelectric attenuation coefficient (σPE) is required for crystallography, medical diagnosis, radiation safety, and XAFS studies. Discrepancies between currently used theoretical approaches of 200% exist for numerous elements from 1 to 3 keV x-ray energies. The key discrepancies are due to the smoothing of edge structure, the use of nonrelativistic wave functions, and the lack of appropriate convergence of wave functions. This paper addresses these key discrepancies and derives new theoretical results of substantially higher accuracy in near-edge soft x-ray regions. The high-energy limitations of the current approach are also illustrated. The energy range covered is 0.1 to 10 keV. The associated figures and tabulation demonstrate the current comparison with alternate theory and with available experimental data. In general, experimental data are not sufficiently accurate to establish the errors and inadequacies of theory at this level. However, the best experimental data and the observed experimental structure as a function of energy are strong indicators of the validity of the current approach. New developments in experimental measurement hold great promise in making critical comparisons with theory in the near future.

  1. Structure determination from XAFS using high-accuracy measurements of x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of silver, 11 keV-28 keV, and development of an all-energies approach to local dynamical analysis of bond length, revealing variation of effective thermal contributions across the XAFS spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantau, L. J.; Chantler, C. T.; Bourke, J. D.; Islam, M. T.; Payne, A. T.; Rae, N. A.; Tran, C. Q.

    2015-07-01

    We use the x-ray extended range technique (XERT) to experimentally determine the mass attenuation coefficient of silver in the x-ray energy range 11 kev-28 kev including the silver K absorption edge. The results are accurate to better than 0.1%, permitting critical tests of atomic and solid state theory. This is one of the most accurate demonstrations of cross-platform accuracy in synchrotron studies thus far. We derive the mass absorption coefficients and the imaginary component of the form factor over this range. We apply conventional XAFS analytic techniques, extended to include error propagation and uncertainty, yielding bond lengths accurate to approximately 0.24% and thermal Debye-Waller parameters accurate to 30%. We then introduce the FDMX technique for accurate analysis of such data across the full XAFS spectrum, built on full-potential theory, yielding a bond length accuracy of order 0.1% and the demonstration that a single Debye parameter is inadequate and inconsistent across the XAFS range. Two effective Debye-Waller parameters are determined: a high-energy value based on the highly-correlated motion of bonded atoms ({σ\\text{DW}}=0.1413(21) Å), and an uncorrelated bulk value ({σ\\text{DW}}=0.1766(9) Å) in good agreement with that derived from (room-temperature) crystallography.

  2. Structure determination from XAFS using high-accuracy measurements of x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of silver, 11 keV-28 keV, and development of an all-energies approach to local dynamical analysis of bond length, revealing variation of effective thermal contributions across the XAFS spectrum.

    PubMed

    Tantau, L J; Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D; Islam, M T; Payne, A T; Rae, N A; Tran, C Q

    2015-07-01

    We use the x-ray extended range technique (XERT) to experimentally determine the mass attenuation coefficient of silver in the x-ray energy range 11 kev-28 kev including the silver K absorption edge. The results are accurate to better than 0.1%, permitting critical tests of atomic and solid state theory. This is one of the most accurate demonstrations of cross-platform accuracy in synchrotron studies thus far. We derive the mass absorption coefficients and the imaginary component of the form factor over this range. We apply conventional XAFS analytic techniques, extended to include error propagation and uncertainty, yielding bond lengths accurate to approximately 0.24% and thermal Debye-Waller parameters accurate to 30%. We then introduce the FDMX technique for accurate analysis of such data across the full XAFS spectrum, built on full-potential theory, yielding a bond length accuracy of order 0.1% and the demonstration that a single Debye parameter is inadequate and inconsistent across the XAFS range. Two effective Debye-Waller parameters are determined: a high-energy value based on the highly-correlated motion of bonded atoms (σ(DW) = 0.1413(21) Å), and an uncorrelated bulk value (σ(DW) = 0.1766(9) Å) in good agreement with that derived from (room-temperature) crystallography.

  3. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  4. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  5. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Pinegin, A. V.; Suslov, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 — 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s — 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p — 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  6. An automatic attenuator device for x-ray detectors at high counting rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J.; Paiser, E.; Capitan, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    In this article we describe an attenuator device for reducing/controlling the pulse detector counting losses at a high counting rate. The electronics are based on a direct measure of the detector dead time from the analog output signal at the end of the detection chain. Taking into account this parameter the attenuator device decides to reduce/enhance the number of photons that arrive at the detector by inserting/extracting the necessary number of attenuation foils in the x-ray beam path. In that way the number of events in the incoming signal are reduced and the "apparent dynamic range" of the detector is increased.

  7. In vivo observing x-ray attenuation of intratumor injection of indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chang; Luo, Qingming; Liang, Wenxi; Lu, Jinling

    2003-12-01

    We report our experimental results of in vivo observing x-ray attenuation of intra-tumor injection of indocyanine green (ICG). An eight- to nine-week-old male BALB/c mouse weighting between 15 and 20 g is used in the experiments, which has been implanted with myeloma cell line (SP2/0) two week before. The system used to monitor the intratumor diffusion of ICG is a digital x-ray imaging system. It works at 33kVp, 0.3mAs, 4 seconds and 1.5×magnification. The objective of this research is to study the x-ray attenuation at different area, which represented by gray-scale value. Compare to the ROI in the tissue without ICG and ROI of black background in the image, there is an obvious change before and after injecting ICG in the tumor, which is the area ICG can diffuse to. It shows the feasibility of using digital x-ray imaging system to dynamically, effectively and noninterventionly monitor the diffusion of the ICG.

  8. The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Les, C. M.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yan, C. H.; Cleek, T. M.; Wills, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the material characteristics of bone marrow with aging can be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities. In the context of computed tomography, dual-energy computed techniques have been used to correct for changes in marrow composition. However, dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (DE-QCT) protocols, while increasing the accuracy of the measurement, reduce the precision and increase the radiation dose to the patient in comparison to single-energy quantitative computed tomography (SE-QCT) protocols. If the attenuation properties of the marrow for a particular bone can be shown to be relatively constant with age, it should be possible to use single-energy techniques without experiencing errors caused by unknown marrow composition. Marrow was extracted by centrifugation from 10 mm thick frontal sections of 34 adult cadaver calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17-65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation coefficient of each marrow sample were determined. For purposes of comparing our results, we then computed an effective CT number at two GE CT/i scan voltages (80 and 120 kVp) for each specimen. The coefficients of variation for the density, CT number at 80 kVp and CT number at 120 kVp were each less than 1%, and the parameters did not change significantly with age (p > 0.2, r2 < 0.02, power > 0.8 where the minimum acceptable r2 = 0.216). We could demonstrate no significant gender-associated differences in these relationships. These data suggest that calcaneal bone marrow X-ray attenuation properties and marrow density are essentially constant from the third through sixth decades of life.

  9. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGES

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  10. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  11. The criteria for measuring average density by x-ray attenuation: The role of spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, W.

    1999-07-29

    It is well known that the attenuation of X-rays as they pass through a material can be used to quantify the amount of matter in their path. This is the basis for the gamma ray densitometer which can measure the amount of material on a moving conveyor belt. It is also the rationale for using X-rays for medical imaging as the attenuation can discriminate between tissue of different density and composition, yielding images of great diagnostic utility. Spatial resolution is obviously important with regard to detecting small features. However, it is less obvious that it plays an important role in obtaining quantitative information from the X-ray transmission data since the spatial resolution of the instrument can affect the accuracy of those measurements. This problem is particularly severe in the case of computed tomography where the accuracy of the reconstruction is dependent on the accuracy of the initial projection data. It should be noted that spatial resolution is not a concern for the case where the material is uniform. Here uniform is defined by small variations related to either the scale size of the resolution element in the detector, or to the size of a collimated X-ray beam. However, if the material has non-homogeneous composition or changes in density on the scale size of the systems spatial resolution, then there can be effects that will compromise the transmission data before it is acquired and these errors can not be corrected by any subsequent data processing. A method is presented for computing the density measurement error which parameterizes the effect in terms of the actual modulation on the face of the detector and the attenuation in the material. For cases like stacks of lead plates the errors can exceed 80%.

  12. Research on reducing radiation exposure for clinical applications of X-ray attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Min-Cheol; Han, Man-Seok; So, Woon-Young; Lee, Hyeon-Guck; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Seung-Yeol

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed at identifing areas with low radiation exposure where workers could be taken in the examination room in case that they had to hold the patients by estimating the attenuation of primary radiation and measuring the spatial distribution of scattered radiation. The laboratory equipment included on the X-ray generator, a phantom (human phantom), and a dosimeter. The experiment measured the performance of the examination system (dose reproducibility), the dose of primary radiation (X-rays), and the dose of scattered radiation (secondary radiation). Both the primary and the scattered radiation were attenuated by a factor of tube in vacuum experimental tests of the inverse square law. In this study, the attenuation was 2 ˜ 2.246 for primary radiation and 2 ˜ 2.105 for secondary radiation. Natural attenuation occurred as the X-rays passed through air, and an attenuation equation was established in this study. The equation for primary radiation (1st dose) was y = A1* exp(- x/t1)+ y0. The high-intensity contour of the direction for the cathode was wider than that of the direction for the anode, showing a wide range on the rear side of the cathode and on the rear side of the anode. We tried to find the positions where the workers' radiation exposure could be reduced. When the medical radiation workers have to hold the patient for an abdominal examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and on the left side of the patient. For a lumbar-spine lateral examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and behind the patient, and for a femur AP (anterior-posterior) examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and on the right side of the patient.

  13. Filamentation effect in a gas attenuator for high-repetition-rate X-ray FELs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2016-01-01

    A sustained filamentation or density depression phenomenon in an argon gas attenuator servicing a high-repetition femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser has been studied using a finite-difference method applied to the thermal diffusion equation for an ideal gas. A steady-state solution was obtained by assuming continuous-wave input of an equivalent time-averaged beam power and that the pressure of the entire gas volume has reached equilibrium. Both radial and axial temperature/density gradients were found and describable as filamentation or density depression previously reported for a femtosecond optical laser of similar attributes. The effect exhibits complex dependence on the input power, the desired attenuation, and the geometries of the beam and the attenuator. Time-dependent simulations were carried out to further elucidate the evolution of the temperature/density gradients in between pulses, from which the actual attenuation received by any given pulse can be properly calculated. PMID:26698041

  14. An elastically compressible phantom material with mechanical and x-ray attenuation properties equivalent to breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, B. D.; Gibson, A. P.; Tan, L. T.; Royle, G. J.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a novel phantom material: a solution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL) in ethanol and water, freeze-thawed to produce a solid yet elastically compressible gel. The x-ray attenuation and mechanical properties of these gels are compared with published measurements of breast tissue. Gels with PVAL concentrations from 5 to 20% w/v were produced. The linear x-ray attenuation coefficients of these gels range from 0.76 to 0.86 cm-1 at 17.5 keV, increasing with PVAL concentration. These values are very similar to the published values of breast tissue at this energy, 0.8-0.9 cm-1. Under compression cancerous breast tissue is approximately ten times stiffer than healthy breast tissue. The Young's moduli of the gels increase with PVAL concentration. Varying the PVAL concentration from 7.5 to 20% w/v produces gels with Young's moduli from 20 to 220 kPa at 15% strain. These values are characteristic of normal and cancerous breast tissue, respectively.

  15. Single-shot Zeff dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density ne and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Zeff, a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorptionmore » images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Zeff values of test objects within the 4–12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Zeff mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of HED research, such as shocked materials and ICF experiments, as well as material science and NDT.« less

  16. Single-shot Z(eff) dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot-Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, M P; Stutman, D; Finkenthal, M

    2015-04-01

    The Talbot-Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n=1-δ+iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density n(e) and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Z(eff), a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorption images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot-Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Z(eff) values of test objects within the 4-12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Z(eff) mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Z(eff) from refraction and attenuation measurements with moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of high energy density research, such as shocked materials and inertial confinement fusion experiments, as well as material science and nondestructive testing.

  17. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; White, R. Allen; Atkinson, E. Neely; Cody, Dianna D.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. Methods: An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49-33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09-1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1-0.45 mm Cu and 0.49-14.87 mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semilogarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. Results: The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R{sup 2} > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and/or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. Conclusions: The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry).

  18. Measurement of the density of liquid aluminum-319 alloy by an x-ray attenuation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Gallegos, G.F.

    1994-11-01

    This study was made for assisting in casting simulations. A relatively simple apparatus was constructed for measuring the density of Al-based alloys in the solid and liquid states up to 900 C. One of the more important physical properties of a casting alloy, solidification shrinkage, was measured for a commercial Al alloy (Al-319). It was found that while the thermal expansion of Al-319 in both solid and liquid phases is similar to that of pure Al, the density of the liquid alloy is lower than estimated by averaging the atomic volumes of the pure liquid components. The densities were measured by x-ray attenuation.

  19. Imaging method based on attenuation, refraction and ultra-small-angle-scattering of x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Wernick, Miles N.; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Oltulu, Oral; Zhong, Zhong

    2005-09-20

    A method for detecting an image of an object by measuring the intensity at a plurality of positions of a transmitted beam of x-ray radiation emitted from the object as a function of angle within the transmitted beam. The intensity measurements of the transmitted beam are obtained by a crystal analyzer positioned at a plurality of angular positions. The plurality of intensity measurements are used to determine the angular intensity spectrum of the transmitted beam. One or more parameters, such as an attenuation property, a refraction property and a scatter property, can be obtained from the angular intensity spectrum and used to display an image of the object.

  20. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients in air by application of detector linearity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.; Chantler, C. T.; Paterson, D.; McMahon, P. J.; Irving, T. H.; Lin, J. J.; Nugent, K. A.; Brunton, A. N.; McNulty, I.

    2002-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of x-ray mass attenuation coefficients is essential for studies as diverse as atomic physics, materials science, and radiation safety. However, a significant discrepancy exists between theoretical tabulated results for air at soft x-ray energies. We outline a precision measurement of the mass attenuation coefficients for air at various energies using two types of detectors and a simple test of detector response. We discuss whether sufficient accuracy can be obtained using this data to distinguish between competing theoretical estimates. In the process, we investigate the intensity response of two common synchrotron x-ray detectors: an x ray to optical charge-coupled device camera using a crystal scintillator and an x-ray sensitive photodiode.

  1. Estimation of effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences for volumetric breast density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Ruth, Chris; Jing, Zhenxue; Ren, Baorui; Smith, Andrew; Kshirsagar, Ashwini

    2014-03-01

    Breast density has been identified to be a risk factor of developing breast cancer and an indicator of lesion diagnostic obstruction due to masking effect. Volumetric density measurement evaluates fibro-glandular volume, breast volume, and breast volume density measures that have potential advantages over area density measurement in risk assessment. One class of volume density computing methods is based on the finding of the relative fibro-glandular tissue attenuation with regards to the reference fat tissue, and the estimation of the effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences between the fibro-glandular and fat tissue is key to volumetric breast density computing. We have modeled the effective attenuation difference as a function of actual x-ray skin entrance spectrum, breast thickness, fibro-glandular tissue thickness distribution, and detector efficiency. Compared to other approaches, our method has threefold advantages: (1) avoids the system calibration-based creation of effective attenuation differences which may introduce tedious calibrations for each imaging system and may not reflect the spectrum change and scatter induced overestimation or underestimation of breast density; (2) obtains the system specific separate and differential attenuation values of fibroglandular and fat for each mammographic image; and (3) further reduces the impact of breast thickness accuracy to volumetric breast density. A quantitative breast volume phantom with a set of equivalent fibro-glandular thicknesses has been used to evaluate the volume breast density measurement with the proposed method. The experimental results have shown that the method has significantly improved the accuracy of estimating breast density.

  2. Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savin, D. W.; Gwinner, G.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2002-01-01

    Low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism for most ions in X-ray photoionized cosmic plasmas. Reliably modeling and interpreting spectra from these plasmas requires accurate low temperature DR rate Coefficients. Of particular importance are the DR rate coefficients for the iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII-Fe XXIV). These ions are predicted to play an important role in determining the thermal structure and line emission of X-ray photoionized plasmas, which form in the media surrounding accretion powered sources such as X-ray binaries (XRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and cataclysmic variables (Savin et al., 2000). The need for reliable DR data of iron L-shell ions has become particularly urgent after the launches of Chandra and XMM-Newton. These satellites are now providing high-resolution X-ray spectra from a wide range of X-ray photoionized sources. Interpreting the spectra from these sources requires reliable DR rate coefficients. However, at the temperatures relevant, for X-ray photoionized plasmas, existing theoretical DR rate coefficients can differ from one another by factors of two to orders of magnitudes.

  3. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: first results on cyst fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Dance, David R.; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; von Tiedemann, Miriam; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to better characterize cysts at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development is hampered by the lack of attenuation data for cysts. We have developed a method to measure x-ray attenuation of tissue samples using a prototype photon-counting spectral mammography unit. The method was applied to measure the attenuation of 50 samples of breast cyst fluid and 50 samples of water. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The attenuation of cyst fluid was found to be significantly different from water. There was a relatively large natural spread between different samples of cyst fluid, whereas the homogeneity of each individual sample was found to be good; the variation within samples did not reach above the quantum noise floor. The spectral method proved stable between several measurements on the same sample. Further, chemical analysis and elemental attenuation calculation were used to validate the spectral measurement on a subset of the samples. The two methods agreed within the precision of the elemental attenuation calculation over the mammographic energy range.

  4. Filamentation effect in a gas attenuator for high-repetition-rate X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W.; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2016-01-01

    A sustained filamentation or density depression phenomenon in an argon gas attenuator servicing a high-repetition femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser has been studied using a finite-difference method applied to the thermal diffusion equation for an ideal gas. A steady-state solution was obtained by assuming continuous-wave input of an equivalent time-averaged beam power and that the pressure of the entire gas volume has reached equilibrium. Both radial and axial temperature/density gradients were found and describable as filamentation or density depression previously reported for a femtosecond optical laser of similar attributes. The effect exhibits complex dependence on the input power, the desired attenuation, and the geometries of the beam and the attenuator. Time-dependent simulations were carried out to further elucidate the evolution of the temperature/density gradients in between pulses, from which the actual attenuation received by any given pulse can be properly calculated.

  5. Accurate determination of the thickness or mass per unit area of thin foils and single-crystal wafers for x-ray attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; de Jonge, M. D.

    2004-09-01

    The determination of the local mass per unit area m/A=∫ρdt and the thickness of a specimen is an important aspect of its characterization and is often required for material quality control in fabrication. We discuss common methods which have been used to determine the local thickness of thin specimens. We then propose an x-ray technique which is capable of determining the local thickness and the x-ray absorption profile of a foil or wafer to high accuracy. This technique provides an accurate integration of the column density which is not affected by the presence of voids and internal defects in the material. The technique is best suited to specimens with thickness substantially greater than the dimensions of the surface and void structure. We also show that the attenuation of an x-ray beam by a nonuniform specimen is significantly different from that calculated by using a simple linear average of the mass per unit area and quantify this effect. For much thinner specimens or in the presence of a very structured surface profile we propose a complementary technique capable of attaining high accuracy by the use of a secondary standard. The technique is demonstrated by absolute measurements of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient of copper and silver.

  6. Accurate determination of the thickness or mass per unit area of thin foils and single-crystal wafers for x-ray attenuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, C.Q.; Chantler, C.T.; Barnea, Z.; Jonge, M.D. de

    2004-09-01

    The determination of the local mass per unit area m/A={integral}{rho}dt and the thickness of a specimen is an important aspect of its characterization and is often required for material quality control in fabrication. We discuss common methods which have been used to determine the local thickness of thin specimens. We then propose an x-ray technique which is capable of determining the local thickness and the x-ray absorption profile of a foil or wafer to high accuracy. This technique provides an accurate integration of the column density which is not affected by the presence of voids and internal defects in the material. The technique is best suited to specimens with thickness substantially greater than the dimensions of the surface and void structure. We also show that the attenuation of an x-ray beam by a nonuniform specimen is significantly different from that calculated by using a simple linear average of the mass per unit area and quantify this effect. For much thinner specimens or in the presence of a very structured surface profile we propose a complementary technique capable of attaining high accuracy by the use of a secondary standard. The technique is demonstrated by absolute measurements of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient of copper and silver.

  7. X-Ray CT of Highly-Attenuating Objects: 9- or 15- MV Spectra?

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G; Trebes, J; Perry, R; Schneberk, D; Logan, C

    2005-08-29

    We imaged-highly attenuating test objects in three dimensions with 9-MV (at LLNL) and 15-MV (at Hill Air Force Base) x-ray spectra. While we used the same detector and motion control, there were differences that we could not control in the two radiography bays and in the sources. The results show better spatial resolution for the 9-MV spectrum and better contrast for the 15-MV spectrum. The 15-MV data contains a noise pattern that obfuscates the data. It is our judgment that if sufficient attention were given to design of the bay, beam dump, collimation, filtration and linac spot size; a 15-MV imaging system using a flat panel could be developed with spatial resolution of 5 lp/mm and contrastive performance better than we have demonstrated using a 9-MV spectrum.

  8. Evaluation of conversion coefficients relating air-kerma to H*(10) using primary and transmitted x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology energy range.

    PubMed

    Santos, J C; Mariano, L; Tomal, A; Costa, P R

    2016-03-01

    According to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the relationship between effective dose and incident air-kerma is complex and depends on the attenuation of x-rays in the body. Therefore, it is not practical to use this quantity for shielding design purposes. This correlation is adopted in practical situations by using conversion coefficients calculated using validated mathematical models by the ICRU. The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is a quantity adopted by the IAEA for monitoring external exposure. Dose constraint levels are established in terms of H*(10), while the radiation levels in radiometric surveys are calculated by means of the measurements of air-kerma with ion chambers. The resulting measurements are converted into ambient dose equivalents by conversion factors. In the present work, an experimental study of the relationship between the air-kerma and the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent was conducted using different experimental scenarios. This study was done by measuring the primary x-ray spectra and x-ray spectra transmitted through materials used in dedicated chest radiographic facilities, using a CdTe detector. The air-kerma to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients were calculated from these measured spectra. The resulting values of the quantity ambient dose equivalent using these conversion coefficients are more realistic than those available in the literature, because they consider the real energy distribution of primary and transmitted x-ray beams. The maximum difference between the obtained conversion coefficients and the constant value recommended in national and international radiation protection standards is 53.4%. The conclusion based on these results is that a constant coefficient may not be adequate for deriving the ambient dose equivalent. PMID:26835613

  9. Calibrating the X-ray attenuation of liquid water and correcting sample movement artefacts during in operando synchrotron X-ray radiographic imaging of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Nan; Chevalier, Stéphane; Hinebaugh, James; Yip, Ronnie; Lee, Jongmin; Antonacci, Patrick; Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray radiography, due to its high temporal and spatial resolutions, provides a valuable means for understanding the in operando water transport behaviour in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The purpose of this study is to address the specific artefact of imaging sample movement, which poses a significant challenge to synchrotron-based imaging for fuel cell diagnostics. Specifically, the impact of the micrometer-scale movement of the sample was determined, and a correction methodology was developed. At a photon energy level of 20 keV, a maximum movement of 7.5 µm resulted in a false water thickness of 0.93 cm (9% higher than the maximum amount of water that the experimental apparatus could physically contain). This artefact was corrected by image translations based on the relationship between the false water thickness value and the distance moved by the sample. The implementation of this correction method led to a significant reduction in false water thickness (to ∼0.04 cm). Furthermore, to account for inaccuracies in pixel intensities due to the scattering effect and higher harmonics, a calibration technique was introduced for the liquid water X-ray attenuation coefficient, which was found to be 0.657 ± 0.023 cm(-1) at 20 keV. The work presented in this paper provides valuable tools for artefact compensation and accuracy improvements for dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging of fuel cells. PMID:26917148

  10. Calibrating the X-ray attenuation of liquid water and correcting sample movement artefacts during in operando synchrotron X-ray radiographic imaging of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Nan; Chevalier, Stéphane; Hinebaugh, James; Yip, Ronnie; Lee, Jongmin; Antonacci, Patrick; Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray radiography, due to its high temporal and spatial resolutions, provides a valuable means for understanding the in operando water transport behaviour in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The purpose of this study is to address the specific artefact of imaging sample movement, which poses a significant challenge to synchrotron-based imaging for fuel cell diagnostics. Specifically, the impact of the micrometer-scale movement of the sample was determined, and a correction methodology was developed. At a photon energy level of 20 keV, a maximum movement of 7.5 µm resulted in a false water thickness of 0.93 cm (9% higher than the maximum amount of water that the experimental apparatus could physically contain). This artefact was corrected by image translations based on the relationship between the false water thickness value and the distance moved by the sample. The implementation of this correction method led to a significant reduction in false water thickness (to ∼0.04 cm). Furthermore, to account for inaccuracies in pixel intensities due to the scattering effect and higher harmonics, a calibration technique was introduced for the liquid water X-ray attenuation coefficient, which was found to be 0.657 ± 0.023 cm(-1) at 20 keV. The work presented in this paper provides valuable tools for artefact compensation and accuracy improvements for dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging of fuel cells.

  11. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  12. X-ray attenuation of adipose breast tissue: in-vitro and in-vivo measurements using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Erhard, Klaus; Berggren, Karl; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Cederström, Björn; Johansson, Henrik; Lundqvist, Mats; Moa, Elin; Homan, Hanno; Willsher, Paula; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Wallis, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    The development of new x-ray imaging techniques often requires prior knowledge of tissue attenuation, but the sources of such information are sparse. We have measured the attenuation of adipose breast tissue using spectral imaging, in vitro and in vivo. For the in-vitro measurement, fixed samples of adipose breast tissue were imaged on a spectral mammography system, and the energy-dependent x-ray attenuation was measured in terms of equivalent thicknesses of aluminum and poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). For the in-vivo measurement, a similar procedure was applied on a number of spectral screening mammograms. The results of the two measurements agreed well and were consistent with published attenuation data and with measurements on tissue-equivalent material.

  13. Effect of X-Ray Attenuation of Arterial Obstructions on Intravenous Thrombolysis and Outcome after Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Grant; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Lindley, Richard I.; Sandercock, Peter A. G.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the x-ray attenuation of intra-arterial obstruction measured on non-contrast CT in ischemic stroke can predict response to thrombolysis and subsequent functional outcome. Methods The Third International Stroke Trial (IST-3) was a multicenter randomized-controlled trial of intravenous thrombolysis (rt-PA) given within six hours of ischemic stroke. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. In a subgroup of 109 IST-3 patients (38 men, median age 82 years), a single reader, masked to all clinical and other imaging data, manually measured x-ray attenuation (Hounsfield Units, HU) on non-contrast CT at the location of angiographically-proven intra-arterial obstructions, pre-randomization and at 24–48 hour follow-up. We calculated change in attenuation between scans. We assessed the impact of pre-randomization arterial obstruction attenuation on six-month functional outcome. Results Most arterial obstructions (64/109, 59%) were hyperattenuating (mean 51.0 HU). Compared with control, treatment with rt-PA was associated with a greater, but non-significant, reduction in obstruction attenuation at follow-up (-8.0 HU versus -1.4 HU in patients allocated control, p = 0.117). In multivariable ordinal regression analysis controlled for patient age, stroke severity, location and extent of obstruction, time from stroke onset to baseline scan and rt-PA treatment allocation, the attenuation of pre-randomization arterial obstruction was not independently associated with six-month outcome (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.94–1.03, p = 0.516). Conclusions In ischemic stroke, the x-ray attenuation of the arterial obstruction may decline more rapidly from baseline to 24–48 hours following treatment with thrombolysis but we found no evidence that baseline arterial obstruction attenuation predicts six-month outcome. PMID:26701648

  14. Attenuation coefficient determination of printed ABS and PLA samples in diagnostic radiology standard beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, G. R.; Corrêa, E. L.; Potiens, M. P. A.; Campos, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    IAEA code of practice TRS-457 states that standard phantoms should offer the same primary attenuation and scatter production as relevant body section of a representative patient. Material cost, availability and dimensional stability must also be considered. The goal of this study is to determine the attenuation coefficient of printed ABS and PLA samples in standard X-ray beams, verifying if phantoms printed with these materials could be an easier-handle substitute for PMMA, enabling the creation of different designs in an easier and cheaper way. Results show that PMMA presents higher attenuation coefficient, followed by PLA and ABS, which means that thinner PMMA layer creates higher radiation attenuation.

  15. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  16. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Warren, L M; Mackenzie, A; Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  17. Comparison of lead attenuation and lead hardening equivalence of materials used in respect of diagnostic X-ray shielding.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe

    2002-12-01

    Present interest is in the shielding of diagnostic X-ray units. Numerical comparison has been made of the attenuation and hardening properties of lead and some particular alternative materials: steel, plate glass and gypsum wallboard. Results show, for particular choices of thickness, that lead and steel can be made to provide closely similar attenuation and spectral hardening, values of lead attenuation equivalent (LAE) and lead hardening equivalent (LHE) thicknesses being nearly the same. Significant differences in the attenuation and hardening properties of lead are found in comparison with plate glass and gypsum wallboard. LAE produces better matching of exposure for lead-plate glass and lead-gypsum wallboard than LHE. PMID:12406622

  18. Single-shot Zeff dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density ne and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Zeff, a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorption images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Zeff values of test objects within the 4–12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Zeff mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of HED research, such as shocked materials and ICF experiments, as well as material science and NDT.

  19. X-ray absorption in matter. Reengineering XCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerward, L.; Guilbert, N.; Bjørn Jensen, K.; Levring, H.

    2001-01-01

    A Windows version of XCOM, the well-known program for calculating X-ray and gamma-ray attenuation coefficients and interaction cross sections, has been developed. The new program, called WinXCom, has an improved user interface.

  20. Simultaneous Maximum-Likelihood Reconstruction of Absorption Coefficient, Refractive Index and Dark-Field Scattering Coefficient in X-Ray Talbot-Lau Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A maximum-likelihood reconstruction technique for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography is presented. This technique allows the iterative simultaneous reconstruction of discrete distributions of absorption coefficient, refractive index and a dark-field scattering coefficient. This technique avoids prior phase retrieval in the tomographic projection images and thus in principle allows reconstruction from tomographic data with less than three phase steps per projection. A numerical phantom is defined which is used to evaluate convergence of the technique with regard to photon statistics and with regard to the number of projection angles and phase steps used. It is shown that the use of a random phase sampling pattern allows the reconstruction even for the extreme case of only one single phase step per projection. The technique is successfully applied to measured tomographic data of a mouse. In future, this reconstruction technique might also be used to implement enhanced imaging models for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. These enhancements might be suited to correct for example beam hardening and dispersion artifacts and improve overall image quality of X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. PMID:27695126

  1. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  2. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation**

    PubMed Central

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested high-accuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm−3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 μm) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 μm). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm−3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown. PMID:27099408

  3. GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION IN X-RAY BINARIES: AN APPLICATION TO LSI + 61{sup 0}303

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Paul D.; LeBohec, Stephan; Vincent, Stephane

    2011-04-20

    The X-ray binary LSI + 61{sup 0}303 consisting of a main-sequence Be star and a compact object has been detected in the TeV range with MAGIC and VERITAS, and showed a clear intensity modulation as a function of the orbital phase. We describe a gamma-ray attenuation model and apply it to this system. Our first result is that interaction of high energy photons with the background radiation produced by the main-sequence star alone does not account for the observed modulation. We then include interactions between very high energy radiation and matter and are able to constrain fundamental parameters of the system such as the mass of the compact object and the density of circumstellar matter around the Be star. In our analysis of the TeV data, we find that the compact object has mass M{sub 2} > 2.5 M{sub sun} at the 99% confidence level, implying it is most likely a black hole. However, we find a column density which conflicts with results from X-ray observations, suggesting that attenuation may not play an important role in the modulation.

  4. Relating x-ray attenuation measurements to water content and distribution in SB-15D core

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J

    1996-09-30

    Making improved estimates of the water content of The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam power from the resource. A series of coordinated physical properties measurements form core recovered from the SB-15D, reported in this volume in a series of papers, have been made to better understand water storage and to relate water content and distribution to observable geophysical properties such as electrical conductivity and seismic velocities. A principal objective here is to report new interpretations of x-ray scans made within 72 hours of core recovery from SB-15D, which suggest, taking advantage of preliminary measurements of capillary suction for metagraywacke, that water content was low in much of the preserved core.

  5. Attenuation efficiency of X-ray and comparison to gamma ray and neutrons in composite metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Bourham, Mohamed; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2015-12-01

    Steel-steel composite metal foams (S-S CMFs) and Aluminum-steel composite metal foams (Al-S CMFs) with various sphere sizes and matrix materials were manufactured and investigated for nuclear and radiation environments applications. 316 L Stainless steel, high-speed T15 steel and aluminum materials were used as the matrix material together with 2, 4 and 5.2 mm steel hollow spheres to manufacture various types of composite metal foams (CMFs). High-speed T15 steel is selected due to its high tungsten and vanadium concentration (both high-Z elements) to further improve the shielding efficiency of CMFs. This new type of S-S CMF is called high-Z steel-steel composite metal foam (HZ S-S CMF). Radiation shielding efficiency of all types of CMFs was explored for the attenuation of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. The experimental results were compared with pure lead and Aluminum A356, and verified theoretically through XCOM and Monte Carlo Z-particle Transport Code (MCNP). It was observed that the radiation shielding effectiveness of CMFs is relatively independent of sphere sizes as long as the ratio of sphere-wall thickness to its outer-radius stays constant. However, the smaller spheres seem to be more efficient in general due to the fine fluctuation in the gray value profile of their 2D Micro-CT images. S-S CMFs and Al-S CMFs are respectively 275% and 145% more effective for X-ray attenuation than Aluminum A356. Compared to pure lead, CMFs show adequate attenuation with additional advantages of being lightweight and more environmentally friendly. The mechanical performance of HZ S-S CMFs under quasi-static compression was compared to that of other classes of S-S CMF. It is observed that the addition of high-Z elements to the matrix of CMFs improved their shielding against X-rays, low energy gamma rays and neutrons, while maintained their low density, high mechanical properties and high-energy absorption capability.

  6. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: comparison with through-diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients (D(p)) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Deltamicro) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration (C/C(0)) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of D(p) are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (phi(I)). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of D(p) of (4.8+/-2.5)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) (mean+/-standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6+/-1.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with D(p) values of (4.6+/-2.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for shale and (3.5+/-1.8)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of phi(I) for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  7. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  8. Evaluation of soft x-ray average recombination coefficient and average charge for metallic impurities in beam-heated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sesnic, S.S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hiroe, S.; Hulse, R.; Shimada, M.; Stratton, B.; von Goeler, S.

    1986-05-01

    The soft x-ray continuum radiation in TFTR low density neutral beam discharges can be much lower than its theoretical value obtained by assuming a corona equilibrium. This reduced continuum radiation is caused by an ionization equilibrium shift toward lower states, which strongly changes the value of the average recombination coefficient of metallic impurities anti ..gamma.., even for only slight changes in the average charge, anti Z. The primary agent for this shift is the charge exchange between the highly ionized impurity ions and the neutral hydrogen, rather than impurity transport, because the central density of the neutral hydrogen is strongly enhanced at lower plasma densities with intense beam injection. In the extreme case of low density, high neutral beam power TFTR operation (energetic ion mode) the reduction in anti ..gamma.. can be as much as one-half to two-thirds. We calculate the parametric dependence of anti ..gamma.. and anti Z for Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni impurities on neutral density (equivalent to beam power), electron temperature, and electron density. These values are obtained by using either a one-dimensional impurity transport code (MIST) or a zero-dimensional code with a finite particle confinement time. As an example, we show the variation of anti ..gamma.. and anti Z in different TFTR discharges.

  9. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  10. Determination of attenuation coefficients, thicknesses and effective atomic numbers for CuInSe 2 semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, Ugˇur; Baltaş, Hasan; Çelik, Ahmet; Bacaksız, Emin

    2006-06-01

    The X-rays attenuation coefficients for Cu, In and Se in elemental state and the semiconductor CuInSe2 were measured at 15 different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the following secondary targets: Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te and Ba. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular 241Am radioactive source were used to excite secondary target and X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. A method to determine the thickness of thin film with XRF is described. Additionally, the effect of absorption edges on effective atomic numbers and their variation with photon energy in composite semiconductor sample was discussed. Obtained values were compared with calculated values.

  11. X-ray attenuation measurements in a cavitating mixing layer for instantaneous two-dimensional void ratio determination

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschlimann, Vincent; Barre, Stephane; Legoupil, Samuel

    2011-05-15

    The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze a two-dimensional cavitating shear layer. The global aim of this work was to obtain a better understanding and modeling of cavitation phenomenon in a 2D turbulent sheared flow which can be considered as quite representative of cavitating rocket engine turbopomp inducers. This 2D mixing layer flow provided us a well documented test case which can be used for the characterization of the cavitation effects in sheared flows. The development of a velocity gradient was observed inside a liquid water flow: Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities developed at the interface. Vaporizations and implosions of cavitating structures inside the vortices were observed. X-ray attenuation measurements were performed to estimate the amount of vapor present inside the mixing area. Instantaneous two-dimensional void ratio fields were acquired. The real spatial resolutions are 0.5 mm with 2000 fps and 1.5 mm with 20 000 fps. The effective time resolution is equal to the camera frame rate up to a 19% void ratio variation between two consecutive images. This seems to be sufficient in the context of the present flow configuration. The two-phase structures present inside the mixing area were analyzed at three different cavitation levels and their behaviors were compared to non-cavitating flow dynamic. Convection velocities and vortices shedding frequencies were estimated. Results show that vapor was transported by the turbulent velocity field. Statistical analysis of the void ratio signal was carried out up to the fourth order moment. This study provided a global understanding of the cavitating structure evolution and of the cavitation effects on turbulent sheared flows.

  12. Using Variable Temperature Powder X-Ray Diffraction to Determine the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid MgO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsepius, Nicholas C.; DeVore, Thomas C.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Warnaar, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was developed by using variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine [alpha] for MgO (periclase)and was tested in the Applied Physical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Laboratories at James Madison University. The experiment which was originally designed to provide undergraduate students with a…

  13. Hygrothermal degradation of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane films studied by neutron and X-ray reflectivity and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, David Robert; Garcia, Manuel Joseph; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Kent, Michael Stuart; Yim, Hyun

    2005-05-01

    Thin films of organosilanes have great technological importance in the areas of adhesion promotion, durability, and corrosion resistance. However, it is well-known that water can degrade organosilane films, particularly at elevated temperatures. In this work, X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR and NR) were combined with attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to study the chemical and structural changes within thin films of (3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPS) after exposure for various periods of time to air saturated with either D{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}O at 80 C. For NR and XR, ultrathin ({approx}100 {angstrom}) films were prepared by spin-coating. Both D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O provide neutron scattering contrast with GPS. Variations in the neutron scattering length density (SLD) profiles (a function of mass density and atomic composition) with conditioning time were measured after drying the samples out and also swelled with H{sub 2}O or D{sub 2}O vapor at room temperature. For samples that were dried out prior to measurement, little or no change was observed for H{sub 2}O conditioning up to 3.5 days, but large changes were observed after 30 days of conditioning. The range of conditioning time for this structural change was narrowed to between 4 and 10 days with XR. The SLD profiles indicated that the top portion of the GPS film was transformed into a thick low-density layer after conditioning, but the bottom portion showed little structural change. A previous NR study of as-prepared GPS films involving swelling with deuterated nitrobenzene showed that the central portion of the film has much lower cross-link density than the region nearest the substrate. The present data show that the central portion also swells to a much greater extent with water and hydrolyzes more rapidly. The chemical degradation mechanism was identified by IR as hydrolysis of siloxane bonds. For ATR-IR, GPS films were prepared by dip-coating, which resulted in a greater

  14. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials.

    PubMed

    Damla, N; Baltas, H; Celik, A; Kiris, E; Cevik, U

    2012-07-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic, numbers (Z(eff)), effective electron densities (N(e)) and photon interaction cross section (σ(a)) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. PMID:22128356

  15. Synthesis, Characterization, and X-ray Attenuation Properties of Ultrasmall BiOI Nanoparticles: Toward Renal Clearable Particulate CT Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A unique decelerated hydrolytic procedure is developed and reported here for the preparation of ultrasmall nanoparticles (NPs) of PVP-coated BiOI with a narrow size distribution, i.e., 2.8 ± 0.5 nm. The crystal structure of this compound is determined by X-ray powder diffraction using the bulk materials. The stability, cytotoxicity, and potential use of the PVP-coated ultrasmall BiOI NPs as a CT contrast agent are investigated. Because of the combined X-ray attenuation effect of bismuth and iodine, such NPs exhibit a CT value that is among the best of those of the inorganic nanoparticle-based CT contrast agents reported in the literature. PMID:25283335

  16. Time-dependent simulation of the gas attenuator for the LCLS-II X-ray FEL's under high beam power operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W.; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2015-09-01

    Time-dependent simulation was carried out to study the dynamic response of a gas-based attenuator system designed for the LCLS-II high repetition rate X-ray Free-electron Laser's, and to further elucidate the impact of the fluctuating energies of proceeding pulses on the actual attenuation factor achieved for the trailing pulses. The filamentation effect in the gas density revealed from an earlier steady-state calculation under a constant Continuous-Wave input power was reproduced with additional ramping behavior and oscillations arising from the onset and the pulsed structure of the beam. More importantly, the actual achieved attenuation for a given pulse was found to vary randomly in response to the fluctuations in the input power.

  17. Development of in vivo characterization of breast tissues through absolute attenuation coefficients using dedicated cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhav, Priti; Li, Christina M.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2010-04-01

    With advances in 3D in vivo imaging technology, non-invasive procedures can be used to characterize tissues to identify tumors and monitor changes over time. Using a dedicated breast CT system with a quasi-monochromatic cone-beam x-ray source and flat-panel digital detector, this study was performed in an effort to directly characterize different materials in vivo based on their absolute attenuation coefficients. CT acquisitions were first acquired using a multi-material rod phantom with acrylic, delrin, polyethylene, fat-equivalent, and glandular-equivalent plastic rods, and also with a human cadaver breast. Projections were collected with and without a beam stop array for scatter correction. For each projection, the 2D scatter was estimated with cubic spline interpolation of the average values behind the shadow of each beam stop overlapping the object. Scatter-corrected projections were subsequently calculated by subtracting the scatter images containing only the region of the object from corresponding projections (consisting of primary and scatter x-rays) without the beam stop array. Iterative OSTR was used to reconstruct the data and estimate the non-uniform attenuation distribution. Preliminary results show that with reduced beam hardening from the x-ray beam, scatter correction further reduces the cupping artifact, improves image contrast, and yields attenuation coefficients < 8% of narrow-beam values of the known materials (range 1.2 - 7.8%). Peaks in the histogram showed clear separation between the different material attenuation coefficients. These findings indicate that minimizing beam hardening and applying scatter correction make it practical to directly characterize different tissues in vivo using absolute attenuation coefficients.

  18. Application of x-ray techniques in precision farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Selcuk; Inanc, Feyzi; Gray, Joseph N.; Colvin, Thomas S.

    2000-05-01

    The precision farming is a relatively new concept basing farming upon quantitative determination of various parameters in the farming practices. One of these parameters is accurate measurement of grain flow rates on real time basis. Although there are various techniques already available for this purpose, x-rays provide a very competitive alternative to the current state of art. In this work, the use of low energy bremsstrahlung x-ray, up to 30 keV, densitometry is demonstrated for grain flow rate measurements. Mass flow rates for corn are related to measured x-ray intensity in gray scale units with a 0.99 correlation coefficient for flow rates ranging from 2 kg/s to 6 kg/s. Higher flow rate values can be measured by using slightly more energetic x-rays or a higher tube current. Measurements were done in real time at a 30 Hz sampling rate. Flow rate measurements are independent of grain moisture due to a negligible change in the x-ray attenuation coefficients at typical moisture content values from 15% to 25%. Grain flow profile changes do not affect measurement accuracy. X-rays easily capture variations in the corn stream. Due to the low energy of the x-ray photons, biological shielding can easily be accomplished with 2 mm thick lead foil or 5 mm of steel.

  19. Revealing the powdering methods of black makeup in Ancient Egypt by fitting microstructure based Fourier coefficients to the whole x-ray diffraction profiles of galena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungár, T.; Martinetto, P.; Ribárik, G.; Dooryhée, E.; Walter, Ph.; Anne, M.

    2002-02-01

    Galena (PbS) is a major ingredient in ancient Egyptian eye makeup. The microstructure of PbS in Egyptian cosmetic powders is used as a fingerprint and is matched with the microstructures produced artificially in geological galena minerals. The microstructure of PbS is determined by x-ray diffraction peak profile analysis in terms of dislocation density, crystallite size, and size distribution. High-resolution powder diffractograms were measured at the ESRF Grenoble synchrotron source with high resolution and high peak-to-background ratios. The Fourier coefficients of the first nine measured reflections of galena are fitted using physically based Fourier coefficients of strain and size functions. Strain anisotropy is accounted for by the dislocation model of the mean square strain. The x-ray data are supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs, and are compared with archæological documents. It enables us to describe the procedures of eye makeup manufacturing in the Middle and New Kingdoms of Egypt some 2000 years before Christ.

  20. Flow visualization and void fraction measurement in liquid-metal/water direct contact heat exchange by X-ray attenuation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin

    One concept being considered for steam generation in particular next generation nuclear reactor designs, involves water coming into direct contact with a circulating molten metal. To optimize the design of such direct contact heat exchange and vaporization systems, detailed knowledge is necessary of the various flow regimes, interfacial transport phenomena, heat transfer and operational stability. With the development of high performance digital detectors, radiography using X-rays or neutrons maybe a suitable technique to obtain information about that direct-contact interaction; i.e., void volume fractions, length scales and dynamic behavior. Under the basis of previous investigations, a complete methodology of the X-ray radiography for two-phase flow measurement has been developed from the facility and imaging analysis aspects. Through this developed methodology, a high energy X-ray imaging system is optimized for the direct-contact heat exchange experiment. Beside an on-line calibration procedure which practically quantifies the imaging system's performance, the extended linear system theory and Rose's model have also been used to evaluate the imaging system's performance, respectively. The bottleneck of the current imaging system and the future of system improvement direction have been pointed out. With our real-time, large-area high energy X-ray imaging system, the two-phase flow was visualized and stored digitally. An efficient image processing strategy has also been established by combining several optimal digital image processing algorithms. The approach has been implemented into a software computational tool written in MATLAB called T-XIP. Time-dependent heat transfer related variables, such as void fraction (void volume), local heat transfer coefficient, etc., were calculated using this software tool. Finally, an error analysis associated with the void fraction measurement has been given based on two procedures.

  1. Attenuation Coefficient Estimation of the Healthy Human Thyroid In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, J.; Cueva, T.; Portal, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Lavarello, R.

    Previous studies have demonstrated that attenuation coefficients can be useful towards characterizing thyroid tissues. In this work, ultrasonic attenuation coefficients were estimated from healthy human thyroids in vivo using a clinical scanner. The selected subjects were five young, healthy volunteers (age: 26 ± 6 years old, gender: three females, two males) with no reported history of thyroid diseases, no palpable thyroid nodules, no smoking habits, and body mass index less than 30 kg/m2. Echographic examinations were conducted by a trained sonographer using a SonixTouch system (Ultrasonix Medical Corporation, Richmond, BC) equipped with an L14-5 linear transducer array (nominal center frequency of 10 MHz, transducer footprint of 3.8 cm). Radiofrequency data corresponding to the collected echographic images in both transverse and longitudinal views were digitized at a sampling rate of 40 MHz and processed with Matlab codes (MathWorks, Natick, MA) to estimate attenuation coefficients using the spectral log difference method. The estimation was performed using an analysis bandwidth spanning from 4.0 to 9.0 MHz. The average value of the estimated ultrasonic attenuation coefficients was equal to 1.34 ± 0.15 dB/(cm.MHz). The standard deviation of the estimated average attenuation coefficient across different volunteers suggests a non-negligible inter-subject variability in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of the human thyroid.

  2. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  3. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  4. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  5. Measurements of spectral attenuation coefficients in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectral transmission was measured for water samples taken in the lower Chesapeake Bay to allow characterization of several optical properties. The coefficients of total attenuation, particle attenuation, and absorption by dissolved organic matter were determined over a wavelength range from 3500 A to 8000 A. The data were taken over a 3 year period and at a number of sites so that an indication of spatial and temporal variations could be obtained. The attenuations determined in this work are, on the average, 10 times greater than those obtained by Hulburt in 1944, which are commonly accepted in the literature for Chesapeake Bay attenuation.

  6. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  7. Quantitative Mass Density Image Reconstructed from the Complex X-Ray Refractive Index

    PubMed Central

    Mukaide, Taihei; Iida, Atsuo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takada, Kazuhiro; Noma, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new analytical X-ray computed tomography technique for visualizing and quantifying the mass density of materials comprised of low atomic number elements with unknown atomic ratios. The mass density was obtained from the experimentally observed ratio of the imaginary and real parts of the complex X-ray refractive index. An empirical linear relationship between the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient of the materials and X-ray energy was found for X-ray energies between 8 keV and 30 keV. The mass density image of two polymer fibers was quantified using the proposed technique using a scanning-type X-ray microbeam computed tomography system equipped with a wedge absorber. The reconstructed mass density agrees well with the calculated one. PMID:26114770

  8. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    PubMed

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  9. Determination of Thermal Expansion Coefficients and Locating the Temperature-Induced Phase Transition in Methylammonium Lead Perovskites Using X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, T Jesper; Schwan, L Josef; Ottosson, Mikael; Hagfeldt, Anders; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-16

    Lead halogen perovskites, and particularly methylammonium lead iodine, CH3NH3PbI3, have recently attracted considerable interest as alternative solar cell materials, and record solar cell efficiencies have now surpassed 20%. Concerns have, however, been raised about the thermal stability of methylammonium lead iodine, and a phase transformation from a tetragonal to a cubic phase has been reported at elevated temperature. Here, this phase transition has been investigated in detail using temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transformation is pinpointed to 54 °C, which is well within the normal operating range of a typical solar cell. The cell parameters were extracted as a function of the temperature, from which the thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. The latter was found to be rather high (αv = 1.57 × 10(-4) K(-1)) for both the tetragonal and cubic phases. This is 6 times higher than the thermal expansion coefficient for soda lime glass and CIGS and 11 times larger than that of CdTe. This could potentially be of importance for the mechanical stability of perovskite solar cells in the temperature cycling experienced under normal day-night operation. The experimental knowledge of the thermal expansion coefficients and precise determination of the cell parameters can potentially also be valuable while conducting density functional theory simulations on these systems in order to deliver more accurate band structure calculations. PMID:26457861

  10. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  11. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  12. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  14. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  15. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  16. Effect of fluoroscopic X-ray beam spectrum on air-kerma measurement accuracy: implications for establishing correction coefficients on interventional fluoroscopes with KAP meters.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Kevin A; Rakowski, Joseph T; Dong, Frank F

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the displayed reference plane air kerma (Ka,r) or air kerma-area product (Pk,a) over a broad spectrum of X-ray beam qualities on clinically used interventional fluoroscopes incorporating air kerma-area product meters (KAP meters) to measure X-ray output. The second goal was to investigate the accuracy of a correction coefficient (CC) determined at a single beam quality and applied to the measured Ka,r over a broad spectrum of beam qualities. Eleven state-of-the-art interventional fluoroscopes were evaluated, consisting of eight Siemens Artis zee and Artis Q systems and three Philips Allura FD systems. A separate calibrated 60 cc ionization chamber (external chamber) was used to determine the accuracy of the KAP meter over a broad range of clinically used beam qualities. For typical adult beam qualities, applying a single CC deter-mined at 100 kVp with copper (Cu) in the beam resulted in a deviation of < 5% due to beam quality variation. This result indicates that applying a CC determined using The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 190 protocol or a similar protocol provides very good accuracy as compared to the allowed ± 35% deviation of the KAP meter in this limited beam quality range. For interventional fluoroscopes dedicated to or routinely used to perform pediatric interventions, using a CC established with a low kVp (~ 55-60 kVp) and large amount of Cu filtration (~ 0.6-0.9 mm) may result in greater accuracy as compared to using the 100 kVp values. KAP meter responses indicate that fluoroscope vendors are likely normalizing or otherwise influencing the KAP meter output data. Although this may provide improved accuracy in some instances, there is the potential for large discrete errors to occur, and these errors may be difficult to identify. PMID:27167287

  17. Inferential Procedures for Correlation Coefficients Corrected for Attenuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A model and computation procedure based on classical test score theory are presented for determination of a correlation coefficient corrected for attenuation due to unreliability. Delta and Monte Carlo method applications are discussed. A power analysis revealed no serious loss in efficiency resulting from correction for attentuation. (TJH)

  18. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  19. Reference Phantom Method for Acoustic Backscatter Coefficient and Attenuation Coefficient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linxin

    1990-08-01

    In previous work in our laboratory accurate backscatter coefficient measurements were obtained with a data reduction method that explicitly accounts for experimental factors involved in recording echo data. An alternative, relative processing method for determining the backscatter coefficient and the attenuation coefficient is presented here. This method involves comparison of echo data from a sample with data recorded from a reference phantom whose backscatter and attenuation coefficients are known. The ratio of the signals cancels depth-dependent instrumentation factors. This saves the efforts of beam profile computation and various calibrations. The attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient of the sample are found from these ratios and the known acoustic properties of the reference phantom. This method is tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms with known scattering and attenuation properties. Various experiments have been done using clinical scanners with different transducers to compute attenuation coefficients and backscatter coefficients, and to make quantitative images. This method has been found to be accurate for media containing Rayleigh scatterers, as well as samples containing intermediate-size scatterers. Accuracy was maintained over different frequency bands and for a wide range of transducer-to-ROI distances. Measurements were done in vivo for human livers, kidneys and dog myocardium. The results have shown that the reference phantom method simplifies the measurement procedure as well as keeps the accuracy, and therefore is practical clinically. Statistical uncertainties propagated in the data reduction have been analyzed in detail. Formulae are deduced to predict statistical errors in the attenuation and backscatter coefficients measured with the reference phantom method. Spatial correlations of the echo signals are also considered. A 2-dimensional lateral correlation matrix is introduced to compute the number of effective independent

  20. Computation of conversion coefficients relating air Kerma to Hp(0.07,alpha), Hp(10,alpha), and H*(10) for x-ray narrow spectrum from 40 to 140 kV.

    PubMed

    Kharrati, Hedi; Zarrad, Boubaker

    2004-02-01

    A computation method was implemented to predict the conversion coefficients and the angular dependence factors relating air Kerma to Hp(0.07,alpha), Hp(10,alpha), and H*(10) in an ICRU slab phantom for tungsten anode x-ray spectra for tube potentials from 40 to 140 kV. The simulation of the unfiltered x-ray spectra is based on the Boone and Seibert model. The calculation of conversion coefficients were performed for an x-ray narrow spectrum at any filtration material and tube potentials in the diagnostic radiology range. This computation method has been checked for five narrow x-ray spectra using a comparison of the results with published data given by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and American National Standards Institute (ANSI). In all cases, the mean deviation of the calculated mean conversion coefficients values do not exceed 1% for Hp (0.07,alpha) and 1.5% for Hp (10,alpha), except at 60 degrees where a mean deviation from the ISO values of 1.72% and of 2.27% was, respectively, found. But it is still lower than the mean deviation of 2.31% for Hp(0.07,alpha), and of 3.08% for Hp(10,alpha) observed at this angle between ISO and ANSI values. Otherwise, the computed values of conversion coefficients of H*(10) differ by only 0.41% from the ISO values. The results of this computation method can be considered satisfactory considering the accuracy required in radioprotection fields, and can allow an appreciable estimation of conversion coefficients for the narrow x-ray spectra indispensable to calibrate the personnel dosimeters in terms of the personal dose equivalent.

  1. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  2. High accuracy experimental determination of copper and zinc mass attenuation coefficients in the 100 eV to 30 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Gerlach, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Haschke, M.; Beckhoff, B.; Lépy, M.-C.

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of atomic fundamental parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients with low uncertainties, is of decisive importance in elemental quantification using x-ray fluorescence analysis techniques. Several databases are accessible and frequently used within a large community of users. These compilations are most often in good agreement for photon energies in the hard x-ray ranges. However, they significantly differ for low photon energies and around the absorption edges of any element. In a joint cooperation of the metrology institutes of France and Germany, mass attenuation coefficients of copper and zinc were determined experimentally in the photon energy range from 100 eV to 30 keV by independent approaches using monochromatized synchrotron radiation at SOLEIL (France) and BESSY II (Germany), respectively. The application of high-accuracy experimental techniques resulted in mass attenuation coefficient datasets determined with low uncertainties that are directly compared to existing databases. The novel datasets are expected to enhance the reliability of mass attenuation coefficients.

  3. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  4. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  5. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  6. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  7. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  8. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  9. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  10. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  11. Biomedical elemental analysis and imaging using synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Dejun, Xue ); Bockman, R.S. ); Saubermann, A.J. . Health Science Center)

    1990-01-01

    The application of synchrotron x-ray microscopy to biomedical research is currently in progress at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The current status of the x-ray microscope (XRM) is reviewed from a technical standpoint. Some of the items considered are photon flux, spatial resolution, quantitation, minimum detection limits, and beam-induced specimen damage. Images can be produced by measurement of fluorescent x rays or of the attenuation of the incident beam by the specimen. Maps of the elemental distributions or linear attenuation of the incident beam by the specimen. Maps of the elemental distributions or linear attenuation coefficients can be made by scanning the specimen past the beam. Computed microtomography (CMT) can be used for non- destructive images through the specimen in either the emission or absorption mode. Examples of measurements made with the XRM are given.

  12. Attenuation coefficient of usable solar radiation of the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junfang; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Kahru, Mati

    2016-05-01

    Usable solar radiation (USR) represents spectrally integrated solar energy in the spectral range of 400-560 nm, a domain where photons penetrate the most in oceanic waters and thus contribute to photosynthesis and heating at deeper depths. Through purely numerical simulations, it was found that the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling USR (Kd(USR), m-1) is nearly a constant vertically in the upper water column for clear waters and most turbid waters. Subsequently an empirical model was developed to estimate Kd(USR) based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd(490), m-1). We here evaluate this relationship using data collected from a wide range of oceanic and coastal environments and found that the relationship between Kd(490) and Kd(USR) developed via the numerical simulation is quite robust. We further refined this relationship to extend the applicability to "clearest" natural waters. This refined relationship was then used to produce sample distribution of Kd(USR) of global oceans. As expected, extremely low Kd(USR) (˜0.02 m-1) was observed in ocean gyres, while significantly higher Kd(USR) (˜5.2 m-1) was found in very turbid coastal regions. A useful application of Kd(USR) is to easily and accurately propagate surface USR to deeper depths, potentially to significantly improve the estimation of basin scale primary production and heat fluxes in the upper water column.

  13. Quantitative determination of two polymorphic forms of imatinib mesylate in a drug substance and tablet formulation by X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bellur Atici, Esen; Karlığa, Bekir

    2015-10-10

    Imatinib has been identified as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinases, including Bcr-Abl. The active substance used in drug product is the mesylate salt form of imatinib, a phenylaminopyrimidine derivative and chemically named as N-(3-(4-(pyridin-3-yl) pyrimidin-2-ylamino)-4-methylphenyl)-4-((4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) methyl)-benzamide methanesulfonic acid salt. It exhibits many polymorphic forms and most stable and commercialized polymorphs are known as α and β forms. Molecules in α and β polymorphic forms exhibit significant conformational differences due to their different intra- and intermolecular interactions, which stabilize their molecular conformations and affect their physicochemical properties such as bulk density, melting point, solubility, stability, and processability. The manufacturing process of a drug tablet included granulation, compression, coating, and drying may cause polymorphic conversions. Therefore, polymorphic content of the drug substance should be controlled during quality control and stability testing. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) methods were evaluated for determination of the polymorphic content of the drug substance and drug product; and PXRD was the most accurate technique and selected as preferred method and validated. Prior to development of a quantification method, pure α and β polymorphs were characterized and used throughout the method development and validation studies. Mixtures with different ratios of α and β forms were scanned using X-ray diffractometer with a scan rate of 0.250°/min over an angular range of 19.5-21.0° 2θ and the peak heights for characteristic peak of β form at 20.5 ± 0.2° 2θ diffraction angle were used to generate a calibration curve. The detection limit of β polymorph in α form imatinib mesylate tablets was found as 4% and

  14. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  15. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers

  16. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  17. Attenuation coefficient of single-mode periodic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Baron, A; Mazoyer, S; Smigaj, W; Lalanne, P

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that, on ensemble average, the transmission T of guided modes decays exponentially with the waveguide length L due to small imperfections, leading to the important figure of merit defined as the attenuation-rate coefficient α=-⟨ln(T)⟩/L. In this Letter, we evidence that the exponential-damping law is not valid in general for periodic monomode waveguides, especially as the group velocity decreases. This result, that contradicts common beliefs and experimental practices aiming at measuring α, is supported by a theoretical study of light transport in the limit of very small imperfections, and by numerical results obtained for two waveguide geometries that offer contrasted damping behaviors.

  18. Representative Elementary Length to Measure Soil Mass Attenuation Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Borges, J. A. R.; Pires, L. F.; Costa, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    With increasing demand for better yield in agricultural areas, soil physical property representative measurements are more and more essential. Nuclear techniques such as computerized tomography (CT) and gamma-ray attenuation (GAT) have been widely employed with this purpose. The soil mass attenuation coefficient (μs) is an important parameter for CT and GAT analysis. When experimentally determined (μes), the use of suitable sized samples enable to evaluate it precisely, as well as to reduce measurement time and costs. This study investigated the representative elementary length (REL) of sandy and clayey soils for μes measurements. Two radioactive sources were employed (241Am and 137Cs), three collimators (2–4 mm diameters), and 14 thickness (x) samples (2–15 cm). Results indicated ideal thickness intervals of 12–15 and 2–4 cm for the sources 137Cs and 241Am, respectively. The application of such results in representative elementary area (REA) evaluations in clayey soil clods via CT indicated that μes average values obtained for x > 4 cm and source 241Am might induce to the use of samples which are not large enough for soil bulk density evaluations (ρs). As a consequence, ρs might be under- or overestimated, generating inaccurate conclusions about the physical quality of the soil under study. PMID:24672338

  19. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  20. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  1. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  2. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies in the womb are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays. Tell your health care provider if you think you might be pregnant.

  3. A Generalised Porosity Formalism for Isotropic and Anisotropic Effective Opacity and its Effects on X-ray Line Attenuation in Clumped O Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a generalised formalism for treating the porosity-associated reduction in continuum opacity that occurs when individual clumps in a stochastic medium become optically thick. As in previous work, we concentrate on developing bridging laws between the limits of optically thin and thick clumps. We consider geometries resulting in either isotropic or anisotropic effective opacity, and, in addition to an idealised model in which all clumps have the same local overdensity and scale, we also treat an ensemble of clumps with optical depths set by Markovian statistics. This formalism is then applied to the specific case of bound-free absorption of X- rays in hot star winds, a process not directly affected by clumping in the optically thin limit. We find that the Markov model gives surprisingly similar results to those found previously for the single clump model, suggesting that porous opacity is not very sensitive to details of the assumed clump distribution function. Further, an anisotropic effective opacity favours escape of X-rays emitted in the tangential direction (the venetian blind effect), resulting in a bump of higher flux close to line centre as compared to profiles computed from isotropic porosity models. We demonstrate how this characteristic line shape may be used to diagnose the clump geometry, and we confirm previous results that for optically thick clumping to significantly influence X-ray line profiles, very large porosity lengths, defined as the mean free path between clumps, are required. Moreover, we present the first X-ray line profiles computed directly from line-driven instability simulations using a 3-D patch method, and find that porosity effects from such models also are very small. This further supports the view that porosity has, at most, a marginal effect on X-ray line diagnostics in O stars, and therefore that these diagnostics do indeed provide a good clumping insensitive method for deriving O star mass-loss rates.

  4. A Generalised Porosity Formalism for Isotropic and Anisotropic Effective Opacity and Its Effects on X-ray Line Attenuation in Clumped O Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a generalised formalism for treating the porosity-associated reduction in continuum opacity that occurs when individual clumps in a stochastic medium become optically thick. As in previous work, we concentrate on developing bridging laws between the limits of optically thin and thick clumps. We consider geometries resulting in either isotropic or anisotropic effective opacity, and, in addition to an idealised model in which all clumps have the same local overdensity and scale, we also treat an ensemble of clumps with optical depths set by Markovian statistics. This formalism is then applied to the specific case of bound-free absorption of X- rays in hot star winds, a process not directly affected by clumping in the optically thin limit. We find that the Markov model gives surprisingly similar results to those found previously for the single clump model, suggesting that porous opacity is not very sensitive to details of the assumed clump distribution function. Further, an anisotropic effective opacity favours escape of X-rays emitted in the tangential direction (the venetian blind effect), resulting in a bump of higher flux close to line centre as compared to profiles computed from isotropic porosity models. We demonstrate how this characteristic line shape may be used to diagnose the clump geometry, and we confirm previous results that for optically thick clumping to significantly influence X-ray line profiles, very large porosity lengths, defined as the mean free path between clumps, are required. Moreover, we present the first X-ray line profiles computed directly from line-driven instability simulations using a 3-D patch method, and find that porosity effects from such models also are very small. This further supports the view that porosity has, at most, a marginal effect on X-ray line diagnostics in O stars, and therefore that these diagnostics do indeed provide a good clumping insensitive method for deriving O star mass-loss rates.

  5. Investigation of Sandstones Wetting by X-ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquesa, Leonardo C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Nagata, Rodrigo

    2011-08-01

    X-ray microtomography is a non-destructive imaging technique. It consists in cross-sections object reconstruction based in the linear attenuation coefficient maps achieved through the object illuminating by a X-ray beam at different angular positions. It has been used by various researches to supply microstructural informations of materials as ceramic filters, pills, titanium prosthesis and reservoir rocks. An item of great interest has been the characterization of the liquid phase presence in porous space. This paper shows the X-ray microtomography methodology employed to achieve qualitative and quantitative results about Botucatu sandstones wetting. It was used a Skyscan, 1172 model, which employs an X-ray tube with W anode and a cone beam. This laboratory based equipment is able to provide images of until 1 μm spatial resolution. The employed samples were two cores of layered Botucatu sandstone, named ARN1 and ARN 2. These samples were scanned in two situations each one, dried and wet. 2D images, porosity values for each 2D image, total average porosity and pose size distribution for the dried and wet situation were compared. H20-NaCl-KI solution was employed for the samples wetting procedure. The two samples were scanned with 4.84 μm spatial resolution. The total average porosities obtained for ARN1 sample before and after wetting were 4.4±0.7% and 1.8±0.4%, respectively.

  6. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  7. X-ray energy optimisation in computed microtomography.

    PubMed

    Spanne, P

    1989-06-01

    Expressions describing the absorbed dose and the number of incident photons necessary for the detection of a contrasting detail in x-ray transmission CT imaging of a circular phantom are derived as functions of the linear attenuation coefficients of the materials comprising the object and the detail. A shell of a different material can be included to allow simulation of CT imaging of the skulls of small laboratory animals. The equations are used to estimate the optimum photon energy in x-ray transmission computed microtomography. The optimum energy depends on whether the number of incident photons or the absorbed dose at a point in the object is minimised. For a water object of 300 mm diameter the two optimisation criteria yield optimum photon energies differing by an order of magnitude.

  8. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  9. Laboratory x ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. L.

    1989-08-01

    One of the most innovative spinoffs of ICF technology and physics was the development of the x ray wavelength laser. The first incontrovertible demonstration of this type of laser came from LLNL in 1984 using the Novette laser to pump a selenium foil target. The power and energy of Novette were then needed to produce a column of plasma of sufficient length to achieve a sufficient gainlength product (approximately 5.5, this corresponds to an amplification of approximately 250X) that could unquestionably illustrate the lasing effect. LLNL ICF expertise was also required to develop time-resolved spectrometers used to view the lasing transitions at approximately 20 nm, a region of the XUV spectrum normally dominated by high backgrounds. The design of the x ray laser amplifier, which required maintaining nonequilibrium level populations in a tailored plasma having the proper conditions for gain and x ray laser beam propagation, was accomplished with modified versions of ICF kinetics and hydrodynamics codes. Since the first demonstration, progress in the development of the x ray laser was rapid. New achievements include production of megawatt power levels at 20 nm, amplified spontaneous emission levels approaching saturation intensity GL of approximately 17 at 20 nm, efficiency (x ray laser energy/pump energy) approximately 10(exp 6), the demonstration of double and triple pass amplification (hinting at the possibility of producing x ray wavelength resonators), the focusing of x ray lasers to pump other types of lasers and the first demonstration of an x ray hologram produced by an x ray laser. The generation of amplification at ever shorter wavelength is possible using various types of inversion schemes. We depict below this progress benchmarked against production of gain in the water window (2.2 to 4.4 nm,), where applications to biological imaging may be facilitated.

  10. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 - 25.26 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941).

  11. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  12. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  13. X-ray microtomography of bones and teeth.

    PubMed

    Davis, G R; Wong, F S

    1996-08-01

    X-ray microtomography is a miniaturized version of computerized axial tomography with a resolution of the order of micrometres. In the biomedical field it is particularly useful in the study of hard tissue because of its ability to accurately measure the linear attenuation coefficient. From this, the mineral concentration can be computed, which is one measure of bone quality. Using microtomography it is also possible to form three-dimensional images of bone from which structural parameters can be derived which could not be measured using conventional histomorphometry. Various types of microtomography scanner have been used, including simple translate-rotate systems which are capable of measuring x-ray attenuation at multiple energies simultaneously, and "cone-beam' systems which can acquire the necessary data for three-dimensional reconstructions in a relatively short time. Both laboratory x-ray sources and synchrotrons have been used in the study of hard tissue using microtomography. Most studies of bone have been concerned primarily with either the mineral concentration in cortical bone or the structure in cancellous bone. The mineral concentration in teeth has also been studied, in particular the loss of mineral in enamel during in vitro demineralization and the gain during subsequent remineralization. Although there are currently relatively few centres carrying out this work, interest in the technique is rapidly growing and it is likely to find a useful place both in research and ultimately in clinical practice.

  14. Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project is to study the hard x-ray emission from x-ray bursters. One target of opportunity observation was made for this investigation during 1997. We obtained 38ks of data on the source 4UI705-44. The project is closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", and "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters."

  15. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight ...

  16. Pelvis x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  17. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  18. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  19. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  20. Combining x-ray and photoacoustics for in vivo tumor imaging with gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guojia; Yang, Sihua; Yuan, Yi; Xing, Da

    2011-09-01

    We have demonstrated a new hybrid cancer imaging method combining x-ray and photoacoustic imaging with multifunctional gold nanorods as contrast agents. The two imaging modalities provide complementary contrast mechanisms. X-ray imaging exploits the high attenuation coefficient of gold nanorods, while photoacoustic imaging takes advantage of the strong optical absorption of the nanorods. The fused image has presented both location and vasculature of the tumor. Our experimental results demonstrate that this combined modality has the capability to provide anatomical and functional information of tumor for accurate medical diagnosis and imaging-guided therapy.

  1. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  2. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Boone, John M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1998-01-27

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  3. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Daiji; Tokuoka, Atsushi; Katori, Megumi; Minamiyama, Yasuto; Yamashita, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2012-07-31

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  4. Extension of depth-resolved reconstruction of attenuation coefficients in optical coherence tomography for slim samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Martin; Lengenfelder, B.; Kanawade, R.; Klämpfl, F.; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Coherent light propagating through turbid media is attenuated due to scattering and absorption. The decrease of the intensity of the coherent light is described by the attenuation coefficient. The measured decay of the coherent light through turbid media with optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to reconstruct the attenuation coefficient. Since most of the OCT systems work in the near-infrared region, they are the optical window from 800-1400 nm in tissue. Hence, the most part of the attenuation coefficient is caused due to the scattering. Therefore, deriving the attenuation coefficient is one way to get an approximation of the scattering coefficient which is difficult to access even up to day. Moreover, OCT measurements are one of the few possibilities to derive physical properties with micrometre resolution of the media under investigation.

  5. The Attenuation of Correlation Coefficients: A Statistical Literacy Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafimow, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the science reported in the media depends on correlation coefficients. But the size of correlation coefficients depends, in part, on the reliability with which the correlated variables are measured. Understanding this is a statistical literacy issue.

  6. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  7. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  8. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  9. Application of micron X-ray CT based on micro-PIXE to investigate the distribution of Cs in silt particles for environmental remediation in Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Keizo; Hatakeyama, Taisuke; Itoh, Shin; Sata, Daichi; Ohnuma, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Toshiro; Arai, Hiromu; Arai, Hirotsugu; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Terakawa, Atsuki; Kim, Seong-Yun

    2016-03-01

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) using characteristic X-rays produced in micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to investigate the internal structure of silt particles and develop new methods to decontaminate soil containing radioactive cesium. We obtained 3D attenuation coefficient images of silt particles with a diameter of approximately 100 μm for V K and Cr K X-rays. Owing to the absorption edges of the Cs L-shell, the differences between the V K and Cr K X-ray images revealed the spatial distribution of Cs atoms in the silt particles. Cs atoms were distributed over the surfaces of the silt particles to a thickness of approximately 10 μm. This information is useful for the decontamination of silt contaminated by radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

  10. Development of a model of an x-ray tube transmission source

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Joetta M; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Moss, Cal E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of an x-ray tube based source for transmission measurements of UF6 gas, we have developed a one-dimensional, spreadsheet-based model of the source. Starting with the spectrum produced by an x-ray tube we apply the linear attenuation coefficients for various notch filters, the aluminum pipe, and UF6 gas. This model allows calculation of the transmitted spectrum based on the type of filter, the thickness of the filter, the x-ray tube high voltage, the Al pipe thickness, and the UF6 gas pressure. The sensitivity of the magnitude of the transmission peak produced by the notch filter to any of these variables can be explored quickly and easily to narrow the choices for experimental measurements. To validate the spreadsheet based model, comparisons have been made to various experimental data.

  11. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods.

  12. Context sensitive cardiac x-ray imaging: a machine vision approach to x-ray dose control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Keeble, Claire; Magee, Derek R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cardiac x-ray imaging systems regulate their radiation output based on the thickness of the patient to maintain an acceptable signal at the input of the x-ray detector. This approach does not account for the context of the examination or the content of the image displayed. We have developed a machine vision algorithm that detects iodine-filled blood vessels and fits an idealized vessel model with the key parameters of contrast, diameter, and linear attenuation coefficient. The spatio-temporal distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient samples, when appropriately arranged, can be described by a simple linear relationship, despite the complexity of scene information. The algorithm was tested on static anthropomorphic chest phantom images under different radiographic factors and 60 dynamic clinical image sequences. It was found to be robust and sensitive to changes in vessel contrast resulting from variations in system parameters. The machine vision algorithm has the potential of extracting real-time context sensitive information that may be used for augmenting existing dose control strategies.

  13. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  14. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  15. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Jonathan I.; Morris, Christopher L.

    2011-06-07

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  16. Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Plasmas: Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for L-Shell Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Bartsch, T.; Brandau, C.; Chen, M. H.; Grieser, M.; Gwinner, G.; Hoffknecht, A.; Kahn, S. M.; Linkemann, J.

    2000-01-01

    Iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII to Fe XXIV) play an important role in determining the line emission and thermal and ionization structures of photoionized gases. Existing uncertainties in the theoretical low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for these ions significantly affects our ability to model and interpret observations of photoionized plasmas. To help address this issue, we have initiated a laboratory program to produce reliable low temperature DR rates. Here, we present some of our recent results and discuss some of their astrophysical implications.

  17. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  18. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  19. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  20. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  1. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  2. Comparison of RNFL thickness and RPE-normalized RNFL attenuation coefficient for glaucoma diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a method to determine the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) attenuation coefficient, based on normalization on the retinal pigment epithelium, was introduced. In contrast to conventional RNFL thickness measures, this novel measure represents a scattering property of the RNFL tissue. In this paper, we compare the RNFL thickness and the RNFL attenuation coefficient on 10 normal and 8 glaucomatous eyes by analyzing the correlation coefficient and the receiver operator curves (ROCs). The thickness and attenuation coefficient showed moderate correlation (r=0.82). Smaller correlation coefficients were found within normal (r=0.55) and glaucomatous (r=0.48) eyes. The full separation between normal and glaucomatous eyes based on the RNFL attenuation coefficient yielded an area under the ROC (AROC) of 1.0. The AROC for the RNFL thickness was 0.9875. No statistically significant difference between the two measures was found by comparing the AROC. RNFL attenuation coefficients may thus replace current RNFL thickness measurements or be combined with it to improve glaucoma diagnosis.

  3. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  4. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  5. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P. ); Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R. )

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  6. CdZnTe detector in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Satoshi; Imagawa, Kotaro

    2002-11-21

    A CdZnTe (CZT) detector was utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions. First, the detector response was investigated using y-rays from 241Am. The escape of secondary (Compton scattered and K fluorescent) x-rays and tailing due to carrier trapping were minor in the mammographic energy range. In addition, the transmission of primary x-rays was minimal from the results calculated using the mass attenuation coefficients of CZT. Therefore, spectral distortion in this energy range was expected to be negligible. Secondly, x-ray spectroscopy was carried out with the CZT detector. The measured spectra were in good agreement with the spectra obtained with the Compton-scatter method with a high-purity germanium detector. Moreover, the half-value layers (HVLs) calculated from the CZT spectra were consistent with the HVLs measured with an ionization chamber. The results indicate that a CZT detector can be utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy without any corrections.

  7. CdZnTe detector in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Satoshi; Imagawa, Kotaro

    2002-11-01

    A CdZnTe (CZT) detector was utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions. First, the detector response was investigated using γ-rays from 241Am. The escape of secondary (Compton scattered and K fluorescent) x-rays and tailing due to carrier trapping were minor in the mammographic energy range. In addition, the transmission of primary x-rays was minimal from the results calculated using the mass attenuation coefficients of CZT. Therefore, spectral distortion in this energy range was expected to be negligible. Secondly, x-ray spectroscopy was carried out with the CZT detector. The measured spectra were in good agreement with the spectra obtained with the Compton-scatter method with a high-purity germanium detector. Moreover, the half-value layers (HVLs) calculated from the CZT spectra were consistent with the HVLs measured with an ionization chamber. The results indicate that a CZT detector can be utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy without any corrections.

  8. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  9. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  10. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  11. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  12. Comparison between different spectral models of the diffuse attenuation and absorption coefficients of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Oleg V.; Filippov, Yuri V.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this work is to verify different spectral models of the diffuse attenuation and absorption coefficients of sea water and to work out a recommendation for their use. It is shown that the spectral models of the diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd((lambda) ) developed by Austin, Petzold, 1984 and by Volynsky, Sud'bin, 1992 correspond with each other, as well the models of Ivanov, Shemshura, 1973 and of Kopelevich, Shemshura, 1988 for calculation of the spectral absorption coefficient a((lambda) ) on the values of Kd((lambda) ). Theoretical foundation of the relation between a((lambda) ) and Kd((lambda) ) is given. The up-to-date physical model of the sea water light absorption is considered and checked by means of comparison with measured values of the attenuation coefficient at the ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges.

  13. Implications of X-ray tube parameter deviations in X-ray reference fields.

    PubMed

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P

    2016-02-01

    For the purpose of radiation protection, ICRU Report 57/ICRP Publication 74 provides a list of monoenergetic conversion coefficients to be used with, among others, photon reference fields generated with X-ray tubes. A comprehensive definition of these photon reference fields can be found in international standard ISO 4037; however, it lacks thorough indication of the allowed deviations of essential parameters that influence these X-ray reference fields. These parameters are the high-voltage tube potential, the thickness of the beryllium window and the purity and thickness of the filter materials used to create different radiation qualities. Small variations of these parameters can lead to significant changes in the created X-ray spectra and, hence, the spectra-dependent conversion coefficients for phantom-related radiation-protection quantities. This can lead to situations in which the conversion coefficients listed in ISO 4037 cannot be used, resulting in time-consuming spectrometry measurements. In this work, the impact on the resulting conversion coefficients is investigated using a simplified mathematical approximation model. The findings are validated with an independent X-ray spectra calculation programme. As a result, well-founded upper limit values on the allowed deviations of the essential X-ray tube parameters are proposed to be used in a future revision of ISO 4037. PMID:25889609

  14. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  15. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  16. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  17. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  18. High-contrast X-ray micro-tomography of low attenuation samples using large area hybrid semiconductor pixel detector array of 10 × 5 Timepix chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, J.; Krejci, F.; Bartl, B.; Dudak, J.; Kuba, J.; Kvacek, J.; Zemlicka, J.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide excellent imaging properties such as unlimited dynamic range, high spatial resolution, high frame rate and energy sensitivity. Nevertheless, a limitation in the use of these devices for imaging has been the small sensitive area of a few square centimetres. In the field of microtomography we make use of a large area pixel detector assembled from 50 Timepix edgeless chips providing fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 7.15 cm2. We have successfully demonstrated that the enlargement of the sensitive area enables high-quality tomographic measurements of whole objects with high geometrical magnification without any significant degradation in resulting reconstructions related to the chip tilling and edgeless sensor technology properties. The technique of micro-tomography with the newly developed large area detector is applied for samples formed by low attenuation, low contrast materials such a seed from Phacelia tanacetifolia, a charcoalified wood sample and a beeswax seal sample.

  19. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  20. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-30

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  1. Direct three-dimensional coherently scattered x-ray microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Congwu; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Eaker, Diane R.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that coherently scattered x rays can be used to discriminate and identify specific components in a mixture of low atomic weight materials. The authors demonstrated a new method of doing coherently scattered x-ray tomography with a thin sheet of x ray. Methods: A collimated x-ray fan-beam, a parallel polycapillary collimator, and a phantom consisting of several biocompatible materials of low attenuation-based contrast were used to investigate the feasibility of the method. Because of the particular experimental setup, only the phantom translation perpendicular to the x-ray beam is needed and, thus, there is no need of Radon-type tomographic reconstruction, except for the correction of the attenuation to the primary and scattered x rays, which was performed by using a conventional attenuation-based tomographic image data set. The coherent scatter image contrast changes with momentum transfer among component materials in the specimen were investigated with multiple x-ray sources with narrow bandwidth spectra generated with anode and filter combinations of Cu∕Ni (8 keV), Mo∕Zr (18 keV), and Ag∕Pd (22 keV) and at multiple scatter angles by orienting the detector and polycapillary collimator at different angles to the illuminating x ray. Results: The contrast among different materials changes with the x-ray source energy and the angle at which the image was measured. The coherent scatter profiles obtained from the coherent scatter images are consistent with the published results. Conclusions: This method can be used to directly generate the three-dimensional coherent scatter images of small animal, biopsies, or other small objects with low atomic weight biological or similar synthetic materials with low attenuation contrast. With equipment optimized, submillimeter spatial resolution may be achieved. PMID:21302788

  2. Electrical conductivity anomaly and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Qing; Chang, Aimin E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu; Li, Yiyu; Liu, Yin; Wu, Yiquan E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu

    2014-03-10

    Electrical conductivity anomaly of perovskite-type YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient (NTC) ceramics produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been investigated by using defect chemistry theory combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. From the results of the lnρ-1/T curves and the XPS analysis, it can be considered that YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics exhibit the hopping conductivity. The major carriers in YCrO{sub 3} are holes, which are compensated by the oxygen vacancies produced due to the introduction of Mn ions. The Mn{sup 4+} ion contents increase monotonically in the range of 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.5. The resistivity increases at first and then decreases with increasing Mn contents, which has the same varying tendency with activation energy. The electrical conductivity anomaly appearing in these ceramics may be due to the variation of Cr{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions concentration as Mn content changes.

  3. Effective density and mass attenuation coefficient for building material in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salinas, I C P; Conti, C C; Lopes, R T

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents values for density and mass attenuation coefficient of building materials commonly used in Brazil. Transmission measurements were performed to provide input information for simulations with MCNP4B code. The structure for the clay bricks was simulated as a mix of all material layers and an effective density determined. The mass attenuation coefficients were determined for the 50-3,000 keV gamma-ray energy range. A comparison with results for similar materials found in the literature showed good agreement.

  4. Determination of the Absorption Coefficient and Cloudiness Multiplicity Attenuation During the Gamma-Radiation Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, K. N.; Borovikov, I. F.; Gaidamak, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents background value equivalent dose of gamma-radiation investigation in different weather: clear cloudy and overcast. The change of the dose rate of gamma radiation, depending on the weather and the ability cloudiness to shield gamma rays is shown. A new method for eliminating the consequences of accidents at nuclear power plants or plants using radioactive elements is proposed. A calculation method of cloudiness coefficient absorption and cloudiness gamma-radiation multiplicity attenuation is developed. The gamma- radiation multiplicity attenuation and the absorption coefficient of gamma radiation were calculated.

  5. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  6. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  7. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  8. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging.Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator.Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 10{sup 3}. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 10{sup 4}. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases

  9. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  10. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  11. Improved contrast of materials based on multi-voltage images decomposition in X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiaotong; Han, Yan; Chen, Ping

    2016-02-01

    A polychromatic X-ray beam results in hardening artefacts and contrast reduction in the reconstructed image, increasing the difficulty of distinguishing materials with approximately linear attenuation coefficients. For this reason, a model is proposed to decompose multi-voltage X-ray images into many ‘narrow-energy-width’ X-ray images by minimizing the weighted sum of the squared error in decomposition. This approach requires no change of hardware in the typical computed tomography imaging system. The ‘narrow-energy-width’ projection is obtained directly from the decomposition and is used to reconstruct the image. The distinction among materials with approximately linear attenuation coefficients is enlarged in the ‘narrow-energy-width’ reconstructed image. A cylinder composed of aluminium and silicon is used in the verification experiment. The contrast of silicon and aluminium is improved, and there is a significant difference between silicon and aluminium in the ‘narrow-energy-width’ reconstructed image, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Contrast imaging with a monochromatic x-ray scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pole, Donald J.; Popovic, Kosta; Williams, Mark B.

    2008-03-01

    We are currently developing a monochromatic x-ray source for small animal tomographic imaging. This source consists of a conventional cone beam microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten target coupled to a filter that uses Bragg diffraction to transmit only x-rays within a narrow energy range (~3 keV FWHM). A tissue-equivalent mouse phantom was used to a) evaluate how clearly CT imaging using the quasi-monoenergetic beam is able to differentiate tissue types compared to conventional polyenergetic CT, and b) to test the ability of the source and Bragg filter combination to perform dual energy, iodine contrast enhanced imaging. Single slice CT scans of the phantom were obtained both with polyenergetic (1.8 mm Al filtration) and quasi-monoenergetic beams. Region of interest analysis showed that pixel value variance was signifcantly reduced in the quasi-monochromatic case compared to the polyenergetic case, suggesting a reduction in the variance of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissue equivalent materials due to the narrower energy spectrum. To test dual energy iodine K-edge imaging, vials containing solutions with a range of iodine contrasts were added to the phantom. Single-slice CT scans were obtained using spectra with maximum values at 30 and 35 keV, respectively. Analysis of the resulting difference images (35 keV image - 30 keV image) shows that the magnitude of the difference signal produced by iodine exceeds that of bone for iodine concentrations above ~20 mg/ml, and that of muscle and fat tissues for iodine concentrations above ~5 mg/ml.

  13. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 – 25.26 keV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941)

  14. Quantification of numerical aperture-dependence of the OCT attenuation coefficient (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinado, Liliana M.; Bloemen, Paul R.; Almasian, Mitra; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite the improvements in early cancer diagnosis, adequate diagnostic tools for early staging of bladder cancer tumors are lacking [1]. MEMS-probes based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) provide cross-sectional imaging with a high-spatial resolution at a high-imaging speed, improving visualization of cancerous tissue [2-3]. Additionally, studies show that the measurement of localized attenuation coefficient allows discrimination between healthy and cancerous tissue [4]. We have designed a new miniaturized MEMS-probe based on OCT that will optimize early diagnosis by improving functional visualization of suspicious lesions in bladder. During the optical design phase of the probe, we have studied the effect of the numerical aperture (NA) on the OCT signal attenuation. For this study, we have employed an InnerVision Santec OCT system with several numerical apertures (25mm, 40mm, 60mm, 100mm, 150mm and 200mm using achromatic lenses). The change in attenuation coefficient was studied using 15 dilutions of intralipid ranging between 6*10-5 volume% and 20 volume%. We obtained the attenuation coefficient from the OCT images at several fixed positions of the focuses using established OCT models (e.g. single scattering with known confocal point spread function (PSF) [5] and multiple scattering using the Extended Huygens Fresnel model [6]). As a result, a non-linear increase of the scattering coefficient as a function of intralipid concentration (due to dependent scattering) was obtained for all numerical apertures. For all intralipid samples, the measured attenuation coefficient decreased with a decrease in NA. Our results suggest a non-negligible influence of the NA on the measured attenuation coefficient. [1] Khochikar MV. Rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer. Indian J Urol 2011 Apr-Jun; 27(2): 218-225. [2] Sun J and Xie H. Review Article MEMS-Based Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography. IJO 2011, Article ID 825629, 12 pages. doi:10

  15. X-ray beam pointer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive, readily assembled pointer aims X-ray machine for welded assembly radiographs. Plumb bob used for vertical alinement and yardstick used to visualize X-ray paths were inconvenient and inaccurate. Pointer cuts alinement time by one-half and eliminates necessity of retakes. For 3,000 weld radiographs, pointer will save 300 worker-hours and significant materials costs.

  16. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  17. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  18. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  19. Three-dimensional X-ray visualization of axonal tracts in mouse brain hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Saiga, Rino; Ohtsuka, Masato; Miura, Hiromi; Hoshino, Masato; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons transmit active potentials through axons, which are essential for the brain to function. In this study, the axonal networks of the murine brain were visualized with X-ray tomographic microscopy, also known as X-ray microtomography or micro-CT. Murine brain samples were freeze-dried to reconstitute the intrinsic contrast of tissue constituents and subjected to X-ray visualization. A whole brain hemisphere visualized by absorption contrast illustrated three-dimensional structures including those of the striatum, corpus callosum, and anterior commissure. Axonal tracts observed in the striatum start from the basal surface of the cerebral cortex and end at various positions in the basal ganglia. The distribution of X-ray attenuation coefficients indicated that differences in water and phospholipid content between the myelin sheath and surrounding tissue constituents account for the observed contrast. A rod-shaped cutout of brain tissue was also analyzed with a phase retrieval method, wherein tissue microstructures could be resolved with up to 2.7 μm resolution. Structures of axonal networks of the striatum were reconstructed by tracing axonal tracts. Such an analysis should be able to delineate the functional relationships of the brain regions involved in the observed network. PMID:27725699

  20. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The main results from this investigation were serendipitous. The long observation approved for the study of the hard X-ray emission of X-ray bursters lead, instead, to one of the largest early samples of the behavior of fast quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOS) in an atoll sources. Our analysis of this data set lead to the several important discoveries including the existence of a robust correlation between QPO frequency and the flux of a soft blackbody component of the X-ray spectrum in the atoll source 4U 0614+091.

  1. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Bromine Compounds and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Luo, Yi; Le, Linh; Pradhan, A. K.; Chowdhury, E.; Pitzer, R.; Montenegro, M.

    2010-06-01

    In conventional biomedical applications intense and broadband high energy X-rays are used in therapy and diagnostics (theranostics) to ensure sufficient tissue penetration for imaging or treatment. To avoid damages incurred by these, our proposed method, Resonant Theranosticsb,c, aims to find narrow energy regions that corresponds to resonant absorption or emission. We show that such energy bands lie below the K-shell ionization energy, contrary to the research focus on the K-shell ionization energy itself. Targeting these energy bands, Auger processes can be initiated to produce a number of photons and electrons from each atomic/molecular species via photon fluorescence and electron ejections. We will report our study on the bromine compound bromodeoxyuridyne (BUdR), widely used as radiological contrast agent in radiation imaging. The active system is Br^o-Br^+ combination, which can emit or absorb X-rays in the relative narrow energy range of 12 to 13.6 keV, through 1s-np transitions. We will present the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for various Auger or K-shell 1s-np transitions. We will show that the corresponding cross sections and attenuation coefficients per unit mass, are orders of magnitude higher than the background and that at K-shell ionization energy. Employing these attenuation coefficients in the Monte Carlo simulation program Geant4, we study the intensities of photon and electron emission spectra. Acknowledgment: Partially support: Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA (SNN). The computational work was carried out at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-Ray Enhancement of the Auger Effect in High-Z atoms, molecules, and Nanoparticles: Biomedical Applications", A. K. Pradhan, S. N. Nahar, M. Montenegro, Yan Yu, H. L. Zhang, C. Sur, M. Mrozik, R. M. Pitzer, J. of Phys. Chem. A, 113 (2009), 12356. "Monte Carlo Simulations and Atomic Calculations for Auger Processes in

  2. Problems of Objects Identification in Three-dimensional X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamyrbayev, T.; Batranin, A.; Ivashkov, D.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is a unique non-destructive technique which is suitable for dimensional measurements and quality testing. X-ray tomography is applied widely not only in the traditional medical area, but in natural science and engineering fields. The result of tomography is a volumetric map of attenuation coefficients which has, in fact, a limited practical sense. Usually, segmentation that converts the map into binary objects by means of threshold value is applied. In this paper we discuss the some key features of segmentation applied to a test object which is gravel composed of unconsolidated rock fragments. Gravel appeared to be a challenging object for segmentation and image recognition. One of effective approach for image processing of tomographic data, among many possible ones, is presented in this paper.

  3. Material decomposition with the multi-energy attenuation coefficient ratio by using a multiple discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Kang, Se-Ryong; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a spectral CT system using a photon counting detector and to decompose materials by applying a multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) to the energy-dependent attenuation coefficient ratios. We imaged cylindrical phantoms of Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with four holes filled with calcium chloride, iodine, and gold nanoparticle contrast agents. The attenuation coefficients were measured via reconstructed multi-energy images, and the linear attenuation ratio was used for material identification. The MDA projection matrix, determined from training phantoms, was used to identify the four materials in the testing phantoms. For quantification purposes, the relationships between the attenuation coefficients at multiple energy bins and the concentrations were characterized by using the least-squares method for each material. The mean identification accuracy for each of the three materials were 0.94 ± 0.09 for iodine, 0.96 ± 0.07 for gold nanoparticles, and 0.92 ± 0.05 for calcium chloride. The mean quantification errors were 1.90 ± 1.58% for iodine, 3.85 ± 3.13% for gold nanoparticle, and 3.40 ± 2.62% for calcium chloride. The developed multi-energy CT system based on the photon-counting detector with MDA can precisely decompose the four materials.

  4. Evaluation of effective dose conversion coefficients for Korean adults during medical x-ray examinations up to 150 keV through comparison with ICRP Publication 74 and ICRP Publication 116.

    PubMed

    Keum, Mihyun; Park, Jae Hong; Park, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do

    2014-03-01

    A Monte Carlo program for calculating organ doses for patients undergoing medical x-ray examination (PCXMC) was used to calculate effective dose conversion coefficients for Korean adults. Two sets of effective dose results were calculated based on tissue weighting factors recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 103 for monochromatic energy photons of 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100 and 150 keV. The results were obtained for monoenergetic photons, since effective dose conversion coefficients recommended in ICRP Publications 74 and 116 were given for monochromatic energies, thereby enabling the comparison of our result to those suggested by the ICRP publications. The areas of comparison include: to observe effects due to changes in tissue weighting factors, modification within Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) phantoms and differences in phantom types. The phantom employed in the PCXMC program is a modified version of the phantom used in ICRP Publication 74, with additional organs that were added in order to take into account the updated tissue weighting factors given in ICRP Publication 103. Both use MIRD phantoms but our study modified the phantom size to the average physical condition of Korean adults, while ICRP Publication 74 uses the phantom size of the reference man defined in ICRP Publication 23. On the other hand, the effective dose suggested in ICRP 116 was calculated using an entirely different type of phantom: a voxel phantom with the size of reference man. Although significant differences were observed for certain organ doses in the lateral beam directions, differences in the effective doses were within 5% for the anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) directions, and within 16% in lateral directions when tissue weighting factors were applied and the variations were adjusted for all three comparisons. The results show that calculation of effective doses for Korean adults

  5. Investigation of the relationship between linear attenuation coefficients and CT Hounsfield units using radionuclides for SPECT.

    PubMed

    Brown, Saxby; Bailey, Dale L; Willowson, Kathy; Baldock, Clive

    2008-09-01

    This study has investigated the relationship between linear attenuation coefficients (mu) and Hounsfield units (HUs) for six materials covering the range of values found clinically. Narrow-beam mu values were measured by performing radionuclide transmission scans using (99m)Tc, (123)I, (131)I, (201)Tl and (111)In. The mu values were compared to published data. The relationships between mu and HU were determined. These relationships can be used to convert computed tomography (CT) images to mu-maps for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) attenuation correction. PMID:18662614

  6. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  7. X-Ray photonics: X-rays inspire electron movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The advent of high-energy, short-pulse X-ray sources based on free-electron lasers, laser plasmas and high-harmonic generation is now making it possible to probe the dynamics of electrons within molecules.

  8. Structural effects of insulin-loading into HII mesophases monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

    PubMed

    Mishraki, Tehila; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca; Shames, Alexander I; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-06-30

    Insulin entrapment within a monoolein-based reverse hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase was investigated under temperature-dependent conditions at acidic (pH 3) and basic (pH 8) conditions. Studying the structure of the host H(II) system and the interactions of insulin under temperature-dependent conditions has great impact on the enhancement of its thermal stabilization and controlled release for the purposes of transdermal delivery. Small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS) measurements show that pH variation and/or insulin entrapment preserve the hexagonal structure and do not influence the lattice parameter. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectra indicate that, although insulin interacts with hydroxyl groups of GMO in the interface region, it is not affected by pH variations. Hence different microenvironments within the H(II) mesophase were monitored by a computer-aided electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis using 5-doxylstearic acid (5-DSA) as a pH-dependent probe. The microviscosity, micropolarity, order of systems, and distribution of the probes in different microenvironments were influenced by three factors: temperature, pH, and insulin solubilization. When the temperature is increased, microviscosity and order parameters decreased at both pH 3 and 8, presenting different decrease trends. It was found that, at pH 3, the protein perturbs the lipid structure while "pushing aside" the un-ionized 5-DSA probe to fit into the narrow water cylinders. At the interface region (pH 8), the probe was distributed in two differently structured environments that significantly modifies by increasing temperature. Insulin loading within the H(II) mesophase decreased the order and microviscosity of both the microenvironments and increased their micropolarity. Finally, the EPR analysis also provides information about the unfolding/denaturation of insulin within the channel at high temperatures.

  9. Quantitative RNFL attenuation coefficient measurements by RPE-normalized OCT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate significantly different scattering coefficients of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) between normal and glaucoma subjects. In clinical care, SD-OCT is routinely used to assess the RNFL thickness for glaucoma management. In this way, the full OCT data set is conveniently reduced to an easy to interpret output, matching results from older (non- OCT) instruments. However, OCT provides more data, such as the signal strength itself, which is due to backscattering in the retinal layers. For quantitative analysis, this signal should be normalized to adjust for local differences in the intensity of the beam that reaches the retina. In this paper, we introduce a model that relates the OCT signal to the attenuation coefficient of the tissue. The average RNFL signal (within an A-line) was then normalized based on the observed RPE signal, resulting in normalized RNFL attenuation coefficient maps. These maps showed local defects matching those found in thickness data. The average (normalized) RNFL attenuation coefficient of a fixed band around the optic nerve head was significantly lower in glaucomatous eyes than in normal eyes (3.0mm-1 vs. 4.9mm-1, P<0.01, Mann-Whitney test).

  10. Be/X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    The interest in X/ γ-ray Astronomy has grown enormously in the last decades thanks to the ability to send X-ray space missions above the Earth’s atmosphere. There are more than half a million X-ray sources detected and over a hundred missions (past and currently operational) devoted to the study of cosmic X/ γ rays. With the improved sensibilities of the currently active missions new detections occur almost on a daily basis. Among these, neutron-star X-ray binaries form an important group because they are among the brightest extra-solar objects in the sky and are characterized by dramatic variability in brightness on timescales ranging from milliseconds to months and years. Their main source of power is the gravitational energy released by matter accreted from a companion star and falling onto the neutron star in a relatively close binary system. Neutron-star X-ray binaries divide into high-mass and low-mass systems according to whether the mass of the donor star is above ˜8 or below ˜2 M⊙, respectively. Massive X-ray binaries divide further into supergiant X-ray binaries and Be/X-ray binaries depending on the evolutionary status of the optical companion. Virtually all Be/X-ray binaries show X-ray pulsations. Therefore, these systems can be used as unique natural laboratories to investigate the properties of matter under extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called “Be phenomenon”, such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/ R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass

  11. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  12. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  13. Total attenuation coefficients and scattering phase functions of tissues and phantom materials at 633 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Flock, S.T.; Wilson, B.C.; Patterson, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the total attenuation coefficient sigma t and the scattering phase function, S(theta), of 632.8 nm of light for a number of animal model tissues, blood, and inert scattering and absorbing media. Polystyrene microspheres of known size and refractive index, for which sigma t and S(theta) can be calculated by Mie theory, were used to test the experimental methods. The purpose of the study was to define typical ranges for these optical properties of tissues, as a contribution to the development of experimental and theoretical methods of light dosimetry in tissue, particularly related to photodynamic therapy of solid tumors. The results demonstrate that, for the representative tissues studied, the total attenuation coefficients are of the order of 10-100 mm-1, and that the scattering is highly forward peaked, with average cosine of scatter in the range 0.6-0.97.

  14. The linear attenuation coefficients as features of multiple energy CT image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homem, M. R. P.; Mascarenhas, N. D. A.; Cruvinel, P. E.

    2000-09-01

    We present in this paper an analysis of the linear attenuation coefficients as useful features of single and multiple energy CT images with the use of statistical pattern classification tools. We analyzed four CT images through two pointwise classifiers (the first classifier is based on the maximum-likelihood criterion and the second classifier is based on the k-means clustering algorithm) and one contextual Bayesian classifier (ICM algorithm - Iterated Conditional Modes) using an a priori Potts-Strauss model. A feature extraction procedure using the Jeffries-Matusita (J-M) distance and the Karhunen-Loève transformation was also performed. Both the classification and the feature selection procedures were found to be in agreement with the predicted discrimination given by the separation of the linear attenuation coefficient curves for different materials.

  15. Study on inelastic attenuation coefficient, site response and source parameters in Shanxi region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuo, Yong-Qing; Su, Yan; Jia, Jian-Xi; Huang, Jin-Gang

    2004-07-01

    Based on 310 horizontal-component digital seismograms recorded at 14 seismic stations in Shanxi Digital Seismograph Network, the inelastic attenuation coefficient in Shanxi region is studied. By the methods of Atkinson and Moya, the site response of each station and several source parameters are obtained and the inversion results from both methods are compared and analyzed. The frequency-dependent inelastic attenuation coefficient Q is estimated as Q(f)=323.2 f 0.506. The site responses of 14 seismic stations do not show significant amplification, which is consistent with their basement on rock. We also found the dependence of corner frequency on seismic moment, seismic moment on stress drop, source radius on stress drop.

  16. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  17. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  18. X-ray fiducial foils

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, C.; Serduke, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Jankowski, A.; Wall, M.

    1991-03-13

    An x-ray spectrum from a laser fusion experiment was passed through an Al, Si, Y multilayer foil. The position of the absorption edges of the Al, Si, and Y was used to calibrate the x-ray energy spectrum recorded on photographic film. The foil consisted of 4000 {angstrom} of Al, 6000 {angstrom} of Si and 4000 {angstrom} of Y sputter deposited on a 1.5 {mu}m thick Mylar{reg sign} film. It was necessary to layer the structure in order to achieve the required mechanical strength and dimensional stability. The results include analysis of the x-ray energy spectrum and microstructural characterization of the foil using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone x-ray is used to: diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony fragments following treatment of a fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, ...

  20. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Model 60007A InnerView Real-time X-ray Imaging System, produced by National Imaging Systems, a division of FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc. (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), Northbrook, IL, is a third generation spinoff from x-ray astronomy technology. Goddard Space Flight Center developed the original technology into the Lixiscope, a small, portable, minimal radiation x-ray instrument that could be used at the scene of an accident. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc., adapted this technology to develop the FlouroScan, a low-intensity, x-ray system that could be used without the lead aprons, film badges and lead-lined walls that conventional systems require. The InnerView is a spinoff of non-destructive testing and product inspection.

  1. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  2. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Results A radiologist, a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images, will look at ...

  4. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  5. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  6. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  10. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  11. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  12. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? ... of tooth decay. Updated: January 2012 Related Articles: X-Rays The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) Sets the ...

  13. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  14. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  15. Total mass attenuation coefficient evaluation of ten materials commonly used to simulate human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C. C.; Ximenes, R. E.; Garcia, C. A. B.; Vieira, J. W.; Maia, A. F.

    2010-11-01

    To study the doses received by patient submitted to ionizing radiation, several materials are used to simulate the human tissue and organs. The total mass attenuation coefficient is a reasonable way for evaluating the usage in dosimetry of these materials. The total mass attenuation coefficient is determined by photon energy and constituent elements of the material. Currently, the human phantoms are composed by a unique material that presents characteristics similar to the mean proprieties of the different tissues within the region. Therefore, the phantoms are usually homogeneous and filled with a material similar to soft tissue. We studied ten materials used as soft tissue-simulating. These materials were named: bolus, nylon®, orange articulation wax, red articulation wax, PMMA, modelling clay, bee wax, paraffin 1, paraffin 2 and pitch. The objective of this study was to verify the best material to simulate the human cerebral tissue. We determined the elementary composition, mass density and, therefore, calculated the total mass attenuation coefficient of each material. The results were compared to the values established by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU, report n° 44, and by the International Commission on Radiation Protection - ICRP, report n° 89, to determine the best material for this energy interval. These results indicate that new head phantoms can be constructed with nylon®.

  16. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Albertin, F; Astolfo, A; Stampanoni, M; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y; Kaplan, F; Margaritondo, G

    2015-03-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page `reading'. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project. PMID:25723946

  17. Phase-targeted X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    A powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) method to enhance the signal of a specific crystalline phase within a mixture is presented for the first time. Specificity to the targeted phase relies on finding coincidences in the ratios of crystal d spacings and the ratios of elemental characteristic X-ray energies. Such coincidences can be exploited so that the two crystal planes diffract through the same scattering angle at two different X-ray energies. An energy-resolving detector placed at the appropriate scattering angle will detect a significantly enhanced signal at these energies if the target mineral or phase is present in the sample. When implemented using high scattering angles, for example 2θ > 150°, the method is tolerant to sample morphology and distance on the scale of ∼2 mm. The principle of the method is demonstrated experimentally using Pd Lα1 and Pd Lβ1 emission lines to enhance the diffraction signal of quartz. Both a pure quartz powder pellet and an unprepared mudstone rock specimen are used to test and develop the phase-targeted method. The technique is further demonstrated in the sensitive detection of retained austenite in steel samples using a combination of In Lβ1 and Ti Kβ emission lines. For both these examples it is also shown how the use of an attenuating foil, with an absorption edge close to and above the higher-energy characteristic X-ray line, can serve to isolate to some degree the coincidence signals from other fluorescence and diffraction peaks in the detected spectrum. The phase-targeted XRD technique is suitable for implementation using low-cost off-the-shelf components in a handheld or in-line instrument format. PMID:27738415

  18. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  19. An X-ray diffraction study of titanium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium specimens of commercial purity were exposed at 1100 to 1400 F to laboratory air for times up to 100 hours. The extent of substrate contamination by interstitial oxygen was was determined by a new X-ray diffraction analysis involving transformation of X-ray diffraction intensity bands. The oxygen solid-solubility at the oxide-metal interfaces and its variation with time at temperature were also determined. Diffusion coefficients are deduced from the oxygen depth profiles.

  20. X-ray spectra of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the various classes of Galactic X-ray sources are discussed, with particular emphasis on binary sources containing an accreting compact object, where post-emission scattering in an accretion disk often prevents the initially produced X-radiation from being observed directly. Theoretical interpretations and X-ray observations are considered for the cataclysmic variables, binary systems with a white dwarf as the compact object and which suffer relatively less from Thomson scattering, and the similar phenomenological spectral characteristics of the bulge sources, including soft transients, bursters and steady X-ray sources with thermal spectra, thought to represent an accreting neutron star, are pointed out. The spectral characteristics of X-ray pulsars in accreting binary systems (rather than the Crab pulsar, which is losing rotational kinetic energy with time) are then presented and interpreted in terms of accretion in the polar regions, and mechanisms for the newly discovered X-ray emission from late-type RS CVn stars are considered.

  1. Phase contrast enhancement of x-ray mammography: a design study.

    PubMed

    Kotre, C J; Birch, I P

    1999-11-01

    This paper explores the application to mammography of phase contrast produced by variations in x-ray refractive index. As a spatially coherent x-ray beam propagates through an x-ray transparent medium, the phase of the incident wavefront becomes modified in a manner related to the electron density of the medium. The resulting phase gradient across the wavefront is equivalent to a small change in direction of the propagation of the wave. For a general object, the change in propagation direction will vary from point to point depending on the structures within the object. The net effect can be recorded in a radiographic image using an appropriate geometry to produce the visual appearance of edge enhancement at interfaces between materials with differing x-ray refractive indices. Normally these materials will also have differences in attenuation coefficient, so the overall effect is to increase the visibility of interfaces between materials. It is proposed that mammographic images can be subtly enhanced by the use of phase contrast information to overcome some of the known limitations of the imaging process whilst leaving the gross radiological appearance of the images substantially unchanged. The design trade-offs required to utilize phase contrast information were investigated using a conventional mammographic x-ray generator and film-screen system. The Leeds TORMAM mammographic image quality test object was then used to demonstrate a considerable improvement in image quality for the phase contrast enhanced images over those produced in the conventional geometry with no increase in radiation dose to the patient. The results are discussed in terms of their possible practical application.

  2. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  3. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  4. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  5. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  6. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  7. Clocking Femtosecond X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Mills, D M; Pahl, R; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Lowney, D P; MacPhee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Calleman, C; Huldt, G; der Spoel, D v; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Hastings, J B

    2004-10-08

    The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) produces the brightest ultrafast x-ray pulses in the world, and is the first to employ compressed femtosecond electron bunches for the x-ray source. Both SPPS and future X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL's) will use precise measurements of individual electron bunches to time the arrival of x-ray pulses for time-resolved experiments. At SPPS we use electro-optic sampling (EOS) to perform these measurements. Here we present the first results using this method. An ultrafast laser pulse (135 fs) passes through an electro-optic crystal adjacent to the electron beam. The refractive index of the crystal is distorted by the strong electromagnetic fields of the ultra-relativistic electrons, and this transient birefringence is imprinted on the laser polarization. A polarizer decodes this signal, producing a time-dependent image of the compressed electron bunch. Our measurements yield the relative timing between an ultrafast optical laser and an ultrafast x-ray pulse to within 60 fs, making it possible to use the SPPS to observe atomic-scale ultrafast dynamics initiated by laser-matter interaction.

  8. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  9. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Stacey Giles briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  10. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Lance Weiss briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  11. Evaluation of coastal zone color scanner diffuse attenuation coefficient algorithms for application to coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, James L.; Trees, Charles C.; Arnone, Robert A.

    1990-09-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scannez (ZCS) and associated atmospheric and in-water algorithms have allowed synoptic analyses of regional and large scale variability of bio-optical properties [phytoplankton pigments and diffuse auenuation coefficient K(490)}. Austin and Petzold (1981) developed a robust in-water K(490) algorithm which related the diffuse attenuation coefficient at one optical depth [1/K(490)] to the ratio of the water-leaving radiances at 443 and 550 nm. Their regression analysis included diffuse attenuation coefficients K(490) up to 0.40 nm, but excluded data from estuarine areas, and other Case II waters, where the optical properties are not predominantly determined by phytoplankton. In these areas, errors are induced in the retrieval of remote sensing K(490) by extremely low water-leaving radiance at 443 nm [Lw(443) as viewed at the sensor may only be 1 or 2 digital counts], and improved cury can be realized using algorithms based on wavelengths where Lw(λ) is larger. Using ocean optical profiles quired by the Visibility Laboratory, algorithms are developed to predict K(490) from ratios of water leaving radiances at 520 and 670, as well as 443 and 550 nm.

  12. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmissivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments, and might also pave the way to advanced schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  13. Porous Media Contamination: 3-Dimensional Visualization and Quantification Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, L.; Prasher, S. O.; Ghoshal, S.

    2004-05-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), if spilled into the subsurface, will migrate downward, and a significant fraction will become trapped in the soil matrix. These trapped NAPL globules partition into the water and/or vapor phase, and serve as continuous sources of contamination (e.g. source zones). At present, the presence of NAPL in the subsurface is typically inferred from chemical analysis data. There are no accepted methodologies or protocols available for the direct characterization of NAPLs in the subsurface. Proven and cost-effective methodologies are needed to allow effective implementation of remediation technologies at NAPL contaminated sites. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has the potential to non-destructively quantify NAPL mass and distribution in soil cores due to this technology's ability to detect small atomic density differences of solid, liquid, gas, and NAPL phases present in a representative volume element. We have demonstrated that environmentally significant NAPLs, such as gasoline and other oil products, chlorinated solvents, and PCBs possess a characteristic and predictable X-ray attenuation coefficient that permits their quantification in porous media at incident beam energies, typical of medical and industrial X-ray CT scanners. As part of this study, methodologies were developed for generating and analyzing X-ray CT data for the study of NAPLs in natural porous media. Columns of NAPL-contaminated soils were scanned, flushed with solvents and water to remove entrapped NAPL, and re-scanned. X-ray CT data was analyzed to obtain numerical arrays of soil porosity, NAPL saturation, and NAPL volume at a spatial resolution of 1 mm. This methodology was validated using homogeneous and heterogeneous soil columns with known quantities of gasoline and tetrachloroethylene. NAPL volumes computed using X-ray CT data was compared with known volumes from volume balance calculations. Error analysis revealed that in a 5 cm long and 2.5 cm diameter soil

  14. Auger Electrons via Kα X-Ray Lines of Platinum Compounds for Nanotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Lim, Sara; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R. M.

    2011-06-01

    We will report study on the Kα X-ray lines of platinum. Pt compounds, such as cisplatin, are common in biomedical applications. The active element Pt can emit or absorb hard X-rays. We have obtained the photoionization cross sections from the oscillator strengths of 1s-2p (Kα) transitions in Pt ions. We find that these transitions appear as resonances in photoionization in the hard X-ray energy range of 64 - 71 keV (0.18 - 0.17 Å) below the K-shell ionization and with a strength orders of magnitude higher compared to that at the K-shell ionization. This is the focus of our study for possible initiation of an emission cascade of Auger electrons at the resonant energy. We will present the oscillator strengths and attenuation coefficients per unit mass for all the Kα transitions in the event platinum cascades through various, namely from fluorine-like to hydrogen like, ionic states. The study is motivated by uur proposed method, Resonant Theranosticsb,C (RT) for biomedical appliations, which aims to find narrow band X-ray energy that corresponds to resonant photo-absorption and leads to emission of Auger electrons. As the next step of the RT method we will also report on experimental results on producing monochromatic X-rays, targeted to the resonant energy, from the wide band Bremstruhlung radiation of a conventional X-ray source. Partially support: DOE, Computational Facility: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, Ohio. "Resonant X-Ray Enhancement of the Auger Effect in High-Z atoms, molecules, and Nanoparticles: Biomedical Applications", A.K. Pradhan, S.N. Nahar, M. Montenegro, Yan Yu, H.L. Zhang, C. Sur, M. Mrozik, R.M. Pitzer, J. of Phys. Chem. A, 113 (2009), 12356. "Monte Carlo Simulations and Atomic Calculations for Auger Processes in Biomedical Nanotheranostics", M. Montenegro, S. N. Nahar, A. K. Pradhan, Ke Huang, Yan Yu, J. of Phys. Chem. A, 113 (2009), 12364.

  15. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  16. Portable X-Ray Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  17. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  18. Acceleration of binary X-ray sources by their radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal'Shin, V. D.; Tsygan, A. I.

    1998-03-01

    We consider a case where the magnetic field of a neutron star in an X-ray binary system differs from a dipole field. This difference gives rise to an asymmetry in the X-ray radiation from the system and, consequently, to an accelerating force. After averaging over the rotation period of the neutron star, the component of the force along its spin axis remains. Its magnitude, F = Xi L_X/c (where L_X is the total X-ray luminosity of the neutron star, and Xi is the radiation asymmetry coefficient), can exceed the force of gravitational attraction of the binary system to the Galaxy. This effect is most important for low-mass X-ray binary systems at the stage of intense accretion of matter onto the neutron stars. Such systems form the Galactic halo, while some of them go away into intergalactic space.

  19. X-ray fluorescence microtomography analyzing reference samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, G. R.; Lopes, R. T.; Anjos, M. J.; Rocha, H. S.; Pérez, C. A.

    2007-08-01

    The X-ray fluorescence microtomography (XRFCT) is a non-destructive technique to complement other techniques used for samples characterization. The common techniques provide only information on the attenuation coefficients (transmission microtomography) or electronic density (Compton microtomography) and no information on the distribution of the elements inside of the sample can be obtained in these cases. XRFCT is based on the detection of fluorescence photons emitted by the elements in the sample. As the energy of photons of fluorescence has a particular value for each element, it is possible to obtain the distribution of all the elements in a sample, since that a minimum of fluorescence signal is detected. The experiments were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beamline (D09B-XRF) of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. A monochromatic beam and a white beam was used for the excitation of the elements and the fluorescence photons have been detected by a HPGe detector, placed at 90° to the incident beam. The beam was monitored by an ionization chamber and a fast scintillator detector was used to detect the transmitted radiation. In order to study the performance of the system, some reference samples made of polyethylene filled with standard solutions were analyzed, and some tissues of human breast (normal tissue, benign tumor and malignant tumor) have been analyzed in order to verify the efficiency of the system in determination of the elemental distribution in these kinds of samples. All the tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered-back projection algorithm. In the breast tissue samples, the elements of higher concentration were Zn, Cu and Fe.

  20. Automatic detection of bone fragments in poultry using multi-energy x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Gleason, Shaun S [Knoxville, TN; Paulus, Michael J [Knoxville, TN; Mullens, James A [Knoxville, TN

    2002-04-09

    At least two linear arrays of x-ray detectors are placed below a conveyor belt in a poultry processing plant. Multiple-energy x-ray sources illuminate the poultry and are detected by the detectors. Laser profilometry is used to measure the poultry thickness as the x-ray data is acquired. The detector readout is processed in real time to detect the presence of small highly attenuating fragments in the poultry, i.e., bone, metal, and cartilage.

  1. A solid iodinated phantom material for use in tomographic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Mainprize, James G.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-10-15

    PURPOSE: Iodinated phantoms are of value in x-ray imaging for quality control measurements, system calibration, and for use in the research setting; however, the liquid phantoms that are most often used have several limitations including variability between repeated dilutions, inhomogeneities from air bubbles or precipitants, and long set up times. Although suitable materials have been investigated for projection radiography, quantitative measurements of contrast enhancement in computed tomography (CT) have become increasingly important in the clinic, and a need exists for a durable and reproducible iodinated phantom material. In this work, the authors describe a solid radiographic phantom material that has an accurately known concentration of iodine distributed uniformly throughout its volume and that has stable properties over time. This material can be molded or machined into a desired shape to create a test object or for use in an anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: Two sets of calibration phantoms were produced with a clinically relevant range of iodine concentrations. Measurements were made on these phantoms to characterize the material properties in terms of accuracy of iodine concentration, radiographic uniformity, temporal stability of x-ray attenuation, and manufacturing repeatability. Experimentally measured linear x-ray attenuation coefficients were compared to those predicted by a theoretical model. The uniformity of the iodine distribution in the material was assessed by measuring image intensity variation, both in projection images and in reconstructed CT volumes. The reproducibility of manufacture was estimated on a set of independently produced samples. A longitudinal study was performed to assess the stability of the material x-ray characteristics over time by making measurements at 6 month intervals. Results: Good agreement was seen between the experimental measurements of effective attenuation and the theoretically predicted values. It is

  2. Accurate Modeling of X-ray Extinction by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John; Draine, B. T.

    2016-02-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the incorrect assumption that scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. We show that the consequences of neglecting scattering on the determination of interstellar elemental abundances are modest; however, scattering (along with uncertainties in the grain size distribution) must be taken into account when near-edge extinction fine structure is used to infer dust mineralogy. We advertise the benefits and accuracy of anomalous diffraction theory for both X-ray halo analysis and near edge absorption studies. We present an open source Fortran suite, General Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory (GGADT), that calculates X-ray absorption, scattering, and differential scattering cross sections for grains of arbitrary geometry and composition.

  3. X-ray computerized tomography analysis and density estimation using a sediment core from the Challenger Mound area in the Porcupine Seabight, off Western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Nakano, Tsukasa; Ikehara, Ken

    2011-02-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) analysis was used to image a half-round core sample of 50 cm long recovered from near Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight, off western Ireland during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. This allowed three-dimensional examination of complex shapes of pebbles and ice-rafted debris in sedimentary sequences. X-ray CT analysis was also used for the determination of physical properties; a comparison between bulk density by the mass-volume method and estimated density based on linear attenuation coefficients of X-ray CT images provides insight into a spatially detailed and precise map of density variation in samples through the distribution of CT numbers.

  4. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  5. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  6. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  7. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  8. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  9. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  10. Observing the setting and hardening of cementitious materials by X-ray dark-field radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Prade, F.; Chabior, M.; Malm, F.; Grosse, C.U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-08-15

    Novel X-ray imaging methods expand conventional attenuation-based X-ray radiography by the phase- and the dark-field contrasts. While weakly absorbing structures in the specimen can be better visualized in phase contrast, the dark-field contrast provides information about morphological sub-pixel microstructures. Here we report an application of dark-field X-ray radiography for imaging the time-resolved setting process in fresh cement. Our results demonstrate that the microstructural changes within the cement result in a decreasing dark-field signal. We quantify this imaging signal with a time-dependent dark-field scatter coefficient and show its good correlation with the compressional wave velocity. We further present images based on a pixel-wise analysis of the scattering signal and a corresponding logistic fit. These images emphasize the benefit of dark-field imaging of cementitious materials as it provides two dimensional spatial information on the processes within the sample while other established testing techniques only provide information on the bulk average.

  11. Computed tomography and X-ray fluorescence CT of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, G. R.; Anjos, M. J.; Rocha, H. S.; Faria, P.; Pérez, C. A.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-10-01

    Transmission microtomography ( μCT) and X-ray fluorescence microtomography (XRF μCT) are complementary and noninvasive techniques used for sample characterization. μCT provide information on the attenuation coefficients, while XRF μCT can provide the distribution of all elements in a sample. XRF μCT is a noninvasive technique, based on the detection of X-ray fluorescence emitted by the elements in the sample, and it is used to complement other techniques for sample characterization. The experiments were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) beamline of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. A monochromatic beam of 9.8 keV was used for excitation of the elements within samples and the fluorescence photons were detected by an HPGe detector. The incident beam was monitored by an ionization chamber and a fast scintillator detector was used to detect the transmitted radiation. In this work, several intestine and breast tissue samples were investigated in order to verify the concentration of some elements correlated with the characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by transmission μCT. All XRF μCT were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. In those samples the elements Zn, Cu, and Fe were observed.

  12. ImaSim, a software tool for basic education of medical x-ray imaging in radiotherapy and radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; deBlois, François; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: X-ray imaging is an important part of medicine and plays a crucial role in radiotherapy. Education in this field is mostly limited to textbook teaching due to equipment restrictions. A novel simulation tool, ImaSim, for teaching the fundamentals of the x-ray imaging process based on ray-tracing is presented in this work. ImaSim is used interactively via a graphical user interface (GUI). Materials and methods: The software package covers the main x-ray based medical modalities: planar kilo voltage (kV), planar (portal) mega voltage (MV), fan beam computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The user can modify the photon source, object to be imaged and imaging setup with three-dimensional editors. Objects are currently obtained by combining blocks with variable shapes. The imaging of three-dimensional voxelized geometries is currently not implemented, but can be added in a later release. The program follows a ray-tracing approach, ignoring photon scatter in its current implementation. Simulations of a phantom CT scan were generated in ImaSim and were compared to measured data in terms of CT number accuracy. Spatial variations in the photon fluence and mean energy from an x-ray tube caused by the heel effect were estimated from ImaSim and Monte Carlo simulations and compared. Results: In this paper we describe ImaSim and provide two examples of its capabilities. CT numbers were found to agree within 36 Hounsfield Units (HU) for bone, which corresponds to a 2% attenuation coefficient difference. ImaSim reproduced the heel effect reasonably well when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Discussion: An x-ray imaging simulation tool is made available for teaching and research purposes. ImaSim provides a means to facilitate the teaching of medical x-ray imaging.

  13. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  14. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  15. Spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Wenxiang E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu Xi, Yan E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu Wang, Ge E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Grating interferometry is a state-of-the-art x-ray imaging approach, which can acquire information on x-ray attenuation, phase shift, and small-angle scattering simultaneously. Phase-contrast imaging and dark-field imaging are very sensitive to microstructural variation and offers superior contrast resolution for biological soft tissues. However, a common x-ray tube is a point-like source. As a result, the popular planar grating imaging configuration seriously restricts the flux of photons and decreases the visibility of signals, yielding a limited field of view. The purpose of this study is to extend the planar x-ray grating imaging theory and methods to a spherical grating scheme for a wider range of preclinical and clinical applications. Methods: A spherical grating matches the wave front of a point x-ray source very well, allowing the perpendicular incidence of x-rays on the grating to achieve a higher visibility over a larger field of view than the planer grating counterpart. A theoretical analysis of the Talbot effect for spherical grating imaging is proposed to establish a basic foundation for x-ray spherical gratings interferometry. An efficient method of spherical grating imaging is also presented to extract attenuation, differential phase, and dark-field images in the x-ray spherical grating interferometer. Results: Talbot self-imaging with spherical gratings is analyzed based on the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula, featuring a periodic angular distribution in a polar coordinate system. The Talbot distance is derived to reveal the Talbot self-imaging pattern. Numerical simulation results show the self-imaging phenomenon of a spherical grating interferometer, which is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. Conclusions: X-ray Talbot interferometry with spherical gratings has a significant practical promise. Relative to planar grating imaging, spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry has a larger field of view and

  16. Water equivalence of NIPAM based polymer gel dosimeters with enhanced sensitivity for x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Bosi, Stephen; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2013-10-01

    Two new formulations of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) based three dimensional (3D) gel dosimeters have recently been developed with improved sensitivity to x-ray CT readout, one without any co-solvent and the other one with isopropanol co-solvent. The water equivalence of the NIPAM gel dosimeters was investigated using different methods to calculate their radiological properties including: density, electron density, number of electrons per grams, effective atomic number, photon interaction probabilities, mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients, electron collisional, radiative and total mass stopping powers and electron mass scattering power. Monte Carlo modelling was also used to compare the dose response of these gel dosimeters with water for kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beams and for megavoltage electron beams. We found that the density and electron density of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter are more water equivalent with less than a 2.6% difference compared to a 5.7% difference for the isopropanol gel dosimeter. Both the co-solvent free and isopropanol solvent gel dosimeters have lower effective atomic numbers than water, differing by 2.2% and 6.5%, respectively. As a result, their photoelectric absorption interaction probabilities are up to 6% and 19% different from water, respectively. Compton scattering and pair production interaction probabilities of NIPAM gel with isopropanol differ by up to 10% from water while for the co-solvent free gel, the differences are 3%. Mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter and the isopropanol gel dosimeter are up to 7% and 19% lower than water, respectively. Collisional and total mass stopping powers of both gel dosimeters differ by less than 2% from those of water. The dose response of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter is water equivalent (with <1% discrepancy) for dosimetry of x-rays with energies <100 keV while the discrepancy increases (up to 5%) for the

  17. [Characteristics of diffuse attenuation coefficient of underwater irradiance in the lakes in the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze river ].

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Yun-Lin; Wang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Xiao-Han

    2013-02-01

    Based on the underwater irradiance profile measurement and water samples collection in September, October 2007 in Lake Donghu, Lake Liangzi and Lake Honghu, and in April in 2010 in Lake Kuileihu, the diffuse attenuation coefficient and the dominant attenuation factors were analyzed. The ranges of diffuse attenuation coefficient and total suspended solid (TSS), organic suspended solid (OSS), inorganic suspended solid (ISS), chlorophyll a (Chla), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration varied less in Lake Donghu and Lake Kuileihu than in Lake liangzi and Lake Honghu. The regression analysis showed that ISS was the dominant affecting factor of transparency in Lake Donghu and Lake Kuileihu, but ISS and OSS jointly controlled the transparency in Lake Liangzi and Lake Honghu. The diffuse attenuation coefficient minimum occurred near 580 nm. At around 675 nm, the diffuse attenuation coefficient peak was due to phytoplankton absorption, especially at sites with high pigment concentration. The euphotic depth was less than the mean water depth in Lake Donghu, suggesting that the submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) can not grow in the present underwater light climate. However, the euphotic depth was larger than the mean water depth in other three lakes showing that the underwater light climate can meet the light requirements for the growth of SAV. The regression analysis showed that ISS was the dominant affecting factor of PAR attenuation in Lake Donghu and Lake Kuileihu, but ISS, OSS and Chla jointly controlled PAR attenuation in lake Liangzi and lake Honghu. The significant correlation between the beam attenuatin coefficient at 750 nm and PAR difffuse attenuation coefficient showed that the particles scattering significantly contributed to underwater irradiance attenuation.

  18. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  19. Remote sensing of the diffuse attenuation coefficient of ocean water. [coastal zone color scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A technique was devised which uses remotely sensed spectral radiances from the sea to assess the optical diffuse attenuation coefficient, K (lambda) of near-surface ocean water. With spectral image data from a sensor such as the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) carried on NIMBUS-7, it is possible to rapidly compute the K (lambda) fields for large ocean areas and obtain K "images" which show synoptic, spatial distribution of this attenuation coefficient. The technique utilizes a relationship that has been determined between the value of K and the ratio of the upwelling radiances leaving the sea surface at two wavelengths. The relationship was developed to provide an algorithm for inferring K from the radiance images obtained by the CZCS, thus the wavelengths were selected from those used by this sensor, viz., 443, 520, 550 and 670 nm. The majority of the radiance arriving at the spacecraft is the result of scattering in the atmospheric and is unrelated to the radiance signal generated by the water. A necessary step in the processing of the data received by the sensor is, therefore, the effective removal of these atmospheric path radiance signals before the K algorithm is applied. Examples of the efficacy of these removal techniques are given together with examples of the spatial distributions of K in several ocean areas.

  20. Quality control tool of electrode coating for lithium-ion batteries based on X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiemble, A.; Besnard, N.; Adrien, J.; Tran-Van, P.; Gautier, L.; Lestriez, B.; Maire, E.

    2015-12-01

    A simple and efficient method, based on X-ray radiography, is developed to check the quality (homogeneity of the thickness, presence of defects) of NMC-, LFP- and NMC/LFP-based electrode coating for Li-ion batteries at the scale of several cm2 with a resolution of 20 μm. As a first step, the attenuation coefficient of NMC- and LFP-based coating is experimentally determined according to the Beer-Lambert law. Then, the attenuation coefficient of each active material is estimated from these experimental results and X-ray attenuation databases, which allows establishing an attenuation law for any coating composition. Finally, thanks to this relationship, the thickness can be evaluated in each spot of the film and the defects, such as pinholes or broad edges with gradual decrease of the thickness coating, can be detected. The analysis of NMC-, LFP- and NMC/LFP-based electrodes shows that the coating quality decreases as coating thickness increases and as the nanometric vs. micrometric material content increases in the coating composition. This reveals detrimental aspects of nanomaterials with respect to their use in composite electrode manufactured through conventional slot-die or casting process.

  1. Applications of Hard X-ray Full-Field Transmission X-ray Microscopy at SSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Andrews, J. C.; Meirer, F.; Mehta, A.; Gil, S. Carrasco; Sciau, P.; Mester, Z.; Pianetta, P.

    2011-09-01

    State-of-the-art hard x-ray full-field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) at beamline 6-2C of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource has been applied to various research fields including biological, environmental, and material studies. With the capability of imaging a 32-micron field-of-view at 30-nm resolution using both absorption mode and Zernike phase contrast, the 3D morphology of yeast cells grown in gold-rich media was investigated. Quantitative evaluation of the absorption coefficient was performed for mercury nanoparticles in alfalfa roots exposed to mercury. Combining XANES and TXM, we also performed XANES-imaging on an ancient pottery sample from the Roman pottery workshop at LaGraufesenque (Aveyron).

  2. Applications of Hard X-ray Full-Field Transmission X-ray Microscopy at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Andrews, J. C.; Mehta, A.; Pianetta, P.; Meirer, F.; Gil, S. Carrasco; Sciau, P.; Mester, Z.

    2011-09-09

    State-of-the-art hard x-ray full-field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) at beamline 6-2C of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource has been applied to various research fields including biological, environmental, and material studies. With the capability of imaging a 32-micron field-of-view at 30-nm resolution using both absorption mode and Zernike phase contrast, the 3D morphology of yeast cells grown in gold-rich media was investigated. Quantitative evaluation of the absorption coefficient was performed for mercury nanoparticles in alfalfa roots exposed to mercury. Combining XANES and TXM, we also performed XANES-imaging on an ancient pottery sample from the Roman pottery workshop at LaGraufesenque (Aveyron).

  3. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  4. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1996-01-01

    A window that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 .mu.m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons.

  5. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1996-04-16

    A window is disclosed that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 {micro}m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons. 1 fig.

  6. The associated X-ray spectra of Amersham caesium-137 afterloading sources.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D A; Chong, C S

    1987-02-01

    Low-energy X rays are clearly observed in the energy spectra of Amersham 137Cs afterloading sources. Examination is made of the effects of encapsulation and source train attenuation on the source spectra. Estimates of the resulting X-ray intensities are also made.

  7. Grazing-incidence cylindric mirror with multiple reflection for the soft X-ray spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Yu. M.; Fedin, D. A.; Fedorchuk, R. V.; Koshevoi, M. O.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Murashova, V. A.; Pisarzyk, T.; Rupasov, A. A.; Shikanov, A. S.; Yakimenko, M. N.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    1991-10-01

    New possibilities of the SR beam control are opened with the use of grazing incidence elements based on the "whispering gallery" effect. Experimental investigations of such an X-ray optical element have been performed on the S-60 synchrotron at the Lebedev Institute. By using the absolute spectral characteristics of the X-ray photofilm RAR 2497 (Kodak) and the SR spectral shape we have determined the output-angle integral spectral coefficient of reflection of the studied mirror. A high value of the reflection coefficient makes it possible to use such an X-ray optical element as the effective reflector for soft X-ray beams.

  8. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  9. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  10. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  11. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  12. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  13. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  14. Highly porous nanoberyllium for X-ray beam speckle suppression.

    PubMed

    Goikhman, Alexander; Lyatun, Ivan; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Wojda, Pawel; Gorlevsky, Vladimir; Semenov, Alexander; Sheverdyaev, Maksim; Koletskiy, Viktor; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a special device called a `speckle suppressor', which contains a highly porous nanoberyllium plate squeezed between two beryllium windows. The insertion of the speckle suppressor in an X-ray beam allows manipulation of the spatial coherence length, thus changing the effective source size and removing the undesirable speckle structure in X-ray imaging experiments almost without beam attenuation. The absorption of the nanoberyllium plate is below 1% for 1 mm thickness at 12 keV. The speckle suppressor was tested on the ID06 ESRF beamline with X-rays in the energy range from 9 to 15 keV. It was applied for the transformation of the phase-amplitude contrast to the pure amplitude contrast in full-field microscopy.

  15. Bone age assessment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in children: an alternative for X-ray?

    PubMed Central

    Heppe, D H M; Taal, H R; Ernst, G D S; Van Den Akker, E L T; Lequin, M M H; Hokken-Koelega, A C S; Geelhoed, J J M; Jaddoe, V W V

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to validate dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as a method to assess bone age in children. Methods Paired dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans and X-rays of the left hand were performed in 95 children who attended the paediatric endocrinology outpatient clinic of University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands. We compared bone age assessments by DXA scan with those performed by X-ray. Bone age assessment was performed by two blinded observers according to the reference method of Greulich and Pyle. Intra-observer and interobserver reproducibility were investigated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and agreement was tested using Bland and Altman plots. Results The intra-observer ICCs for both observers were 0.997 and 0.991 for X-ray and 0.993 and 0.987 for DXA assessments. The interobserver ICC was 0.993 and 0.991 for X-ray and DXA assessments, respectively. The mean difference between bone age assessed by X-ray and DXA was 0.11 years. The limits of agreement ranged from −0.82 to 1.05 years, which means that 95% of all differences between the methods were covered by this range. Conclusions Results of bone age assessment by DXA scan are similar to those obtained by X-ray. The DXA method seems to be an alternative for assessing bone age in a paediatric hospital-based population. PMID:21586503

  16. X-ray absorption in perfect crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Attenuation coefficients for germanium, silicon and HOPG were measured for the fundamental, second and third harmonic wavelengths of the tungsten L1, L..cap alpha../sub 1/, L..beta../sub 1/, and L..gamma.., excitation lines. The relation between the atomic scattering factor and the photoelectric contribution to the attenuation coefficient is discussed. Also, theoretical calculations of these are discussed along with theoretical calculations for the coherent and incoherent processes. Following this, the unique apparatus on which the experiment was performed along with some general experimental techniques which were used are described. This is proceeded by the results and discussion of the data obtained for the perfect crystals and HOPG. Also, experimental attenuation coefficients for HOPG are presented for different temperatures. Within the conclusions, the results of the data are summarized and differences in obtaining attenuation coefficients for the perfect crystals and HOPG are discussed. In the final chapter, recommendations are given for further studies to determine characteristics of the change of the linear attenuation coefficient in the regime of the thick crystal or small scattering angle. (WHK)

  17. Optimized Volumetric Scanning for X-Ray Array Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Foudray, A M; Wang, A; Kallman, J S; Martz, H

    2009-09-29

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is the science and technology of determining non-invasively the internal structure of manufactured parts, objects, and materials. NDE application areas include medicine, industrial manufacturing, military, homeland security, and airport luggage screening. X-ray measurement systems are most widely used because of their ability to image through a wide range of material densities (from human tissue in medical applications to the dense materials of weapon components). Traditional x-ray systems involve a single source and detector system that rotate and/or translate about the object under evaluation. At each angular location, the source projects x-rays through the object. The rays undergo attenuation proportional to the density of the object's constitutive material. The detector records a measure of the attenuation. Mathematical algorithms are used to invert the forward attenuated ray projection process to form images of the object. This is known as computed tomography (CT). In recent years, the single-source x-ray NDE systems have been generalized to arrays of x-ray sources. Array sources permit multiple views of the object with fewer rotations and translations of the source/detector system. The spatially diverse nature of x-ray array sources has the potential of reducing data collection time, reducing imaging artifacts, and increasing the resolution of the resultant images. Most of the existing CT algorithms were not derived from array source models with a spatially diverse set of viewing perspectives. Single-source x-ray CT data collection, processing, and imaging methods and algorithms are not applicable when the source location is expanded from one dimension (a rotating and/or translating point source) to two (a rotating and/or translating array). They must be reformulated. The goal of this project is to determine the applicability of x-ray array sources to problems of interest to LLNL and its customers. It is believed array source

  18. An edge-on charge-transfer design for energy-resolved x-ray detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zaifeng; Yang, Haoyu; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    As an x-ray beam goes through the human body, it will collect important information via interaction with tissues. Since this interaction is energy-sensitive, the state-of-the-art spectral CT technologies provide higher quality images of biological tissues with x-ray energy information (or spectral information). With existing energy-integrating technologies, a large fraction of energy information is ignored in the x-ray detection process. Although the recently proposed photon-counting technology promises to achieve higher image quality at a lower radiation dose, it suffers from limitations in counting rate, performance uniformity, and fabrication cost. In this paper, we focus on an alternative approach to resolve the energy distribution of transmitted x-ray photons. First, we analyze the x-ray attenuation in a silicon substrate and describe a linear approximation model for x-ray detection. Then, we design an edge-on architecture based on the proposed energy-resolving model. In our design, the x-ray-photon-induced charges are transferred sequentially resembling the working process of a CCD camera. Finally, we numerically evaluate the linear approximation of x-ray attenuation and derive the energy distribution of x-ray photons. Our simulation results show that the proposed energy-sensing approach is feasible and has the potential to complement the photon-counting technology.

  19. An edge-on charge-transfer design for energy-resolved x-ray detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zaifeng; Yang, Haoyu; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    As an x-ray beam goes through the human body, it will collect important information via interaction with tissues. Since this interaction is energy-sensitive, the state-of-the-art spectral CT technologies provide higher quality images of biological tissues with x-ray energy information (or spectral information). With existing energy-integrating technologies, a large fraction of energy information is ignored in the x-ray detection process. Although the recently proposed photon-counting technology promises to achieve higher image quality at a lower radiation dose, it suffers from limitations in counting rate, performance uniformity, and fabrication cost. In this paper, we focus on an alternative approach to resolve the energy distribution of transmitted x-ray photons. First, we analyze the x-ray attenuation in a silicon substrate and describe a linear approximation model for x-ray detection. Then, we design an edge-on architecture based on the proposed energy-resolving model. In our design, the x-ray-photon-induced charges are transferred sequentially resembling the working process of a CCD camera. Finally, we numerically evaluate the linear approximation of x-ray attenuation and derive the energy distribution of x-ray photons. Our simulation results show that the proposed energy-sensing approach is feasible and has the potential to complement the photon-counting technology. PMID:27192190

  20. An edge-on charge-transfer design for energy-resolved x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zaifeng; Yang, Haoyu; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    As an x-ray beam goes through the human body, it will collect important information via interaction with tissues. Since this interaction is energy-sensitive, the state-of-the-art spectral CT technologies provide higher quality images of biological tissues with x-ray energy information (or spectral information). With existing energy-integrating technologies, a large fraction of energy information is ignored in the x-ray detection process. Although the recently proposed photon-counting technology promises to achieve higher image quality at a lower radiation dose, it suffers from limitations in counting rate, performance uniformity, and fabrication cost. In this paper, we focus on an alternative approach to resolve the energy distribution of transmitted x-ray photons. First, we analyze the x-ray attenuation in a silicon substrate and describe a linear approximation model for x-ray detection. Then, we design an edge-on architecture based on the proposed energy-resolving model. In our design, the x-ray-photon-induced charges are transferred sequentially resembling the working process of a CCD camera. Finally, we numerically evaluate the linear approximation of x-ray attenuation and derive the energy distribution of x-ray photons. Our simulation results show that the proposed energy-sensing approach is feasible and has the potential to complement the photon-counting technology.

  1. Temperature Increase Dependence on Ultrasound Attenuation Coefficient in Innovative Tissue-mimicking Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccaro, R.; Magnetto, C.; Albo, P. A. Giuliano; Troia, A.; Lago, S.

    Although high intensity focused ultrasound beams (HIFU) have found rapid agreement in clinical environment as a tool for non invasive surgical ablation and controlled destruction of cancer cells, some aspects related to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with tissues, such as the conversion of acoustic energy into heat, are not thoroughly understood. In this work, innovative tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs), based on Agar and zinc acetate, have been used to conduct investigations in order to determine a relation between the sample attenuation coefficient and its temperature increase measured in the focus region when exposed to an HIFU beam. An empirical relation has been deduced establishing useful basis for further processes of validations of numerical models to be adopted for customizing therapeutic treatments.

  2. Calculation of solar attenuation coefficient using ACCOS V along a critical scattering path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Alan J.

    An appraisal of the optical properties of the AVHRR is made for a proposed orbital trajectory which results in an unexpected solar stray-light path; i.e., bypassing the external scan mirror and Cassegrain telescope and proceeding directly to the inner conical baffle. This stray-light path is directed onto an internal beamsplitter which, in turn, is directly observed by the detectors. Stray-light analysis, as a goal, seeks to remove or minimize the influence of such critical scattering paths. The AVHRR path is evaluated using a standard optical ray-tracing program, ACCOS V. To determine the expected sensor degradation, a calculation of the expected attenuation coefficient of scattered sunlight in the AVHRR sensor is estimated based on this important critical scattering path.

  3. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  4. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  5. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  6. Producing X-rays at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  7. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily Kara

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus.

  9. Unified imaging theory for x-ray and acoustic computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pingyu; Wang, Ge; Boyer, Arthur

    2004-10-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and acoustic CT are two main medical imaging modalities based on two intrinsically different physical phenomena. X-ray CT is based on x-ray"s attenuation when x-ray passes through medium. It has been well known that the Radon transform is the imaging theory for x-ray CT. Photoacoustic CT is a type of acoustic CT, which is based on differentiating electromagnetic energy absorption among media. In 1998 a new 3D reconstruction concept, the P-transform, was proposed to serve the imaging theory for photoacoustic CT. In this paper it was rigorously proved that both x-ray CT and photoacoustic CT are governed by a unified imaging theory. 3D data acquisition can be completed in 2p stereoangle. This new imaging theory realized, in part, the dream of all physicists, including Albert Einstein, who have long believed that our world is ultimately governed by few simple rules.

  10. Dark-field X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Di Bella, C.; Lura, P.; Prade, F.; Herzen, J.; Sarapata, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Griffa, M. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Jerjen, I.

    2014-10-13

    We introduce in this Letter an approach to X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials based upon the intrinsic X-ray scattering produced by the material microstructural heterogeneity at a length scale below the imaging system spatial resolution. The basic principle for image contrast creation consists in a reduction of such scattering by permeation of the porosity by water. The implementation of the approach is based upon X-ray dark-field imaging via Talbot-Lau interferometry. The proof-of-concept is provided by performing laboratory-scale dark-field X-ray radiography of mortar samples during a water capillary uptake experiment. The results suggest that the proposed approach to visualizing unsaturated water transport in porous materials is complementary to neutron and magnetic resonance imaging and alternative to standard X-ray imaging, the latter requiring the use of contrast agents because based upon X-ray attenuation only.

  11. Imaging the attenuation coefficients of magnetically constrained positron beams in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Charles C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a method for tomographically imaging the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of positron beams in heterogeneous materials. A β+ ray emitter such as 68Ga, placed in a uniform 3T static magnetic field, generates a well-defined positron beam that maintains its spatial coherence over an attenuation of more than 10-3 while signaling its intensity via the annihilation radiation it generates. A positron emission tomography (PET) system embedded in the magnetic field measures the positron-electron annihilation distribution within objects illuminated by the beam. It's shown that this image can be decomposed into maps of the positron beam's flux and its material-dependent LACs without need for auxiliary measurements or transmission of the beam completely through the object. The initial implementation employs a hybrid PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner developed for medical applications. Mass thicknesses up to 0.55 g/cm2 at a spatial resolution of a few millimeters have been imaged.

  12. X-ray spectrometry and X-ray microtomography techniques for soil and geological samples analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Dziadowicz, M.; Kopeć, E.; Majewska, U.; Mazurek, M.; Pajek, M.; Sobisz, M.; Stabrawa, I.; Wudarczyk-Moćko, J.; Góźdź, S.

    2015-12-01

    A particular subject of X-ray fluorescence analysis is its application in studies of the multielemental sample of composition in a wide range of concentrations, samples with different matrices, also inhomogeneous ones and those characterized with different grain size. Typical examples of these kinds of samples are soil or geological samples for which XRF elemental analysis may be difficult due to XRF disturbing effects. In this paper the WDXRF technique was applied in elemental analysis concerning different soil and geological samples (therapeutic mud, floral soil, brown soil, sandy soil, calcium aluminum cement). The sample morphology was analyzed using X-ray microtomography technique. The paper discusses the differences between the composition of samples, the influence of procedures with respect to the preparation of samples as regards their morphology and, finally, a quantitative analysis. The results of the studies were statistically tested (one-way ANOVA and correlation coefficients). For lead concentration determination in samples of sandy soil and cement-like matrix, the WDXRF spectrometer calibration was performed. The elemental analysis of the samples was complemented with knowledge of chemical composition obtained by X-ray powder diffraction.

  13. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  14. Metal Artifact Reduction for Polychromatic X-ray CT Based on a Beam-Hardening Corrector.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Hwang, Dosik; Seo, Jin Keun

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new method to correct beam hardening artifacts caused by the presence of metal in polychromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) without degrading the intact anatomical images. Metal artifacts due to beam-hardening, which are a consequence of X-ray beam polychromaticity, are becoming an increasingly important issue affecting CT scanning as medical implants become more common in a generally aging population. The associated higher-order beam-hardening factors can be corrected via analysis of the mismatch between measured sinogram data and the ideal forward projectors in CT reconstruction by considering the known geometry of high-attenuation objects. Without prior knowledge of the spectrum parameters or energy-dependent attenuation coefficients, the proposed correction allows the background CT image (i.e., the image before its corruption by metal artifacts) to be extracted from the uncorrected CT image. Computer simulations and phantom experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method to alleviate beam hardening artifacts. PMID:26390451

  15. Metal Artifact Reduction for Polychromatic X-ray CT Based on a Beam-Hardening Corrector.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Hwang, Dosik; Seo, Jin Keun

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new method to correct beam hardening artifacts caused by the presence of metal in polychromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) without degrading the intact anatomical images. Metal artifacts due to beam-hardening, which are a consequence of X-ray beam polychromaticity, are becoming an increasingly important issue affecting CT scanning as medical implants become more common in a generally aging population. The associated higher-order beam-hardening factors can be corrected via analysis of the mismatch between measured sinogram data and the ideal forward projectors in CT reconstruction by considering the known geometry of high-attenuation objects. Without prior knowledge of the spectrum parameters or energy-dependent attenuation coefficients, the proposed correction allows the background CT image (i.e., the image before its corruption by metal artifacts) to be extracted from the uncorrected CT image. Computer simulations and phantom experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method to alleviate beam hardening artifacts.

  16. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  17. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  18. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  19. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  20. On the response of Y 3Al 5O 12: Ce (YAG: Ce) powder scintillating screens to medical imaging X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Sianoudis, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Episkopakis, A.; Linardatos, D.; Margetis, D.; Nirgianaki, E.; Roussou, M.; Melissaropoulos, P.; Kalivas, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Kourkoutas, K.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Louizi, A.; Nomicos, C.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce (also known as YAG:Ce) powder scintillator under X-ray imaging conditions. This material shows a very fast scintillation decay time and it has never been used in X-ray medical imaging. In the present study various scintillator layers (screens) with coating thickness ranging from 13 to 166 mg/cm 2 were prepared in our laboratory by sedimentation of Y 3Al 5O 12: Ce powder. Optical emission spectra and light emission efficiency (spectrum area over X-ray exposure) of the layers were measured under X-ray excitation using X-ray tube voltages (80-120 kVp) often employed in general medical radiography and fluoroscopy. Spectral compatibility with various optical photon detectors (photodiodes, photocathodes, charge coupled devices, films) and intrinsic conversion efficiency values were determined using emission spectrum data. In addition, parameters related to X-ray detection, energy absorption efficiency and K-fluorescence characteristic emission were calculated. A theoretical model describing radiation and light transfer through scattering media was used to fit experimental data. Intrinsic conversion efficiency (η≈0.03-0.05) and light attenuation coefficients (σ≈26.5 cm/g) were derived through this fitting. Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce showed peak emission in the wavelength range 530-550 nm. The light emission efficiency was found to be maximum for the 107 mg/cm 2 layer. Due to its "green" emission spectrum, Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce showed excellent compatibility (of the order of 0.9) with the sensitivity of many currently used photodetectors. Taking into account its very fast response Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce could be considered for application in X-ray imaging especially in various digital detectors.

  1. Diel variability of the beam attenuation and backscattering coefficients in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (BOUSSOLE site)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheireddine, Malika; Antoine, David

    2014-08-01

    The diel variability of the particulate beam attenuation coefficient, cp, and of the particulate backscattering coefficient, bbp, were investigated during five seasonal cycles at an oceanic site in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, covering contrasting physical and trophic situations. We observed a diel cycle in cp and bbp, related to changes in phytoplankton properties (i.e., size and refractive index) induced by the accumulation of carbon within phytoplankton cells associated with photosynthetic processes, during the winter mixing of the water column, the development of the spring phytoplankton bloom, its decline, and during the summer oligotrophy. The relative amplitude of the cp diel variability was much larger during the spring bloom (20-50%) than during other seasons (10-20%), whereas that of bbp is steadily around 20% and does not show significant seasonal variability. The minimal cp and bbp occurred at sunrise and are synchronized, whereas maximum bbp values are often reached 3-6 h before those for cp (except during bloom conditions), which occur near sunset. These different amplitudes and timing are tentatively explained using Mie computations, which allow discerning the respective roles of changes in the particle size distribution and refractive index. The differences observed here in the diel cycles of cp and bbp show that they cannot be used interchangeably to determine the daily increase of the particle pool. This result has implications on the feasibility to determine net community production from the bbp diel changes, when only bbp is measured in situ or available from ocean color observations.

  2. Noninvasive monitoring of photodynamic therapy on skin neoplastic lesions using the optical attenuation coefficient measured by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, Viviane P.; dos Santos, Moisés O.; Latrive, Anne; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a promising alternative for treatment of skin lesions such as squamous cell carcinoma. We propose a method to monitor the effects of PDT in a noninvasive way by using the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) calculated from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. We conducted a study on mice with chemically induced neoplastic lesions and performed PDT on these lesions using homemade photosensitizers. The response of neoplastic lesions to therapy was monitored using, at the same time, macroscopic clinical visualization, histopathological analysis, OCT imaging, and OCT-based attenuation coefficient measurement. Results with all four modalities demonstrated a positive response to treatment. The attenuation coefficient was found to be 1.4 higher in skin lesions than in healthy tissue and it decreased after therapy. This study shows that the OAC is a potential tool to noninvasively assess the evolution of skin neoplastic lesions with time after treatment.

  3. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    The soft X-ray sky survey data are combined with the results from the UXT sounding rocket payload. Very strong constraints can then be placed on models of the origin of the soft diffuse background. Additional observational constraints force more complicated and realistic models. Significant progress was made in the extraction of more detailed spectral information from the UXT data set. Work was begun on a second generation proportional counter response model. The first flight of the sounding rocket will have a collimator to study the diffuse background.

  4. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  5. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  6. X-ray imaging for palaeontology.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, P

    2004-05-01

    Few may be aware that X-ray imaging is used in palaeontology and has been used since as early as 1896. The X-raying, preparation and exposure of Hunsrück slate fossils are described. Hospital X-ray machines are used by the author in his work. An X-ray is vital to provide evidence that preparation of a slate is worthwhile as well as to facilitate preparation even if there is little external sign of what lies within. The beauty of the X-ray exposure is an added bonus.

  7. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  8. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  9. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  10. Extended range X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray telescope system is described which is comprised of a tubular mount having a collecting region remote from the one axial end. A soft X-ray/XUV subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively soft, near on-axis X-rays/XUV radiation incident on a first portion of the collecting region into a first detector sensitive to relatively soft X-rays/XUV radiation. A hard X-ray subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively hard near on-axis X-rays incident on a second portion of the collecting region into a second detector sensitive to relatively hard X-rays.

  11. Evolution of X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossj, B.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of X-ray astronomy up to the launching of the Einstein observatory is presented. The evaluation proceeded through the following major steps: (1) discovery of an extrasolar X-ray source, Sco X-1, orders of magnitude stronger than astronomers believed might exist; (2) identification of a strong X-ray source with the Crab Nebula; (3) identification of Sco X-1 with a faint, peculiar optical object; (4) demonstration that X-ray stars are binary systems, each consisting of a collapsed object accreting matter from an ordinary star; (5) discovery of X-ray bursts; (6) discovery of exceedingly strong X-ray emission from active galaxies, quasars and clusters of galaxies; (7) demonstration that the principal X-ray source is a hot gas filling the space between galaxies.

  12. On stellar X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  13. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  14. Theoretical study of the X-ray emission from astrophysical shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, J.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical X-ray emission spectra are needed to interpret the X-ray emission observed by many low and moderate resolution X-ray instruments, and to provide diagnosis of physical conditions for high resolution spectra. Over the past decade, a set of model codes which compute the X-ray and XUV emission for a wide set of physical conditions, including high or low densities, photoionized gas, and time-dependent ionization balance was developed. In the past year, the atomic rate coefficients in the code was improved. Further capabilities were added, and applied to several astrophysical problems.

  15. Modeling X-ray emission line profiles from massive star winds - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes have led to numerous advances in the study and understanding of astrophysical X-ray sources. Particularly important has been the much increased spectral resolution of modern X-ray instrumentation. Wind-broadened emission lines have been spectroscopically resolved for many massive stars. This contribution reviews approaches to the modeling of X-ray emission line profile shapes from single stars, including smooth winds, winds with clumping, optically thin versus thick lines, and the effect of a radius-dependent photoabsorption coefficient.

  16. X-ray Tube Using a Graphene Flower Cloth Field Emission Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Tsuboi, Shougo; Jyouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated a filament-less X-ray tube using a graphene flower cloth (GFC) field emission cathode. The GFC has numerous nanoprotrusions formed by self-standing graphene structures. The field emission current and the field enhancement factor β were 500 µA and 5600, respectively. The stability of voltage defined as a variance coefficient (σ/mean) of voltage was calculated to be 0.04% while maintaining the X-ray tube current of 300 µA. We applied our X-ray tube with the GFC field emitter to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of stainless steel.

  17. X-ray deconvolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship pn with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n. PMID:27446649

  18. X-ray omni microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paganin, D; Gureyev, T E; Mayo, S C; Stevenson, A W; Nesterets, Ya I; Wilkins, S W

    2004-06-01

    The science of wave-field phase retrieval and phase measurement is sufficiently mature to permit the routine reconstruction, over a given plane, of the complex wave-function associated with certain coherent forward-propagating scalar wave-fields. This reconstruction gives total knowledge of the information that has been encoded in the complex wave-field by passage through a sample of interest. Such total knowledge is powerful, because it permits the emulation in software of the subsequent action of an infinite variety of coherent imaging systems. Such 'virtual optics', in which software forms a natural extension of the 'hardware optics' in an imaging system, may be useful in contexts such as quantitative atom and X-ray imaging, in which optical elements such as beam-splitters and lenses can be realized in software rather than optical hardware. Here, we develop the requisite theory to describe such hybrid virtual-physical imaging systems, which we term 'omni optics' because of their infinite flexibility. We then give an experimental demonstration of these ideas by showing that a lensless X-ray point projection microscope can, when equipped with the appropriate software, emulate an infinite variety of optical imaging systems including those which yield interferograms, Zernike phase contrast, Schlieren imaging and diffraction-enhanced imaging.

  19. X-ray deconvolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship [Formula: see text] with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n. PMID:27446649

  20. Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient of Downwelling Irradiance: An Evaluation of Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Darecki, Miroslaw; Carder, Kendall L.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Stramski, Dariusz; Rhea, W. Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of downwelling irradiance at wavelength lambda from surface to a depth (z) in the ocean is governed by the diffuse attenuation coefficient, K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda). There are two standard methods for the derivation of K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) in remote sensing, which both are based on empirical relationships involving the blue-to-green ratio of ocean color. Recently, a semianalytical method to derive K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) from reflectance has also been developed. In this study, using K(sup -)(sub d)(490) and K(sup -)(sub d)(443) as examples, we compare the K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) values derived from the three methods using data collected in three different regions that cover oceanic and coastal waters, with K(sup -)(sub d)(490) ranging from approximately 0.04 to 4.0 per meter. The derived values are compared with the data calculated from in situ measurements of the vertical profiles of downwelling irradiance. The comparisons show that the two standard methods produced satisfactory estimates of K(sup -)(sub d)(lambda) in oceanic waters where attenuation is relatively low but resulted in significant errors in coastal waters. The newly developed semianalytical method appears to have no such limitation as it performed well for both oceanic and coastal waters. For all data in this study the average of absolute percentage difference between the in situ measured and the semianalytically derived K(sup -)(sub d) is approximately 14% for lambda = 490 nm and approximately 11% for lambda = 443 nm.

  1. Coated x-ray filters

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-24

    A radiation filter for filtering radiation beams of wavelengths within a preselected range of wavelengths comprises a radiation transmissive substrate and an attenuating layer deposited on the substrate. The attenuating layer may be deposited by a sputtering process or a vacuum process. Beryllium may be used as the radiation transmissive substrate. In addition, a second radiation filter comprises an attenuating layer interposed between a pair of radiation transmissive layers. 4 figs.

  2. Coated x-ray filters

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-24

    A radiation filter for filtering radiation beams of wavelengths within a preselected range of wavelengths comprises a radiation transmissive substrate and an attenuating layer deposited on the substrate. The attenuating layer may be deposited by a sputtering process or a vacuum process. Beryllium may be used as the radiation transmissive substrate. In addition, a second radiation filter comprises an attenuating layer interposed between a pair of radiation transmissive layers.

  3. Determining the Uncertainty of X-Ray Absorption Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray absorption (or more properly, x-ray attenuation) techniques have been applied to study the moisture movement in and moisture content of materials like cement paste, mortar, and wood. An increase in the number of x-ray counts with time at a location in a specimen may indicate a decrease in moisture content. The uncertainty of measurements from an x-ray absorption system, which must be known to properly interpret the data, is often assumed to be the square root of the number of counts, as in a Poisson process. No detailed studies have heretofore been conducted to determine the uncertainty of x-ray absorption measurements or the effect of averaging data on the uncertainty. In this study, the Poisson estimate was found to adequately approximate normalized root mean square errors (a measure of uncertainty) of counts for point measurements and profile measurements of water specimens. The Poisson estimate, however, was not reliable in approximating the magnitude of the uncertainty when averaging data from paste and mortar specimens. Changes in uncertainty from differing averaging procedures were well-approximated by a Poisson process. The normalized root mean square errors decreased when the x-ray source intensity, integration time, collimator size, and number of scanning repetitions increased. Uncertainties in mean paste and mortar count profiles were kept below 2 % by averaging vertical profiles at horizontal spacings of 1 mm or larger with counts per point above 4000. Maximum normalized root mean square errors did not exceed 10 % in any of the tests conducted. PMID:27366627

  4. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon

  5. Combined SPECT and x-ray CT medical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalki, Kathrin; Brown, J. Keenan; Blankespoor, Stephen C.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Wu, Xiang; Cann, Christopher E.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Chin, Michael; Stillson, Carol A.; Dae, Michael W.; Carver, James M.

    1995-05-01

    We have designed and built a system for correlated x ray CT transmission and SPECT emission imaging with an array of photon counting detectors. The scanner operates in a third generation fan beam geometry by translating a 23 element high purity germanium detector across the fan to image phantoms and small animals. The x ray CT image is used to obtain an object specific, i.e., anatomically accurate, attenuation map for the reconstruction of the SPECT image. SPECT images are reconstructed with an MLEM code and the pixel values are scaled in physical units by determining a scaling factor from a uniform water phantom with homogeneous and known attenuation. Single myocardial slices of several pigs were imaged with a 99mTc sestamibi imaging agent which is taken up in proportion to regional myocardial blood flow. The results show that 99mTc uptake and regional myocardial blood flow, determined in vivo from reconstructed SPECT images, correlate with the measured in vitro data. Furthermore, the correlation is markedly improved by reconstructing the images with an object specific attenuation map obtained from the coregistered x ray CT image. We were also able to restore the 99mTc sestamibi uptake from the reconstructed images to an accuracy between 40% and 90% of the true in vitro value, depending on the selection of maximum or mean pixel values in the regions of interest.

  6. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  7. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  8. Evaluation of Moisture-Related Attenuation Coefficient and Water Diffusion Velocity in Human Skin Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Chang, Feng-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Shen, Su-Chin; Yuan, Ouyang; Yang, Chih-He

    2013-01-01

    In this study, time-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning images of the process of water diffusion in the skin that illustrate the enhancement in the backscattered intensities due to the increased water concentration are presented. In our experiments, the water concentration in the skin was increased by soaking the hand in water, and the same region of the skin was scanned and measured with the OCT system and a commercial moisture monitor every three minutes. To quantitatively analyze the moisture-related optical properties and the velocity of water diffusion in human skin, the attenuation coefficients of the skin, including the epidermis and dermis layers, were evaluated. Furthermore, the evaluated attenuation coefficients were compared with the measurements made using the commercial moisture monitor. The results demonstrate that the attenuation coefficient increases as the water concentration increases. Furthermore, by evaluating the positions of center-of mass of the backscattered intensities from OCT images, the diffusion velocity can be estimated. In contrast to the commercial moisture monitor, OCT can provide three-dimensional structural images of the skin and characterize its optical property, which together can be used to observe morphological changes and quantitatively evaluate the moisture-related attenuation coefficients in different skin layers. PMID:23529149

  9. Attenuation coefficient of the light in skin of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. R.; Camargo, C. F. M.; Aureliano, D. P.; De Pretto, L. R.; Freitas, A. Z.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Optical properties of the biological tissue play an important role to a correct use of optical techniques for therapy and diagnosis. The mice skin presents morphological differences due to characteristics such as gender, body mass and age. Murine models are frequently used in pre-clinical trials in optical therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the assessment of the skin tissue in animal models is needed for a proper understanding of how light interacts with skin. Noninvasive techniques such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) have been used to obtain optical information of the tissue, as the attenuation coefficient, with the advantage of obtaining sectional images in real time. In this study, eight female BALB/c albino mice (twenty-four weeks old) and eight male C57BL/6 black mice (eight weeks old) were used to measure the attenuation coefficient of the light in the skin, utilizing the OCT technique, aiming to check for influence of the aging process. Two moments were assessed twenty-two weeks apart from each other. Our data show that the aging process significantly affects the light attenuation coefficient in mice skin. Twenty-two weeks after, statistical significant differences were observed between groups within a same strain. We conclude that light attenuation coefficient of mice skin may be influenced by factors such as disorganization of the dermis. Morphological aspects of skin should be taken into account in studies that involve optical strategies in murine models.

  10. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  11. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, Jeanette

    2012-07-01

    The first black hole was observed almost 50 years ago, ˜ 1 year after Sco X-1 (although its nature was not confirmed for ˜ 11 years). Observations of black holes have been ongoing since then, falling in to two distinct categories; stellar-mass (sMBHs; 3 - 80 M_{⊙}) and super-massive black holes (10^6 - 10^9 M_⊙). The missing link between these two types, intermediate mass black holes, has been the target of many searches due to their cosmological implications. Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) have been proposed to harbor such objects, but recent observational evidence has strongly suggested that the majority contain sMBHs. However, a handful of the brightest ULXs are so luminous that they defy this explanation. Here we will discuss the nature of both standard ULXs and this new bright subgroup of this population.

  12. Industrial X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, Lewis Research Center jointly sponsored a conference with the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory focused on high speed imaging. This conference, and early funding by Lewis Research Center, helped to spur work by Silicon Mountain Design, Inc. to break the performance barriers of imaging speed, resolution, and sensitivity through innovative technology. Later, under a Small Business Innovation Research contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the company designed a real-time image enhancing camera that yields superb, high quality images in 1/30th of a second while limiting distortion. The result is a rapidly available, enhanced image showing significantly greater detail compared to image processing executed on digital computers. Current applications include radiographic and pathology-based medicine, industrial imaging, x-ray inspection devices, and automated semiconductor inspection equipment.

  13. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  14. X-rays for medical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  15. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  16. Handbook of X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Keith; Smith, Randall; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Ellis, Richard; Huchra, John; Kahn, Steve; Rieke, George; Stetson, Peter B.

    2011-11-01

    Practical guide to X-ray astronomy for graduate students, professional astronomers and researchers. Presenting X-ray optics, basic detector physics and data analysis. It introduces the reduction and calibration of X-ray data, scientific analysis, archives, statistical issues and the particular problems of highly extended sources. The appendices provide reference material often required during data analysis. The handbook web page contains figures and tables: http://xrayastronomyhandbook.com/

  17. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  18. Lobster-Eye X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Marsikova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2010-07-15

    We report on technical and astrophysical aspects of Lobster-Eye wide-field X-ray telescopes expected to monitor the sky with high sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They will contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc.

  19. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  20. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Armon; Mills, Dennis M.

    2002-01-01

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  1. The precise measurement of the attenuation coefficients of various IR optical materials applicable to immersion grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Sayumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2014-07-01

    Immersion grating is a next-generation diffraction grating which has the immersed the diffraction surface in an optical material with high refractive index of n > 2, and can provide higher spectral resolution than a classical reflective grating. Our group is developing various immersion gratings from the near- to mid-infrared region (Ikeda et al.1, 2, 3, 4, Sarugaku et al.5, and Sukegawa et al.6). The internal attenuation αatt of the candidate materials is especially very important to achieve the high efficiency immersion gratings used for astronomical applications. Nevertheless, because there are few available data as αatt < 0.01cm-1 in the infrared region, except for measurements of CVD-ZnSe, CVD-ZnS, and single-crystal Si in the short near-infrared region reported by Ikeda et al.7, we cannot select suitable materials as an immersion grating in an aimed wavelength range. Therefore, we measure the attenuation coefficients of CdTe, CdZnTe, Ge, Si, ZnSe, and ZnS that could be applicable to immersion gratings. We used an originally developed optical unit attached to a commercial FTIR which covers the wide wavelength range from 1.3μm to 28μm. This measurement system achieves the high accuracy of (triangle)αatt ~ 0.01cm-1. As a result, high-resistivity single-crystal CdZnTe, single-crystal Ge, single-crystal Si, CVD-ZnSe, and CVD-ZnS show αatt < 0.01cm-1 at the wavelength range of 5.5 - 19.0μm, 2.0 - 10.5μm, 1.3 - 5.4μm, 1.7 - 13.2μm, and 1.9 - 9.2μm, respectively. This indicates that these materials are good candidates for high efficiency immersion grating covering those wavelength ranges. We plan to make similar measurement under the cryogenic condition as T <= 10K for the infrared, especially mid-infrared applications.

  2. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities. PMID:26811449

  3. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  4. Determination of the total attenuation coefficient for six contact lens materials using the Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Hull, C C; Crofts, N C

    1996-03-01

    The Beer-Lambert law has been used to determine the total attenuation coefficient, mu t, of three hard and three soft contact lens materials. The three hard contact lens materials were PMMA, Polycon II and Boston IV whereas the 3 soft materials were chosen with differing water contents of 38, 55 and 70%, respectively. The total attenuation coefficients of all six materials were obtained from measurements of the axial transmission at 632.8 nm of a series of plano powered lenses varying in axial thickness from 0.5 to 3.5 mm. The value of the total attenuation coefficient depends on both scattering and absorption and hence PMMA and Boston IV, which both incorporated a handling tint, showed significantly higher values (P < 0.0001) of mu t (0.562 +/- 0.010 mm-1 and 0.820 +/- 0.008 mm-1, respectively) than Polycon II (mu t = 0.025 +/- 0.005 mm-1). A comparison between Polycon II and the three hydrated soft contact lens materials showed a significant increase (P < 0.02) in the total attenuation coefficients for the 38% and 55% water content materials, and a weakly significant increase for the 70% water content soft lens material (P < 0.1). On the assumption that the absorption coefficients of these four materials are approximately constant, then this change would be due to an increase in the scattering coefficient of the material and could contribute to an increase in intraocular scatter. No significant difference (P > 0.5) was found between any of the hydrated soft contact lens materials tested.

  5. X-ray Absorption Improvement of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube through Gadolinium Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimin; Narsito, I.; Kartini; Santosa, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption improvement of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through gadolinium (Gd) encapsulation has been studied. The liquid phase adsorption using ethanol has been performed for the doping treatment. The Gd-doped SWCNT (Gd@SWCNT) was characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. A relatively high residual weight of Gd@SWCNT compared to non-doped SWCNT (n-SWCNT) indicated that Gd has been doped in the nanotube. Even though Gd nanoparticles could not be observed clearly by TEM image, however, a significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes at low pressure and RBM (Radial Breathing Mode) upshift of Raman spectra of Gd@SWCNT specimen suggest that the metal nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. It was found that Gd-doped in the SWCNT increased significantly mass attenuation coefficient of the nanotube.

  6. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  7. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  8. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  9. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  10. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  11. The Lunar X-ray Observatory (LXO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission from charge exchange recombination between the highly ionized solar wind and neutral material i n Earth's magnetosheath has complicated x-ray observations of celestial objects with x-ray observatories including ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. However, the charge-exchange emission can also be used as an important diagnostic of the solar-wind interacting with the magnetosheath. Soft x-ray observations from low-earth orbit or even the highly eccentric orbits of Chandra and XMM-Newton are likely superpositions of the celestial object of interest, the true extra-solar soft x-ray background, geospheric charge exchange, and heliospheric charge exchange. We show that with a small x-ray telescope placed either on the moon, in a similar vein as the Apollo ALSOP instruments, or at a stable orbit near L1, we can begin t o disentangle the complicated emission structure in the soft x-ray band. Here we present initial results of a feasibility study recently funded by NASA t o place a small x-ray telescope on the lunar surface. The telescope operates during lunar night to observe charge exchange interactions between the solar wind and magnetospheric neutrals, between the solar wind and the lunar atmosphere, and an unobstructed view of the soft x-ray background without the geospheric component.

  12. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  13. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  14. [X-ray diagnosis of histiocytosis X].

    PubMed

    Khomenko, A G; Dmitrieva, L I; Khikkel', Kh G; Stepanian, I E

    1988-01-01

    The results of a dynamic x-ray study of 27 patients suffering from histiocytosis X with lung involvement were analyzed; the study was supplemented by CT in 4 cases. X-ray semiotics of the disease was investigated with relation to its stage. X-ray symptom complexes were defined: interstitial, interstitial-granulomatous, and focal (tumorous). The authors have emphasized the fact that the small focal-cystic and pneumothoracic x-ray variants of the disease, described in literature, are not nosological entities but reflect only its stage and complications.

  15. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  16. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao; Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Rosenmann, Daniel; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W.; Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2016-01-01

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  17. [The Development of Luminescent Nano-probes on Hard X-ray Irradiation].

    PubMed

    Osakada, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

      X-rays are widely used in imaging applications such as diffraction imaging of crystals and medical imaging. In particular, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a critical tool for clinical and disease diagnostics. The principle of conventional CT is based on X-ray attenuation caused by photoelectric absorption and scattering. In addition to conventional CT, a number of novel methodologies are presently under development, including state-of-the-art instrument technologies and chemical probes to fulfill diagnosis criteria. Among these novel methodologies, we have utilized hard X-ray-excited optical luminescence (hXEOL) as a new methodology to enhance the contrast of the image. Herein, we explored the possibility of hXEOL via iridium-doped polymer nanoparticles and biomolecule-directed metal clusters and propose it as a potential platform for new X-ray imaging.

  18. Proposed New Accelerator Design for Homeland Security X-Ray Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, James; Shedlock, Daniel; Langeveld, Willem G.J.; Bharadwaj, Vinod; Nosochkov, Yuri

    2015-08-07

    In the security and inspection market, there is a push towards highly mobile, reduced-dose active interrogation scanning and imaging systems to allow operation in urban environments. To achieve these goals, the accelerator system design needs to be smaller than existing systems. A smaller radiation exclusion zone may be accomplished through better beam collimation and an integrated, x-ray-source/detector-array assembly to allow feedback and control of an intensity-modulated x-ray source. A shaped low-Z target in the x-ray source can be used to generate a more forward peaked x-ray beam. Electron-beam steering can then be applied to direct the forward-peaked x rays toward areas in the cargo with high attenuation. This paper presents an exploratory study to identify components and upgrades that would be required to meet the desired specifications, as well as the best technical approach to design and build a prototype.

  19. Non-convexly constrained image reconstruction from nonlinear tomographic X-ray measurements

    PubMed Central

    Blumensath, Thomas; Boardman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The use of polychromatic X-ray sources in tomographic X-ray measurements leads to nonlinear X-ray transmission effects. As these nonlinearities are not normally taken into account in tomographic reconstruction, artefacts occur, which can be particularly severe when imaging objects with multiple materials of widely varying X-ray attenuation properties. In these settings, reconstruction algorithms based on a nonlinear X-ray transmission model become valuable. We here study the use of one such model and develop algorithms that impose additional non-convex constraints on the reconstruction. This allows us to reconstruct volumetric data even when limited measurements are available. We propose a nonlinear conjugate gradient iterative hard thresholding algorithm and show how many prior modelling assumptions can be imposed using a range of non-convex constraints. PMID:25939619

  20. X-ray microCT study of pyramids of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R; Nagaraja, S; Barss, J; Dahl, T; Veis, A

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports results of a novel approach, X-ray microCT, for quantifying stereom structures applied to ossicles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. MicroCT, a high resolution variant of medical CT (computed tomography), allows noninvasive mapping of microstructure in 3-D with spatial resolution approaching that of optical microscopy. An intact pyramid (two demipyramids, tooth epiphyses, and one tooth) was reconstructed with 17 microm isotropic voxels (volume elements); two individual demipyramids and a pair of epiphyses were studied with 9-13 microm isotropic voxels. The cross-sectional maps of a linear attenuation coefficient produced by the reconstruction algorithm showed that the structure of the ossicles was quite heterogeneous on the scale of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Variations in magnesium content and in minor elemental constitutents could not account for the observed heterogeneities. Spatial resolution was insufficient to resolve the individual elements of the stereom, but the observed values of the linear attenuation coefficient (for the 26 keV effective X-ray energy, a maximum of 7.4 cm(-1) and a minimum of approximately 2 cm(-1) away from obvious voids) could be interpreted in terms of fractions of voxels occupied by mineral (high magnesium calcite). The average volume fraction of mineral determined for a transverse slice of the demipyramid near where it joins an epiphysis was 0.46; for a slice 3.3 mm adoral it was 0.70. Local volume fractions of mineral approached 1, and, away from resolvable voids, considerable portions of the demipyramids had volume fractions of calcite at or below approximately 0.33. MicroCT imaging of a demipyramid before and after infiltration with a high absorptivity fluid (sodium polytungstate) confirmed the determination of the volume fractions of minerals. PMID:12576016

  1. X-Ray Imaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 1O(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionally less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. At the same time, there will be substantial potential for collisions between the space platforms and space debris. The current NASA catalogue contains over 4500 objects floating in space which are not considered payloads. This debris can have significant effects on collision with orbiting spacecraft. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are being performed to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. In particular the study of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact on the various surfaces anticipated on the Space Station is very important at this point in time. The need to assess the threat of such debris clouds on space structures is an on-going activity. The Space Debris Impact facility in Building 4612 provides a test facility to monitor the types of damage produced with hypervelocity impact. These facilities are used to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Flash radiography or x-ray imaging has traditionally provided such information and as such has been an important tool for recording damage in situ with the event. The proper

  2. Atomic form factors and photoelectric absorption cross-sections near absorption edges in the soft X-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable knowledge of the complex X-ray form factor [Re(f) and Im(f)] and the photoelectric attenuation coefficient (σPE) is required for crystallography, medical diagnosis, radiation safety and XAFS studies. Key discrepancies in earlier theoretical work are due to the smoothing of edge structure, the use of non-relativistic wave functions, and the lack of appropriate convergence of wave functions. These discrepancies lead to significant corrections for most comprehensive (i.e. all-Z) tabulations. This work has led to a major comprehensive database tabulation [Chantler, C. T. (2000). J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 29, 597-1048] which serves as a sequel and companion to earlier relativistic Dirac-Fock computations [Chantler, C. T. (1995). J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 24, 71-643]. The paper finds that earlier work needs improvement in the near-edge region for soft X-ray energies, and derives new theoretical results of substantially higher accuracy in near-edge soft X-ray regions. Fine grids near edges are tabulated demonstrating the current comparison with alternate theory and with available experimental data. The best experimental data and the observed experimental structure as a function of energy are strong indicators of the validity of the current approach. New developments in experimental measurement hold great promise in making critical comparisons with theory in the near future. This work forms the latest component of the FFAST NIST database [http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData/FFast02/Text/cover.html].

  3. a Laboratory-Based X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging Scanner with Applications in Biomedical and Non-Medical Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Munro, P. R. T.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Millard, T. P.; Speller, R.; Olivo, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) provides a much higher visibility of low-absorbing details than conventional, attenuation-based radiography. This is due to the fact that image contrast is determined by the unit decrement of the real part of the complex refractive index of an object rather than by its imaginary part (the absorption coefficient), which can be up to 1000 times larger for energies in the X-ray regime. This finds applications in many areas, including medicine, biology, material testing, and homeland security. Until lately, XPCi has been restricted to synchrotron facilities due to its demanding coherence requirements on the radiation source. However, edge illumination XPCi, first developed by one of the authors at the ELETTRA Synchrotron in Italy, substantially relaxes these requirements and therefore provides options to overcome this problem. Our group has built a prototype scanner that adapts the edge-illumination concept to standard laboratory conditions and extends it to large fields of view. This is based on X-ray sources and detectors available off the shelf, and its use has led to impressive results in mammography, cartilage imaging, testing of composite materials and security inspection. This article presents the method and the scanner prototype, and reviews its applications in selected biomedical and non-medical disciplines.

  4. Bioabsorbable bone fixation plates for X-ray imaging diagnosis by a radiopaque layer of barium sulfate and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Yoon; Hur, Woojune; Kim, Byeung Kyu; Shasteen, Catherine; Kim, Myung Hun; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Seung Ho; Park, Chun Gwon; Park, Min; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choy, Young Bin

    2015-04-01

    Bone fixation systems made of biodegradable polymers are radiolucent, making post-operative diagnosis with X-ray imaging a challenge. In this study, to allow X-ray visibility, we separately prepared a radiopaque layer and attached it to a bioabsorbable bone plate approved for clinical use (Inion, Finland). We employed barium sulfate as a radiopaque material due to the high X-ray attenuation coefficient of barium (2.196 cm(2) /g). The radiopaque layer was composed of a fine powder of barium sulfate bound to a biodegradable material, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), to allow layer degradation similar to the original Inion bone plate. In this study, we varied the mass ratio of barium sulfate and PLGA in the layer between 3:1 w/w and 10:1 w/w to modulate the degree and longevity of X-ray visibility. All radiopaque plates herein were visible via X-ray, both in vitro and in vivo, for up to 40 days. For all layer types, the radio-opacity decreased with time due to the swelling and degradation of PLGA, and the change in the layer shape was more apparent for layers with a higher PLGA content. The radiopaque plates released, at most, 0.5 mg of barium sulfate every 2 days in a simulated in vitro environment, which did not appear to affect the cytotoxicity. The radiopaque plates also exhibited good biocompatibility, similar to that of the Inion plate. Therefore, we concluded that the barium sulfate-based, biodegradable plate prepared in this work has the potential to be used as a fixation device with both X-ray visibility and biocompatibility. PMID:24964903

  5. Bioabsorbable bone fixation plates for X-ray imaging diagnosis by a radiopaque layer of barium sulfate and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Yoon; Hur, Woojune; Kim, Byeung Kyu; Shasteen, Catherine; Kim, Myung Hun; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Seung Ho; Park, Chun Gwon; Park, Min; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choy, Young Bin

    2015-04-01

    Bone fixation systems made of biodegradable polymers are radiolucent, making post-operative diagnosis with X-ray imaging a challenge. In this study, to allow X-ray visibility, we separately prepared a radiopaque layer and attached it to a bioabsorbable bone plate approved for clinical use (Inion, Finland). We employed barium sulfate as a radiopaque material due to the high X-ray attenuation coefficient of barium (2.196 cm(2) /g). The radiopaque layer was composed of a fine powder of barium sulfate bound to a biodegradable material, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), to allow layer degradation similar to the original Inion bone plate. In this study, we varied the mass ratio of barium sulfate and PLGA in the layer between 3:1 w/w and 10:1 w/w to modulate the degree and longevity of X-ray visibility. All radiopaque plates herein were visible via X-ray, both in vitro and in vivo, for up to 40 days. For all layer types, the radio-opacity decreased with time due to the swelling and degradation of PLGA, and the change in the layer shape was more apparent for layers with a higher PLGA content. The radiopaque plates released, at most, 0.5 mg of barium sulfate every 2 days in a simulated in vitro environment, which did not appear to affect the cytotoxicity. The radiopaque plates also exhibited good biocompatibility, similar to that of the Inion plate. Therefore, we concluded that the barium sulfate-based, biodegradable plate prepared in this work has the potential to be used as a fixation device with both X-ray visibility and biocompatibility.

  6. Spatial Distribution of Trehalose Dihydrate Crystallization in Tablets by X-ray Diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Naveen K; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Stephenson, Gregory A; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Crystallization of trehalose dihydrate (C12H22O11·2H2O) was induced by storing tablets of amorphous anhydrous trehalose (C12H22O11) at 65% RH (RT). Our goal was to evaluate the advantages and limitations of two approaches of profiling spatial distribution of drug crystallization in tablets. The extent of crystallization, as a function of depth, was determined in tablets stored for different time-periods. The first approach was glancing angle X-ray diffractometry, where the penetration depth of X-rays was modulated by the incident angle. Based on the mass attenuation coefficient of the matrix, the depth of X-ray penetration was calculated as a function of incident angle, which in turn enabled us to "calculate" the extent of crystallization to different depths. In the second approach, the tablets were split into halves and the split surfaces were analyzed directly. Starting from the tablet surface and moving toward the midplane, XRD patterns were collected in 36 "regions", in increments of 0.05 mm. The results obtained by the two approaches were, in general, in good agreement. Additionally, the results obtained were validated by determining the "average" crystallization in the entire tablet by using synchrotron radiation in the transmission mode. The glancing angle method could detect crystallization up to ∼650 μm and had a "surface bias". Being a nondestructive technique, this method will permit repeated analyses of the same tablet at different time points, for example, during a stability study. However, split tablet analyses, while a "destructive" technique, provided comprehensive and unbiased depth profiling information.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray scatter based on patient model from digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bob; Wu, Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-03-01

    We are developing a breast specific scatter correction method for digital beast tomosynthesis (DBT). The 3D breast volume was initially reconstructed from 15 projection images acquired from a GE prototype tomosynthesis system without correction of scatter. The voxel values were mapped to the tissue compositions using various segmentation schemes. This voxelized digital breast model was entered into a Monte Carlo package simulating the prototype tomosynthesis system. One billion photons were generated from the x-ray source for each projection in the simulation and images of scattered photons were obtained. A primary only projection image was then produced by subtracting the scatter image from the corresponding original projection image which contains contributions from the both primary photons and scatter photons. The scatter free projection images were then used to reconstruct the 3D breast using the same algorithm. Compared with the uncorrected 3D image, the x-ray attenuation coefficients represented by the scatter-corrected 3D image are closer to those derived from the measurement data.

  8. Calibration-free quantification of interior properties of porous media with x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Esam M A; Agbogun, H M D; Al, Tom A

    2015-03-01

    A method is presented for interpreting the values of x-ray attenuation coefficients reconstructed in computed tomography of porous media, while overcoming the ambiguity caused by the multichromatic nature of x-rays, dilution by void, and material heterogeneity. The method enables determination of porosity without relying on calibration or image segmentation or thresholding to discriminate pores from solid material. It distinguishes between solution-accessible and inaccessible pores, and provides the spatial and frequency distributions of solid-matrix material in a heterogeneous medium. This is accomplished by matching an image of a sample saturated with a contrast solution with that saturated with a transparent solution. Voxels occupied with solid-material and inaccessible pores are identified by the fact that they maintain the same location and image attributes in both images, with voxels containing inaccessible pores appearing empty in both images. Fully porous and accessible voxels exhibit the maximum contrast, while the rest are porous voxels containing mixtures of pore solutions and solid. This matching process is performed with an image registration computer code, and image processing software that requires only simple subtraction and multiplication (scaling) processes. The process is demonstrated in dolomite (non-uniform void distribution, homogeneous solid matrix) and sandstone (nearly uniform void distribution, heterogeneous solid matrix) samples, and its overall performance is shown to compare favorably with a method based on calibration and thresholding. PMID:25576734

  9. Improving chemical mapping algorithm and visualization in full-field hard x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng; Xu, Wei; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jun; Yu, Dantong

    2013-12-01

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) imaging, an advanced absorption spectroscopy technique, at the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) Beamline X8C of NSLS enables high-resolution chemical mapping (a.k.a. chemical composition identification or chemical spectra fitting). Two-Dimensional (2D) chemical mapping has been successfully applied to study many functional materials to decide the percentages of chemical components at each pixel position of the material images. In chemical mapping, the attenuation coefficient spectrum of the material (sample) can be fitted with the weighted sum of standard spectra of individual chemical compositions, where the weights are the percentages to be calculated. In this paper, we first implemented and compared two fitting approaches: (i) a brute force enumeration method, and (ii) a constrained least square minimization algorithm proposed by us. Next, as 2D spectra fitting can be conducted pixel by pixel, so theoretically, both methods can be implemented in parallel. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of parallel computing in the chemical mapping problem and investigate how much efficiency improvement can be achieved, we used the second approach as an example and implemented a parallel version for a multi-core computer cluster. Finally we used a novel way to visualize the calculated chemical compositions, by which domain scientists could grasp the percentage difference easily without looking into the real data.

  10. Multi-contrast 3D X-ray imaging of porous and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, Adrian; Herzen, Julia; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Zanette, Irene; Rack, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-04-13

    Grating-based X-ray computed tomography allows for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the full X-ray complex index of refraction and the scattering coefficient distribution inside an object in three dimensions. Its multi-contrast capabilities combined with a high resolution of a few micrometers make it a suitable tool for assessing multiple phases inside porous and composite materials such as concrete. Here, we present quantitative results of a proof-of-principle experiment performed on a concrete sample. Thanks to the complementarity of the contrast channels, more concrete phases could be distinguished than in conventional attenuation-based imaging. The phase-contrast reconstruction shows high contrast between the hardened cement paste and the aggregates and thus allows easy 3D segmentation. Thanks to the dark-field image, micro-cracks inside the coarse aggregates are visible. We believe that these results are extremely interesting in the field of porous and composite materials studies because of unique information provided by grating interferometry in a non-destructive way.

  11. Diffusive transport within dentinal tubules: an X-ray microtomographic study.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Masako; Hector, Mark P; Davis, Graham R; Parkinson, Charles R; Rees, Gareth D; Anderson, Paul

    2008-08-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of dentine hypersensitivity proposes that external stimuli cause dentinal fluid movement within dentinal tubules thereby triggering mechanosensitive nerves and eliciting a pain response. The aim of this study was to employ X-ray microtomography (XMT) to monitor diffusion of caesium acetate through dentine to investigate the extent to which transport occurs within the primary tubules compared to that through branched microtubules believed to run perpendicular to the direction of the primary dentinal tubules. 2.0-mm thick coronal dentine disks masked to leave half of the upper surface exposed were imaged by XMT, initially in water, which was then replaced with an aqueous solution of 0.50 mol l(-1) caesium acetate. Further XMT images were acquired after 1 and 6 days immersion. The XMT images were used to measure the change in the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient resulting from caesium acetate ingress into dentine. There was clearly considerable ingress of caesium acetate into the dentine lying below the exposed surface, but considerably less beneath the sealed surface, suggesting that diffusive transport occurs predominantly in the direction of the primary dentinal tubules, with no significant lateral transport. Primary tubules are clearly the dominant transmission route for triggering the mechanosensitive nerves present at the dentine-pulp interface, and for delivery of nerve desensitising agents. PMID:18485329

  12. Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to characterize the hard x-ray emission of these objects over long time intervals. The project was closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", NASA project, and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project, and shares publications in common with both of these. These efforts have lead to results directly from the BATSE data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with BATSE. The following papers have used BATSE data or data obtained with BATSE TOO triggers.

  13. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul

    1998-05-16

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

  14. Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: This article describes a method to achieve near optimal performance with low energy resolution detectors. Tapiovaara and Wagner [Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 519-529 (1985)] showed that an energy selective x-ray system using a broad spectrum source can produce images with a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR) than conventional systems using energy integrating or photon counting detectors. They showed that there is an upper limit to the SNR and that it can be achieved by measuring full spectrum information and then using an optimal energy dependent weighting. Methods: A performance measure is derived by applying statistical detection theory to an abstract vector space of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients of the two function approximation to the x-ray attenuation coefficient. The approach produces optimal results that utilize all the available energy dependent data. The method can be used with any energy selective detector and is applied not only to detectors using pulse height analysis (PHA) but also to a detector that simultaneously measures the total photon number and integrated energy, as discussed by Roessl et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 959-966 (2007)]. A generalization of this detector that improves the performance is introduced. A method is described to compute images with the optimal SNR using projections in a ''whitened'' vector space transformed so the noise is uncorrelated and has unit variance in both coordinates. Material canceled images with optimal SNR can also be computed by projections in this space. Results: The performance measure is validated by showing that it provides the Tapiovaara-Wagner optimal results for a detector with full energy information and also a conventional detector. The performance with different types of detectors is compared to the ideal SNR as a function of x-ray tube voltage and subject thickness. A detector that combines two bin PHA with a simultaneous measurement of integrated photon energy provides near ideal

  15. SN X-ray Progenitor?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Identifying stars that explode, right before they explode, is a tricky proposition since the end of starlife comes swiftly: in thermonuclear deflagrations, in nuclear exhaustion, or maybe in a rapid swirling merger of two dead stellar cores. On the right in the image above is an image of the galaxy NGC 1404 taken by the UV/optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift observatory. The circle surrounds SN 2007on, a supernova of Type Ia produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary system. These types of supernovae are important since they are believed to be 'standard candles', events which have the same intrinsic brightness which can serve as an important yardstick to measure cosmic distances. On the left is an image of the same galaxy taken by the Chandra X-ray observatory four years before the supernova. Conspicuous in the SN source circle is a bright source in the Chandra image, believed to be emission from a compact object+normal star companion: a similar system to the supposed precursor of SN 2007on. If true this would be the first time a Type Ia supernova precursor has ever been seen. But astronomers are still debating whether the Chandra source really is the precursor or not; it seems there's a slight but significant difference in the location of the Chandra source and the supernova. Stay tuned for more developments.

  16. SMM X-ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  17. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  18. Tracing the X-Ray Trail

    MedlinePlus

    What you need to know about… Tracing the X-ray Trail If you’ve just completed an x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) Start here! or other diagnostic imaging procedure, you probably want to know when you will ... los rayos X Si acaba de hacerse una radiografía, tomografía ¡Empezar ...

  19. X-ray determination of parts alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining the alignment of adjoining metal objects is provided. The method comprises producing an X-ray image of adjoining surfaces of the two metal objects. The X-ray beam is tangential to the point the surfaces are joined. The method is particularly applicable where the alignment of the two metal objects is not readily susceptible to visual inspection.

  20. X-Ray Determination of Weld Misalinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Simple technique uses ordinary X-ray equipment. Weld line between hemispheres of hidden spherical pressure vessel examined for misalinement between hemispheres. Central X-ray tangent to pressure vessel at weld line. Technique not limited to spheres. Also used to check alinement between insulated sections of pipelines or chemical-reaction vessels without removing insulation or interrupting flow or process.

  1. X-rays Flares and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2011-04-01

    X-ray observations of star forming regions show that magnetic reconnection flares are powerful and frequent in pre-main sequence solar-type stars. Well-defined samples in the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus clouds exhibit flares with peak X- ray luminosities Lx˜10^29 - 10^32 erg/s, orders of magnitude stronger and more frequent than contemporary solar flares. X-rays are emitted in magnetic loops extending 0.1-10 R * above the stellar surface and thus have a favorable geometry to irradiate the protoplanetary disk. Several lines of evidence - fluorescent iron X-ray emission line, forbidden [NeII] infrared line, and excited molecular bands - support X-ray irradiation of cold material in some young systems. Several astrophysical consequences of X-ray irradiation are outlined. As ionization fractions need only reach 10-12 to induce the magnetorotational instability and associated turbulence, X-rays may be the principal determinant of the extent of the viscous "active zone" and laminar "dead zone" in the layered accretion disk. X-ray irradiation may thus play a major role in planet formation processes: particle settling; meter-size inspiral; protoplanetary migration; and dissipation of the gaseous disk.

  2. X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer holography.

    PubMed

    Balyan, Minas

    2013-09-01

    An X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer holographic scheme is proposed. Theoretically it is shown that the reconstruction of the object image by visible light is possible. The spatial and temporal coherence requirements of the incident X-ray beam are considered. As an example, the hologram recording as well as the reconstruction by visible light of an absolutely absorbing wire are discussed.

  3. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2016-07-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  4. X-Ray Emissions from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Crary, F. J.; Elsner, R. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Lewis, W. S.; Jahn, J.-M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Clarke, J. T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20 years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at low-latitudes as identified by past Einstein and ROSAT observations. Enhanced auroral x-rays were also observed to be associated with the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. The high-latitude x-ray emissions are best explained by energetic sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation from the Jovian magnetosphere, a suggestion that has been confirmed by recent Chandra ACIS observations. Exciting new information about Jovian x-ray emissions has been made possible with Chandra's High Resolution Camera. We report here for the first time the detection of a forty minute oscillation associated with the Jovian x-ray aurora. With the help of ultraviolet auroral observations from Hubble Space Telescope, we pinpoint the auroral mapping of the x-rays and provide new information on the x-ray source mechanism.

  5. Course Manual for X-Ray Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Radiological Health.

    This publication is the third of three sequential course manuals for instructors in x-ray science and engineering. This course manual has been tested by introducing it into the Oregon State University curriculum. The publication is prepared for the purpose of improving the qualifications of x-ray users and to reduce the ionizing radiation exposure…

  6. VETA-1 x ray detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podgorski, W. A.; Flanagan, Kathy A.; Freeman, Mark D.; Goddard, R. G.; Kellogg, Edwin M.; Norton, T. J.; Ouellette, J. P.; Roy, A. G.; Schwartz, Daniel A.

    1992-01-01

    The alignment and X-ray imaging performance of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Verification Engineering Test Article-I (VETA-I) was measured by the VETA-I X-Ray Detection System (VXDS). The VXDS was based on the X-ray detection system utilized in the AXAF Technology Mirror Assembly (TMA) program, upgraded to meet the more stringent requirements of the VETA-I test program. The VXDS includes two types of X-ray detectors: (1) a High Resolution Imager (HRI) which provides X-ray imaging capabilities, and (2) sealed and flow proportional counters which, in conjunction with apertures of various types and precision translation stages, provide the most accurate measurement of VETA-I performance. Herein we give an overview of the VXDS hardware including X-ray detectors, translation stages, apertures, proportional counters and flow counter gas supply system and associated electronics. We also describe the installation of the VXDS into the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). We discuss in detail the design and performance of those elements of the VXDS which have not been discussed elsewhere; translation systems, flow counter gas supply system, apertures and thermal monitoring system.

  7. Subpicosecond Coherent Manipulation of X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.

    2004-05-12

    The Takagi-Taupin theory is synthesized with the eikonal theory in a unified space-time approach, based upon microscopic electromagnetism. It is designed specifically to address x-ray diffraction in crystal structures being modified within down to a few femtosconds. Possible applications in the subpicosecond coherent manipulation of x-rays are given.

  8. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  9. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  10. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  11. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  12. The future in X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasinger, Günther

    2015-08-01

    I will chair this "Way Forward" discusson about the future in X-ray Surveys at the Focus Meeting #6Cosmological X-ray Surveys: probing the Hot and Energetic Cosmos. Participants will be R. Gilli,G. Pratt, G. Fabbiano, X. Barcons, T. Ohashi, F. Harrison.

  13. X-rays from intermediate mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    I will review the X-ray properties of intermediate mass stars and discuss possible X-ray generating mechanisms. Main-sequence stars of spectral type mid B to mid A neither drive sufficiently strong winds to produce shock generated X-rays, nor possess an outer convection zone to generate dynamo driven magnetic activity and coronae. Consequently they should be virtually X-ray dark and occasionally detected X-ray emission was usually attributed to undetected low-mass companions. However, in magnetic intermediate mass stars, the Ap/Bp stars, a different X-ray production mechanism may operate. It is termed the magnetically channeled wind-shock model, where the stellar wind from both hemispheres is channelled towards the equatorial plane, collides and forms a rigidly rotating disk around the star. The strong shocks of the nearly head-on wind collision as well as the existence of magnetically confined plasma in a dynamic circumstellar disk can lead to diverse X-ray phenomena. In this sense Ap/Bp stars bridge the 'classical' X-ray regimes of cool and hot stars.

  14. The Columbia University proton-induced soft x-ray microbeam.

    PubMed

    Harken, Andrew D; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W; Brenner, David J

    2011-09-15

    A soft x-ray microbeam using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) of characteristic titanium (K(α) 4.5 keV) as the x-ray source has been developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) at Columbia University. The proton beam is focused to a 120 μm × 50 μm spot on the titanium target using an electrostatic quadrupole quadruplet previously used for the charged particle microbeam studies at RARAF. The proton induced x-rays from this spot project a 50 μm round x-ray generation spot into the vertical direction. The x-rays are focused to a spot size of 5 μm in diameter using a Fresnel zone plate. The x-rays have an attenuation length of (1/e length of ~145 μm) allowing more consistent dose delivery across the depth of a single cell layer and penetration into tissue samples than previous ultra soft x-ray systems. The irradiation end station is based on our previous design to allow quick comparison to charged particle experiments and for mixed irradiation experiments.

  15. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  16. The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility. Observing the Universe in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, V.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Advanced X ray Astronophysics Facility (AXAF) program is presented. Beginning with a brief introduction to X ray astrophysics, the AXAF observatory is described including the onboard instrumentation and system capabilities. Possible X ray sources suitable for AXAF observation are identified and defined.

  17. Modeling contamination migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Anderson, Scot K.; Chen, Kenny C.; Giordano, Rino J.; Knollenberg, Perry J.; Morris, Peter A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Tice, Neil W.; Tran, Hien

    2005-01-01

    During its first 5 years of operation, the cold (-60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a contaminating layer that attenuates the low-energy x rays. To assist in assessing the likelihood of successfully baking off the contaminant, members of the Chandra Team developed contamination-migration simulation software. The simulation follows deposition onto and (temperature-dependent) vaporization from surfaces comprising a geometrical model of the Observatory. A separate thermal analysis, augmented by on-board temperature monitoring, provides temperatures for each surface of the same geometrical model. This paper describes the physical basis for the simulations, the methodologies, and the predicted migration of the contaminant for various bake-out scenarios and assumptions.

  18. X-ray cone beam CT system calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sire, Pascal; Rizo, Philippe; Martin, M.

    1993-12-01

    Recently x-ray cone beam computed tomography (CT) has become of interest for nondestructive testing (NDT) of advanced materials. Such a technique takes advantage of the cone beam geometry, to reduce the acquisition time and increase the resolution. Performances of CT systems rely mainly on geometric precision and measurement quality. Inaccurate geometry or incorrect data produce artifacts and blurring which limit the spatial resolution. A precise geometric calibration procedure is required and some corrections must be applied to the raw attenuation data in order to obtain accurate measurements. An x-ray cone beam CT system has been developed at the LETI. This machine was designed to control small parts limited to a few centimeters, with a high spatial resolution close to 30 microns. This paper introduces the machine setup and describes the calibration computing resources involved in the system. Then, we discuss the performances on experimental data.

  19. Method for beam hardening correction in quantitative computed X-ray tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Chye Hwang (Inventor); Whalen, Robert T. (Inventor); Napel, Sandy (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Each voxel is assumed to contain exactly two distinct materials, with the volume fraction of each material being iteratively calculated. According to the method, the spectrum of the X-ray beam must be known, and the attenuation spectra of the materials in the object must be known, and be monotonically decreasing with increasing X-ray photon energy. Then, a volume fraction is estimated for the voxel, and the spectrum is iteratively calculated.

  20. White beam x-ray waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarre, A.; Salditt, T.; Panzner, T.; Pietsch, U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2004-07-12

    We report a white beam x-ray waveguide (WG) experiment. A resonant beam coupler x-ray waveguide (RBC) is used simultaneously as a broad bandpass (or multibandpass) monochromator and as a beam compressor. We show that, depending on the geometrical properties of the WG, the exiting beam consists of a defined number of wavelengths which can be shifted by changing the angle of incidence of the white x-ray synchrotron beam. The characteristic far-field pattern is recorded as a function of exit angle and energy. This x-ray optical setup may be used to enhance the intensity of coherent x-ray WG beams since the full energetic acceptance of the WG mode is transmitted.

  1. Solar x ray astronomy rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics were studied of the solar corona through the imaging of large scale coronal structures with AS&E High Resolution Soft X ray Imaging Solar Sounding Rocket Payload. The proposal for this program outlined a plan of research based on the construction of a high sensitivity X ray telescope from the optical and electronic components of the previous flight of this payload (36.038CS). Specifically, the X ray sensitive CCD camera was to be placed in the prime focus of the grazing incidence X ray mirror. The improved quantum efficiency of the CCD detector (over the film which had previously been used) allows quantitative measurements of temperature and emission measure in regions of low x ray emission such as helmet streamers beyond 1.2 solar radii or coronal holes. Furthermore, the improved sensitivity of the CCD allows short exposures of bright objects to study unexplored temporal regimes of active region loop evolution.

  2. Handbook Of X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Keith A.; Smith, R. K.; Siemiginowska, A.; Edgar, R. J.; Grant, C. E.; Kuntz, K. D.; Schwartz, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    This poster advertises a book to be published in September 2011 by Cambridge University Press. Written for graduate students, professional astronomers and researchers who want to start working in this field, this book is a practical guide to x-ray astronomy. The handbook begins with x-ray optics, basic detector physics and CCDs, before focussing on data analysis. It introduces the reduction and calibration of x-ray data, scientific analysis, archives, statistical issues and the particular problems of highly extended sources. The book describes the main hardware used in x-ray astronomy, emphasizing the implications for data analysis. The concepts behind common x-ray astronomy data analysis software are explained. The appendices present reference material often required during data analysis.

  3. X-ray diffraction: instrumentation and applications.

    PubMed

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Udriştioiu, Elena Gabriela; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful nondestructive technique for characterizing crystalline materials. It provides information on structures, phases, preferred crystal orientations (texture), and other structural parameters, such as average grain size, crystallinity, strain, and crystal defects. X-ray diffraction peaks are produced by constructive interference of a monochromatic beam of X-rays scattered at specific angles from each set of lattice planes in a sample. The peak intensities are determined by the distribution of atoms within the lattice. Consequently, the X-ray diffraction pattern is the fingerprint of periodic atomic arrangements in a given material. This review summarizes the scientific trends associated with the rapid development of the technique of X-ray diffraction over the past five years pertaining to the fields of pharmaceuticals, forensic science, geological applications, microelectronics, and glass manufacturing, as well as in corrosion analysis.

  4. Apollo 15 X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1971-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, carried in the SIM bay of the command service module was employed principally for compositional mapping of the lunar surface while in lunar orbit, and secondarily, for X-ray astronomical observations during the trans-earth coast. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristics energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The astronomical observations consisted of relatively long periods of measurements of X-rays from pre-selected galactic sources such as Cyg-X-1 and Sco X-1 as well as from the galactic poles.

  5. X-rays from hot subdwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; La Palombara, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to the high sensitivity of the instruments on board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, it has become possible to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs. The small but growing sample of hot subdwarfs detected in X-rays includes binary systems, in which the X-rays result from wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low mass stars provide information which can be useful also for our understanding of the winds of more luminous and massive early-type stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems.

  6. X-Rays from Green Pea Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    X-rays may have contributed to the heating and reionization of the IGM in the early universe. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) within small, low-metallicity galaxies are expected to be the main source of X-rays at this time. Since studying these high-redshift galaxies is currently impossible, we turn to local analogs that have the same properties the galaxies in the early are expected to have. A number of recent studies have shown an enhanced number of HMXBs in nearby low metallicity galaxies. We propose to observe a sample of metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG) in order to determine if the X-ray luminosity is enhanced relative to SFR, thereby providing further evidence to the importance of X-rays in the early universe.

  7. Establishment of ANSI N13.11 X-ray radiation fields for personal dosimetry performance test by computation and experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J L; Kim, B H; Chang, S Y; Lee, J K

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes establishment by computational and experimental methods of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N13.11 X-ray radiation fields by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). These fields were used in the standard irradiations of various personal dosimeters for the personal dosimetry performance test program performed by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Korea in the autumn of 1995. Theoretical X-ray spectra produced from two KAERI X-ray generators were estimated using a modified Kramers' theory with target attenuation and backscatter correction and their spectral distributions experimentally measured by a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector through proper corrections for measured pulse height distributions with photopeak efficiency, Compton fraction, and K-escape fraction. The average energies and conversion coefficients obtained from the computation and experimental methods, when compared with ANSI N13.11 and the recently published National Institute of Standards and Technology X-ray beams, appeared to be in good agreement--(+/-)3% between corresponding values--and thus, could be satisfactorily applied in the performance test of personal dosimeters. PMID:9467054

  8. Calibration of a turbidity meter for making estimates of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Management of water resources such as a reservoir requires using analytical models which describe such parameters as the suspended sediment field. To select or develop an appropriate model requires making many measurements to describe the distribution of this parameter in the water column. One potential method for making those measurements expeditiously is to measure light transmission or turbidity and relate that parameter to total suspended solids concentrations. An instrument which may be used for this purpose was calibrated by generating curves of transmission measurements plotted against measured values of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients. Results of these experiments indicate that field measurements made with this instrument using curves generated in this study should correlate with total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in the water column within 20 percent.

  9. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  10. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  11. CT scanner x-ray spectrum estimation from transmission measurements

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In diagnostic CT imaging, multiple important applications depend on the knowledge of the x-ray spectrum, including Monte Carlo dose calculations and dual-energy material decomposition analysis. Due to the high photon flux involved, it is difficult to directly measure spectra from the x-ray tube of a CT scanner. One potential method for indirect measurement involves estimating the spectrum from transmission measurements. The expectation maximization (EM) method is an accurate and robust method to solve this problem. In this article, this method was evaluated in a commercial CT scanner. Methods: Two step-wedges (polycarbonate and aluminum) were used to produce different attenuation levels. Transmission measurements were performed on the scanner and the measured data from the scanner were exported to an external computer to calculate the spectra. The EM method was applied to solve the equations that represent the attenuation processes of polychromatic x-ray photons. Estimated spectra were compared to the spectra simulated using a software provided by the manufacturer of the scanner. To test the accuracy of the spectra, a verification experiment was performed using a phantom containing different depths of water. The measured transmission data were compared to the transmission values calculated using the estimated spectra. Results: Spectra of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp from a dual-source CT scanner were estimated. The estimated and simulated spectra were well matched. The differences of mean energies were less than 1 keV. In the verification experiment, the measured and calculated transmission values were in excellent agreement. Conclusions: Spectrum estimation using transmission data and the EM method is a quantitatively accurate and robust technique to estimate the spectrum of a CT system. This method could benefit studies relying on accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra from CT scanner. PMID:21452736

  12. Improved Algorithms for Accurate Retrieval of UV - Visible Diffuse Attenuation Coefficients in Optically Complex, Inshore Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Fang; Fichot, Cedric G.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Miller, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical processes driven by high-energy ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in inshore, estuarine, and coastal waters play an important role in global bio geochemical cycles and biological systems. A key to modeling photochemical processes in these optically complex waters is an accurate description of the vertical distribution of UVR in the water column which can be obtained using the diffuse attenuation coefficients of down welling irradiance (Kd()). The Sea UV Sea UVc algorithms (Fichot et al., 2008) can accurately retrieve Kd ( 320, 340, 380,412, 443 and 490 nm) in oceanic and coastal waters using multispectral remote sensing reflectances (Rrs(), Sea WiFS bands). However, SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms are currently not optimized for use in optically complex, inshore waters, where they tend to severely underestimate Kd(). Here, a new training data set of optical properties collected in optically complex, inshore waters was used to re-parameterize the published SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, resulting in improved Kd() retrievals for turbid, estuarine waters. Although the updated SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms perform best in optically complex waters, the published SeaUVSeaUVc models still perform well in most coastal and oceanic waters. Therefore, we propose a composite set of SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, optimized for Kd() retrieval in almost all marine systems, ranging from oceanic to inshore waters. The composite algorithm set can retrieve Kd from ocean color with good accuracy across this wide range of water types (e.g., within 13 mean relative error for Kd(340)). A validation step using three independent, in situ data sets indicates that the composite SeaUVSeaUVc can generate accurate Kd values from 320 490 nm using satellite imagery on a global scale. Taking advantage of the inherent benefits of our statistical methods, we pooled the validation data with the training set, obtaining an optimized composite model for estimating Kd() in UV wavelengths for almost all marine waters. This

  13. Robust x-ray based material identification using multi-energy sinogram decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yaoshen; Tracey, Brian; Miller, Eric

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in developing X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging systems with improved ability to discriminate material types, going beyond the attenuation imaging provided by most current systems. Dual- energy CT (DECT) systems can partially address this problem by estimating Compton and photoelectric (PE) coefficients of the materials being imaged, but DECT is greatly degraded by the presence of metal or other materials with high attenuation. Here we explore the advantages of multi-energy CT (MECT) systems based on photon-counting detectors. The utility of MECT has been demonstrated in medical applications where photon- counting detectors allow for the resolution of absorption K-edges. Our primary concern is aviation security applications where K-edges are rare. We simulate phantoms with differing amounts of metal (high, medium and low attenuation), both for switched-source DECT and for MECT systems, and include a realistic model of detector energy 0 resolution. We extend the DECT sinogram decomposition method of Ying et al. to MECT, allowing estimation of separate Compton and photoelectric sinograms. We furthermore introduce a weighting based on a quadratic approximation to the Poisson likelihood function that deemphasizes energy bins with low signal. Simulation results show that the proposed approach succeeds in estimating material properties even in high-attenuation scenarios where the DECT method fails, improving the signal to noise ratio of reconstructions by over 20 dB for the high-attenuation phantom. Our work demonstrates the potential of using photon counting detectors for stably recovering material properties even when high attenuation is present, thus enabling the development of improved scanning systems.

  14. Validation of radiographic simulation codes including x-ray phase effects for millimeter-size objects with micrometer structures.

    PubMed

    Martz, Harry E; Kozioziemski, Bernard J; Lehman, Sean K; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Schneberk, Daniel J; Barty, Anton

    2007-01-01

    The mix between x-ray phase and attenuation information needs to be understood for accurate object recovery from radiography and tomography data. We are researching and experimentally validating algorithms that simulate x-ray phase contrast to determine the required physics necessary for quantitative object recovery. The results of a study are described to determine if a multislice (beam-propagation) method is required for simulating x-ray radiographs. We conclude that the multislice method is not required for accurate simulation of greater than or equal to 8 keV x-ray radiographs of millimeter-size objects with micrometer structures.

  15. Recent X-ray Variability of Eta Car Approaching The X-ray Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.; Swank, J. H.; Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T.; Humphreys, R.; Damineli, A.; Walborn, N.; Hillier, D. J.; Davidson, K.; White, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss recent X-ray spectral variability of the supermassive star Eta Car in the interval since the last X-ray eclipse in 1998. We concentrate on the interval just prior to the next X-ray eclipse which is expected to occur in June 2003. We compare the X-ray behavior during the 2001-2003 cycle with the previous cycle (1996-1998) and note similarities and differences in the temporal X-ray behavior. We also compare a recent X-ray observation of Eta Car obtained with the Chandra high energy transmission grating in October 2002 with an earlier observation from Nov 2002, and interpret these results in terms of the proposed colliding wind binary model for the star. In addition we discuss planned observations for the upcoming X-ray eclipse.

  16. Selection of patients for x-ray examinations: Chest x-ray screening examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Five chest x-ray referral criteria statements have been developed and unanimously endorsed by a panel of physicians convened as part of a major voluntary cooperative effort between FDA's National Center for Devices and Radiological Health (NCDRH) and the medical professional community. The referral criteria statements include recommendations concerning the following applications of chest x-ray screening: mandated routine chest x-ray screening examinations, routine prenatal chest x-ray examinations, routine hospital admission chest x-ray examinations, chest x-ray examinations for tuberculosis detection and control, and routine chest x-ray examinations for occupational medicine. The complete text of the five referral criterial statements plus a brief discussion of the rationale for the development of each statement is presented.

  17. Observation of living cells by x-ray microscopy with a laser-plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomie, Toshihisa; Shimizu, Hazime; Majima, Toshikazu; Yamada, Mitsuo; Kanayama, Toshihiko; Yano, M.; Kondo, H.

    1991-12-01

    We studied laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source for x-ray microscopy. Using water- window x rays, contact x-ray images of living sea urchin sperm were taken by a 500 picosecond x-ray pulse. The resist relief was examined by atomic force microscope and informations characteristic of x-ray microscopy were obtained. The finest feature noticed in the x-ray image was 0.1 micrometers .

  18. Toward active x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-09-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (< 1") optics with very-large-aperture (> 25 m2) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kg/m2 or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, active optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom (UK) and the Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States (US). This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  19. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  20. Toward Adaptive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Tim W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peer; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (less than 1 inch) optics with very-large-aperture (greater than 25 square meter) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the surface areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kilogram per square meter or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve adaptive (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, adaptive optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States, and the Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward adaptive x-ray telescopes.

  1. X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, L.; Burrows, D.; Cash, W.; Cerna, D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Jakubek, J.; Marsikova, V.; Sieger, L.; Tichy, V.

    2014-09-01

    This work addresses the issue of X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications. The proposed wide-field optical system has not been used in space yet. The proposed novel approach is based on the use of 1D "Lobster eye" optics in combination with Timepix X-ray detector in the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The proposed project includes theoretical study and a functional sample of the Timepix X-ray detector with multifoil wide-field X-ray "Lobster eye" optics. Using optics to focus X-rays on a detector is the only solution in cases the intensity of impinging X-ray radiation is below the sensitivity of the detector, e.g. while monitoring astrophysical objects in space, or phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere. The optical system could be used in a student rocket experiment at University of Colorado. Ideal opportunity is to extend the CubeSat of Pennsylvania State University with the hard X-ray telescope demonstrator consisting of an optical module and Timepix detector.

  2. GEMS X-ray Polarimeter Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Strohmayer, Tod; Kallman, Tim; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) is an X-ray polarization telescope selected as a NASA small explorer satellite mission. The X-ray Polarimeter on GEMS uses a Time Projection Chamber gas proportional counter to measure the polarization of astrophysical X-rays in the 2-10 keV band by sensing the direction of the track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray. We have simulated the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter to polarized X-rays. We use the simulation package Penelope to model the physics of the interaction of the initial photoelectron with the detector gas and to determine the distribution of charge deposited in the detector volume. We then model the charge diffusion in the detector,and produce simulated track images. Within the track reconstruction algorithm we apply cuts on the track shape and focus on the initial photoelectron direction in order to maximize the overall sensitivity of the instrument, using this technique we have predicted instrument modulation factors nu(sub 100) for 100% polarized X-rays ranging from 10% to over 60% across the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We also discuss the simulation program used to develop and model some of the algorithms used for triggering, and energy measurement of events in the polarimeter.

  3. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 10(33) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  4. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  5. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 1033 ergs-1) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  6. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  7. Three dimensional imaging of porosity and tracer concentration distributions in a dolostone sample during diffusion experiments using X-ray micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Agbogun, H M D; Al, Tom A; Hussein, Esam M A

    2013-02-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) techniques for measuring the three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of diffusion-accessible porosity (φ(d)) and temporal tracer-concentrations (C(t)) within a dolostone sample subjected to solute diffusion are developed and tested in this work. The φ(d) and C(t) measurements are based on spatially resolved changes in X-ray attenuation coefficients in sequentially acquired 3-D micro-CT datasets using two (calibration and relative) analytical approaches. The measured changes in X-ray attenuation coefficient values are a function of the mass of X-ray absorbing potassium-iodide tracer present in voxels. Mean φ(d) values of 3.8% and 6.5% were obtained with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. The detection limits for φ(d) measurements at individual voxel locations are 20% and 36% with the calibration and the relative methods, respectively. The detection limit for C(t) are 0.12 M and 0.22 M with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. Results from the calibration method are affected by a beam-hardening artifact and although results from the relative approach are not affected by the artifact, they are subject to high detection limits. This work presents a quantitative assessment of micro-CT data for studies of solute transport. Despite limitations in precision and accuracy, the method provides quantitative 3-D distributions of φ(d) and C(t) that reflect solute diffusion in heterogeneous porous geologic media. PMID:23298531

  8. Three dimensional imaging of porosity and tracer concentration distributions in a dolostone sample during diffusion experiments using X-ray micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Agbogun, H M D; Al, Tom A; Hussein, Esam M A

    2013-02-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) techniques for measuring the three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of diffusion-accessible porosity (φ(d)) and temporal tracer-concentrations (C(t)) within a dolostone sample subjected to solute diffusion are developed and tested in this work. The φ(d) and C(t) measurements are based on spatially resolved changes in X-ray attenuation coefficients in sequentially acquired 3-D micro-CT datasets using two (calibration and relative) analytical approaches. The measured changes in X-ray attenuation coefficient values are a function of the mass of X-ray absorbing potassium-iodide tracer present in voxels. Mean φ(d) values of 3.8% and 6.5% were obtained with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. The detection limits for φ(d) measurements at individual voxel locations are 20% and 36% with the calibration and the relative methods, respectively. The detection limit for C(t) are 0.12 M and 0.22 M with the calibration and the relative approaches, respectively. Results from the calibration method are affected by a beam-hardening artifact and although results from the relative approach are not affected by the artifact, they are subject to high detection limits. This work presents a quantitative assessment of micro-CT data for studies of solute transport. Despite limitations in precision and accuracy, the method provides quantitative 3-D distributions of φ(d) and C(t) that reflect solute diffusion in heterogeneous porous geologic media.

  9. Imaging Cellular Architecture with X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Larabell, Carolyn A.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray imaging of biological samples is progressing rapidly. In this paper we review the progress to date in high resolution imaging of cellular architecture. In particular we survey the progress in soft X-ray tomography and argue that the field is coming of age and that important biological insights are starting to emerge. We then review the new ideas based on coherent diffraction. These methods are at a much earlier stage of development but, as they eliminate the need for X-ray optics, have the capacity to provide substantially better spatial resolution than zone plate based methods. PMID:20869868

  10. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  11. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  12. X-ray streak crystal spectography

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Brown, T.; Medecki, H.

    1983-07-01

    We have built an x-ray streaked crystal spectrograph for making time-resolved x-ray spectral measurements. This instrument can access Bragg angles from 11/sup 0/ to 38/sup 0/ and x-ray spectra from 200 eV to greater than 10 keV. We have demonstrated resolving powers, E/..delta..E > 200 at 1 keV and time resolution less than 20 psec. A description of the instrument and an example of the data is given.

  13. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lider, V. V. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  14. Diffractive Imaging Using Partially Coherent X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Vine, D. J.; Dilanian, R. A.; Flewett, S.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Balaur, E.; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-01

    The measured spatial coherence characteristics of the illumination used in a diffractive imaging experiment are incorporated in an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental x-ray diffraction data using 1.4 keV x rays. Conventional coherent diffractive imaging, which assumes full spatial coherence, is a limiting case of our approach. Even in cases in which the deviation from full spatial coherence is small, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of wave field reconstructions. Our formulation is applicable to x-ray and electron diffraction imaging techniques provided that the spatial coherence properties of the illumination are known or can be measured.

  15. New opportunities in X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Mancuso, A. P.; Arhatari, B.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-11-01

    We discuss standard X-ray-imaging techniques. Phase-imaging methods and a new class of nano-focus and nano-resolution laboratory systems offer new opportunities in true laboratory-based X-ray microtomography with a host of possible applications that have mainly been demonstrated only at synchrotron sources. Notwithstanding these advances, the diffraction limit for X-ray-imaging methods is a long way off. We preview the link between high-resolution 'standard' imaging schemes and the new field of coherent diffractive imaging.

  16. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  17. X-ray Interferometer Using Prism Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2004-05-12

    Two-beam X-ray interferometer using refractive optics has been developed. A prism made of acrylic resin is used as the beam deflector for hard X-ray wavefront dividing interferometer. This configuration is the same as that of the Fresnel's bi-prism interferometer or the Leith-Upatnieks type two-beam holography in visible light region. Therefore, quantitative analysis of the degree of transversal coherence can be performed by measuring the visibility of interference fringes. It is also possible to realize two-beam holographic imaging in hard X-ray regions.

  18. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-01-01

    We are developing a hard x-ray microscope for direct observation of solidification dynamics in metal alloys and metal matrix composites. The Fein-Focus Inc. x-ray source was delivered in September and found to perform better than expected. Confirmed resolution of better than 2 micrometers was obtained and magnifications up to 800X were measured. Nickel beads of 30 micrometer diameter were easily detected through 6mm of aluminum. X-ray metallography was performed on several specimens showing high resolution and clear definition of 3-dimensional structures. Prototype furnace installed and tested.

  19. Monochromatic X-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics including Kα Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at monochromatic X-ray imaging and therapy, broadband, monochromatic, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources and propagation through low and high-Z (HZ) media were studied with numerically and experimentally. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the software package Geant4, and a new code Photx, to simulate X-ray image contrast, depth of penetration, and total attenuation. The data show that monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-rays achieve improved contrast at lower absorbed radiation doses compared to conventional broadband 120 kV or CT scans. Experimental quasi-monochromatic high-intensity laser-produced plasma sources and monochromatic synchrotron beam data are compared. Physical processes responsible for X-ray photoexcitation and absorption are numerically modelled, including a novel mechanism for accelerating Kα resonance fluorescence via twin monochromatic X-ray beam. Potential applications are medical diagnostics and high-Z material detection. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  20. Plasma-driven Z-pinch X-ray loading and momentum coupling in meteorite and planetary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, John L.; Furnish, Michael D.; Lawrence, R. Jeffery; Lawrence

    2013-04-01

    X-ray momentum coupling coefficients, C M, were determined by measuring stress waveforms in planetary materials subjected to impulsive radiation loading from the Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine. Velocity interferometry (VISAR) diagnostics provided equation-of-state data. Targets were iron and stone meteorites, magnesium-rich olivine (dunite) solid and powder (~5-300 μm), and Si, Al, and Fe calibration targets. Samples were ~1-mm thick and, except for Si, backed by LiF single-crystal windows. X-ray spectra combined thermal radiation (blackbody 170-237 eV) and line emissions from pinch materials (Cu, Ni, Al, or stainless steel). Target fluences of 0.4-1.7 kJ/cm2 at intensities of 43-260GW/cm2 produced plasma pressures of 2.6-12.4 GPa. The short (~5 ns) drive pulses gave rise to attenuating stress waves in the samples. The attenuating wave impulse is constant, allowing accurate C M measurements from rear-surface motion. C M was 1.9 - 3.1 × 10-5 s/m for stony meteorites, 2.7 and 0.5 × 10-5 s/m for solid and powdered dunite, 0.8 - 1.4 × 10-5 s/m for iron meteorites, and 0.3, 1.8, and 2.7 × 10-5 s/m respectively for Si, Fe, and Al calibration targets. Results are consistent with geometric scaling from recent laser hohlraum measurements. CTH hydrocode modeling of X-ray coupling to porous silica corroborated experimental measurements and supported extrapolations to other materials. CTH-modeled C M for porous materials was low and consistent with experimental results. Analytic modeling (BBAY) of X-ray radiation-induced momentum coupling to selected materials was also performed, often producing higher C M values than experimental results. Reasons for the higher values include neglect of solid ejecta mechanisms, turbulent mixing of heterogeneous phases, variances in heats of melt/vaporization, sample inhomogeneities, wave interactions at the sample/window boundary, and finite sample/window sizes. The measurements validate application of C M to (inhomogeneous

  1. Soft x-ray shock loading and momentum coupling in meteorite and planetary materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R. Jeffery; Remo, John L.; Furnish, Michael David

    2010-12-01

    X-ray momentum coupling coefficients, C{sub M}, were determined by measuring stress waveforms in planetary materials subjected to impulsive radiation loading from the Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine. Results from the velocity interferometry (VISAR) diagnostic provided limited equation-of-state data as well. Targets were iron and stone meteorites, magnesium rich olivine (dunite) solid and powder ({approx}5--300 {mu}m), and Si, Al, and Fe calibration targets. All samples were {approx}1 mm thick and, except for Si, backed by LiF single-crystal windows. The x-ray spectrum included a combination of thermal radiation (blackbody 170--237 eV) and line emissions from the pinch material (Cu, Ni, Al, or stainless steel). Target fluences 0.4--1.7 kJ/cm{sup 2} at intensities 43--260 GW/cm{sup 2} produced front surface plasma pressures 2.6--12.4 GPa. Stress waves driven into the samples were attenuating due to the short ({approx}5 ns) duration of the drive pulse. Attenuating wave impulse is constant allowing accurate C{sub M} measurements provided mechanical impedance mismatch between samples and the window are known. Impedance-corrected C{sub M} determined from rear-surface motion was 1.9--3.1 x 10{sup -5} s/m for stony meteorites, 2.7 and 0.5 x 10{sup -5} s/m for solid and powdered dunite, 0.8--1.4 x 10{sup -5}.

  2. "X-Ray Transients in Star-Forming Regions" and "Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    This grant funded work on the analysis of data obtained with the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The goal of the work was to search for hard x-ray transients in star forming regions using the all-sky hard x-ray monitoring capability of BATSE. Our initial work lead to the discovery of a hard x-ray transient, GRO J1849-03. Follow-up observations of this source made with the Wide Field Camera on BeppoSAX showed that the source should be identified with the previously known x-ray pulsar GS 1843-02 which itself is identified with the x-ray source X1845-024 originally discovered with the SAS-3 satellite. Our identification of the source and measurement of the outburst recurrence time, lead to the identification of the source as a Be/X-ray binary with a spin period of 94.8 s and an orbital period of 241 days. The funding was used primarily for partial salary and travel support for John Tomsick, then a graduate student at Columbia University. John Tomsick, now Dr. Tomsick, received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in July 1999, based partially on results obtained under this investigation. He is now a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of California, San Diego.

  3. The Physics of the Gas Attenuator for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Kishiyama, K.I.; McMahon, D.; Roeben, M.D.; Shen, S.; Stefan, P.M.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    A systematic assessment of a variety of physics issues affecting the performance of the LCLS X-ray beam attenuator is presented. Detailed analysis of the gas flow in the gas attenuator and in the apertures is performed. A lot of attention is directed towards the gas ionization and heating by intense X-ray pulses. The role of these phenomena in possible deviations of the attenuation coefficient from its 'dialed in' value is evaluated and found small in most cases. Other sources of systematic and statistical errors are also discussed. The regimes where the errors may reach a few percent correspond to the lower X-ray energies (less than 2 keV) and highest beam intensities. Other effects discussed include chemical interaction of the gas with apertures, shock formation in the transonic flow in the apertures of the attenuator, generation of electromagnetic wakes in the gas, and head-to-tail variation of the attenuation caused by the ionization of gas or solid. Possible experimental tests of the consistency of the physics assumptions used in the concept of the gas attenuator are discussed. Interaction of X-rays with the solid attenuator (that will be used at higher X-ray energies, from 2.5 to 8 keV) is considered and thermo-mechanical effects caused by the beam heating are evaluated. Wave-front distortions induced by non-uniform heating of both the solid and the gas are found to be small. An overall conclusion drawn from the analysis presented is that the attenuator will be a reliable and highly versatile device, provided that some caution is exercised in its use for highest beam intensities at lowest X-ray energies.

  4. A method for normalization of X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.-C.; Waldo, G.S.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.

    2010-07-20

    Accurate normalization of X-ray absorption data is essential for quantitative analysis of near-edge features. A method, implemented as the program MBACK, to normalize X-ray absorption data to tabulated mass absorption coefficients is described. Comparison of conventional normalization methods with MBACK demonstrates that the new normalization method is not sensitive to the shape of the background function, thus allowing accurate comparison of data collected in transmission mode with data collected using fluorescence ion chambers or solid-state fluorescence detectors. The new method is shown to have better reliability and consistency and smaller errors than conventional normalization methods. The sensitivity of the new normalization method is illustrated by analysis of data collected during an equilibrium titration.

  5. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  6. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  7. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  9. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  10. Modeling Broadband X-Ray Absorption of Massive Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen,David H.; Zsargo, Janos; Martell, Erin M.; MacArthur, James P.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Gagne, Marc; Hillier, D. John

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for computing the net transition of X-rays emitted by shock-heated plasma distributed throughout a partially optically thick stellar wind from a massive star. We find the transmission by an exact integration of the formal solution, assuming the emitting plasma and absorbing plasma are mixed at a constant mass ratio above some minimum radius, below which there is assumed to be no emission. This model is more realistic than either the slab absorption associated with a corona at the base of the wind or the exospheric approximation that assumes all observed X-rays are emitted without attenuation from above the radius of optical depth unity. Our model is implemented in XSPEC as a pre-calculated table that can be coupled to a user-defined table of the wavelength dependent wind opacity. We provide a default wind opacity model that is more representative of real wind opacities than the commonly used neutral ISM tabulation. Preliminary modeling of Chandra grating data indicates that the X-ray hardness trend of OB stars with spectral subtype cars largely be understood as a wind absorption effect.

  11. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, M. Wiemann, C.; Weber, N.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Schneider, C. M.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. The high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.

  12. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  13. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-08-01

    This report covers the third 6 month period, from February 28, 1995 to August 31, 1995, under this contract. The main efforts during this period were the construction of the X-ray furnace, evaluation and selection of the CCD technology for the X-ray camera, solidification experiments with Al alloys and Al-zirconia composites in the prototype furnace, evaluation of specimens for the particle pushing flight experiment - PEPSI, measurements of emitted spectra from X-ray source, testing of the high resolution X-ray test targets, and the establishment of criteria for and selection of peripheral equipment. In addition to these tasks, two presentations were prepared in this period; one for the AIAA Microgravity Symposium and another for the Gordon Conference on Gravitational Effects in Pyisico-Chemical Systems.

  14. Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Li, Renkai; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Shi, Jiaru; Du, Qiang; Yu, Peicheng; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Taibin; Cheng, Cheng; Lin, Yuzheng

    2009-09-01

    We proposed the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray (TTX) source as an ultra-fast, high flux source for advanced X-ray imaging studies and applications. A linac system, which consists of an S-band photocathode RF gun, a SLAC type 3 m traveling wave tube and two X-band structures, generates ultra-short, high brightness electron pulses to scatter with tera-watt femto-second laser pulses. A compact low energy electron storage ring is also designed to dramatically enhance the average X-ray flux. In this paper, we present the simulation studies and optimized parameters of the electron and X-ray pulses. The construction and commissioning status of TTX is also reported.

  15. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  16. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  17. Rosat and the X-ray universe

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.K.

    1990-08-01

    A major new satellite (Rosat) promises to provide astronomers with a map of perhaps 100,000 beacons in the X-ray sky, fresh images of high-energy objects approaching the resolution of visible-light photographs, and a first-ever survey of the sky at extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths. The German and British governments along with NASA are participating in this program. The grazing incidence technique previously used by Einstein and other missions is used to bring the X-rays to a focus and thus to create images. The X-ray telescope is equipped with three instruments, though only one can occupy the focus at any given time. Two are redundant detectors called position-sensitive proportional counters. The whole-sky survey will yield a complete X-ray image of the celestial sphere with 1/2-arc-minute detail of sources large and small, not just crude scans by wide-angle sensors.

  18. X-ray microbeam for speech research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Murray A.; Robl, Phillip E.

    A steerable X-ray beam system is being built for use in speech research. A beam of 150 keV to 600 keV electrons will be steered by a computer and the resulting X-rays will be selected by a pinhole to give a beam with a width of 0.6 mm. The X-ray beam will be used to follow about 8 gold pellets on tongue and throat surfaces at sampling frequencies of about 125 frames/s. The pattern recognition system and X-ray energies have been chosen to allow the tracking of pellets behind some teeth fillings of mercury amalgam and gold caps.

  19. X-ray holography in-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkhover, Tais; Ulmer, Anatoli; Ferguson, Ken; Bucher, Max; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Daurer, Benedikt; Nettelblad, Carl; Bielecki, Johan; Faigel, Guila; Hasse, Dirk; Morgan, Andrew; Mühlig, Kerstin; Seibert, Marvin; Chapman, Henry; Hajdu, Janos; Maia, Filipe; Moeller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, delivering ultra intense femtosecond X-ray flashes, opens the door for structure determination of single nanoparticles and biosamples with single shots. The first X-ray diffraction imaging experiments at LCLS delivered promising results on samples in the gas phase. However, the reconstruction of non-periodic structures is still challenging due to the loss of phase information. Meanwhile, X-ray holographic approaches allow for recording the phase directly into the diffraction image. In my talk, I will present the first successful proof-of-principle experiment for ``in-flight''-holography with free viruses. Our experiments pave the way for unique studies on levitating nanospecimen that are of central interest in several scientific communities including atmosphere research, chemistry, material sciences, and studies on matter under extreme conditions.

  20. Low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, J. E.; Rappaport, S. A.

    A review is given of current understanding of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), which are luminous X-ray sources composed of a late-type optical companion (mass less than about 1 solar mass) and a neutron star (or possibly a black hole). Thirty-two LMXBs have been identified with optical counterparts in the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (Brad and McClintock, 1983). It is unlikely that there are more than about 100 active LMXBs in the Galaxy, compared with about 200,000 cataclysmic variables. Topics covered in the review are: typical X-ray and optical properties; orbital periods; the nature of the compact source; accretion disks; formation; mass transfer mechanisms; and globular clusters and bright bulge X-ray sources.

  1. Resonant X-Ray Scattering and Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, S. P.; Bombardi, A.

    This chapter outlines some of the basic ideas behind nonresonant and resonant X-ray scattering, using classical or semiclassical pictures wherever possible; specifically, we highlight symmetry arguments governing the observation of X-ray optical effects, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and resonant "forbidden" diffraction. Without dwelling on the microscopic physics that underlies resonant scattering, we outline some key steps required for calculating its rotation and polarization dependence, based on Cartesian and spherical tensor frameworks. Several examples of resonant scattering, involving electronic anisotropy and magnetism, are given as illustrations. Our goal is not to develop or defend theoretical concepts in X-ray scattering, but to bring together existing ideas in a pragmatic and utilitarian manner.

  2. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers. PMID:27661687

  3. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  4. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  5. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  6. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the third 6 month period, from February 28, 1995 to August 31, 1995, under this contract. The main efforts during this period were the construction of the X-ray furnace, evaluation and selection of the CCD technology for the X-ray camera, solidification experiments with Al alloys and Al-zirconia composites in the prototype furnace, evaluation of specimens for the particle pushing flight experiment - PEPSI, measurements of emitted spectra from X-ray source, testing of the high resolution X-ray test targets, and the establishment of criteria for and selection of peripheral equipment. In addition to these tasks, two presentations were prepared in this period; one for the AIAA Microgravity Symposium and another for the Gordon Conference on Gravitational Effects in Pyisico-Chemical Systems.

  7. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  8. VETA-I x ray test analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissenden, R. J. V.; Chartas, G.; Freeman, M. D.; Hughes, J. P.; Kellogg, E. M.; Podgorski, W. A.; Schwartz, D. A.; Zhao, P.

    1992-01-01

    This interim report presents some definitive results from our analysis of the VETA-I x-ray testing data. It also provides a description of the hardware and software used in the conduct of the VETA-I x-ray test program performed at the MSFC x-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). These test results also serve to supply data and information to include in the TRW final report required by DPD 692, DR XC04. To provide an authoritative compendium of results, we have taken nine papers as published in the SPIE Symposium, 'Grazing Incidence X-ray/EUV Optics for Astronomy and Projection Lithography' and have reproduced them as the content of this report.

  9. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.-F.; Kahn, S. M.; Lepson, J. K.; Savin, D. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in its ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, X-Ray Multi-Mirror telescope (XMM), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE).

  10. X-ray imaging: Status and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, R.W.; Martz, H.E.; Hernandez, J.M.; Haskins, J.J.; Day, R.A.; Brase, J.M.; Cross, B.; Wherry, D.

    1987-08-01

    There is a veritable renaissance occurring in x-ray imaging. X-ray imaging by radiography has been a highly developed technology in medicine and industry for many years. However, high resolution imaging has not generally been practical because sources have been relatively dim and diffuse, optical elements have been nonexistent for most applications, and detectors have been slow and of low resolution. Materials analysis needs have therefore gone unmet. Rapid progress is now taking place because we are able to exploit developments in microelectronics and related material fabrication techniques, and because of the availability of intense x-ray sources. This report describes the methods and uses of x-ray imaging along with a discussion of technology advances in these areas.

  11. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  12. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... a radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... by a radiologist (a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  16. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  17. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  18. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  19. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  20. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.